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Sample records for sub-nanometer resolution electron

  1. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  2. Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) for the imaging of biological samples at sub-nanometer resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joens, Matthew S.; Huynh, Chuong; Kasuboski, James M.; Ferranti, David; Sigal, Yury J.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Burkhardt, Claus J.; Curran, Kevin P.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.; Stern, Lewis A.; Goetze, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has long been the standard in imaging the sub-micrometer surface ultrastructure of both hard and soft materials. In the case of biological samples, it has provided great insights into their physical architecture. However, three of the fundamental challenges in the SEM imaging of soft materials are that of limited imaging resolution at high magnification, charging caused by the insulating properties of most biological samples and the loss of subtle surface features by heavy metal coating. These challenges have recently been overcome with the development of the Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), which boasts advances in charge reduction, minimized sample damage, high surface contrast without the need for metal coating, increased depth of field, and 5 angstrom imaging resolution. We demonstrate the advantages of HIM for imaging biological surfaces as well as compare and contrast the effects of sample preparation techniques and their consequences on sub-nanometer ultrastructure.

  3. Sub-nanometer-resolution imaging of peptide nanotubes in water using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, Tomoki; Hayashi, Itsuho; Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Kenjiro, E-mail: kimura@gold.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tamura, Atsuo [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Peptide nanotubes were aligned on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface. ► We visualized sub-nanometer-scale structure on peptide nanotube surface in water. ► We observed hydration structure at a peptide nanotube/water interface. - Abstract: Peptide nanotubes are self-assembled fibrous materials composed of cyclic polypeptides. Recently, various aspects of peptide nanotubes have been studied, in particular the utility of different methods for making peptide nanotubes with diverse designed functions. In order to investigate the relationship between formation, function and stability, it is essential to analyze the precise structure of peptide nanotubes. Atomic-scale surface imaging in liquids was recently achieved using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with improved force sensing. Here we provide a precise surface structural analysis of peptide nanotubes in water without crystallizing them obtained by imaging the nanotubes at the sub-nanometer scale in water. In addition, the local hydration structure around the peptide nanotubes was observed at the nanotube/water interface.

  4. Elastic recoil atomic spectroscopy of light elements with sub-nanometer depth resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosmata, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis the QQDS magnetic spectrometer that is used for high resolution ion beam analysis (IBA) of light elements at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is presented for the first time. In addition all parameters are investigated that influence the analysis. Methods and models are presented with which the effects can be minimised or calculated. There are five focal points of this thesis. The first point is the construction and commissioning of the QQDS magnetic spectrometer, the corresponding scattering chamber with all the peripherals and the detector, which is specially developed for high resolution elastic recoil detection. Both the reconstructed spectrometer and the detector were adapted to the specific experimental conditions needed for high-resolution Ion beam analysis of light elements and tested for routine practice. The detector consists of two components. At the back end of the detector a Bragg ionization chamber is mounted, which is used for the particle identification. At the front end, directly behind the entrance window a proportional counter is mounted. This proportional counter includes a highresistance anode. Thus, the position of the particles is determined in the detector. The following two points concern fundamental studies of ion-solid interaction. By using a magnetic spectrometer the charge state distribution of the particles scattered from the sample after a binary collision is both possible and necessary for the analysis. For this reason the charge states are measured and compared with existing models. In addition, a model is developed that takes into account the charge state dependent energy loss. It is shown that without the application of this model the depth profiles do not correspond with the quantitative measurements by conventional IBA methods and with the thickness obtained by transmission electron microscopy. The second fundamental ion-solid interaction is the damage and the modification of the sample that occurs during

  5. Displacement laser interferometry with sub-nanometer uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cosijns, S.J.A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Development in industry is asking for improved resolution and higher accuracy in mechanical measurement. Together with miniaturization the demand for sub nanometer uncertainty on dimensional metrology is increasing rapidly. Displacement laser interferometers are used widely as precision displacement

  6. Elastic recoil atomic spectroscopy of light elements with sub-nanometer depth resolution; Elastische Rueckstossatomspektrometrie leichter Elemente mit Subnanometer-Tiefenaufloesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmata, Marcel

    2011-06-30

    In this thesis the QQDS magnetic spectrometer that is used for high resolution ion beam analysis (IBA) of light elements at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is presented for the first time. In addition all parameters are investigated that influence the analysis. Methods and models are presented with which the effects can be minimised or calculated. There are five focal points of this thesis. The first point is the construction and commissioning of the QQDS magnetic spectrometer, the corresponding scattering chamber with all the peripherals and the detector, which is specially developed for high resolution elastic recoil detection. Both the reconstructed spectrometer and the detector were adapted to the specific experimental conditions needed for high-resolution Ion beam analysis of light elements and tested for routine practice. The detector consists of two components. At the back end of the detector a Bragg ionization chamber is mounted, which is used for the particle identification. At the front end, directly behind the entrance window a proportional counter is mounted. This proportional counter includes a highresistance anode. Thus, the position of the particles is determined in the detector. The following two points concern fundamental studies of ion-solid interaction. By using a magnetic spectrometer the charge state distribution of the particles scattered from the sample after a binary collision is both possible and necessary for the analysis. For this reason the charge states are measured and compared with existing models. In addition, a model is developed that takes into account the charge state dependent energy loss. It is shown that without the application of this model the depth profiles do not correspond with the quantitative measurements by conventional IBA methods and with the thickness obtained by transmission electron microscopy. The second fundamental ion-solid interaction is the damage and the modification of the sample that occurs during

  7. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10 4 s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses

  8. Sub-Nanometer Channels Embedded in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yimo

    2017-07-31

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are among the most promising candidates for next-generation electronics due to their atomic thinness, allowing for flexible transparent electronics and ultimate length scaling1. Thus far, atomically-thin p-n junctions2-7, metal-semiconductor contacts8-10, and metal-insulator barriers11-13 have been demonstrated. While 2D materials achieve the thinnest possible devices, precise nanoscale control over the lateral dimensions are also necessary. Although external one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes14 can be used to locally gate 2D materials, this adds a non-trivial third dimension, complicating device integration and flexibility. Here, we report the direct synthesis of sub-nanometer 1D MoS2 channels embedded within WSe2 monolayers, using a dislocation-catalyzed approach. The 1D channels have edges free of misfit dislocations and dangling bonds, forming a coherent interface with the embedding 2D matrix. Periodic dislocation arrays produce 2D superlattices of coherent MoS2 1D channels in WSe2. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have identified other combinations of 2D materials that could form 1D channels. Density function theory (DFT) calculation predicts these 1D channels display type II band alignment needed for carrier confinement and charge separation to access the ultimate length scales necessary for future electronic applications.

  9. Helium Ion Microscope: A New Tool for Sub-nanometer Imaging of Soft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, B.; Smallwood, C. R.; Evans, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution inspection of surface details is needed in many biological and environmental researches to understand the Soil organic material (SOM)-mineral interactions along with identifying microbial communities and their interactions. SOM shares many imaging characteristics with biological samples and getting true surface details from these materials are challenging since they consist of low atomic number materials. FE-SEM imaging is the main imagining technique used to image these materials in the past. These SEM images often show loss of resolution and increase noise due to beam damage and charging issues. Newly developed Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), on the other hand can overcome these difficulties and give very fine details. HIM is very similar to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) but instead of using electrons as a probe beam, HIM uses helium ions with energy ranges from 5 to 40 keV. HIM offers a series of advantages compared to SEM such as nanometer and sub-nanometer image resolutions (about 0.35 nm), detailed surface topography, high surface sensitivity, low Z material imaging (especially for polymers and biological samples), high image contrast, and large depth of field. In addition, HIM also has the ability to image insulating materials without any conductive coatings so that surface details are not modified. In this presentation, several scientific applications across biology and geochemistry will be presented to highlight the effectiveness of this powerful microscope. Acknowledgements: Research was performed using the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. Work was supported by DOE-BER Mesoscale to Molecules Bioimaging Project FWP# 66382.

  10. Development of a sub-nanometer positioning device: combining a new linear motor with linear motion ball guide ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, J; Tanaka, T; Masuda, I

    2010-01-01

    A new type of linear motor described in this note has some advantages compared with conventional motors. The attractive magnetic force between the stator (permanent magnets) and mover (armature) is diminished almost to zero. The efficiency is better because the magnetic flux leakage is very small, the size of motor is smaller and detent (force ripple) is smaller than for conventional motors. Therefore, we think that this motor is greatly suitable for ultra-precision positioning as an actuator. An ultra-precision positioning device using this motor and linear motion ball guide ways is newly developed by making the device very rigid and using a suitable control method. Moreover, the positioning performance is evaluated by a positioning resolution, and deviation and dispersion errors. As a result of repeated step response tests, the positioning resolution is 0.3 nm, with the deviation error and dispersion error (3σ) being sub-nanometer. Consequently, the positioning device achieves sub-nanometer positioning. (technical design note)

  11. Generating Sub-nanometer Displacement Using Reduction Mechanism Consisting of Torsional Leaf Spring Hinges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda Makoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent demand on the measurement resolution of precise positioning comes up to tens of picometers. Some distinguished researches have been performed to measure the displacement in picometer order, however, few of them can verify the measurement performance as available tools in industry. This is not only because the picometer displacement is not yet required for industrial use, but also due to the lack of standard tools to verify such precise displacement. We proposed a displacement reduction mechanism for generating precise displacement using torsional leaf spring hinges (TLSHs that consist of four leaf springs arranged radially. It has been demonstrated that a prototype of the reduction mechanism was able to provide one-nanometer displacement with 1/1000 reduction rate by a piezoelectric actuator. In order to clarify the potential of the reduction mechanism, a displacement reduction table that can be mounted on AFM stage was newly developed using TLSHs. This paper describes the design of the reduction mechanism and the sub-nanometer displacement performance of the table obtained from its dynamic and static characteristics measured by displacement sensors and from the AFM images

  12. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Rui [ORNL; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Feng, Guang [Clemson University

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.

  13. Imaging Action Potential in Single Mammalian Neurons by Tracking the Accompanying Sub-Nanometer Mechanical Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunze; Liu, Xian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Guan, Yan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2018-03-28

    Action potentials in neurons have been studied traditionally by intracellular electrophysiological recordings and more recently by the fluorescence detection methods. Here we describe a label-free optical imaging method that can measure mechanical motion in single cells with a sub-nanometer detection limit. Using the method, we have observed sub-nanometer mechanical motion accompanying the action potential in single mammalian neurons by averaging the repeated action potential spikes. The shape and width of the transient displacement are similar to those of the electrically recorded action potential, but the amplitude varies from neuron to neuron, and from one region of a neuron to another, ranging from 0.2-0.4 nm. The work indicates that action potentials may be studied noninvasively in single mammalian neurons by label-free imaging of the accompanying sub-nanometer mechanical motion.

  14. Sub-Nanometer Channels Embedded in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yimo; Li, Ming-yang; Jung, Gang-Seob; Marsalis, Mark A.; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.; Li, Lain-Jong; Muller, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are among the most promising candidates for next-generation electronics due to their atomic thinness, allowing for flexible transparent electronics and ultimate length scaling1. Thus far, atomically-thin p-n junctions2

  15. Bimetallic Ag-Pt Sub-nanometer Supported Clusters as Highly Efficient and Robust Oxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negreiros, Fabio R. [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Yin, Chunrong [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Singh, Akansha [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Barcaro, Giovanni [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Sementa, Luca [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Bartling, Stephan [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Sen, Prasenjit [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Nigam, Sandeep [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Fukui, Nobuyuki [East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc., Ichikawa Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Yasumatsu, Hisato [Cluster Research Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute: in, East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc. Ichikawa, Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Fortunelli, Alessandro [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA USA

    2017-12-29

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of Ag-Pt sub-nanometer clusters as heterogeneous catalysts in the CO -> CO2 reaction (COox) is presented. Ag9Pt2 and Ag9Pt3 clusters are size-selected in the gas phase, deposited on an ultrathin amorphous alumina support, and tested as catalysts experimentally under realistic conditions and by first-principles simulations at realistic coverage. Insitu GISAXS/TPRx demonstrates that the clusters do not sinter or deactivate even after prolonged exposure to reactants at high temperature, and present comparable, extremely high COox catalytic efficiency. Such high activity and stability are ascribed to a synergic role of Ag and Pt in ultranano-aggregates, in which Pt anchors the clusters to the support and binds and activates two CO molecules, while Ag binds and activates O-2, and Ag/Pt surface proximity disfavors poisoning by CO or oxidized species.

  16. High-resolution electron microscopy of detonation nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iakoubovskii, K; Mitsuishi, K; Furuya, K

    2008-01-01

    The structure of individual nanodiamond grains produced by the detonation of carbon-based explosives has been studied with a high-vacuum aberration-corrected electron microscope. Many grains show a well-resolved cubic diamond lattice with negligible contamination, thereby demonstrating that the non-diamond shell, universally observed on nanodiamond particles, could be intrinsic to the preparation process rather than to the nanosized diamond itself. The strength of the adhesion between the nanodiamond grains, and the possibility of their patterning with sub-nanometer precision, are also demonstrated

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy of detonation nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iakoubovskii, K; Mitsuishi, K [Quantum Dot Research Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0005 (Japan); Furuya, K [High Voltage Microscopy Station, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0005 (Japan)], E-mail: Iakoubovskii.Konstantin@nims.go.jp

    2008-04-16

    The structure of individual nanodiamond grains produced by the detonation of carbon-based explosives has been studied with a high-vacuum aberration-corrected electron microscope. Many grains show a well-resolved cubic diamond lattice with negligible contamination, thereby demonstrating that the non-diamond shell, universally observed on nanodiamond particles, could be intrinsic to the preparation process rather than to the nanosized diamond itself. The strength of the adhesion between the nanodiamond grains, and the possibility of their patterning with sub-nanometer precision, are also demonstrated.

  18. Sub-nanometer emittance monitor for high brightness synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.

    1991-01-01

    Method of measuring a very small beam emittance in electron storage rings is presented. The monitor can sense an intrinsic emittance of beam particles by detecting the angular distribution of Compton scatterings of laser photons on beam electrons. It is possible to achieve measurement resolution smaller than 10 -9 m-rad without difficulty. (author)

  19. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40/sup 0/ biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals.

  20. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40 0 biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals

  1. Nanopore Measurements of Filamentous Viruses Reveal a Sub-nanometer-Scale Stagnant Fluid Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Angus J; Tang, Jay X; Stein, Derek

    2017-11-28

    We report measurements and analyses of nanopore translocations by fd and M13, two related strains of filamentous virus that are identical except for their charge densities. The standard continuum theory of electrokinetics greatly overestimates the translocation speed and the conductance associated with counterions for both viruses. Furthermore, fd and M13 behave differently from one another, even translocating in opposite directions under certain conditions. This cannot be explained by Manning-condensed counterions or a number of other proposed models. Instead, we argue that these anomalous findings are consequences of the breakdown of the validity of continuum hydrodynamics at the scale of a few molecular layers. Next to a polyelectrolyte, there exists an extra-viscous, sub-nanometer-thin boundary layer that has a giant influence on the transport characteristics. We show that a stagnant boundary layer captures the essential hydrodynamics and extends the validity of the electrokinetic theory beyond the continuum limit. A stagnant layer with a thickness of about half a nanometer consistently improves predictions of the ionic current change induced by virus translocations and of the translocation velocity for both fd and M13 over a wide range of nanopore dimensions and salt concentrations.

  2. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  3. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO{sub 2} transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 009 (India); National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India); Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam [Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chettinad Hospital & Research Institute, Kelambakkam, Tamilnadu 603 103 (India); Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy [Department of Chemistry, The American College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 002 (India); Viswanathan, Balasubramanian, E-mail: bvnathan@iitm.ac.in [National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • On interaction with adsorbate CO{sub 2,} the adsorbent changes its configuration around the metal. • Electron transfer is faster in low coordinative environment of Cu. • CO formation is more favorable on Cu sites with even coordination number. • Cu at coordination number two has a over potential of −0.35 V. - Abstract: Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO at an applied potential of −0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to various value added chemicals.

  4. Assessing the concept of structure sensitivity or insensitivity for sub-nanometer catalyst materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Andrew S.; Rötzer, Marian D.; Ridge, Claron J.; Yoon, Bokwon; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Landman, Uzi; Heiz, Ueli

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the nano-catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene, yielding benchmark information pertaining to the concept of structure sensitivity/insensitivity and its applicability at the bottom of the catalyst particle size-range, is explored with experiments on size-selected Ptn (n = 7-40) clusters soft-landed on MgO, in conjunction with first-principles simulations. As in the case of larger particles both the direct ethylene hydrogenation channel and the parallel hydrogenation-dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route must be considered, with the fundamental uncovering that at the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to the structure insensitivity found for larger particles. In this size-regime, the chemical properties can be modulated and tuned by a single atom, reflected by the onset of low temperature hydrogenation at T > 150 K catalyzed by Ptn (n ≥ 10) clusters, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13 using a pulsed molecular beam technique. Structure insensitive behavior, inherent for specific cluster sizes at ambient temperatures, can be induced in the more active sizes, e.g. Pt13, by a temperature increase, up to 400 K, which opens dehydrogenation channels leading to ethylidyne formation. This reaction channel was, however found to be attenuated on Pt20, as catalyst activity remained elevated after the 400 K step. Pt30 displayed behavior which can be understood from extrapolating bulk properties to this size range; in particular the calculated d-band center. In the non-scalable sub-nanometer size regime, however, precise control of particle size may be used for atom-by-atom tuning and manipulation of catalyzed hydrogenation activity and selectivity.

  5. Mechanism and Prediction of Gas Permeation through Sub-Nanometer Graphene Pores: Comparison of Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Govind Rajan, Ananth; Misra, Rahul Prasanna; Drahushuk, Lee W; Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2017-08-22

    Due to its atomic thickness, porous graphene with sub-nanometer pore sizes constitutes a promising candidate for gas separation membranes that exhibit ultrahigh permeances. While graphene pores can greatly facilitate gas mixture separation, there is currently no validated analytical framework with which one can predict gas permeation through a given graphene pore. In this work, we simulate the permeation of adsorptive gases, such as CO 2 and CH 4 , through sub-nanometer graphene pores using molecular dynamics simulations. We show that gas permeation can typically be decoupled into two steps: (1) adsorption of gas molecules to the pore mouth and (2) translocation of gas molecules from the pore mouth on one side of the graphene membrane to the pore mouth on the other side. We find that the translocation rate coefficient can be expressed using an Arrhenius-type equation, where the energy barrier and the pre-exponential factor can be theoretically predicted using the transition state theory for classical barrier crossing events. We propose a relation between the pre-exponential factor and the entropy penalty of a gas molecule crossing the pore. Furthermore, on the basis of the theory, we propose an efficient algorithm to calculate CO 2 and CH 4 permeances per pore for sub-nanometer graphene pores of any shape. For the CO 2 /CH 4 mixture, the graphene nanopores exhibit a trade-off between the CO 2 permeance and the CO 2 /CH 4 separation factor. This upper bound on a Robeson plot of selectivity versus permeance for a given pore density is predicted and described by the theory. Pores with CO 2 /CH 4 separation factors higher than 10 2 have CO 2 permeances per pore lower than 10 -22 mol s -1 Pa -1 , and pores with separation factors of ∼10 have CO 2 permeances per pore between 10 -22 and 10 -21 mol s -1 Pa -1 . Finally, we show that a pore density of 10 14 m -2 is required for a porous graphene membrane to exceed the permeance-selectivity upper bound of polymeric

  6. Differential optical shadow sensor for sub-nanometer displacement measurement and its application to drag-free satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Andreas; Tan, Si; Saraf, Shailendhar; Alfauwaz, Abdul; DeBra, Dan; Buchman, Sasha; Lipa, John A

    2017-10-16

    We present a method for 3D sub-nanometer displacement measurement using a set of differential optical shadow sensors. It is based on using pairs of collimated beams on opposite sides of an object that are partially blocked by it. Applied to a sphere, our 3-axis sensor module consists of 8 parallel beam-detector sets for redundancy. The sphere blocks half of each beam's power in the nominal centered position, and any displacement can be measured by the differential optical power changes amongst the pairs of detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated a displacement sensitivity of 0.87nm/Hz at 1 Hz and 0.39nm/Hz at 10 Hz. We describe the application of the module to the inertial sensor of a drag-free satellite, which can potentially be used for navigation, geodesy and fundamental science experiments as well as ground based applications.

  7. Spatial coherence of electron beams from field emitters and its effect on the resolution of imaged objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana, E-mail: tatiana@physik.uzh.ch

    2017-04-15

    Sub-nanometer and nanometer-sized tips provide high coherence electron sources. Conventionally, the effective source size is estimated from the extent of the experimental biprism interference pattern created on the detector by applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem. Previously reported experimental intensity distributions on the detector exhibit Gaussian distribution and our simulations show that this is an indication that such electron sources must be at least partially coherent. This, in turn means that strictly speaking the Van Cittert Zernike theorem cannot be applied, since it assumes an incoherent source. The approach of applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem is examined in more detail by performing simulations of interference patterns for the electron sources of different size and different coherence length, evaluating the effective source size from the extent of the simulated interference pattern and comparing the obtained result with the pre-defined value. The intensity distribution of the source is assumed to be Gaussian distributed, as it is observed in experiments. The visibility or the contrast in the simulated holograms is found to be always less than 1 which agrees well with previously reported experimental results and thus can be explained solely by the Gaussian intensity distribution of the source. The effective source size estimated from the extent of the interference pattern turns out to be of about 2–3 times larger than the pre-defined size, but it is approximately equal to the intrinsic resolution of the imaging system. A simple formula for estimating the intrinsic resolution, which could be useful when employing nano-tips in in-line Gabor holography or point-projection microscopy, is provided. - Highlights: • van Cittert Zernike theorem for nano- and sub-nano electron emitting tips is revised. • Simulations show that nano- and sub-nano electron emitting tips are at least partially coherent. • A simple formula for evaluating

  8. A general approach to homogeneous sub-nanometer metallic particle/graphene composites by S-coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Senhao; Wang, Wei; Gu, Shangzhi; Zhang, Guoxin; Song, Ningning

    2018-05-01

    In this study, sulphur-modified reduced graphene oxide (S-rGO) was employed as substrate to investigate the growth mechanism of metal and metallic nanoparticles (NPs). It is observed that the monodispersed Au, SnO2, FeO(OH) and Co3S4 NPs in sub-nanometer (sub-nm) with narrow size distribution were successfully anchored on S-rGO, respectively. The results indicate that the S contained radicals, viz. the Cdbnd S and Csbnd Ssbnd C functional groups play an important role in determining the homogeneous distribution of NPs on S-rGO by providing active sites for the NPs anchoring and nucleation. In additional, as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the as-synthesized sub-nm sized Co3S4/S-rGO and SnO2/S-rGO composites show excellent Li storage performance. It could be stabilized at ca. 600 mAh/g after formation cycle with the coulombic efficiency of 98%. It is expected that the strategy of growing sub-nm sized metallic component onto graphene by applying sulphur functionalities could be utilized as a general method to prepare monodispersed graphene-based NPs with other metals, especially with transition metals in sub-nm sizes.

  9. NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mengesha, W

    2002-01-01

    NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution eta sub e was measured using the Modified Compton Coincidence Technique (MCCT). The MCCT allowed detection of nearly monoenergetic internal electrons resulting from the scattering of incident 662 keV gamma rays within a primary NaI(Tl) detector. Scattered gamma rays were detected using a secondary HPGe detector in a coincidence mode. Measurements were carried out for electron energies ranging from 16 to 438 keV, by varying the scattering angle. Measured HPGe coincidence spectra were deconvolved to determine the scattered energy spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector. Subsequently, the NaI(Tl) electron energy spectra were determined by subtracting the energy of scattered spectra from the incident source energy (662 keV). Using chi-squared minimization, iterative deconvolution of the internal electron energy spectra from the measured NaI(Tl) spectra was then used to determine eta sub e at the electron energy of interest. eta sub e values determined using this technique represent va...

  10. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO2 transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam; Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy; Viswanathan, Balasubramanian

    2017-02-01

    Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO2 to CO at an applied potential of -0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to various value added chemicals.

  11. A compact, all-optical, THz wave generator based on self-modulation in a slab photonic crystal waveguide with a single sub-nanometer graphene layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, R; Ouyang, Z; Mohammd, M M

    2015-07-14

    We design a compact, all-optical THz wave generator based on self-modulation in a 1-D slab photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide with a single sub-nanometer graphene layer by using enhanced nonlinearity of graphene. It has been shown that at the bandgap edge of higher bands of a 1-D slab PhC, through only one sub-nanometer graphene layer we can obtain a compact, high modulation factor (about 0.98 percent), self-intensity modulator at a high frequency (about 0.6 THz) and low threshold intensity (about 15 MW per square centimeter), and further a compact, all-optical THz wave generator by integrating the self-modulator with a THz photodiode or photonic mixer. Such a THz source is expected to have a relatively high efficiency compared with conventional sources based on optical methods. The proposed THz source can find wide applications in THz science and technology, e.g., in THz imaging, THz sensors and detectors, THz communication systems, and THz optical integrated logic circuits.

  12. Benchmarking NaI(Tl) Electron Energy Resolution Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Valentine, J D.

    2002-01-01

    A technique for validating electron energy resolution results measured using the modified Compton coincidence technique (MCCT) has been developed. This technique relies on comparing measured gamma-ray energy resolution with calculated values that were determined using the measured electron energy resolution results. These gamma-ray energy resolution calculations were based on Monte Carlo photon transport simulations, the measured NaI(Tl) electron response, a simplified cascade sequence, and the measured electron energy resolution results. To demonstrate this technique, MCCT-measured NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution results were used along with measured gamma-ray energy resolution results from the same NaI(Tl) crystal. Agreement to within 5% was observed for all energies considered between the calculated and measured gamma-ray energy resolution results for the NaI(Tl) crystal characterized. The calculated gamma-ray energy resolution results were also compared with previously published gamma-ray energy resolution measurements with good agreement (<10%). In addition to describing the validation technique that was developed in this study and the results, a brief review of the electron energy resolution measurements made using the MCCT is provided. Based on the results of this study, it is believed that the MCCT-measured electron energy resolution results are reliable. Thus, the MCCT and this validation technique can be used in the future to characterize the electron energy resolution of other scintillators and to determine NaI(Tl) intrinsic energy resolution

  13. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Resolution Versus Error for Computational Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzi, Lorenzo; Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Images that are collected via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) can be undersampled to avoid damage to the specimen while maintaining resolution [1, 2]. We have used BPFA to impute missing data and reduce noise [3]. The reconstruction is typically evaluated using the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). This measure is too conservative for STEM images and we propose that the Fourier ring correlation (FRC) is used instead to evaluate the reconstruction. We are not concerned with exact reconstruction of the truth image, and therefore PSNR is a conservative estimation of the quality of the reconstruction. Instead, we are concerned with the visual resolution of the image and whether atoms can be distinguished. We have evaluated the reconstruction of a simulated STEM image using the FRC and compared the results with the PSNR measurements. The FRC captures the resolution of the image and is not affected by a large MSE if the atom peaks are still distinguishable. The noisy and reconstructed images are shown in Figure 1. The simulated STEM image was sampled at 100%, 80%, 40%, and 20% of the original pixels to simulate an undersampled scan. The reconstruction was done using BPFA with a patch size of 10 x 10 and no overlapping patches. Not having overlapping patches produces inferior results but they are still acceptable. The dictionary size is 64 and 30 iterations were completed during each reconstruction. The 100% image was denoised instead of reconstructed. Poisson noise was applied to the simulated image with λ values of 500, 50, and 5 to simulate lower imaging dose. The original simulated STEM image was also included in our calculations and was generated using a dose of 1000. The simulated STEM image is 100 by 100 pixels and has essentially no high frequency components. The image reconstruction tends to smooth the data, also resulting in no high frequency components. This causes the FRC of the two images to be large at higher resolutions and may be

  15. Zeolites - a high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredsson, V.

    1994-10-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to investigate a number of zeolites (EMT, FAU, LTL, MFI and MOR) and a member of the mesoporous M41S family. The electron optical artefact, manifested as a dark spot in the projected centre of the large zeolite channels, caused by insufficient transfer of certain reflections in the objective lens has been explained. The artefact severely hinders observation of materials confined in the zeolite channels and cavities. It is shown how to circumvent the artefact problem and how to image confined materials in spite of disturbance caused by the artefact. Image processing by means of a Wiener filter has been applied for removal of the artefact. The detailed surface structure of FAU has been investigated. Comparison of experimental micrographs with images simulated using different surface models indicates that the surface can be terminated in different ways depending on synthesis methods. The dealuminated form of FAU (USY) is covered by an amorphous region. Platinum incorporated in FAU has a preponderance to aggregate in the (111) twin planes, probably due to a local difference in cage structure with more spacious cages. It is shown that platinum is intra-zeolitic as opposed to being located on the external surface of the zeolite crystal. This could be deduced from tomography of ultra-thin sections among observations. HRTEM studies of the mesoporous MCM-41 show that the pores have a hexagonal shape and also supports the mechanistic model proposed which involves a cooperative formation of a mesophase including the silicate species as well as the surfactant. 66 refs, 24 figs

  16. Dose-dependent high-resolution electron ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A. J.; Allen, L. J.; Sawada, H.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of electron ptychography at atomic resolution have ushered in a new era of coherent diffractive imaging in the context of electron microscopy. We report and discuss electron ptychography under variable electron dose conditions, exploring the prospects of an approach which has considerable potential for imaging where low dose is needed

  17. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  18. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures is descr......The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  19. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  20. An EELS sub-nanometer investigation of the dielectric gate stack for the realization of InGaAs based MOSFET devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, P; Paterson, G W; Craven, A J; Holland, M C; Thayne, I G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a subnanometer investigation of the Ga 2 O 3 /GdGaO dielectric gate stack deposited onto InGaAs is presented. Results regarding the influence of the growth conditions on the interface region from a chemical and morphological point of view are presented. The chemical information reported in this paper has been obtained using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) that was carried out in a scanning transmission electron microscope ((S)TEM) showing both spatial and depth resolution.

  1. Problem Resolution through Electronic Mail: A Five-Step Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgenett, Neal; Grandgenett, Don

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of electronic mail within the general resolution and management of administrative problems and emphasizes the need for careful attention to problem definition and clarity of language. Presents a research-based five-step model for the effective use of electronic mail based on experiences at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.…

  2. High Resolution Electron Microscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelinckx, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper illustrates different operating modes of the electron microscope and shows the image formation in an ideal microscope. Diffraction contrast is used in the study of crystal defects, such as dislocations and planar interfaces. Methods are surveyed which give at least a rudimentary image of the lattice and therefore make use of at least two interfering beams. Special attention is given to images which also carry structural information and therefore imply the use of many beams. The underlying theory is discussed as are the theories of Van Dyck, Spence and Cowley. These are illustrated by means of a number of recent case studies

  3. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei; Cheng, Bin; Liu, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Meng-Lin; He, Jr-Hau; Chuvilin, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  4. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  5. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  6. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-03-09

    Mar 9, 2001 ... kinematics and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) electron temperature (Te) of this region. H109α RRL observations by Wilsonet al.(1970) with a resolution of 4 and by Pankonin et al. (1979) with a resolution of 2.6 show that Te ∼ 6000 K in G49.5-0.4. Lower frequency observations for H137β and ...

  7. Sub-micron resolution selected area electron channeling patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, J; Mansour, H; Gey, N; Crimp, M A; Chalal, S; Maloufi, N

    2015-02-01

    Collection of selected area channeling patterns (SACPs) on a high resolution FEG-SEM is essential to carry out quantitative electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) studies, as it facilitates accurate determination of the crystal plane normal with respect to the incident beam direction and thus allows control the electron channeling conditions. Unfortunately commercial SACP modes developed in the past were limited in spatial resolution and are often no longer offered. In this contribution we present a novel approach for collecting high resolution SACPs (HR-SACPs) developed on a Gemini column. This HR-SACP technique combines the first demonstrated sub-micron spatial resolution with high angular accuracy of about 0.1°, at a convenient working distance of 10mm. This innovative approach integrates the use of aperture alignment coils to rock the beam with a digitally calibrated beam shift procedure to ensure the rocking beam is maintained on a point of interest. Moreover a new methodology to accurately measure SACP spatial resolution is proposed. While column considerations limit the rocking angle to 4°, this range is adequate to index the HR-SACP in conjunction with the pattern simulated from the approximate orientation deduced by EBSD. This new technique facilitates Accurate ECCI (A-ECCI) studies from very fine grained and/or highly strained materials. It offers also new insights for developing HR-SACP modes on new generation high-resolution electron columns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  9. A Novel Low Energy Electron Microscope for DNA Sequencing and Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, M.; Shadman, K.; Persson, H.H.J.; N’Diaye, A.T.; Schmid, A.K.; Davis, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel technique that is directed towards imaging nanostructures and surfaces with sub-nanometer resolution. The technique combines a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, an energy filter, and dual beam illumination in a single instrument. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. Simulation results predict that the novel aberration corrector design will eliminate the second rank chromatic and third and fifth order spherical aberrations, thereby improving the resolution into the sub-nanometer regime at landing energies as low as one hundred electron-Volts. The energy filter produces a beam that can extract detailed information about the chemical composition and local electronic states of non-periodic objects such as nanoparticles, interfaces, defects, and macromolecules. The dual flood illumination eliminates charging effects that are generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which requires high resolution to distinguish the individual bases and high speed to reduce the cost. The MAD-LEEM approach images the DNA with low electron impact energies, which provides nucleobase contrast mechanisms without organometallic labels. Furthermore, the micron-size field of view when combined with imaging on the fly provides long read lengths, thereby reducing the demand on assembling the sequence. Experimental results from bulk specimens with immobilized single-base oligonucleotides demonstrate that base specific contrast is available with reflected, photo-emitted, and Auger electrons. Image contrast simulations of model rectangular features mimicking the individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed to translate measurements of contrast on bulk DNA to the detectability of

  10. A novel low energy electron microscope for DNA sequencing and surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, M; Shadman, K; Persson, H H J; N'Diaye, A T; Schmid, A K; Davis, R W

    2014-10-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel technique that is directed towards imaging nanostructures and surfaces with sub-nanometer resolution. The technique combines a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, an energy filter, and dual beam illumination in a single instrument. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. Simulation results predict that the novel aberration corrector design will eliminate the second rank chromatic and third and fifth order spherical aberrations, thereby improving the resolution into the sub-nanometer regime at landing energies as low as one hundred electron-Volts. The energy filter produces a beam that can extract detailed information about the chemical composition and local electronic states of non-periodic objects such as nanoparticles, interfaces, defects, and macromolecules. The dual flood illumination eliminates charging effects that are generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which requires high resolution to distinguish the individual bases and high speed to reduce the cost. The MAD-LEEM approach images the DNA with low electron impact energies, which provides nucleobase contrast mechanisms without organometallic labels. Furthermore, the micron-size field of view when combined with imaging on the fly provides long read lengths, thereby reducing the demand on assembling the sequence. Experimental results from bulk specimens with immobilized single-base oligonucleotides demonstrate that base specific contrast is available with reflected, photo-emitted, and Auger electrons. Image contrast simulations of model rectangular features mimicking the individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed to translate measurements of contrast on bulk DNA to the detectability of

  11. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  12. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references

  13. On the resolution of the electron microscopic radioautography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Kazuko; Daimon, Tateo; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    1981-01-01

    The aim of electron microscopic radioautography is to reveal the exact localization of certain substances at the macromolecular level. In order to attain this object the establishment of a fine grain development method is indispensable. Some of latent images are formed at the contact surface between the polyhedral halide silver grain and the section surface, where the impact of #betta# particles come directly from the section involved, and since it is in contact with the section it remains in place even after development and gelatin removal. This latent image finally becomes a developed silver grain in the electron microscope radioautogram. Although the limit of resolution in electron microscopic radioautography is supposed to be the diameter of halide silver grains in emulsion, it may be improved by considering the fact that the contact area between the halide silver grain and the section surface is the minimum unit of resolution. The minimum resolution of electron microscopic radioautography was determined histologically to be about 100A. (author)

  14. Optical circular deflector with attosecond resolution for ultrashort electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel method using high-power laser as a circular deflector is proposed for the measurement of femtosecond (fs and sub-fs electron beam. In the scheme, the electron beam interacts with a laser pulse operating in a radially polarized doughnut mode (TEM_{01^{*}} in a helical undulator, generating angular kicks along the beam in two directions at the same time. The phase difference between the two angular kicks makes the beam form a ring after a propagation section with appropriate phase advance, which can reveal the current profile of the electron beam. Detailed theoretical analysis of the method and numerical results with reasonable parameters are both presented. It is shown that the temporal resolution can reach up to ∼100 attosecond, which is a significant improvement for the diagnostics of ultrashort electron beam.

  15. Construction of a high resolution electron beam profile monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Dawson, J.; Haberichter, W.; Novak, W.; Reed, L.; Yang, X.F.

    1993-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung from an electron beam on a heavy target can be used to image the beam profile using collimators and slits. The limiting resolution using this system is determined by Fresnel diffraction, and is ∼ √(λd/2), where λ is the photon wavelength and d is determined by the linear dimensions of the system. For linear colliders this resolution could be a few nm. The highest resolution requires detectors which see only high energy, (small λ), photons, and this is accomplished by converting photons to pairs, and detecting Cherenkov light in a nearly forward angle with a CCD detector or streak camera. Tests are planned at the Argonne APS and SLAC FFTB

  16. Precipitate resolution in an electron irradiated ni-si alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.; Kitajima, K.

    1988-09-01

    Precipitate resolution processes in a Ni-12.6 at% Si alloy under electron irradiation have been observed by means of HVEM. Above 400°C, growth and resolution of Ni 3Si precipitates were observed simultaneously. The detail stereoscopic observation showed that the precipitates close to free surfaces grew, while those in the middle of a specimen dissolved. The critical dose when the precipitates start to shrink increases with increasing the depth. This depth dependence of the precipitate behavior under irradiation has a close relation with the formation of surface precipitates and the growth of solute depleted zone beneath them. The temperature and dose dependence of the resolution rate showed that the precipitates in the solute depleted zone dissolved by the interface controlled process of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  17. High-resolution observation by double-biprism electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Ken; Tonomura, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution electron holography has been achieved by using a double-biprism interferometer implemented on a 1 MV field emission electron microscope. The interferometer was installed behind the first magnifying lens to narrow carrier fringes and thus enabled complete separation of sideband Fourier spectrum from center band in reconstruction process. Holograms of Au fine particles and single-crystalline thin films with the finest fringe spacing of 4.2 pm were recorded and reconstructed. The overall holography system including the reconstruction process performed well for holograms in which carrier fringes had a spacing of around 10 pm. High-resolution lattice images of the amplitude and phase were clearly reconstructed without mixing of the center band and sideband information. Additionally, entire holograms were recorded without Fresnel fringes normally generated by the filament electrode of the biprism, and the holograms were thus reconstructed without the artifacts caused by Fresnel fringes

  18. Averaging scheme for atomic resolution off-axis electron holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, T; Lehmann, M

    2014-08-01

    All micrographs are limited by shot-noise, which is intrinsic to the detection process of electrons. For beam insensitive specimen this limitation can in principle easily be circumvented by prolonged exposure times. However, in the high-resolution regime several instrumental instabilities limit the applicable exposure time. Particularly in the case of off-axis holography the holograms are highly sensitive to the position and voltage of the electron-optical biprism. We present a novel reconstruction algorithm to average series of off-axis holograms while compensating for specimen drift, biprism drift, drift of biprism voltage, and drift of defocus, which all might cause problematic changes from exposure to exposure. We show an application of the algorithm utilizing also the possibilities of double biprism holography, which results in a high quality exit-wave reconstruction with 75 pm resolution at a very high signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electron-optical design parameters for a high-resolution electron monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Huebner, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed design parameters of a new, high-resolution electron monochromator are presented. The design utilizes a hemispherical filter as the energy-dispersing element and combines both cylindrical and aperture electrostatic lenses to accelerate, decelerate, transport, and focus the electron beam from the cathode to the interaction region

  1. Precision crystal alignment for high-resolution electron microscope imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, G.J.; Beeching, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more difficult tasks involved in obtaining quality high-resolution electron micrographs is the precise alignment of a specimen into the required zone. The current accepted procedure, which involves changing to diffraction mode and searching for symmetric point diffraction pattern, is insensitive to small amounts of misalignment and at best qualitative. On-line analysis of the fourier space representation of the image, both for determining and correcting crystal tilt, is investigated. 8 refs., 42 figs

  2. Environmental high resolution electron microscopy and applications to chemical science

    OpenAIRE

    Boyes, Edward; Gai, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    An environmental cell high resolution electron microscope (EHREM) has been developed for in situ studies of dynamic chemical reactions on the atomic scale. It allows access to metastable intermediate phases of catalysts and to sequences of reversible microstructural and chemical development associated with the activation, deactivation and poisoning of a catalyst. Materials transported through air can be restored or recreated and samples damaged, e.g. by dehydration, by the usual vacuum enviro...

  3. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daliang; Zhu, Yihan; Liu, Lingmei; Ying, Xiangrong; Hsiung, Chia-En; Sougrat, Rachid; Li, Kun; Han, Yu

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam–sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  4. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daliang

    2018-01-18

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam-sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  5. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krehl, Jonas; Lubk, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction

  6. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  7. High-resolution electron microscopy and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F H

    1987-12-01

    A review of research on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) carried out at the Institute of Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is presented. Apart from the direct observation of crystal and quasicrystal defects for some alloys, oxides, minerals, etc., and the structure determination for some minute crystals, an approximate image-contrast theory named pseudo-weak-phase object approximation (PWPOA), which shows the image contrast change with crystal thickness, is described. Within the framework of PWPOA, the image contrast of lithium ions in the crystal of R-Li2Ti3O7 has been observed. The usefulness of diffraction analysis techniques such as the direct method and Patterson method in HREM is discussed. Image deconvolution and resolution enhancement for weak-phase objects by use of the direct method are illustrated. In addition, preliminary results of image restoration for thick crystals are given.

  8. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Siqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

  9. Single-shot 35 fs temporal resolution electron shadowgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoby, C. M.; Li, R. K.; Threlkeld, E.; To, H.; Musumeci, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-01-14

    We obtain single-shot time-resolved shadowgraph images of the electromagnetic fields resulting from the interaction of a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse with a metal surface. Using a high brightness relativistic electron beam and a high streaking speed radiofrequency deflector, we report <35 fs temporal resolution enabling a direct visualization of the retarded-time dominated field evolution which follows the laser-induced charge emission. A model including the finite signal propagation speed well reproduces the data and yields measurements of fundamental parameters in short pulse laser-matter interaction such as the amount of emitted charge and the emission time scale.

  10. Single-shot 35 fs temporal resolution electron shadowgraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Li, R. K.; Threlkeld, E.; To, H.; Musumeci, P.

    2013-01-01

    We obtain single-shot time-resolved shadowgraph images of the electromagnetic fields resulting from the interaction of a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse with a metal surface. Using a high brightness relativistic electron beam and a high streaking speed radiofrequency deflector, we report <35 fs temporal resolution enabling a direct visualization of the retarded-time dominated field evolution which follows the laser-induced charge emission. A model including the finite signal propagation speed well reproduces the data and yields measurements of fundamental parameters in short pulse laser-matter interaction such as the amount of emitted charge and the emission time scale.

