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Sample records for sub-nanometer resolution electron

  1. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  2. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklarczyk, Marek; Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J.; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Hutton, Simon; Głaszczka, Rafał; Blomfield, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  3. Sub-nanometer drift correction for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Wang, X; Zhang, X; Li, J; Dai, L

    2014-10-01

    Spatial resolution of conventional far-field fluorescence microscopy is limited by diffraction of light. Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), such as (direct) stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM/STORM), and (fluorescence) photoactivation localization microscopy (fPALM/PALM), can break this barrier by localizing single emitters and reconstructing super-resolution image with much higher precision. Nevertheless, a SMLM measurement needs to record a large number of image frames and takes considerable recording time. In this process, sample drift becomes a critical problem and cannot be neglected. In this Letter, we present a sub-nanometer precision, low-cost sample drift correction method based on minimizing normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) between bright field images. Two optical configurations are suggested for recording bright field and fluorescence images simultaneously or alternately. The method was demonstrated on simulated data, and better than 0.3 nm drift correction precision was achieved. It was also applied on dSTORM imaging of F-actins of 3T3 cell, and the quality of reconstructed super-resolution image was improved observably. This method does not require special hardware, extra labelling or markers, and no precision decline due to photobleaching. It can be applied as an add-on for SMLM setups and achieves sub-nanometer precision drift correction for post-measurement or real time drift compensation.

  4. Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) for the imaging of biological samples at sub-nanometer resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joens, Matthew S.; Huynh, Chuong; Kasuboski, James M.; Ferranti, David; Sigal, Yury J.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Burkhardt, Claus J.; Curran, Kevin P.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.; Stern, Lewis A.; Goetze, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has long been the standard in imaging the sub-micrometer surface ultrastructure of both hard and soft materials. In the case of biological samples, it has provided great insights into their physical architecture. However, three of the fundamental challenges in the SEM imaging of soft materials are that of limited imaging resolution at high magnification, charging caused by the insulating properties of most biological samples and the loss of subtle surface features by heavy metal coating. These challenges have recently been overcome with the development of the Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), which boasts advances in charge reduction, minimized sample damage, high surface contrast without the need for metal coating, increased depth of field, and 5 angstrom imaging resolution. We demonstrate the advantages of HIM for imaging biological surfaces as well as compare and contrast the effects of sample preparation techniques and their consequences on sub-nanometer ultrastructure. PMID:24343236

  5. Effect of electric field gradient on sub-nanometer spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyan; Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Jianing; Sun, Mengtao

    2015-03-18

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) with sub-nanometer spatial resolution has been recently demonstrated experimentally. However, the physical mechanism underlying is still under discussion. Here we theoretically investigate the electric field gradient of a coupled tip-substrate system. Our calculations suggest that the ultra-high spatial resolution of TERS can be partially attributed to the electric field gradient effect owning to its tighter spatial confinement and sensitivity to the infrared (IR)-active of molecules. Particularly, in the case of TERS of flat-lying H₂TBPP molecules,we find the electric field gradient enhancement is the dominating factor for the high spatial resolution, which qualitatively coincides with previous experimental report. Our theoretical study offers a new paradigm for understanding the mechanisms of the ultra-high spatial resolution demonstrated in tip-enhanced spectroscopy which is of importance but neglected.

  6. Molecular Electronics at Metal/Semiconductor Junctions. Si Inversion by Sub-Nanometer Molecular Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaffe, O.; Scheres, L.M.W.; Reddy Puniredd, S.; Stein, N.; Biller, A.; Har Lavan, R.; Shpaisman, H.; Zuilhof, H.; Haick, H.; Cahen, D.; Vilan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic transport across n-Si-alkyl monolayer/Hg junctions is, at reverse and low forward bias, independent of alkyl chain length from 18 down to 1 or 2 carbons! This and further recent results indicate that electron transport is minority, rather than majority carrier dominated, occurs via

  7. Direct sub-nanometer scale electron microscopy analysis of anion incorporation to self-ordered anodic alumina layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rovira, L.; Lopez-Haro, M.; Hungria, A.B.; El Amrani, K. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cadiz, Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sanchez-Amaya, J.M. [Titania, Ensayos y Proyectos Industriales, S.L. Parque Tecnobahia, Edificio RETSE, Nave 4, 11500 El Puerto de Santa Maria (Cadiz) (Spain); Calvino, J.J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cadiz, Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Botana, F.J., E-mail: javier.botana@uca.e [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cadiz, Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Morphological and chemical characterization at atomic scale of porous alumina layers anodised in ordered regimes. {yields} Characterization based on the use of FEG-SEM, STEM-HAADF, STEM-EELS and STEM-X-EDS. {yields} Nanoscale distribution of P-, C- and S-bearing species in the pore wall. - Abstract: Ordered porous alumina layers prepared by two-step anodising in phosphoric, oxalic and sulphuric acids have been characterized at sub-nanometer scale using electron microscopy techniques. FEG-SEM and STEM-HAADF images allowed estimating the pore size, cell wall and pore wall thicknesses of the layers. Nanoanalytical characterization has been performed by STEM-EELS and STEM-X-EDS. Detailed features of the spatial distribution of anions in the pore wall of the films have been obtained. Maximum concentration of P-species occurs, approximately, at the middle of the pore wall; adjacent to the pore for C-species, whereas the distribution of S-species appears to be uniform.

  8. Sub-nanometer surface chemistry and orbital hybridization in lanthanum-doped ceria nano-catalysts revealed by 3D electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean M; Fernandez-Garcia, Susana; Calvino, José J; Midgley, Paul A

    2017-07-14

    Surface chemical composition, electronic structure, and bonding characteristics determine catalytic activity but are not resolved for individual catalyst particles by conventional spectroscopy. In particular, the nano-scale three-dimensional distribution of aliovalent lanthanide dopants in ceria catalysts and their effect on the surface electronic structure remains unclear. Here, we reveal the surface segregation of dopant cations and oxygen vacancies and observe bonding changes in lanthanum-doped ceria catalyst particle aggregates with sub-nanometer precision using a new model-based spectroscopic tomography approach. These findings refine our understanding of the spatially varying electronic structure and bonding in ceria-based nanoparticle aggregates with aliovalent cation concentrations and identify new strategies for advancing high efficiency doped ceria nano-catalysts.

  9. Elastic recoil atomic spectroscopy of light elements with sub-nanometer depth resolution; Elastische Rueckstossatomspektrometrie leichter Elemente mit Subnanometer-Tiefenaufloesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmata, Marcel

    2011-06-30

    In this thesis the QQDS magnetic spectrometer that is used for high resolution ion beam analysis (IBA) of light elements at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is presented for the first time. In addition all parameters are investigated that influence the analysis. Methods and models are presented with which the effects can be minimised or calculated. There are five focal points of this thesis. The first point is the construction and commissioning of the QQDS magnetic spectrometer, the corresponding scattering chamber with all the peripherals and the detector, which is specially developed for high resolution elastic recoil detection. Both the reconstructed spectrometer and the detector were adapted to the specific experimental conditions needed for high-resolution Ion beam analysis of light elements and tested for routine practice. The detector consists of two components. At the back end of the detector a Bragg ionization chamber is mounted, which is used for the particle identification. At the front end, directly behind the entrance window a proportional counter is mounted. This proportional counter includes a highresistance anode. Thus, the position of the particles is determined in the detector. The following two points concern fundamental studies of ion-solid interaction. By using a magnetic spectrometer the charge state distribution of the particles scattered from the sample after a binary collision is both possible and necessary for the analysis. For this reason the charge states are measured and compared with existing models. In addition, a model is developed that takes into account the charge state dependent energy loss. It is shown that without the application of this model the depth profiles do not correspond with the quantitative measurements by conventional IBA methods and with the thickness obtained by transmission electron microscopy. The second fundamental ion-solid interaction is the damage and the modification of the sample that occurs during

  10. Sub-Nanometer Channels Embedded in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yimo

    2017-07-31

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are among the most promising candidates for next-generation electronics due to their atomic thinness, allowing for flexible transparent electronics and ultimate length scaling1. Thus far, atomically-thin p-n junctions2-7, metal-semiconductor contacts8-10, and metal-insulator barriers11-13 have been demonstrated. While 2D materials achieve the thinnest possible devices, precise nanoscale control over the lateral dimensions are also necessary. Although external one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes14 can be used to locally gate 2D materials, this adds a non-trivial third dimension, complicating device integration and flexibility. Here, we report the direct synthesis of sub-nanometer 1D MoS2 channels embedded within WSe2 monolayers, using a dislocation-catalyzed approach. The 1D channels have edges free of misfit dislocations and dangling bonds, forming a coherent interface with the embedding 2D matrix. Periodic dislocation arrays produce 2D superlattices of coherent MoS2 1D channels in WSe2. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have identified other combinations of 2D materials that could form 1D channels. Density function theory (DFT) calculation predicts these 1D channels display type II band alignment needed for carrier confinement and charge separation to access the ultimate length scales necessary for future electronic applications.

  11. Complex biomembrane mimetics on the sub-nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A; Pabst, Georg

    2017-08-01

    Biomimetic lipid vesicles are indispensable tools for gaining insight into the biophysics of cell physiology on the molecular level. The level of complexity of these model systems has steadily increased, and now spans from domain-forming lipid mixtures to asymmetric lipid bilayers. Here, we review recent progress in the development and application of elastic neutron and X-ray scattering techniques for studying these systems in situ and under physiologically relevant conditions on the nanometer to sub-nanometer length scales. In particular, we focus on: (1) structural details of coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, including their thickness and lipid packing mismatch as a function of a size transition from nanoscopic to macroscopic domains; (2) membrane-mediated protein partitioning into lipid domains; (3) the role of the aqueous medium in tuning interactions between membranes and domains; and (4) leaflet-specific structure in asymmetric bilayers and passive lipid flip-flop.

  12. New integrated Monte Carlo code for the simulation of high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images for metrology in microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgüsatiroglu, Emre; Illarionov, Alexey Yu.; Ciappa, Mauro; Pfäffli, Paul; Bomholt, Lars

    2014-04-01

    A new Monte Carlo code is presented that includes among others definition of arbitrary geometries with sub-nanometer resolution, high performance parallel computing capabilities, trapped charge, electric field calculation, electron tracking in electrostatic field, and calculation of 3D dose distributions. These functionalities are efficiently implemented thanks to the coupling of the Monte Carlo simulator with a TCAD environment. Applications shown are the synthesis of SEM linescans and images that focus on the evaluation of the impact of proximity effects and self charging on the quantitative extraction of critical dimensions in dense photoresist structures.

  13. Insight into Ion Transfer through the Sub-Nanometer Channels in Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ze-Yu; Liu, Hai-Ling; Ahmed, Saud Asif; Hanif, Sumaira; Ren, Shi-Bin; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Xia, Xing-Hua; Wang, Kang

    2017-04-18

    A crack-free sub-nanometer composite structure for the study of ion transfer was constructed by in situ growth of ZIF-90 [Zn(ICA)2 , ICA=Imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde] on the tip of a glass nanopipette. The potential-driven ion transfer through the sub-nanometer channels in ZIF-90 is strongly influenced by the pH of the solution. A rectification ratio over 500 is observed in 1 m KCl solution under alkaline conditions (pH 11.58), which is the highest value reported under such a high salt concentration. Fluorescence experiments show the super-high rectification ratio under alkaline conditions results from the strong electrostatic interaction between ions and the sub-nanometer channels of ZIF-90. In addition to providing a general pathway for further study of mass-transfer process through sub-nanometer channels, the approach enable all kinds of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to be used as ionic permselectivity materials in nanopore-based analysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Sub-nanometer dimensions control of core/shell nanoparticles prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M J; Verheijen, M A; Bol, A A; Kessels, W M M

    2015-03-06

    Bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) are the subject of intense research due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Accurate and independent control over the dimensions of both core and shell would allow for unprecedented catalytic performance. Here, we demonstrate that both core and shell dimensions of Pd/Pt core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Al2O3 substrates can be controlled at the sub-nanometer level by using a novel strategy based on atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results it is derived that the main conditions for accurate dimension control of these core/shell NPs are: (i) a difference in surface energy between the deposited core metal and the substrate to obtain island growth; (ii) a process yielding linear growth of the NP cores with ALD cycles to obtain monodispersed NPs with a narrow size distribution; (iii) a selective ALD process for the shell metal yielding a linearly increasing thickness to obtain controllable shell growth exclusively on the cores. For Pd/Pt core/shell NPs it is found that a minimum core diameter of 1 nm exists above which the NP cores are able to catalytically dissociate the precursor molecules for shell growth. In addition, initial studies on the stability of these core/shell NPs have been carried out, and it has been demonstrated that core/shell NPs can be deposited by ALD on high aspect ratio substrates such as nanowire arrays. These achievements show therefore that ALD has significant potential for the preparation of tuneable heterogeneous catalyst systems.

  15. Figuring large optics at the sub-nanometer level: compensation for coating and gravity distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensemer, Stephen; Gross, Mark

    2015-11-30

    Large, precision optics can now be manufactured with surface figures specified at the sub-nanometer level. However, coatings and gravity deform large optics, and there are limits to what can be corrected by clever compensation. Instead, deformations caused by stress from optical mounts and deposited coatings must be incorporated into the optical design. We demonstrate compensation of coating stress on a 370mm substrate to λ/200 by a process of coating and annealing. We also model the same process and identify the leading effects that must be anticipated in fabrication of optics for future gravitational wave detectors and other applications of large, precisely figured optics, and identify the limitations inherent in using coatings to compensate for these deformations.

  16. Bimetallic Ag-Pt Sub-nanometer Supported Clusters as Highly Efficient and Robust Oxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negreiros, Fabio R. [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Yin, Chunrong [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Singh, Akansha [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Barcaro, Giovanni [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Sementa, Luca [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Bartling, Stephan [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Sen, Prasenjit [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Nigam, Sandeep [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Fukui, Nobuyuki [East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc., Ichikawa Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Yasumatsu, Hisato [Cluster Research Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute: in, East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc. Ichikawa, Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Fortunelli, Alessandro [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA USA

    2017-12-29

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of Ag-Pt sub-nanometer clusters as heterogeneous catalysts in the CO -> CO2 reaction (COox) is presented. Ag9Pt2 and Ag9Pt3 clusters are size-selected in the gas phase, deposited on an ultrathin amorphous alumina support, and tested as catalysts experimentally under realistic conditions and by first-principles simulations at realistic coverage. Insitu GISAXS/TPRx demonstrates that the clusters do not sinter or deactivate even after prolonged exposure to reactants at high temperature, and present comparable, extremely high COox catalytic efficiency. Such high activity and stability are ascribed to a synergic role of Ag and Pt in ultranano-aggregates, in which Pt anchors the clusters to the support and binds and activates two CO molecules, while Ag binds and activates O-2, and Ag/Pt surface proximity disfavors poisoning by CO or oxidized species.

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  18. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO{sub 2} transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 009 (India); National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India); Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam [Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chettinad Hospital & Research Institute, Kelambakkam, Tamilnadu 603 103 (India); Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy [Department of Chemistry, The American College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 002 (India); Viswanathan, Balasubramanian, E-mail: bvnathan@iitm.ac.in [National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600 036 (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • On interaction with adsorbate CO{sub 2,} the adsorbent changes its configuration around the metal. • Electron transfer is faster in low coordinative environment of Cu. • CO formation is more favorable on Cu sites with even coordination number. • Cu at coordination number two has a over potential of −0.35 V. - Abstract: Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO at an applied potential of −0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to various value added chemicals.