  11. Secondary electron spectroscopy and Auger microscopy at high spatial resolution. Application to scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gressus, Claude; Massignon, Daniel; Sopizet, Rene

    1979-01-01

    Secondary electron spectroscopy (SES), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) are combined with ultra high vacuum scanning microscopy (SEM) for surface analysis at high spatial resolution. Reliability tests for the optical column for the vacuum and for the spectrometer are discussed. Furthermore the sensitivity threshold in AES which is compatible with a non destructive surface analysis at high spatial resolution is evaluated. This combination of all spectroscopies is used in the study of the beam damage correlated with the well known secondary electron image (SEI) darkening still observed in ultra high vacuum. The darkening is explained as a bulk decontamination of the sample rather than as a surface contamination from the residual vacuum gas [fr

  12. Millisecond resolution electron fluxes from the Cluster satellites: Calibrated EDI ambient electron data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Matthias; Rashev, Mikhail; Haaland, Stein

    2017-04-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster can measure 500 eV and 1 keV electron fluxes with high time resolution during passive operation phases in its Ambient Electron (AE) mode. Data from this mode is available in the Cluster Science Archive since October 2004 with a cadence of 16 Hz in the normal mode or 128 Hz for burst mode telemetry intervals. The fluxes are recorded at pitch angles of 0, 90, and 180 degrees. This paper describes the calibration and validation of these measurements. The high resolution AE data allow precise temporal and spatial diagnostics of magnetospheric boundaries and will be used for case studies and statistical studies of low energy electron fluxes in the near-Earth space. We show examples of applications.

  13. High resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, W.; Shaw, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental high resolution electron micrographs and computer simulation experiments have been used to evaluate the visibility of the atomic constituents of YBa 2 Cu 3 O(7-x). In practice, the detection of oxygen has not been possible in contradiction to that predicted by modelling of perfect crystalline material. Preliminary computer experiments of the electron diffraction patterns when oxygen vacancies are introduced on the Cu-O sheets separating Ba layers show the diffuse streaks characteristic of short range ordering. 7 references

  14. High resolution electron attachment to molecules of atmospheric relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senn, G.

    2000-10-01

    This Ph.D. thesis is divided into three parts. The first is an introduction into the field of electron attachment. In the second part the experimental apparatus is described, and in the third part the results are presented. In the present thesis molecules were chosen for our investigations that are not only of academic interest but that also play an important role for applications or even the life on this planet. All the molecules studied in this work are of atmospheric relevance. NO, and OClO, are involved in the ozone depletion of the stratosphere. The D-layer of the ionosphere is an upper boundary of the ozone layer, therefore the interaction of the electrons from the D-layer with O 3 might play an important role for the chemistry in that part of the atmosphere. Especially the interaction of slow electrons (that will be present in the D-layer in large numbers) with ozone was emphasized in the present study. The production of O - and O 2 - by dissociative electron attachment to ozone was measured for incident electron energies between 0 and 10eV. A previously unobserved sharp structure was discovered in the formation of O - ions for electrons with zero kinetic energy. This additional cross section peak has important consequences for the role of ozone in the anion formation process in the ionosphere. Since OClO is a night time reservoir for chlorine atoms (Cl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) both of which play a critical role in the depletion of the stratospheric ozone, we have studied negative ion formation following electron impact (0-10eV) to OClO. Despite its atmospheric relevance the mechanism of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to NO is still a matter of controversy. DEA was studied at high energy resolution and with a kinetic-energy analysis of the O - fragment in two independent crossed electron-molecular-beam experiments. The DEA cross section exhibits a vertical onset near 7.45eV that corresponds to the energy threshold of the DEA channel O - ( 2 P

  15. Measuring the electron bunch timing with femtosecond resolution at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, Marie Kristin

    2013-03-01

    Bunch arrival time monitors (BAMs) are an integral part of the laser-based synchronisation system which is being developed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH).The operation principle comprises the measurement of the electron bunch arrival time relative to the optical timing reference, which is provided by actively length-stabilised fibre-links of the synchronisation system. The monitors are foreseen to be used as a standard diagnostic tool, not only for FLASH but also for the future European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL). The present bunch arrival time monitors have evolved from proof-of-principle experiments to beneficial diagnostic devices, which are almost permanently available during standard machine operation. This achievement has been a major objective of this thesis. The developments went in parallel to improvements in the reliable and low-maintenance operation of the optical synchronisation system. The key topics of this thesis comprised the characterisation and optimisation of the opto-mechanical front-ends of both, the fibre-links and the BAMs. The extent of applications involving the bunch arrival time information has been enlarged, providing automated measurements for properties of the RF acceleration modules, for instance, the RF on-crest phase determination and the measurement of energy fluctuations. Furthermore, two of the currently installed BAMs are implemented in an active phase and gradient stabilisation of specific modules in order to minimise the arrival time jitter of the electron bunches at the location of the FEL undulators, which is crucial for a high timing resolution of pump-probe experiments.

  16. Measuring the electron bunch timing with femtosecond resolution at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Marie Kristin

    2013-03-15

    Bunch arrival time monitors (BAMs) are an integral part of the laser-based synchronisation system which is being developed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH).The operation principle comprises the measurement of the electron bunch arrival time relative to the optical timing reference, which is provided by actively length-stabilised fibre-links of the synchronisation system. The monitors are foreseen to be used as a standard diagnostic tool, not only for FLASH but also for the future European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL). The present bunch arrival time monitors have evolved from proof-of-principle experiments to beneficial diagnostic devices, which are almost permanently available during standard machine operation. This achievement has been a major objective of this thesis. The developments went in parallel to improvements in the reliable and low-maintenance operation of the optical synchronisation system. The key topics of this thesis comprised the characterisation and optimisation of the opto-mechanical front-ends of both, the fibre-links and the BAMs. The extent of applications involving the bunch arrival time information has been enlarged, providing automated measurements for properties of the RF acceleration modules, for instance, the RF on-crest phase determination and the measurement of energy fluctuations. Furthermore, two of the currently installed BAMs are implemented in an active phase and gradient stabilisation of specific modules in order to minimise the arrival time jitter of the electron bunches at the location of the FEL undulators, which is crucial for a high timing resolution of pump-probe experiments.

  17. Observations of silicon carbide by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.; Jepps, N.W.; Page, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, principally involving direct lattice imaging, have been used as part of a study of the crystallography and phase transformation mechanics of silicon carbide polytypes. In particular, the 3C (cubic) and 6H (hexagonal) polytypes have been examined together with partially transformed structural mixtures. Although direct observation of two-dimensional atomic structures was not possible at an operating voltage of 100 kV, considerable microstructural information has been obtained by careful choice of the experimental conditions. In particular, tilted beam observations of the 0.25 nm lattice fringes have been made in the 3C polytype for two different brace 111 brace plane arrays in order to study the dimensions and coherency of finely-twinned regions together with brace 0006 brace and brace 1 0 bar1 2 brace lattice images in the 6H polytype which allow the detailed stacking operations to be resolved. Lower resolution lattice images formed with axial illumination have also been used to study the nature of the 3C → 6H transformation and results are presented showing that the transformation interface may originate with fine twinning of the 3C structure followed by growth of the resultant 6H regions. Observations have been made of the detailed stepped structure of this interface together with the stacking fault distribution in the resultant 6H material. (author)

  18. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  19. Accelerator-based Single-shot Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope with Picosecond Temporal Resolution and Nanometer Spatial Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs, and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. W...

  20. Mapping the layer count of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride at high lateral spatial resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Ali; Cross, Nicholas G.; Liu, Lei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Duscher, Gerd; Gu, Gong

    2018-01-01

    Layer count control and uniformity of two dimensional (2D) layered materials are critical to the investigation of their properties and to their electronic device applications, but methods to map 2D material layer count at nanometer-level lateral spatial resolutions have been lacking. Here, we demonstrate a method based on two complementary techniques widely available in transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to map the layer count of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films. The mass-thickness contrast in high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode allows for thickness determination in atomically clean regions with high spatial resolution (sub-nanometer), but is limited by surface contamination. To complement, another technique based on the boron K ionization edge in the electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum (EELS) of h-BN is developed to quantify the layer count so that surface contamination does not cause an overestimate, albeit at a lower spatial resolution (nanometers). The two techniques agree remarkably well in atomically clean regions with discrepancies within  ±1 layer. For the first time, the layer count uniformity on the scale of nanometers is quantified for a 2D material. The methodology is applicable to layer count mapping of other 2D layered materials, paving the way toward the synthesis of multilayer 2D materials with homogeneous layer count.

  1. APES: Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer - A High Time Resolution Monodirectional Magnetic Deflection Electron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, R. G.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G., II; Ogasawara, K.; Miller, G.; Trevino, J. A.; Webster, J.; Stange, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a description of the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) that was designed and built for the Ground-to-Rocket Electron Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) auroral sounding rocket mission. The purpose was to measure the precipitating electron spectrum with high time resolution, on the order of milliseconds. The trade-off made in order to achieve high time resolution was to limit the aperture to only one look direction. The energy selection was done by using a permanent magnet to separate the incoming electrons, such that the different energies would fall onto different regions of the microchannel plate and therefore be detected by different anodes. A rectangular microchannel plate (MCP) was used (15 mm x 100 mm), and there was a total of 50 discrete anodes under the MCP, each one 15 mm x 1.5 mm, with a 0.5 mm spacing between anodes. The target energy range of APES was 200 eV to 30 keV.

  2. Advances in cryo-electron tomography for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Koster, Abraham J; Sharp, Thomas H

    2018-05-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) utilizes a combination of specimen cryo-fixation and multi-angle electron microscopy imaging to produce three-dimensional (3D) volume reconstructions of native-state macromolecular and subcellular biological structures with nanometer-scale resolution. In recent years, cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) has experienced a dramatic increase in the attainable resolution of 3D reconstructions, resulting from technical improvements of electron microscopes, improved detector sensitivity, the implementation of phase plates, automated data acquisition schemes, and improved image reconstruction software and hardware. These developments also greatly increased the usability and applicability of CET as a diagnostic and research tool, which is now enabling structural biologists to determine the structure of proteins in their native cellular environment to sub-nanometer resolution. These recent technical developments have stimulated us to update on our previous review (Koning, R.I., Koster, A.J., 2009. Cryo-electron tomography in biology and medicine. Ann Anat 191, 427-445) in which we described the fundamentals of CET. In this follow-up, we extend this basic description in order to explain the aforementioned recent advances, and describe related 3D techniques that can be applied to the anatomy of biological systems that are relevant for medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Accelerator-based single-shot ultrafast transmission electron microscope with picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-09-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. We anticipate that u-TEMs with a product of temporal and spatial resolution beyond 10-19 ms will open up new opportunities in probing matter at ultrafast temporal and ultrasmall spatial scales.

  4. High-Resolution Measurements of Low-Energy Conversion Electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Gizon, A; Putaux, J

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of low-energy internal conversion electrons have been performed with high energy resolution in some N = 105 odd and odd-odd nuclei using a semi-circular spectrograph associated to a specific tape transport system. These experiments aimed to answer the following questions~: \\begin{itemize} \\item Do M3 isomeric transitions exist in $^{183}$Pt and $^{181}$Os, isotones of $^{184}$Au~? \\item Are the neutron configurations proposed to describe the isomeric and ground states of $^{184}$Au right or wrong~? \\item Does it exist an isomeric state in $^{182}$Ir, isotone of $^{181}$Os, $^{183}$Pt and $^{184}$Au~? \\item What are the spin and parity values of the excited states of $^{182}$Ir~? \\end{itemize} In $^{183}$Pt, the 35.0 keV M3 isomeric transition has been clearly observed and the reduced transition probability has been determined. The deduced hindrance factor is close to that observed in the neighbouring odd-odd $^{184}$Au nucleus. This confirms the neutron configurations previously proposed for the ...

  5. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Z.; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions

  6. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel low energy electron microscope for DNA sequencing and surface analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankos, M., E-mail: marian@electronoptica.com [Electron Optica Inc., 1000 Elwell Court #110, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States); Shadman, K. [Electron Optica Inc., 1000 Elwell Court #110, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States); Persson, H.H.J. [Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); N’Diaye, A.T. [Electron Optica Inc., 1000 Elwell Court #110, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States); NCEM, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmid, A.K. [NCEM, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Davis, R.W. [Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel technique that is directed towards imaging nanostructures and surfaces with sub-nanometer resolution. The technique combines a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, an energy filter, and dual beam illumination in a single instrument. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. Simulation results predict that the novel aberration corrector design will eliminate the second rank chromatic and third and fifth order spherical aberrations, thereby improving the resolution into the sub-nanometer regime at landing energies as low as one hundred electron-Volts. The energy filter produces a beam that can extract detailed information about the chemical composition and local electronic states of non-periodic objects such as nanoparticles, interfaces, defects, and macromolecules. The dual flood illumination eliminates charging effects that are generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which requires high resolution to distinguish the individual bases and high speed to reduce the cost. The MAD-LEEM approach images the DNA with low electron impact energies, which provides nucleobase contrast mechanisms without organometallic labels. Furthermore, the micron-size field of view when combined with imaging on the fly provides long read lengths, thereby reducing the demand on assembling the sequence. Experimental results from bulk specimens with immobilized single-base oligonucleotides demonstrate that base specific contrast is available with reflected, photo-emitted, and Auger electrons. Image contrast simulations of model rectangular features mimicking the individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed to translate measurements of contrast on bulk DNA to the detectability of

  8. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Michael R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: armstrong30@llnl.gov; Boyden, Ken [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred [N Division, Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-280, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kim, Judy S. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  9. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Boyden, Ken; Browning, Nigel D.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M.; Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred; Kim, Judy S.; King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R.

    2007-01-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10 7 electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution -6 s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed

  10. Non-Proportionality of Electron Response and Energy Resolution of Compton Electrons in Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, L.; Marcinkowski, R.; Szawlowski, M.; Moszynski, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Szczesniak, T.; Pausch, G.; Plettner, C.; Roemer, K.

    2012-02-01

    Non-proportionality of light yield and energy resolution of Compton electrons in three scintillators (LaBr3:Ce, LYSO:Ce and CsI:Tl) were studied in a wide energy range from 10 keV up to 1 MeV. The experimental setup was comprised of a High Purity Germanium detector and tested scintillators coupled to a photomultiplier. Probing the non-proportionality and energy resolution curves at different energies was obtained by changing the position of various radioactive sources with respect to both detectors. The distance between both detectors and source was kept small to make use of Wide Angle Compton Coincidence (WACC) technique, which allowed us to scan large range of scattering angles simultaneously and obtain relatively high coincidence rate of 100 cps using weak sources of about 10 μCi activity. The results are compared with those obtained by direct irradiation of the tested scintillators with gamma-ray sources and fitting the full-energy peaks.

  11. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We have made continuum radio observations of these HII regions of the W51 complex at 240, 610, 1060 and 1400 MHz using GMRT with lower resolution (20'' × 15'') at the lowest frequency. The observed spectra of the prominent thermal subcomponents of W51 have been fitted to a free-free emission ...

  12. Toward single electron resolution phonon mediated ionization detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabolfathi, Nader, E-mail: mirabolfathi@physics.tamu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University (United States); Harris, H. Rusty; Mahapatra, Rupak; Sundqvist, Kyle; Jastram, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University (United States); Serfass, Bruno; Faiez, Dana; Sadoulet, Bernard [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Experiments seeking to detect rare event interactions such as dark matter or coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering are striving for large mass detectors with very low detection threshold. Using Neganov-Luke phonon amplification effect, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is reaching unprecedented RMS resolutions of ∼14 eV{sub ee}. CDMSlite is currently the most sensitive experiment to WIMPs of mass ∼5 GeV/c{sup 2} but is limited in achieving higher phonon gains due to an early onset of leakage current into Ge crystals. The contact interface geometry is particularly weak for blocking hole injection from the metal, and thus a new design is demonstrated that allows high voltage bias via vacuum separated electrode. With an increased bias voltage and a×2 Luke phonon gain, world best RMS resolution of sigma ∼7 eV{sub ee} for 0.25 kg (d=75 mm, h=1 cm) Ge detectors was achieved. Since the leakage current is a function of the field and the phonon gain is a function of the applied voltage, appropriately robust interface blocking material combined with thicker substrate (25 mm) will reach a resolution of ∼2.8 eV{sub ee}. In order to achieve better resolution of ∼ eV, we are investigating a layer of insulator between the phonon readout surface and the semiconductor crystals.

  13. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremen, R. van; Ribas Gomes, D.; Jeer, L.T.H. de; Ocelík, V., E-mail: v.ocelik@rug.nl; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2016-01-15

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles. - Highlights: • Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting resolution of t-EBSD are determined and characterized. • Distinction between resolutions of transmitted and detected electrons is determined. • The simulated results are confirmed experimentally on 140 nm thick AuAg foil.

  14. Breaking the Crowther limit: Combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ercius, Peter [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jiang, Yi [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Elser, Veit [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. - Highlights: • Develop tomography technique for high-resolution and large field of view. • We combine depth sectioning with traditional tilt tomography. • Through-focal tomography reduces tilts and improves resolution. • Through-focal tomography overcomes the fundamental Crowther limit. • Aberration-corrected becomes a benefit and not a hindrance for tomography.

  15. Computer simulation of high resolution transmission electron micrographs: theory and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilaas, R.

    1985-03-01

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. Third, a new method for computing scattering amplitudes in high resolution transmission electron microscopy has been examined. Fourth, the effect of a surface layer of amorphous silicon dioxide on images of crystalline silicon has been investigated for a range of crystal thicknesses varying from zero to 2 1/2 times that of the surface layer

  16. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-11

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results.

  17. Novel carbon nanosheets as support for ultrahigh-resolution structural analysis of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottbohm, Christoph T.; Beyer, Andre; Sologubenko, Alla S.; Ennen, Inga; Huetten, Andreas; Roesner, Harald; Eck, Wolfgang; Mayer, Joachim; Goelzhaeuser, Armin

    2008-01-01

    The resolution in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has reached values as low as 0.08 nm. However, these values are not accessible for very small objects in the size range of a few nanometers or lower, as they have to be placed on some support, which contributes to the overall electron-scattering signal, thereby blurring the contrast. Here, we report on the use of nanosheets made from cross-linked aromatic self-assembled monolayers as TEM sample supports. When transferred onto a copper grid, a single 1.6-nm-thick nanosheet can cover the grid and is free standing within the micron-sized openings. Despite its thinness, the sheet is stable under the impact of the electron beam. Micrographs taken from nanoclusters onto these nanosheets show highly increased contrast in comparison to the images taken from amorphous carbon supports. In scanning transmission electron microscopy with nanosheet support, a size analysis of sub-nanometer Au clusters was performed and single Au atoms were resolved

  18. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J.; Nguyen, Huy A.; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x0, y0) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x0, y0) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density |φi) (x0,y0)|nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  19. Modelling high-resolution electron microscopy based on core-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.J.; Findlay, S.D.; Oxley, M.P.; Witte, C.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    There are a number of factors affecting the formation of images based on core-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution electron microscopy. We demonstrate unambiguously the need to use a full nonlocal description of the effective core-loss interaction for experimental results obtained from high angular resolution electron channelling electron spectroscopy. The implications of this model are investigated for atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Simulations are used to demonstrate that core-loss spectroscopy images formed using fine probes proposed for future microscopes can result in images that do not correspond visually with the structure that has led to their formation. In this context, we also examine the effect of varying detector geometries. The importance of the contribution to core-loss spectroscopy images by dechannelled or diffusely scattered electrons is reiterated here

  20. Simulations of the temporal and spatial resolution for a compact time-resolved electron diffractometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2016-02-01

    A novel compact electron gun for use in time-resolved gas electron diffraction experiments has recently been designed and commissioned. In this paper we present and discuss the extensive simulations that were performed to underpin the design in terms of the spatial and temporal qualities of the pulsed electron beam created by the ionisation of a gold photocathode using a femtosecond laser. The response of the electron pulses to a solenoid lens used to focus the electron beam has also been studied. The simulated results show that focussing the electron beam affects the overall spatial and temporal resolution of the experiment in a variety of ways, and that factors that improve the resolution of one parameter can often have a negative effect on the other. A balance must, therefore, be achieved between spatial and temporal resolution. The optimal experimental time resolution for the apparatus is predicted to be 416 fs for studies of gas-phase species, while the predicted spatial resolution of better than 2 nm-1 compares well with traditional time-averaged electron diffraction set-ups.

  1. Effects of display resolution and size on primary diagnosis of chest images using a high-resolution electronic work station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrman, C.R.; Cooperstein, L.A.; Herron, J.; Good, W.F.; Good, B.; Gur, D.; Maitz, G.; Tabor, E.; Hoy, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the acceptability of electronically displayed planar images, the authors have a high-resolution work station. This system utilizes a high-resolution film digitizer (100-micro resolution) interfaced to a mainframe computer and two high-resolution (2,048 X 2,048) display devices (Azuray). In a clinically simulated multiobserver blind study (19 cases and five observers) a prodetermined series of reading sessions is stored on magnetic disk and is transferred to the displays while the preceding set of images is being reviewed. Images can be linearly processed on the fly into 2,000 X 2,000 full resolution, 1,000 X 1,000 minified display, or 1,000 X 1,000 interpolated for full-size display. Results of the study indicate that radiologists accept but do not like significant minification (more than X2), and they rate 2,000 X 2,000 images as having better diagnostic quality than 1,000 X 1,000 images

  2. Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution of thin-sample field-emission electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro; Urano, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The minimum detection limit and spatial resolution for a thinned semiconductor sample were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using a Schottky field emission (FE) electron gun and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Comparison of the FE-EPMA results with those obtained using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with scanning transmission electron microscopy, confirmed that FE-EPMA is largely superior in terms of detection sensitivity. Thin-sample FE-EPMA is demonstrated as a very effective method for high resolution, high sensitivity analysis in a laboratory environment because a high probe current and high signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved. - Highlights: • Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution determined for FE-EPMA. • Detection sensitivity of FE-EPMA greatly superior to that of STEM-EDX. • Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution controllable by probe current

  3. High-resolution EELS investigation of the electronic structure of ilmenites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, G.; Lazar, S.; Botton, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of a series of compounds belonging to the ilmenite family is investigated using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The energy loss near edge structure (ELNES) of the O-K, Ti-L23 and transition metal L23 edges have been recorded in MnTiO3, FeTiO3,

  4. Electron beam fabrication and characterization of high- resolution magnetic force microscopy tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhrig, M.; Rührig, M.; Porthun, S.; Porthun, S.; Lodder, J.C.; Mc vitie, S.; Heyderman, L.J.; Johnston, A.B.; Chapman, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    The stray field, magnetic microstructure, and switching behavior of high‐resolution electron beam fabricated thin film tips for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) are investigated with different imaging modes in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As the tiny smooth carbon needles covered with a

  5. A Simple Metric for Determining Resolution in Optical, Ion, and Electron Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alexandra E; Skinner, Ryan; Sanders, Aric W

    2015-06-01

    A resolution metric intended for resolution analysis of arbitrary spatially calibrated images is presented. By fitting a simple sigmoidal function to pixel intensities across slices of an image taken perpendicular to light-dark edges, the mean distance over which the light-dark transition occurs can be determined. A fixed multiple of this characteristic distance is then reported as the image resolution. The prefactor is determined by analysis of scanning transmission electron microscope high-angle annular dark field images of Si. This metric has been applied to optical, scanning electron microscope, and helium ion microscope images. This method provides quantitative feedback about image resolution, independent of the tool on which the data were collected. In addition, our analysis provides a nonarbitrary and self-consistent framework that any end user can utilize to evaluate the resolution of multiple microscopes from any vendor using the same metric.

  6. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  7. Visualizing Surface Plasmons with Photons, Photoelectrons, and Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Gong, Yu; Hage, F. S.; Cottom, J.; Joly, Alan G.; Brydson, R.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-06-21

    Both photons and electrons may be used to excite surface plasmon polaritons, the collective charge density fluctuations at the surface of metal nanostructures. By virtue of their nanoscopic and dissipative nature, a detailed characterization of surface plasmon (SP) eigenmodes in real space-time ultimately requires joint sub-nanometer spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. The latter realization has driven significant developments in the past few years, aimed at interrogating both localized and propagating SP modes over the relevant length and time scales. In this mini-review, we briefly highlight different techniques we employ to visualize the enhanced electric fields associated with SPs. Specifically, we discuss recent hyperspectral optical microscopy, tip-enhanced Raman nano-spectroscopy, nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy, as well as correlated scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements targeting prototypical plasmonic nanostructures and constructs. Through selected practical examples, we examine the information content in multidimensional images recorded by taking advantage of each of the aforementioned techniques. In effect, we illustrate how SPs can be visualized at the ultimate limits of space and time.

  8. State of the art in atomic resolution off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linck, Martin; Freitag, Bert; Kujawa, Stephan; Lehmann, Michael; Niermann, Tore

    2012-01-01

    As proposed by Hannes Lichte, to resolve structure–property relations not only the question “Which atom is where?” but also the question “Which fields are around?” has to be answered. High-resolution off-axis electron holography opens up an access to these key questions in that it allows accessing the complete exit-wave of the object provided within the information limit of the microscope, i.e. amplitude and phase including atomic details such as position and species, and moreover, information about large area electric potentials and magnetic fields, which a conventional transmission electron microscope is blind for—also when using a Cs-corrector. For an excellent object exit-wave reconstruction, special care has to be taken on the hologram quality, i.e. interference fringe contrast and electron dose. Severe restrictions are given to signal resolution by the limited brightness of the electron source. Utilizing a new high-brightness Schottky field electron emitter in a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV, the phase signal resolution at atomic resolution can significantly be enhanced. An improvement by at least a factor of 2.88 compared to the most recently reported single hologram at atomic resolution is found. To proof the applicability of this setup to real materials science problems, a grain boundary of gold has been investigated holographically. -- Highlights: ► Impact of the brightness on the reconstructed signal in electron holography. ► Factor 2.8 gain in signal quality by setup with a high brightness electron gun. ► Investigation of a grain boundary in gold with a state-of-the-art holography setup. ► A-posteriori aberration fine-tuning for true one Angstrom resolution in the object wave. ► Mistilt analysis on the atomic scale by numerical wave optics.

  9. Study of spatial resolution of coordinate detectors based on Gas Electron Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Maltsev, T. V.; Shekhtman, L. I.

    2017-02-01

    Spatial resolution of GEM-based tracking detectors is determined in the simulation and measured in the experiments. The simulation includes GEANT4 implemented transport of high energy electrons with careful accounting of atomic relaxation processes including emission of fluorescent photons and Auger electrons and custom post-processing with accounting of diffusion, gas amplification fluctuations, distribution of signals on readout electrodes, electronics noise and particular algorithm of final coordinate calculation (center of gravity). The simulation demonstrates that the minimum of spatial resolution of about 10 μm can be achieved with a gas mixture of Ar -CO2 (75-25 %) at a strips pitch from 250 μm to 300 μm. At a larger pitch the resolution quickly degrades reaching 80-100 μm at a pitch of 460-500 μm. Spatial resolution of low-material triple-GEM detectors for the DEUTERON facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring is measured at the extracted beam facility of the VEPP-4 M collider. One-coordinate resolution of the DEUTERON detector is measured with electron beam of 500 MeV, 1 GeV and 3.5 GeV energies. The determined value of spatial resolution varies in the range from approximately 35 μm to 50 μm for orthogonal tracks in the experiments.

  10. Refinement procedure for the image alignment in high-resolution electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houben, L.; Bar Sadan, M.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution electron tomography from a tilt series of transmission electron microscopy images requires an accurate image alignment procedure in order to maximise the resolution of the tomogram. This is the case in particular for ultra-high resolution where even very small misalignments between individual images can dramatically reduce the fidelity of the resultant reconstruction. A tomographic-reconstruction based and marker-free method is proposed, which uses an iterative optimisation of the tomogram resolution. The method utilises a search algorithm that maximises the contrast in tomogram sub-volumes. Unlike conventional cross-correlation analysis it provides the required correlation over a large tilt angle separation and guarantees a consistent alignment of images for the full range of object tilt angles. An assessment based on experimental reconstructions shows that the marker-free procedure is competitive to the reference of marker-based procedures at lower resolution and yields sub-pixel accuracy even for simulated high-resolution data. -- Highlights: → Alignment procedure for electron tomography based on iterative tomogram contrast optimisation. → Marker-free, independent of object, little user interaction. → Accuracy competitive with fiducial marker methods and suited for high-resolution tomography.

  11. Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography with improved lateral resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickmann, Jan, E-mail: jan.sickmann@triebenberg.de [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Formanek, Petr; Linck, Martin [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Muehle, Uwe [Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Lichte, Hannes [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Electron holography is the highest resolving tool for dopant profiling at nanometre-scale resolution. In order to measure the object areas of interest in a hologram, both a wide field of view and a sufficient lateral resolution are required. The usual path of rays for recording holograms with an electron biprism using the standard objective lens does not meet these requirements, because the field of view amounts to some 10 nm only, however, at a resolution of 0.1 nm better than needed here. Therefore, instead of the standard objective lens, the Lorentz lens is widely used for holography of semiconductors, since it provides a field of view up to 1000 nm at a sufficient lateral resolution of about 10 nm. Since the size of semiconductor structures is steadily shrinking, there is now a need for better lateral resolution at an appropriate field of view. Therefore, additional paths of rays for recording holograms are studied with special emphasis on the parameters field of view and lateral resolution. The findings allow an optimized scheme with a field of view of 200 nm and a lateral resolution of 3.3 nm filling the gap between the existing set-ups. In addition, the Lorentz lens is no longer required for investigation of non-magnetic materials, since the new paths of rays are realized with the standard objective lens and diffraction lens. An example proves the applicability of this arrangement for future semiconductor technology. -- Research highlights: {yields} Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography. {yields} Using objective and diffraction lens for imaging instead of Lorentz lens. {yields} Detailed investigation of four different paths of rays and its basic parameters for holographic application: field of view, lateral resolution, signal resolution. {yields} Measuring the phase profile of a field effect transistor with 3 nm lateral resolution at field of view of 200 nm.

  12. Ultrashort and coherent single-electron pulses for diffraction at ultimate resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Friedrich Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful tool for studying structural dynamics with femtosecond temporal and sub-aangstroem spatial resolutions. It benefits from the high scattering cross-sections of electrons compared X-rays and allows the examination of thin samples, surfaces and gases. One of the main challenges in ultrafast electron diffraction is the generation of electron pulses with a short duration and a large transverse coherence. The former limits the temporal resolution of the experiment while the latter determines the maximum size of the scattering structures that can be studied. In this work, we strive to push the limits of electron diffraction towards higher temporal and spatial resolutions. The decisive step in our approach is to eliminate all detrimental effects caused by Coulomb repulsion between the electrons by reducing the number of electrons per pulse to one. In this situation, the electrons' longitudinal and transverse velocity distributions are determined solely by the photoemission process. By reducing the electron source size on the photocathode, we make use of the small transverse velocity spread to produce electron pulses with a transverse coherence length of 20 nm, which is about an order of magnitude larger than the reported values for comparable experiments. The energy distribution of an ensemble of single-electron pulses from a photoemission source is directly linked to the mismatch between the photon energy and the cathode's work function. This excess energy can be reduced by using a photon energy close to the material's work function. Using a tunable source of ultraviolet pulses, we demonstrate the reduction of the velocity spread of the electrons, resulting in a shorter duration of the electron pulses. The reduced electron pulse durations achieved by a tunable excitation or by other approaches require new characterization techniques for electron pulses. We developed a novel method for the characterization of electron pulses at

  13. Design and performance of a spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer with high momentum resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyev, D.; Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We describe a new “complete” spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer comprising a spin-polarized primary electron source, an imaging electron analyzer, and a spin analyzer of the “spin-polarizing mirror” type. Unlike previous instruments, we have a high momentum resolution of less than 0.04 Å{sup −1}, at an energy resolution of 90-130 meV. Unlike all previous studies which reported rather broad featureless data in both energy and angle dependence, we find richly structured spectra depending sensitively on small changes of the primary energy, the kinetic energy after scattering, and of the angle of incidence. The key factor is the momentum resolution.

  14. Electron energy-loss spectrometry at the frontier of spatial and energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, F.; Grogger, W.; Kothleitner, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) is now used routinely as a means of measuring chemical and structural properties of very small regions of a thin specimen. The power of this technique depends significantly on two parameters: its spatial resolution and the energy resolution available in the spectrum and in the energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) image. The cold field emission source and the Schottky emitter have made an energy resolution below 1 eV possible and it is now feasible to obtain data with a spatial resolution close to atomic dimensions, given the right instrumentation and specimen. EFTEM allows to record elemental maps at sub-nanometre resolution, being mainly limited by chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens and by delocalization of inelastic scattering. Recently the possibility of correcting spherical and even chromatic aberrations of electron lenses has become a practical reality thus improving the point resolution of the TEM to below 0.1 nm. The other limiting factor for EFTEM resolution is delocalization. However, recent measurements show that resolution values in the range of 1 nm and below can be achieved, even for energy-losses of only a few eV. In terms of energy-resolution, EELS and EFTEM compare less favourably with other spectroscopies. For common TEMs, the overall energy-resolution is mainly determined by the energy width of the electron source, typically between 0.5 and 1.5 eV. For comparison, synchrotron x-ray sources and beam line spectrometers, provide a resolution well below 0.1 eV for absorption spectroscopy. During the early sixties, the energy spread of an electron beam could be reduced by incorporating an energy-filter into the illumination system, but the system lacked spatial resolution. Later developments combined high energy resolution in the range of 0.1 eV with improved spatial resolution. Recently, FEI introduced a new high resolution EELS system based

  15. An economic prediction of the finer resolution level wavelet coefficients in electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Szilvia; Pipek, János

    2015-12-21

    In wavelet based electronic structure calculations, introducing a new, finer resolution level is usually an expensive task, this is why often a two-level approximation is used with very fine starting resolution level. This process results in large matrices to calculate with and a large number of coefficients to be stored. In our previous work we have developed an adaptively refined solution scheme that determines the indices, where the refined basis functions are to be included, and later a method for predicting the next, finer resolution coefficients in a very economic way. In the present contribution, we would like to determine whether the method can be applied for predicting not only the first, but also the other, higher resolution level coefficients. Also the energy expectation values of the predicted wave functions are studied, as well as the scaling behaviour of the coefficients in the fine resolution limit.

  16. Energy Resolution of the CMS ECAL Barrel Super-Module Using MGPA Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Dewhirst, G

    2004-01-01

    A method for extracting the amplitude of a pulse has been developed in order to optimise the energy resolution of a CMS ECAL super-module in the 2003 test beam. The method consists of using a set of weights to extract the amplitude as well as subtract the baseline level event by event. For an incident beam impact restricted to an area of 4times 4~mm^2 the resolution of the ECAL, which uses the final prototype version of the MGPA electronics, is shown to match the target resolution.

  17. Instrumentation at the National Center for Electron Microscopy: the Atomic Resolution Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronsky, R.; Thomas, G.

    1983-01-01

    The Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM) is one of two unique high voltage electron microscopes at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM). The latest results from this new instrument which was manufactured by JEOL, Ltd. to the performance specifications of the NCEM, delivered in January of 1983, and soon to be open to access by the entire microscopy community are given. Details of its history and development are given and its performance specifications are reviewed

  18. Longitudinal profile diagnostic scheme with subfemtosecond resolution for high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Andonian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution measurement of the longitudinal profile of a relativistic electron beam is of utmost importance for linac based free-electron lasers and other advanced accelerator facilities that employ ultrashort bunches. In this paper, we investigate a novel scheme to measure ultrashort bunches (subpicosecond with exceptional temporal resolution (hundreds of attoseconds and dynamic range. The scheme employs two orthogonally oriented deflecting sections. The first imparts a short-wavelength (fast temporal resolution horizontal angular modulation on the beam, while the second imparts a long-wavelength (slow angular kick in the vertical dimension. Both modulations are observable on a standard downstream screen in the form of a streaked sinusoidal beam structure. We demonstrate, using scaled variables in a quasi-1D approximation, an expression for the temporal resolution of the scheme and apply it to a proof-of-concept experiment at the UCLA Neptune high-brightness injector facility. The scheme is also investigated for application at the SLAC NLCTA facility, where we show that the subfemtosecond resolution is sufficient to resolve the temporal structure of the beam used in the echo-enabled free-electron laser. We employ beam simulations to verify the effect for typical Neptune and NLCTA parameter sets and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

  19. Rapid increase of near atomic resolution virus capsid structures determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phuong T; Reddy, Vijay S

    2018-01-01

    The recent technological advances in electron microscopes, detectors, as well as image processing and reconstruction software have brought single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) into prominence for determining structures of bio-molecules at near atomic resolution. This has been particularly true for virus capsids, ribosomes, and other large assemblies, which have been the ideal specimens for structural studies by cryo-EM approaches. An analysis of time series metadata of virus structures on the methods of structure determination, resolution of the structures, and size of the virus particles revealed a rapid increase in the virus structures determined by cryo-EM at near atomic resolution since 2010. In addition, the data highlight the median resolution (∼3.0 Å) and size (∼310.0 Å in diameter) of the virus particles determined by X-ray crystallography while no such limits exist for cryo-EM structures, which have a median diameter of 508 Å. Notably, cryo-EM virus structures in the last four years have a median resolution of 3.9 Å. Taken together with minimal sample requirements, not needing diffraction quality crystals, and being able to achieve similar resolutions of the crystal structures makes cryo-EM the method of choice for current and future virus capsid structure determinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, D D; Austin, M E

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels' IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters' center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a "zoomed-in" analysis of a ∼2-4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  1. Refinement procedure for the image alignment in high-resolution electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, L; Bar Sadan, M

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution electron tomography from a tilt series of transmission electron microscopy images requires an accurate image alignment procedure in order to maximise the resolution of the tomogram. This is the case in particular for ultra-high resolution where even very small misalignments between individual images can dramatically reduce the fidelity of the resultant reconstruction. A tomographic-reconstruction based and marker-free method is proposed, which uses an iterative optimisation of the tomogram resolution. The method utilises a search algorithm that maximises the contrast in tomogram sub-volumes. Unlike conventional cross-correlation analysis it provides the required correlation over a large tilt angle separation and guarantees a consistent alignment of images for the full range of object tilt angles. An assessment based on experimental reconstructions shows that the marker-free procedure is competitive to the reference of marker-based procedures at lower resolution and yields sub-pixel accuracy even for simulated high-resolution data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gas-phase synthesis of magnesium nanoparticles : A high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; Palasantzas, G.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium nanoparticles with size above 10 nm, prepared by gas-phase syntheses, were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The dominant particle shape is a hexagonal prism terminated by Mg(0002) and Mg{1010} facets. Oxidation of Mg yields a MgO shell (similar to 3 nm

  3. Study of position resolution and electron-hadron separation of electromagnetic calorimeter with a silicon structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodnichev, V.B.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Rykali, V.V.; Solovianov, V.L.; Ukhalov, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    The maximum shower silicon strip detectors embedded in a module of sandwich-type electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested. The position resolution at different depths of the silicon structure has been measured. The results on electron-hadron separation obtained as a byproduct in this study are presented, and possibility of their improvement is discussed. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  4. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  5. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  6. A monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-07-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a high-resolution electron-beam profile monitor using Fresnel zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Norio; Sakai, Hiroshi; Muto, Toshiya; Hayano, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    We present a high-resolution and real-time beam profile monitor using Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) developed in the KEK-ATF damping ring. The monitor system has an X-ray imaging optics with two FZPs. In this monitor, the synchrotron radiation from the electron beam at the bending magnet is monochromatized by a crystal monochromator and the transverse electron beam image is twenty-times magnified by the two FZPs and detected on an X-ray CCD camera. The expected spatial resolution for the selected photon energy of 3.235 keV is less than 1 μm. With the beam profile monitor, we succeeded in obtaining a clear electron-beam image and measuring the extremely small beam size less than 10 μm. It is greatly expected that the beam profile monitor will be used in high-brilliance light sources and low-emittance accelerators. (author)

  8. A design for a subminiature, low energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Greene, S.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a type of scanning electron microscope that works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field, and focused to a spot using a microscale Einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 μm, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size, and an atomic emission site will give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 A). Also, because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100 nm in diameter, the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 A) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids), it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field emission and can be up to 1x10 6 times larger than in a typical (high energy) electron microscope. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam electron microscope with atomic resolution are described and include the possibility of it being used to rapidly sequence the human genome from a single strand of DNA as well as being able to identify atomic species directly from the elastic scattering of electrons

  9. Toward electron exit wave tomography of amorphous materials at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B., E-mail: konstantin.borisenko@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Moldovan, Grigore [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Kirkland, Angus I., E-mail: angus.kirkland@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Van Dyck, Dirk [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Tang, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Fu-Rong [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Kuang-Fu Road, 300 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest a novel electron exit wave tomography approach to obtain three dimensional atomic structures of amorphous materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical tests using a model of amorphous Si doped with Au show that it is feasible to reconstruct both Si and Au atoms positions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reconstructions of the strongly scattering Au atoms positions appear to be insensitive to typical experimental errors. - Abstract: We suggest to use electron exit wave phase for tomographic reconstruction of structure of Au-doped amorphous Si with atomic resolution. In the present theoretical investigation into the approach it is found that the number of projections and the accuracy of defocus in the focal series restoration are the main factors that contribute to the final resolution. Although resolution is ultimately limited by these factors, phase shifts in the exit wave are sufficient to identify the position of Au atoms in an amorphous Si needle model, even when only 19 projections with defocus error of 4 nm are used. Electron beam damage will probably further limit the resolution of such tomographic reconstructions, however beam damage can be mitigated using lower accelerating voltages.

  10. ELECTRON BUNCH CHARACTERIZATION WITH SUBPICOSECOND RESOLUTION USING ELECTRO-OPTIC TECHNIQUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEMERTZIDIS, Y.K.; CASTILLO, V.; LARSEN, R.; LAZARUS, D.M.; NIKAS, D.; OZBEN, C.; SRINIVASAN-RAO, T.; STILLMAN, A.; TSANG, T.; KOWALSKI, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the past decade, the bunch lengths of electrons in accelerators have decreased dramatically and are in the range off a few millimeters. Measurement of the length as well as the longitudinal profile of these short bunches have been a topic of research in a number of institutions. One of the techniques uses the electric field induced by the passage of electrons in the vicinity of a birefringent crystal to change its optical characteristics. Well-established electro-optic techniques can then be used to measure the temporal characteristics of the electron bunch. The inherent fast response of the crystal facilitates the measurement to femtosecond time resolution. However, the resolution in experiments so far has been limited to 70 ps, by the bandwidth of the detection equipment. Use of a streak camera can improve this resolution to a few picoseconds. In this paper we present a novel, non-invasive, single-shot approach to improve the resolution to tens of femtoseconds so that sub mm bunch length can be measured

  11. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state. - Highlights: • We investigate the temporal stability of optical aberrations in HRTEM. • We develop a statistical framework for the estimation of optical lifetimes. • We introduce plots showing the success probability for aberration-free work. • Optical lifetimes in sub-Ångström electron microscopy are surprisingly low. • The success of aberration correction depends strongly on the optical stability

  12. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3

  13. High-resolution electron collision spectroscopy with multicharged ions in merged beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestinsky, M.

    2007-04-18

    The Heidelberg ion storage ring Tsr is currently the only ring equipped with two independent devices for the collinear merging of a cold electron beam with stored ions. This greatly improves the potential of electron-ion collision experiments, as the ion beam can be cooled with one electron beam, while the other one is used as a dedicated target for energy-resolved electron collision processes, such as recombination. The work describes the implementation of this system for rst electron collision spectroscopy experiments. A detection system has been realized including an ion detector and specroscopic beam-control software and instrumentation. Moreover, in order to improve the spectroscopic resolution systematical studies of intrinsic relaxation processes in the electron beam have been carried out. These include the dependence on the electron beam density, the magnetic guiding eld strength, and the acceleration geometry. The recombination measurements on low-lying resonances in lithiumlike Sc{sup 18+} yield a high-precision measurement of the 2s-2p{sub 3/2} transition energy in this system. Operation of the two-electron-beam setup at high collision energy ({approx}1000 eV) is established using resonances of hydrogenlike Mg{sup 11+}, while the unique possibility of modifying the beam-merging geometry con rms its importance for the electron-ion recombination rate at lowest relative energy, as demonstrated on F{sup 6+}. (orig.)

  14. High-resolution electron collision spectroscopy with multicharged ions in merged beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestinsky, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Heidelberg ion storage ring Tsr is currently the only ring equipped with two independent devices for the collinear merging of a cold electron beam with stored ions. This greatly improves the potential of electron-ion collision experiments, as the ion beam can be cooled with one electron beam, while the other one is used as a dedicated target for energy-resolved electron collision processes, such as recombination. The work describes the implementation of this system for rst electron collision spectroscopy experiments. A detection system has been realized including an ion detector and specroscopic beam-control software and instrumentation. Moreover, in order to improve the spectroscopic resolution systematical studies of intrinsic relaxation processes in the electron beam have been carried out. These include the dependence on the electron beam density, the magnetic guiding eld strength, and the acceleration geometry. The recombination measurements on low-lying resonances in lithiumlike Sc 18+ yield a high-precision measurement of the 2s-2p 3/2 transition energy in this system. Operation of the two-electron-beam setup at high collision energy (∼1000 eV) is established using resonances of hydrogenlike Mg 11+ , while the unique possibility of modifying the beam-merging geometry con rms its importance for the electron-ion recombination rate at lowest relative energy, as demonstrated on F 6+ . (orig.)

  15. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and microdiffraction for radiation damage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, R.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution TEM techniques have developed to quite a sophisticated level over the past few years. In addition TEM instruments with a scanning capability have become available commercially which permit in particular the formation of a small electron probe at the specimen. Thus direct resolution and microdiffraction investigations of thin specimens are now possible, neither of which have been employed to any great extent in the analysis of radiation damage. Some recent advances which are thought to be relevant to this specific area of research are highlighted

  16. Carbon K-shell excitation in small molecules by high-resolution electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, M.; King, G.C.; Read, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The excitation of 1s carbon electrons has been observed in C0, CH 4 , CF4, C0 2 , COS, C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 4 by means of the electron energy-loss technique with high resolution (70 meV in the 300 eV excitation energy range) and at an incident electron energy of 1.5 keV. The energies, widths and vibrational structures of excited states corresponding to the promotion of 1s carbon electrons to unoccupied valence and Rydberg orbitals have been obtained. The validity of the equivalent-core model, and the role of resonances caused by potential barriers, are discussed. (author)

  17. Temporal resolution criterion for correctly simulating relativistic electron motion in a high-intensity laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arefiev, Alexey V. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Cochran, Ginevra E.; Schumacher, Douglass W. [Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Robinson, Alexander P. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Chen, Guangye [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Particle-in-cell codes are now standard tools for studying ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions. Motivated by direct laser acceleration of electrons in sub-critical plasmas, we examine temporal resolution requirements that must be satisfied to accurately calculate electron dynamics in strong laser fields. Using the motion of a single electron in a perfect plane electromagnetic wave as a test problem, we show surprising deterioration of the numerical accuracy with increasing wave amplitude a{sub 0} for a given time-step. We go on to show analytically that the time-step must be significantly less than λ/ca{sub 0} to achieve good accuracy. We thus propose adaptive electron sub-cycling as an efficient remedy.

  18. Improved Temperature Diagnostic for Non-Neutral Plasmas with Single-Electron Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanman, Sabrina; Evans, Lenny; Fajans, Joel; Hunter, Eric; Nelson, Cheyenne; Sierra, Carlos; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma temperature diagnostics in a Penning-Malmberg trap are essential for reliably obtaining cold, non-neutral plasmas. We have developed a setup for detecting the initial electrons that escape from a trapped pure electron plasma as the confining electrode potential is slowly reduced. The setup minimizes external noise by using a silicon photomultiplier to capture light emitted from an MCP-amplified phosphor screen. To take advantage of this enhanced resolution, we have developed a new plasma temperature diagnostic analysis procedure which takes discrete electron arrival times as input. We have run extensive simulations comparing this new discrete algorithm to our existing exponential fitting algorithm. These simulations are used to explore the behavior of these two temperature diagnostic procedures at low N and at high electronic noise. This work was supported by the DOE DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the NSF 1500538-PHY.

  19. High-resolution compact Johann crystal spectrometer with the Livermore electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.L.; Chen, H.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; May, M.J.; Dunn, J.; Smith, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    A compact high-resolution (λ/Δλ≅10 000) spherically bent crystal spectrometer in the Johann geometry was recently installed and tested on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap. The curvature of the mica (002) crystal grating allows for higher collection efficiency compared to the flat and cylindrically bent crystal spectrometers commonly used on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The spectrometer's Johann configuration enables orientation of its dispersion plane to be parallel to the electron beam propagation. Used in concert with a crystal spectrometer, whose dispersion plane is perpendicular to the electron beam propagation, the polarization of x-ray emission lines can be measured

  20. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L Rice

    Full Text Available Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details

  1. Optical and mechanical design for 1 nm resolution Auger spectroscopy in an electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleeker, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed information about the atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces is vital for the progress in materials science and physics. One widely used surface sensitive technique is Auger spectroscopy (AS). This technique, in which the electron energy spectrum emerging from the sample is evaluated, gives information about the average elemental composition of the surface over a relative large surface area (>30nm). Electron microscopy (EM), on the other hand, is capable of producing surface structural, but no elemental, information with almost atomic resolution. EM and AS techniques have not been combined so far because of the different nature of the instrumentation used in both techniques. In AS instruments the sample is placed in an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) system with a relatively large open space around the sample. In EM the sample is situated in the tight volume between the magnetic polepieces of the probe forming objective lens. The space around the sample is therefore tight. Furthermore the vacuum in most electron microscopes is not in UHV range. Radical mechanical changes to improve the vacuum are necessary to do AS in an electron microscope. Since the sample is immersed in the strong magnetic field of the objective lens the Auger electrons can not be extracted with conventional electrostatical methods. The only possibility to extract the Auger electrons is through the upper bore of the objective lens. However, this has large implications on the optical system of the microscope and requires a thorough investigation of the extraction of the Auger electrons. In this work it will be discussed how the surface sensitive AS can be combined with the high spatial resolution of the electron microscope in a practical instrument. (author). 102 refs.; 81 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. An ASIC implementation of digital front-end electronics for a high resolution PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport, D.F.; Young, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    AN Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) has been designed and fabricated which implements many of the current functions found in the digital front-end electronics for a high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner. The ASIC performs crystal selection, energy qualification, time correction, and event counting functions for block technology high resolution PET scanners. Digitized x and y position, event energy, and time information are used by the ASIC to determine block crystal number, qualify the event based on energy, and correct the event time. In addition, event counting and block dead time calculations are performed for system dead time corrections. A loadable sequencer for controlling the analog front-end electronics is also implemented. The ASIC is implemented in a 37,000 gate, 1.0 micron CMOS gate-array and is capable of handling 4 million events/second while reducing parts count, cost, and power consumption over current board-level designs

  3. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. PMID:26592474

  4. Performance of ultrahigh resolution electron microscope JEM-4000EX and some applications of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Ibe, K.; Ishida, Y.; Kersker, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The high resolution electron microscope is powerful for modern materials science because of its direct observation capability for the atomic structure of materials. the JEM-4000EX, a 400 kV accelerating voltage electron microscope whose objective lens has a 1 mm spherical aberration coefficient, has a 0.168 nm theoretical resolving power. Using this microscope, atomic structure images of high Tc superconductor such as Y-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O and Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O are reported

  5. Gas-phase synthesis of magnesium nanoparticles: A high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium nanoparticles with size above 10 nm, prepared by gas-phase syntheses, were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The dominant particle shape is a hexagonal prism terminated by Mg(0002) and Mg(1010) facets. Oxidation of Mg yields a MgO shell (∼3 nm thick), which has an orientation relation with the Mg. Inhomogeneous facet oxidation influences their growth kinetics resulting in a relatively broad size and shape distribution. Faceted voids between Mg and MgO shells indicate a fast outward diffusion of Mg and vacancy rearrangement into voids. The faceting of polar (220) planes is assisted by electron irradiation

  6. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  7. High resolution electron microscopy of a small crack at the superficial layer of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y

    1994-12-01

    A small enamel crack was investigated using a high resolution electron microscope. The inside of the crack was filled with aggregates of irregularly oriented plate-like crystals. Amorphous mineral deposits were observed among these aggregates at a low magnification. Selected area electron diffractions indicated that the plate-like crystals consisted of hydroxyapatite (OH-AP), and that the amorphous mineral deposits were a mixture of OH-AP and whitlockite. These findings indicate that this crack may have been formed by occlusal and/or masticatory stress, and that a natural occlusion might occur through mineral deposition at the small crack such as in this case.

  8. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ing Metalurgica y Q. Inorganica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Gonzalez, L; Ripalda, J M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Varela, M; Pennycook, S J, E-mail: sergio.molina@uca.e [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled {sup S}elf-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE){sup .}

  9. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, D. D., E-mail: dtruong@wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ∼2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  10. High-resolution broadband terahertz spectroscopy via electronic heterodyne detection of photonically generated terahertz frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, D G; Skryl, A S; Bakunov, M I

    2014-10-01

    We report an alternative approach to the terahertz frequency-comb spectroscopy (TFCS) based on nonlinear mixing of a photonically generated terahertz pulse train with a continuous wave signal from an electronic synthesizer. A superlattice is used as a nonlinear mixer. Unlike the standard TFCS technique, this approach does not require a complex double-laser system but retains the advantages of TFCS-high spectral resolution and wide bandwidth.

  11. Methods For Electron Bunch Measurement With Resolution Of The Order Of 1 Fs And 1 Nm

    CERN Document Server

    Tron, A M

    2004-01-01

    Methods for bunch length and shape monitoring with femtosecond resolution by means of time converting photochronography of the bunch radiation in the range of visible light using photoelectron camera of new principle of its operation, and for monitoring the transverse bunch size, based on new beam cross section wire scanner technique where the depth of electron escapement being not more than 1 nm is used, are described. Main limitation, caused by space charge effect, is considered.

  12. High-resolution electron-beam patternable nanocomposite containing metal nanoparticles for plasmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abargues, R; Marques-Hueso, J; Canet-Ferrer, J; Pedrueza, E; Valdes, J L; Jimenez, E; MartInez-Pastor, J P

    2008-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites containing noble metal nanoparticles are promising materials for plasmonic applications. In this paper, we report on a high-resolution negative-tone nanocomposite resist based on poly(vinyl alcohol) where silver nanoparticles and nanopatterns are simultaneously generated by electron-beam lithography. Our results indicate nanostructures with a relatively high concentration of nanoparticles and, consequently, an electromagnetic coupling among the nanoparticles. Therefore, the patternable nanocomposite described in this work may be a suitable material for future plasmonic circuitry

  13. Double-resolution electron holography with simple Fourier transform of fringe-shifted holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.V.; Han, M.G.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method with an appropriate image wave recovery algorithm leading to exact solution of holographic equations. With this new method the complex object image wave recovered from holograms appears to have much less traditional artifacts caused by the autocorrelation band present practically in all Fourier transformed holograms. The new analytical solutions make possible a double-resolution electron holography free from autocorrelation band artifacts and thus push the limits for phase resolution. The new image wave recovery algorithm uses a popular Fourier solution of the side band-pass filter technique, while the fringe-shifting holographic method is simple to implement in practice. - Highlights: • We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method simple enough for practical implementations. • Our new image-wave-recovery algorithm follows from exact solution of holographic equations. • With autocorrelation band removal from holograms it is possible to achieve double-resolution electron holography data free from several commonly known artifacts. • The new fringe-shifting method can reach an image wave resolution close to single fringe spacing

  14. Double-resolution electron holography with simple Fourier transform of fringe-shifted holograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V.V., E-mail: volkov@bnl.gov; Han, M.G.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-11-15

    We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method with an appropriate image wave recovery algorithm leading to exact solution of holographic equations. With this new method the complex object image wave recovered from holograms appears to have much less traditional artifacts caused by the autocorrelation band present practically in all Fourier transformed holograms. The new analytical solutions make possible a double-resolution electron holography free from autocorrelation band artifacts and thus push the limits for phase resolution. The new image wave recovery algorithm uses a popular Fourier solution of the side band-pass filter technique, while the fringe-shifting holographic method is simple to implement in practice. - Highlights: • We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method simple enough for practical implementations. • Our new image-wave-recovery algorithm follows from exact solution of holographic equations. • With autocorrelation band removal from holograms it is possible to achieve double-resolution electron holography data free from several commonly known artifacts. • The new fringe-shifting method can reach an image wave resolution close to single fringe spacing.

  15. Practical Approaches to Mitigation of Specimen Charging in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Min Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Specimen charging that is associated with the electron bombardment on the sample is a practical hindrance to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM analysis because it causes a severe loss of resolution in either diffraction or image data. Conductive thin film deposition on an insulating specimen has been proposed as an effective approach to the mitigation of the specimen charging; however, this method is generally not useful in HRTEM imaging of materials because the deposited film induces another artifact in the HRTEM image contrast. In this study, we propose practical methods to mitigate the specimen charging that takes place during the HRTEM of materials. For bulk-type specimens prepared by either an ion-thinning or focused-ion beam (FIB process, a plasma cleaning treatment is significantly effective in eliminating the charging phenomenon. In the case of low-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanowires and nanoparticles, the plasma cleaning is not feasible; however, the charging effect can be effectively eliminated by adjusting the electron illumination condition. The proposed methods facilitate a decrease in the buildup of specimen charging, thereby enhancing the quality of high-resolution images significantly.

  16. On the role of the gas environment, electron-dose-rate, and sample on the image resolution in transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Martin; Jespersen, Sebastian Pirel Fredsgaard; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    on the electron-dose-rate. In this article, we demonstrate that both the total and areal electron-dose-rates work as descriptors for the dose-rate-dependent resolution and are related through the illumination area. Furthermore, the resolution degradation was observed to occur gradually over time after......The introduction of gaseous atmospheres in transmission electron microscopy offers the possibility of studying materials in situ under chemically relevant environments. The presence of a gas environment can degrade the resolution. Surprisingly, this phenomenon has been shown to depend...... initializing the illumination of the sample and gas by the electron beam. The resolution was also observed to be sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the sample. These observations can be explained by a charge buildup over the electron-illuminated sample area, caused by the beam–gas–sample interaction...

  17. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2017-07-01

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Minimal exposure technique in the Cambridge University 600kV high resolution electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, J.R.; Cleaver, J.R.A.; Smith, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation damage due to the incident electron beam imposes a fundamental limitation on the information obtainable by electron microscopy about organic materials; it is desirable therefore that exposure of the specimen to the electron beam should be restricted to the actual period during which the image is being recorded. A description is given of methods employed in the observation of the organic aromatic hydrocarbons quaterrylene, ovalene and coronene with the Cambridge University 600kV high resolution electron microscope (HREM). In particular, the condenser-objective mode of operation of this microscope lends itself to the use of an area-defining aperture below the second condenser lens conjugate with the specimen. Furthermore, operation at the higher accelerating voltage of this instrument could be anticipated to reduce the rate of damage, depending on the dominant beam-specimen interaction, whilst the increased width of the first broad band of the contrast transfer function of this microscope at the optimum defocus may overcome the reported resolution limitation of current 100kV microscopes for the observation of related materials. (author)

  19. Electron beam fabrication and characterization of high-resolution magnetic force microscopy tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rührig, M.; Porthun, S.; Lodder, J. C.; McVitie, S.; Heyderman, L. J.; Johnston, A. B.; Chapman, J. N.

    1996-03-01

    The stray field, magnetic microstructure, and switching behavior of high-resolution electron beam fabricated thin film tips for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) are investigated with different imaging modes in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As the tiny smooth carbon needles covered with a thermally evaporated magnetic thin film are transparent to the electron energies used in these TEMs it is possible to observe both the external stray field emanating from the tips as well as their internal domain structure. The experiments confirm the basic features of electron beam fabricated thin film tips concluded from various MFM observations using these tips. Only a weak but highly concentrated stray field is observed emanating from the immediate apex region of the tip, consistent with their capability for high resolution. It also supports the negligible perturbation of the magnetization sample due to the tip stray field observed in MFM experiments. Investigation of the magnetization distributions within the tips, as well as preliminary magnetizing experiments, confirm a preferred single domain state of the high aspect ratio tips. To exclude artefacts of the observation techniques both nonmagnetic tips and those supporting different magnetization states are used for comparison.

  20. Pulse radiolysis with (sub) nanosecond time resolution using a 3 MV electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthjens, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the development of equipment for pulse radiolysis is described and the application of the technique to time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence emission of excited states formed after irradiation of some alkanes is dealt with. A review is given of the development of the pulsed 3MV Van de Graaf electron accelerator for the generation of subnanosecond electron beam pulses and of the development of the equipment for optical detection as accomplished by the author. The initial stage of a further development for shorter pulses and higher time resolution is briefly discussed. A collection of papers on the development of apparatus and a collection of papers dealing with the results obtained from measurements of the fluorescence of excited states, formed by the recombination of electrons and ions in irradiated alkanes such as cyclohexane and the decalines, are included. (Auth.)

  1. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  2. Characterisation of phases in nanostructured, multilayered titanium alloys by analytical and high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A; Buffat, P A

    2009-01-01

    Surface processing of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy led to a complex multilayered microstructure containing several phases of the Ni-Ti-P-Al-O system, which improves the mechanical and tribological surface properties. The microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the hard layer formed on the surface were investigated by LM, XRD, SEM as well as analytical/high-resolution TEM, STEM, EDS, electron diffraction and FIB. Phase identification based on electron diffraction, HRTEM and EDS microanalysis revealed the presence of several binary and ternary phases in the system Ti-Ni-P, sometimes with partial substitution of Ti by Al. However some phases, mainly nanoparticles, still remain not identified satisfactorily. Electron microscopy techniques used for identification of phases present in surface multilayers and some practical limits to their routine application are reminded here.

  3. An extended model of electrons: experimental evidence from high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Werner A

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper we introduced a model of extended electrons, which is fully compatible with quantum mechanics in the formulation of Schrödinger. However, it contradicts the current interpretation of electrons as point-particles. Here, we show by a statistical analysis of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, that the interpretation of electrons as point particles and, consequently, the interpretation of the density of electron charge as a statistical quantity will lead to a conflict with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Given the precision in these experiments we find that the uncertainty principle would be violated by close to two orders of magnitude, if this interpretation were correct. We are thus forced to conclude that the density of electron charge is a physically real, i.e. in principle precisely measurable quantity, as derived in a recent paper. Experimental evidence to the contrary, in particular high-energy scattering experiments, is briefly discussed. The finding is expected to have wide implications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, and biology, scientific disciplines which are based on the properties and interactions of electrons.

  4. High-resolution monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy of organic photovoltaic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jessica A; Scheltens, Frank J; Drummy, Lawrence F; Durstock, Michael F; Hage, Fredrik S; Ramasse, Quentin M; McComb, David W

    2017-09-01

    Advances in electron monochromator technology are providing opportunities for high energy resolution (10 - 200meV) electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to be performed in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The energy-loss near-edge structure in core-loss spectroscopy is often limited by core-hole lifetimes rather than the energy spread of the incident illumination. However, in the valence-loss region, the reduced width of the zero loss peak makes it possible to resolve clearly and unambiguously spectral features at very low energy-losses (photovoltaics (OPVs): poly(3-hexlythiophene) (P3HT), [6,6] phenyl-C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and fullerene (C 60 ). Data was collected on two different monochromated instruments - a Nion UltraSTEM 100 MC 'HERMES' and a FEI Titan 3 60-300 Image-Corrected S/TEM - using energy resolutions (as defined by the zero loss peak full-width at half-maximum) of 35meV and 175meV, respectively. The data was acquired to allow deconvolution of plural scattering, and Kramers-Kronig analysis was utilized to extract the complex dielectric functions. The real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric functions obtained from the two instruments were compared to evaluate if the enhanced resolution in the Nion provides new opto-electronic information for these organic materials. The differences between the spectra are discussed, and the implications for STEM-EELS studies of advanced materials are considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using elastic peak electron spectroscopy for enhanced depth resolution in sputter profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, S.; Kesler, V.

    2002-01-01

    Elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) is an alternative to AES in sputter depth profiling of thin film structures. In contrast to AES, EPES depth profiling is not influenced by chemical effects. The high count rate ensures a good signal to noise ratio, that is lower measurement times and/or higher precision. In addition, because of the elastically scattered electrons travel twice through the sample, the effective escape depth is reduced, an important factor for the depth resolution function. Thus, the depth resolution is increased. EPES depth profiling was successfully applied to a Ge/Si multilayer structure. For an elastic peak energy of 1.0 keV the information depth is considerably lower (0.8 nm) as compared to the Ge (LMM, 1147 eV) peak (1.6 nm) used in AES depth profiling, resulting in a respectively improved depth resolution for EPES profiling under otherwise similar profiling conditions. EPES depth profiling is successfully applied to measure small diffusion lengths at Ge/Si interfaces of the order of 1 nm. (Authors)

  6. Contribution to the resolution of algebraic differential equations. Application to electronic circuits and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsef, Youssef.

    1977-05-01

    This note deals with the resolution of large algebraic differential systems involved in the physical sciences, with special reference to electronics and nuclear physics. The theoretical aspect of the algorithms established and developed for this purpose is discussed in detail. A decomposition algorithm based on the graph theory is developed in detail and the regressive analysis of the error involved in the decomposition is carried out. The specific application of these algorithms on the analyses of non-linear electronic circuits and to the integration of algebraic differential equations simulating the general operation of nuclear reactors coupled to heat exchangers is discussed in detail. To conclude, it is shown that the development of efficient digital resolution techniques dealing with the elements in order is sub-optimal for large systems and calls for the revision of conventional formulation methods. Thus for a high-order physical system, the larger, the number of auxiliary unknowns introduced, the easier the formulation and resolution, owing to the elimination of any form of complex matricial calculation such as those given by the state variables method [fr

  7. THE HIGH-RESOLUTION EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF N{sub 2} BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heays, A. N. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T., E-mail: heays@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N{sub 2} electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a {sup 1}Π {sub g} , b {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and b'{sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +} excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'{sub n} {sub +1} {sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +}, c{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and o{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  8. High resolution surface scanning of Thick-GEM for single photo-electron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamar, G.; Varga, D.

    2012-01-01

    An optical system for high resolution scanning of TGEM UV photon detection systems is introduced. The structure exploits the combination of a single Au-coated TGEM under study, and an asymmetric MWPC (Close Cathode Chamber) as post-amplification stage. A pulsed UV LED source with emission down to 240 nm has been focused to a spot of 0.07 mm on the TGEM surface, and single photo-electron charge spectra has been recorded over selected two dimensional regions. This way, the TGEM gain (order of 10–100) and TGEM photo-electron detection efficiency is clearly separated, unlike in case of continuous illumination. The surface structure connected to the TGEM photon detection is well observable, including inefficiencies in the holes and at the symmetry points between holes. The detection efficiency as well as the gas gain are fluctuating from hole to hole. The gain is constant in the hexagon around any hole, pointing to the fact that the gain depends on hole geometry, and less on the position where the electron enters. The detection probability map strongly changes with the field strength above the TGEM surface, in relation to the change of the actual surface field configuration. The results can be confronted with position-dependent simulations of TGEM electron transfer and gas multiplication. -- Highlights: ► First demonstration of Thick GEM surface scanning with single photo-electrons. ► Resolution of 0.1 mm is sufficient to identify structures connected to TGEM surface field structure. ► Gain and detection efficiency and separately measurable. ► Detection efficiency is high in a ring around the holes, and gain is constant in the hexagonal collection regions.

  9. High resolution surface scanning of Thick-GEM for single photo-electron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamar, G., E-mail: hamar.gergo@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Varga, D., E-mail: vdezso@mail.cern.ch [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    An optical system for high resolution scanning of TGEM UV photon detection systems is introduced. The structure exploits the combination of a single Au-coated TGEM under study, and an asymmetric MWPC (Close Cathode Chamber) as post-amplification stage. A pulsed UV LED source with emission down to 240 nm has been focused to a spot of 0.07 mm on the TGEM surface, and single photo-electron charge spectra has been recorded over selected two dimensional regions. This way, the TGEM gain (order of 10-100) and TGEM photo-electron detection efficiency is clearly separated, unlike in case of continuous illumination. The surface structure connected to the TGEM photon detection is well observable, including inefficiencies in the holes and at the symmetry points between holes. The detection efficiency as well as the gas gain are fluctuating from hole to hole. The gain is constant in the hexagon around any hole, pointing to the fact that the gain depends on hole geometry, and less on the position where the electron enters. The detection probability map strongly changes with the field strength above the TGEM surface, in relation to the change of the actual surface field configuration. The results can be confronted with position-dependent simulations of TGEM electron transfer and gas multiplication. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First demonstration of Thick GEM surface scanning with single photo-electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resolution of 0.1 mm is sufficient to identify structures connected to TGEM surface field structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gain and detection efficiency and separately measurable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection efficiency is high in a ring around the holes, and gain is constant in the hexagonal collection regions.

  10. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  11. Double-resolution electron holography with simple Fourier transform of fringe-shifted holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, V V; Han, M G; Zhu, Y

    2013-11-01

    We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method with an appropriate image wave recovery algorithm leading to exact solution of holographic equations. With this new method the complex object image wave recovered from holograms appears to have much less traditional artifacts caused by the autocorrelation band present practically in all Fourier transformed holograms. The new analytical solutions make possible a double-resolution electron holography free from autocorrelation band artifacts and thus push the limits for phase resolution. The new image wave recovery algorithm uses a popular Fourier solution of the side band-pass filter technique, while the fringe-shifting holographic method is simple to implement in practice. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Preservation of high resolution protein structure by cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, Kasim; Studer, Daniel; Zuber, Benoit; Gnaegi, Helmut; Trinick, John

    2009-01-01

    We have quantitated the degree of structural preservation in cryo-sections of a vitrified biological specimen. Previous studies have used sections of periodic specimens to assess the resolution present, but preservation before sectioning was not assessed and so the damage due particularly to cutting was not clear. In this study large single crystals of lysozyme were vitrified and from these X-ray diffraction patterns extending to better than 2.1 A were obtained. The crystals were high pressure frozen in 30% dextran, and cryo-sectioned using a diamond knife. In the best case, preservation to a resolution of 7.9 A was shown by electron diffraction, the first observation of sub-nanometre structural preservation in a vitreous section.

  13. High-speed classification of coherent X-ray diffraction patterns on the K computer for high-resolution single biomolecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Arai, Junya [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Kameyama, Toyohisa; Yamamoto, Keiji; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Gerofi, Balazs; Shimada, Akio; Kurokawa, Motoyoshi; Shoji, Fumiyoshi [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Okada, Kensuke [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sugimoto, Takashi [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamaga, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Ryotaro [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Hori, Atsushi [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Ishikawa, Yutaka, E-mail: ishikawa@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hatsui, Takaki, E-mail: ishikawa@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Go, Nobuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A code with an algorithm for high-speed classification of X-ray diffraction patterns has been developed. Results obtained for a set of 1 × 10{sup 6} simulated diffraction patterns are also reported. Single-particle coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using an X-ray free-electron laser has the potential to reveal the three-dimensional structure of a biological supra-molecule at sub-nanometer resolution. In order to realise this method, it is necessary to analyze as many as 1 × 10{sup 6} noisy X-ray diffraction patterns, each for an unknown random target orientation. To cope with the severe quantum noise, patterns need to be classified according to their similarities and average similar patterns to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-speed scalable scheme has been developed to carry out classification on the K computer, a 10PFLOPS supercomputer at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science. It is designed to work on the real-time basis with the experimental diffraction pattern collection at the X-ray free-electron laser facility SACLA so that the result of classification can be feedback for optimizing experimental parameters during the experiment. The present status of our effort developing the system and also a result of application to a set of simulated diffraction patterns is reported. About 1 × 10{sup 6} diffraction patterns were successfully classificatied by running 255 separate 1 h jobs in 385-node mode.

  14. A high resolution electron microscopy investigation of curvature in multilayer graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenxia; Hu Jun; Wang Wenmin; Yu Guoqing

    1998-01-01

    Here the authors report a carbon sample generated by ultrasonic wave high oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in ethanol, water or ethanol-water mixed solution. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed many multilayer graphite sheets with a total curved angle that is multiples of θ 0 (= 30 degree C). Close examination of the micrographs showed that the curvature is accomplished by bending the lattice planes. A possible explanation for the curvature in multilayer graphite sheets is discussed based on the conformation of graphite symmetry axes and the formation of sp 3 -like line defects in the sp 2 graphitic network

  15. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  16. High resolution and high voltage electron microscopy at the University of California, Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.; Westmacott, K.H.

    1978-01-01

    Recent applications of high-resolution and high-voltage techniques at Berkely are described, using 100-kV TEMs and a standard 650-keV HVEM: grain boundary precipitation in Al--Zn, lattice imaging of grain boundaries in ceramics, steels, phase transitions and magnetic properties of ferrites, lattice defects, precipitation in Al--Si and behavior of interstitial dislocations under electron irradiation, effect of oxide films on loop formation in Al--Mg, and polytypism in magnesium Sialon. 13 refs. 12 figs

  17. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energetics of flattened carbon nonoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    When examined under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, carbon soot produced alongside buckytubes in an arc-discharge is found to contain a small percentage of flattened carbon shells. These objects are shown to be small graphite flakes which eliminated their dangling bonds by terminating their edges with highly curved junctions. Ideal models for these structures are presented, and their energy estimated. The calculations show that the establishment of highly curved junctions is energetically favourable for a graphite flake in an inert atmosphere. Flattened shells also appear more stable than their 'inflated' counterparts (fullerene 'onions' and buckytubes) when the shell dimensions obey specific criteria.(authors)

  18. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to ΔE/E∼10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION registered ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to ΔE/E 2,3 VV-transition with PAES. Thus, within this thesis two objectives were achieved: Firstly, the PAES spectrometer was renewed and improved by at least one order of magnitude with respect to the signal to noise ratio, the measurement time and the energy resolution. Secondly, several measurements have been carried out, demonstrating the high performance of the spectrometer. Amongst them are first dynamic PAES measurements and a high resolution measurement of the CuM 2,3 VV

  19. A graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lina; Zhang Haoxu; Zhou Ruifeng; Chen Zhuo; Li Qunqing; Fan Shoushan; Jiang Kaili; Ge Guanglu; Liu Renxiao

    2011-01-01

    A novel grid for use in transmission electron microscopy is developed. The supporting film of the grid is composed of thin graphene oxide films overlying a super-aligned carbon nanotube network. The composite film combines the advantages of graphene oxide and carbon nanotube networks and has the following properties: it is ultra-thin, it has a large flat and smooth effective supporting area with a homogeneous amorphous appearance, high stability, and good conductivity. The graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid has a distinct advantage when characterizing the fine structure of a mass of nanomaterials over conventional amorphous carbon grids. Clear high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of various nanomaterials are obtained easily using the new grids.

  20. Electron Energy Resolution of the ATLAS TILECAL Modules with Flat Filter Method (July 2002 test beam)

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitskii, Yu A; Vinogradov, V B

    2005-01-01

    The constructed ATLAS detector at the LHC will have the great physics discovery potential, in particular in the detection of a heavy Higgs boson. Calorimeters will play a crucial role in it. It is necessary to have confidence that the calorimeters will perform as expected. With the aim of understanding of performance of the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter to electrons 12\\% of modules have been exposed in electron beams with various energies by three possible ways: cell-scan at $\\theta =20^o$ at the centers of the front face cells, $\\eta$-scan and tilerow scan at $\\theta = 90^o$ for the module side cells. We have extracted the electron energy resolutions of the $EBM-$ (ANL-44), $EBM+$ (IFA-42) and $BM$ (JINR-55) Modules of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at energies E = 10, 20, 50, 100 and 180 GeV and $\\theta = 20^o$ and $90^o $ and $\\eta$ scan from the July 2002 testbeam run data using the flat filter method of the PMT signal reconstruction. We have determined the statistical and constant terms for the electron en...

  1. Electron Energy Resolution of the ATLAS TILECAL Modules with Fit Filter Method (July 2002 test beam)

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitskii, Yu A; Vinogradov, V B

    2006-01-01

    The constructed ATLAS detector at the LHC will have the great physics discovery potential, in particular in the detection of a heavy Higgs boson. Calorimeters will play a crucial role in it. It is necessary to have confidence that the calorimeters will perform as expected. With the aim of understanding of performance of the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter to electrons 12\\% of modules have been exposed in electron beams with various energies by three possible ways: cell-scan at $\\theta =20^o$ at the centers of the front face cells, $\\eta$-scan and tilerow scan at $\\theta = 90^o$ for the module side cells. We have extracted the electron energy resolutions of the $EBM-$ (ANL-44), $EBM+$ (IFA-42) and $BM$ (JINR-55) Modules of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at energies E = 10, 20, 50, 100 and 180 GeV and $\\theta = 20^o$ and $90^o $ and $\\eta$ scan from the July 2002 testbeam run data using the fit filter method of the PMT signal reconstruction. We have determined the statistical and constant terms for the electron ene...

  2. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Erni, R.; Bals, S.; Luysberg, M.; Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  3. Grand Canonical adaptive resolution simulation for molecules with electrons: A theoretical framework based on physical consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Site, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for the treatment of an open molecular system with electrons and nuclei is proposed. The idea is based on the Grand Canonical description of a quantum region embedded in a classical reservoir of molecules. Electronic properties of the quantum region are calculated at constant electronic chemical potential equal to that of the corresponding (large) bulk system treated at full quantum level. Instead, the exchange of molecules between the quantum region and the classical environment occurs at the chemical potential of the macroscopic thermodynamic conditions. The Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Scheme is proposed for the treatment of the classical environment; such an approach can treat the exchange of molecules according to first principles of statistical mechanics and thermodynamic. The overall scheme is build on the basis of physical consistency, with the corresponding definition of numerical criteria of control of the approximations implied by the coupling. Given the wide range of expertise required, this work has the intention of providing guiding principles for the construction of a well founded computational protocol for actual multiscale simulations from the electronic to the mesoscopic scale.

  4. Nanometer-resolution electron microscopy through micrometers-thick water layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonge, Niels de, E-mail: niels.de.jonge@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Nashville, TN 37232-0615 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States); Poirier-Demers, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix [Universite de Sherbrooke, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K 2R1 (Canada); Peckys, Diana B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States); University of Tennessee, Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Knoxville, TN 37996-1605 (United States); Drouin, Dominique [Universite de Sherbrooke, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to image gold nanoparticles on top of and below saline water layers of several micrometers thickness. The smallest gold nanoparticles studied had diameters of 1.4 nm and were visible for a liquid thickness of up to 3.3 {mu}m. The imaging of gold nanoparticles below several micrometers of liquid was limited by broadening of the electron probe caused by scattering of the electron beam in the liquid. The experimental data corresponded to analytical models of the resolution and of the electron probe broadening as function of the liquid thickness. The results were also compared with Monte Carlo simulations of the STEM imaging on modeled specimens of similar geometry and composition as used for the experiments. Applications of STEM imaging in liquid can be found in cell biology, e.g., to study tagged proteins in whole eukaryotic cells in liquid and in materials science to study the interaction of solid:liquid interfaces at the nanoscale.

  5. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  6. A silicon microstrip detector in a magnetic spectrometer for high-resolution electron scattering experiments at the S-DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhardt, A.W.; Bonnes, U.; Burda, O.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Platz, M.; Richter, A.; Watzlawik, S.

    2006-01-01

    A silicon microstrip detector was developed as focal plane detector of the 169.7 deg. magic angle double-focussing spectrometer at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). It allows experiments with minimum ionizing electrons at data rates up to 100 kHz, utilizing the maximum resolution of the spectrometer achievable in dispersion-matching mode

  7. Annular dark field electron microscope images with better than 2 A resolution at 100 kV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, D.H.; Kirkland, E.J.; Silcox, J.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images in the annular dark field (ADF) imaging mode approaching the theoretical point-to-point resolution limit are presented. The ADF images were obtained from a high T c superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x thin-film specimen at 100 kV. The 1.9 A resolution lattice image, which is the smallest lattice spacing in the specimen, corresponds to the minimum resolvable spatial frequency with 5% contrast in the contrast transfer function for annular dark field, and is smaller than the resolution limit given by the Rayleigh criterion. This demonstrates that STEM ADF imaging can have a resolution approximately 40% better than that of the bright field conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) imaging at Scherzer condition

  8. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-04-03

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to {delta}E/E{approx}10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION {sup registered} ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to {delta}E/E < 1. The exceptional surface sensitivity and elemental selectivity of PAES was demonstrated in measurements of Pd and Fe, both coated with Cu layers of varying thickness. PAES showed that with 0.96 monolayer of Cu on Fe, more than 55% of the detected Auger electrons stem from Cu. In the case of the Cu coated Pd sample 0.96 monolayer of Cu resulted in a Cu Auger fraction of more than 30% with PAES and less than 5% with electron induced Auger spectroscopy

  9. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigations and characterization of the microstructure of special ceramic materials using the high-resolution electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirn, M.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities to characterize phases and microstructures by direct lattice imaging are indicated in the following work. Ceramic materials are particularly suitable for this as these exhibit a high mechanical stability in the investigation in the transmission electron microscope. First of all the fundamentals of the high-resolution electron microscopy are introduced and the various resulting possibilities to characterize microstructures are presented. A report then follows on experimental observations on undisturbed crystals of special ceramics on a Si 3 N 4 basis. Furthermore, it is shown that the high-resolution electron microscope provides valuable contributions to the determination of structure, in particular of twin variants. Finally, revealing information on the structure of the interfaces was obtained with the help of high-resolution electron microscopy. (orig./IHOE) [de

  11. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu; Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-01-01

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au 8 Al 3 formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration

  12. Coma-free alignment of high resolution electron microscopes with the aid of optical diffractograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemlin, F.; Weiss, K.; Schiske, P.; Kunath, W.; Herrmann, K.-H.

    1978-01-01

    Alignment by means of current commutating and defocusing of the objective does not yield the desired rotational symmetry of the imaging pencils. This was found while aligning a transmission electron microscope with a single field condenser objective. A series of optical diffractograms of micrographs taken under the same tilted illumination yet under various azimuths have been arranged in a tableau, wherein strong asymmetry is exhibited. Quantitative evaluation yields the most important asymmetric aberration to be the axial coma, which becomes critical when a resolution better than 5 A 0 is obtained. The tableau also allows an assessment of the three-fold astigmatism. A procedure has been developed which aligns the microscope onto the coma-free and dispersion-free pencil axis and does not rely on current communication. The procedure demands equal appearance of astigmatic carbon film images produced under the same tilt yet diametrical azimuth. (Auth.)

  13. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Observation of Zero-Strain Deformation Twinning Mechanisms in Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Wang, J.; Gong, S. K.; Mao, S. X.

    2011-04-01

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  15. High resolution electron microscopy study of as-prepared and annealed tungsten-carbon multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Gronsky, R.; Kortright, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    A series of sputtered tungsten-carbon multilayer structures with periods ranging from 2 to 12 nm in the as-prepared state and after annealing at 500/degree/C for 4 hours has been studied with high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The evolution with annealing of the microstructure of these multilayers depends on their period. As-prepared structures appear predominantly amorphous from TEM imaging and diffraction. Annealing results in crystallization of the W-rich layers into WC in the larger period samples, and less complete or no crystallization in the smaller period samples. X-ray scattering reveals that annealing expands the period in a systematic way. The layers remain remarkably well-defined after annealing under these conditions. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of grain-refining particles in amorphous aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, P.; Greer, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleation mechanism of Al-Ti-B grain refiners is studied in an Al-based amorphous alloy. The ability to limit growth of α-Al in the amorphous alloy permits the microscopical observation of nucleation events on boride particles. Earlier studies of this kind are extended by using high-resolution electron microscopy. This shows that the efficient nucleation α-Al depends on the TiB 2 particles being coated with a thin layer of Al 3 Ti, which can form only when there is some excess titanium in the melt. The aluminide layer, stabilized by adsorption effects, can be as little as a few monolayers thick, and is coherent with the boride. The nature of this layer, and its importance for the nucleation mechanism are discussed. The fading of the grain refinement action is also considered

  17. High resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of a milled oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyer-Prost, M., E-mail: marie.loyer-prost@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Merot, J.-S. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures – UMR 104, CNRS/ONERA, BP72-29, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92 322, Châtillon (France); Ribis, J. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliquée, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Le Bouar, Y. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures – UMR 104, CNRS/ONERA, BP72-29, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92 322, Châtillon (France); Chaffron, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliquée, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Legendre, F. [DEN-Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Matériaux dans leur Environnement, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for generation IV fuel claddings as their dense nano-oxide dispersion provides good creep and irradiation resistance. Even if they have been studied for years, the formation mechanism of these nano-oxides is still unclear. Here we report for the first time a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of an ODS milled powder. It provides clear evidence of the presence of small crystalline nanoclusters (NCs) enriched in titanium directly after milling. Small NCs (<5 nm) have a crystalline structure and seem partly coherent with the matrix. They have an interplanar spacing close to the (011) {sub bcc} iron structure. They coexist with larger crystalline spherical precipitates of 15–20 nm in size. Their crystalline structure may be metastable as they are not consistent with any Y-Ti-O or Ti-O structure. Such detailed observations in the as-milled grain powder confirm a mechanism of Y, Ti, O dissolution in the ferritic matrix followed by a NC precipitation during the mechanical alloying process of ODS materials. - Highlights: • We observed an ODS ball-milled powder by high resolution transmission microscopy. • The ODS ball-milled powder exhibits a lamellar microstructure. • Small crystalline nanoclusters were detected in the milled ODS powder. • The nanoclusters in the ODS milled powder are enriched in titanium. • Larger NCs of 15–20 nm in size are, at least, partly coherent with the matrix.

  18. Understanding deformation with high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, T. B.; Hickey, J. L. R.

    2018-01-01

    High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) affords an increase in angular resolution, as compared to ‘conventional’ Hough transform based EBSD, of two orders of magnitude, enabling measurements of relative misorientations of 1 x 10-4 rads (~ 0.006°) and changes in (deviatoric) lattice strain with a precision of 1 x 10-4. This is achieved through direct comparison of two or more diffraction patterns using sophisticated cross-correlation based image analysis routines. Image shifts between zone axes in the two-correlated diffraction pattern are measured with sub-pixel precision and this realises the ability to measure changes in interplanar angles and lattice orientation with a high degree of sensitivity. These shifts are linked to strains and lattice rotations through simple geometry. In this manuscript, we outline the basis of the technique and two case studies that highlight its potential to tackle real materials science challenges, such as deformation patterning in polycrystalline alloys.

  19. High resolution electron microscope study of the omega transformation in Zr--Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.L.J.; Sass, S.L.; Krakow, W.