  19. Mechanism and Prediction of Gas Permeation through Sub-Nanometer Graphene Pores: Comparison of Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Govind Rajan, Ananth; Misra, Rahul Prasanna; Drahushuk, Lee W; Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2017-08-22

    Due to its atomic thickness, porous graphene with sub-nanometer pore sizes constitutes a promising candidate for gas separation membranes that exhibit ultrahigh permeances. While graphene pores can greatly facilitate gas mixture separation, there is currently no validated analytical framework with which one can predict gas permeation through a given graphene pore. In this work, we simulate the permeation of adsorptive gases, such as CO2 and CH4, through sub-nanometer graphene pores using molecular dynamics simulations. We show that gas permeation can typically be decoupled into two steps: (1) adsorption of gas molecules to the pore mouth and (2) translocation of gas molecules from the pore mouth on one side of the graphene membrane to the pore mouth on the other side. We find that the translocation rate coefficient can be expressed using an Arrhenius-type equation, where the energy barrier and the pre-exponential factor can be theoretically predicted using the transition state theory for classical barrier crossing events. We propose a relation between the pre-exponential factor and the entropy penalty of a gas molecule crossing the pore. Furthermore, on the basis of the theory, we propose an efficient algorithm to calculate CO2 and CH4 permeances per pore for sub-nanometer graphene pores of any shape. For the CO2/CH4 mixture, the graphene nanopores exhibit a trade-off between the CO2 permeance and the CO2/CH4 separation factor. This upper bound on a Robeson plot of selectivity versus permeance for a given pore density is predicted and described by the theory. Pores with CO2/CH4 separation factors higher than 10(2) have CO2 permeances per pore lower than 10(-22) mol s(-1) Pa(-1), and pores with separation factors of ∼10 have CO2 permeances per pore between 10(-22) and 10(-21) mol s(-1) Pa(-1). Finally, we show that a pore density of 10(14) m(-2) is required for a porous graphene membrane to exceed the permeance-selectivity upper bound of polymeric materials

  20. Self-assembling organic nanotubes with precisely defined, sub-nanometer pores: formation and mass transport characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bing; Shao, Zhifeng

    2013-12-17

    The transport of molecules and ions across nanometer-scaled pores, created by natural or artificial molecules, is a phenomenon of both fundamental and practical significance. Biological channels are the most remarkable examples of mass transport across membranes and demonstrate nearly exclusive selectivity and high efficiency with a diverse collection of molecules. These channels are critical for many basic biological functions, such as membrane potential, signal transduction, and osmotic homeostasis. If such highly specific and efficient mass transport or separation could be achieved with artificial nanostructures under controlled conditions, they could create revolutionary technologies in a variety of areas. For this reason, investigators from diverse disciplines have vigorously studied small nondeformable nanopores. The most exciting studies have focused on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which have exhibited fast mass transport and high ion selectivity despite their very simple structure. However, the limitations of CNTs and the dearth of other small (≤2 nm) nanopores have severely hampered the systematic investigation of nanopore-mediated mass transport, which will be essential for designing artificial nanopores with desired functions en masse. Researchers can overcome the difficulties associated with CNT and other artificial pores by stacking macrocyclic building blocks with persistent shapes to construct tunable, self-assembling organic pores. This effort started when we discovered a highly efficient, one-pot macrocyclization process to efficiently prepare several classes of macrocycles with rigid backbones containing nondeformable cavities. Such macrocycles, if stacked atop one another, should lead to nanotubular assemblies with defined inner pores determined by their constituent macrocycles. One class of macrocycles with aromatic oligoamide backbones had a very high propensity for directional assembly, forming nanotubular structures containing nanometer and sub-nanometer

  1. Spatial coherence of electron beams from field emitters and its effect on the resolution of imaged objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana, E-mail: tatiana@physik.uzh.ch

    2017-04-15

    Sub-nanometer and nanometer-sized tips provide high coherence electron sources. Conventionally, the effective source size is estimated from the extent of the experimental biprism interference pattern created on the detector by applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem. Previously reported experimental intensity distributions on the detector exhibit Gaussian distribution and our simulations show that this is an indication that such electron sources must be at least partially coherent. This, in turn means that strictly speaking the Van Cittert Zernike theorem cannot be applied, since it assumes an incoherent source. The approach of applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem is examined in more detail by performing simulations of interference patterns for the electron sources of different size and different coherence length, evaluating the effective source size from the extent of the simulated interference pattern and comparing the obtained result with the pre-defined value. The intensity distribution of the source is assumed to be Gaussian distributed, as it is observed in experiments. The visibility or the contrast in the simulated holograms is found to be always less than 1 which agrees well with previously reported experimental results and thus can be explained solely by the Gaussian intensity distribution of the source. The effective source size estimated from the extent of the interference pattern turns out to be of about 2–3 times larger than the pre-defined size, but it is approximately equal to the intrinsic resolution of the imaging system. A simple formula for estimating the intrinsic resolution, which could be useful when employing nano-tips in in-line Gabor holography or point-projection microscopy, is provided. - Highlights: • van Cittert Zernike theorem for nano- and sub-nano electron emitting tips is revised. • Simulations show that nano- and sub-nano electron emitting tips are at least partially coherent. • A simple formula for evaluating

  2. Differential optical shadow sensor for sub-nanometer displacement measurement and its application to drag-free satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Andreas; Tan, Si; Saraf, Shailendhar; Alfauwaz, Abdul; DeBra, Dan; Buchman, Sasha; Lipa, John A

    2017-10-16

    We present a method for 3D sub-nanometer displacement measurement using a set of differential optical shadow sensors. It is based on using pairs of collimated beams on opposite sides of an object that are partially blocked by it. Applied to a sphere, our 3-axis sensor module consists of 8 parallel beam-detector sets for redundancy. The sphere blocks half of each beam's power in the nominal centered position, and any displacement can be measured by the differential optical power changes amongst the pairs of detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated a displacement sensitivity of 0.87nm/Hz at 1 Hz and 0.39nm/Hz at 10 Hz. We describe the application of the module to the inertial sensor of a drag-free satellite, which can potentially be used for navigation, geodesy and fundamental science experiments as well as ground based applications.

  3. Ultra-stable and versatile widefield cryo-fluorescence microscope for single-molecule localization with sub-nanometer accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weixing; Stein, Simon C; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2015-02-09

    We developed a stand-alone cryostat with optical access to the sample which can be adapted to any epi-fluorescence microscope for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The cryostat cools the sample to a cryogenic temperature of 89 K, and allows for imaging single molecules using an air objective with a numerical aperture of 0.7. An important property of this system is its excellent thermal and mechanical stability, enabling long-time observations of samples over several hours with negligible drift. Using this system, we performed photo-bleaching studies of Atto647N dye molecules, and find an improvement of the photostability of these molecules by more than two orders of magnitude. The resulting increased photon numbers of several millions allow for single-molecule localization accuracy of sub-nanometer.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition-prepared sub-nanometer Zr clusters on Pd surfaces: promotion of methane dry reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Lukas; Shi, Xue-Rong; Köpfle, Norbert; Milligan, Cory A; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Hävecker, Michael; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2016-11-23

    An inverse Pd-Zr model catalyst was prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using zirconium-t-butoxide (ZTB) as an organometallic precursor. Pd-Zr interaction was then investigated with focus on the correlation of reforming performance with the oxidation state of Zr. As test reactions, dry reforming of methane (DRM) and methanol steam reforming (MSR) were chosen. Depending on treatments, either ZrOxHy or ZrO2 overlayers or Zr as sub-nanometer clusters could be obtained. Following the adsorption of ZTB on Pd(111), a partially hydroxylated Zr4+-containing layer was formed, which can be reduced to metallic Zr by thermal annealing in ultrahigh vacuum, leading to redox-active Zr0 sub-nanometer clusters. Complementary density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations showed that a single layer of ZrO2 on Pd(111) can be more easily reduced toward the metallic state than a double- and triple layer. Also, the initial and resulting layer compositions greatly depend on gas environment. The lower the water background partial pressure, the faster and more complete the reduction of Zr4+ species to Zr0 on Pd takes place. Under methanol steam reforming conditions, water activation by hydroxylation of Zr occurs. In excess of methanol, strong coking is induced by the Pd/ZrOxHy interface. In contrast, dry reforming of methane is effectively promoted if these initially metallic Zr species are present in the pre-catalyst, leading to a Pd/ZrOxHy phase boundary by oxidative activation under reaction conditions. These reaction-induced active sites for DRM are stable with respect to carbon blocking or coking. In essence, Zr doping of Pd opens specific CO2 activation channels, which are absent on pure metallic Pd.

  5. Sub-nanometer stable precision MEMS clamping mechanism maintaining clamp force unpowered for TEM application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Dannis Michel; de Jong, B.R.; Soemers, Herman; van Dijk, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    A design is presented for a relatively large force (0.5 mN) high-precision MEMS clamping mechanism. The clamp is a part of a MEMS transmission electron microscope (TEM) sample manipulator, which needs to be fixed unpowered once positioned. The elastic deformation of the clamp suspension has been

  6. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO2 transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam; Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy; Viswanathan, Balasubramanian

    2017-02-01

    Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO2 to CO at an applied potential of -0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to various value added chemicals.

  9. Resolution Versus Error for Computational Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzi, Lorenzo; Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Images that are collected via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) can be undersampled to avoid damage to the specimen while maintaining resolution [1, 2]. We have used BPFA to impute missing data and reduce noise [3]. The reconstruction is typically evaluated using the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). This measure is too conservative for STEM images and we propose that the Fourier ring correlation (FRC) is used instead to evaluate the reconstruction. We are not concerned with exact reconstruction of the truth image, and therefore PSNR is a conservative estimation of the quality of the reconstruction. Instead, we are concerned with the visual resolution of the image and whether atoms can be distinguished. We have evaluated the reconstruction of a simulated STEM image using the FRC and compared the results with the PSNR measurements. The FRC captures the resolution of the image and is not affected by a large MSE if the atom peaks are still distinguishable. The noisy and reconstructed images are shown in Figure 1. The simulated STEM image was sampled at 100%, 80%, 40%, and 20% of the original pixels to simulate an undersampled scan. The reconstruction was done using BPFA with a patch size of 10 x 10 and no overlapping patches. Not having overlapping patches produces inferior results but they are still acceptable. The dictionary size is 64 and 30 iterations were completed during each reconstruction. The 100% image was denoised instead of reconstructed. Poisson noise was applied to the simulated image with λ values of 500, 50, and 5 to simulate lower imaging dose. The original simulated STEM image was also included in our calculations and was generated using a dose of 1000. The simulated STEM image is 100 by 100 pixels and has essentially no high frequency components. The image reconstruction tends to smooth the data, also resulting in no high frequency components. This causes the FRC of the two images to be large at higher resolutions and may be

  10. SI-traceable absolute distance measurement over more than 800 meters with sub-nanometer interferometry by two-color inline refractivity compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Meyer, Tobias; Mildner, Jutta; Pollinger, Florian

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate two-color inline refractivity compensation in a heterodyne synthetic wavelength interferometer for a measurement of absolute distances over several hundred meters with sub-millimeter accuracy. Two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers with a coherence length of more than 1 km are used as light sources. Direct SI traceability is achieved by controlling the lasers' frequency difference in the radio frequency regime. The resulting synthetic wavelengths at 532 nm and 1064 nm are used for the absolute distance measurement and dispersion-based inline refractive index compensation. A standard deviation of 50 μm is achieved for distances up to 864 m. This performance corresponds to a standard deviation of the observable, the difference of the four optical wavelengths, on a sub-nanometer level. Comparison against white light interferometry confirms sub-millimeter accuracy over this distance. Temporally resolved data over 864 m provide quantitative insights into the influence of chromatic beam paths.

  11. Dengue virus purification and sample preparation for cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joanne L; Lok, Shee Mei

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a valuable tool used to study the structures of icosahedral viruses without having to resort to crystallization. During the last few decades, significant progress has been made where virus structures previously resolved only to low resolution have now breached the sub-nanometer threshold. Critical to such excellent results are the acquisition of highly purified virus samples and well-frozen samples in vitreous ice. With the virus particles locked in their native conformations, cryo-EM together with single-particle analysis can then be deployed to study the structures of the viruses in their fully hydrated states.

  12. Center for Electron Microscopy, CEN-DTU; The building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    Center for electron nanoscopy, CEN●DTU; The building Andy Horsewell Technical University of Denmark, DTU Materials Technology, Building 204, 2800 Lyngby ABSTRACT CEN●DTU, having been given[1] the opportunity to create a world-class facility with a unique suite of electron microscopes, is in full...... swing with the construction of a purpose-built building. The microscopes are very special: 2 Titans, both Cs corrected, with monochromators and full analytical capabilities are to achieve spatial resolutions of 0.7Å and spectroscopy resolutions of 0.1eV. One of the Titans is to be equipped...... with an environmental cell, to provide in-situ observations of gas-solid interactions at high temperatures. 2 dual beam FIB-FEGSEMs, both with EDS and one with EBSD will allow 3D image, composition and crystallographic reconstruction at sub-nanometer resolution. Additional electron microscopes, making 7 in all...

  13. Prospects for electron imaging with ultrafast time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Reed, Bryan W.; Torralva, Ben R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2007-03-01

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here the authors demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10km/s) without smearing. The authors outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, the authors present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution.

  14. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M R; Reed, B W; Torralva, B R; Browning, N D

    2007-01-26

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.

  15. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  16. Comparison of High Resolution Negative Electron Beam Resists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Schøler, Mikkel; Shi, Peixiong

    2006-01-01

    Four high resolution negative electron beam resists are compared: TEBN-1 from Tokuyama Corp. Japan, ma-N 2401XP and mr-L 6000AXP from microresist technology GmbH Germany, and SU-8 2000 series from MicroChem Corp., USA. Narrow linewidth high density patterns are defined by 100 kV electron beam...

  17. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  18. Quantitative High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Gamm, B.; Popescu, R.; Blank, H.; Schneider, R; Beyer, A.; Gölzhäuser, A.; Gerthsen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Single atoms can be considered as basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling of image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate which induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weick...

  19. Electron cryomicroscopy of single particles at subnanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Ludtke, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle reconstruction have advanced substantially over the past two decades. There are now numerous examples of structures that have been solved using this technique to better than 10 A resolution. At such resolutions, direct identification of alpha helices is possible and, often, beta-sheet-containing regions can be identified. The most numerous subnanometer resolution structures are the icosahedral viruses, as higher resolution is easier to achieve with higher symmetry. Important non-icosahedral structures solved to subnanometer resolution include several ribosome structures, clathrin assemblies and, most recently, the Ca2+ release channel. There is now hope that, in the next few years, this technique will achieve resolutions approaching 4 A, permitting a complete trace of the protein backbone without reference to a crystal structure.

  20. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  1. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  2. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, D.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Introduction to high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnocki-Cieciura, Mariusz; Nowotny, Marcin

    For many years two techniques have dominated structural biology - X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Traditional cryo-electron microscopy of biological macromolecules produced macromolecular reconstructions at resolution limited to 6-10 Å. Recent development of transmission electron microscopes, in particular the development of direct electron detectors, and continuous improvements in the available software, have led to the "resolution revolution" in cryo-EM. It is now possible to routinely obtain near-atomic-resolution 3D maps of intact biological macromolecules as small as ~100 kDa. Thus, cryo-EM is now becoming the method of choice for structural analysis of many complex assemblies that are unsuitable for structure determination by other methods.

  4. Sharpening high resolution information in single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J J; Luque, D; Castón, J R; Carrascosa, J L

    2008-10-01

    Advances in single particle electron cryomicroscopy have made possible to elucidate routinely the structure of biological specimens at subnanometer resolution. At this resolution, secondary structure elements are discernable by their signature. However, identification and interpretation of high resolution structural features are hindered by the contrast loss caused by experimental and computational factors. This contrast loss is traditionally modeled by a Gaussian decay of structure factors with a temperature factor, or B-factor. Standard restoration procedures usually sharpen the experimental maps either by applying a Gaussian function with an inverse ad hoc B-factor, or according to the amplitude decay of a reference structure. EM-BFACTOR is a program that has been designed to widely facilitate the use of the novel method for objective B-factor determination and contrast restoration introduced by Rosenthal and Henderson [Rosenthal, P.B., Henderson, R., 2003. Optimal determination of particle orientation, absolute hand, and contrast loss in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. J. Mol. Biol. 333, 721-745]. The program has been developed to interact with the most common packages for single particle electron cryomicroscopy. This sharpening method has been further investigated via EM-BFACTOR, concluding that it helps to unravel the high resolution molecular features concealed in experimental density maps, thereby making them better suited for interpretation. Therefore, the method may facilitate the analysis of experimental data in high resolution single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

  5. Sub-ångstrom resolution using aberration corrected electron optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, P E; Dellby, N; Krivanek, O L

    2002-08-08

    Following the invention of electron optics during the 1930s, lens aberrations have limited the achievable spatial resolution to about 50 times the wavelength of the imaging electrons. This situation is similar to that faced by Leeuwenhoek in the seventeenth century, whose work to improve the quality of glass lenses led directly to his discovery of the ubiquitous "animalcules" in canal water, the first hints of the cellular basis of life. The electron optical aberration problem was well understood from the start, but more than 60 years elapsed before a practical correction scheme for electron microscopy was demonstrated, and even then the remaining chromatic aberrations still limited the resolution. We report here the implementation of a computer-controlled aberration correction system in a scanning transmission electron microscope, which is less sensitive to chromatic aberration. Using this approach, we achieve an electron probe smaller than 1 A. This performance, about 20 times the electron wavelength at 120 keV energy, allows dynamic imaging of single atoms, clusters of a few atoms, and single atomic layer 'rafts' of atoms coexisting with Au islands on a carbon substrate. This technique should also allow atomic column imaging of semiconductors, for detection of single dopant atoms, using an electron beam with energy below the damage threshold for silicon.

  6. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  7. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-05-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays.