    1976-01-01

    High resolution direct lattice imaging and dark field electron microscopy were used to examine the omega phase transformation in Zr--Nb alloys. Direct lattice imaging demonstrated the existence of subvariants within an omega variant. The existence of an ordered sequence of subvariants, which is the basic premise of recent diffuse intensity calculations which seek to explain diffuse diffraction observations in high Nb content alloys, could not be checked because of the small size of the omega regions. In the low Nb content alloys dark field electron microscopy was used to show that the ω phase consists of large domains (100 to 200 A dia) the interior of which contains features that are 3 to 6 A dia. As the Nb content is increased the omega domains decrease in size until only 3 to 5 A images are observed in alloys containing 15 wt. percent Nb or more. The isolated images are present over the range of composition from 8 to 30 wt. percent Nb. Time sequence dark field micrographs show that these small images change with time. The diffuse ω reflections are believed due in part to the existence of a (111) linear detect, consisting of groups of (111) rows of atoms which are displaced from bcc to ω positions for short periods of time

  20. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High resolution beam profiling of X-ray free electron laser radiation by polymer imprint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, Benedikt; Döring, Florian; Ribič, Primož R; Gauthier, David; Principi, Emiliano; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Zangrando, Marco; Vila-Comamala, Joan; De Ninno, Giovanni; David, Christian

    2017-11-27

    High resolution metrology of beam profiles is presently a major challenge at X-ray free electron lasers. We demonstrate a characterization method based on beam imprints in poly (methyl methacrylate). By immersing the imprints formed at 47.8 eV into organic solvents, the regions exposed to the beam are removed similar to resist development in grayscale lithography. This allows for extending the sensitivity of the method by more than an order of magnitude compared to the established analysis of imprints created solely by ablation. Applying the Beer-Lambert law for absorption, the intensity distribution in a micron-sized focus can be reconstructed from one single shot with a high dynamic range, exceeding 10 3 . The procedure described here allows for beam characterization at free electron lasers revealing even faint beam tails, which are not accessible when using ablation imprint methods. We demonstrate the greatly extended dynamic range on developed imprints taken in focus of conventional Fresnel zone plates and spiral zone plates producing beams with a topological charge.

  2. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm -3 ) and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 2 bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense 'amorphous' carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 3 bonding fractions

  3. Calibration of high-resolution electronic autocollimators with demanded low uncertainties using single reading head angle encoders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yandayan, Tanfer; Akgoz, S Asli; Asar, Muharrem

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of high-resolution electronic autocollimators is carried out in TUBITAK UME using an angle comparator to ensure direct traceability to the SI unit of plane angle, radian (rad). The device is a specially designed air-bearing rotary table fitted with a commercially available angular encoder utilizing a single reading head. It is shown that high-resolution electronic autocollimators in the large measurement range (e.g. ±1000 arcsec) can be calibrated with an expanded uncertainty of 0.035 arcsec (k = 2) in conventional dimensional laboratory conditions, applying good measurement strategy for single reading head angle encoders and taking simple but smart precautions. Description of the angle comparator is presented with various test results derived using different high-precision autocollimators, and a detailed uncertainty budget is given for the calibration of a high-resolution electronic autocollimator. (paper)

  4. Use of water vapor for suppressing the growth of unstable low-{kappa} interlayer in HfTiO gate-dielectric Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with sub-nanometer capacitance equivalent thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.P. [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Zou, X. [School of Electromachine and Architecture Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan, 430056 (China); Lai, P.T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)], E-mail: laip@eee.hku.hk; Li, C.X.; Chan, C.L. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2009-03-02

    Annealing of high-permittivity HfTiO gate dielectric on Ge substrate in different gases (N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, NO and N{sub 2}O) with or without water vapor is investigated. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy indicates that the four wet anneals can greatly suppress the growth of a GeO{sub x} interlayer at the dielectric/Ge interface, and thus decrease interface states, oxide charges and gate leakage current. Moreover, compared with the wet N{sub 2} anneal, the wet NH{sub 3}, NO and N{sub 2}O anneals decrease the equivalent permittivity of the gate dielectric due to the growth of a GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interlayer. Among the eight anneals, the wet N{sub 2} anneal produces the best dielectric performance with an equivalent relative permittivity of 35, capacitance equivalent thickness of 0.81 nm, interface-state density of 6.4 x 10{sup 11} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and gate leakage current of 2.7 x 10{sup -4} A/cm{sup 2} at V{sub g} = 1 V.

  5. Use of water vapor for suppressing the growth of unstable low-κ interlayer in HfTiO gate-dielectric Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with sub-nanometer capacitance equivalent thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.P.; Zou, X.; Lai, P.T.; Li, C.X.; Chan, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Annealing of high-permittivity HfTiO gate dielectric on Ge substrate in different gases (N 2 , NH 3 , NO and N 2 O) with or without water vapor is investigated. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy indicates that the four wet anneals can greatly suppress the growth of a GeO x interlayer at the dielectric/Ge interface, and thus decrease interface states, oxide charges and gate leakage current. Moreover, compared with the wet N 2 anneal, the wet NH 3 , NO and N 2 O anneals decrease the equivalent permittivity of the gate dielectric due to the growth of a GeO x N y interlayer. Among the eight anneals, the wet N 2 anneal produces the best dielectric performance with an equivalent relative permittivity of 35, capacitance equivalent thickness of 0.81 nm, interface-state density of 6.4 x 10 11 eV -1 cm -2 and gate leakage current of 2.7 x 10 -4 A/cm 2 at V g = 1 V

  6. The measurement and calculation of the X-ray spatial resolution obtained in the analytical electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, J.R.; Williams, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The X-ray microanalytical spatial resolution is determined experimentally in various analytical electron microscopes by measuring the degradation of an atomically discrete composition profile across an interphase interface in a thin-foil of Ni-Cr-Fe. The experimental spatial resolutions are then compared with calculated values. The calculated spatial resolutions are obtained by the mathematical convolution of the electron probe size with an assumed beam-broadening distribution and the single-scattering model of beam broadening. The probe size is measured directly from an image of the probe in a TEM/SETEM and indirectly from dark-field signal changes resulting from scanning the probe across the edge of an MgO crystal in a dedicated STEM. This study demonstrates the applicability of the convolution technique to the calculation of the microanalytical spatial resolution obtained in the analytical electron microscope. It is demonstrated that, contrary to popular opinion, the electron probe size has a major impact on the measured spatial resolution in foils < 150 nm thick. (author)

  7. High-resolution x-ray scattering studies of charge ordering in highly correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Many important properties of transition metal oxides such as, copper oxide high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in manganites are due to strong electron-electron interactions, and hence these systems are called highly correlated systems. These materials are characterised by the coexistence of different kinds of order, including charge, orbital, and magnetic moment. This thesis contains high-resolution X-ray scattering studies of charge ordering in such systems namely the high-T C copper oxides isostructural system, La 2-x Sr x NiO 4 with various Sr concentrations (x = 0.33 - 0.2), and the CMR manganite system, Nd 1/2 Sr 1/2 MnO 3 . It also includes a review of charge ordering in a large variety of transition metal oxides, such as ferrates, vanadates, cobaltates, nickelates, manganites, and cuprates systems, which have been reported to date in the scientific literature. Using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering, it has been demonstrated that the charge stripes exist in a series of single crystals of La 2-x Sr x NiO 4 with Sr concentrations (x = 0.33 - 0.2) at low temperatures. Satellite reflections due to the charge ordering were found with the wavevector (2ε, 0, 1) below the charge ordering transition temperature, T CO , where 2ε is the amount of separation from the corresponding Bragg peak. The charge stripes are shown to be two-dimensional in nature both by measurements of their correlation lengths and by measurement of the critical exponents of the charge stripe melting transition with an anomaly at x = 0.25. The results show by decreasing the hole concentration from the x = 0.33 to 0.2, the well-correlated charge stripes change to a glassy state at x = 0.25. The electronic transition into the charge stripe phase is second-order without any corresponding structural transition. Above the second-order transition critical scattering was observed due to fluctuations into the charge stripe phase. In a single-crystal of Nd

  8. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Houben, L. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Mayer, J. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges for a specimen of SrTiO{sub 3} oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. - Highlights: • Achromatic atomic-resolution EFTEM images were obtained for STO 〈110〉. • Simulations were in qualitative agreement with Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edge maps. • The experimental EFTEM maps are not directly interpretable as elemental maps. • Image intensities are strongly determined by preservation of elastic contrast. • Interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.

  9. 'Big Bang' tomography as a new route to atomic-resolution electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Dirk; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2012-06-13

    Until now it has not been possible to image at atomic resolution using classical electron tomographic methods, except when the target is a perfectly crystalline nano-object imaged along a few zone axes. The main reasons are that mechanical tilting in an electron microscope with sub-ångström precision over a very large angular range is difficult, that many real-life objects such as dielectric layers in microelectronic devices impose geometrical constraints and that many radiation-sensitive objects such as proteins limit the total electron dose. Hence, there is a need for a new tomographic scheme that is able to deduce three-dimensional information from only one or a few projections. Here we present an electron tomographic method that can be used to determine, from only one viewing direction and with sub-ångström precision, both the position of individual atoms in the plane of observation and their vertical position. The concept is based on the fact that an experimentally reconstructed exit wave consists of the superposition of the spherical waves that have been scattered by the individual atoms of the object. Furthermore, the phase of a Fourier component of a spherical wave increases with the distance of propagation at a known 'phase speed'. If we assume that an atom is a point-like object, the relationship between the phase and the phase speed of each Fourier component is linear, and the distance between the atom and the plane of observation can therefore be determined by linear fitting. This picture has similarities with Big Bang cosmology, in which the Universe expands from a point-like origin such that the distance of any galaxy from the origin is linearly proportional to the speed at which it moves away from the origin (Hubble expansion). The proof of concept of the method has been demonstrated experimentally for graphene with a two-layer structure and it will work optimally for similar layered materials, such as boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide.

  10. Sub-nanometre resolution imaging of polymer-fullerene photovoltaic blends using energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Robert C; Pearson, Andrew J; Glen, Tom S; Sasam, Fabian-Cyril; Li, Letian; Dapor, Maurizio; Donald, Athene M; Lidzey, David G; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2015-04-24

    The resolution capability of the scanning electron microscope has increased immensely in recent years, and is now within the sub-nanometre range, at least for inorganic materials. An equivalent advance has not yet been achieved for imaging the morphologies of nanostructured organic materials, such as organic photovoltaic blends. Here we show that energy-selective secondary electron detection can be used to obtain high-contrast, material-specific images of an organic photovoltaic blend. We also find that we can differentiate mixed phases from pure material phases in our data. The lateral resolution demonstrated is twice that previously reported from secondary electron imaging. Our results suggest that our energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy approach will be able to make major inroads into the understanding of complex, nano-structured organic materials.

  11. Sub-nanometre resolution imaging of polymer–fullerene photovoltaic blends using energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Robert C.; Pearson, Andrew J.; Glen, Tom S.; Sasam, Fabian-Cyril; Li, Letian; Dapor, Maurizio; Donald, Athene M.; Lidzey, David G.; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The resolution capability of the scanning electron microscope has increased immensely in recent years, and is now within the sub-nanometre range, at least for inorganic materials. An equivalent advance has not yet been achieved for imaging the morphologies of nanostructured organic materials, such as organic photovoltaic blends. Here we show that energy-selective secondary electron detection can be used to obtain high-contrast, material-specific images of an organic photovoltaic blend. We also find that we can differentiate mixed phases from pure material phases in our data. The lateral resolution demonstrated is twice that previously reported from secondary electron imaging. Our results suggest that our energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy approach will be able to make major inroads into the understanding of complex, nano-structured organic materials. PMID:25906738

  12. Fluorescence photooxidation with eosin: a method for high resolution immunolocalization and in situ hybridization detection for light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A simple method is described for high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunolocalization of proteins in cells and tissues by immunofluorescence and subsequent photooxidation of diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride into an insoluble osmiophilic polymer. By using eosin as the fluorescent marker, a substantial improvement in sensitivity is achieved in the photooxidation process over other conventional fluorescent compounds. The technique allows for precise correlative immunolocalization studies on the same sample using fluorescence, transmitted light and electron microscopy. Furthermore, because eosin is smaller in size than other conventional markers, this method results in improved penetration of labeling reagents compared to gold or enzyme based procedures. The improved penetration allows for three-dimensional immunolocalization using high voltage electron microscopy. Fluorescence photooxidation can also be used for high resolution light and electron microscopic localization of specific nucleic acid sequences by in situ hybridization utilizing biotinylated probes followed by an eosin-streptavidin conjugate. PMID:7519623

  13. Direct Detection Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy: A Method to Push the Limits of Resolution and Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, James L; Lang, Andrew C; Leff, Asher C; Longo, Paolo; Trevor, Colin; Twesten, Ray D; Taheri, Mitra L

    2017-08-15

    In many cases, electron counting with direct detection sensors offers improved resolution, lower noise, and higher pixel density compared to conventional, indirect detection sensors for electron microscopy applications. Direct detection technology has previously been utilized, with great success, for imaging and diffraction, but potential advantages for spectroscopy remain unexplored. Here we compare the performance of a direct detection sensor operated in counting mode and an indirect detection sensor (scintillator/fiber-optic/CCD) for electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Clear improvements in measured detective quantum efficiency and combined energy resolution/energy field-of-view are offered by counting mode direct detection, showing promise for efficient spectrum imaging, low-dose mapping of beam-sensitive specimens, trace element analysis, and time-resolved spectroscopy. Despite the limited counting rate imposed by the readout electronics, we show that both core-loss and low-loss spectral acquisition are practical. These developments will benefit biologists, chemists, physicists, and materials scientists alike.

  14. Complementary Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Thin-Film Photovoltaic Cells Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Jung; Lee, Jihye; Jeong, Jeung-Hyun; Lee, Kang-Bong; Kim, Donghwan; Lee, Yeonhee

    2018-05-01

    To enhance the conversion performance of solar cells, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is required. In this study, we determined the average concentration of the major elements (Cu, In, Ga, and Se) in fabricated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and wavelengthdispersive electron probe microanalysis. Depth profiling results for CIGS thin films with different cell efficiencies were obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy to compare the atomic concentrations. Atom probe tomography, a characterization technique with sub-nanometer resolution, was used to obtain three-dimensional elemental mapping and the compositional distribution at the grain boundaries (GBs). GBs are identified by Na increment accompanied by Cu depletion and In enrichment. Segregation of Na atoms along the GB had a beneficial effect on cell performance. Comparative analyses of different CIGS absorber layers using various analytical techniques provide us with understanding of the compositional distributions and structures of high efficiency CIGS thin films in solar cells.

  15. Linear versus non-linear structural information limit in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Chen, J.H.; Van Dyck, D.

    2010-01-01

    A widely used performance criterion in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is the information limit. It corresponds to the inverse of the maximum spatial object frequency that is linearly transmitted with sufficient intensity from the exit plane of the object to the image plane and is limited due to partial temporal coherence. In practice, the information limit is often measured from a diffractogram or from Young's fringes assuming a weak phase object scattering beyond the inverse of the information limit. However, for an aberration corrected electron microscope, with an information limit in the sub-angstrom range, weak phase objects are no longer applicable since they do not scatter sufficiently in this range. Therefore, one relies on more strongly scattering objects such as crystals of heavy atoms observed along a low index zone axis. In that case, dynamical scattering becomes important such that the non-linear and linear interaction may be equally important. The non-linear interaction may then set the experimental cut-off frequency observed in a diffractogram. The goal of this paper is to quantify both the linear and the non-linear information transfer in terms of closed form analytical expressions. Whereas the cut-off frequency set by the linear transfer can be directly related with the attainable resolution, information from the non-linear transfer can only be extracted using quantitative, model-based methods. In contrast to the historic definition of the information limit depending on microscope parameters only, the expressions derived in this paper explicitly incorporate their dependence on the structure parameters as well. In order to emphasize this dependence and to distinguish from the usual information limit, the expressions derived for the inverse cut-off frequencies will be referred to as the linear and non-linear structural information limit. The present findings confirm the well-known result that partial temporal coherence has

  16. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R; Murshudov, Garib N; Short, Judith M; Scheres, Sjors H W; Henderson, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  17. Direct atomic fabrication and dopant positioning in Si using electron beams with active real-time image-based feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Hudak, Bethany M.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Song, Jiaming; Maksov, Artem; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Snijders, Panchapakesan C.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2018-06-01

    Semiconductor fabrication is a mainstay of modern civilization, enabling the myriad applications and technologies that underpin everyday life. However, while sub-10 nanometer devices are already entering the mainstream, the end of the Moore’s law roadmap still lacks tools capable of bulk semiconductor fabrication on sub-nanometer and atomic levels, with probe-based manipulation being explored as the only known pathway. Here we demonstrate that the atomic-sized focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to manipulate semiconductors such as Si on the atomic level, inducing growth of crystalline Si from the amorphous phase, reentrant amorphization, milling, and dopant front motion. These phenomena are visualized in real-time with atomic resolution. We further implement active feedback control based on real-time image analytics to automatically control the e-beam motion, enabling shape control and providing a pathway for atom-by-atom correction of fabricated structures in the near future. These observations open a new epoch for atom-by-atom manufacturing in bulk, the long-held dream of nanotechnology.

  18. Direct atomic fabrication and dopant positioning in Si using electron beams with active real-time image-based feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Hudak, Bethany M; Zarkadoula, Eva; Song, Jiaming; Maksov, Artem; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Snijders, Panchapakesan C; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2018-06-22

    Semiconductor fabrication is a mainstay of modern civilization, enabling the myriad applications and technologies that underpin everyday life. However, while sub-10 nanometer devices are already entering the mainstream, the end of the Moore's law roadmap still lacks tools capable of bulk semiconductor fabrication on sub-nanometer and atomic levels, with probe-based manipulation being explored as the only known pathway. Here we demonstrate that the atomic-sized focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to manipulate semiconductors such as Si on the atomic level, inducing growth of crystalline Si from the amorphous phase, reentrant amorphization, milling, and dopant front motion. These phenomena are visualized in real-time with atomic resolution. We further implement active feedback control based on real-time image analytics to automatically control the e-beam motion, enabling shape control and providing a pathway for atom-by-atom correction of fabricated structures in the near future. These observations open a new epoch for atom-by-atom manufacturing in bulk, the long-held dream of nanotechnology.

  19. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  20. An improved image alignment procedure for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang; Liu, Yan; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jianghua

    2010-06-01

    Image alignment is essential for image processing methods such as through-focus exit-wavefunction reconstruction and image averaging in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Relative image displacements exist in any experimentally recorded image series due to the specimen drifts and image shifts, hence image alignment for correcting the image displacements has to be done prior to any further image processing. The image displacement between two successive images is determined by the correlation function of the two relatively shifted images. Here it is shown that more accurate image alignment can be achieved by using an appropriate aperture to filter the high-frequency components of the images being aligned, especially for a crystalline specimen with little non-periodic information. For the image series of crystalline specimens with little amorphous, the radius of the filter aperture should be as small as possible, so long as it covers the innermost lattice reflections. Testing with an experimental through-focus series of Si[110] images, the accuracies of image alignment with different correlation functions are compared with respect to the error functions in through-focus exit-wavefunction reconstruction based on the maximum-likelihood method. Testing with image averaging over noisy experimental images from graphene and carbon-nanotube samples, clear and sharp crystal lattice fringes are recovered after applying optimal image alignment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High resolution electron microscopy of the triply incommensurate phase of 2H-TaSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Otsuka, Nobuo; Sato, Hiroshi

    1986-09-01

    The triply incommensurate phase of 2H-TaSe2 obtained by cooling from the normal phase was investigated by transmission electron microscopy between 87 and 113 K with the resolution of 3 Å, one order of magnitude better than earlier experiments. Moirélike patterns observed in this phase were confirmed to be interference fringes due to the first- and second-order diffraction beams (with small separation and possibly with higher-order diffraction beams) from the incommensurate structure and were not due to the dark-field diffraction contrast of domains of the commensurate structure as interpreted earlier. Lattice fringes (~9 Å) of this modulated phase do not show any discontinuity across the boundaries of regions of different contrasts of the moirélike fringes which is expected from domain boundaries. Instead, a periodic change in the spacing of the lattice fringes (phase-slip region) expected from the superposition of split superlattice spots in forming the lattice image is observed. This is what is believed to be the first direct observation of the existence of the phase-slip region which is also expected from the discommensuration theory. A series of observations presented here thus shows that the triply incommensurate phase is intrinsically incommensurate and suggests the need for a modification of interpretations of this phase in terms of the double honeycomb discommensuration model.

  2. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure of a Plant Geminivirus Determined by Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Grimm, Clemens; Jeske, Holger; Böttcher, Bettina

    2017-08-01

    African cassava mosaic virus is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus which forms unique twin particles of incomplete icosahedra that are joined at five-fold vertices, building an unusual waist. How its 22 capsomers interact within a half-capsid or across the waist is unknown thus far. Using electron cryo-microscopy and image processing, we determined the virion structure with a resolution of 4.2 Å and built an atomic model for its capsid protein. The inter-capsomer contacts mediated by the flexible N termini and loop regions differed within the half-capsids and at the waist, explaining partly the unusual twin structure. The tip of the pentameric capsomer is sealed by a plug formed by a turn region harboring the evolutionary conserved residue Y193. Basic amino acid residues inside the capsid form a positively charged pocket next to the five-fold axis of the capsomer suitable for binding DNA. Within this pocket, density most likely corresponding to DNA was resolved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Micaceous occlusions in kaolinite observed by ultramicrotomy and high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S Y [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Jackson, M L; Brown, J L

    1975-01-01

    The layer structure of kaolinite from Twiggs, Georgia, and fire-clay type kaolinite (Frantex B, from France, particle size separates 2 0.2 ..mu..m was studied by high resolution electron microscopy after embedment in Spurr low-viscosity Epoxy media and thin sectioning normal to the (001) planes by an ultramicrotome. Images of the (001) planes (viewed edge-on) of both kaolinites were spaced at 7 A and generally aligned in parallel, with occasional bending into more widely spaced images of about 10 A interval. Some of the 10 A images converged to 7 A at one or both ends, forming ellipse-shaped islands 80 to 130 A thick and 300 to 500 A long. The island areas and interleaved 10 A layers between 7 A layers may represent a residue of incomplete weathering of mica to kaolinite. The proportions of micaceous occlusions were too small and the layer sequences too irregular to be detected by X-ray diffraction. The lateral continuity of the layers through the 7-10-7 A sequence in a kaolinite particle would partially interrupt or prevent expansion in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and other kaolinite intercalating media. Discrete mica particles were also observed with parallel images at 10 A, as impurities in both kaolinites. The small K content of the chemical analyses of the kaolinite samples is accounted for as interlayer K, not only in discrete mica particles but also in the micaceous occlusions.

  4. Electron attachment to oxygen, ozone and other compounds of atmospheric relevance as studied with ultra-high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.D.; Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Cicman, P.; Senn, G.; Skalny, J.; Stampfli, P.; Illenberger, E.; Chu, Y.; Stamatovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    The processes of electron attachment to oxygen, ozone, ozone/oxygen cluster and oxygen cluster as well as other compounds of atmospheric relevance (CF 2 Cl 2 , CHCl 3 and CCl 3 Br) were studied with ultra-high energy resolution crossed beam technique

  5. Electron vortex beams prepared by a spiral aperture with the goal to measure EMCD on ferromagnetic films via STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Darius, E-mail: d.pohl@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, d-01171 Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Sebastian [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, d-01171 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute for Solid State Physics, d-01069 Dresden (Germany); Rusz, Jan [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Rellinghaus, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, d-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism is a well established method to study element specific magnetic properties of a material, while electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), which is the electron wave analogue to XMCD, is scarcely used today. Recently discovered electron vortex beams, that carry a discrete orbital angular momentum (OAM) L, are also predicted to reveal dichroic signals. Since electron beams can be easily focused down to sub-nanometer diameters, this novel technique promises the possibility to quantitatively determine local magnetic properties with unrivalled lateral resolution. As the spiralling wave front of the electron vortex beam has an azimutally growing phase shift of up to 2π and a phase singularity in its axial center, specially designed apertures are needed to generate such non-planar electron waves. We report on the preparation and successful implementation of spiral apertures into the condenser lens system of an aberration-corrected FEI Titan{sup 3} 80-300 transmission electron microscope (TEM). This setup allows to perform scanning TEM (STEM) with vortex beams carrying user-selected OAM. First experiments on the interaction of the vortex beam with a poly-crystalline sample are presented. Within the achieved signal to noise ratio no EMCD signal has been detected. This finding is supported by simulations of inelastic scattering of a beam generated by spiral aperture. - Highlights: • We show the implementation of a spiral aperture into a FEI Titan{sup 3} 80-300. • Experiments and simulations on the interaction of the vortex beam with a Ni sample are presented. • Both, simulations and experiments show no (or a not detectable small) EMCD signal. • The absence of an EMCD signal is explained by the superposition of different vortex states.

  6. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  7. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard, E-mail: rh15@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

    2013-12-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  8. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  9. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°.

  10. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  11. FOLD-EM: automated fold recognition in medium- and low-resolution (4-15 Å) electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mitul; Morais, Marc C

    2012-12-15

    Owing to the size and complexity of large multi-component biological assemblies, the most tractable approach to determining their atomic structure is often to fit high-resolution radiographic or nuclear magnetic resonance structures of isolated components into lower resolution electron density maps of the larger assembly obtained using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). This hybrid approach to structure determination requires that an atomic resolution structure of each component, or a suitable homolog, is available. If neither is available, then the amount of structural information regarding that component is limited by the resolution of the cryo-EM map. However, even if a suitable homolog cannot be identified using sequence analysis, a search for structural homologs should still be performed because structural homology often persists throughout evolution even when sequence homology is undetectable, As macromolecules can often be described as a collection of independently folded domains, one way of searching for structural homologs would be to systematically fit representative domain structures from a protein domain database into the medium/low resolution cryo-EM map and return the best fits. Taken together, the best fitting non-overlapping structures would constitute a 'mosaic' backbone model of the assembly that could aid map interpretation and illuminate biological function. Using the computational principles of the Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), we have developed FOLD-EM-a computational tool that can identify folded macromolecular domains in medium to low resolution (4-15 Å) electron density maps and return a model of the constituent polypeptides in a fully automated fashion. As a by-product, FOLD-EM can also do flexible multi-domain fitting that may provide insight into conformational changes that occur in macromolecular assemblies.

  12. Intense energetic electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N; Dewey, Ryan M; Lawrence, David J; Goldsten, John O; Peplowski, Patrick N; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Anderson, Brian J; Ho, George C; McNutt, Ralph L; Raines, Jim M; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C

    2016-03-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer, as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work greatly extends our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary nightside. The electrons populate the plasma sheet and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and prenoon sectors, at times executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  13. Phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of light and heavy atoms at the limit of contrast and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücelen, Emrah; Lazić, Ivan; Bosch, Eric G T

    2018-02-08

    Using state of the art scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is nowadays possible to directly image single atomic columns at sub-Å resolution. In standard (high angle) annular dark field STEM ((HA)ADF-STEM), however, light elements are usually invisible when imaged together with heavier elements in one image. Here we demonstrate the capability of the recently introduced Integrated Differential Phase Contrast STEM (iDPC-STEM) technique to image both light and heavy atoms in a thin sample at sub-Å resolution. We use the technique to resolve both the Gallium and Nitrogen dumbbells in a GaN crystal in [[Formula: see text

  14. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, A L; Mikula, S; Schalek, R; Lichtman, J; Knothe Tate, M L; Zeidler, D

    2015-08-01

    Electron-electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  16. High resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, W.; Shaw, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental high resolution electron micrographs and computer simulation experiments have been used to evaluate the visibility of the atomic constituents of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/. In practice, the detection of oxygen has not been possible in contradiction to that predicted by modelling of perfect crystalline material. Preliminary computer experiments of the electron diffraction patterns when oxygen vacancies are introduced on the Cu-O sheets separating Ba layers show the diffuse streaks characteristic of short range ordering

  17. Hybridization approach to in-line and off-axis (electron) holography for superior resolution and phase sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, C.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; van Aken, P. A.; Koch, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Holography - originally developed for correcting spherical aberration in transmission electron microscopes - is now used in a wide range of disciplines that involve the propagation of waves, including light optics, electron microscopy, acoustics and seismology. In electron microscopy, the two primary modes of holography are Gabor's original in-line setup and an off-axis approach that was developed subsequently. These two techniques are highly complementary, offering superior phase sensitivity at high and low spatial resolution, respectively. All previous investigations have focused on improving each method individually. Here, we show how the two approaches can be combined in a synergetic fashion to provide phase information with excellent sensitivity across all spatial frequencies, low noise and an efficient use of electron dose. The principle is also expected to be widely to applications of holography in light optics, X-ray optics, acoustics, ultra-sound, terahertz imaging, etc. PMID:25387480

  18. Super-resolution imaging based on the temperature-dependent electron-phonon collision frequency effect of metal thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chenliang; Wei, Jingsong; Xiao, Mufei

    2018-05-01

    We herein propose a far-field super-resolution imaging with metal thin films based on the temperature-dependent electron-phonon collision frequency effect. In the proposed method, neither fluorescence labeling nor any special properties are required for the samples. The 100 nm lands and 200 nm grooves on the Blu-ray disk substrates were clearly resolved and imaged through a laser scanning microscope of wavelength 405 nm. The spot size was approximately 0.80 μm , and the imaging resolution of 1/8 of the laser spot size was experimentally obtained. This work can be applied to the far-field super-resolution imaging of samples with neither fluorescence labeling nor any special properties.

  19. Deceleration of probe beam by stage bias potential improves resolution of serial block-face scanning electron microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, James C; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Astakhov, Vadim; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Peltier, Steven T; Ellisman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is quickly becoming an important imaging tool to explore three-dimensional biological structure across spatial scales. At probe-beam-electron energies of 2.0 keV or lower, the axial resolution should improve, because there is less primary electron penetration into the block face. More specifically, at these lower energies, the interaction volume is much smaller, and therefore, surface detail is more highly resolved. However, the backscattered electron yield for metal contrast agents and the backscattered electron detector sensitivity are both sub-optimal at these lower energies, thus negating the gain in axial resolution. We found that the application of a negative voltage (reversal potential) applied to a modified SBEM stage creates a tunable electric field at the sample. This field can be used to decrease the probe-beam-landing energy and, at the same time, alter the trajectory of the signal to increase the signal collected by the detector. With decelerated low landing-energy electrons, we observed that the probe-beam-electron-penetration depth was reduced to less than 30 nm in epoxy-embedded biological specimens. Concurrently, a large increase in recorded signal occurred due to the re-acceleration of BSEs in the bias field towards the objective pole piece where the detector is located. By tuning the bias field, we were able to manipulate the trajectories of the  primary and secondary electrons, enabling the spatial discrimination of these signals using an advanced ring-type BSE detector configuration or a standard monolithic BSE detector coupled with a blocking aperture.

  20. Specific, sensitive, high-resolution detection of protein molecules in eukaryotic cells using metal-tagging transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, Cristina; Sanmartín-Conesa, Eva; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Frey, Teryl K.; Seybold, Volker; de Groot, Raoul J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary More than any other methodology, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has contributed to our understanding of the architecture and organization of cells. With current detection limits approaching atomic resolution, it will ultimately become possible to ultrastructurally image intracellular macromolecular assemblies in situ. Presently, however, methods to unambiguously identify proteins within the crowded environment of the cell’s interior are lagging behind. We describe a novel approach, metal-tagging TEM (METTEM) that allows detection of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells with high specificity, exceptional sensitivity and at molecular scale resolution. In live cells treated with gold salts, proteins bearing a small metal-binding tag will form 1-nm gold nanoclusters, readily detectable in electron micrographs. The applicability and strength of METTEM is demonstrated by a study of Rubella virus replicase and capsid proteins, which revealed virus-induced cell structures not seen before. PMID:22579245

  1. Investigation of thin films, heterostructures and devices of ceramic superconductors by means of high-resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Chunlin.

    1993-08-01

    In this thesis a systematic study of the microstructure of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 thin films is presented by means of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). Most of the efforts are focused on the characterization of heterostructures of superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 and non-superconducting PrBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 and on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films deposited on step-edge substrates. These specially designed structures exhibit a great potential for the electronic application of high-Tc superconductors and for the investigation of the basic electric properties of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 superconductor. (orig.) [de

  2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of {sigma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Fei [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu Pan [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Feng Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Han Xiaodong; Mao Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM micrograph of {sigma} phase; (b) HRTEM image of {sigma}/{gamma} interface corresponding to the area of the white frame in (a); (c) an enlarged image of area from the white frame in (b). The combination of {sigma}/{gamma} interface appears very well, and a two-atomic-layer step is shown on the {sigma}/{gamma} interface. In addition, {sigma} phase has the orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental characteristic of {sigma} phase is studied by HAADF techniques and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial characteristics of {sigma}/{gamma} interface are revealed by HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An atomic structural {sigma}/{gamma} interface with a two-atomic-layer step has been proposed. - Abstract: By means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field image technique (HAADF), morphological of plate-shaped {sigma} phase and interfacial characteristics between plate-shaped {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys have been studied. On the basis of HRTEM observations, an atomic structural interface between {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase with a step has been proposed. {sigma} Phase has the relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma},} (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. The compositional characteristics of the {sigma} phase which

  3. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing: the effect of substrate thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F; Lazic, Ivan; Beyer, André

    2011-01-01

    It is often suggested that the growth in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is caused not only by primary electrons, but also (and even predominantly) by secondary electrons (SEs). If that is true, the growth rate for FEBIP can be changed by modifying the SE yield. Results from our ...

  4. High-resolution electron microscope image analysis approach for superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Lu, F.; Jia, C.; Hua, Z.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, an HREM (High-resolution electron microscope) image analysis approach has been developed. The image filtering, segmentation and particles extraction based on gray-scale mathematical morphological operations, are performed on the original HREM image. The final image is a pseudocolor image, with the background removed, relatively uniform brightness, filtered slanting elongation, regular shape for every kind of particle, and particle boundaries that no longer touch each other so that the superconducting material structure can be shown clearly

  5. High-resolution patterning of graphene by screen printing with a silicon stencil for highly flexible printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-01-07

    High-resolution screen printing of pristine graphene is introduced for the rapid fabrication of conductive lines on flexible substrates. Well-defined silicon stencils and viscosity-controlled inks facilitate the preparation of high-quality graphene patterns as narrow as 40 μm. This strategy provides an efficient method to produce highly flexible graphene electrodes for printed electronics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High resolution electron microscopy studies of interfaces between Al2O3 substrates and MBE grown Nb films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, J.; Ruhle, M.; Dura, J.; Flynn, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on single crystal niobium films grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on (001) S sapphire substrates. Cross-sectional specimens with thickness of 2 O 3 interface could be investigated by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The orientation relationship between the metal film and the ceramic substrate was verified by selected area diffraction: (111) Nb parallel (0001) S and [1 bar 10] Nb parallel [2 bar 1 bar 10] S . The atomistic structure of the interface was identified by HREM

  7. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Moon, C.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Inagaki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  8. One- and two-phonon mixed-symmetry states in 94Mo in high-resolution electron and proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, H.; Botha, N.T.; Burda, O.; Carter, J.; Fearick, R.W.; Foertsch, S.V.; Fransen, C.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Neveling, R.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Scholten, O.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F.D.; Wambach, J.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution inelastic electron scattering experiments at the S-DALINAC and proton scattering experiments at iThemba LABS permit a thorough test of the nature of proposed one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2 + states of the nucleus 94 Mo. The combined analysis reveals the one-phonon content of the mixed-symmetry state and its isovector character suggested by microscopic calculations. The purity of two-phonon 2 + states is extracted

  9. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T., E-mail: kobayashi.tatsuya@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Yoshinuma, M.; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Moon, C.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Inagaki, S. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  10. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  11. High-resolution electron microscopy study of electron-irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in α-SiC single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, H.; Mori, H.; Sakata, T.

    1992-01-01

    An electron-irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous (CA) transition in α-SiC has been studied by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The irradiation-produced damage structure was examined as a function of dose of electrons by taking high-resolution maps extending from the unirradiated crystalline region to the completely amorphized region. In the intermediate region between those two regions, that is in the CA transition region, the damage structure was essentially a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases. The volume fraction of the amorphous phase was found to increase with increasing dose of electrons and no discrete crystalline-amorphous interface was observed in the CA transition region. These facts indicate the heterogeneous and gradual nature of the CA transition. In the transition region close to the unirradiated crystalline region, a sort of fragmentation of the crystal lattice was observed to occur, crystallites with slightly different orientations with respect to the parent crystal were formed owing to the strain around the dispersed local amorphous regions. In the transition region close to the amorphized region, these crystallites were reduced in size and were embedded in an amorphous matrix. This damage structure is the result of the increased volume fraction of the amorphous phase. In the completely amorphized region, no lattice fringes were recognized in the HREM images. The atomistic process of the CA transition is discussed on the basis of the present results and those from previous studies. (Author)

  12. The spatial resolution of silicon-based electron detectors in beta-autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Jorge; Wells, Kevin

    2010-03-21

    Thin tissue autoradiography is an imaging modality where ex-vivo tissue sections are placed in direct contact with autoradiographic film. These tissue sections contain a radiolabelled ligand bound to a specific biomolecule under study. This radioligand emits beta - or beta+ particles ionizing silver halide crystals in the film. High spatial resolution autoradiograms are obtained using low energy radioisotopes, such as (3)H where an intrinsic 0.1-1 microm spatial resolution can be achieved. Several digital alternatives have been presented over the past few years to replace conventional film but their spatial resolution has yet to equal film, although silicon-based imaging technologies have demonstrated higher sensitivity compared to conventional film. It will be shown in this work how pixel size is a critical parameter for achieving high spatial resolution for low energy uncollimated beta imaging. In this work we also examine the confounding factors impeding silicon-based technologies with respect to spatial resolution. The study considers charge diffusion in silicon and detector noise, and this is applied to a range of radioisotopes typically used in autoradiography. Finally an optimal detector geometry to obtain the best possible spatial resolution for a specific technology and a specific radioisotope is suggested.

  13. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  14. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range

  15. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  16. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  17. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kuwajima

    Full Text Available Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2 (65.54 µm per side at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM system, which were only 66.59 µm(2 (8.160 µm per side at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2 and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm. Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems.

  18. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of clean and hydrogen covered Si(001) surfaces: first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C H

    2012-09-07

    Surface phonons, conductivities, and loss functions are calculated for reconstructed (2×1), p(2×2) and c(4×2) clean Si(001) surfaces, and (2×1) H and D covered Si(001) surfaces. Surface conductivities perpendicular to the surface are significantly smaller than conductivities parallel to the surface. The surface loss function is compared to high resolution electron energy loss measurements. There is good agreement between calculated loss functions and experiment for H and D covered surfaces. However, agreement between experimental data from different groups and between theory and experiment is poor for clean Si(001) surfaces. Formalisms for calculating electron energy loss spectra are reviewed and the mechanism of electron energy losses to surface vibrations is discussed.

  19. Impact of measuring electron tracks in high-resolution scientific charge-coupled devices within Compton imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, D.H.; Coffer, A.; Plimley, B.; Vetter, K.

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented benchmarked models to determine the gain in sensitivity of electron-tracking based Compton imaging relative to conventional Compton imaging by the use of high-resolution scientific charge-coupled devices (CCD). These models are based on the recently demonstrated ability of electron-tracking based Compton imaging by using fully depleted scientific CCDs. Here we evaluate the gain in sensitivity by employing Monte Carlo simulations in combination with advanced charge transport models to calculate two-dimensional charge distributions corresponding to experimentally obtained tracks. In order to reconstruct the angle of the incident γ-ray, a trajectory determination algorithm was used on each track and integrated into a back-projection routine utilizing a geodesic-vertex ray tracing technique. Analysis was performed for incident γ-ray energies of 662 keV and results show an increase in sensitivity consistent with tracking of the Compton electron to approximately ±30 o .

  20. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  1. Investigations on resolution enhancement in EPR by means of electron spin echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merks, R.P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The electron spin echo technique has been applied in four types of experiments: the measurement of electric field induced shifts of the EPR line; the detection of electron spin echo ENDOR; a relaxation measurement and the measurement of hyperfine interactions via the nuclear modulation effect. (Auth.)

  2. Testing of Track Point Resolution of Gas Electron Multiplier with Pion Beam at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Adak, R P; Das, S; Dubey, A K; Ganti, M S; Saini, J; Singaraju, R

    2015-01-01

    A muon detection system using segmented and instrumented absorber has been designed for high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments to be held at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The muon detector system is mounted downstream of a Silicon Tracking System. The reconstructed tracks from the STS are to be matched to the hits in the GEM detector. For reconstructing track in the GEM Detector, track point resolution is an important issue. We report her first time the track point resolution of the GEM detector.

  3. Inner-Shell Excitations of 2p Electrons of Argon Investigated by Fast Electron Impact with High Resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Lin-Mao; Wang You-Yan; Li Dong-Dong; Yuan Zhen-Sheng; Zhu Lin-Fan

    2011-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectra of inner-shell excitations of 2p electrons of argon are measured at an incident electron energy of 2500 eV and scattering angles of 0° and 4°. The dipole-forbidden transitions of 2p −1 3/2 4p and 2p −1 3/2 5p are observed in the measured spectra and assigned based on the calculations of the Cowan code. The positions and line widths for the excitations of 2p −1 3/2 nl and 2p −1 1/2 nl (n ≤ 5) of argon are determined. The present results show that the line widths of the electric quadrupole transitions of 2p −1 3/2 4p[5/2 + 3/2] 2 and the electric monopole one of 2p −1 3/2 4p[1/2] 0 are less than those of the dipole-allowed transitions. (atomic and molecular physics)

  4. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbun, N.; Lund, E.; Adolfsson, E.; Gustafsson, H.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogeneously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. (authors)

  5. Novel method of simultaneous multiple immunogold localization on resin sections in high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebesářová, Jana; Wandrol, P.; Vancová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 105-517 ISSN 1549-9634 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : multiple immunolabeling * gold nanoparticles * high resolution SEM * STEM imaging * BSE imaging Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 5.720, year: 2016

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of tumor hypoxia: enhanced spatial and temporal resolution for in vivo pO2 determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Subramanian, Sankaran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Aravalluvan, Thirumaran; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2006-05-01

    The time-domain (TD) mode of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data collection offers a means of estimating the concentration of a paramagnetic probe and the oxygen-dependent linewidth (LW) to generate pO2 maps with minimal errors. A methodology for noninvasive pO2 imaging based on the application of TD-EPR using oxygen-induced LW broadening of a triarylmethyl (TAM)-based radical is presented. The decay of pixel intensities in an image is used to estimate T2*, which is inversely proportional to pO2. Factors affecting T2* in each pixel are critically analyzed to extract the contribution of dissolved oxygen to EPR line-broadening. Suitable experimental and image-processing parameters were obtained to produce pO2 maps with minimal artifacts. Image artifacts were also minimized with the use of a novel data collection strategy using multiple gradients. Results from a phantom and in vivo imaging of tumor-bearing mice validated this novel method of noninvasive oximetry. The current imaging protocols achieve a spatial resolution of approximately 1.0 mm and a temporal resolution of approximately 9 s for 2D pO2 mapping, with a reliable oxygen resolution of approximately 1 mmHg (0.12% oxygen in gas phase). This work demonstrates that in vivo oximetry can be performed with good sensitivity, accuracy, and high spatial and temporal resolution.