  8. A Novel Low Energy Electron Microscope for DNA Sequencing and Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, M.; Shadman, K.; Persson, H.H.J.; N’Diaye, A.T.; Schmid, A.K.; Davis, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel technique that is directed towards imaging nanostructures and surfaces with sub-nanometer resolution. The technique combines a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, an energy filter, and dual beam illumination in a single instrument. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. Simulation results predict that the novel aberration corrector design will eliminate the second rank chromatic and third and fifth order spherical aberrations, thereby improving the resolution into the sub-nanometer regime at landing energies as low as one hundred electron-Volts. The energy filter produces a beam that can extract detailed information about the chemical composition and local electronic states of non-periodic objects such as nanoparticles, interfaces, defects, and macromolecules. The dual flood illumination eliminates charging effects that are generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which requires high resolution to distinguish the individual bases and high speed to reduce the cost. The MAD-LEEM approach images the DNA with low electron impact energies, which provides nucleobase contrast mechanisms without organometallic labels. Furthermore, the micron-size field of view when combined with imaging on the fly provides long read lengths, thereby reducing the demand on assembling the sequence. Experimental results from bulk specimens with immobilized single-base oligonucleotides demonstrate that base specific contrast is available with reflected, photo-emitted, and Auger electrons. Image contrast simulations of model rectangular features mimicking the individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed to translate measurements of contrast on bulk DNA to the detectability of

  9. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, John [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  10. Optical circular deflector with attosecond resolution for ultrashort electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel method using high-power laser as a circular deflector is proposed for the measurement of femtosecond (fs and sub-fs electron beam. In the scheme, the electron beam interacts with a laser pulse operating in a radially polarized doughnut mode (TEM_{01^{*}} in a helical undulator, generating angular kicks along the beam in two directions at the same time. The phase difference between the two angular kicks makes the beam form a ring after a propagation section with appropriate phase advance, which can reveal the current profile of the electron beam. Detailed theoretical analysis of the method and numerical results with reasonable parameters are both presented. It is shown that the temporal resolution can reach up to ∼100 attosecond, which is a significant improvement for the diagnostics of ultrashort electron beam.

  11. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm

  12. Averaging scheme for atomic resolution off-axis electron holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, T; Lehmann, M

    2014-08-01

    All micrographs are limited by shot-noise, which is intrinsic to the detection process of electrons. For beam insensitive specimen this limitation can in principle easily be circumvented by prolonged exposure times. However, in the high-resolution regime several instrumental instabilities limit the applicable exposure time. Particularly in the case of off-axis holography the holograms are highly sensitive to the position and voltage of the electron-optical biprism. We present a novel reconstruction algorithm to average series of off-axis holograms while compensating for specimen drift, biprism drift, drift of biprism voltage, and drift of defocus, which all might cause problematic changes from exposure to exposure. We show an application of the algorithm utilizing also the possibilities of double biprism holography, which results in a high quality exit-wave reconstruction with 75 pm resolution at a very high signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  14. Electron cryomicroscopy of biological machines at subnanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wah; Baker, Matthew L; Jiang, Wen; Dougherty, Matthew; Schmid, Michael F

    2005-03-01

    Advances in electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) have made possible the structural determination of large biological machines in the resolution range of 6-9 angstroms. Rice dwarf virus and the acrosomal bundle represent two distinct types of machines amenable to cryo-EM investigations at subnanometer resolutions. However, calculating the density map is only the first step, and much analysis remains to extract structural insights and the mechanism of action in these machines. This paper will review the computational and visualization methodologies necessary for analysis (structure mining) of the computed cryo-EM maps of these machines. These steps include component segmentation, averaging based on local symmetry among components, density connectivity trace, incorporation of bioinformatics analysis, and fitting of high-resolution component data, if available. The consequences of these analyses can not only identify accurately some of the secondary structure elements of the molecular components in machines but also suggest structural mechanisms related to their biological functions.

  15. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daliang

    2018-01-18

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam-sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  16. Electron Cryomicroscopy of Viruses at Near-Atomic Resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelber, Jason T; Hryc, Corey F; Chiu, Wah

    2017-09-29

    Recently, dozens of virus structures have been solved to resolutions between 2.5 and 5.0 Å by means of electron cryomicroscopy. With these structures we are now firmly within the "atomic age" of electron cryomicroscopy, as these studies can reveal atomic details of protein and nucleic acid topology and interactions between specific residues. This improvement in resolution has been the result of direct electron detectors and image processing advances. Although enforcing symmetry facilitates reaching near-atomic resolution with fewer particle images, it unfortunately obscures some biologically interesting components of a virus. New approaches on relaxing symmetry and exploring structure dynamics and heterogeneity of viral assemblies have revealed important insights into genome packaging, virion assembly, cell entry, and other stages of the viral life cycle. In the future, novel methods will be required to reveal yet-unknown structural conformations of viruses, relevant to their biological activities. Ultimately, these results hold the promise of answering many unresolved questions linking structural diversity of viruses to their biological functions.

  17. Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Björn; Blank, Holger; Popescu, Radian; Schneider, Reinhard; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.

  18. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  19. High-Resolution Conversion Electron Spectroscopy of Valence Electron Configurations (CESVEC) in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    First measurements with the Zurich $\\beta$-spectrometer on sources from ISOLDE have demonstrated that high resolution spectroscopy of conversion electrons from valence shells is feasible.\\\\ \\\\ This makes possible a novel type of electron spectroscopy (CESVEC) on valence-electron configurations of tracer elements in solids. Thus the density of occupied electron states of impurities in solids has been measured for the first time. Such data constitute a stringent test of state-of-the-art calculations of impurity properties. Based on these results, we are conducting a systematic investigation of impurities in group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  20. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  1. High-resolution AMLCD for the electronic library system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Russel A.; Middo, Kathy; Turner, William D.; Lewis, Alan; Thompson, Malcolm J.; Silverstein, Louis D.

    1994-06-01

    The Electronic Library System (ELS), is a proposed data resource for the cockpit which can provide the aircrew with a vast array of technical information on their aircraft and flight plan. This information includes, but is not limited to, approach plates, Jeppeson Charts, and aircraft technical manuals. Most of these data are appropriate for digitization at high resolution (300 spi). Xerox Corporation has developed a flat panel active matrix liquid crystal display, AMLCD, that is an excellent match to the ELS, due to its innovative and aggressive design.

  2. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: Experimental observations and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Su, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Egerton, R.F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Konno, M. [Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Wu, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhu, Y., E-mail: zhu@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. -- Research highlights: {yields} Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in an aberration-corrected electron microscope. {yields} High-resolution secondary electron imaging mechanism. {yields} Image contrast quantification and as functions of imaging conditions. {yields} Simultaneous acquisition of atomic images from surface and bulk.

  3. Measuring the electron bunch timing with femtosecond resolution at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Marie Kristin

    2013-03-15

    Bunch arrival time monitors (BAMs) are an integral part of the laser-based synchronisation system which is being developed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH).The operation principle comprises the measurement of the electron bunch arrival time relative to the optical timing reference, which is provided by actively length-stabilised fibre-links of the synchronisation system. The monitors are foreseen to be used as a standard diagnostic tool, not only for FLASH but also for the future European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL). The present bunch arrival time monitors have evolved from proof-of-principle experiments to beneficial diagnostic devices, which are almost permanently available during standard machine operation. This achievement has been a major objective of this thesis. The developments went in parallel to improvements in the reliable and low-maintenance operation of the optical synchronisation system. The key topics of this thesis comprised the characterisation and optimisation of the opto-mechanical front-ends of both, the fibre-links and the BAMs. The extent of applications involving the bunch arrival time information has been enlarged, providing automated measurements for properties of the RF acceleration modules, for instance, the RF on-crest phase determination and the measurement of energy fluctuations. Furthermore, two of the currently installed BAMs are implemented in an active phase and gradient stabilisation of specific modules in order to minimise the arrival time jitter of the electron bunches at the location of the FEL undulators, which is crucial for a high timing resolution of pump-probe experiments.

  4. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy - and Associated Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, Peter; Cowley, John; Eyring, Leroy

    1989-02-01

    This book provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts, techniques, and methods used for electron microscopy at high resolution in space, energy, and even in time. It delineates the theory of elastic scattering, which is most useful for spectroscopic and chemical analyses. There are also discussions of the theory and practice of image calculations, and applications of HRTEM to the study of solid surfaces, highly disordered materials, solid state chemistry, mineralogy, semiconductors and metals. Contributors include J. Cowley, J. Spence, P. Buseck, P. Self, and M.A. O'Keefe. Compiled by experts in the fields of geology, physics and chemistry, this comprehensive text will be the standard reference for years to come.

  5. High resolution electron scattering on {sup 96}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Christoph; Bassauer, Sergej; Krugmann, Andreas; Krumbholz, Anna Maria; Pietralla, Norbert; Singer, Maxim; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The low-energy structure of the nucleus {sup 96}Zr is interesting for numerous reasons - especially the strong octupole correlation leading to an excitation of the prominent 3{sup -}{sub 1} state with the largest known ground-state transition strength (B(E3, 3{sup +}{sub 1} → 0{sup +}{sub 1}) = 57(4) W.u.) of all nuclei. Even though this nucleus is a good testing ground for nuclear structure theories some low-energy observables are known with insufficient precision. Especially the transition strength of low-lying 2{sup +} states, which are important for the identification of mixed-symmetry states, have large uncertainties. Electron scattering at low impulse transfer has been shown to be capable of obtaining these B(E2) values with high precision. A {sup 96}Zr(e,e{sup '}) experiment has recently been performed at the superconducting electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC at Darmstadt using the high-resolution LINTOTT spectrometer. The experiment and preliminary results are presented.

  6. Electron Diffraction and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy of Mineral Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Gordon L., Jr.

    This book is a well-written English translation of the original 1981 Russian edition, Strukturnoye issledovaniye mineralov metodami mikrodifraktsii i elechtronnoi mikroskopii vysokogo razresheniya. The 1987 English version has been extensively updated and includes references up to 1986. The book is essentially a text on the theoretical and experimental aspects of transmission electron microscopy and has chapters on the reciprocal lattice, electron diffraction (both kinematic and dynamic), and high-resolution electron microscopy.Electron diffraction is emphasized, especially its use for structure analysis of poorly crystalline and fine-grained phases not readily determined by the more exact X ray diffraction method. Two methods of electron diffraction are discussed: selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and oblique-texture electron diffraction (OTED); the latter technique is rarely used in the west and is never discussed in western electron microscopy texts. A SAED pattern is formed by isolating a small micrometer-size area with an aperture and obtaining single-crystal patterns from the diffracted beams. By tilting the sample and obtaining many patterns, a complete picture of the reciprocal lattice can be taken. An OTED pattern is formed when the incident electron beam passes through an inclined preparation consisting of a great number of thin platy crystals lying normal to the texture axis (axis normal to the support grid). To form an OTED pattern, the plates must all lie on a common face, such as a basal plane in phyllosilicates. Upon tilting the plates, an elliptical powder diffraction pattern is formed. Intensities measured from these patterns are used for a structural analysis of the platy minerals.

  7. High-Resolution Measurements of Low-Energy Conversion Electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Gizon, A; Putaux, J

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of low-energy internal conversion electrons have been performed with high energy resolution in some N = 105 odd and odd-odd nuclei using a semi-circular spectrograph associated to a specific tape transport system. These experiments aimed to answer the following questions~: \\begin{itemize} \\item Do M3 isomeric transitions exist in $^{183}$Pt and $^{181}$Os, isotones of $^{184}$Au~? \\item Are the neutron configurations proposed to describe the isomeric and ground states of $^{184}$Au right or wrong~? \\item Does it exist an isomeric state in $^{182}$Ir, isotone of $^{181}$Os, $^{183}$Pt and $^{184}$Au~? \\item What are the spin and parity values of the excited states of $^{182}$Ir~? \\end{itemize} In $^{183}$Pt, the 35.0 keV M3 isomeric transition has been clearly observed and the reduced transition probability has been determined. The deduced hindrance factor is close to that observed in the neighbouring odd-odd $^{184}$Au nucleus. This confirms the neutron configurations previously proposed for the ...

  8. Mapping the layer count of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride at high lateral spatial resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Ali; Cross, Nicholas G.; Liu, Lei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Duscher, Gerd; Gu, Gong

    2018-01-01

    Layer count control and uniformity of two dimensional (2D) layered materials are critical to the investigation of their properties and to their electronic device applications, but methods to map 2D material layer count at nanometer-level lateral spatial resolutions have been lacking. Here, we demonstrate a method based on two complementary techniques widely available in transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to map the layer count of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films. The mass-thickness contrast in high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode allows for thickness determination in atomically clean regions with high spatial resolution (sub-nanometer), but is limited by surface contamination. To complement, another technique based on the boron K ionization edge in the electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum (EELS) of h-BN is developed to quantify the layer count so that surface contamination does not cause an overestimate, albeit at a lower spatial resolution (nanometers). The two techniques agree remarkably well in atomically clean regions with discrepancies within  ±1 layer. For the first time, the layer count uniformity on the scale of nanometers is quantified for a 2D material. The methodology is applicable to layer count mapping of other 2D layered materials, paving the way toward the synthesis of multilayer 2D materials with homogeneous layer count.

  9. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Z., E-mail: zhongbo.lee@uni-ulm.de; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-10-15

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions.

  10. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  11. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Michael R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: armstrong30@llnl.gov; Boyden, Ken [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred [N Division, Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-280, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kim, Judy S. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  12. Accelerator-based single-shot ultrafast transmission electron microscope with picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Fu, F.; Zhang, J. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wan, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. We anticipate that u-TEMs with a product of temporal and spatial resolution beyond 10{sup −19} ms will open up new opportunities in probing matter at ultrafast temporal and ultrasmall spatial scales.

  13. High-resolution XAS/XES analyzing electronic structures of catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    Photon-in-photon-out core level spectroscopy is an emerging approach to characterize the electronic structure of catalysts and enzymes, and it is either installed or planned for intense synchrotron beam lines and X-ray free electron lasers. This type of spectroscopy requires high-energy resolution spectroscopy not only for the incoming X-ray beam but also, in most applications, for the detection of the outgoing photons. Thus, the use of high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometers whose resolving power ?E/E is typically about 10-4, is mandatory.High-Resolution XAS/XES: Analyzing Electronic Stru

  14. Time resolution of resistive plate chambers investigated with 10 MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradela, C., E-mail: carlos.paradela@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Casarejos, E. [Universidad de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Duran, I. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    The time resolution of double-gap timing resistive plate chambers (tRPC) has been measured with 10 MeV electron bunches of variable intensity. The use of electrons delivered in bunches of a few picoseconds was an attempt to mimic the energy deposition of heavy ions in the tRPC gas gap. The measurements show a clear dependence of the time resolution with the number of electrons per bunch, reaching 21 ps (standard deviation) for the highest beam intensity. The signal charge distribution and the time resolution are compared to data obtained with the same detectors for cosmic rays and {sup 238}U ions at 1 AGeV.

  15. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have made continuum radio observations of these HII regions of the W51 complex at 240, 610, 1060 and 1400 MHz using GMRT with lower resolution (20'' × 15'') at the lowest frequency. The observed spectra of the prominent thermal subcomponents of W51 have been fitted to a free-free emission spectrum and their ...

  16. Toward single electron resolution phonon mediated ionization detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabolfathi, Nader, E-mail: mirabolfathi@physics.tamu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University (United States); Harris, H. Rusty; Mahapatra, Rupak; Sundqvist, Kyle; Jastram, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University (United States); Serfass, Bruno; Faiez, Dana; Sadoulet, Bernard [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Experiments seeking to detect rare event interactions such as dark matter or coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering are striving for large mass detectors with very low detection threshold. Using Neganov-Luke phonon amplification effect, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is reaching unprecedented RMS resolutions of ∼14 eV{sub ee}. CDMSlite is currently the most sensitive experiment to WIMPs of mass ∼5 GeV/c{sup 2} but is limited in achieving higher phonon gains due to an early onset of leakage current into Ge crystals. The contact interface geometry is particularly weak for blocking hole injection from the metal, and thus a new design is demonstrated that allows high voltage bias via vacuum separated electrode. With an increased bias voltage and a×2 Luke phonon gain, world best RMS resolution of sigma ∼7 eV{sub ee} for 0.25 kg (d=75 mm, h=1 cm) Ge detectors was achieved. Since the leakage current is a function of the field and the phonon gain is a function of the applied voltage, appropriately robust interface blocking material combined with thicker substrate (25 mm) will reach a resolution of ∼2.8 eV{sub ee}. In order to achieve better resolution of ∼ eV, we are investigating a layer of insulator between the phonon readout surface and the semiconductor crystals.

  17. High Resolution Measurements and Electronic Structure Calculations of a Diazanaphthalene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Goubet, Manuel; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been suspected to be the carriers of so called Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). Most of the results published in the literature report rotationally unresolved spectra of pure carbon as well as heteroatom-containing PAHs species. To date for this class of molecules, the principal source of rotational informations is ruled by microwave (MW) spectroscopy while high resolution measurements reporting rotational structure of the infrared (IR) vibrational bands are very scarce. Recently, some high resolution techniques provided interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR and far-IR bands of these large carbonated molecules of astrophysical interest. One of them is to use the bright synchrotron radiation as IR continuum source of a high resolution Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer. We report the very complementary analysis of the [1,6] naphthyridine (a N-bearing PAH) for which we recorded the microwave spectrum at the PhLAM laboratory (Lille) and the high resolution far-infrared spectrum on the AILES beamline at synchrotron facility SOLEIL. MW spectroscopy provided highly accurate rotational constants in the ground state to perform Ground State Combinations Differences (GSCD) allowing the analysis of the two most intense FT-FIR bands in the 50-900 wn range. Moreover, during this presentation the negative value of the inertial defect in the GS of the molecule will be discussed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013).

  18. The resolution dependence of optimal exposures in liquid nitrogen temperature electron cryomicroscopy of catalase crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay A; Smith, Eric A; Bueler, Stephanie A; Rubinstein, John L

    2010-03-01

    Electron beam damage is the fundamental limit to resolution in electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) of frozen, hydrated specimens. Radiation damage increases with the number of electrons used to obtain an image and affects information at higher spatial frequencies before low-resolution information. For the experimentalist, a balance exists between electron exposures sufficient to obtain a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in images and exposures that limit the damage to structural features. In single particle cryo-EM this balance is particularly delicate: low-resolution features must be imaged with a sufficient SNR to allow image alignment so that high-resolution features recorded below the noise level can be recovered by averaging independent images. By measuring the fading of Fourier components from images obtained at 200 kV of thin crystals of catalase embedded in ice, we have determined the electron exposures that will maximize the SNR at resolutions between 86 and 2.9A. These data allow for a rational choice of exposure for single particle cryo-EM. For example, for 20A resolution, the SNR is maximized at approximately 20e(-)/A(2), whereas for 3A resolution, it is maximized at approximately 10 e(-)/A(2). We illustrate the effects of exposure in single particle cryo-EM with data collected at approximately 12-15 and approximately 24-30 e(-)/A(2). (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-03-09

    Mar 9, 2001 ... All the RRL results quoted above have been derived under the LTE approximation. The electron temperature is one of the most important parameters in understanding the physical properties of thermal HII regions. Low frequency continuum observations in the optically thick regime offer a direct estimate of ...

  20. Microfluidic chip for high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A Microfluidic chip (100) for transmission electron microscopy has a monolithic body (101) with a front side (102) and a back side (103). The monolithic body (101) comprises an opening (104) on the back side (103) extending in a vertical direction from the back side (103) to a membrane (107...

  1. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  2. High-energy-resolution monochromator for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy/electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Ursin, Jonathan P; Bacon, Neil J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Hrncirik, Petr; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S

    2009-09-28

    An all-magnetic monochromator/spectrometer system for sub-30 meV energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope is described. It will link the energy being selected by the monochromator to the energy being analysed by the spectrometer, without resorting to decelerating the electron beam. This will allow it to attain spectral energy stability comparable to systems using monochromators and spectrometers that are raised to near the high voltage of the instrument. It will also be able to correct the chromatic aberration of the probe-forming column. It should be able to provide variable energy resolution down to approximately 10 meV and spatial resolution less than 1 A.

  3. Mapping atomic motions with ultrabright electrons: towards fundamental limits in space-time resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Stephanie; Casandruc, Albert; Zhang, Dongfang; Zhong, Yinpeng; Loch, Rolf A; Marx, Alexander; Hasegawa, Taisuke; Liu, Lai Chung; Bayesteh, Shima; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Hoffmann, Matthias; Felber, Matthias; Hachmann, Max; Mayet, Frank; Hirscht, Julian; Keskin, Sercan; Hada, Masaki; Epp, Sascha W; Flöttmann, Klaus; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The long held objective of directly observing atomic motions during the defining moments of chemistry has been achieved based on ultrabright electron sources that have given rise to a new field of atomically resolved structural dynamics. This class of experiments requires not only simultaneous sub-atomic spatial resolution with temporal resolution on the 100 femtosecond time scale but also has brightness requirements approaching single shot atomic resolution conditions. The brightness condition is in recognition that chemistry leads generally to irreversible changes in structure during the experimental conditions and that the nanoscale thin samples needed for electron structural probes pose upper limits to the available sample or "film" for atomic movies. Even in the case of reversible systems, the degree of excitation and thermal effects require the brightest sources possible for a given space-time resolution to observe the structural changes above background. Further progress in the field, particularly to the study of biological systems and solution reaction chemistry, requires increased brightness and spatial coherence, as well as an ability to tune the electron scattering cross-section to meet sample constraints. The electron bunch density or intensity depends directly on the magnitude of the extraction field for photoemitted electron sources and electron energy distribution in the transverse and longitudinal planes of electron propagation. This work examines the fundamental limits to optimizing these parameters based on relativistic electron sources using re-bunching cavity concepts that are now capable of achieving 10 femtosecond time scale resolution to capture the fastest nuclear motions. This analysis is given for both diffraction and real space imaging of structural dynamics in which there are several orders of magnitude higher space-time resolution with diffraction methods. The first experimental results from the Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic

  4. Resolution of two distinct electron transfer sites on azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Blatt, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    reaction rates of the Cr(III)-modified protein are attenuated. This decreased reactivity of Cr(III)-labeled azurin toward one of its physiological partners suggests the involvement of the labeled region in the electron transfer reaction with cytochrome c551. Furthermore, the presence of a second active......Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin is stoichiometrically and specifically labeled upon reduction by Cr(II)aq ions, yielding a substitution-inert Cr(III) adduct on the protein surface. We investigated the effect of this chemical modification on the reactivity of azurin with two of its presumed partners...... in the redox system of the bacterium. The Pseudomonas cytochrome oxidase catalyzed oxidation of reduced native and Cr(III)-labeled azurin by O2 was found to be unaffected by the modification. The kinetics of the electron exchange reaction between native or Cr(III)-labeled azurin and cytochrome c551 were...

  5. Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Ramanathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100  MeV was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

  6. Submillimeter-Resolution Radiography of Shielded Structures with Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, Vidya [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Banerjee, Sudeep [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Powell, Nathan [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cummingham, N. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandler-Smith, Nate [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Zhao, Kun [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Brown, Kevin [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Umstadter, Donald [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Clarke, Shaun [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100 MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

  7. High resolution near-infrared electronic spectroscopy of HCBr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bor-Chen; Sears, Trevor J.

    1996-08-01

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of the HCBr à 1A″(0,2,0)←X˜ 1A'(0,0,0) Ka=0←1 transition between 12760 and 12850 cm-1 was obtained for the first time at Doppler-limited resolution using a transient frequency-modulation absorption technique. Rotational structure of HC 79Br and HC 81Br was identified and analyzed. The analysis shows R″(C-Br)=1.852 Å and R'(C-Br)=1.749 Å. The observed band indicates a linear-bent transition. This yields an upper limit of approximately 1600 cm-1 for the barrier to linearity above the zero-point energy for the à 1A″ state. Perturbations caused by singlet-triplet interactions were also found in the observed spectrum. The analysis of these perturbations indicates a very low-lying ã 3A″ state.

  8. Electron beam fabrication and characterization of high- resolution magnetic force microscopy tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhrig, M.; Rührig, M.; Porthun, S.; Porthun, S.; Lodder, J.C.; Mc vitie, S.; Heyderman, L.J.; Johnston, A.B.; Chapman, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    The stray field, magnetic microstructure, and switching behavior of high‐resolution electron beam fabricated thin film tips for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) are investigated with different imaging modes in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As the tiny smooth carbon needles covered with a

  9. A Simple Metric for Determining Resolution in Optical, Ion, and Electron Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alexandra E; Skinner, Ryan; Sanders, Aric W

    2015-06-01

    A resolution metric intended for resolution analysis of arbitrary spatially calibrated images is presented. By fitting a simple sigmoidal function to pixel intensities across slices of an image taken perpendicular to light-dark edges, the mean distance over which the light-dark transition occurs can be determined. A fixed multiple of this characteristic distance is then reported as the image resolution. The prefactor is determined by analysis of scanning transmission electron microscope high-angle annular dark field images of Si. This metric has been applied to optical, scanning electron microscope, and helium ion microscope images. This method provides quantitative feedback about image resolution, independent of the tool on which the data were collected. In addition, our analysis provides a nonarbitrary and self-consistent framework that any end user can utilize to evaluate the resolution of multiple microscopes from any vendor using the same metric.

  10. Electron-Beam Mapping of Vibrational Modes with Nanometer Spatial Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C; Aoki, T; Rez, P; Chang, S L Y; Lovejoy, T C; Krivanek, O L

    2016-12-16

    We demonstrate that a focused beam of high-energy electrons can be used to map the vibrational modes of a material with a spatial resolution of the order of one nanometer. Our demonstration is performed on boron nitride, a polar dielectric which gives rise to both localized and delocalized electron-vibrational scattering, either of which can be selected in our off-axial experimental geometry. Our experimental results are well supported by our calculations, and should reconcile current controversy regarding the spatial resolution achievable in vibrational mapping with focused electron beams.

  11. High resolution near-infrared electronic spectroscopy of HCBr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, B.; Sears, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of the HCBr {tilde {ital A}}{sup 1}{ital A}{double_prime}(0,2,0){l_arrow}{tilde {ital X}}{sup 1}{ital A}{prime}(0,0,0) {ital K}{sub {ital a}}=0{l_arrow}1 transition between 12760 and 12850 cm{sup {minus}1} was obtained for the first time at Doppler-limited resolution using a transient frequency-modulation absorption technique. Rotational structure of HC{sup 79}Br and HC{sup 81}Br was identified and analyzed. The analysis shows {ital R}{double_prime}(C{endash}Br)=1.85{sub 2} A and {ital R}{prime}(C{endash}Br)=1.74{sub 9} A. The observed band indicates a linear{endash}bent transition. This yields an upper limit of approximately 1600 cm{sup {minus}1} for the barrier to linearity above the zero-point energy for the {tilde {ital A}}{sup 1}{ital A}{double_prime} state. Perturbations caused by singlet{endash}triplet interactions were also found in the observed spectrum. The analysis of these perturbations indicates a very low-lying {tilde {ital a}}{sup 3}{ital A}{double_prime} state. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Refinement procedure for the image alignment in high-resolution electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houben, L., E-mail: l.houben@fz-juelich.de [Peter Gruenberg Institute and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bar Sadan, M. [Peter Gruenberg Institute and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    High-resolution electron tomography from a tilt series of transmission electron microscopy images requires an accurate image alignment procedure in order to maximise the resolution of the tomogram. This is the case in particular for ultra-high resolution where even very small misalignments between individual images can dramatically reduce the fidelity of the resultant reconstruction. A tomographic-reconstruction based and marker-free method is proposed, which uses an iterative optimisation of the tomogram resolution. The method utilises a search algorithm that maximises the contrast in tomogram sub-volumes. Unlike conventional cross-correlation analysis it provides the required correlation over a large tilt angle separation and guarantees a consistent alignment of images for the full range of object tilt angles. An assessment based on experimental reconstructions shows that the marker-free procedure is competitive to the reference of marker-based procedures at lower resolution and yields sub-pixel accuracy even for simulated high-resolution data. -- Highlights: {yields} Alignment procedure for electron tomography based on iterative tomogram contrast optimisation. {yields} Marker-free, independent of object, little user interaction. {yields} Accuracy competitive with fiducial marker methods and suited for high-resolution tomography.

  13. Atomic Imaging Using Secondary Electrons in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope: Experimental Observations and Possible Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, D.; Inada, H.; Egerton, R.F.; Konno, M.; Wua, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-11-11

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondaryelectrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmissionelectron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. Apossiblemechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  14. Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams

    OpenAIRE

    Vidya Ramanathan; Sudeep Banerjee; Nathan Powers; Nathaniel Cunningham; Nathan A. Chandler-Smith; Kun Zhao; Kevin Brown; Donald Umstadter; Shaun Clarke; Sara Pozzi; James Beene; Vane, C R; David Schultz

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100  MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense ma...

  15. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  16. Towards correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Georg; Hagen, Christoph; Gr?newald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has become a powerful tool in life sciences. Particularly cryo-CLEM, the combination of fluorescence cryo-microscopy (cryo-FM) permitting for non-invasive specific multi-colour labelling, with electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) providing the undisturbed structural context at a resolution down to the ?ngstrom range, has enabled a broad range of new biological applications. Imaging rare structures or events in crowded environments, such as inside...

  17. Split ring resonator based THz-driven electron streak camera featuring femtosecond resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiańska, Justyna; Kassier, Günther; Feurer, Thomas

    2014-07-10

    Through combined three-dimensional electromagnetic and particle tracking simulations we demonstrate a THz driven electron streak camera featuring a temporal resolution on the order of a femtosecond. The ultrafast streaking field is generated in a resonant THz sub-wavelength antenna which is illuminated by an intense single-cycle THz pulse. Since electron bunches and THz pulses are generated with parts of the same laser system, synchronization between the two is inherently guaranteed.

  18. Longitudinal profile diagnostic scheme with subfemtosecond resolution for high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Andonian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution measurement of the longitudinal profile of a relativistic electron beam is of utmost importance for linac based free-electron lasers and other advanced accelerator facilities that employ ultrashort bunches. In this paper, we investigate a novel scheme to measure ultrashort bunches (subpicosecond with exceptional temporal resolution (hundreds of attoseconds and dynamic range. The scheme employs two orthogonally oriented deflecting sections. The first imparts a short-wavelength (fast temporal resolution horizontal angular modulation on the beam, while the second imparts a long-wavelength (slow angular kick in the vertical dimension. Both modulations are observable on a standard downstream screen in the form of a streaked sinusoidal beam structure. We demonstrate, using scaled variables in a quasi-1D approximation, an expression for the temporal resolution of the scheme and apply it to a proof-of-concept experiment at the UCLA Neptune high-brightness injector facility. The scheme is also investigated for application at the SLAC NLCTA facility, where we show that the subfemtosecond resolution is sufficient to resolve the temporal structure of the beam used in the echo-enabled free-electron laser. We employ beam simulations to verify the effect for typical Neptune and NLCTA parameter sets and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

  19. Factors Associated with Young People's Successful Resolution of Distressing Electronic Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenaughty, John; Harre, Niki

    2013-01-01

    Electronic harassment is a pervasive phenomenon among young people, however relatively little is known about actions that targets of harassment may undertake to manage such abuse, and whether particular actions and personal characteristics are associated with successful resolution of such harassment. This mixed methods research identified whether…

  20. Rapid increase of near atomic resolution virus capsid structures determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phuong T; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-10-27

    The recent technological advances in electron microscopes, detectors, as well as image processing and reconstruction software have brought single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) into prominence for determining structures of bio-molecules at near atomic resolution. This has been particularly true for virus capsids, ribosomes, and other large assemblies, which have been the ideal specimens for structural studies by cryo-EM approaches. An analysis of time series metadata of virus structures on the methods of structure determination, resolution of the structures, and size of the virus particles revealed a rapid increase in the virus structures determined by cryo-EM at near atomic resolution since 2010. In addition, the data highlight the median resolution (∼3.0 Å) and size (∼310.0 Å in diameter) of the virus particles determined by X-ray crystallography while no such limits exist for cryo-EM structures, which have a median diameter of 508 Å. Notably, cryo-EM virus structures in the last four years have a median resolution of 3.9 Å. Taken together with minimal sample requirements, not needing diffraction quality crystals, and being able to achieve similar resolutions of the crystal structures makes cryo-EM the method of choice for current and future virus capsid structure determinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  2. Lateral resolution in focused electron beam-induced deposition: scaling laws for pulsed and static exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkudlarek, Aleksandra [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Szmyt, Wojciech; Kapusta, Czeslaw [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Utke, Ivo [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we review the single-adsorbate time-dependent continuum model for focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID). The differential equation for the adsorption rate will be expressed by dimensionless parameters describing the contributions of adsorption, desorption, dissociation, and the surface diffusion of the precursor adsorbates. The contributions are individually presented in order to elucidate their influence during variations in the electron beam exposure time. The findings are condensed into three new scaling laws for pulsed exposure FEBID (or FEB-induced etching) relating the lateral resolution of deposits or etch pits to surface diffusion and electron beam exposure dwell time for a given adsorbate depletion state. (orig.)

  3. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  4. High time resolution reconstruction of electron temperature profiles with a neural network in C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Player, Gabriel; Magee, Richard; Trask, Erik; Korepanov, Sergey; Clary, Ryan; Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2017-10-01

    One of the most important parameters governing fast ion dynamics in a plasma is the electron temperature, as the fast ion-electron collision rate goes as νei Te3 / 2 . Unfortunately, the electron temperature is difficult to directly measure-methods relying on high-powered laser pulses or fragile probes lead to limited time resolution or measurements restricted to the edge. In order to rectify the lack of time resolution on the Thomson scattering data in the core, a type of learning algorithm, specifically a neural network, was implemented. This network uses 3 hidden layers to correlate information from nearly 250 signals, including magnetics, interferometers, and several arrays of bolometers, with Thomson scattering data over the entire C-2U database, totalling nearly 20,000 samples. The network uses the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm with Bayesian regularization to learn from the large number of samples and inputs how to accurately reconstruct the entire electron temperature time history at a resolution of 500 kHz, a huge improvement over the 2 time points per shot provided by Thomson scattering. These results can be used in many different types of analysis and plasma characterization-in this work, we use the network to quantify electron heating.