  7. Information System of Resolution of Procedural Incidents and Management of the Modifications Made to the Electronic Court Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan Gheorghe PENTIUC

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This information system was made for its use by the staff responsible for random distribution of cases to the courts. The Information System of Resolution of Procedural Incidents and Management of the Modifications Made to the Electronic Court Registration consists of three new developed modules: the management module is a Web application which chronicles the modifications made in the electronic court registration, regarding the random assignment of cases,the resolution of procedural incidents, which is a Web service whose logic implements a logic Semantic Web application and the module of confirming judges which is a windows service running on the judges’ workstations. The Web service implements a Semantic Web application which processes the knowledgebase achieved through OWL ontology (Ontology Web Language by applying inferences leading to the correct solution. If this does not solve the problem, a set of associated Jena rules are used to infer and generate new knowledge. It also uses the SPARQL(SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language language that allows queries on the knowledge,similar to the classic query languages of databases. The novelty of the new conceived, designed and implemented system consists in accessing the domain knowledge as a web service to solve the procedural incidents occurred in electronic court registration.

  8. Resolution and Efficiency of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers with Final Read-out Electronics at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dubbert, J; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Rauscher, F; Richter, R; Staude, A; Stiller, W

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a monitored drift-tube chamber for ATLAS with the final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation facility at CERN under varyin photon irradiation rates of up to 990~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$ which corresponds to 10 times the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. The signal pulse-height measurement of the final read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections. The corrections improve the average single-tube resolution from 106~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the nominal discriminator threshold of 44~mV without irradiation, and from 114~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the maximum nominal irradiation rate in ATLAS of 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The reduction of the threshold from 44~mV to 34~mV and the time-slewing corrections lead to an average single-tube resolution of 82~$\\mu$m without photon background and of 89~$\\mu$m at 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The measured muon detection efficiency agrees with the expectation for the final read-out electronics.

  9. High-Resolution of Electron Microscopy of Montmorillonite and Montmorillonite/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drummy, Lawrence F; Farmer, Karen; Tan, Ashley; Farmer, B. L; Vaia, Richard A; Koerner, Hilmar

    2005-01-01

    .... These procedures involve careful control of the microscope's objective lens defocus to maximize contrast from features of certain size, as well as limiting the total dose of electrons received by the sample...

  10. Optimization of the detector and associated electronics used for high-resolution liquid-scintillation alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorngate, J.H.; Christian, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of various reflector geometries, light coupling liquids, photomultiplier tubes, preamplifiers and linear amplifiers were compared and the configuration found that optimized the combination of pulse-height resolution and pulse-shape discrimination. The best combination used a hemispherical reflector, filled with distilled water, coupled to an 8575 photomultiplier tube, the output of which was conditioned by a special integrating preamplifier and a double-delay-line linear amplifier. Careful choice of the scintillator, sample preparation procedures, and electronic apparatus can produce liquid-scintillation alpha spectroscopy with a pulse-height resolution of 300 keV, or less, and, by using pulse-shape discrimination, background levels as low as 0.01 counts/min. (author)

  11. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  12. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of Al x Ga 1-x As, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Study of the structure of the particles of channel black of phase-contrasting electron microscopy of high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlakov, V.P.; Fialkov, A.S.; Smirnov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of channel black, DG-100, in the initial and graphitized states has been studied by phase-contrasting electron microscopy with a direct resolution of the carbon layers. An individual carbon layer is the main structural element of carbon black. The structure of channel black in the graphitized state looks like a hollow closed polyhedron made up of bundles of continuous carbon layers which can bend and become deformed to a great extent, testifying to the polymeric nature of the structure of channel black. The authors give an interpretation of the roentgen values of the 'dimensions of crystallites' in channel black.

  14. Quantitative analysis of localized stresses in irradiated stainless steels using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and molecular dynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Kuhr, B.; Farkas, D.; Was, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of stress near dislocation channel–grain boundary (DC–GB) interaction sites were made using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HREBSD) and have been compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Tensile stress normal to the grain boundary was significantly elevated at discontinuous DC–GB intersections with peak magnitudes roughly an order of magnitude greater than at sites where slip transfer occurred. These results constitute the first measurement of stress amplification at DC–GB intersections and provide support to the theory that high normal stress at the grain boundary may be a key driver for the initiation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracks.

  15. Characterisation of radiation damage in perovskite using high angular resolution electron channeling x-ray spectroscopy (HARECXS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.L.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Predicting and/or modelling the occurrence of radiation damage induced defects and their effects on physical properties (eg. amorphisation induced swelling, electrical conductivity., optical response etc.) in ceramic phases requires knowledge of the displacement energies, E d , of cations and anions in those phases. In this study, High Angular Resolution Electron Channelling X-ray Spectroscopy (HARECXS) spectra were collected from perovskite (CaTiO 3 ) samples that had been exposed to high-energy electrons or high-energy heavy ions. Calculations based on experimental data were then used to indicate the E d of the cations in perovskite. The HARECXS measurements were conducted on a Philips EM 420T AEM (LaB6 source, operated at 120 kV) fitted with an EDAX ultra thin window Si(Li) detector. The specimen was first manually oriented to an appropriate zone axis. Then control of the relative orientation of the incident probe was accomplished via direct computer control of the beam tilt coils, Typical acquisition times for a complete two-dimensional scan were 18-24 hours, while one dimensional scans ranged from 1-5 hours. Our experiments established that: a) HARECXS can detect radiation damage in perovskite caused by either high energy heavy ions or high energy electrons, b) the HARECXS signature of perovskite shows a systematic change with ion dose, c) HARECXS detects damage in perovskite that has been irradiated with 900kV electrons and does not detect damage in perovskite that has been irradiated with 620kV electrons, indicating the existance of an electron irradiation damage threshold. Calculations based on the latter results indicate that the displacement energy, E d of calcium and titanium in perovskite lie between 50 and 85eV. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  16. In situ electrical probing and bias-mediated manipulation of dielectric nanotubes in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golberg, D.; Mitome, M.; Kurashima, K.; Zhi, C.Y.; Tang, C.C.; Bando, Y.; Lourie, O.

    2006-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes filled with magnesium oxides [MgO, MgO 2 ] and/or hydroxide [Mg(OH) 2 ] are electrically probed and delicately manipulated inside a 300 kV JEOL-3000F high-resolution transmission analytical electron microscope equipped with a side-entry 'Nanofactory Instruments' piezoholder. At a low bias the nanotubes demonstrate truly insulating behavior. At a high bias of ±30 V they show reversible breakdown current of several dozens of nA. Under 300 kV electron beam irradiation the nanotubes are positively charged that allows us to perform on-demand manipulation with them through tuning of polarity and/or value of a bias voltage on a gold counterelectrode from -140 to +140 V, owing to the prominent electrostatic nanotube-electrode interactions

  17. A low cost high resolution pattern generator for electron-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennelli, G.; D'Angelo, F.; Piotto, M.; Barillaro, G.; Pellegrini, B.

    2003-01-01

    A simple, very low cost pattern generator for electron-beam lithography is presented. When it is applied to a scanning electron microscope, the system allows a high precision positioning of the beam for lithography of very small structures. Patterns are generated by a suitable software implemented on a personal computer, by using very simple functions, allowing an easy development of new writing strategies for a great adaptability to different user necessities. Hardware solutions, as optocouplers and battery supply, have been implemented for reduction of noise and disturbs on the voltages controlling the positioning of the beam

  18. Achievement of extreme resolution for the selective by depth Moessbauer method on conversion electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenkov, M.I.; Zhdanov, V.S.; Ryzhikh, V.Yu.; Chubisov, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan the depth selective conversion electrons Moessbauer spectroscopy (DSCEMS) method was realized on the facility designed on the magnet sector beta-spectrometer base with the dual focusing equipped with non-equipotential electron source in the multi-ribbon variant and the position-sensitive detector. In the work the model statistical calculations of energy and angular distributions experienced not so many times of inelastic scattering acts were carried out

  19. Spatial and temporal resolution in cryo-electron microscopy : a scope for nano-chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederik, P.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy has evolved in an established approach to study the structure of bio-colloids. Recent developments in instrumentation and automation, often demanded by life sciences, made cryo-EM a general tool in colloid chemistry. Recently improved instrumentation for vitrification has

  20. Inner shell excitation in atoms and molecules by high resolution electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this work an inner-shell spin-forbidden transition in N 2 and a parity-forbidden transition in Ar were studied. These transitions were observed by using incident electron energies as low as 1.15 times the excitation energy of the inner-shell states. (Auth.)

  1. [A high resolution projection electron spectrometers]: Final report 1978-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The main emphasis of the work has been to study inner shell ionization processes. The signatures have been K x-rays or K Auger transitions. We have worked with semiconductor or Bragg x-ray spectrometers. Toward the end of the contract we concentrated on projectile electron spectroscopy. These topics and other atomic physics projects are described briefly in this progress report

  2. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R. P.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Afanasev, A. V.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peña, C.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GEp, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GEp from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (ɛ ) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ɛ at Q2=1.45 GeV2 . This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Δ intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2 - 3 GeV2 .

  3. Technique for measuring hot plsma electron temperture by soft X-ray spectra with increased resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, V.A.; Kabanovskij, S.V.; Lyadina, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Ways of improving time resolution of amplitude spectrometers used for diagnostics of hot plasma in tokamaks are discussed. The circuit of an analog-to-digital processor for processing signals coming from detectors is suggested. The converter comprises 8 similar channels each of them including an input shaper, differential discriminator with a wide energy band; fast shaper with shaping time of 0.1-0.2 μs, analog delay circuit, linear transmission circuit, control device, slow shaping circuit, differential discriminator with a narrow energy band, digital intensimeter. Model test of the described channel is conducted; it confirmed correctness of the applied method

  4. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  5. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, L D; Rivas, J; José-Yacamán, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS 2 will be discussed. MoS 2 -based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important

  6. Structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates, studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Robert, E-mail: bobsinc@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Sang Chul, E-mail: sclee99@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Shi, Yezhou; Chueh, William C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    We have applied aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films, grown by pulsed laser deposition onto (001) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. There are few observable defects apart from the expected mismatch interfacial dislocations and so the films would be expected to have good potential for applications. Under high electron beam dose rate (above about 6000 e{sup -}/Å{sup 2}s) domains of an ordered structure appear and these are interpreted as being created by oxygen vacancy ordering. The ordered structure does not appear at lower lose rates (ca. 2600 e{sup -}/Å{sup 2}s) and can be removed by imaging under 1 mbar oxygen gas in an environmental TEM. EELS confirms that there is both oxygen deficiency and the associated increase in Ce{sup 3+} versus Ce{sup 4+} cations in the ordered domains. In situ high resolution TEM recordings show the formation of the ordered domains as well as atomic migration along the ceria thin film (001) surface. - Highlights: • The local structure and chemistry of ceria can be studied by TEM combined with EELS. • At lower electron, there are no observable changes in the ceria thin films. • At higher dose rates, an ordered phase is created due to oxygen vacancy ordering. • In situ HRTEM shows the oxygen vacancy ordering and the movement of surface atoms.

  7. Online diagnostics of time-resolved electron beam properties with femtosecond resolution for X-ray FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Minjie

    2016-07-01

    The European X-ray Free-electron Laser (XFEL) puts high demands on the quality of the highbrightness driving electron beam with bunch lengths in the femtosecond regime. Longitudinal diagnostics is requested to optimize and control the longitudinal profile, the longitudinal phase space, the slice energy spread and the slice emittance of the electron bunch, all of which are crucial to the generation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The high bunch repetition rate of the super-conducting accelerator renders diagnostic method that is (quasi) non-destructive to the generation of SASE possible. In this thesis, three online diagnostic sections utilizing transverse deflecting structures (TDS) have been designed for the European XFEL, providing access to all parameters of interest with a longitudinal resolution down to below 10 fs.The requirement on the non-destructive capability has been realized by the implementation of fast kickermagnets and off-axis screens, which has been validated experimentally using an installation of the same concept at the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg. A special slicing procedure has been developed to significantly enhance the accuracy of slice energy spread measurements. Suppression of coherence effects, which impede the beam imaging in the TDS diagnostics, has been first demonstrated experimentally using the spatial separation method with scintillator screens. Comparison of the results of emittance measurements using the quadrupole scan method with those using the multi-screen method has proved the reliability of the latter method, which has been modelled intensively for the European XFEL.

  8. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  9. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe [Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  10. Improving the resolution in soft X-ray emission spectrometers through photon-counting using an Electron Multiplying CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D J; Soman, M; Tutt, J; Murray, N; Holland, A; Schmitt, T; Raabe, J; Strocov, V N; Schmitt, B

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, a study of back-illuminated Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) for soft X-ray photon detection demonstrated the improvements that could be brought over more traditional micro-channel plate detectors for X-ray spectrometers based on diffraction gratings and position sensitive detectors. Whilst the spatial resolution was reported to be improved dramatically, an intrinsic limit of approximately 25 micrometers was found due to the spreading of the charge cloud generated in the CCD across several pixels. To overcome this resolution limit, it is necessary to move away from the current integrated imaging methods and consider a photon-counting approach, recording the photon interaction locations to the sub-pixel level. To make use of photon-counting techniques it is important that the individual events are separable. To maintain the throughput of the spectrometer for high intensity lines, higher frame rates and therefore higher readout speeds are required. With CCD based systems, the increased noise at high readout speeds can limit the photon-counting performance. The Electron-Multiplying CCD shares a similar architecture with the standard CCD but incorporates a g ain register . This novel addition allows controllable gain to be applied to the signal before the read noise is introduced, therefore allowing individual events to be resolved above the noise even at much higher readout rates. In the past, the EM-CCD has only been available with imaging areas too small to be practical in soft X-ray emission spectrometers. The current drive for large area Electron-Multiplying CCDs is opening this technology to new photon-counting applications, requiring in-depth analysis of the processes and techniques involved. Early results indicate that through the introduction of photon-counting techniques the resolution in such systems can be dramatically improved.

  11. Sensitivity and spatial resolution for electron-spin-resonance detection by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Roukes, M.L.; Hammel, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    The signal intensity of electron spin resonance in magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) experiments employing periodic saturation of the electron spin magnetization is determined by four parameters: the rf field H 1 , the modulation level of the bias field H m , the spin relaxation time τ 1 , and the magnetic size R(∂H/∂z) of the sample. Calculations of the MRFM spectra obtained from a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl particle have been performed for various conditions. The results are compared with experimental data and excellent agreement is found. The systematic variation of the signal intensity as a function of H 1 and H m provides a powerful tool to characterize the MRFM apparatus. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Core polarisation and configuration mixing in 58Ni studied by high resolution electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleus 58 Ni is studied by inelastic electron-scattering. This nucleus has two valence neutrons outside a closed 58 Ni core which implies that no valence protons contribute to the transitions and thus, besides configuration mixing of the valence neutrons, proton-core polarization can be studied in detail. From inelastic electron-scattering data one obtains the charge- and current-transition densities by determining the Fourier-Bessel transform of the cross sections measured over a wide range of linear momenta transferred to the nucleus. The results of an analysis of the excitation of two 0 ++ states at low-momentum transfer are presented. These transitions are particularly interesting for studying core-polarization contributions. (Auth.)

  13. Low-energy magnetic dipole response in 56Fe from high-resolution electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearick, R.W.; Hartung, G.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.

    2003-01-01

    The 56 Fe(e, e') reaction has been studied for excitation energies up to about 8 MeV and momentum transfers q≅0.4-0.55 fm -1 at the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (DALINAC) with kinematics emphasizing M1 transitions. Additional data have been taken for q≅0.8-1.7 fm -1 at the electron accelerator NIKHEF, Amsterdam. A PWBA analysis allows spin and parity determination of the excited states. For M1 excitations, transition strengths are derived with a DWBA analysis using shell-model form factors. The resulting B(M1) strength distribution is compared to shell-model calculations employing different effective interactions. The form factor of the prominent low-lying M1 transition at 3.449 MeV demonstrates its dominant orbital nature. It represents a major part of the scissors mode in 56 Fe

  14. Optical Sideband Generation: a Longitudinal Electron Beam Diagnostic Beyond the Laser Bandwidth Resolution Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Tilborg, J. van; Matlis, N. H.; Plateau, G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    Electro-optic sampling (EOS) is widely used as a technique to measure THz-domain electric field pulses such asthe self-fields of femtosecond electron beams. We present an EOS-based approach for single-shot spectral measurement that excels in simplicity (compatible with fiber integration) and bandwidth coverage (overcomes the laser bandwidth limitation), allowing few-fs electron beams or single-cycle THz pulses to be characterized with conventional picosecond probes. It is shown that the EOS-induced optical sidebands on the narrow-bandwidth optical probe are spectrally-shifted replicas of the THz pulse. An experimental demonstration on a 0-3 THz source is presented.

  15. High resolution electron exit wave reconstruction from a diffraction pattern using Gaussian basis decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Kirkland, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    We describe an algorithm to reconstruct the electron exit wave of a weak-phase object from single diffraction pattern. The algorithm uses analytic formulations describing the diffraction intensities through a representation of the object exit wave in a Gaussian basis. The reconstruction is achieved by solving an overdetermined system of non-linear equations using an easily parallelisable global multi-start search with Levenberg-Marquard optimisation and analytic derivatives

  16. High resolution electron scattering facility at the Darmstadt Linear Accelerator (DALINAC). Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foh, J.; Frey, R.; Schneider, R.; Schuell, D.; Schwierczinski, A.; Theissen, H.; Titze, O.

    1977-11-01

    The computer system installed for the electron scattering facility and its usage is described. For on-line control a dedicated system of two tightly coupled computers (PDP 11/20, H116) is used wheras a PDP 11/45 is provided for all other data processing work resulting from the experiments. Special interfaces, graphic terminals, system software and a complete set of application programs have been developed. (orig.) [de

  17. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-01-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision ± 6%, relative precision between channels ± 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B vacuum with ripple, B para , B dia , B pol , all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz spaced). (authors)

  18. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M. [Association EURATOM -CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision {+-} 6%, relative precision between channels {+-} 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B{sub vacuum} with ripple, B{sub para}, B{sub dia}, B{sub pol}, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz

  19. A high resolution electron microscopy investigation of curvature in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, D. N.; Blau, W. J.; Zandbergen, H. W.

    1995-07-01

    Evidence for heptagon inclusion in multi-walled carbon nanotubes was sought in arc-produced carbon deposits. Transmission electron microscopy revealed many curved nanotubes although their relative abundance was low. Close examination of the micrographs in the regions of expected heptagon inclusion shows that the curvature is accomplished by folding or fracture of the lattice planes. This observed phenomenon contradicts the theoretical modelling studies which predict stable structures with negative curvature accomplished by heptagon/pentagon pairs. A possible explanation for curvature in single-walled tubes is presented based on a molecular mechanics geometry optimisation study of spa inclusion in a graphite sheet.

  20. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ducournau

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements.

  1. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Francis; Yang, Chun; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lampin, Jean-François; Blary, Karine; Peytavit, Emilien; Akalin, Tahsin; Ducournau, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements.

  2. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Francis; Yang, Chun; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lampin, Jean-François; Blary, Karine; Peytavit, Emilien; Akalin, Tahsin; Ducournau, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements. PMID:22291552

  3. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-02-12

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. This newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.

  4. Crystal interface and high-resolution electron microscopy—the best partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ichinose

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Several contributions of HRTEM on the interface science are reviewed in chronological order. The first contribution of HRTEM is the observation of gold (113Σ°11 boundary, giving experimental proof of the CSL model. An observation of the asymmetric (112Σ°3 boundary follows. A SiC grain boundary is effectively assessed not by the density of CSL point but the number of dangling bonds in the boundary. A ZnO/Pd interface provides an example that a misfit dislocation does not necessarily accommodate the lattice mismatch. Segregated interface shows characteristic HRTEM image contrast, suggesting change in atomic bonding. An atomic height step in the semiconductor hetero interface is observed by the Chemical Lattice Image technique. In the diamond grain boundary a dangling bond may not elevate the boundary energy, being contradictory of the least dangling bond rule. Super-high resolution of the HVHRTEM enable us to determine atomic species in the grain boundary. Combined use of HRTEM and EELSE allows us to discuss the correlation between atomic structure and nature of the corresponding interface. It is not exaggeration to say that modern interface science does not exist witout HRTEM. On the other hand, many complicated interfaces found by HRTEM remained as unaswered questions. An innovative structural model is requested to appear on the scene.

  5. Quantitative High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM): a novel approach towards application oriented basic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisielowski, Christian; Weber, Eicke R.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments of microscopic methods that base on a quantitative analysis of electron micrographs to access subsurface systems at the atomic scale. It focuses on non-equilibrium diffusion processes that are observed in nano structured MBE grown materials if a low growth temperature was used and on local deviations from a stoichiometric composition of materials. As examples we investigate Ga As/Al As and Si/Ge Si heterostructures and Ga N single crystals. The purpose of the research is twofold. On the one hand it helps understanding physical processes at the atomic scale. On the other hand we can use the results to link basic physical knowledge with the performance of semiconductor devices made from nano structured materials. (author). 28 refs., 15 figs

  6. Resolution of the hydroxyapatite crystal lattice in bone and dental enamel by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvig, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    The molecular and atomic structure of hydroxyapatite was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The form, size and packing of hydroxyapatite crystals in sections of bone and dental hard tissues could be determined. Lattice fringe patterns with repeat distances in the range 2.7-8.2 A occurred in images of individual crystals. On the basis of these fringes the true orientation of the crystals relative to the plane of sectioning was calculated. The observed crystal lattice spacings and interplanar angles were in close agreement with data derived from X-ray diffraction analysis. This study shows that the possibility exists of relating crystallographic analysis to the morphology and fine structure of calcified tissue in health and disease

  7. Band resolution of optical spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, F.-Y.; Freeman, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran are empirically resolved into two Gaussian bands and a continuum tail. The first Gaussian band covers most of the low energy side of the spectrum. The second Gaussian band lies at an energy slightly above that of the absorption maximum of the total spectrum. With the exception of tert-butyl alcohol, in water and alcohols the following were observed: (a) the first Gaussian bands have the same half-width, but the oscillator strength in water is about double that in an alcohol; (b) the second Gaussian bands have similar half-widths and oscillator strengths; (c) the continuum tails have similar half-widths, yet that in water possesses only about one third as much oscillator strength as the one in alcohol. In tert-butyl alcohol and tetrahydrofuran the first Gaussian band and the continuum tail each carry nearly half of the total oscillator strength. (author)

  8. Bio-camouflage of anatase nanoparticles explored by in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Mukherjee, Arijita; Hu, Xuan; Shafien, Shayan; Ghodsi, Reza; He, Kun; Gemini-Piperni, Sara; Wang, Canhui; Klie, Robert F; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Borojevic, Radovan; Rocha, Luis A; Granjeiro, José M

    2017-08-03

    While titanium is the metal of choice for most prosthetics and inner body devices due to its superior biocompatibility, the discovery of Ti-containing species in the adjacent tissue as a result of wear and corrosion has been associated with autoimmune diseases and premature implant failures. Here, we utilize the in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a liquid flow holder and graphene liquid cells (GLCs) to investigate, for the first time, the in situ nano-bio interactions between titanium dioxide nanoparticles and biological medium. This imaging and spectroscopy methodology showed the process of formation of an ionic and proteic bio-camouflage surrounding Ti dioxide (anatase) nanoparticles that facilitates their internalization by bone cells. The in situ understanding of the mechanisms of the formation of the bio-camouflage of anatase nanoparticles may contribute to the definition of strategies aimed at the manipulation of these NPs for bone regenerative purposes.

  9. Tensor decompositions for the analysis of atomic resolution electron energy loss spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegelberg, Jakob; Rusz, Ján [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Pelckmans, Kristiaan [Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Box 337, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-04-15

    A selection of tensor decomposition techniques is presented for the detection of weak signals in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. The focus of the analysis lies on the correct representation of the simulated spatial structure. An analysis scheme for EEL spectra combining two-dimensional and n-way decomposition methods is proposed. In particular, the performance of robust principal component analysis (ROBPCA), Tucker Decompositions using orthogonality constraints (Multilinear Singular Value Decomposition (MLSVD)) and Tucker decomposition without imposed constraints, canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) and block term decompositions (BTD) on synthetic as well as experimental data is examined. - Highlights: • A scheme for compression and analysis of EELS or EDX data is proposed. • Several tensor decomposition techniques are presented for BSS on hyperspectral data. • Robust PCA and MLSVD are discussed for denoising of raw data.

  10. The digital structural analysis of cadmium selenide crystals by a method of ion beam thinning for high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Koichi; Baba, Norio; Naka, Michiaki; Kitagawa, Yukihisa; Suzuki, Kunio

    1986-01-01

    A digital processing method using a scanning densitometer system for structural analysis of electron micrographs was successfully applied to a study of cadmium selenide crystals, which were prepared by an argon-ion beam thinning method. Based on Fourier techniques for structural analysis from a computer-generated diffractogram, it was demonstrated that when cadmium selenide crystals were sufficiently thin to display the higher order diffraction spots at a high resolution approaching the atomic level, they constitute an alternative hexagonal lattice of imperfect wurtzite phase from a superposition of individual harmonic images by the enhanced scattering amplitude and corrected phase. From the structural analysis data, a Fourier synthetic lattice image was reconstructed, representing the precise location and three-dimensional arrangement of each of the atoms in the unit cell. Extensively enhanced lattice defect images of dislocations and stacking faults were also derived and shown graphically. (author)

  11. Superstructure of the superconductor BI2Sr2CaCu2O8 by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewat, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The superstructure of the high Tc superconducting oxide BI 2S r 2C aCu 2 0 8 has been studied by high resolution electron microscopy. Waves of distortion along the b-axis give an incommensurate superlattice slightly larger or smaller than 5√2a p (a p = perovskite unit cell). The building blocks along the b-axis are 4, 5 and 6 times √2a p /2. The incommensurate superlattice is composed of approximately periodic combinations of these building blocks. The symmetry of three major projections are P gm (or possibly P gg ), C mm and C mm for the ideal superlattice with b=5√ 2a p . These projections correspond to the space groups Pcnn and Pmnn respectively

  12. Structure and orbital ordering of ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} probed by atomic resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela; Engelmayer, Johannes; Loosdrecht, Paul H.M. van [II. Physikalisches Institut, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Jin, Lei; Jia, Chun-Lin [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-5) and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Himcinschi, Cameliu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Hensling, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Dittmann, Regina [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Orbital ordering has been less investigated in epitaxial thin films, due to the difficulty to evidence directly the occurrence of this phenomenon in thin film samples. Atomic resolution electron microscopy enabled us to observe the structural details of the ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films. The transition to orbital ordering of epitaxial layers as thin as ∼4 nm was probed by temperature-dependent Raman scattering spectroscopy of multilayer samples. From the occurrence and temperature dependence of the 700 cm{sup -1} Raman active mode it can be inferred that the structural phase transition associated with orbital ordering takes place in ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films at about 130 K. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. High-resolution electron microscopy on incommensurate long-period superstructures of hexagonal-close-packed Cu-Sb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, T.; Kakehashi, S.; Takahashi, T.; Hirabayashi, M.

    1989-01-01

    Hexagonal incommensurate long-period superstructures of the Cu-Sb alloys containing 18-20 at.% Sb have been investigated by means of superstructure imaging using a high-resolution electron microscope. Honeycomb-type distributions of hexagonal domains consisting of the commensurate superstructure of type 7a 0 -2H are observed. The incommensurabilities of superstructure can be interpreted well with a hexagonal model composed of the 7a 0 -2H domains surrounded by domain walls which contain higher Sb content than the domain interior. The observed image contrast is reproduced well with multislice computer simulations based on the structure models proposed for the 7a 0 -2H domain and the domain wall. (orig.)

  14. High-resolution electron microscopy on incommensurate long-period superstructures of hexagonal-close-packed Cu-Sb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, T.; Kakehashi, S.; Takahashi, T.; Hirabayashi, M. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research)

    1989-06-01

    Hexagonal incommensurate long-period superstructures of the Cu-Sb alloys containing 18-20 at.% Sb have been investigated by means of superstructure imaging using a high-resolution electron microscope. Honeycomb-type distributions of hexagonal domains consisting of the commensurate superstructure of type 7a{sub 0}-2H are observed. The incommensurabilities of superstructure can be interpreted well with a hexagonal model composed of the 7a{sub 0}-2H domains surrounded by domain walls which contain higher Sb content than the domain interior. The observed image contrast is reproduced well with multislice computer simulations based on the structure models proposed for the 7a{sub 0}-2H domain and the domain wall. (orig.).

  15. High-resolution visualization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms by freeze-substitution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ryan C; Beveridge, Terry J

    2005-11-01

    High-pressure freeze-substitution and transmission electron microscopy have been used for high-resolution imaging of the natural structure of a gram-negative biofilm. Unlike more conventional embedding techniques, this method confirms many of the observations seen by confocal microscopy but with finer structural detail. It further reveals that there is a structural complexity to biofilms at both the cellular and extracellular matrix levels that has not been seen before. Different domains of healthy and lysed cells exist randomly dispersed within a single biofilm as well as different structural organizations of exopolymers. Particulate matter is suspended within this network of fibers and appears to be an integral part of the exopolymeric substance (EPS). O-side chains extending from the outer membrane are integrated into EPS polymers so as to form a continuum. Together, the results support the concept of physical microenvironments within biofilms and show a complexity that was hitherto unknown.

  16. Phonon spectrum of single-crystalline FeSe probed by high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Khalil; Engelhardt, Tobias; Le Tacon, Matthieu; Wolf, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Utilizing high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) we measure the phonon frequencies of β-FeSe(001), cleaved under ultra-high vacuum conditions. At the zone center (Γ bar-point) three prominent loss features are observed at loss energies of about ≃ 20.5 and 25.6 and 40 meV. Based on the scattering selection rules we assign the observed loss features to the A1g, B1g, and A2u phonon modes of β-FeSe(001). The experimentally measured phonon frequencies do not agree with the results of density functional based calculations in which a nonmagnetic, a checkerboard or a strip antiferromagnetic order is assumed for β-FeSe(001). Our measurements suggest that, similar to the other Fe-based materials, magnetism has a profound impact on the lattice dynamics of β-FeSe(001).

  17. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, M.L.; Chien, T.Y.; Preissner, C.; Madhavan, V.; Diesing, D.; Bode, M.; Freeland, J.W.; Rose, V.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  18. Optimizing low-light microscopy with back-illuminated electron multiplying charge-coupled device: enhanced sensitivity, speed, and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Colin G; Denvir, Donal J; McHale, Noel G; Thornbury, Keith D; Hollywood, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    The back-illuminated electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera is having a profound influence on the field of low-light dynamic cellular microscopy, combining highest possible photon collection efficiency with the ability to virtually eliminate the readout noise detection limit. We report here the use of this camera, in 512 x 512 frame-transfer chip format at 10-MHz pixel readout speed, in optimizing a demanding ultra-low-light intracellular calcium flux microscopy setup. The arrangement employed includes a spinning confocal Nipkow disk, which, while facilitating the need to both generate images at very rapid frame rates and minimize background photons, yields very weak signals. The challenge for the camera lies not just in detecting as many of these scarce photons as possible, but also in operating at a frame rate that meets the temporal resolution requirements of many low-light microscopy approaches, a particular demand of smooth muscle calcium flux microscopy. Results presented illustrate both the significant sensitivity improvement offered by this technology over the previous standard in ultra-low-light CCD detection, the GenIII+intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), and also portray the advanced temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of the EMCCD. Copyright 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  19. High-Resolution Electron-Impact Study of the Far-Ultraviolet Emission Spectrum of Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-Ming; Ahmed, Syed M.; Multari, Rosalie A.; James, Geoffrey K.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    The emission spectrum of molecular hydrogen produced by electron-impact excitation at 100 eV has been measured in the wavelength range 1140-1690 A. High-resolution, optically thin spectra (delta(lambda) = 0.136 A) of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) Lyman and Werner band systems have been obtained with a newly constructed 3 m spectrometer. Synthetic spectral intensities based on the transition probabilities calculated by Abgrall et al. are in very good agreement with experimentally observed intensities. Previous modeling that utilized Allison & Daigarno band transition probabilities with Hoenl-London factors breaks down when the transition moment has significant J dependence or when ro-vibrational coupling is significant. Ro-vibrational perturbation between upsilon = 14 of the B(sup 1)Sigma(sup +, sub u) state and upsilon = 3 of the C(sup 1)Pi(sub u) state and the rotational dependence of the transition moment in the bands of the Lyman system are examined. Complete high-resolution experimental reference FUV spectra, together with the model synthetic spectra based on the Abgrall transition probabilities, are presented. An improved calibration standard is obtained, and an accurate calibration of the 3 m spectrometer has been achieved.

  20. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  1. Atomic Resolution Structures of Human Bufaviruses Determined by Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ilyas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bufavirus strain 1 (BuV1, a member of the Protoparvovirus genus of the Parvoviridae, was first isolated from fecal samples of children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso. Since this initial discovery, BuVs have been isolated in several countries, including Finland, the Netherlands, and Bhutan, in pediatric patients exhibiting similar symptoms. Towards their characterization, the structures of virus-like particles of BuV1, BuV2, and BuV3, the current known genotypes, have been determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to 2.84, 3.79, and 3.25 Å, respectively. The BuVs, 65–73% identical in amino acid sequence, conserve the major viral protein, VP2, structure and general capsid surface features of parvoviruses. These include a core β-barrel (βB-βI, α-helix A, and large surface loops inserted between these elements in VP2. The capsid contains depressions at the icosahedral 2-fold and around the 5-fold axes, and has three separated protrusions surrounding the 3-fold axes. Structure comparison among the BuVs and to available parvovirus structures revealed capsid surface variations and capsid 3-fold protrusions that depart from the single pinwheel arrangement of the animal protoparvoviruses. These structures provide a platform to begin the molecular characterization of these potentially pathogenic viruses.

  2. Transformations of gold nanoparticles investigated using variable temperature high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, N.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M.A. van; Zandbergen, H.W. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft, The Netherlands. (Netherlands); Xu, H. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kirkland, A.I., E-mail: angus.kirkland@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Recently designed advanced in-situ specimen holders for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in studies of gold nanoparticles. We report results of variable temperature TEM experiments in which structural transformations have been correlated with specimen temperature, allowing general trends to be identified. Transformation to a decahedral morphology for particles in the size range 5-12 nm was observed for the majority of particles regardless of their initial structure. Following in-situ annealing, decahedra were found to be stable at room temperature, confirming this as the equilibrium morphology, in agreement with recently calculated phase diagrams. Other transitions at low temperature in addition to surface roughening have also been observed and correlated with the same nanoscale phase diagram. Investigations of gold particles at high temperature have revealed evidence for co-existing solid and liquid phases. Overall, these results are important in a more precise understanding of the structure and action of catalytic gold nanoparticles and in the experimental verification of theoretical calculations.

  3. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the high temperature crystal structures of GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) phase change material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structures of GeSb2Te4, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge3Sb2Te6 were determined using electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structure determined for the former two crystals deviates from the ones proposed in the literature. These crystal structures were

  4. Structural evolution of a deformed Σ=9 (122) grain boundary in silicon. A high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study by high resolution electron microscopy of the evolution of a silicon bi-crystal under deformation at different temperatures. The author notably studied the structural evolution of the boundary as well as that of grains at the vicinity of the boundary. Two observation scales have been used: the evolution of sub-structures of dislocations induced by deformation in grains and in boundary, and the structure of all defects at an atomic scale. After a presentation of experimental tools (the necessary perfect quality of the electronic optics is outlined), the author recalls some descriptive aspects of grain boundaries (geometric network concepts to describe coinciding networks, concepts of delimiting boundaries and of structural unit to describe grain boundary atomic structure), recalls the characteristics of the studied bi-crystal, and the conditions under which it is deformed. He presents the structures of all perfectly coinciding boundaries, describes defects obtained by deformation at the vicinity of the boundary, describes the entry of dissociated dislocations into the boundaries, and discusses the characterization of boundary dislocations (the notion of Burgers vector is put into question again), and the atomic mechanism of displacement of dislocations in boundaries [fr

  5. High-spatial-resolution electron density measurement by Langmuir probe for multi-point observations using tiny spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, H.; Røed, K.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Trondsen, E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Miloch, W. J.; Moen, J. I.

    2017-11-01

    A method for evaluating electron density using a single fixed-bias Langmuir probe is presented. The technique allows for high-spatio-temporal resolution electron density measurements, which can be effectively carried out by tiny spacecraft for multi-point observations in the ionosphere. The results are compared with the multi-needle Langmuir probe system, which is a scientific instrument developed at the University of Oslo comprising four fixed-bias cylindrical probes that allow small-scale plasma density structures to be characterized in the ionosphere. The technique proposed in this paper can comply with the requirements of future small-sized spacecraft, where the cost-effectiveness, limited space available on the craft, low power consumption and capacity for data-links need to be addressed. The first experimental results in both the plasma laboratory and space confirm the efficiency of the new approach. Moreover, detailed analyses on two challenging issues when deploying the DC Langmuir probe on a tiny spacecraft, which are the limited conductive area of the spacecraft and probe surface contamination, are presented in the paper. It is demonstrated that the limited conductive area, depending on applications, can either be of no concern for the experiment or can be resolved by mitigation methods. Surface contamination has a small impact on the performance of the developed probe.

  6. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Bos, K.H.W. van den [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Broek, W. [AG Strukturforschung/Elektronenmikroskopie, Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license. - Highlights: • An efficient model-based method for quantitative electron microscopy is introduced. • Images are modelled as a superposition of 2D Gaussian peaks. • Overlap between neighbouring columns is taken into account. • Structure parameters can be obtained with the highest precision and accuracy. • StatSTEM, auser friendly program (GNU public license) is developed.

  7. High-resolution electron microscopic evidence for the filamentous structure of the cyst wall in Giardia muris and Giardia duodenalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsen, S L; Bemrick, W J; Pawley, J

    1989-10-01

    High-resolution morphological studies of the cyst wall of Giardia spp. were performed using low-voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cyst wall was composed of membranous and filamentous layers. The membranous layer consisted of an inner and an outer cyst membrane separated by a thin layer of cytoplasm. The filamentous layer contained individual filaments that ranged from 7 to 20 nm in diameter when measured by LVSEM, formed a dense meshwork with branches or interconnections, and were occasionally arranged on the surface in whorled patterns. Cysts of Giardia muris from mice, Giardia duodenalis from dogs, pigs, voles, beavers, muskrats, and humans, and Giardia psittaci from a bird (parakeet), possessed an essentially identical wall composed of filaments. Inducement of excystation in viable Giardia cysts produced a dramatic increase in the interfilament spacing over an entire cyst, but none was observed in heat-killed or chemically fixed control cysts. These results demonstrated that the cyst wall of Giardia spp. was composed of a complex arrangement of filaments, presumably formed during the process of encystment.

  8. An Inexpensive High-Temporal Resolution Electronic Sun Journal for Monitoring Personal Day to Day Sun Exposure Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Downs

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to natural sunlight, specifically solar ultraviolet (UV radiation contributes to lifetime risks of skin cancer, eye disease, and diseases associated with vitamin D insufficiency. Improved knowledge of personal sun exposure patterns can inform public health policy; and help target high-risk population groups. Subsequently, an extensive number of studies have been conducted to measure personal solar UV exposure in a variety of settings. Many of these studies, however, use digital or paper-based journals (self-reported volunteer recall, or employ cost prohibitive electronic UV dosimeters (that limit the size of sample populations, to estimate periods of exposure. A cost effective personal electronic sun journal (ESJ built from readily available infrared photodiodes is presented in this research. The ESJ can be used to complement traditional UV dosimeters that measure total biologically effective exposure by providing a time-stamped sun exposure record. The ESJ can be easily attached to clothing and data logged to personal devices (including fitness monitors or smartphones. The ESJ improves upon self-reported exposure recording and is a cost effective high-temporal resolution option for monitoring personal sun exposure behavior in large population studies.

  9. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy studies of clean and hydrogen-covered tungsten (100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution (10-meV FWHM) low-energy (≤ 100eV) electrons are scattered from the tungsten (100) surface. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) selection rules are utilized to identify vibrational modes of the surface tungsten atoms. A 36-meV mode is measured on the c(2 X 2) thermally reconstructed surface and is modeled as an overtone of the 18-meV mode at M in the surface Brillouin zone. The superstructure of the reconstructed surface allows this mode to be observed in specular scattering. The surface tungsten atoms return to their bulk lateral positions with saturated hydrogen (β 1 phase) adsorption; and a 26-meV mode identified is due to the perpendicular vibration of the surface tungsten layers. The clean-room temperature surface does not display either low-energy vibrations and the surface is modeled as disordered. The three β 1 phase hydrogen vibrations are observed and a new vibration at 118 meV is identified. The 118-meV cross section displays characteristics of a parallel mode, but calculations show this assignment to be erroneous. There are two hydrogen atoms for each surface tungsten atom in the β 1 phase, and lattice-dynamical calculations show that the 118-meV mode is due to a hydrogen-zone edge vibration. The predicted breakdown of the parallel hydrogen vibration selection rule was not observed

  10. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pennacchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect. Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons.

  11. Design and construction of a high-stability, low-noise power supply for use with high-resolution electron energy loss spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.E.; Davies, P.W.; Crowell, J.E.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The design and construction of a high-stability, low-noise power supply which provides potentials for the lens and analyzer elements of a 127 0 Ehrhardt-type high-resolution electron energy loss spectrometer (HREELS) is described. The supply incorporates a filament emission-control circuit and facilities for measuring electron beam current at each spectrometer element, thus facilitating optimal tuning of the spectrometer. Spectra obtained using this supply are shown to have a four-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and a higher resolution of the vibrational loss features when compared with spectra taken using a previously existing supply based on passive potential divider networks

  12. Attainment of 40.5 pm spatial resolution using 300 kV scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with fifth-order aberration corrector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ryo; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2018-02-01

    The achievement of a fine electron probe for high-resolution imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy requires technological developments, especially in electron optics. For this purpose, we developed a microscope with a fifth-order aberration corrector that operates at 300 kV. The contrast flat region in an experimental Ronchigram, which indicates the aberration-free angle, was expanded to 70 mrad. By using a probe with convergence angle of 40 mrad in the scanning transmission electron microscope at 300 kV, we attained the spatial resolution of 40.5 pm, which is the projected interatomic distance between Ga-Ga atomic columns of GaN observed along [212] direction.

  13. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy synthesis observation of nanostructured carbon coated LiFePO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, M. L.; Laul, D.; Veillette, R.; Serventi, A. M.; Mauger, A.; Julien, C. M.; Zaghib, K.

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies of the structural transformations that occur during the synthesis of carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C-LiFePO 4) and heat treatment to elevated temperatures were conducted in two different electron microscopes. Both microscopes have sample holders that are capable of heating up to 1500 °C, with one working under high vacuum and the other capable of operating with the sample surrounded by a low gaseous environment. The C-LiFePO 4 samples were prepared using three different compositions of precursor materials with Fe(0), Fe(II) or Fe(III), a Li-containing salt and a polyethylene- block-poly(ethylene glycol)-50% ethylene oxide or lactose. The in situ TEM studies suggest that low-cost Fe(0) and a low-cost carbon-containing compound such as lactose are very attractive precursors for mass production of C-LiFePO 4, and that 700 °C is the optimum synthesis temperature. At temperatures higher than 800 °C, LiFePO 4 has a tendency to decompose. The same in situ measurements have been made on particles without carbon coat. The results show that the homogeneous deposit of the carbon deposit at 700 °C is the result of the annealing that cures the disorder of the surface layer of bare LiFePO 4. Electrochemical tests supported the conclusion that the C-LiFePO 4 derived from Fe(0) is the most attractive for mass production.