  5. Topographic contrast of ultrathin cryo-sections for correlative super-resolution light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, José María; Guhl, Bruno; Doehner, Jana; Barmettler, Gery; Kaech, Andres; Ziegler, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy reveals molecular expression at nanometer resolution but lacks ultrastructural context information. This deficit often hinders a clear interpretation of results. Electron microscopy provides this contextual subcellular detail, but protein identification can often be problematic. Correlative light and electron microscopy produces complimentary information that expands our knowledge of protein expression in cells and tissue. Inherent methodological difficulties are however encountered when combining these two very different microscopy technologies. We present a quick, simple and reproducible method for protein localization by conventional and super-resolution light microscopy combined with platinum shadowing and scanning electron microscopy to obtain topographic contrast from the surface of ultrathin cryo-sections. We demonstrate protein distribution at nuclear pores and at mitochondrial and plasma membranes in the extended topographical landscape of tissue. PMID:27666401

  6. Analyzer of high-load electron beams with resolution in two energy components, space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Arkhipov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The new apparatus is developed for experimental determination of electron energy and spatial distributions in dense medium-energy long-pulsed magnetically confined beams – typically, 10 A/cm2, 60 keV, 100 µs, 0.1 T. To provide most detailed and unambiguous information, direct electrostatic cut-off method is used for electron energy analysis. In combination with variation of the magnetic field in the analysis area, this method allows to determine both (axial and transverse components of electron energy. Test experiments confirmed ∼1% energy resolution being predicted from calculations, accounting for electrode shapes, space-charge effects and non-adiabatic energy transfer effects in varied magnetic field. Space and time resolution of the apparatus are determined by the input aperture size (∼1 mm and cut-off electric field pulse-length (∼5–10 µs respectively.

  7. High-resolution characterization of multiferroic heterojunction using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhoushen; Ruan, Jieji; Xie, Lin; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wu, Di; Wang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Multiferroic tunnel junctions have been considered as potential candidates for nonvolatile memory devices. Understanding the atomic structure at the interface is crucial for optimizing the performances in such oxide electronics. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to measure the compositional profiles across the interfaces of different layers with atomic resolution. Two-dimensional elemental imaging with atomic resolution is demonstrated, and the influences of the interface sharpness, the terminal layer, and cation intermixing are investigated. An asymmetric sublattice intermixing at the Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 interface is observed, which can affect the local Mn valence and coupling. The reduction in the Mn valence at the interface is further studied using EELS near-edge fine structures.

  8. A design for a subminiature, low energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Greene, S.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a type of scanning electron microscope that works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field, and focused to a spot using a microscale Einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 μm, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size, and an atomic emission site will give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å). Also, because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100 nm in diameter, the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids), it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field emission and can be up to 1×106 times larger than in a typical (high energy) electron microscope. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam electron microscope with atomic resolution are described and include the possibility of it being used to rapidly sequence the human genome from a single strand of DNA as well as being able to identify atomic species directly from the elastic scattering of electrons.

  9. Near-atomic resolution using electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Settembre, Ethan; Xu, Chen; Dormitzer, Philip R; Bellamy, Richard; Harrison, Stephen C; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2008-02-12

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) yields images of macromolecular assemblies and their components, from which 3D structures can be determined, by using an image processing method commonly known as "single-particle reconstruction." During the past two decades, this technique has become an important tool for 3D structure determination, but it generally has not been possible to determine atomic models. In principle, individual molecular images contain high-resolution information contaminated by a much higher level of noise. In practice, it has been unclear whether current averaging methods are adequate to extract this information from the background. We present here a reconstruction, obtained by using recently developed image processing methods, of the rotavirus inner capsid particle ("double-layer particle" or DLP) at a resolution suitable for interpretation by an atomic model. The result establishes single-particle reconstruction as a high-resolution technique. We show by direct comparison that the cryo-EM reconstruction of viral protein 6 (VP6) of the rotavirus DLP is similar in clarity to a 3.8-A resolution map obtained from x-ray crystallography. At this resolution, most of the amino acid side chains produce recognizable density. The icosahedral symmetry of the particle was an important factor in achieving this resolution in the cryo-EM analysis, but as the size of recordable datasets increases, single-particle reconstruction also is likely to yield structures at comparable resolution from samples of much lower symmetry. This potential has broad implications for structural cell biology.

  10. Advances in Single-Particle Electron Cryomicroscopy Structure Determination applied to Sub-tomogram Averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Russo, Christopher J; Löwe, Jan; Passmore, Lori A; Scheres, Sjors H W

    2015-09-01

    Recent innovations in specimen preparation, data collection, and image processing have led to improved structure determination using single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Here we explore some of these advances to improve structures determined using electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) and sub-tomogram averaging. We implement a new three-dimensional model for the contrast transfer function, and use this in a regularized likelihood optimization algorithm as implemented in the RELION program. Using direct electron detector data, we apply both single-particle analysis and sub-tomogram averaging to analyze radiation-induced movements of the specimen. As in single-particle cryo-EM, we find that significant sample movements occur during tomographic data acquisition, and that these movements are substantially reduced through the use of ultrastable gold substrates. We obtain a sub-nanometer resolution structure of the hepatitis B capsid, and show that reducing radiation-induced specimen movement may be central to attempts at further improving tomogram quality and resolution. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, J., E-mail: ju.barthel@fz-juelich.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy (GFE), Aachen University (RWTH), Ahornstr. 55, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Thust, A., E-mail: a.thust@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state. - Highlights: • We investigate the temporal stability of optical aberrations in HRTEM. • We develop a statistical framework for the estimation of optical lifetimes. • We introduce plots showing the success probability for aberration-free work. • Optical lifetimes in sub-Ångström electron microscopy are surprisingly low. • The success of aberration correction depends strongly on the optical stability.

  12. High-resolution electron collision spectroscopy with multicharged ions in merged beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestinsky, M.

    2007-04-18

    The Heidelberg ion storage ring Tsr is currently the only ring equipped with two independent devices for the collinear merging of a cold electron beam with stored ions. This greatly improves the potential of electron-ion collision experiments, as the ion beam can be cooled with one electron beam, while the other one is used as a dedicated target for energy-resolved electron collision processes, such as recombination. The work describes the implementation of this system for rst electron collision spectroscopy experiments. A detection system has been realized including an ion detector and specroscopic beam-control software and instrumentation. Moreover, in order to improve the spectroscopic resolution systematical studies of intrinsic relaxation processes in the electron beam have been carried out. These include the dependence on the electron beam density, the magnetic guiding eld strength, and the acceleration geometry. The recombination measurements on low-lying resonances in lithiumlike Sc{sup 18+} yield a high-precision measurement of the 2s-2p{sub 3/2} transition energy in this system. Operation of the two-electron-beam setup at high collision energy ({approx}1000 eV) is established using resonances of hydrogenlike Mg{sup 11+}, while the unique possibility of modifying the beam-merging geometry con rms its importance for the electron-ion recombination rate at lowest relative energy, as demonstrated on F{sup 6+}. (orig.)

  13. YUP.SCX: coaxing atomic models into medium resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert K-Z; Devkota, Batsal; Harvey, Stephen C

    2008-08-01

    The structures of large macromolecular complexes in different functional states can be determined by cryo-electron microscopy, which yields electron density maps of low to intermediate resolutions. The maps can be combined with high-resolution atomic structures of components of the complex, to produce a model for the complex that is more accurate than the formal resolution of the map. To this end, methods have been developed to dock atomic models into density maps rigidly or flexibly, and to refine a docked model so as to optimize the fit of the atomic model into the map. We have developed a new refinement method called YUP.SCX. The electron density map is converted into a component of the potential energy function to which terms for stereochemical restraints and volume exclusion are added. The potential energy function is then minimized (using simulated annealing) to yield a stereochemically-restrained atomic structure that fits into the electron density map optimally. We used this procedure to construct an atomic model of the 70S ribosome in the pre-accommodation state. Although some atoms are displaced by as much as 33A, they divide themselves into nearly rigid fragments along natural boundaries with smooth transitions between the fragments.

  14. A Monochromatic, Aberration-Corrected, Dual-Beam Low Energy Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. PMID:23582636

  15. 4D electron microscopy: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-10-16

    achievable with short intense pulses containing a large number of electrons, however, are limited to tens of nanometers and nanoseconds, respectively. This is because Coulomb repulsion is significant in such a pulse, and the electrons spread in space and time, thus limiting the beam coherence. It is therefore not possible to image the ultrafast elementary dynamics of complex transformations. The challenge was to retain the high spatial resolution of a conventional TEM while simultaneously enabling the temporal resolution required to visualize atomic-scale motions. In this Account, we discuss the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) and summarize techniques and applications that illustrate the power of the approach. In UEM, images are obtained either stroboscopically with coherent single-electron packets or with a single electron bunch. Coulomb repulsion is absent under the single-electron condition, thus permitting imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy, all with high spatiotemporal resolution, the atomic scale (sub-nanometer and femtosecond). The time resolution is limited only by the laser pulse duration and energy carried by the electron packets; the CCD camera has no bearing on the temporal resolution. In the regime of single pulses of electrons, the temporal resolution of picoseconds can be attained when hundreds of electrons are in the bunch. The applications given here are selected to highlight phenomena of different length and time scales, from atomic motions during structural dynamics to phase transitions and nanomechanical oscillations. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging methods, which include scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM) with convergent beams, and time-resolved imaging of biological structures at ambient conditions with environmental cells.

  16. Electron attachment studies to musk ketone and high mass resolution anionic isobaric fragment detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauracher, A.; Sulzer, P.; Alizadeh, E.; Denifl, S.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Probst, M.; Märk, T. D.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Scheier, P.

    2008-11-01

    Gas phase electron attachment studies have been performed for musk ketone by means of a crossed electron-molecular beams experiment in an energy range from 0 to 15 eV with a resolution of ~70 meV. Additional measurements, utilizing a two-sector-field instrument, have been used to distinguish between possible isobaric products. Anion efficiency curves for 19 anions have been measured including a long-lived (metastable) non-dissociated parent anion which is formed at energies near 0 eV. Many of the dissociative electron attachment products observed at low energy arise from surprisingly complex reactions associated with multiple bond cleavages and structural and electronic rearrangement. The present results are compared with previous aromatic nitrocompounds studied in our laboratory recently. Particularly the close similarity of musk ketone and the explosive trinitrotoluene is of special interest.

  17. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  18. High-resolution Electronic and Chemical imaging of wonder nanomaterials beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Lorcy, Stephane; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-06-01

    Despite the great progress made recently in spectroscopic imagery and even the remarkable success achieved, the challenge still remain concerning the precise determination of the chemical and electronic imagery of advances materials, which usually are available as heterogeneous large crystals or tiny homogeneous monocrystals. Here we report, a recently developed novel X-ray microscope, labelled, k-microscope or Nano-ARPES (Nano Angle Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy) particularly well suited to provide both high resolved chemical and electronic information in the real and reciprocal space of complex materials with nano-scale resolution.

  19. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. PMID:26592474

  1. Towards correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Georg; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has become a powerful tool in life sciences. Particularly cryo-CLEM, the combination of fluorescence cryo-microscopy (cryo-FM) permitting for non-invasive specific multi-colour labelling, with electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) providing the undisturbed structural context at a resolution down to the Ångstrom range, has enabled a broad range of new biological applications. Imaging rare structures or events in crowded environments, such as inside a cell, requires specific fluorescence-based information for guiding cryo-EM data acquisition and/or to verify the identity of the structure of interest. Furthermore, cryo-CLEM can provide information about the arrangement of specific proteins in the wider structural context of their native nano-environment. However, a major obstacle of cryo-CLEM currently hindering many biological applications is the large resolution gap between cryo-FM (typically in the range of ∼400 nm) and cryo-EM (single nanometre to the Ångstrom range). Very recently, first proof of concept experiments demonstrated the feasibility of super-resolution cryo-FM imaging and the correlation with cryo-EM. This opened the door towards super-resolution cryo-CLEM, and thus towards direct correlation of structural details from both imaging modalities. © 2016 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Correlative Super-resolution and Electron Microscopy to Resolve Protein Localization in Zebrafish Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, José M; Barmettler, Gery; Doehner, Jana; Ojeda Naharros, Irene; Guhl, Bruno; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Kaech, Andres; Bachmann-Gagescu, Ruxandra; Ziegler, Urs

    2017-11-10

    We present a method to investigate the subcellular protein localization in the larval zebrafish retina by combining super-resolution light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The sub-diffraction limit resolution capabilities of super-resolution light microscopes allow improving the accuracy of the correlated data. Briefly, 110 nanometer thick cryo-sections are transferred to a silicon wafer and, after immunofluorescence staining, are imaged by super-resolution light microscopy. Subsequently, the sections are preserved in methylcellulose and platinum shadowed prior to imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The images from these two microscopy modalities are easily merged using tissue landmarks with open source software. Here we describe the adapted method for the larval zebrafish retina. However, this method is also applicable to other types of tissues and organisms. We demonstrate that the complementary information obtained by this correlation is able to resolve the expression of mitochondrial proteins in relation with the membranes and cristae of mitochondria as well as to other compartments of the cell.

  3. Diverse protocols for correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of chemically fixed samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G.; Paez-Segala, Maria G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Sochacki, Kem A.; Sun, Mei G.; Wang, Yalin; Xu, C. Shan; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Taraska, Justin W.; Looger, Loren L.; Hess, Harald F.

    2017-01-01

    Our groups have recently developed related approaches for sample preparation for super-resolution imaging within endogenous cellular environments using correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). Four distinct techniques for preparing and acquiring super-resolution CLEM datasets on aldehyde-fixed specimens are provided, including Tokuyasu cryosectioning, whole-cell mount, cell unroofing and platinum replication, and resin embedding and sectioning. Choice of the best protocol for a given application depends on a number of criteria that are discussed in detail. Tokuyasu cryosectioning is relatively rapid but is limited to small, delicate specimens. Whole-cell mount has the simplest sample preparation but is restricted to surface structures. Cell unroofing and platinum replica creates high-contrast, 3-dimensional images of the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, but is more challenging than whole-cell mount. Resin embedding permits serial sectioning of large samples, but is limited to osmium-resistant probes, and is technically difficult. Expected results from these protocols include super-resolution localization (~10–50 nm) of fluorescent targets within the context of electron microscopy ultrastructure, which can help address cell biological questions. These protocols can be completed in 2–7 days, are compatible with a number of super-resolution imaging protocols, and are broadly applicable across biology. PMID:28384138

  4. Double-resolution electron holography with simple Fourier transform of fringe-shifted holograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V.V., E-mail: volkov@bnl.gov; Han, M.G.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-11-15

    We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method with an appropriate image wave recovery algorithm leading to exact solution of holographic equations. With this new method the complex object image wave recovered from holograms appears to have much less traditional artifacts caused by the autocorrelation band present practically in all Fourier transformed holograms. The new analytical solutions make possible a double-resolution electron holography free from autocorrelation band artifacts and thus push the limits for phase resolution. The new image wave recovery algorithm uses a popular Fourier solution of the side band-pass filter technique, while the fringe-shifting holographic method is simple to implement in practice. - Highlights: • We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method simple enough for practical implementations. • Our new image-wave-recovery algorithm follows from exact solution of holographic equations. • With autocorrelation band removal from holograms it is possible to achieve double-resolution electron holography data free from several commonly known artifacts. • The new fringe-shifting method can reach an image wave resolution close to single fringe spacing.

  5. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2017-07-01

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy using conventional fluorescent proteins in vacuo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, Christopher J; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Snetkov, Xenia; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Way, Michael; Cox, Susan; Collinson, Lucy M

    2017-08-01

    Super-resolution light microscopy, correlative light and electron microscopy, and volume electron microscopy are revolutionising the way in which biological samples are examined and understood. Here, we combine these approaches to deliver super-accurate correlation of fluorescent proteins to cellular structures. We show that YFP and GFP have enhanced blinking properties when embedded in acrylic resin and imaged under partial vacuum, enabling in vacuo single molecule localisation microscopy. In conventional section-based correlative microscopy experiments, the specimen must be moved between imaging systems and/or further manipulated for optimal viewing. These steps can introduce undesirable alterations in the specimen, and complicate correlation between imaging modalities. We avoided these issues by using a scanning electron microscope with integrated optical microscope to acquire both localisation and electron microscopy images, which could then be precisely correlated. Collecting data from ultrathin sections also improved the axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the raw localisation microscopy data. Expanding data collection across an array of sections will allow 3-dimensional correlation over unprecedented volumes. The performance of this technique is demonstrated on vaccinia virus (with YFP) and diacylglycerol in cellular membranes (with GFP). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Cryo-electron microscopy and the amazing race to atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binshtein, Elad; Ohi, Melanie D

    2015-05-26

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), the structural analysis of samples embedded in vitreous ice, is a powerful approach for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological specimens. Over the past two decades, this technique has been used to successfully calculate subnanometer (electron microscopes with automated data collection capabilities and robust direct electron detection cameras, as well as new powerful image processing algorithms, has dramatically expanded the number of biological macromolecules amenable for study using cryo-EM. In addition, these new technological and computational developments have been used to successfully determine cryo-EM. With these exciting new advances, cryo-EM is now on pace to determine atomic resolution 3D structures.

  8. Ultraviolet-photoelectric effect for augmented contrast and resolution in electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Seniutinas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new tool providing material contrast control in scanning electron microscopy (SEM is demonstrated. The approach is based on deep-UV illumination during SEM imaging and delivers a novel material based contrast as well as higher resolution due to the photoelectric effect. Electrons liberated from illuminated sample surface contribute to the imaging which can be carried out at a faster acquisition rate, provide material selective contrast, reduce distortions caused by surface charging, and can substitute metal coating in SEM. These features provide high fidelity SEM imaging and are expected to significantly improve the performance of electron beam instruments as well as to open new opportunities for imaging and characterization of materials at the nanoscale.

  9. High resolution EUV spectroscopy of xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Safdar; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    We performed high resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy measurements of highly charged xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap. The spectra were recorded with a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer while varying the electron beam energy between 200 and 890 eV. We measured the wavelengths for several lines of Rh-like Xe9+ - Cd-like Xe6+ and Cu-like Xe25+- Se-like Xe20+ in the range of 150-200 Å with an uncertainty of 0.05 Å. Previously, most of these lines have been reported from EBITs with a wavelength uncertainty of 0.2 Å. Additionally, based on the electron beam energy dependence of the observed spectra we tentatively identified three new lines, which were reported as unidentified lines in the previous studies.

  10. Energy Linearity and Resolution of the ATLAS Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter in an Electron Test-Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aharrouche, M; Di Ciaccio, L; El-Kacimi, M; Gaumer, O; Gouanère, M; Goujdami, D; Lafaye, R; Laplace, S; Le Maner, C; Neukermans, L; Perrodo, P; Poggioli, L; Prieur, D; Przysiezniak, H; Sauvage, G; Tarrade, F; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Lanni, F; Ma, H; Rajagopalan, S; Rescia, S; Takai, H; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Hakimi, M; Hoummada, A; Barberio, E; Gao, Y S; Lü, L; Stroynowski, R; Aleksa, Martin; Beck-Hansen, J; Carli, T; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fassnacht, P; Follin, F; Gianotti, F; Hervás, L; Lampl, W; Collot, J; Hostachy, J Y; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Martin, P; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Saboumazrag, S; Leltchouk, M; Parsons, J A; Seman, M; Simion, S; Banfi, D; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Tartarelli, F; Bourdarios, C; Fayard, L; Fournier, D; Graziani, G; Hassani, S; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Kado, M; Lechowski, M; Lelas, M; Parrour, G; Puzo, P; Rousseau, D; Sacco, R; Serin, L; Unal, G; Zerwas, D; Camard, A; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Nikolic-Audit, I; Schwemling, P; Ghazlane, H; Cherkaoui-El-Moursli, R; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Boonekamp, M; Kerschen, N; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, P; Schwindling, J; Lund-Jensen, B; Tayalati, Y

    2006-01-01

    A module of the ATLAS electromagnetic barrel liquid argon calorimeter was exposed to the CERN electron test-beam at the H8 beam line upgraded for precision momentum measurement. The available energies of the electron beam ranged from 10 to 245 GeV. The electron beam impinged at one point corresponding to a pseudo-rapidity of eta=0.687 and an azimuthal angle of phi=0.28 in the ATLAS coordinate system. A detailed study of several effects biasing the electron energy measurement allowed an energy reconstruction procedure to be developed that ensures a good linearity and a good resolution. Use is made of detailed Monte Carlo simulations based on Geant which describe the longitudinal and transverse shower profiles as well as the energy distributions. For electron energies between 15 GeV and 180 GeV the deviation of the measured incident electron energy over the beam energy is within 0.1%. The systematic uncertainty of the measurement is about 0.1% at low energies and negligible at high energies. The energy resoluti...

  11. High-resolution electron microscope and computed images of human tooth enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brés, E F; Barry, J C; Hutchison, J L

    1985-03-01

    The structure of human enamel crystallites has been studied at a near atomic level by high-resolution electron microscopy. Electron micrographs have been obtained from crystallites present in human enamel with a structure resolution of 0.2 nm in the [0001], [1210], [1213], [1100] and [4510] zone axes directions. In most cases it was possible to match the experimental images with images calculated using the atomic positions of mineral hydroxyapatite. However, in some cases a discrepancy between calculated and experimental image detail was observed in the c direction of the [1210] and the [1100] images. This shows: (i) a structural heterogeneity of the crystals, and (ii) a loss of hexagonal symmetry of the structure. The resolution required to distinguish individual atomic sites in the different zones has been determined, and this will provide a useful basis for future work. As the determination of the "real structure" of biological crystals is of prime importance for the study of calcification mechanisms (crystal growth), biological properties and destructive phenomena of calcified tissues (i.e., dental caries and bone resorption).

  12. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  13. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high-resolution electron imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A; Craighead, Harold G

    2011-10-12

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high-resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step toward the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information.

  14. THE HIGH-RESOLUTION EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF N{sub 2} BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heays, A. N. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T., E-mail: heays@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N{sub 2} electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a {sup 1}Π {sub g} , b {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and b'{sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +} excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'{sub n} {sub +1} {sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +}, c{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and o{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  15. High Resolution Helium Ion Scanning Microscopy of the Rat Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L.; Van Hoek, Alfred N.; Păunescu, Teodor G.; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A.; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  16. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Păunescu, Teodor G; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  17. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L Rice

    Full Text Available Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details

  18. Electron Tomography: A Three-Dimensional Analytic Tool for Hard and Soft Materials Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercius, Peter; Alaidi, Osama; Rames, Matthew J; Ren, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis is essential to understand the relationship between the structure and function of an object. Many analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, neutron spectroscopy, and electron microscopy imaging, are used to provide structural information. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), one of the most popular analytic tools, has been widely used for structural analysis in both physical and biological sciences for many decades, in which 3D objects are projected into two-dimensional (2D) images. In many cases, 2D-projection images are insufficient to understand the relationship between the 3D structure and the function of nanoscale objects. Electron tomography (ET) is a technique that retrieves 3D structural information from a tilt series of 2D projections, and is gradually becoming a mature technology with sub-nanometer resolution. Distinct methods to overcome sample-based limitations have been separately developed in both physical and biological science, although they share some basic concepts of ET. This review discusses the common basis for 3D characterization, and specifies difficulties and solutions regarding both hard and soft materials research. It is hoped that novel solutions based on current state-of-the-art techniques for advanced applications in hybrid matter systems can be motivated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Live correlative light-electron microscopy to observe molecular dynamics in high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) is a powerful tool for observing specific molecular components in living cells, but its spatial resolution is relatively low. In contrast, electron microscopy (EM) provides high-resolution information about cellular structures, but it cannot provide temporal information in living cells. To achieve molecular selectivity in imaging at high resolution, a method combining EM imaging with live-cell fluorescence imaging, known as live correlative light-EM (CLEM), has been developed. In this method, living cells are first observed by FM, fixed in situ during the live observation and then subjected to EM observation. Various fluorescence techniques and tools can be applied for FM, resulting in the generation of various modified methods that are useful for understanding cellular structure in high resolution. Here, we review the methods of CLEM and live-cell imaging associated with CLEM (live CLEM). Such methods can greatly advance the understanding of the function of cellular structures on a molecular level, and thus are useful for medical fields as well as for basic biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J. Todd

    2017-03-01

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ˜95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-SDS-H2O. Higher aspect ratios (˜1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-PEG-H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  1. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J Todd

    2017-03-24

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-SDS-H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-PEG-H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  2. A novel programmable pulse generator with nanosecond resolution for pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasahayam, N; Subramanian, S; Krishna, M C

    2008-02-01

    A pulse programmer with nanosecond time resolution needed for time-domain electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic applications is described. This unit uses commercially available timing and input-output port modules and control software developed in our laboratory. The pulse programmer is operated through a personal computer front panel graphic user interface (GUI) inputs to control pulse widths, delays, and the associated acquisition trigger timings. Based on these parameters, all other associated gate and trigger timings are internally generated automatically without the need to enter them explicitly. The excitation pulse widths were of nanosecond resolution while all other gate pulses can be incremented in steps of 20 ns without compromising spectrometer performance. In the current configuration, the pulse programmer permits generation of a single pulse or multiple pulse sequences for EPR imaging with minimal data entry via the front panel GUI.

  3. High Resolution Beam Orbit Measurement Electronics based on Compensated Diode Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution beam position monitor (BPM) electronics based on diode peak detectors has been developed at CERN. The circuit processes the BPM electrode signals independently, converting the short beam pulses into slowly varying signals which can be digitized with high resolution ADCs operating in the kHz range or even measured with a DC voltmeter. For signals with peak amplitudes larger than some hundred mV the non-linear forward voltage of the diodes is compensated by a simple network using signals from two peak detectors, one with a single and the second with two diodes in series. This contribution presents results obtained with the first prototype in the laboratory and with the CERN-SPS beam. Ongoing development and possible future applications of the technique are also discussed.

  4. Double-resolution electron holography with simple Fourier transform of fringe-shifted holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, V V; Han, M G; Zhu, Y

    2013-11-01

    We propose a fringe-shifting holographic method with an appropriate image wave recovery algorithm leading to exact solution of holographic equations. With this new method the complex object image wave recovered from holograms appears to have much less traditional artifacts caused by the autocorrelation band present practically in all Fourier transformed holograms. The new analytical solutions make possible a double-resolution electron holography free from autocorrelation band artifacts and thus push the limits for phase resolution. The new image wave recovery algorithm uses a popular Fourier solution of the side band-pass filter technique, while the fringe-shifting holographic method is simple to implement in practice. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  6. RENNSH: a novel α-helix identification approach for intermediate resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingyu; Reisert, Marco; Burkhardt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein secondary structures is beneficial to understand three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. In this paper, a novel refined classification framework is proposed, which treats alpha-helix identification as a machine learning problem by representing each voxel in the density map with its Spherical Harmonic Descriptors (SHD). An energy function is defined to provide statistical analysis of its identification performance, which can be applied to all the α-helix identification approaches. Comparing with other existing α-helix identification methods for intermediate resolution electron density maps, the experimental results demonstrate that our approach gives the best identification accuracy and is more robust to the noise.

  7. Metadislocations in complex metallic alloys: A high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggen, Marc; Houben, Lothar; Feuerbacher, Michael [Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Metadislocations are highly complex defects which involve several hundreds of atoms in their core. We present a microstructural investigation on Metadislocations using aberration-corrected high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. A novel and highly complex deformation mechanism is found which is based on the movement of a metadislocation core mediating strain and separate escort defects. Upon deformation, the escort defects move along with the metadislocation core and locally transform the material structure. This mechanism implies the coordinated movement of hundreds of atoms per elementary step. Although the mechanism is very complex, it can be described by a simple jigsaw-puzzle-like rearrangement of basic structural subunits.

  8. A graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Haoxu; Zhou, Ruifeng; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Renxiao; Jiang, Kaili

    2011-09-23

    A novel grid for use in transmission electron microscopy is developed. The supporting film of the grid is composed of thin graphene oxide films overlying a super-aligned carbon nanotube network. The composite film combines the advantages of graphene oxide and carbon nanotube networks and has the following properties: it is ultra-thin, it has a large flat and smooth effective supporting area with a homogeneous amorphous appearance, high stability, and good conductivity. The graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid has a distinct advantage when characterizing the fine structure of a mass of nanomaterials over conventional amorphous carbon grids. Clear high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of various nanomaterials are obtained easily using the new grids.

  9. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of hexagonal and rhombohedral molybdenum disulfide crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, T; Nishio, K; Saijo, H; Shiojiri, M; Yabuuchi, Y; Takahashi, N

    1993-07-01

    Natural (molybdenite) and synthesized molybdenum disulfide crystals have been studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The image simulation demonstrates that the [0001] and [0110] HRTEM images of hexagonal and rhombohedral MoS2 crystals hardly disclose their stacking sequences, and that the [2110] images can distinguish the Mo and S columns along the incident electron beam and enable one to determine not only the crystal structure but also the fault structure. Observed [0001] images of cleaved molybdenite and synthesized MoS2 crystals, however, reveal the strain field around partial dislocations limiting an extended dislocation. A cross-sectional image of a single molecular (S-Mo-S) layer cleaved from molybdenite has been observed. Synthesized MoS2 flakes which were prepared by grinding have been found to be rhombohedral crystals containing many stacking faults caused by glides between S/S layers.

  10. Plasmonic Hot Electron Transport Driven Site-Specific Surface-Chemistry with Nanoscale Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Emiliano; Cambiasso, Javier; Jermyn, Adam S; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schlücker, Sebastian; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale localization of electromagnetic fields near metallic nanostructures underpins the fundamentals and applications of plasmonics. The unavoidable energy loss from plasmon decay, initially seen as a detriment, has now expanded the scope of plasmonic applications to exploit the generated hot carriers. However, quantitative understanding of the spatial localization of these hot carriers, akin to electromagnetic near-field maps, has been elusive. Here we spatially map hot-electron-driven reduction chemistry with 15 nanometre resolution as a function of time and electromagnetic field polarization for different plasmonic nanostructures. We combine experiments employing a six-electron photo-recycling process that modify the terminal group of a self-assembled monolayer on plasmonic silver nanoantennas, with theoretical predictions from first-principles calculations of non-equilibrium hot-carrier transport in these systems. The resulting localization of reactive regions, determined by hot carrier transport from...

  11. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@ua.ac.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Verbeeck, J. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Erni, R. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 72R0150, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bals, S. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Luysberg, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Helmholtz Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-09-15

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  12. Grand Canonical adaptive resolution simulation for molecules with electrons: A theoretical framework based on physical consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Site, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for the treatment of an open molecular system with electrons and nuclei is proposed. The idea is based on the Grand Canonical description of a quantum region embedded in a classical reservoir of molecules. Electronic properties of the quantum region are calculated at constant electronic chemical potential equal to that of the corresponding (large) bulk system treated at full quantum level. Instead, the exchange of molecules between the quantum region and the classical environment occurs at the chemical potential of the macroscopic thermodynamic conditions. The Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Scheme is proposed for the treatment of the classical environment; such an approach can treat the exchange of molecules according to first principles of statistical mechanics and thermodynamic. The overall scheme is build on the basis of physical consistency, with the corresponding definition of numerical criteria of control of the approximations implied by the coupling. Given the wide range of expertise required, this work has the intention of providing guiding principles for the construction of a well founded computational protocol for actual multiscale simulations from the electronic to the mesoscopic scale.

  13. High resolution surface scanning of Thick-GEM for single photo-electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, G.; Varga, D.

    2012-12-01

    An optical system for high resolution scanning of TGEM UV photon detection systems is introduced. The structure exploits the combination of a single Au-coated TGEM under study, and an asymmetric MWPC (Close Cathode Chamber) as post-amplification stage. A pulsed UV LED source with emission down to 240 nm has been focused to a spot of 0.07 mm on the TGEM surface, and single photo-electron charge spectra has been recorded over selected two dimensional regions. This way, the TGEM gain (order of 10-100) and TGEM photo-electron detection efficiency is clearly separated, unlike in case of continuous illumination. The surface structure connected to the TGEM photon detection is well observable, including inefficiencies in the holes and at the symmetry points between holes. The detection efficiency as well as the gas gain are fluctuating from hole to hole. The gain is constant in the hexagon around any hole, pointing to the fact that the gain depends on hole geometry, and less on the position where the electron enters. The detection probability map strongly changes with the field strength above the TGEM surface, in relation to the change of the actual surface field configuration. The results can be confronted with position-dependent simulations of TGEM electron transfer and gas multiplication.

  14. High resolution patterning for flexible electronics via roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabik, Sami; de Riet, Joris; Yakimets, Iryna; Smits, Edsger

    2014-03-01

    Flexible electronics is a growing field and is currently maturing in applications such as displays, smart packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. In order to process on flexible substrates at high throughput and large areas, novel patterning techniques will be essential. Conventional optical lithography is limited in throughput as well as resolution, and requires several alignment steps to generate multi-layered patterns, required for applications such as thin-film transistors. It therefore remains a complex and expensive process. Nanoimprint lithography is an emerging alternative to optical lithography, demonstrating patterning capabilities over a wide range of resolutions, from several microns down to a few nanometres. For display applications, nanoimprint lithography can be used to pattern various layers. Micron sized thin-film transistors for backplane can be fabricated where a self-aligned geometry is used to decrease the number of alignment steps, and increase the overlay accuracy. In addition, nano-structures can be used for optical applications such as anti-reflective surfaces and nano patterned transparent electrodes. Imprint lithography is a fully roll-to-roll compatible process and enables large area and high throughput fabrication for flexible electronics. In this paper we discuss the possibilities and the challenges of large area patterning by roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography, reviewing micron and nano sized structures realized on our roll-to-roll equipment. Nano patterned transparent electrodes, moth-eye antireflective coatings, and multilevel structures will be covered.

  15. Gold nanoparticle-protein arrays improve resolution for cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minghui; Qian, Luping; Briñas, Raymond P; Lymar, Elena S; Kuznetsova, Larisa; Hainfeld, James F

    2008-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy single particle analysis shows limited resolution due to poor alignment precision of noisy images taken under low electron exposure. Certain advantages can be obtained by assembling proteins into two-dimensional (2D) arrays since protein particles are locked into repetitive orientation, thus improving alignment precision. We present a labeling method to prepare protein 2D arrays using gold nanoparticles (NPs) interconnecting genetic tag sites on proteins. As an example, mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S proteasomes tagged with 6x-histidine were assembled into 2D arrays using 3.9-nm Au NPs functionalized with nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid. The averaged top-view images from the array particles showed higher resolution (by 6-8A) compared to analysis of single particles. The correct 7-fold symmetry was also evident by using array particles whereas it was not clear by analysis of a comparable number of single particles. The applicability of this labeling method for three-dimensional reconstruction of biological macromolecules is discussed.