  14. Atomic-resolution studies of In2O3-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In 2 O 3 (ZnO) m (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In 2 O 3 (ZnO) 30 were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of ∝1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In 2 O 3 (ZnO) 30 were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In 2 O 3 (ZnO) m compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In 3+ atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  15. High resolution electron back-scatter diffraction analysis of thermally and mechanically induced strains near carbide inclusions in a superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamched, Phani S., E-mail: phani.karamched@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Cross-correlation-based analysis of electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns has been used to obtain high angular resolution maps of lattice rotations and elastic strains near carbides in a directionally solidified superalloy MAR-M-002. Lattice curvatures were determined from the EBSD measurements and used to estimate the distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) induced by the deformation. Significant strains were induced by thermal treatment due to the lower thermal expansion coefficient of the carbide inclusions compared to that of the matrix. In addition to elastic strains the mismatch was sufficient to have induced localized plastic deformation in the matrix leading to a GND density of 3 x 10{sup 13} m{sup -2} in regions around the carbide. Three-point bending was then used to impose strain levels within the range {+-}12% across the height of the bend bar. EBSD lattice curvature measurements were then made at both carbide-containing and carbide-free regions at different heights across the bar. The average GND density increases with the magnitude of the imposed strain (both in tension and compression), and is markedly higher near the carbides particles. The higher GND densities near the carbides (order of 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}) are generated by the large strain gradients produced around the plastically rigid inclusion during mechanical deformation with some minor contribution from the pre-existing residual deformation caused by the thermal mismatch between carbide and nickel matrix.

  16. High resolution inelastic electron scattering on 90Zr at low momentum transfer and strong fragmentation of the magnetic quadrupole strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuer, D.; Frey, R.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Richter, A.; Spamer, E.; Titze, O.; Knuepfer, W.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution (FWHM approx. 30 keV) inelastic electron scattering on 90 Zr at low momentum transfer (0.20 -1 ) has been used to study magnetic transitions at excitation energies Esub(x) = 8-10 MeV. The experimental data were analyzed in the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) with wave functions calculated in the random phase approximation (RPA). Three Jsup(π) = 1 + states have been identified Esub(x) = 8.233, 9.000 and 9.371 MeV. There is some indication of further very fragmented dipole strength and the upper limit for the total M1 strength in the investigated energy region is ΣB(M1)up 2 sub(K). It is much smaller than any theoretical prediction. Furthermore, a large number of 2 - states has been observed, with the center of gravity located at Esub(x) approx. 9 MeV. These states carry a total strength of ΣB(M2)up = 1000 μ 2 sub(K) x fm 2 . Their strong fragmentation is in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations, but the deduced strength is much smaller than theoretically predicted. In addition the distributions of spacings and radiative widths of the 2 - states are consistent with a Wigner and a Porter-Thomas distribution, respectively. (orig.)

  17. High-resolution electron-microscopic studies of the polymorphs in Ag2±δSe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabe, Toshio; Ura, Katsuhiko

    1994-01-01

    The polymorphs that appear in the low-temperature phase of silver selenide have been studied by high-resolution electron microscopy. The specimen films are intentionally prepared with excess silver or selenium over stoichiometric composition by flash evaporation, as-depositing carbon films on both sides of the specimen films to protect them from selenium sublimation and to maintain the composition throughout the heat treatment. It is shown that four different types of low-temperature phase exist: tetragonal (a = 6.98, c = 4.96 A) for a metastable phase only formed with a small grain size of less than 50 nm; face-centred cubic (a = 10.9 A) for a non-stoichiometric phase with excess silver; monoclinic (a = 7.05, b = 8.17, c = 4.34 A, α = 101.0 ) for a non-stoichiometric phase with excess selenium; and orthorhombic (a = 7.05, b 7.82, c = 4.34 A) for the stoichiometric stable phase. The topotactic relations between the orthorhombic and monoclinic types are found to be fully coherent, having the same a and c lattice parameters. (orig.)

  18. Automated analysis of heterogeneous carbon nanostructures by high-resolution electron microscopy and on-line image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, P.; Farrer, J.K.; Palotas, A.B.; Lighty, J.S.; Eddings, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy is an efficient tool for characterizing heterogeneous nanostructures; however, currently the analysis is a laborious and time-consuming manual process. In order to be able to accurately and robustly quantify heterostructures, one must obtain a statistically high number of micrographs showing images of the appropriate sub-structures. The second step of analysis is usually the application of digital image processing techniques in order to extract meaningful structural descriptors from the acquired images. In this paper it will be shown that by applying on-line image processing and basic machine vision algorithms, it is possible to fully automate the image acquisition step; therefore, the number of acquired images in a given time can be increased drastically without the need for additional human labor. The proposed automation technique works by computing fields of structural descriptors in situ and thus outputs sets of the desired structural descriptors in real-time. The merits of the method are demonstrated by using combustion-generated black carbon samples. - Highlights: ► The HRTEM analysis of heterogeneous nanostructures is a tedious manual process. ► Automatic HRTEM image acquisition and analysis can improve data quantity and quality. ► We propose a method based on on-line image analysis for the automation of HRTEM image acquisition. ► The proposed method is demonstrated using HRTEM images of soot particles

  19. High-resolution electron microscopy study of Ni81Fe19 film with Co33Cr67 buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.Y.; Wang, Z.M.; Shen, F.; Du, Y.W.; Zhang, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in permalloy Ni 81 Fe 19 film deposited on a 1.2 nm Co 33 Cr 67 buffer layer was significantly enhanced. The high-resolution electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure of Ni 81 Fe 19 film with and without Co 33 Cr 67 buffer layer. It was found that Co 33 Cr 67 buffer layer can induce good (1 1 1) texture, while without Co 33 Cr 67 buffer layer, Ni 81 Fe 19 film show randomly oriented grain structure. The Δρ/ρ enhancement is attributed to the decrease in the resistivity ρ of the Ni 81 Fe 19 film due to the formation of the large (1 1 1) textured grains in Ni 81 Fe 19 film with Co 33 Cr 67 buffer layer. However, the surface roughness of substrate may limit the (1 1 1) textured grain size and induce additional grain boundaries in Ni 81 Fe 19 film with Co 33 Cr 67 buffer layer, limit the enhancement of the AMR effect

  20. Structure of a headful DNA-packaging bacterial virus at 2.9 Å resolution by electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Li, Kunpeng; Lynn, Anna Y; Aron, Keith E; Yu, Guimei; Jiang, Wen; Tang, Liang

    2017-04-04

    The enormous prevalence of tailed DNA bacteriophages on this planet is enabled by highly efficient self-assembly of hundreds of protein subunits into highly stable capsids. These capsids can stand with an internal pressure as high as ∼50 atmospheres as a result of the phage DNA-packaging process. Here we report the complete atomic model of the headful DNA-packaging bacteriophage Sf6 at 2.9 Å resolution determined by electron cryo-microscopy. The structure reveals the DNA-inflated, tensed state of a robust protein shell assembled via noncovalent interactions. Remarkable global conformational polymorphism of capsid proteins, a network formed by extended N arms, mortise-and-tenon-like intercapsomer joints, and abundant β-sheet-like mainchain:mainchain intermolecular interactions, confers significant strength yet also flexibility required for capsid assembly and DNA packaging. Differential formations of the hexon and penton are mediated by a drastic α-helix-to-β-strand structural transition. The assembly scheme revealed here may be common among tailed DNA phages and herpesviruses.

  1. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Béché, Armand

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. A strain value of 5.4%60.1% has been determined which...

  2. Investigation of the martensitic phase transformations in CoFe single crystals using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waitz, T.

    1999-06-01

    In CoFe crystals containing 0.85, 1.5, 5.75 and 6.0at.% Fe the thermally induced martensitic phase transformations between the close packed lattices face centered cubic (fcc), double hexagonal close packed (dhcp) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) were studied. Transmission electron microscopy methods were applied including in-situ experiments; both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and lattice fringe images were used to analyze the transformations at an atomic scale. Based on the results of both the transformations in the bulk and the in-situ transformations it is concluded that the phase transitions occur by the formation of lamellae on the close packed habit planes. The lamellae have a minimum thickness of 10 to 15 close packed planes; therefore transformation models that are based on random overlap of stacking faults can be excluded. The glissile transformation fronts of the lamellae contain transformation dislocations (partials) that are correlated on an atomic scale. In the HRTEM images partials that are only about 0.2 nm apart were resolved and analyzed in detail by circuits that are similar to Burgers circuits. Two attracting partials on adjacent close packed planes are the structural units of the transformation fronts; they are dipoles and paired partials (with a total Burgers vector of a single partial) in the case of the transformations hcp dhcp and fcc dhcp, respectively. Different arrangements of the partials at the transformation fronts lead to two different modes A and B of the phase transition. These two modes seem to be competitive processes that can be favored by different parameters of the material (as chemical composition and microstructure). Partials of mode A transformations have the same Burgers vectors; therefore the partials repel each other causing long range internal stresses and large transformation shear strains that can lead to a surface relief. Whereas, partials of mode B transformations have different

  3. High resolution transmission electron microscopy study on the development of nanostructured precipitates in Al-Cu obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Villalba, L.S., E-mail: luzgomez@geo.ucm.es [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Geociencias-(CSIC-UCM), Madrid (Spain); Delgado, M.L.; Ruiz-Navas, E.M. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-01-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of defect structures and nanoprecipitates after 10 h of mechanical alloying in Al-Cu system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Defects act as nucleation sites of the {epsilon}Al{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incoherent and semicoherent precipitates are identified by TEM-HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moire patterns are associated to the {epsilon}Al{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phase. - Abstract: Aluminum alloy 2014 is used to obtain nanostructured powders via mechanical alloying. The evolution of the diffusion processes is observed by the development of defect structures and nanoprecipitates after 10 h of milling. The characterization includes analytical and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Dislocations associated with different Al/Cu ratio affect the material. These defects act as nucleation sites where precipitates of the {epsilon}Al{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} hexagonal phase have been identified. Moire fringes show the interference of {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}{sub Al} with {l_brace}10{sup -}10{r_brace}{sub {epsilon}Al{sub 2Cu{sub 3}}} glide planes and locally small shifts of 1/3{l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}{sub Al} and 1/3{l_brace}10{sup -}10{r_brace}{sub {epsilon}Al{sub 2Cu{sub 3}}}. Changes in the Al/Cu ratio lead to the formation of other solid solutions identified in the Cu rich area and could correspond to transition phases.

  4. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  5. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A.N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite exhibits

  6. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  7. Anelasticity of olivine single crystals investigated by stress-reduction tests and high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, D.; Hansen, L. N.; Kempton, I.; Wilkinson, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Geodynamic phenomena, including glacial isostatic adjustment and postseismic deformation, can involve transient deformation in response to changes in differential stress acting on mantle rocks. As such, rheological models of transient deformation are incorporated in predictions of associated processes, including sea-level rise and stress redistribution after earthquakes. However, experimental constraints on rheological models for transient deformation of mantle materials are sparse. In particular, experiments involving stress reductions have been lacking. Moreover, a material's response to a reduction in stress can provide clues to the microphysical processes controlling deformation. To constrain models of transient deformation of mantle rocks we performed stress-reduction tests on single crystals of olivine at 1250-1300°C. Mechanical and piezoelectric actuators controlled constant initial stress during creep. At various strain intervals stress was reduced near-instantaneously using the piezoelectric actuator, inducing both elastic and anelastic (time-dependent) lengthening of the samples. A range of magnitudes of stress reduction were applied, typically unloading 10-90% of the initial stress. High-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on cross-correlation of diffraction patterns, was used to map dislocation density and elastic strain distributions in the recovered samples. Magnitudes of anelastic back-strain increase with increasing magnitudes of stress reduction and show a marked increase when stress reductions exceed 50% of the initial stress, consistent with previous observations in metals and alloys. This observation is inconsistent with the Burgers rheological model commonly used to describe transient behaviour and suggests that the style of rheological behaviour depends on the magnitude of stress change. HR-EBSD maps reveal that the crystal lattices are smoothly curved and generally lack subgrain boundaries and elastic strain

  8. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H; Pan Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Luscombe, Christine K; Frechet, Jean M J; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates

  9. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Label-free cellular structure imaging with 82 nm lateral resolution using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-07-25

    We present label-free and high spatial-resolution imaging for specific cellular structures using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope (EXA microscope). Images of the actin filament and mitochondria of stained HeLa cells, obtained by fluorescence and EXA microscopy, were compared to identify cellular structures. Based on these results, we demonstrated the feasibility of identifying label-free cellular structures at a spatial resolution of 82 nm. Using numerical analysis, we calculated the imaging depth region and determined the spot size of a cathodoluminescent (CL) light source to be 83 nm at the membrane surface.

  11. Neuroanatomy from Mesoscopic to Nanoscopic Scales: An Improved Method for the Observation of Semithin Sections by High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; Turégano-López, Marta; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel

    2018-01-01

    Semithin sections are commonly used to examine large areas of tissue with an optical microscope, in order to locate and trim the regions that will later be studied with the electron microscope. Ideally, the observation of semithin sections would be from mesoscopic to nanoscopic scales directly, instead of using light microscopy and then electron microscopy (EM). Here we propose a method that makes it possible to obtain high-resolution scanning EM images of large areas of the brain in the millimeter to nanometer range. Since our method is compatible with light microscopy, it is also feasible to generate hybrid light and electron microscopic maps. Additionally, the same tissue blocks that have been used to obtain semithin sections can later be used, if necessary, for transmission EM, or for focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

  12. Calibration for medium resolution off-axis electron holography using a flexible dual-lens imaging system in a JEOL ARM 200F microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Ponce, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In this work the calibration of a medium resolution off-axis electron holography using a dual-lens imaging system in a JEOL ARM 200F is shown. The objective dual-lens configuration allows adjusting the field of view from 35 nm to 2.5 μm. Subsequently, the parameters used in phase shift reconstruction were calibrated considering biprism voltage versus fringe spacing (σ) and versus fringe width (W). The reliability of the transmission electron microscope performance using these parameters was achieved using gold nanoparticles of known size and adjusting the excitation voltage of the lenses. - Highlights: • We presented the off-axis electron holography calibration in dual-lens mode of a JEOL ARM 200F. • We provide optimal conditions for a wide field of views varying the objective lens excitation. • The calibration was made using Au-nanoparticles controlling fringe width, spacing and contrast. • Application of electron holography to nanoparticles is also shown

  13. Visualising reacting single atoms under controlled conditions: Advances in atomic resolution in situ Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward D.; Gai, Pratibha L.

    2014-02-01

    Advances in atomic resolution Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM) for probing gas-solid catalyst reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions of gas environment and temperature are described. The recent development of the ESTEM extends the capability of the ETEM by providing the direct visualisation of single atoms and the atomic structure of selected solid state heterogeneous catalysts in their working states in real-time. Atomic resolution E(S)TEM provides a deeper understanding of the dynamic atomic processes at the surface of solids and their mechanisms of operation. The benefits of atomic resolution-E(S)TEM to science and technology include new knowledge leading to improved technological processes with substantial economic benefits, improved healthcare, reductions in energy needs and the management of environmental waste generation. xml:lang="fr"

  14. High-resolution inelastic electron scattering on 208Pb at 50 and 63.5 MeV and fragmentation of the magnetic quadrupole strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuepfer, W.; Frey, R.; Richter, A.; Schwierczinski, A.; Spamer, E.; Titze, O.

    1977-12-01

    High-resolution inelastic electron scattering (FWHM approximately equal to 33 keV) with 50 MeV and 63.5 MeV electrons on 208 Pb has been used to study magnetic excitations between Esub(x) = 6 MeV and 8 MeV. Angular distributions were analyzed in terms of the DWBA with RPA wave functions. Eight Isup(π) = 2- states carrying a total strength ΣB(M2) = 8500 μ 2 sub(K) fm 2 have been found. The strong fragmentation is in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. (orig.) [de

  15. Calibration for medium resolution off-axis electron holography using a flexible dual-lens imaging system in a JEOL ARM 200F microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Ponce, Arturo

    2014-12-01

    In this work the calibration of a medium resolution off-axis electron holography using a dual-lens imaging system in a JEOL ARM 200F is shown. The objective dual-lens configuration allows adjusting the field of view from 35nm to 2.5μm. Subsequently, the parameters used in phase shift reconstruction were calibrated considering biprism voltage versus fringe spacing (σ) and versus fringe width (W). The reliability of the transmission electron microscope performance using these parameters was achieved using gold nanoparticles of known size and adjusting the excitation voltage of the lenses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Hans G.J., E-mail: hans.mol@wur.nl; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg{sup −1}) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg{sup −1}. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive

  17. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg"−"1) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg"−"1. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to

  18. Static and Dynamic Electron Microscopy Investigations at the Atomic and Ultrafast Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Pranav Kumar

    Advancements in the electron microscopy capabilities - aberration-corrected imaging, monochromatic spectroscopy, direct-electron detectors - have enabled routine visualization of atomic-scale processes with millisecond temporal resolutions in this decade. This, combined with progress in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder technology and nanofabrication techniques, allows comprehensive experiments on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. The development of ultrafast (sub-nanosecond) time-resolved TEM with ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has further pushed the envelope of in situ TEM to sub-nanosecond temporal resolution while maintaining sub-nanometer spatial resolution. A plethora of materials phenomena - including electron-phonon coupling, phonon transport, first-order phase transitions, bond rotation, plasmon dynamics, melting, and dopant atoms arrangement - are not yet clearly understood and could be benefitted with the current in situ TEM capabilities having atomic-level and ultrafast precision. Better understanding of these phenomena and intrinsic material dynamics (e.g. how phonons propagate in a material, what time-scales are involved in a first-order phase transition, how fast a material melts, where dopant atoms sit in a crystal) in new-generation and technologically important materials (e.g. two-dimensional layered materials, semiconductor and magnetic devices, rare-earth-element-free permanent magnets, unconventional superconductors) could bring a paradigm shift in their electronic, structural, magnetic, thermal and optical applications. Present research efforts, employing cutting-edge static and dynamic in situ electron microscopy resources at the University of Minnesota, are directed towards understanding the atomic-scale crystallographic structural transition and phonon transport in an iron-pnictide parent compound LaFeAsO, studying the mechanical stability of fast moving hard-drive heads in heat

  19. High resolution low dose transmission electron microscopy real-time imaging and manipulation of nano-scale objects in the electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jr., R. Malcolm; Barnes, Zack [Austin, TX; Sawatari, Chie [Shizuoka, JP; Kondo, Tetsuo [Kukuoka, JP

    2008-02-26

    The present invention includes a method, apparatus and system for nanofabrication in which one or more target molecules are identified for manipulation with an electron beam and the one or more target molecules are manipulated with the electron beam to produce new useful materials.

  20. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  1. Test Particle Simulations of Electron Injection by the Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs) using High Resolution Lyon-Feddor-Mobarry (LFM) Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshetu, W. W.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Hudson, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Test particle simulations of electron injection by the bursty bulk flows (BBFs) have been done using a test particle tracer code [1], and the output fields of the Lyon-Feddor-Mobarry global magnetohydro- dynamics (MHD) code[2]. The MHD code was run with high resolu- tion (oct resolution), and with specified solar wind conditions so as to reproduce the observed qualitative picture of the BBFs [3]. Test par- ticles were injected so that they interact with earthward propagating BBFs. The result of the simulation shows that electrons are pushed ahead of the BBFs and accelerated into the inner magnetosphere. Once electrons are in the inner magnetosphere they are further energized by drift resonance with the azimuthal electric field. In addition pitch angle scattering of electrons resulting in the violation conservation of the first adiabatic invariant has been observed. The violation of the first adiabatic invariant occurs as electrons cross a weak magnetic field region with a strong gradient of the field perturbed by the BBFs. References 1. Kress, B. T., Hudson,M. K., Looper, M. D. , Albert, J., Lyon, J. G., and Goodrich, C. C. (2007), Global MHD test particle simulations of ¿ 10 MeV radiation belt electrons during storm sudden commencement, J. Geophys. Res., 112, A09215, doi:10.1029/2006JA012218. Lyon,J. G., Fedder, J. A., and Mobarry, C.M., The Lyon- Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) Global MHD Magnetospheric Simulation Code (2004), J. Atm. And Solar-Terrestrial Phys., 66, Issue 15-16, 1333- 1350,doi:10.1016/j.jastp. Wiltberger, Merkin, M., Lyon, J. G., and Ohtani, S. (2015), High-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of bursty bulk flows, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 120, 45554566, doi:10.1002/2015JA021080.

  2. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  3. Quantitative measurement of mean inner potential and specimen thickness from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms of ultra-thin layered WSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Florian, E-mail: f.winkler@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Tavabi, Amir H. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gemeinschaftslabor für Elektronenmikroskopie (GFE), RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Duchamp, Martial [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Yucelen, Emrah [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, Eindhoven 5600 KA (Netherlands); Borghardt, Sven; Kardynal, Beata E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9 (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); and others

    2017-07-15

    The phase and amplitude of the electron wavefunction that has passed through ultra-thin flakes of WSe{sub 2} is measured from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms. Both the experimental measurements and corresponding computer simulations are used to show that, as a result of dynamical diffraction, the spatially averaged phase does not increase linearly with specimen thickness close to an [001] zone axis orientation even when the specimen has a thickness of only a few layers. It is then not possible to infer the local specimen thickness of the WSe{sub 2} from either the phase or the amplitude alone. Instead, we show that the combined analysis of phase and amplitude from experimental measurements and simulations allows an accurate determination of the local specimen thickness. The relationship between phase and projected potential is shown to be approximately linear for extremely thin specimens that are tilted by several degrees in certain directions from the [001] zone axis. A knowledge of the specimen thickness then allows the electrostatic potential to be determined from the measured phase. By using this combined approach, we determine a value for the mean inner potential of WSe{sub 2} of 18.9±0.8 V, which is 12% lower than the value calculated from neutral atom scattering factors. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of high resolution electron holograms of WSe{sub 2}. • Local specimen thickness determination and estimation of tilt angle. • Mean inner potential evaluation of WSe2 avoiding dynamical diffraction.

  4. An (e, 2e + ion) study of low-energy electron-impact ionization and fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran with high mass and energy resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueguang; Pflüger, Thomas; Weyland, Marvin; Baek, Woon Yoon; Rabus, Hans; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    We study the low-energy (E0 = 26 eV) electron-impact induced ionization and fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran using a reaction microscope. All three final-state charged particles, i.e., two outgoing electrons and one fragment ion, are detected in triple coincidence such that the momentum vectors and, consequently, the kinetic energies for charged reaction products are determined. The ionic fragments are clearly identified in the experiment with a mass resolution of 1 amu. The fragmentation pathways of tetrahydrofuran are investigated by measuring the ion kinetic energy spectra and the binding energy spectra where an energy resolution of 1.5 eV has been achieved using the recently developed photoemission electron source. Here, we will discuss the fragmentation reactions for the cations C4H8O+, C4H7O+, C2H3O+, C3H_6^+, C3H_5^+, C3H_3^+, CH3O+, CHO+, and C2H_3^+.

  5. The influence of experimental resolution and background upon ion-induced vsub(e) approximately equal to vsub(i) electron distributions measured behind solid foils; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.C.R.; McGowan, J.W.; Meckbach, W.; Sarmiento, G.S.; Steckelmacher, W.; Lucas, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    It is stated that some confusion has developed with regard to the correct procedure necessary to compare charge exchange to the continuum (CEC) theories and experiment for ion-beam-foil collisions where the emitted electrons have velocities vsub(e) approximately equal to vsub(1) and that to make such comparisons it is necessary that (a) the instrumental resolutions in angle and absolute value of velocity be folded into the theoretical double differential cross section, and (b) if the emission of CEC electrons occurs only because of interaction with the outermost atomic layers, those electrons originating from further inside the foil be subtracted as background. It is felt that Steckelmacher et al (J. Phys. B.; 11: 2711 (1978)) did not properly account for these considerations in their comparison of theoretical and experimental results. In a reply Steckelmacher and Lucas, while agreeing that confusion has arisen in the literature, state that possible errors due to insufficiently low values in the ratio of velocity resolution to angular acceptance were overcome in their work by careful experimental design but suggest that the main area of disagreement concerns the treatment of direct ionisation background. (U.K.)

  6. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A 2 in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure

  7. Multiple resolution chirp reflectometry for fault localization and diagnosis in a high voltage cable in automotive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seung Jin; Lee, Chun Ku; Shin, Yong-June; Park, Jin Bae

    2016-12-01

    A multiple chirp reflectometry system with a fault estimation process is proposed to obtain multiple resolution and to measure the degree of fault in a target cable. A multiple resolution algorithm has the ability to localize faults, regardless of fault location. The time delay information, which is derived from the normalized cross-correlation between the incident signal and bandpass filtered reflected signals, is converted to a fault location and cable length. The in-phase and quadrature components are obtained by lowpass filtering of the mixed signal of the incident signal and the reflected signal. Based on in-phase and quadrature components, the reflection coefficient is estimated by the proposed fault estimation process including the mixing and filtering procedure. Also, the measurement uncertainty for this experiment is analyzed according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we conduct comparative experiments to detect and measure faults under different conditions. Considering the installation environment of the high voltage cable used in an actual vehicle, target cable length and fault position are designed. To simulate the degree of fault, the variety of termination impedance (10 Ω , 30 Ω , 50 Ω , and 1 \\text{k} Ω ) are used and estimated by the proposed method in this experiment. The proposed method demonstrates advantages in that it has multiple resolution to overcome the blind spot problem, and can assess the state of the fault.

  8. An improved experimental scheme for simultaneous measurement of high-resolution zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron and threshold photoion (MATI) spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, François; Mazzoni, Federico; Becucci, Maurizio; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2017-10-01

    An improved detection scheme is presented for threshold ionization spectroscopy with simultaneous recording of the Zero Electron Kinetic Energy (ZEKE) and Mass Analysed Threshold Ionisation (MATI) signals. The objective is to obtain accurate dissociation energies for larger molecular clusters by simultaneously detecting the fragment and parent ion MATI signals with identical transmission. The scheme preserves an optimal ZEKE spectral resolution together with excellent separation of the spontaneous ion and MATI signals in the time-of-flight mass spectrum. The resulting improvement in sensitivity will allow for the determination of dissociation energies in clusters with substantial mass difference between parent and daughter ions.

  9. Construction of an apparatus for the investigation of inelastic electron scattering processes at high energy resolution and experimental determination of appearance energies of various atoms, molecules and small van-der-Waals clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, C.

    1993-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented, which enables the investigation of inelastic electron scattering processes at high energy resolution with dE n + cluster ions, n>3, is supported by these measurements

  10. Electron-impact-induced K plus M shell ionization in solid targets of medium-Z elements studied by means of high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludziejewski, T.; Rymuza, P.; Sujkowski, Z.; Borchert, G.; Dousse, J.; Rheme, C.; Polasik, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Kβ 2 x-ray spectra of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, and palladium bombarded by 150 and 300 keV electrons were measured with a high-resolution transmission curved crystal spectrometer. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations were used for the decomposition of the experimental spectra into the Kβ 2 M 0 (diagram) and Kβ 2 M 1 (satellite) components. The probabilities of energy dependent (direct Coulomb and two-step) processes were estimated from the differences in the satellite line yields for electrons and photons. The satellite yields are found to be considerably enhanced in comparison with those for the proton-induced ionization recently measured and analyzed in the same way [T. Ludziejewski et al., Phys. Rev. A 52, 2791 (1995)]. This result indicates the importance of multielectron effects in the K plus M shell ionization by energetic projectiles. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. Calibration of high-dynamic-range, finite-resolution x-ray pulse-height spectrometers for extracting electron energy distribution data from the PFRC-2 device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, C.; Jandovitz, P.; Cohen, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the full x-ray energy distribution function (XEDF) emitted from a plasma over a large dynamic range of energies can yield valuable insights about the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of that plasma and the dynamic processes that create them. X-ray pulse height detectors such as Amptek's X-123 Fast SDD with Silicon Nitride window can detect x-rays in the range of 200eV to 100s of keV. However, extracting EEDF from this measurement requires precise knowledge of the detector's response function. This response function, including the energy scale calibration, the window transmission function, and the resolution function, can be measured directly. We describe measurements of this function from x-rays from a mono-energetic electron beam in a purpose-built gas-target x-ray tube. Large-Z effects such as line radiation, nuclear charge screening, and polarizational Bremsstrahlung are discussed.

  12. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C

    2015-04-01

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium

  14. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium.

  15. Laser resolution of unpolarized-electron scattering cross sections into spin-conserved and spin-flip components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.

    1981-01-01

    The theory is presented for one-photon free-free absorption by electrons scattering from high-Z atoms. The absorption cross section provides sufficient information to resolve the unpolarized-electron total cross section, Vertical Barf(theta)Vertical Bar 2 +Vertical Barg(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , into its individual components for spin-nonflip, Vertical Barf(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , and spin-flip, Vertical Barg(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , scattering. The observation of a spin-polarization effect for a spin-independent process (free-free absorption) is analogous to the Fano effect for bound-free absorption

  16. Piezoelectric properties of PbTiO(3) thin films characterized with piezoresponse force and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morelli, A.; Venkatesan, Sriram; Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the piezoelectric properties of PbTiO(3) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition with piezoresponse force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The as-grown films exhibit an upward polarization, inhomogeneous distribution of piezoelectric characteristics

  17. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  18. Optimal thickness of a monocrystal line object in atomic plane visualization on its image in a high-resolution electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishina, T.A.; Sviridova, V.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the influence of the FCC-lattice crystal (gold, nickel) thickness on conditions of visulization of atomic plane projections (APP) on the crystal image in a transmission high-resolution electron microscope (THREM) is reported. Results of electron diffraction theory are used for theoretical investigation. Calculation analysis of the influence of the monocrystal thickness and orientation on conitions of visualization of APP and atomic columns in monocrystal images formed in THREM in multibeam regimes with inclined and axial illumination is conducted. It is shown that, to visualize the atomic column projections in a crystal image formed in the multibeam regime with axial illumination, optimal are the thicknesses from 0.1 xisub(min) to 0.25 xisub(min) and at some object orientations also the thicknesses from 0.8 xisub(min) to 0.9 xisub(min), where xisub(min) is the extinction length minimum for the given orientation. It is shown that, to realize the ultimate resolutions in multibeam regimes both with inclined and axial illumination the optimal thickness of the object is 0.63 xisub(min). Satisfactory coincidence of theoretical and experimental data is obtained

  19. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High-resolution energetic particle measurements at 6.6 R/sub E/ 1. Electron micropulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Baker, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    The three papers dealing with data from satellites 1976--059A which we present in this issue represent the first publication of data from the new series of charged particle analyzer (CPA) instruments designed to measure energetic particle fluxes at geosynchronous altitudes. This first report presents new results on electron micropulsation phenomena and includes a concise description of the instrument. We often observe highly periodic modulations which persist for times as long as 2 hours in the spin-averaged counting rate data. These flux oscillations occur most frequently in the 30- to 300-keV electron data but are occasionally seen in higher-energy electron or low-energy proton data. The pitch angle distributions of the observed modulated fluxes may be either 'cigar-shaped' or 'pancake-shaped.' Oscillations at different energies are in phase, although the gross counting rate may be changing in an energy-time dispersive manner. The occurrence distribution of these modulations in local time suggests that they are related to Pc 5 geomagnetic micropulsations observed at ground stations

  1. A technique for measuring an electron beam close-quote s longitudinal phase space with sub-picosecond resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosson, E.R.; Berryman, K.W.; Richman, B.A.; Smith, T.I.; Swent, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a technique for measuring the longitudinal phase space distribution of the Stanford Superconducting Accelerator close-quote s (SCA) electron beam which involves applying tomographic techniques to energy spectra taken as a function of the relative phase between the beam and the accelerating field, and optionally, as a function of the strength of a variable dispersion section in the system. The temporal profile of the beam obtained by projecting the inferred distribution onto the time axis is compared with that obtained from interferometric transition radiation measurements. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. High-resolution energetic particle measurements at 6.6R/sub E/ 3. Low-energy electron anisotropies and short-term substorm predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Higbie, P.R.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Belian, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Multiple detectors giving nearly complete 4π coverage of particle pitch angle distributions have provided high resolution measurements (in energy and time) of 30- to 300-keV electrons. Data from a spacecraft (1976-059A) in geostationary orbit show a remarkably consistent sequence of variations of the electron anisotropy before and during magnetospheric substorms. For periods typically 1--2 hours prior to the onset of substorms, electron distributions, peaked along the direction of the local magnetic field, are observed in the premidnight sector. These cigarlike anisotropies are accompanied by a local taillike magnetic field which may develop further during the event. At substorm onset an abrupt transition usually occurs from the cigar-shaped distributions to pancake-shaped distributions. This anisotropy sequence may be due to the buildup and subsequent release of stresses in the magnetotail; the cigar phase may also be due to associated processes at the dayside magnetopause causing a loss of 90 0 pitch angle particles. The present observations, based on approx.100 events, appear to provide a predictive tool for assessing the probability of occurrence of a substorm

  3. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  4. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz, E-mail: gchojnowski@genesilico.pl [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Waleń, Tomasz [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Bujnicki, Janusz M. [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  5. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-01-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx

  6. Lanthanum Gadolinium Oxide: A New Electronic Device Material for CMOS Logic and Memory Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojan P. Pavunny

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the ternary dielectric, LaGdO3, synthesized and qualified in our laboratory as a novel high-k dielectric material for logic and memory device applications in terms of its excellent features that include a high linear dielectric constant (k of ~22 and a large energy bandgap of ~5.6 eV, resulting in sufficient electron and hole band offsets of ~2.57 eV and ~1.91 eV, respectively, on silicon, good thermal stability with Si and lower gate leakage current densities within the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS specified limits at the sub-nanometer electrical functional thickness level, which are desirable for advanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS, bipolar (Bi and BiCMOS chips applications, is presented in this review article.

  7. High-resolution parallel electron energy-loss spectroscopy of MnL2,3-edges in inorganic manganese compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvie, L.A.J.; Craven, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Parallel electron energy-loss spectroscopy (PEELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) was used to record the Mn L 2,3 -edges from a range of natural and synthetic manganese containing materials, covering valences 0, II, III, IV and VII, with an energy resolution of ca. 0.5 eV. The Mn L 2,3 electron-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of these edges provided a sensitive fingerprint of its valence. The Mn 2+ L 2,3 -edges show little sensitivity to the local site symmetry of the ligands surrounding the manganese. This is illustrated by comparing the Mn L 2,3 -edges from 4-, 6-and 8-fold coordinated Mn 2+ . In contrast, the Mn L 3 -edges from Mn 3+ and Mn 4+ containing minerals exhibited ELNES that are interpreted in terms of a crystals-field splitting of the 3d electrons, governed by the symmetry of the surrounding ligands. The Mn L 3 -edges for octahedrally coordinated Mn 2+ , Mn 3+ and Mn 4+ showed variations in their ELNES that were sensitive to the crystal-field strength. The crystal-field strength (10Q) was measured from these edges and compared very well with published optically determinted values. The magnitude of 10Dq measured from the Mn L 3 -edges and their O K-edge prepeaks of the manganese oxides were almost identical. This further confirms that the value of 10Dq measured at the Mn L 3 -edge is correct. Selected spectra are compared with theoretical 2p atomic multiplet spectra and the differences and similarities are explained in terms of the covalency and site symmetry of the manganese. The Mn L 3 -edges allow the valence of the manganese to be ascertained, even in multivalent state materials, and can also be used to dtermin 10Dq. (orig.)

  8. Preparation and Loading Process of Single Crystalline Samples into a Gas Environmental Cell Holder for In Situ Atomic Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straubinger, Rainer; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-06-01

    A reproducible way to transfer a single crystalline sample into a gas environmental cell holder for in situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis is shown in this study. As in situ holders have only single-tilt capability, it is necessary to prepare the sample precisely along a specific zone axis. This can be achieved by a very accurate focused ion beam lift-out preparation. We show a step-by-step procedure to prepare the sample and transfer it into the gas environmental cell. The sample material is a GaP/Ga(NAsP)/GaP multi-quantum well structure on Si. Scanning TEM observations prove that it is possible to achieve atomic resolution at very high temperatures in a nitrogen environment of 100,000 Pa.

  9. Crystal structure and defects of Zr4Co4Si7( V-phase) investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, J.F.; Ye, H.Q.; Ning, X.G.; He, L.L.; Yang, D.Z.

    1997-01-01

    The results of high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation and image simulation show that Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 possesses the same structure type of Zr 4 Co 4 Ge 7 . Adding of Fe or Ni into the Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 compound, except that the dimensions changed slightly, does not change the lattice type and coordination in the crystal structure, maintaining the V-phase structure. Also, twins with coherent boundaries and with partially coherent at interfaces are observed. The image conditions of Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 and the structure differences between Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 and tetrahedral close-packed phases are also discussed. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  10. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058577 (Japan); Xu, Z., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kvashnin, D. G. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Sorokin, P. B. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutsky Lane 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  11. Restoring defect structures in 3C-SiC/Si (001) from spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope images by means of deconvolution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C; Wan, W; Li, F H; Tang, D

    2015-04-01

    The [110] cross-sectional samples of 3C-SiC/Si (001) were observed with a spherical aberration-corrected 300 kV high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Two images taken not close to the Scherzer focus condition and not representing the projected structures intuitively were utilized for performing the deconvolution. The principle and procedure of image deconvolution and atomic sort recognition are summarized. The defect structure restoration together with the recognition of Si and C atoms from the experimental images has been illustrated. The structure maps of an intrinsic stacking fault in the area of SiC, and of Lomer and 60° shuffle dislocations at the interface have been obtained at atomic level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of the 1s23lnl' Be-like series in oxygen and neon. Test of theoretical data: II. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D

    2003-01-01

    A complete and accurate experimental test of theoretical spectroscopic data sets (state positions, lifetimes) available for the n=3-5 terms of the 1s 2 3lnl' Rydberg series of oxygen and neon ions is presented in a series of two papers. This result was achieved by fitting our high-resolution electron spectra with post-collisional lineshapes calculated with the help of these spectroscopic data. In this second paper we apply the fitting procedure described in the preceding companion paper (I) to the analysis of high-resolution electron spectra measured in O 6+ (1s 2 ) + He, H 2 and Ne 8+ (1s 2 ) + He collisional systems at 10 qkeV collision energy (q is the ion charge). Singlet states alone are found to be excited in oxygen; they also explain most of the neon lines; in the latter case a possible contribution of triplet states is discussed. Many 1s 2 3lnl' 1 L transitions are identified for the first time. A quantitative comparison between measured and calculated positions clearly points to the best theoretical data currently available. Finally, a first identification of some 4l4l' 1 L transitions observed in the neon spectrum is also proposed. From this huge spectroscopic work, we extract the first experimental partial branching ratios for autoionization into the 1s 2 2l ionization continua for a large number of 1s 2 3lnl' 1 L states, which are compared with the total ones calculated by other authors; we deduce that populations of |M L vertical bar = 0 and 1 magnetic sublevels are nearly identical. The double-capture process is also briefly characterized by comparing relative populations of many n=3-5 states; it is found that the same states are populated in O 6+ +H 2 and Ne 8+ +He collisional systems with the same relative populations

  13. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  14. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Mogi, D. [Development and Marketing Department, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka, Kogyo Co., Ltd., Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0063 (Japan); Tanioka, T. [Shibukawa Development Research Laboratory, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka Kogyo Co., Ltd., Shibukawa City, Gunma 377-8513 (Japan); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, allée de la Chimie 3, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  15. Atomic-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Movies for Study of Organic Molecules, Assemblies, and Reactions: The First 10 Years of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2017-06-20

    A molecule is a quantum mechanical entity. "Watching motions and reactions of a molecule with our eyes" has therefore been a dream of chemists for a century. This dream has come true with the aid of the movies of atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopic (AR-TEM) molecular images through real-time observation of dynamic motions of single organic molecules (denoted hereafter as single-molecule atomic-resolution real-time (SMART) TEM imaging). Since 2007, we have reported movies of a variety of single organic molecules, organometallic molecules, and their assemblies, which are rotating, stretching, and reacting. Like movies in the theater, the atomic-resolution molecular movies provide us information on the 3-D structures of the molecules and also their time evolution. The success of the SMART-TEM imaging crucially depends on the development of "chemical fishhooks" with which fish (organic molecules) in solution can be captured on a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT, serving as a "fishing rod"). The captured molecules are connected to a slowly vibrating CNT, and their motions are displayed on a monitor in real time. A "fishing line" connecting the fish and the rod may be a σ-bond, a van der Waals force, or other weak connections. Here, the molecule/CNT system behaves as a coupled oscillator, where the low-frequency anisotropic vibration of the CNT is transmitted to the molecules via the weak chemical connections that act as an energy filter. Interpretation of the observed motions of the molecules at atomic resolution needs us to consider the quantum mechanical nature of electrons as well as bond rotation, letting us deviate from the conventional statistical world of chemistry. What new horizons can we explore? We have so far carried out conformational studies of individual molecules, assigning anti or gauche conformations to each C-C bond in conformers that we saw. We can also determine the structures of van der Waals assemblies of organic molecules

  16. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Marta; Ravasenga, Tiziana; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Falqui, Andrea; Marotta, Roberto; Barberis, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABAA Receptors (GABAARs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABAAR clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABAAR clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  17. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Marta

    2017-10-17

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABAA Receptors (GABAARs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABAAR clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABAAR clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  18. The neural elements in the lining of the ventricular-subventricular zone: making an old story new by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Dos Santos Haemmerle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical description of the neural elements that compose the lining of brain ventricles introduces us to the single layer of ependymal cells. However, new findings, especially in the lateral ventricle - the major niche for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain - have provided information about additional cell elements that influence the organization of this part of the ventricular system and produce important contributions to neurogenesis. To complement the cell neurochemistry findings, we present a three-dimensional in situ description that demonstrates the anatomical details of the different types of ciliated cells and the innervation of these elements. After processing adult rat brains for ultrastructural analysis by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we observed a heterogeneous pattern of cilia distribution at the different poles of the lateral ventricle surface. Furthermore, we describe the particular three-dimensional aspects of the ciliated cells of the lateral ventricle, in addition the fiber bundles and varicose axons surrounding these cells. Therefore, we provide a unique ultrastructural description of the three-dimensional in situ organization of the lateral ventricle surface, highlighting its innervation, to corroborate the available neurochemical and functional findings regarding the factors that regulate this neurogenic niche.

  19. Quantitative measurement of mean inner potential and specimen thickness from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms of ultra-thin layered WSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Florian; Tavabi, Amir H; Barthel, Juri; Duchamp, Martial; Yucelen, Emrah; Borghardt, Sven; Kardynal, Beata E; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E

    2017-07-01

    The phase and amplitude of the electron wavefunction that has passed through ultra-thin flakes of WSe 2 is measured from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms. Both the experimental measurements and corresponding computer simulations are used to show that, as a result of dynamical diffraction, the spatially averaged phase does not increase linearly with specimen thickness close to an [001] zone axis orientation even when the specimen has a thickness of only a few layers. It is then not possible to infer the local specimen thickness of the WSe 2 from either the phase or the amplitude alone. Instead, we show that the combined analysis of phase and amplitude from experimental measurements and simulations allows an accurate determination of the local specimen thickness. The relationship between phase and projected potential is shown to be approximately linear for extremely thin specimens that are tilted by several degrees in certain directions from the [001] zone axis. A knowledge of the specimen thickness then allows the electrostatic potential to be determined from the measured phase. By using this combined approach, we determine a value for the mean inner potential of WSe 2 of 18.9±0.8V, which is 12% lower than the value calculated from neutral atom scattering factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Resolução lamelar num novo microscópio eletrônico de varredura Lamellar resolution in a new scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Kestenbach

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Trabalhando com elétrons de baixa energia (na faixa de 1keV, o novo microscópio eletrônico de varredura dispensa a etapa de metalização e permite a observação direta da estrutura lamelar de polímeros semicristalinos, sem a necessidade de preparação de amostras. São apresentados exemplos da morfologia lamelar do PVDF em função das condições de processamento e da temperatura de cristalização, em filmes contendo as fases a, b e g. Um outro exemplo revela o crescimento inicial da camada transcristalina que se formou ao longo de uma fibra de polietileno de ultra-alto peso molecular embutida em matriz de polietileno de alta densidade.ABSTRACT: Working with low energy electrons (in the range of 1keV, the new scanning electron microscope permits the lamellar (supermolecular structure of semicrystalline polymers to be observed directly without the need of specimen coating or of any other sample preparation technique. Microscope performance is demonstrated by several examples of high resolution micrographs which show spherulitic, lamellar and fibrilar morphologies developed by the a, b and g phases of PVDF as a function of processing conditions and crystallization temperature. Another example reveals the early stages of transcrystalline layer formation in HDPE reinforced by UHMWPE fibers.