  16. Cross-correlation based high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and electron channelling contrast imaging for strain mapping and dislocation distributions in InAlN thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G; Nouf-Allehiani, M.; Gamarra, P.; di Forte-Poisson, M. A.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development of cross-correlation based high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), in the scanning electron microscope (SEM), to quantitatively map the strain variation and lattice rotation and determine the density and identify dislocations in nitride semiconductor thin films. These techniques can provide quantitative, rapid, non-destructive analysis of the structural properties of materials with a spatial resol...

  17. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-04-03

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to {delta}E/E{approx}10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION {sup registered} ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to {delta}E/E < 1. The exceptional surface sensitivity and elemental selectivity of PAES was demonstrated in measurements of Pd and Fe, both coated with Cu layers of varying thickness. PAES showed that with 0.96 monolayer of Cu on Fe, more than 55% of the detected Auger electrons stem from Cu. In the case of the Cu coated Pd sample 0.96 monolayer of Cu resulted in a Cu Auger fraction of more than 30% with PAES and less than 5% with electron induced Auger spectroscopy

  18. HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY PINHOLE CAMERA FOR HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON BEAM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Morgan, J.; Lee, S.H.; Shang, H.

    2017-03-25

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is developing a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice based storage ring as the next major upgrade, featuring a 20-fold reduction in emittance. Combining the reduction of beta functions, the electron beam sizes at bend magnet sources may be reduced to reach 5 – 10 µm for 10% vertical coupling. The x-ray pinhole camera currently used for beam size monitoring will not be adequate for the new task. By increasing the operating photon energy to 120 – 200 keV, the pinhole camera’s resolution is expected to reach below 4 µm. The peak height of the pinhole image will be used to monitor relative changes of the beam sizes and enable the feedback control of the emittance. We present the simulation and the design of a beam size monitor for the APS storage ring.

  19. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...... Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.......We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent...

  20. High-resolution electron microscopy in spin pumping NiFe/Pt interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley Domínguez, D., E-mail: david.ley@cimav.edu.mx; Sáenz-Hernández, R. J.; Faudoa Arzate, A.; Arteaga Duran, A. I.; Ornelas Gutiérrez, C. E.; Solís Canto, O.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Rivera-Gómez, F. J.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Azevedo, A.; Silva, G. L. da; Rezende, S. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-05-07

    In order to understand the effect of the interface on the spin pumping and magnetic proximity effects, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to analyze Py/Pt bilayer and Pt/Py/Pt trilayer systems. The samples were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at room temperature on Si (001) substrates. The Py layer thickness was fixed at 12 nm in all the samples and the Pt thickness was varied in a range of 0–23 nm. A diffusion zone of approximately 8 nm was found in the Py/Pt interfaces and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The FMR measurements show an increase in the linewidth and a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field, which reach saturation.

  1. High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Jakobsen, S.; Schmidt, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in thin layers of the negative resist SU-8 is demonstrated. Sub-30 nm lines with a pitch down to 300 nm are written in 100 nm thick SU-8. Two reactive ion etch processes are developed in order to transfer the SU-8 structures into a silicon substrate......, a Soft O-2-Plasma process to remove SU-8 residues on the silicon surface after development and a highly anisotropic SF6/O-2/CHF3 based process to transfer the pattern into a silicon substrate, with selectivity between silicon and SU-8 of approximately 2. 30 nm lines patterned in SU-8 are successfully...

  2. High resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of a milled oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyer-Prost, M., E-mail: marie.loyer-prost@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Merot, J.-S. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures – UMR 104, CNRS/ONERA, BP72-29, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92 322, Châtillon (France); Ribis, J. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliquée, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Le Bouar, Y. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures – UMR 104, CNRS/ONERA, BP72-29, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92 322, Châtillon (France); Chaffron, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliquée, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Legendre, F. [DEN-Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Matériaux dans leur Environnement, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for generation IV fuel claddings as their dense nano-oxide dispersion provides good creep and irradiation resistance. Even if they have been studied for years, the formation mechanism of these nano-oxides is still unclear. Here we report for the first time a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of an ODS milled powder. It provides clear evidence of the presence of small crystalline nanoclusters (NCs) enriched in titanium directly after milling. Small NCs (<5 nm) have a crystalline structure and seem partly coherent with the matrix. They have an interplanar spacing close to the (011) {sub bcc} iron structure. They coexist with larger crystalline spherical precipitates of 15–20 nm in size. Their crystalline structure may be metastable as they are not consistent with any Y-Ti-O or Ti-O structure. Such detailed observations in the as-milled grain powder confirm a mechanism of Y, Ti, O dissolution in the ferritic matrix followed by a NC precipitation during the mechanical alloying process of ODS materials. - Highlights: • We observed an ODS ball-milled powder by high resolution transmission microscopy. • The ODS ball-milled powder exhibits a lamellar microstructure. • Small crystalline nanoclusters were detected in the milled ODS powder. • The nanoclusters in the ODS milled powder are enriched in titanium. • Larger NCs of 15–20 nm in size are, at least, partly coherent with the matrix.

  3. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B. -G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Biophysics

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  4. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  5. Understanding deformation with high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, T. B.; Hickey, J. L. R.

    2018-01-01

    High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) affords an increase in angular resolution, as compared to ‘conventional’ Hough transform based EBSD, of two orders of magnitude, enabling measurements of relative misorientations of 1 x 10‑4 rads (~ 0.006°) and changes in (deviatoric) lattice strain with a precision of 1 x 10‑4. This is achieved through direct comparison of two or more diffraction patterns using sophisticated cross-correlation based image analysis routines. Image shifts between zone axes in the two-correlated diffraction pattern are measured with sub-pixel precision and this realises the ability to measure changes in interplanar angles and lattice orientation with a high degree of sensitivity. These shifts are linked to strains and lattice rotations through simple geometry. In this manuscript, we outline the basis of the technique and two case studies that highlight its potential to tackle real materials science challenges, such as deformation patterning in polycrystalline alloys.

  6. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy on macromolecular complexes and cell organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenger, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy techniques and computational 3-D reconstruction of macromolecular assemblies are tightly linked tools in modern structural biology. This symbiosis has produced vast amounts of detailed information on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Typically, one of two fundamentally different strategies is used depending on the specimens and their environment. A: 3-D reconstruction based on repetitive and structurally identical unit cells that allow for averaging, and B: tomographic 3-D reconstructions where tilt-series between approximately ± 60 and ± 70° at small angular increments are collected from highly complex and flexible structures that are beyond averaging procedures, at least during the first round of 3-D reconstruction. Strategies of group A are averaging-based procedures and collect large number of 2-D projections at different angles that are computationally aligned, averaged together, and back-projected in 3-D space to reach a most complete 3-D dataset with high resolution, today often down to atomic detail. Evidently, success relies on structurally repetitive particles and an aligning procedure that unambiguously determines the angular relationship of all 2-D projections with respect to each other. The alignment procedure of small particles may rely on their packing into a regular array such as a 2-D crystal, an icosahedral (viral) particle, or a helical assembly. Critically important for cryo-methods, each particle will only be exposed once to the electron beam, making these procedures optimal for highest-resolution studies where beam-induced damage is a significant concern. In contrast, tomographic 3-D reconstruction procedures (group B) do not rely on averaging, but collect an entire dataset from the very same structure of interest. Data acquisition requires collecting a large series of tilted projections at angular increments of 1-2° or less and a tilt range of ± 60° or more. Accordingly, tomographic data

  7. Effects of accelerating voltage and specimen thickness on the spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction in Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Jhih-Wun; Kuo, Ka-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Jui-Chao, E-mail: jckuo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Tsung-Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A quantitative approach is proposed to measure spatial resolutions of t-EBSD. • Increasing accelerating voltage enhances the lateral and longitudinal resolutions. • Decreasing thickness improves the lateral and longitudinal resolutions. • The depth resolution is 34.4 nm for a 100 nm sample thickness at 25 kV. - Abstract: A quantitative approach was proposed to determine the spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) and to understand the limits of spatial resolution of t-EBSD. In this approach, Cu bicrystals and digital image correlation were employed. The effects of accelerating voltage and specimen thickness on the spatial resolution of t-EBSD were also investigated. t-EBSD specimens with 8 μm × 10 μm dimensions and different thicknesses were prepared using focused ion beam milling. The optimized quality of Kikuchi pattern was achieved at a working distance of 12 mm and a tilting angle of 20°. The optimum depth resolution of 34.4 nm was observed in the lower surface of a 100 nm thick sample at 25 kV. Thus, the penetration depth from the upper surface is 65.6 nm. The optimum lateral and longitudinal resolutions obtained from a 100 nm thick sample at 30 kV are 25.2 and 43.4 nm, respectively. The spatial resolution of t-EBSD can be enhanced by increasing the accelerating voltage and decreasing the sample thickness.

  8. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy for discrimination of nano-scale elements with nm-order spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Negishi, Tsutomu; Kudo, Masato; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Discrimination of thin film elements by backscattered electron (BSE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscope was examined. Incident electron acceleration voltage dependence on thin films' BSE intensities in five elements (Au, Ag, Ge, Cu and Fe) on a silicon substrate was experimentally measured from 3 to 30 kV. Normalization of BSE intensities using the difference between maximum and minimum brightness was proposed and allowed reproducible comparison among the elements. Measured intensities, which have correlation with electron backscattering coefficient against atomic number, indicated the existence of adequate acceleration voltage for improvement of resolution to discriminate different elements, showing the possibility of discriminating at least these six elements simultaneously by BSE imaging with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

  10. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Houben, L. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Mayer, J. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges for a specimen of SrTiO{sub 3} oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. - Highlights: • Achromatic atomic-resolution EFTEM images were obtained for STO 〈110〉. • Simulations were in qualitative agreement with Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edge maps. • The experimental EFTEM maps are not directly interpretable as elemental maps. • Image intensities are strongly determined by preservation of elastic contrast. • Interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.

  11. 'Big Bang' tomography as a new route to atomic-resolution electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Dirk; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2012-06-13

    Until now it has not been possible to image at atomic resolution using classical electron tomographic methods, except when the target is a perfectly crystalline nano-object imaged along a few zone axes. The main reasons are that mechanical tilting in an electron microscope with sub-ångström precision over a very large angular range is difficult, that many real-life objects such as dielectric layers in microelectronic devices impose geometrical constraints and that many radiation-sensitive objects such as proteins limit the total electron dose. Hence, there is a need for a new tomographic scheme that is able to deduce three-dimensional information from only one or a few projections. Here we present an electron tomographic method that can be used to determine, from only one viewing direction and with sub-ångström precision, both the position of individual atoms in the plane of observation and their vertical position. The concept is based on the fact that an experimentally reconstructed exit wave consists of the superposition of the spherical waves that have been scattered by the individual atoms of the object. Furthermore, the phase of a Fourier component of a spherical wave increases with the distance of propagation at a known 'phase speed'. If we assume that an atom is a point-like object, the relationship between the phase and the phase speed of each Fourier component is linear, and the distance between the atom and the plane of observation can therefore be determined by linear fitting. This picture has similarities with Big Bang cosmology, in which the Universe expands from a point-like origin such that the distance of any galaxy from the origin is linearly proportional to the speed at which it moves away from the origin (Hubble expansion). The proof of concept of the method has been demonstrated experimentally for graphene with a two-layer structure and it will work optimally for similar layered materials, such as boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide.

  12. On the role of the gas environment, electron-dose-rate, and sample on the image resolution in transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Martin; Jespersen, Sebastian Pirel Fredsgaard; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of gaseous atmospheres in transmission electron microscopy offers the possibility of studying materials in situ under chemically relevant environments. The presence of a gas environment can degrade the resolution. Surprisingly, this phenomenon has been shown to depend on the elec...

  13. On the harmonic technique to measure electron temperature with high time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedo, J. A.; Gray, D.; Conn, R. W.; Luong, P.; Schaffer, M.; Ivanov, R. S.; Chernilevsky, A. V.; Van Oost, G.

    1999-07-01

    A detailed study of the harmonic technique, which exploits the generation of harmonics resulting from excitation of the nonlinearity of the single Langmuir probe characteristic, is presented. The technique is used to measure electron temperature and its fluctuations in tokamak plasmas and the technical issues relevant to extending the technique to high bandwidth (200 kHz) are discussed. The technique has been implemented in a fast reciprocating probe in the TEXTOR tokamak, gaining the ability to study denser and hotter plasmas than previously possible. A corrected analytical expression is derived for the harmonic currents. Measurement of the probe current by inductive pickup is introduced to improve electrical isolation and bandwidth. The temperature profiles in the boundary plasma of TEXTOR have been measured with high spatial (˜2 mm) and temporal (200 kHz) resolution and compared to those obtained with a double probe. The exact expansion of the probe characteristic in terms of Bessel functions is compared to a computationally efficient power series. Various aspects of the interpretation of the measurement are discussed such as the influence of plasma potential and density fluctuations. The technique is well suited to study fast phenomena such as transient plasma discharges or turbulence and turbulent transport in plasmas.

  14. Implementation of a cryo-electron tomography tilt-scheme optimized for high resolution subtomogram averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Briggs, John A G

    2017-02-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D structural information to be obtained from cells and other biological samples in their close-to-native state. In combination with subtomogram averaging, detailed structures of repeating features can be resolved. CryoET data is collected as a series of images of the sample from different tilt angles; this is performed by physically rotating the sample in the microscope between each image. The angles at which the images are collected, and the order in which they are collected, together are called the tilt-scheme. Here we describe a "dose-symmetric tilt-scheme" that begins at low tilt and then alternates between increasingly positive and negative tilts. This tilt-scheme maximizes the amount of high-resolution information maintained in the tomogram for subsequent subtomogram averaging, and may also be advantageous for other applications. We describe implementation of the tilt-scheme in combination with further data-collection refinements including setting thresholds on acceptable drift and improving focus accuracy. Requirements for microscope set-up are introduced, and a macro is provided which automates the application of the tilt-scheme within SerialEM. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron cryomicroscopy structure of N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor at 11 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Johannes; Sutton, R.Bryan; Chen, James; Brunger, Axel T.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2003-01-01

    N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor (NSF) belongs to the AAA family of ATPases and is involved in a number of cellular functions, including vesicle fusion and trafficking of membrane proteins. We present the three-dimensional structure of the hydrolysis mutant E329Q of NSF complexed with an ATP–ADP mixture at 11 Å resolution by electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle averaging of NSF·α-SNAP·SNARE complexes. The NSF domains D1 and D2 form hexameric rings that are arranged in a double-layered barrel. Our structure is more consistent with an antiparallel orientation of the two rings rather than a parallel one. The crystal structure of the D2 domain of NSF was docked into the EM density map and shows good agreement, including details at the secondary structural level. Six protrusions corresponding to the N domain of NSF (NSF-N) emerge from the sides of the D1 domain ring. The density corresponding to α-SNAP and SNAREs is located on the 6-fold axis of the structure, near the NSF-N domains. The density of the N domain is weak, suggesting conformational variability in this part of NSF. PMID:12941689

  16. Subnanometre-resolution electron cryomicroscopy structure of a heterodimeric ABC exporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JungMin; Wu, Shenping; Tomasiak, Thomas M; Mergel, Claudia; Winter, Michael B; Stiller, Sebastian B; Robles-Colmanares, Yaneth; Stroud, Robert M; Tampé, Robert; Craik, Charles S; Cheng, Yifan

    2015-01-15

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters translocate substrates across cell membranes, using energy harnessed from ATP binding and hydrolysis at their nucleotide-binding domains. ABC exporters are present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, with examples implicated in multidrug resistance of pathogens and cancer cells, as well as in many human diseases. TmrAB is a heterodimeric ABC exporter from the thermophilic Gram-negative eubacterium Thermus thermophilus; it is homologous to various multidrug transporters and contains one degenerate site with a non-catalytic residue next to the Walker B motif. Here we report a subnanometre-resolution structure of detergent-solubilized TmrAB in a nucleotide-free, inward-facing conformation by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. The reconstructions clearly resolve characteristic features of ABC transporters, including helices in the transmembrane domain and nucleotide-binding domains. A cavity in the transmembrane domain is accessible laterally from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane as well as from the cytoplasm, indicating that the transporter lies in an inward-facing open conformation. The two nucleotide-binding domains remain in contact via their carboxy-terminal helices. Furthermore, comparison between our structure and the crystal structures of other ABC transporters suggests a possible trajectory of conformational changes that involves a sliding and rotating motion between the two nucleotide-binding domains during the transition from the inward-facing to outward-facing conformations.