  1. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Marta; Ravasenga, Tiziana; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Falqui, Andrea; Marotta, Roberto; Barberis, Andrea

    2017-10-23

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABA A Receptors (GABA A Rs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABA A R clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABA A R clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  2. Probing the electronic structure and Au–C chemical bonding in AuC2− and AuC2 using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    We report photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and high-resolution PE imaging of AuC 2 − at a wide range of photon energies. The ground state of AuC 2 − is found to be linear (C ∞v , 1 Σ + ) with a …8π 4 4δ 4 17σ 2 9π 4 18σ 2 valence configuration. Detachments from all the five valence orbitals of the ground state of AuC 2 − are observed at 193 nm. High-resolution PE images are obtained in the energy range from 830 to 330 nm, revealing complicated vibronic structures from electron detachment of the 18σ, 9π, and 17σ orbitals. Detachment from the 18σ orbital results in the 2 Σ + ground state of neutral AuC 2 , which, however, is bent due to strong vibronic coupling with the nearby 2 Π state from detachment of a 9π electron. The 2 Σ + – 2 Π vibronic and spin-orbit coupling results in complicated vibronic structures for the 2 Σ + and 2 Π 3/2 states with extensive bending excitations. The electron affinity of AuC 2 is measured accurately to be 3.2192(7) eV with a ground state bending frequency of 195(6) cm −1 . The first excited state ( 2 A′) of AuC 2 , corresponding to the 2 Π 3/2 state at the linear geometry, is only 0.0021 eV above the ground state ( 2 A′) and has a bending frequency of 207(6) cm −1 . The 2 Π 1/2 state, 0.2291 eV above the ground state, is linear with little geometry change relative to the anion ground state. The detachment of the 17σ orbital also results in complicated vibronic structures, suggesting again a bent state due to possible vibronic coupling with the lower 2 Π state. The spectrum at 193 nm shows the presence of a minor species with less than 2% intensity relative to the ground state of AuC 2 − . High-resolution data of the minor species reveal several vibrational progressions in the Au–C stretching mode, which are assigned to be from the metastable 3 Π 2,1,0 spin-orbit excited states of AuC 2 − to the 2 Π 3/2,1/2 spin-orbit states of neutral AuC 2 . The spin-orbit splittings of the 3 Π and 2

  3. High-resolution electron microscopy studies of the precipitation of copper under neutron irradiation in an Fe-1.3WT% Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have studied by electron microscopy the copper-rich precipitates in an Fe-1.3wt%Cu model alloy irradiated with neutrons to doses of 8.61 x 10 -3 dpa and 6.3 x 10 -2 dpa at a temperature of ∼270 C. In the lower dose material a majority (ca. 60%)of the precipitates visible in high-resolution electron microscopy were timed 9R precipitates of size ∼2-4 nm, while ca. 40% were untwinned. In the higher dose material, a majority (ca. 75%) of visible precipitates were untwinned although many still seemed to have a 9R structure. The average angle α between the herring-bone fringes in the twin variants was measured as 125 degree, not the 129 degree characteristic of precipitates in thermally-aged and electron-irradiated material immediately after the bcc->9R martensitic transformation. We argue that these results imply that the bcc->9R transformation of small (<4 nm) precipitates under neutron irradiation takes place at the irradiation temperature of 270 C rather than after subsequent cooling. Preliminary measurements showed that precipitate sizes did not depend strongly on dose, with a mean diameter of 3.4 ± 0.7 nm for the lower dose material, and 3.0 ± 0.5 nm for the higher dose material. This result agrees with the previous assumption that the lack of coarsening in precipitates formed under neutron irradiation is a consequence of the partial dissolution of larger precipitates by high-energy cascades

  4. Supported sub-nanometer Ta oxide clusters as model catalysts for the selective epoxidation of cyclooctene

    KAUST Repository

    Zwaschka, Gregor; Rondelli, Manuel; Krause, Maximilian; Rö tzer, Marian David; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Heiz, Ulrich; Basset, Jean-Marie; Schweinberger, Florian; D'Elia, Valerio

    2018-01-01

    The preparation of organic ligands-free, isolated tantalum oxide atoms (Ta1) and small clusters (Tan>1) on flat silicate supports was accomplished by ultra-high vacuum (UHV) techniques followed by oxidation in air. The resulting surface complexes were thoroughly characterized and tested as supported catalysts for the epoxidation of cycloalkenes. The observed catalytic performance highlights the potential of the applied method for the production of active catalysts and the study of well-defined, ligand-free metal oxide moieties.

  5. Supported sub-nanometer Ta oxide clusters as model catalysts for the selective epoxidation of cyclooctene

    KAUST Repository

    Zwaschka, Gregor

    2018-01-22

    The preparation of organic ligands-free, isolated tantalum oxide atoms (Ta1) and small clusters (Tan>1) on flat silicate supports was accomplished by ultra-high vacuum (UHV) techniques followed by oxidation in air. The resulting surface complexes were thoroughly characterized and tested as supported catalysts for the epoxidation of cycloalkenes. The observed catalytic performance highlights the potential of the applied method for the production of active catalysts and the study of well-defined, ligand-free metal oxide moieties.

  6. Multilayer X-ray mirrors for formation of sub-nanometer wavelength range beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhsakhalyan, A.A.; Akhsakhalyan, A.D.; Klyuenkov, E.B.; Murav'ev, V.A.; Salashchenko, N.N.; Kharitonov, A.I.

    2005-01-01

    Paper reviews the efforts undertaken in the RF Academy of Sciences IPM within recent 5 years to design multilayer mirror systems to produce X-ray wavelength subnanometer range beams. Paper describes a process to fabricate the mentioned systems covering the procedures to obtain supersmooth surfaces of the specified shape, to deposit gradient multilayer structures on the mentioned surfaces and describes the rules to calculate the optimal parameters of mirrors. Paper presents characteristics of mirror system two types: a mirror in the shape of a parabolic cylinder to collimate radiation in the DRON-4, DRON-6 production-type X-ray diffractometers and in the shape of a quadraelliptic reflector - a new wide-aperture four-corner focusing system [ru

  7. How to measure atomic diffusion processes in the sub-nanometer range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Gupta, M.; Gutberlet, T.; Stahn, J.; Bruns, M.

    2008-01-01

    Self-diffusion of the atomic constituents in the solid state is a fundamental transport process that controls various materials properties. With established methods of diffusivity determination it is only possible to measure diffusion processes on a length scale down to 10 nm at corresponding diffusivities of 10 -23 m 2 s -1 . However, for complex materials like amorphous or nano-structured solids the given values are often not sufficient for a proper characterization. Consequently, it is necessary to detect diffusion length well below 1 nm. Here, we present the method of neutron reflectometry on isotope multilayers. For two model systems, an amorphous semiconductor and an amorphous metallic alloy, the efficiency of this method is demonstrated to detect minimum diffusion lengths of only 0.6-0.7 nm. It is further shown that diffusivities can be derived which are more than two orders of magnitude lower than those obtainable with conventional methods. Prospects of this method in order to solve actual kinetic problems in materials science are given

  8. Study of vibrations and stabilization of linear collider final doublets at the sub-nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzon, B.

    2007-11-01

    CLIC is one of the current projects of high energy linear colliders. Vertical beam sizes of 0.7 nm at the time of the collision and fast ground motion of a few nanometers impose an active stabilization of the final doublets at a fifth of nanometer above 4 Hz. The majority of my work concerned vibrations and active stabilization study of cantilever and slim beams in order to be representative of the final doublets of CLIC. In a first part, measured performances of different types of vibration sensors associated to an appropriate instrumentation showed that accurate measurements of ground motion are possible from 0.1 Hz up to 2000 Hz on a quiet site. Also, electrochemical sensors answering a priori the specifications of CLIC can be incorporated in the active stabilization at a fifth of nanometer. In a second part, an experimental and numerical study of beam vibrations enabled to validate the efficiency of the numerical prediction incorporated then in the simulation of the active stabilization. Also, a study of the impact of ground motion and of acoustic noise on beam vibrations showed that an active stabilization is necessary at least up to 1000 Hz. In a third part, results on the active stabilization of a beam at its two first resonances are shown down to amplitudes of a tenth of nanometer above 4 Hz by using in parallel a commercial system performing passive and active stabilization of the clamping. The last part is related to a study of a support for the final doublets of a linear collider prototype in phase of finalization, the ATF2 prototype. This work showed that relative motion between this support and the ground is below imposed tolerances (6 nm above 0.1 Hz) with appropriate boundary conditions. (author)

  9. Optimized cleanup method for the determination of short chain polychlorinated n-alkanes in sediments by high resolution gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion-low resolution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yuan; Zhang Haijun; Chen Jiping; Zhang Qing; Tian Yuzeng; Qi Peipei; Yu Zhengkun

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The sediment sample could be purified by the optimized cleanup method, and satisfying cleanup efficiency was obtained. Highlights: → The elution characters of sPCAs and interfering substances were evaluated on three adsorbents. → An optimized cleanup method was developed for sPCAs with satisfying cleanup efficiency. → The cleanup method combined with HRGC/ECNI-LRMS was applied for sPCAs analysis. → The sPCAs levels range from 53.6 ng g -1 to 289.3 ng g -1 in tested sediment samples. - Abstract: The performances of three adsorbents, i.e. silica gel, neutral and basic alumina, in the separation of short chain polychlorinated n-alkanes (sPCAs) from potential interfering substances such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides were evaluated. To increase the cleanup efficiency, a two-step cleanup method using silica gel column and subsequent basic alumina column was developed. All the PCB and organochlorine pesticides could be removed by this cleanup method. The very satisfying cleanup efficiency of sPCAs has been achieved and the recovery in the cleanup method reached 92.7%. The method detection limit (MDL) for sPCAs in sediments was determined to be 14 ng g -1 . Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 5.3% was obtained for the mass fraction of sPCAs by analyzing four replicates of a spiked sediment sample. High resolution gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion-low resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ECNI-LRMS) was used for sPCAs quantification by monitoring [M-HCl]· - ions. When applied to the sediment samples from the mouth of the Daliao River, the optimized cleanup method in conjunction with HRGC/ECNI-LRMS allowed for highly selective identifications for sPCAs. The sPCAs levels in sediment samples are reported to range from 53.6 ng g -1 to 289.3 ng g -1 . C 10 - and C 11 -PCAs are the dominant residue in most of investigated sediment samples.

  10. Structural changes of Bi1.8Sr2(Ca1-xYx)Cu2.2Oz ceramics with yttrium content studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Iwabuchi, Yoshihiro; Fukase, Tetsuo; Sato, Hiroshi; Mitchell, Terence E.

    1991-06-01

    The mode of the incommensurate modulation in the b direction of the Bi1.8Sr2(Ca1-xYx)Cu2.2Oz (0.05electron diffraction and high-resolution lattice imaging. The change of period of the long-period structure with x is found to be basically due to the mixing ratio of domains of two modulation periods with b=4.5b0 and 5b0 or 4.5b0 and 4b0, thus creating periods of b=4.75b0-4.0b0. The fundamental orthorhombic lattice has dimensions of a~=b~=b0 (0.54 nm) and c~=c0 (3.1 nm). The change of the mixing mode from one to the other mentioned above occurs just in the yttrium concentration range, 0.45resolution lattice images. These images are reproduced well by a multislice computer-simulation technique.

  11. Evolution of graphene nanoribbons under low-voltage electron irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Wenpeng

    2012-01-01

    Though the all-semiconducting nature of ultrathin graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) has been demonstrated in field-effect transistors operated at room temperature with ∼105 on-off current ratios, the borderline for the potential of GNRs is still untouched. There remains a great challenge in fabricating even thinner GNRs with precise width, known edge configurations and specified crystallographic orientations. Unparalleled to other methods, low-voltage electron irradiation leads to a continuous reduction in width to a sub-nanometer range until the occurrence of structural instability. The underlying mechanisms have been investigated by the molecular dynamics method herein, combined with in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations. The structural evolution reveals that the zigzag edges are dynamically more stable than the chiral ones. Preferential bond breaking induces atomic rings and dangling bonds as the initial defects. The defects grow, combine and reconstruct to complex edge structures. Dynamic recovery is enhanced by thermal activation, especially in cooperation with electron irradiation. Roughness develops under irradiation and reaches a plateau less than 1 nm for all edge configurations after longtime exposure. These features render low-voltage electron irradiation an attractive technique in the fabrication of ultrathin GNRs for exploring the ultimate electronic properties. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-01-01

    Image guided radiation therapy solutions based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) involve the extension of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) from their traditional role of weekly localization imaging and planar dose mapping to volumetric imaging for 3D setup and dose verification. To sustain the potential advantages of MVCT, EPIDs are required to provide improved levels of portal image quality. Therefore, it is vital that the performance of EPIDs in clinical use is maintained at an optimal level through regular and rigorous quality assurance (QA). Traditionally, portal imaging QA has been carried out by imaging calibrated line-pair and contrast resolution phantoms and obtaining arbitrarily defined QA indices that are usually dependent on imaging conditions and merely indicate relative trends in imaging performance. They are not adequately sensitive to all aspects of image quality unlike fundamental imaging metrics such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) that are widely used to characterize detector performance in radiographic imaging and would be ideal for QA purposes. However, due to the difficulty of performing conventional MTF measurements, they have not been used for routine clinical QA. The authors present a simple and quick QA methodology based on obtaining the MTF, NPS, and DQE of a megavoltage imager by imaging standard open fields and a bar-pattern QA phantom containing 2 mm thick tungsten line-pair bar resolution targets. Our bar-pattern based MTF measurement features a novel zero-frequency normalization scheme that eliminates normalization errors typically associated with traditional bar-pattern measurements at megavoltage x-ray energies. The bar-pattern QA phantom and open-field images are used in conjunction with an automated image analysis algorithm that quickly computes the MTF, NPS, and DQE of an EPID system. Our approach combines the fundamental advantages of

  13. Investigation by high resolution electron spectroscopy of the helium-like 3lnl' Rydberg series in double capture processes at low collision velocity: auto transfer to Rydberg states and electron stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Benhenni, M. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)); Bachau, H.; Sanchez, I. (Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France). Lab. des Collisions Atomiques)

    1994-09-28

    A high resolution electron spectrometry of the (3lnl') Ryberg series populated in N[sup 7+] + He and Ne[sup 10+] + He collisions at 10 q keV, 10[sup o] allows us to observe, for the first time by this method, two post-collisional effects. First, it is found with nitrogen ions that, when n increases from n = 4 to 9, the L-distribution peaks more and more on the high angular momentum states. This is qualitatively understood as a Stark deformation of the Rydberg orbit by the Coulomb field of the receding ion. Also, in the n range where the double capture process populates symmetrical 4l4l' states (n>9), an enhancement of the intensities of the 3lnl' Rydberg lines is observed for both collisonal systems. This is thought to be a signature of the so-called auto transfer to Rydberg states effect. The transfer of population from the 3l4l' to the 3lnl' states is found to be favoured against a direct autoionization of these 4l4l' states into the n = 2 continuum. These experimental findings together with preliminary spectroscopic calculations concerning the configuration interaction of the Ne[sup 8+] (4l4l') states with the Ne[sup 8+](3lnl') Rydberg series are also discussed within the context of the electron stabilization which follows a double capture. (Author).

  14. Investigation by high resolution electron spectroscopy of the helium-like 3lnl' Rydberg series in double capture processes at low collision velocity: auto transfer to Rydberg states and electron stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Benhenni, M.; Bachau, H.; Sanchez, I.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution electron spectrometry of the (3lnl') Ryberg series populated in N 7+ + He and Ne 10+ + He collisions at 10 q keV, 10 o allows us to observe, for the first time by this method, two post-collisional effects. First, it is found with nitrogen ions that, when n increases from n = 4 to 9, the L-distribution peaks more and more on the high angular momentum states. This is qualitatively understood as a Stark deformation of the Rydberg orbit by the Coulomb field of the receding ion. Also, in the n range where the double capture process populates symmetrical 4l4l' states (n>9), an enhancement of the intensities of the 3lnl' Rydberg lines is observed for both collisonal systems. This is thought to be a signature of the so-called auto transfer to Rydberg states effect. The transfer of population from the 3l4l' to the 3lnl' states is found to be favoured against a direct autoionization of these 4l4l' states into the n = 2 continuum. These experimental findings together with preliminary spectroscopic calculations concerning the configuration interaction of the Ne 8+ (4l4l') states with the Ne 8+ (3lnl') Rydberg series are also discussed within the context of the electron stabilization which follows a double capture. (Author)

  15. High energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of the dielectric properties of bulk and nanoparticle LaB6 in the near-infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yohei; Terauchi, Masami; Mukai, Masaki; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Adachi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The dielectric properties of LaB 6 crystals and the plasmonic behavior of LaB 6 nanoparticles, which have been applied to solar heat-shielding filters, were studied by high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). An EELS spectrum of a LaB 6 crystal showed a peak at 2.0 eV, which was attributed to volume plasmon excitation of carrier electrons. EELS spectra of single LaB 6 nanoparticles showed peaks at 1.1-1.4 eV depending on the dielectric effect from the substrates. The peaks were assigned to dipole oscillation excitations. These peak energies almost coincided with the peak energy of optical absorption of a heat-shielding filter with LaB 6 nanoparticles. On the other hand, those energies were a smaller than a dipole oscillation energy predicted using the dielectric function of bulk LaB 6 crystal. It is suggested that the lower energy than expected is due to an excitation at 1.2 eV, which was observed for oxidized LaB 6 area. -- Highlights: → The dielectric properties of LaB 6 nanoparticles applied to solar heat-shielding filters were studied by HR-EELS. → Plasmon peak energies of the LaB 6 nanoparticles were almost equal to optical absorption energy of a heat-shielding filter. → From this result, near-infrared optical absorption of the filter is due to the surface dipole mode of the nanoparticles.

  16. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweiacker, K., E-mail: Kai@zweiacker.org; Liu, C.; Wiezorek, J. M. K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, 648 Benedum Hall, 3700 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); McKeown, J. T.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H. [Materials Science Division, Physical and Life Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of the metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ∼1.3 m s{sup −1} to ∼2.5 m s{sup −1} during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s{sup −1} have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.

  17. Study of the giant multipole resonances especially of the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by medium and high energy resolution inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehner, G.

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus 208 Pb giant multipole resonances up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV were looked for by medium resolution inelastic electron scattering. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of E 0 = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 93 0 to 165 0 . The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. On the base of this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0 + , ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3 + giant resonance. Besides under forward angles a further weak excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV appears which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2 + . At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3 - resonance was found which recently is observed also in (α, α') experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also a Jsup(π) = 3 - character but has to be partly assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2 + excitation was found which gets because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI) [de

  18. High-Resolution Faraday Rotation and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Surface States of the Bulk-Insulating Topological Insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Tse, Wang-Kong; Brahlek, M; Morris, C M; Aguilar, R Valdés; Koirala, N; Oh, S; Armitage, N P

    2015-11-20

    We have utilized time-domain magnetoterahertz spectroscopy to investigate the low-frequency optical response of the topological insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} and Bi_{2}Se_{3} films. With both field and frequency dependence, such experiments give sufficient information to measure the mobility and carrier density of multiple conduction channels simultaneously. We observe sharp cyclotron resonances (CRs) in both materials. The small amount of Cu incorporated into the Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} induces a true bulk insulator with only a single type of conduction with a total sheet carrier density of ~4.9×10^{12}/cm^{2} and mobility as high as 4000 cm^{2}/V·s. This is consistent with conduction from two virtually identical topological surface states (TSSs) on the top and bottom of the film with a chemical potential ~145 meV above the Dirac point and in the bulk gap. The CR broadens at high fields, an effect that we attribute to an electron-phonon interaction. This assignment is supported by an extended Drude model analysis of the zero-field Drude conductance. In contrast, in normal Bi_{2}Se_{3} films, two conduction channels were observed, and we developed a self-consistent analysis method to distinguish the dominant TSSs and coexisting trivial bulk or two-dimensional electron gas states. Our high-resolution Faraday rotation spectroscopy on Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} paves the way for the observation of quantized Faraday rotation under experimentally achievable conditions to push the chemical potential in the lowest Landau level.

  19. In situ investigation of ion-induced dewetting of a thin iron-oxide film on silicon by high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirthapandian, S. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Material Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Schuchart, F.; Garmatter, D.; Bolse, W. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Using our new in situ high resolution scanning electron microscope, which is integrated into the UNILAC ion beamline at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany, we investigated the swift heavy ion induced dewetting of a thin iron oxide layer on Si. Besides heterogeneous hole nucleation at defects and spontaneous (homogeneous) hole nucleation, we could clearly identify a dewetting mechanism, which is similar to the spinodal dewetting observed for liquid films. Instead of being due to capillary waves, it is based on a stress induced surface instability. The latter results in the formation of a wavy surface with constant dominant wave-length and increasing amplitude during ion irradiation. Dewetting sets in as soon as the wave-troughs reach the film-substrate interface. Inspection of the hole radii and rim shapes indicates that removal of the material from the hole area occurs mainly by plastic deformation at the inner boundary and ion induced viscous flow in the peripheral zone due to surface tension.

  20. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of intermetallics formed in Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers during thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.L.; Peng, T.X.; Cao, B.S.; Lei, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intermetallics formation in the Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers magnetron-sputtering deposited on Si(100) substrate during thermal annealing at 623-873 K was investigated by using small and wide angle X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers were constructed with bilayer thickness of 16.2 nm and the sublayer thickness ratio of 1:1. At the annealing temperature of 623 K, intermetallics FeTi were formed by nucleation at the triple joins of α-Fe(Ti)/α-Ti interface and α-Ti grain boundary with an orientational correlation of FeTi(110)//α-Ti(100) and FeTi[001]//α-Ti[001] to adjacent α-Ti grains. The lateral growth of intermetallics FeTi which is dependent on the diffusion path of Ti led to a coalescence into an intermetallic layer. With an increase in the annealing temperature, intermetallics Fe 2 Ti were formed between the intermetallics FeTi and the excess Fe due to the limitation of Fe and Ti atomic concentrations, resulting in the coexistence of intermetallics FeTi and Fe 2 Ti. It was found that the low energy interface as well as the dominant diffusion path constrained the nucleation and growth of intermetallics during interfacial reaction in the nanometer-scale metallic multilayers.

  1. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of graphite materials prepared by high-temperature treatment of unburned carbon concentrates from combustion fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel Cabielles; Jean-Nol Rouzaud; Ana B. Garcia [Instituto Nacional del Carbn (INCAR), Oviedo (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used in this work to study the microstructural (structure and microtexture) changes occurring during the high-temperature treatment of the unburned carbon concentrates from coal combustion fly ashes. Emphasis was placed on two aspects: (i) the development of graphitic carbon structures and (ii) the disordered carbon forms remaining in the graphitized samples. In addition, by coupling HRTEM with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, the transformations with the temperature of the inorganic matter (mainly iron- and silicon-based phases) of the unburned carbon concentrates were evidenced. The HRTEM results were compared to the averaged structural order of the materials as evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. As indicated by XRD and Raman parameters, more-ordered materials were obtained from the unburned carbon concentrates with higher mineral/inorganic matter, thus inferring the catalytic effect of some of their components. However, the average character of the information provided by these instrumental techniques seems to be inconclusive in discriminating between carbon structures with different degrees of order (stricto sensu graphite, graphitic, turbostratic, etc.) in a given graphitized unburned carbon. Unlike XRD and Raman, HRTEM is a useful tool for imaging directly the profile of the polyaromatic layers (graphene planes), thus allowing the sample heterogeneity to be looked at, specifically the presence of disordered carbon phases. 49 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Structural characterization of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 thin films on step-edge substrates by means of high-resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, C.L.; Kabius, B.; Urban, K.

    1993-01-01

    The microstructure of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films epitaxially grown on step-edge (0 0 1) SrTiO 3 and LaAlO 3 substrates has been characterized by means of high-resolution electron microscopy. The results indicate a relationship between the microstructure of the film across a step and the angle the step makes with the substrate plane. On a steep, high-angle step, the film grows with its c-axis perpendicular to that of the film on substrate surface so that two grain boundaries are formed. In the upper grain boundary, on the average, a (0 1 3) habit plane alternates with a (1 0 3) habit plane. This alternating structure is caused by twinning in the orthorhombic structure. The lower boundaries consist of a chain of (0 1 3)(0 1 3) and (0 1 0)(0 0 1) type segments exhibiting a tendency to tilt the whole habit plane toward the a-b plane of the flank film. Dislocations, stacking faults and misfit strains were also observed in or close to the boundaries. (orig.)

  3. Fermi surface of a disordered Cu-Al -alloy single crystal studied by high-resolution Compton scattering and electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, J.; Maniawski, F.; Matsumoto, I.; Kawata, H.; Shiotani, N.; Lityńska, L.; Kaprzyk, S.; Bansil, A.

    2004-08-01

    We have measured high resolution Compton scattering profiles for momentum transfer along a series of 28 independent directions from Cu0.842Al0.158 disordered alloy single crystals with normals to the surfaces oriented along the [100], [110], and [111] directions. The experimental spectra are interpreted via parallel first-principles KKR-CPA (Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential approximation) computations of these directional profiles. The Fermi surface determined by inverting the Compton data is found to be in good agreement with the KKR-CPA predictions. An electron diffraction study of the present Cu0.842Al0.158 sample is additionally undertaken to gain insight into short-range ordering effects. The scattering pattern displays not only the familiar diffuse scattering peaks, but also shows the presence of weak streaks interconnecting the four diffuse scattering spots around the (110) reciprocal lattice points. This study provides a comprehensive picture of the evolution of the shape of the Fermi surface of Cu with the addition of Al . Our results are consistent with the notion that Fermi surface nesting is an important factor in driving short-range ordering effects in disordered alloys.

  4. Hydration Effects on Skin Microstructure as Probed by High-Resolution Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mechanistic Implications to Enhanced Transcutaneous Delivery of Biomacromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; Lawson, Louise B.; He, Jibao; Freytag, Lucia C.; Clements, John D.; John, Vijay T.

    2010-01-01

    Although hydration is long known to improve the permeability of skin, penetration of macromolecules such as proteins is limited and the understanding of enhanced transport is based on empirical observations. This study uses high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy to visualize microstructural changes in the stratum corneum (SC) and enable a mechanistic interpretation of biomacromolecule penetration through highly hydrated porcine skin. Swollen corneocytes, separation of lipid bilayers in the SC intercellular space to form cisternae, and networks of spherical particulates are observed in porcine skin tissue hydrated for a period of 4–10 h. This is explained through compaction of skin lipids when hydrated, a reversal in the conformational transition from unilamellar liposomes in lamellar granules to lamellae between keratinocytes when the SC skin barrier is initially established. Confocal microscopy studies show distinct enhancement in penetration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) through skin hydrated for 4–10 h, and limited penetration of FITC-BSA once skin is restored to its natively hydrated structure when exposed to the environment for 2–3 h. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a 4–10 h hydration period to enhance transcutaneous penetration of large biomacromolecules without permanently damaging the skin. PMID:19582754

  5. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert; Vurpillot, François; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-04-17

    Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis. The increasingly detailed design of such catalysts necessitates three-dimensional characterization with high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is uniquely suited to the task but faces challenges with the evaporation of metal/insulator systems. Correlation of APT with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO, reveals preferential evaporation of the MgO and an inaccurate assessment of nanoparticle composition. Finite element field evaporation modeling is used to illustrate the evolution of the evaporation front. Nanoparticle composition is most accurately predicted when the MgO is treated as having a locally variable evaporation field, indicating the importance of considering laser-oxide interactions and the evaporation of various molecular oxide ions. These results demonstrate the viability of APT for analysis of oxide-supported metal nanoparticles, highlighting the need for developing a theoretical framework for the evaporation of heterogeneous materials.

  6. Experimental positions and lifetimes of Be-like 1s23lnl'(n=3 to 5) states of O4+ and Ne6+ ions investigated by high resolution electron spectroscopy: test of calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.

    1999-01-01

    Using high resolution electron spectroscopy, positions and lifetimes of many Be-like singlet states of the 1s 2 3lnl' Rydberg series (n = 3 to 5) of oxygen and neon have been measured for the first time. This was achieved by a fitting procedure which takes into account an accurate definition of the post-collisional electron lineshapes. These states are produced after a double electron capture by multicharged ions has occurred in O 6+ (1s 2 )+He, H 2 and Ne 8+ (1s 2 )+He collisions at about 4 keV/amu collision energy. (orig.)

  7. Structural changes of Bi sub 1. 8 Sr sub 2 (Ca sub 1 minus x Y sub x )Cu sub 2. 2 O sub z ceramics with yttrium content studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, T.; Iwabuchi, Y.; Fukase, T. (Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980, Japan (JP)); Sato, H. (School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Mitchell, T.E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The mode of the incommensurate modulation in the {ital b} direction of the Bi{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 2}(Ca{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Y{sub {ital x}})Cu{sub 2.2}O{sub {ital z}} (0.05{lt}{ital x}{lt}0.75) system is investigated by means of electron diffraction and high-resolution lattice imaging. The change of period of the long-period structure with {ital x} is found to be basically due to the mixing ratio of domains of two modulation periods with {ital b}=4.5{ital b}{sub 0} and 5{ital b}{sub 0} or 4.5{ital b}{sub 0} and 4{ital b}{sub 0}, thus creating periods of {ital b}=4.75{ital b}{sub 0--}4.0{ital b}{sub 0}. The fundamental orthorhombic lattice has dimensions of {ital a}{congruent}{ital b}{congruent}{ital b}{sub 0} (0.54 nm) and {ital c}{congruent}{ital c}{sub 0} (3.1 nm). The change of the mixing mode from one to the other mentioned above occurs just in the yttrium concentration range, 0.45{lt}{ital x}{lt}0.65, which also corresponds to the superconductor (metallic)-to-semiconductor transition boundary. The mixing modes of the domains are directly recorded as a contrast modulation with half periods, 4.5{ital b}{sub 0}/2 and 5{ital b}{sub 0}/2 or 4.5{ital b}{sub 0}/2 and 4{ital b}{sub 0}/2 in high-resolution lattice images. These images are reproduced well by a multislice computer-simulation technique.

  8. Study on radiation-induced reaction in microscopic region for basic understanding of electron beam patterning in lithographic process. 2. Relation between resist space resolution and space distribution of ionic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Akinori; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Yoichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2002-01-01

    For basic research on electron beam lithography, the time-dependent distribution was measured. In the case of nano-scale electron beam lithography, the distribution of ionic species is thought to have an influence on the space resolution or the line edge roughness. As a model compound of a resist resin, liquid n-dodecane was used as a sample. The experiment was carried out using the subpicosecond pulse radiolysis. The experimental data was analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation based on the diffusion in an electric field. The simulation data were convoluted by the response function and fitted to the experimental data. By transforming the time-dependent behavior of cation radicals to the distribution function of cation radical-electron distance, the time-dependent distribution was obtained. Subsequently, the relation between the space resolution and the space distribution of ionic species was discussed. (author)

  9. Breaking the Crowther limit: Combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovden, Robert; Ercius, Peter; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D.; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A.

    2014-01-01

    To date, high-resolution ( 6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. - Highlights: • Develop tomography technique for high-resolution and large field of view. • We combine depth sectioning with traditional tilt tomography. • Through-focal tomography reduces tilts and improves resolution. • Through-focal tomography overcomes the fundamental Crowther limit. • Aberration-corrected becomes a benefit and not a hindrance for tomography

  10. Atomic-resolution studies of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of {proportional_to}1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In{sup 3+} atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  11. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct observation and analysis of york-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Asahina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in york-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO2, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the york-shell materials: (i resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  13. Direct observation and analysis of yolk-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahina, Shunsuke; Suga, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Hideyuki [JEOL Ltd., SM Business Unit, Tokyo (Japan); Young Jeong, Hu [Graduate School of EEWS, WCU/BK21+, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Galeano, Carolina; Schüth, Ferdi [Department of Heterogeneous Catalysis, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Mülheim (Germany); Terasaki, Osamu, E-mail: terasaki@mmk.su.se, E-mail: terasaki@kaist.ac.kr [Graduate School of EEWS, WCU/BK21+, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-11-01

    Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in yolk-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO{sub 2}, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the yolk-shell materials: (i) resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii) sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii) X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  14. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled 1,1 '-Diphenylethylene: Electronically Excited and Ionic States of a Prototypical Cross-Conjugated System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C. A.; Zgierski, M. Z.; Buma, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated pi-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio

  15. Study of a new magnetic dipole mode in the heavy deformed nuclei 154Sm, 156Gd, 158Gd, 164Dy, 168Er, and 174Yb by high-resolution electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohle, D.

    1985-01-01

    By inelastic electron scattering with high energy resolution a new magnetic dipole mode in heavy, deformed nuclei could be detected. For this the nuclei 154 Sm, 156 Gd, 158 Gd, 164 Dy, 168 Er, and 174 Yb were studied at the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (DALINAC) at small momentum transfer q ≤ 0.6 fm -1 and low excitation energies. A collective magnetic dipole excitation could be discovered in all nuclei at an excitation energy of E x ≅ 66 δA -1/3 MeV whereby δ means the mass deformation. The transition strength extends in the mean to B(M1)↑ ≅ 1.3 μ N 2 . A systematic study of the nucleus 156 Gd yielded hints to a strong fragmentation of the magnetic dipole strength. A comparison of electron scattering, proton scattering, and nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments shows that the new mode is a pure orbital mode. (orig./HSI) [de

  16. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1 '-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C.A.; Zgierski, M.Z.; Buma, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1′-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We

  18. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Geloni, Gianluca [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, Anders [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd’ko, Yuri, E-mail: shvydko@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-12

    This article explores novel opportunities for ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) at high-repetition-rate self-seeded XFELs. These next-generation light sources are promising a more than three orders of magnitude increase in average spectral flux compared with what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. In combination with the advanced IXS spectrometer described here, this may become a real game-changer for ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectroscopies, and hence for the studies of dynamics in condensed matter systems. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup −1} spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup −1} are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10{sup 12} photons s{sup −1} in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  19. Disclosure of domain structure in cubic CaxZr1-xO2-x, 0x15 ≤ x ≤ 0x20, by Talbot image enhancement of high-resolution electron micrographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossell, H.J.; Wilson, I.J.; Sellar, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscope images have been recorded of several cystalline samples of calcia-stabilized zirconia (Ca-CSZ) and of the fluorite-related superstructure phase φ 1 (CaZr 4 O 9 ). The contrast of the CSZ images has been enhanced markedly by the light-optical Talbot self-imaging technique. Is is demonstrated that the CSZ crystals contain a coherent dispersion of microdomains approximately 30 A in diameter, and that the structure of the microdomains is that of φ 1 . (orig.)

  20. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-03-11

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  1. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  2. Resolution propositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    To put a resolution to the meeting in relation with the use of weapons made of depleted uranium is the purpose of this text. The situation of the use of depleted uranium by France during the Gulf war and other recent conflicts will be established. This resolution will give the most strict recommendations face to the eventual sanitary and environmental risks in the use of these kind of weapons. (N.C.)

  3. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of the 1s23lnl' Be-like series in oxygen and neon. Test of theoretical data: I. Experimental method and theoretical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D

    2003-01-01

    A complete and accurate experimental test of theoretical spectroscopic data sets (state positions, lifetimes) available for the n = 3-5 terms of the 1s 2 3lnl' Rydberg series of oxygen and neon ions is presented in a series of two papers. This result was achieved by fitting our high resolution electron spectra with post-collisional lineshapes calculated with the help of these spectroscopic data. In this paper the method which has been developed for this fitting procedure is explained. In addition, as a first test, a comparison of all the available calculated spectroscopic data is presented and discussed. Strong deviations of transition energies and decay lifetimes are observed in many cases. Best data are selected in the following companion paper through a quantitative comparison with our experimental electron spectra

  4. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Be-like series in oxygen and neon. Test of theoretical data: I. Experimental method and theoretical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D [Laboratoire CAR-IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS - Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2003-01-14

    A complete and accurate experimental test of theoretical spectroscopic data sets (state positions, lifetimes) available for the n = 3-5 terms of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Rydberg series of oxygen and neon ions is presented in a series of two papers. This result was achieved by fitting our high resolution electron spectra with post-collisional lineshapes calculated with the help of these spectroscopic data. In this paper the method which has been developed for this fitting procedure is explained. In addition, as a first test, a comparison of all the available calculated spectroscopic data is presented and discussed. Strong deviations of transition energies and decay lifetimes are observed in many cases. Best data are selected in the following companion paper through a quantitative comparison with our experimental electron spectra.

  5. Intrinsic limits on resolutions in muon- and electron-neutrino charged-current events in the KM3NeT/ORCA detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andre, M.; Androulakis, G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Avgitas, T.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Mart, J.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Billault, M.; Bondì, M.; Bormuth, R.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bourret, S.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buis, E.; Buompane, R.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; Celli, S.; Champion, C.; Cherubini, S.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, L.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cobas, D.; Cocimano, R.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Sio, C.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, A. F.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Durocher, M.; Eberl, T.; Eichie, S.; van Eijk, D.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Favaro, M.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Frascadore, G.; Furini, M.; Fusco, L. A.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Garufi, F.; Gay, P.; Gebyehu, M.; Giacomini, F.; Gialanella, L.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia, R.; Graf, K.; Grégoire, T.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Guerzoni, M.; Habel, R.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Harissopulos, S.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hevinga, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C. M. F.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; Jansweijerf, P.; Jongen, M.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Kießling, D.; Koffeman, E. N.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Leisos, A.; Leone, F.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Lo Presti, D.; Löhner, H.; Lonardo, A.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manzali, M.; Margiotta, A.; Margotti, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maris, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Marzaioli, F.; Mele, R.; Melis, K. W.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Mijakowski, P.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Moussa, A.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nicolau, C. A.; Olcina, I.; Olivetto, C.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălas, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrini, G.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Pfutzner, M.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Pleinert, M.-O.; Poma, G. E.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Pratolongo, F.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rauch, T.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez García, A.; Sánchez Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schimmel, F.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sciacca, V.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spisso, B.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Terrasi, F.; Tézier, D.; Theraube, S.; Timmer, P.; Tönnis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Travaglini, R.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Versari, F.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Volkert, M.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Zachariadou, K.; Zani, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-05-01

    Studying atmospheric neutrino oscillations in the few-GeV range with a multi-megaton detector promises to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. This is the main science goal pursued by the future KM3NeT/ORCA water Cherenkov detector in the Mediterranean Sea. In this paper, the processes that limit the obtainable resolution in both energy and direction in charged-current neutrino events in the ORCA detector are investigated. These processes include the composition of the hadronic fragmentation products, the subsequent particle propagation and the photon-sampling fraction of the detector. GEANT simulations of neutrino interactions in seawater produced by GENIE are used to study the effects in the 1-20 GeV range. It is found that fluctuations in the hadronic cascade in conjunction with the variation of the inelasticity y are most detrimental to the resolutions. The effect of limited photon sampling in the detector is of significantly less importance. These results will therefore also be applicable to similar detectors/media, such as those in ice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Howard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H...H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  7. Electron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Tonomura, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Holography was devised for breaking through the resolution limit of electron microscopes The advent of a "coherent" field emission electron beam has enabled the use of Electron Holography in various areas of magnetic domain structures observation, fluxon observation in superconductors, and fundamental experiments in physics which have been inaccessible using other techniques After examining the fundamentals of electron holography and its applications to the afore mentioned fields, a detailed discussion of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the related experiments is presented Many photographs and illustrations are included to elucidate the text

  8. Spatially resolved band alignments at Au-hexadecanethiol monolayer-GaAs(001) interfaces by ballistic electron emission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junay, A.; Guézo, S., E-mail: sophie.guezo@univ-rennes1.fr; Turban, P.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Tricot, S.; Ababou-Girard, S.; Solal, F. [Département Matériaux-Nanosciences, Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251, CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, Bât 11E, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2015-08-28

    We study structural and electronic inhomogeneities in Metal—Organic Molecular monoLayer (OML)—semiconductor interfaces at the sub-nanometer scale by means of in situ Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). BEEM imaging of Au/1-hexadecanethiols/GaAs(001) heterostructures reveals the evolution of pinholes density as a function of the thickness of the metallic top-contact. Using BEEM in spectroscopic mode in non-short-circuited areas, local electronic fingerprints (barrier height values and corresponding spectral weights) reveal a low-energy tunneling regime through the insulating organic monolayer. At higher energies, BEEM evidences new conduction channels, associated with hot-electron injection in the empty molecular orbitals of the OML. Corresponding band diagrams at buried interfaces can be thus locally described. The energy position of GaAs conduction band minimum in the heterostructure is observed to evolve as a function of the thickness of the deposited metal, and coherently with size-dependent electrostatic effects under the molecular patches. Such BEEM analysis provides a quantitative diagnosis on metallic top-contact formation on organic molecular monolayer and appears as a relevant characterization for its optimization.

  9. In Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Observation of Sn Nanoparticles on SnO2 Nanotubes Under Lithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jun Young; Chang, Joon Ha; Kim, Sung Joo; Kim, Chanhoon; Seo, Hyeon Kook; Shin, Jae Won; Yuk, Jong Min; Lee, Jeong Yong; Kim, Il-Doo

    2017-12-01

    We trace Sn nanoparticles (NPs) produced from SnO2 nanotubes (NTs) during lithiation initialized by high energy e-beam irradiation. The growth dynamics of Sn NPs is visualized in liquid electrolytes by graphene liquid cell transmission electron microscopy. The observation reveals that Sn NPs grow on the surface of SnO2 NTs via coalescence and the final shape of agglomerated NPs is governed by surface energy of the Sn NPs and the interfacial energy between Sn NPs and SnO2 NTs. Our result will likely benefit more rational material design of the ideal interface for facile ion insertion.

  10. An accurate test of calculated positions and lifetimes for Ne{sup 6+}(1s{sup 2}3lnl{sup '}) {sup 1}L states (n=3 and 4) using a high-resolution electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. E-mail: abm@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D

    2003-05-01

    An accurate test of available calculations for the autoionizing doubly excited states belonging to the Be-like 1s{sup 2}3lnl{sup '} Rydberg series of neon (positions and lifetimes) is presented in this short communication. These theoretical data are used to calculate electron line shapes which are compared, through a fitting procedure, with a high-resolution electron spectrum measured in Ne{sup 8+}(1s{sup 2}) + He collisional system, at 80 keV collision energy and 13.1 deg. observation angle. Present tests concern the n=3 and n=4 singlet states. It is found that some of these calculations suffer from large discrepancies with experiment and do not allow a description of the electron spectrum. A quantitative comparison of measured and calculated post-collisional Coulomb interaction-shifted line positions is also given and briefly discussed; for one theoretical data set, the agreement with experiment is found to be generally within {+-}50 meV; in contrast agreement with other data often considerably scatters within {+-}500 meV and sometimes more.

  11. An accurate test of calculated positions and lifetimes for Ne6+(1s23lnl') 1L states (n=3 and 4) using a high-resolution electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.

    2003-01-01

    An accurate test of available calculations for the autoionizing doubly excited states belonging to the Be-like 1s 2 3lnl ' Rydberg series of neon (positions and lifetimes) is presented in this short communication. These theoretical data are used to calculate electron line shapes which are compared, through a fitting procedure, with a high-resolution electron spectrum measured in Ne 8+ (1s 2 ) + He collisional system, at 80 keV collision energy and 13.1 deg. observation angle. Present tests concern the n=3 and n=4 singlet states. It is found that some of these calculations suffer from large discrepancies with experiment and do not allow a description of the electron spectrum. A quantitative comparison of measured and calculated post-collisional Coulomb interaction-shifted line positions is also given and briefly discussed; for one theoretical data set, the agreement with experiment is found to be generally within ±50 meV; in contrast agreement with other data often considerably scatters within ±500 meV and sometimes more

  12. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  13. First test results from the Front-End Board with Cyclone V as a test high-resolution platform for the Auger-Beyond-2015 Front End Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew [University of Lodz, Department of Physics and Applied Informatics, Faculty of High-Energy Astrophysics, 90-236 Lodz, Pomorska 149, (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the first results from the Front- End Board (FEB) with the biggest Cyclone{sup R} V E FPGA 5CEFA9F31I7N, supporting 8 channels sampled up to 250 MSps at 14-bit resolution. Considered sampling for the SD is 120 MSps, however, the FEB has been developed with external anti-aliasing filters to keep a maximal flexibility. Six channels are targeted to the SD, two the rest for other experiments like: Auger Engineering Radio Array and additional muon counters. More channels and higher sampling generate larger size of registered events. We used the standard radio channel for a radio transmission from the detectors to the Central Data Acquisition Station (CDAS) to avoid at present a significant modification of a software in both sides: the detector and the CDAS (planned in a future for a final design). Seven FEBs have been deployed in the test detectors on a dedicated Engineering Array in a hexagon. Several variants of the FPGA code were tested for 120, 160, 200 and even 240 MSps DAQ. Tests confirmed a stability and reliability of the FEB design in real pampas conditions with more than 40 deg. C daily temperature variation and a strong sun exposition with a limited power budget only from a single solar panel. (authors)

  14. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho; Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In 1−x ,Ga x )(Se 1−y S y ) 2 of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth

  15. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Sung [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Taewon [Energy lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongho, E-mail: dhlee0333@gmail.com; Nam, Junggyu [PV Development Team, Energy Solution Business Division, Samsung SDI, 467 Beonyeong-ro, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 331-330 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Gaesin-dong, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog, E-mail: bdchoi@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  16. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-03-22

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  18. Study of the giant multipole resonances, especially the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by inelastic electron scattering with medium and high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehner, E.G.F.

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus 208 Pb giant multipole resonances were looked for by inelastic electron scattering up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of Esub(o) = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 93 0 to 165 0 . The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. Basing on this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as a superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0 + , ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3 + giant resonance. Besides under forwards angles a further weak excitation appears at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2 + . At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3 - resonance was found which recently is also observed in (α,α') scattering experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also Jsup(π) = 3 - character but has partly to be assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2 + excitation was found which gels because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI) [de

  19. New light on the Kr-(4p55s2) Feshbach resonances: high-resolution electron scattering experiments and B-spline R-matrix calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, T H; Ruf, M-W; Hotop, H; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K; Allan, M

    2010-01-01

    In a joint experimental and theoretical effort, we carried out a detailed study of electron scattering from Kr atoms in the energy range of the low-lying Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 ) Feshbach resonances. Absolute angle-differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering were measured over the energy range 9.3-10.3 eV with an energy width of about 13 meV at scattering angles between 10 deg. and 180 deg. Using several sets of elastic scattering phase shifts, a detailed analysis of the sharp Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 3/2 ) resonance was carried out, resulting in a resonance width of Γ 3/2 3.6(2) meV. By direct comparison with the position of the Ar - (3p 5 4s 2 2 P 3/2 ) resonance, the energy for the Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 3/2 ) resonance was determined as E 3/2 = 9.489(3) eV. A Fano-type fit of the higher lying Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 1/2 ) resonance yielded the resonance parameters Γ 1/2 = 33(5) meV and E 1/2 = 10.126(4) eV. In order to obtain additional insights, B-spline R-matrix calculations were performed for both the elastic and the inelastic cross sections above the threshold for 4p 5 5s excitation. They provide the total and angle-differential cross sections for excitation of long-lived and short-lived levels of the 4p 5 5s configuration in Kr and branching ratios for the decay of the Kr - (4p 5 5s 2 2 P 1/2 ) resonance into the three available exit channels. The results are compared with selected experimental data.

  20. Unique structure of iC3b resolved at a resolution of 24 Å by 3D-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorlo, Martin; Martínez-Barricarte, Ruben; Fernández, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Round, Adam; Vega, M Cristina; Harris, Claire L; de Cordoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Llorca, Oscar

    2011-08-09

    Activation of C3, deposition of C3b on the target surface, and subsequent amplification by formation of a C3-cleaving enzyme (C3-convertase; C3bBb) triggers the effector functions of complement that result in inflammation and cell lysis. Concurrently, surface-bound C3b is proteolyzed to iC3b by factor I and appropriate cofactors. iC3b then interacts with the complement receptors (CR) of the Ig superfamily, CR2 (CD21), CR3 (CD11b/CD18), and CR4 (CD11c/CD18) on leukocytes, down-modulating inflammation, enhancing B cell-mediated immunity, and targeting pathogens for clearance by phagocytosis. Using EM and small-angle X-ray scattering, we now present a medium-resolution structure of iC3b (24 Å). iC3b displays a unique conformation with structural features distinct from any other C3 fragment. The macroglobulin ring in iC3b is similar to that in C3b, whereas the TED (thioester-containing domain) domain and the remnants of the CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domain have moved to locations more similar to where they were in native C3. A consequence of this large conformational change is the disruption of the factor B binding site, which renders iC3b unable to assemble a C3-convertase. This structural model also justifies the decreased interaction between iC3b and complement regulators and the recognition of iC3b by the CR of the Ig superfamily, CR2, CR3, and CR4. These data further illustrate the extraordinary conformational versatility of C3 to accommodate a great diversity of functional activities.

  1. Susceptibility of porcine ileal enterocytes to the cytotoxin of Serpulina hyodysenteriae and the resolution of the epithelial lesions: an electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, A P; Frost, A J; Lysons, R J

    1995-01-01

    The cytotoxin from Serpulina hyodysenteriae was injected into ileal loops of eight germ-free pigs, and the effects on the villi were observed after 1, 3, and 18 hours of exposure. The mature vacuolated villus enterocytes of the proximal part of the absorptive villi were most susceptible to the lethal effects of the cytotoxin and were extensively exfoliated. The enterocytes at the base of the villi, the goblet cells, and the follicle-associated epithelium of the dome villi, particularly the M cells, were less affected. As the enterocytes were shed, the villi progressively shortened and the basement membrane became extensively folded. The absorptive villi were markedly stunted at 3 hours, and flattened globlet cells predominated at the site of restitution of the lesion. The myofibroblasts were also damaged, apparently subsequent to the exfoliation of the enterocytes. There was no further damage at 18 hours. The absorptive villi were stunted and were devoid of the large interstitial spaces of the normal lamina propria; the enterocytes were generally columnar, and at the apex of each villus there was an accumulation of goblet cells. There was a preponderance of M cells at the apices of the dome villi. Restitution of the lesions was not as rapid as observed in in vitro systems. The changes observed indicated that as the proximal enterocytes of the absorptive villi were shed, the loss of hydrostatic forces in the lamina propria allowed the myofibroblasts to collapse the villi by progressively retracting the basement membrane. This reduced the surface area to be covered during restitution. Resolution of the lesions was still incomplete after 18 hours.

  2. Study of electric monopole transitions between the ground state and the first excited O+-state in 40,42,44,48Ca with high resolution inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strottman, D.; Graef, H.D.; Feldmeier, H.; Manakos, P.; Richter, A.; Spamer, E.

    1977-11-01

    Monopole transitions from the O + 1 ground states to O + 2 excited states at 3.353 MeV ( 40 Ca), 1.837 MeV ( 42 Ca), 1.884 MeV ( 44 Ca) and 4.272 Mev ( 48 Ca) have been investigated with high resolution inelastic electron scattering (FWHM approximately equal to 30 keV) at low momentum transfer (0.29 fm -1 -1 ). The respective monopole matrix elements are (2.53 +- 0.41) fm 2 , (5.24 +- 0.39) fm 2 , (5.45 +- 0.41) fm 2 and (2.28 +- 0.49) fm 2 . These results are used together with known ground state charge radii and the average number of holes in the sd-shell in the ground state to estimate the number of particle-hole excitations in the wavefunctions of th excited O + states. (orig.) [de

  3. High-resolution studies of tropolone in the S0 and S1 electronic states: isotope driven dynamics in the zero-point energy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keske, John C; Lin, Wei; Pringle, Wallace C; Novick, Stewart E; Blake, Thomas A; Plusquellic, David F

    2006-02-21

    Rotationally resolved microwave (MW) and ultraviolet (UV) spectra of jet-cooled tropolone have been obtained in S(0) and S(1) electronic states using Fourier-transform microwave and UV-laser/molecular-beam spectrometers. In the ground electronic state, the MW spectra of all heavy-atom isotopomers including one (18)O and four (13)C isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. The OD isotopomer was obtained from isotopically enriched samples. The two lowest tunneling states of each isotopomer except (18)O have been assigned. The observed inversion splitting for the OD isotopomer is 1523.227(5) MHz. For the asymmetric (13)C structures, the magnitudes of tunneling-rotation interactions are found to diminish with decreasing distance between the heavy atom and the tunneling proton. In the limit of closest approach, the 0(+) state of (18)O was well fitted to an asymmetric rotor Hamiltonian, reflecting significant changes in the tautomerization dynamics. Comparisons of the substituted atom coordinates with theoretical predictions at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory suggest the localized 0(+) and 0(-) wave functions of the heavier isotopes favor the C-OH and C=O forms of tropolone, respectively. The only exception occurs for the (13)C-OH and (13)C[Double Bond]O structures which correlate to the 0(-) and 0(+) states, respectively. These preferences reflect kinetic isotope effects as quantitatively verified by the calculated zero-point energy differences between members of the asymmetric atom pairs. From rotationally resolved data of the 0(+) <--0(+) and 0(-) <--0(-) bands in S(1), line-shape fits have yielded Lorentzian linewidths that differ by 12.2(16) MHz over the 19.88(4) cm(-1) interval in S(1). The fluorescence decay rates together with previously reported quantum yield data give nonradiative decay rates of 7.7(5) x 10(8) and 8.5(5) x 10(8) s(-1) for the 0(+) and 0(-) levels of the S(1) state of tropolone.

  4. [Determination of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in ambient air using high-volume sampling combined with high resolutimi gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion-low resolution mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Loimeng; Gao, Yuan; Hou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yichi; Chen, Jiping

    2016-02-01

    An analytical method for quantifying short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in ambient air using high-volume sampling combined with high resolution gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion-low resolution mass spectrometry ( HRGC-ECNI-LRMS) was developed. An acidified silica gel column and a basic alumina column were used to optimize the cleanup procedures. The results showed a good linearity (R2>0. 99) between the total response factors and the degree of chlorination of SCCPs in the content range of 58. 1%-63. 3%. The limits of detection (S/N ≥3) and the limits of quantification (S/N ≥ 10) were 4. 2 and 12 µg, respectively. The method detection limit (MDL) for SCCPs was 0. 34 ng/m3 (n = 7). The recoveries of SCCPs in air samples were in the range of 81. 9% to 94. 2%. It is demonstrated that the method is suitable for the quantitative analysis of SCCPs in air samples.

  5. A high-resolution analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy study of the early stages of spinodal decomposition in binary Fe–Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westraadt, J.E.; Olivier, E.J.; Neethling, J.H.; Hedström, P.; Odqvist, J.; Xu, X.; Steuwer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Spinodal decomposition (SD) is an important phenomenon in materials science and engineering. For example, it is considered to be responsible for the 475 °C embrittlement of stainless steels comprising the bcc (ferrite) or bct (martensite) phases. Structural characterization of the evolving minute nano-scale concentration fluctuations during SD in the Fe–Cr system is, however, a notable challenge, and has mainly been considered accessible via atom probe tomography (APT) and small-angle neutron scattering. The standard tool for nanostructure characterization, viz. transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has only been successfully applied to late stages of SD when embrittlement is already severe. However, we here demonstrate that the structural evolution in the early stages of SD in binary Fe–Cr, and alloys based on the binary, are accessible via analytical scanning TEM. An Fe–36 wt% Cr alloy aged at 500 °C for 1, 10 and 100 h is investigated using an aberration-corrected microscope and it is found that highly coherent and interconnected Cr-rich regions develop. The wavelength of decomposition is rather insensitive to the sample thickness and it is quantified to 2, 3 and 6 nm after ageing for 1, 10 and 100 h, which is in reasonable agreement with prior APT analysis. The concentration amplitude is more sensitive to the sample thickness and acquisition parameters but the TEM analysis is in good agreement with APT analysis for the longest ageing time. These findings open up for combinatorial TEM studies where both local crystallography and chemistry is required. - Highlights: • STEM-EELS analysis was successfully applied to resolve early stage SD in Fe–Cr. • Compositional wavelength measured with STEM-EELS compares well to previous ATP studies. • Compositional amplitude measured with STEM-EELS is a function of experimental parameters. • STEM-EELS allows for combinatorial studies of SD using complementary techniques.

  6. A high-resolution analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy study of the early stages of spinodal decomposition in binary Fe–Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westraadt, J.E., E-mail: johan.westraadt@nmmu.ac.za [Centre for High Resolution TEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, University Way, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Olivier, E.J.; Neethling, J.H. [Centre for High Resolution TEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, University Way, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Hedström, P.; Odqvist, J.; Xu, X. [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvägen 23, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Steuwer, A. [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Av., Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Spinodal decomposition (SD) is an important phenomenon in materials science and engineering. For example, it is considered to be responsible for the 475 °C embrittlement of stainless steels comprising the bcc (ferrite) or bct (martensite) phases. Structural characterization of the evolving minute nano-scale concentration fluctuations during SD in the Fe–Cr system is, however, a notable challenge, and has mainly been considered accessible via atom probe tomography (APT) and small-angle neutron scattering. The standard tool for nanostructure characterization, viz. transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has only been successfully applied to late stages of SD when embrittlement is already severe. However, we here demonstrate that the structural evolution in the early stages of SD in binary Fe–Cr, and alloys based on the binary, are accessible via analytical scanning TEM. An Fe–36 wt% Cr alloy aged at 500 °C for 1, 10 and 100 h is investigated using an aberration-corrected microscope and it is found that highly coherent and interconnected Cr-rich regions develop. The wavelength of decomposition is rather insensitive to the sample thickness and it is quantified to 2, 3 and 6 nm after ageing for 1, 10 and 100 h, which is in reasonable agreement with prior APT analysis. The concentration amplitude is more sensitive to the sample thickness and acquisition parameters but the TEM analysis is in good agreement with APT analysis for the longest ageing time. These findings open up for combinatorial TEM studies where both local crystallography and chemistry is required. - Highlights: • STEM-EELS analysis was successfully applied to resolve early stage SD in Fe–Cr. • Compositional wavelength measured with STEM-EELS compares well to previous ATP studies. • Compositional amplitude measured with STEM-EELS is a function of experimental parameters. • STEM-EELS allows for combinatorial studies of SD using complementary techniques.

  7. A high-resolution detector based on liquid-core scintillating fibres with readout via an electron-bombarded charge-coupled device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfarani, C.; Duane, A.; Fabre, J.P.; Frenkel, A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, A.M.; Harrison, K.; Kozarenko, E.N.; Kushnirenko, A.E.; Ladygin, E.A.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.M.; Nass, P.A.; Obudovski, V.P.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Yu.P.; Siegmund, W.P.; Tyukov, V.E.; Vasilchenko, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of results from tests in a 5 GeV/c hadron beam of detectors based on liquid-core scintillating fibres, each fibre consisting of a glass capillary filled with organic liquid scintillator. Fibre readout was performed via an Electron-Bombarded Charge-Coupled Device (EBCCD) image tube, a novel instrument that combines the functions of a high-gain, gated image intensifier and a Charge-Coupled Device. Using 1-methylnaphthalene doped with 3 g/l of R45 as liquid scintillator, the attenuation lengths obtained for light propagation over distances greater than 16 cm were 1.5 m in fibres of 20 μm core and 1.0 m in fibres of 16 μm core. For particles that crossed the fibres of 20 μm core at distances of ∼1.8 cm and ∼95 cm from the fibres' readout ends, the recorded hit densities were 5.3 mm -1 and 2.5 mm -1 respectively. Using 1-methylnaphthalene doped with 3.6 g/l of R39 as liquid scintillator and fibres of 75 μm core, the hit density obtained for particles that crossed the fibres at a distance of ∼1.8 cm from their readout ends was 8.5 mm -1 . With a specially designed bundle of tapered fibres, having core diameters that smoothly increase from 16 μm to 75 μm, a spatial precision of 6 μm was measured. (orig.)

  8. Amorphous-like interfacial layer between a high-Tc superconducting Tl-1223 film and a Ag substrate examined by high-voltage high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hyuntak; Nagai, Takuro; Matsui, Yoshio; Horiuchi, Shigeo; Jeong, Daeyeong; Deinhofer, Christian; Gritzner, Gerhard; Kim, Youngmin; Kim, Younjoong

    2006-01-01

    The thin amorphous-like layer, formed at the interface between a high-T c superconducting (Tl 0.5 , Pb 0.5 )(Sr 0.8 , Ba 0.2 )Ca 2 Cu 3 O y (Tl-1223) film and a Ag substrate during heating at 910 .deg. C, has been examined by using high-voltage high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The interfacial layer is less than 10 nm in thickness. It contacts the (001) plane of Tl-1223 and the (113) or (133) planes of Ag in most cases. Its composition is similar to that of Tl-1223, except for the inclusion of a substantial amount of Ag. Its formation proceeds by diffusion of Ag into Tl-1223, during which a structure change first occurs at the layer of CuO 2 + Ca planes. The Tl(Pb)O + the Sr(Ba)O layers are then destroyed to cause the total structure to become amorphous-like. Furthermore, we have found that it is formed under an irradiation of highly energetic electrons.

  9. Amorphous-like interfacial layer between a high-T{sub c} superconducting Tl-1223 film and a Ag substrate examined by high-voltage high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hyuntak [Electronics and Tele-Communications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nagai, Takuro; Matsui, Yoshio [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Horiuchi, Shigeo; Jeong, Daeyeong [Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Deinhofer, Christian; Gritzner, Gerhard [Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Kim, Youngmin; Kim, Younjoong [Electron Microscopy Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    The thin amorphous-like layer, formed at the interface between a high-T{sub c} superconducting (Tl{sub 0.5}, Pb{sub 0.5})(Sr{sub 0.8}, Ba{sub 0.2})Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (Tl-1223) film and a Ag substrate during heating at 910 .deg. C, has been examined by using high-voltage high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The interfacial layer is less than 10 nm in thickness. It contacts the (001) plane of Tl-1223 and the (113) or (133) planes of Ag in most cases. Its composition is similar to that of Tl-1223, except for the inclusion of a substantial amount of Ag. Its formation proceeds by diffusion of Ag into Tl-1223, during which a structure change first occurs at the layer of CuO{sub 2} + Ca planes. The Tl(Pb)O + the Sr(Ba)O layers are then destroyed to cause the total structure to become amorphous-like. Furthermore, we have found that it is formed under an irradiation of highly energetic electrons.

  10. Comparative analysis of the heme iron electronic structure and stereochemistry in tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin and monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Kumar, A.; Berkovsky, A. L.; Oshtrakh, M. I.

    2018-02-01

    A comparative study of tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin and monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a in the oxy- and deoxy-forms was carried out using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution in order to analyze the heme iron electronic structure and stereochemistry in relation to the Mössbauer hyperfine parameters. The Mössbauer spectra of tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin in both forms were fitted using two quadrupole doublets related to the 57Fe in ɑ- and β-subunits. In contrast, the Mössbauer spectra of monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a were fitted using: (i) two quadrupole doublets for the oxy-form related to two conformational states of the distal His E7 imidazole ring and different hydrogen bonding of oxygen molecule in the oxy-form and (ii) using three quadrupole doublets for deoxy-form related to three conformational states of the proximal His F8 imidazole ring. Small variations of Mössbauer hyperfine parameters related to small differences in the heme iron electronic structure and stereochemistry in tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin and monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a are discussed.

  11. Gap Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-25

    Gap Resolution is a software package that was developed to improve Newbler genome assemblies by automating the closure of sequence gaps caused by repetitive regions in the DNA. This is done by performing the follow steps:1) Identify and distribute the data for each gap in sub-projects. 2) Assemble the data associated with each sub-project using a secondary assembler, such as Newbler or PGA. 3) Determine if any gaps are closed after reassembly, and either design fakes (consensus of closed gap) for those that closed or lab experiments for those that require additional data. The software requires as input a genome assembly produce by the Newbler assembler provided by Roche and 454 data containing paired-end reads.

  12. Nature of mixed symmetry 2+ states in 94Mo from high resolution electron and proton scattering and line shape of the first excited 1/2+ state in 9Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burda, Oleksiy

    2007-07-01

    The present work contains two parts. The first one is devoted to the investigation of mixed-symmetry structure in 94 Mo and the second one to the astrophysical relevant line shape of the first excited 1/2 + state in 9 Be. In the first part of the thesis the nature of one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2 + states in 94 Mo is investigated with high-resolution inelastic electron and proton scattering experiments in a combined analysis. The (e,e') experiments were carried out at the 169 magnetic spectrometer at the S-DALINAC. Data were taken at a beam energy E e=70 MeV and scattering angles Θ e =93 -165 . In dispersion-matching mode an energy resolution Δ E =30-45 keV (full width at half maximum) was achieved. The (p,p') measurements were performed at iThemba LABS, South Africa, using a K600 magnetic spectrometer at a proton energy E p=200 MeV and scattering angles Θ p =4.5 -26 . Typical energy resolutions were Δ E ≅35 keV. The combined analysis reveals a dominant one-phonon structure of the transitions to the first and third 2 + states, as well as an isovector character of the transition to the one-phonon mixed-symmetric state within the valence shell. Quantitatively consistent estimates of the one-phonon admixtures are obtained from both experimental probes when two-step contributions to the proton scattering cross sections are taken into account. In the second part of the thesis the line shape of the first excited 1/2 + state in 9 Be is studied. Spectra of the 9 Be(e,e') reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at an electron energy E e=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93 and 141 with high energy resolution up to excitation energies E x =8 MeV. The form factor of the first excited state has been extracted from the data. The astrophysical relevant 9 Be(γ,n) cross sections have been extracted from the (e,e') data. The resonance parameters of the first excited 1/2 + state in 9 Be are derived in a one-level R-matrix approximation. The deduced

  13. Nature of mixed symmetry 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo from high resolution electron and proton scattering and line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burda, Oleksiy

    2007-07-15

    The present work contains two parts. The first one is devoted to the investigation of mixed-symmetry structure in {sup 94}Mo and the second one to the astrophysical relevant line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be. In the first part of the thesis the nature of one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo is investigated with high-resolution inelastic electron and proton scattering experiments in a combined analysis. The (e,e') experiments were carried out at the 169 magnetic spectrometer at the S-DALINAC. Data were taken at a beam energy E e=70 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub e}=93 -165 . In dispersion-matching mode an energy resolution {delta}{sub E}=30-45 keV (full width at half maximum) was achieved. The (p,p') measurements were performed at iThemba LABS, South Africa, using a K600 magnetic spectrometer at a proton energy E p=200 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub p}=4.5 -26 . Typical energy resolutions were {delta}{sub E}{approx_equal}35 keV. The combined analysis reveals a dominant one-phonon structure of the transitions to the first and third 2{sup +} states, as well as an isovector character of the transition to the one-phonon mixed-symmetric state within the valence shell. Quantitatively consistent estimates of the one-phonon admixtures are obtained from both experimental probes when two-step contributions to the proton scattering cross sections are taken into account. In the second part of the thesis the line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be is studied. Spectra of the {sup 9}Be(e,e') reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at an electron energy E e=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93 and 141 with high energy resolution up to excitation energies E{sub x}=8 MeV. The form factor of the first excited state has been extracted from the data. The astrophysical relevant {sup 9}Be({gamma},n) cross sections have been extracted from the (e,e') data. The

  14. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Be-like series in oxygen and neon. Test of theoretical data: II. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D [Laboratoire CAR-IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS - Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2003-01-14

    A complete and accurate experimental test of theoretical spectroscopic data sets (state positions, lifetimes) available for the n=3-5 terms of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Rydberg series of oxygen and neon ions is presented in a series of two papers. This result was achieved by fitting our high-resolution electron spectra with post-collisional lineshapes calculated with the help of these spectroscopic data. In this second paper we apply the fitting procedure described in the preceding companion paper (I) to the analysis of high-resolution electron spectra measured in O{sup 6+} (1s{sup 2}) + He, H{sub 2} and Ne{sup 8+} (1s{sup 2}) + He collisional systems at 10 qkeV collision energy (q is the ion charge). Singlet states alone are found to be excited in oxygen; they also explain most of the neon lines; in the latter case a possible contribution of triplet states is discussed. Many 1s{sup 2}3lnl' {sup 1}L transitions are identified for the first time. A quantitative comparison between measured and calculated positions clearly points to the best theoretical data currently available. Finally, a first identification of some 4l4l' {sup 1}L transitions observed in the neon spectrum is also proposed. From this huge spectroscopic work, we extract the first experimental partial branching ratios for autoionization into the 1s{sup 2}2l ionization continua for a large number of 1s{sup 2}3lnl' {sup 1}L states, which are compared with the total ones calculated by other authors; we deduce that populations of |M{sub L} vertical bar = 0 and 1 magnetic sublevels are nearly identical. The double-capture process is also briefly characterized by comparing relative populations of many n=3-5 states; it is found that the same states are populated in O{sup 6+} +H{sub 2} and Ne{sup 8+} +He collisional systems with the same relative populations.

  15. Probing the electronic structure and Au—C chemical bonding in AuCn− and AuCnH− (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, Iker; Ruipérez, Fernando; Ugalde, Jesus M.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study on AuC 4 − , AuC 6 − , and AuC n H − (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron imaging and ab initio calculations. The ground state of AuC 2 H − , AuC 4 H − , and AuC 6 H − is found to be linear, while that of AuC 4 − and AuC 6 − is bent. All the species are found to be linear in their neutral ground states. The electron affinities (EAs) are measured to be 3.366(1) and 3.593(1) eV for AuC 4 and AuC 6 , respectively. Both bending and stretching frequencies are resolved in the spectra of AuC 4 − and AuC 6 − . High-resolution data of AuC n H − reveal major vibrational progressions in the Au—C stretching and bending modes. AuC 2 H − has a ground state stretching frequency of 445(10) cm −1 and a bending frequency of 260(10) cm −1 ; AuC 4 H − has a ground state stretching frequency of 340(10) cm −1 ; AuC 6 H − has a ground state stretching frequency of 260(10) cm −1 and a bending frequency of 55(10) cm −1 . The EAs are measured to be 1.475(1), 1.778(1), and 1.962(1) eV for AuC 2 H, AuC 4 H, and AuC 6 H, respectively. The strength of the Au—C bond decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases. The current study provides a wealth of electronic structure information about AuC 4 − , AuC 6 − , and AuC n H − (n = 2, 4, and 6) and their corresponding neutrals.

  16. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moszyński, M., E-mail: M.Moszynski@ncbj.gov.pl; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  17. Super-resolution biomolecular crystallography with low-resolution data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Gunnar F; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T

    2010-04-22

    X-ray diffraction plays a pivotal role in the understanding of biological systems by revealing atomic structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes, with much recent interest in very large assemblies like the ribosome. As crystals of such large assemblies often diffract weakly (resolution worse than 4 A), we need methods that work at such low resolution. In macromolecular assemblies, some of the components may be known at high resolution, whereas others are unknown: current refinement methods fail as they require a high-resolution starting structure for the entire complex. Determining the structure of such complexes, which are often of key biological importance, should be possible in principle as the number of independent diffraction intensities at a resolution better than 5 A generally exceeds the number of degrees of freedom. Here we introduce a method that adds specific information from known homologous structures but allows global and local deformations of these homology models. Our approach uses the observation that local protein structure tends to be conserved as sequence and function evolve. Cross-validation with R(free) (the free R-factor) determines the optimum deformation and influence of the homology model. For test cases at 3.5-5 A resolution with known structures at high resolution, our method gives significant improvements over conventional refinement in the model as monitored by coordinate accuracy, the definition of secondary structure and the quality of electron density maps. For re-refinements of a representative set of 19 low-resolution crystal structures from the Protein Data Bank, we find similar improvements. Thus, a structure derived from low-resolution diffraction data can have quality similar to a high-resolution structure. Our method is applicable to the study of weakly diffracting crystals using X-ray micro-diffraction as well as data from new X-ray light sources. Use of homology information is not restricted to X

  18. Kinematics and resolution at future ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Klein, M.

    1992-01-01

    Limitations due to resolution and kinematics are discussed of the (Q 2 , x) range accessible with electron-proton colliders after HERA. For the time after HERA one may think of two electron-proton colliders: an asymmetric energy machine and a rather symmetric one. Both colliders are compared here in order to study the influence of the different E l /E p ratios on the accessible kinematic range which is restricted due to angular coverage, finite detector resolution and calibration uncertainties

  19. Development of a helium-beam diagnostic for the measurement of the electron density and temperature with high space and time resolution; Entwicklung einer Heliumstrahldiagnostik zur Messung der Elektronendichte und -temperatur mit hoher raeumlicher und zeitlicher Aufloesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruezi, U.

    2006-11-15

    A cvoncept for the control of teh particle and energy removal is available with the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) at the TEXTOR tokamak and is studied there. In the framework of this thesis a new diagnostic fot the study of short-time events in the plasma boundary layer was developed and constructed. It allows spatially (2 mm) and timely (10 {mu}s) highly resolved measurements of the electron density n{sub e} and electron temperaturew T{sub e}. This occurs by spectroscopy on helium atoms injected into the plasma, for whose measured line intensities respectively intensity ratios by means of a collision-radiation model n{sub e} and T{sub e} can be determined. In order to fulfil the requirements for the measurement of the plasma fluctuations up to 100 kHz, an injection system was developed, which can produce a supersonic helium beam of high particle density (1.5.10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and simulataneously low deivergence {+-}1 . Parallely for this an observation system consisting of many-channel photomultipliers (PMT) with high and a CCD camera with lower time resolution. The signals of the different MT channels are calibrated on the intensities of the comparable spatial channels of the CCD camera. The first spectroscopic measurement of T{sub e} fluctuations resulted for the characterizing parameters: velocity v{sub r}=(380{+-}60) m/s, correlation length L{sub r}{approx}(5{+-}1) mm, and lifetime {tau}{sub L}{approx}(10{+-}1.25) {mu}s. Under the influence of resonant disturbing magnetic fields by the DED because of the not negligible photon noise no quantitative fluctuation characteristics could be determined. Furthermore during the dynamic AC operation of the DED with rotating disturbing field (974 Hz) n{sub e} and T{sub e} could be spatially and timely resolved and showed because of dynamically co-moved plasma structures a strong modulation by a factor 3 respectively 2. Beside an expected pressure decreasement in the laminar flux tube a hitherto unknown increasement

  20. Contribution to the study of time-resolution in pulse electronics for nuclear physics: phase control circuits; Contribution a l'etude de la resolution en temps de l'electronique impulsionnelle pour physique nucleaire: les circuits de mise en phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortet, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Phase control circuits make it possible to improve quite markedly the time resolution in pulse electronics. They replace a random pulse, of which the time of arrival with respect to a reference zero is being measured, by another pulse whose phase is well determined with respect to that, of a clock taken as reference. The time spectrum of the output, delayed, can always be situated inside channels of width {delta}T defined by the clock. The time statistics of the events analyzed is always correct even if the transition time for the circuits defining the channels represents a large fraction of {delta}T: the coding of the time becomes perfect, The phase control circuits, used in precision chronometry, are widely applied in Nuclear Physics since the lime spectra obtained are representative, indirectly, of certain values which are required to be measured with great accuracy. A description is given of: the constitution and operation of phase control circuits; a chain with automatic analysis and automatic reading, built for testing these circuits. Finally the measurement results are given. (author) [French] Les circuits de mise en phase permettent d'ameliorer notablement la resolution en temps de l'electronique impulsionnelle. Ils substituent a une impulsion aleatoire, dont on cherche a mesurer l'instant d'arrivee par rapport a un instant pris pour origine, une autre impulsion dont la phase est bien determinee par rapport a celle d'une horloge prise comme reference. Le spectre temporel de sortie, retarde, peut toujours etre situe a l'interieur des canaux de largeur {delta}T, definis par l'horloge. La statistique temporelle des evenements analyses est toujours correcte, meme si la duree de transition des circuits definissant les canaux represente une grande fraction de {delta}T: le codage de temps devient parfait. Les circuits de mise en phase, utilises en chronometrie fine, sont tres employes en Physique Nucleaire car les spectres temporels oblenus sont representatifs

  1. Determination of C10-chloroalkane residues in fish matrices by short column gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low resolution mass spectrometry applying single pure and representative synthesised chlorodecanes as standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaume, Florence; Coelhan, Mehmet; Parlar, Harun

    2006-01-01

    A new chlorodecane (CD) standard was developed consisting of five single compounds with 5-9 Cl-atoms, with which it was possible to determine chlorodecane residues in fish matrices from different countries using short column gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low resolution mass spectrometry (SCGC/ECNI-LRMS). The concentrations found were between 4.8 and 30.2 ng/g fat. Pentachlorodecanes could not be detected in all samples. For an evaluation of the new CD-standard, the fish matrices were also quantified by several other polychlorinated decane (CP10) standards with different chlorine grade: 50, 55, 63.5, 65, and 70%. The concentrations found differed unsurprisingly considerable among the applied standards. Considering only these CP10:50-70% standards that showed the highest similarity in peak patterns with the fish samples, the differences in observed chlorodecane concentrations between these standards and the new CD-standard were low, varying only 1-16%. The CP10:50-70% standards were further quantified with the new CD-standard (chlorine content, 58.2%) with neglectable observed differences to the CP10:60, 63.5, and 65% standards. Highest differences were observed to the CP10:50, 55, and 70% standards. By this work, the quantification of eco-toxicologically relevant C10-chloroparaffins using the new CD-standard has led to reproducible and reliable results, which indicates further that these compounds are still a concerning class of substances in environmental fish samples

  2. Localisation assisted by the lattice relaxation and the optical absorption of extra-framework electrons in 12CaO.Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, Peter V.; Shluger, Alexander L.; Hayashi, Katsuro; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    The crystalline framework of a complex oxide 12CaO.7Al 2 O 3 (C12A7) is built from positively charged sub-nanometer cages able to trap electrons. An embedded cluster approach is used to study the electronic structure and optical properties of electron-containing C12A7 for different concentration of extra-framework electrons. Our results suggest that the conduction band of the C12A7 consists of a relatively narrow band of empty cage states (cage conduction band) with one-electron energies between 5.5 and 6.1 eV above the top of the valence band (VB), and a framework conduction band at about 6.7 - 7.0 eV above the to of the VB. The gap between the cage conduction band and the framework conduction band is estimated to be about 1 - 1.5 eV. The energies of the lowest optical transitions from the top of the valence band to the cage conduction band are predicted to be at 5.2 - 5.5 eV. The extra-electrons occupy cage states, which split from the cage conduction band to about 4 eV above the top of the VB. The extra-framework electrons introduce two absorption bands with the experimental peaks at 0.4 eV and 2.8 eV. These bands are assigned to the inter-cage charge transfer and the intra-cage s-p transitions respectively. The changes in the optical absorption spectra as a function of the extra-electrons concentration are also discussed

  3. Seeing with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellist, P.

    2006-01-01

    Commercially available lens correctors are extending the reach of electron microscopes to unprecedented atomic scales, as Peter Nellist describes. The electron microscope was invented in 1933 and is based on the principle that electrons have a wavelength that is inversely proportional to their momentum. There are two basic types: transmission electron microscopes and scanning electron microscopes, plus a hybrid of the two. The lenses in an electron microscope are provided by electromagnetic fields, but they suffer from spherical aberration. The addition of octupole and quadrupole corrector fields has improved the resolution of the electron microscope to better than 0.1 nm in the last decade. The next step is to correct for chromatic aberration, after which the resolution of the microscope will probably be limited by the size of the atom itself. (U.K.)

  4. 40 keV atomic resolution TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Kolmykov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the first atomic resolution TEM imaging at 40 keV using an aberration-corrected, monochromated source TEM. Low-voltage High-Resolution Electron Microscopy (LVHREM) has several advantages, including increased cross-sections for inelastic and elastic scattering, increased contrast per electron and improved spectroscopy efficiency, decreased delocalization effects and reduced knock-on damage. Together, these often improve the contrast to damage ratio obtained on a large class of samples. Third-order aberration correction now allows us to operate the TEM at low energies while retaining atomic resolution, which was previously impossible. At low voltage the major limitation to resolution becomes the chromatic aberration limit. We show that using a source monochromator we are able to reduce the effect of chromatic aberration and achieve a usable high-resolution limit at 40 keV to less than 1 Å. We show various materials' examples of the application of the technique to image graphene and silicon, and compare atomic resolution images with electron multislice simulations. -- Highlights: ► We present the first atomic resolution images recorded at 40 keV using an aberration-corrected, monochromated TEM. ► We show information transfer measured to better than 1 Å. ► At 40 keV an aberration-corrected monochromated TEM is limited by fifth-order spherical aberration. ► We show that using a monochromator the effect of chromatic aberration is reduced to enable high resolution imaging. ► Low voltage high resolution electron microscopy will be beneficial for imaging the organic/inorganic materials interface.

  5. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  6. Experimental positions and lifetimes of Be-like 1s{sup 2}3lnl'(n=3 to 5) states of O{sup 4+} and Ne{sup 6+} ions investigated by high resolution electron spectroscopy: test of calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. Collisions - Agregats - Reactivite

    1999-07-01

    Using high resolution electron spectroscopy, positions and lifetimes of many Be-like singlet states of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Rydberg series (n = 3 to 5) of oxygen and neon have been measured for the first time. This was achieved by a fitting procedure which takes into account an accurate definition of the post-collisional electron lineshapes. These states are produced after a double electron capture by multicharged ions has occurred in O{sup 6+}(1s{sup 2})+He, H{sub 2} and Ne{sup 8+}(1s{sup 2})+He collisions at about 4 keV/amu collision energy. (orig.)

  7. Submicrovolt resolution X-ray monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trammell, G.T.; Hannon, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods are available to obtain monochromatic x-radiation from a white source: wavelength selection and frequency selection. The resolution of wavelength selection methods is limited to 1-10 MeV in the E = 10 KeV range. To exceed this resolution frequency selection methods based on nuclear resonance scattering can be used. Devices which give strong nuclear resonance reflections but weak electronic reflections are candidates for components of frequency selection monochromates. Some examples are discussed

  8. Inner-shell electron spectroscopy for microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.C.; Maher, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission electron energy-loss spectrum shows characteristic edges corresponding to the excitation of inner-shell electrons of atoms in a thin sample. Analysis of these edges provides detailed chemical, structural, and electronic data from the radiated volume. By combining electron spectroscopy and electron microscopy, this microanalytical technique can be performed in conjunction with high-resolution imaging of the sample. It is shown that this approach has advantages of sensitivity, spatial resolution, and convenience over other comparable techniques. 7 figures

  9. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution, the process of obtaining one or more high-resolution images from one or more low-resolution observations, has been a very attractive research topic over the last two decades. It has found practical applications in many real world problems in different fields, from satellite...

  10. Quantum-corrected plasmonic field analysis using a time domain PMCHWT integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Uysal, Ismail E.; Ulku, H. Arda; Bagci, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    When two structures are within sub-nanometer distance of each other, quantum tunneling, i.e., electrons "jumping" from one structure to another, becomes relevant. Classical electromagnetic solvers do not directly account for this additional path

  11. 4D Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a movie of the object in motion, thus enabling studies of nonequilibrium structures and transient processes. The method was demonstrated using carbon nanotubes of a bracelet-like ring structure for which 4D tomograms display different modes of motion, such as breathing and wiggling, with resonance frequencies up to 30 megahertz. Applications can now make use of the full space-time range with the nanometer-femtosecond resolution of ultrafast electron tomography.

  12. ANL high resolution injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.; Kutschera, W.; Hartog, P.D.; Billquist, P.

    1985-01-01

    The ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) high-resolution injector has been installed to obtain higher mass resolution and higher preacceleration, and to utilize effectively the full mass range of ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System). Preliminary results of the first beam test are reported briefly. The design and performance, in particular a high-mass-resolution magnet with aberration compensation, are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Electron cyclotron emission imaging in tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsat, T.; Domier, C.W.; Kong, X. Y.; Liang, T. R.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Tobias, B. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G.; Classen, I.G.J.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the recent history and latest developments of the electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic technique, wherein electron temperature is measured in magnetically confined plasmas with two-dimensional spatial resolution. The key enabling technologies for this technique are the

  14. Nemo-3 calorimeter electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernaudin, P.; Cheikali, C.; Lavigne, B.; Richard, A.; Lebris, J.

    2000-11-01

    The calorimeter electronics of the NEMO-3 double beta decay experiment fulfills three functions: -energy measurement of the electrons by measuring the charge of the pulses, - time measurement, - fast first level triggering. The electronics of the 1940 Scintillator-PM modules is implemented as 40 '9U x 400 mm VME' boards of up to 51 channels. For each channel the analog signals conditioning is implemented as one SMD daughter board. Each board performs 12 bit charge measurements with 0.35 pC charge resolution, 12 bit time measurements with 50 ps time resolution and a fast analog multiplicity level for triggering. The total handling and conversion time for all the channels is less than 100 μs. The electronics will be presented as well as the test system. (authors)

  15. Automated conflict resolution issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  16. High resolution IVEM tomography of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Electron tomography is a powerful tool for elucidating the three-dimensional architecture of large biological complexes and subcellular organelles. The introduction of intermediate voltage electron microscopes further extended the technique by providing the means to examine very large and non-symmetrical subcellular organelles, at resolutions beyond what would be possible using light microscopy. Recent studies using electron tomography on a variety of cellular organelles and assemblies such as centrosomes, kinetochores, and chromatin have clearly demonstrated the power of this technique for obtaining 3D structural information on non-symmetric cell components. When combined with biochemical and molecular observations, these 3D reconstructions have provided significant new insights into biological function.

  17. Super-resolution for asymmetric resolution of FIB-SEM 3D imaging using AI with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagita, Katsumi; Higuchi, Takeshi; Jinnai, Hiroshi

    2018-04-12

    Scanning electron microscopy equipped with a focused ion beam (FIB-SEM) is a promising three-dimen