  17. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B D; Houben, L; Mayer, J; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Allen, L J

    2014-12-01

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti-L2,3 and O-K edges for a specimen of SrTiO3 oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti-L2,3 and O-K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High-resolution x-ray scattering studies of charge ordering in highly correlated electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ghazi, M E

    2002-01-01

    addition, another very weak satellites with wavevector (1/2, 1, 1/2) were observed possibly due to spin ordering. two-dimensional in nature both by measurements of their correlation lengths and by measurement of the critical exponents of the charge stripe melting transition with an anomaly at x = 0.25. The results show by decreasing the hole concentration from the x = 0.33 to 0.2, the well-correlated charge stripes change to a glassy state at x = 0.25. The electronic transition into the charge stripe phase is second-order without any corresponding structural transition. Above the second-order transition critical scattering was observed due to fluctuations into the charge stripe phase. In a single-crystal of Nd sub 1 sub / sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub / sub 2 MnO sub 3 a series of phase transitions were observed using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering. Above the charge ordering transition temperature, T sub C sub O , by measuring the peak profiles of Bragg reflections as a function of temperature, it was foun...

  19. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure of a Plant Geminivirus Determined by Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Grimm, Clemens; Jeske, Holger; Böttcher, Bettina

    2017-08-01

    African cassava mosaic virus is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus which forms unique twin particles of incomplete icosahedra that are joined at five-fold vertices, building an unusual waist. How its 22 capsomers interact within a half-capsid or across the waist is unknown thus far. Using electron cryo-microscopy and image processing, we determined the virion structure with a resolution of 4.2 Å and built an atomic model for its capsid protein. The inter-capsomer contacts mediated by the flexible N termini and loop regions differed within the half-capsids and at the waist, explaining partly the unusual twin structure. The tip of the pentameric capsomer is sealed by a plug formed by a turn region harboring the evolutionary conserved residue Y193. Basic amino acid residues inside the capsid form a positively charged pocket next to the five-fold axis of the capsomer suitable for binding DNA. Within this pocket, density most likely corresponding to DNA was resolved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On Resolution-of-the-Identity Electron Repulsion Integral Approximations and Variational Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Lukas N; Reine, Simen S; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo

    2017-10-10

    The definiteness of the Mulliken and Dirac electron repulsion integral (ERI) matrices is examined for different classes of resolution-of-the-identity (RI) ERI approximations with particular focus on local fitting techniques. For global RI, robust local RI, and nonrobust local RI we discuss the definiteness of the approximated ERI matrices as well as the resulting bounds of Hartree, exchange, and total energies. Lower bounds of Hartree and exchange energy contributions are crucial as their absence may lead to variational instabilities, causing severe convergence problems or even convergence to a spurious state in self-consistent-field optimizations. While the global RI approximation guarantees lower bounds of Hartree and exchange energies, local RI approximations are generally unbounded. The robust local RI approximation guarantees a lower bound of the exchange energy but not of the Hartree energy. The nonrobust local RI approximation guarantees a lower bound of the Hartree energy but not of the exchange energy. These issues are demonstrated by sample calculations on carbon dioxide and benzene using the pair atomic RI approximation.

  1. High resolution electron microscopy investigations of interface and other structure defects in some ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, S; Liu, Q

    1998-02-01

    Interface, grain boundary, and other structure defects are the most important structural factors to affect the properties of ceramics materials. The present paper shows the relationship between the properties and those structure features such as grain boundaries, phase boundaries, interfaces, twins, intergrowths, dislocations, point defect aggregates, order-disorder, and other structure defects in different kinds of ceramics materials. At present this research covers: C60, sialon-based ceramics (alpha-sialon/SiC(w) composite, Y-alpha-sialon/beta-sialon composite), high Tc superconductors (YBa2Cu3O7, YBa2Cu4O8, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8, Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10), and bioceramics (hydroxyapatite, chlorapatite) and so on. The structure features mentioned above were characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy; so the structure details are at an atomic level and the related physical, chemical, engineering, even biological phenomena can be understood at an atomic and molecular level.

  2. Fe valence determination and Li elemental distribution in lithiated FeO₀.₇F₁.₃/C nanocomposite battery materials by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosandey, F; Su, D; Sina, M; Pereira, N; Amatucci, G G

    2012-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a powerful technique for studying Li-ion battery materials because the valence state of the transition metal in the electrode and charge transfer during lithiation and delithiation processes can be analyzed by measuring the relative intensity of the transition metal L₃ and L₂ lines. In addition, the Li distribution in the electrode material can be mapped with nanometer scale resolution. Results obtained for FeO₀.₇F₁.₃/C nanocomposite positive electrodes are presented. The Fe average valence state as a function of lithiation (discharge) has been measured by EELS and results are compared with average Fe valence obtained from electrochemical data. For the FeO₀.₇F₁.₃/C electrode discharged to 1.5 V, phase decomposition is observed and valence mapping with sub-nanometer resolution was obtained by STEM/EELS analysis. For the lowest discharge voltage of 0.8 V, a surface electrolyte inter-phase (SEI) layer is observed and STEM/EELS results are compared with the Li-K edges obtained for various Li standard compounds (LiF, Li₂CO₃ and Li₂O). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R; Murshudov, Garib N; Short, Judith M; Scheres, Sjors H W; Henderson, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  4. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  5. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS

  6. The Role of Gas in Determining Image Quality and Resolution During In Situ Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Browning, Nigel D. [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-08-02

    As gas-solid heterogeneous catalytic reactions are molecular in nature, a full mechanistic understanding of the process requires atomic scale characterization under realistic operating conditions. While atomic resolution imaging has become a routine in modern high-vacuum (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM), both image quality and resolution nominally degrade when reaction gases are introduced. In this work, we systematically assess the effects of different gases at various pressures on the quality and resolution of images obtained at room temperature in the annular dark field STEM imaging mode using a differentially pumped (DP) gas cell. This imaging mode is largely free from inelastic scattering effects induced by the presence of gases and retains good imaging properties over a wide range of gas mass/pressures. We demonstrate the application of the ESTEM with atomic resolution images of a complex oxide alkane oxidation catalyst MoVNbTeOx (M1) immersed in light and heavy gas environments.

  7. Combination of high spatial resolution and low minimum detection limit using thinned specimens in cutting-edge electron probe microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Yugo, E-mail: kubo-yugo@sei.co.jp; Hamada, Kotaro

    2015-10-15

    The effect of sample thickness on the spatial resolution and minimum detection limit (MDL) has been investigated for field-emission electron probe microanalysis with wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-EPMA–WDX). Indium gallium phosphide samples thinned to thicknesses of about 100, 130, 210, 310, and 430 nm provided effective thin-sample FE-EPMA–WDX in the resolution range of 40–350 nm and MDL range of 13,000–600 ppm (mass). A comparison of the FE-EPMA results for thin and bulk samples demonstrated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can achieve both higher sensitivity and better spatial resolution than is possible using bulk samples. Most of the X-rays that determine the MDL are generated in a surface region of the sample with a depth of approximately 300 nm. The spatial resolution and MDL can be tuned by the sample thickness. Furthermore, analysis of small amounts of Cl in SiO{sub 2} indicated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can realize a spatial resolution and MDL of 41 nm and 446 ppm at I{sub prob}=50 nA, respectively, whereas bulk-sample FE-EPMA offers a resolution of only 348 nm and MDL of 426 ppm. - Highlights: • Mechanism for FE-EPMA combining high spatial resolution with a low detection limit. • Spatial resolution and minimum detection limit controllable by sample thickness. • Achievement of a combined resolution and detection limit of 41 nm and 446 ppm. • Spatial resolution and detection limit for FE-EPMA–WDX and FE-SEM–EDX.

  8. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard, E-mail: rh15@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

    2013-12-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  9. Improvement on the visualization of cytoskeletal structures of protozoan parasites using high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Celso; Campanati, Loraine; Gadelha, Catarina; Lourenço, Daniela; Labati-Terra, Letícia; Bittencourt-Silvestre, Joana; Benchimol, Marlene; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa Leal; De Souza, Wanderley

    2005-07-01

    The association of high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), with a more efficient system of secondary electron (SE) collection and in-lens specimen position, provided a great improvement in the specimen's topographical contrast and in the generation of high-resolution images. In addition, images obtained with the use of the high-resolution backscattered electrons (BSE) detector provided a powerful tool for immunocytochemical analysis of biological material. In this work, we show the contribution of the FESEM to the detailed description of cytoskeletal structures of the protozoan parasites Herpetomonas megaseliae, Trypanosoma brucei and Giardia lamblia. High-resolution images of detergent extracted H. megaseliae and T. brucei showed the profile of the cortical microtubules, also known as sub-pellicular microtubules (SPMT), and protein bridges cross-linking them. Also, it was possible to visualize fine details of the filaments that form the lattice-like structure of the paraflagellar rod (PFR) and its connection with the axoneme. In G. lamblia, it was possible to observe the intricate structure of the adhesive disk, funis (a microtubular array) and other cytoskeletal structures poorly described previously. Since most of the stable cytoskeletal structures of this protozoan rely on tubulin, we used the BSE images to accurately map immunolabeled tubulin in its cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that the observation of detergent extracted parasites using FESEM associated to backscattered analysis of immunolabeled specimens represents a new approach for the study of parasite cytoskeletal elements and their protein associations.

  10. High-resolution etching of MoSi using electron beam patterned chemically amplified resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Mark; Komarov, Serguei; Baik, Ki-Ho

    2003-08-01

    High resolution etching of MoSi for photomask processing places new requirements on etching processes. As resist features are sized to 100 nm and below, it is first necessary to duplicate these features first into a chrome over-layer. After resist is stripped, this chrome over-layer is used for etching MoSi. Both chrome and MoSi etched profiles require near-vertical sidewalls, good CD (critical dimension) uniformity, good linearity, and CD mean-to-target (MTT). Additional requirements of etched MoSi include minimal roughness on exposed quartz, selectivity to chrome and quartz, phase angle target and phase angle uniformity, etch depth global uniformity, and etch depth uniformity as a function of feature size. An ETEC integrated process is used for the application of resist, patterning, and all subsequent processing. Chemically amplified resist is patterned with the 50 kV MEBES Quadra or MEBES eXara raster scan electron beam writer, allowing for patterning of small features with vertical resist profiles. Plates are etched in a Tetra photomask etch system for projecting resist images into chrome and MoSi. Etch processes have been developed specifically for etching small features in order to meet the requirements of 65 nm node lithography. An optimized etch process window is capable of patterning MoSi features below 100 nm sizes with near-vertical sidewall, 1 um. Excellent CD uniformity and CD etch loading performance are demonstrated. Micro-profilometry is employed to measure the MoSi etch depths of features of varying sizes, and to quantify the effect of loading on MoSi etch depth. SEM micrographs illustrate sidewall profiles resulting from small feature etching.

  11. The electronic structure of the primary electron donor of reaction centers of purple bacteria at atomic resolution as observed by photo-CIDNP 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviso, Eugenio; Prakash, Shipra; Alia, A; Gast, Peter; Neugebauer, Johannes; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg

    2009-12-29

    Composed of the two bacteriochlorophyll cofactors, P(L) and P(M), the special pair functions as the primary electron donor in bacterial reaction centers of purple bacteria of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Under light absorption, an electron is transferred to a bacteriopheophytin and a radical pair is produced. The occurrence of the radical pair is linked to the production of enhanced nuclear polarization called photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP). This effect can be used to study the electronic structure of the special pair at atomic resolution by detection of the strongly enhanced nuclear polarization with laser-flash photo-CIDNP magic-angle spinning NMR on the carotenoid-less mutant R26. In the electronic ground state, P(L) is strongly disturbed, carrying a slightly negative charge. In the radical cation state, the ratio of total electron spin densities between P(L) and P(M) is 2:1, although it is 2.5:1 for the pyrrole carbons, 2.2:1 for all porphyrinic carbons, and 4:1 for the pyrrole nitrogen. It is shown that the symmetry break between the electronic structures in the electronic ground state and in the radical cation state is an intrinsic property of the special pair supermolecule, which is particularly attributable to a modification of the structure of P(L). The significant difference in electron density distribution between the ground and radical cation states is explained by an electric polarization effect of the nearby histidine.

  12. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  13. Mask-assisted electron radiation grafting for localized through-volume modification of porous substrates: influence of electron energy on spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forner-Cuenca, A.; Manzi-Orezzoli, V.; Kristiansen, P. M.; Gubler, L.; Schmidt, T. J.; Boillat, P.

    2017-06-01

    The spatial resolution aspects of the local modification of porous materials by electron induced graft-polymerization were studied by a combination of experiments and numerical simulations. Using blocking masks, only selected regions of the material were exposed to radiation and subsequently grafted. The main focus of this study is the application to gas diffusion layers, a carbonaceous 200 μm thick porous substrate widely used in fuel cells, with the goal of improving water management by locally tuning the wettability. The comparison of experiments performed with different electron energies and corresponding simulations shows good agreement, identifying the energy threshold necessary to graft through the material to be approximately 150 keV. The impact of electron energy on spatial resolution was studied, showing that the blurring effects due to electron scattering reach a maximum at around 200 keV and are reduced at higher electron energies. Finally, the numerical simulations were used to define the conditions necessary to selectively graft only parts of bi-layer fuel cell materials.

  14. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R; Armstrong, Linda S; Ponce, Arturo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2), TiO(2) and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO(2) and TiO(2), whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution.

  15. Visualization of the cytostome in Trypanosoma cruzi by high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy using secondary and backscattered electron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatarunakamura, Celso; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2005-01-15

    High resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the surface of epimastigote, amastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Significant differences were observed between these forms and in different areas of the same cell. The cytostome found in amastigote and epimastigote forms could be easily visualized in images, which resemble those obtained only using the freeze-fracture technique. In contrast to other areas of the cell surface, the region of the cytostome, localized close to the flagellar pocket, showed a rugous surface and an opening with a diameter of 90 nm. Gold-labeled concanavalin A binds to the whole cell surface. However, the extent of binding was much higher in the region of the cytostome. The results obtained show that high resolution scanning electron microscopy is a powerful technique for analyzing the surface of protozoa.

  16. Deceleration of probe beam by stage bias potential improves resolution of serial block-face scanning electron microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, James C; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Astakhov, Vadim; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Peltier, Steven T; Ellisman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is quickly becoming an important imaging tool to explore three-dimensional biological structure across spatial scales. At probe-beam-electron energies of 2.0 keV or lower, the axial resolution should improve, because there is less primary electron penetration into the block face. More specifically, at these lower energies, the interaction volume is much smaller, and therefore, surface detail is more highly resolved. However, the backscattered electron yield for metal contrast agents and the backscattered electron detector sensitivity are both sub-optimal at these lower energies, thus negating the gain in axial resolution. We found that the application of a negative voltage (reversal potential) applied to a modified SBEM stage creates a tunable electric field at the sample. This field can be used to decrease the probe-beam-landing energy and, at the same time, alter the trajectory of the signal to increase the signal collected by the detector. With decelerated low landing-energy electrons, we observed that the probe-beam-electron-penetration depth was reduced to less than 30 nm in epoxy-embedded biological specimens. Concurrently, a large increase in recorded signal occurred due to the re-acceleration of BSEs in the bias field towards the objective pole piece where the detector is located. By tuning the bias field, we were able to manipulate the trajectories of the  primary and secondary electrons, enabling the spatial discrimination of these signals using an advanced ring-type BSE detector configuration or a standard monolithic BSE detector coupled with a blocking aperture.

  17. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of β-galactosidase at 3.2-Å resolution obtained by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Matthies, Doreen; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-08-12

    We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli β-galactosidase (∼465 kDa), solved at ∼3.2-Å resolution by using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Densities for most side chains, including those of residues in the active site, and a catalytic Mg(2+) ion can be discerned in the map obtained by cryo-EM. The atomic model derived from our cryo-EM analysis closely matches the 1.7-Å crystal structure with a global rmsd of ∼0.66 Å. There are significant local differences throughout the protein, with clear evidence for conformational changes resulting from contact zones in the crystal lattice. Inspection of the map reveals that although densities for residues with positively charged and neutral side chains are well resolved, systematically weaker densities are observed for residues with negatively charged side chains. We show that the weaker densities for negatively charged residues arise from their greater sensitivity to radiation damage from electron irradiation as determined by comparison of density maps obtained by using electron doses ranging from 10 to 30 e(-)/Å(2). In summary, we establish that it is feasible to use cryo-EM to determine near-atomic resolution structures of protein complexes (electron dose can be monitored by using dose fractionation tools available with direct electron detector technology.

  19. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: toshiaki.tanigaki.mv@hitachi.com; Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama 350-0395 (Japan); Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian [Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Tonomura, Akira [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama 350-0395 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  20. Edged watershed segmentation: a semi-interactive algorithm for segmentation of low-resolution maps from electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay A; Rubinstein, John L

    2011-10-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows for the structural analysis of large protein complexes that may be difficult to study by other means. Frequently, maps of complexes from cryo-EM are obtained at resolutions between 10 and 25Å. To aid in the interpretation of these medium- to low-resolution maps, they may be subdivided into three-dimensional segments representing subunits or subcomplexes. This division is often accomplished using a manual segmentation approach. While extremely useful, manual segmentation is subjective. We have developed a novel semi-interactive segmentation algorithm that can incorporate prior knowledge of subunit composition or structure without biasing the boundaries between subunits or subcomplexes. This algorithm has been characterized with experimental and simulated cryo-EM density maps at resolutions between 10 and 25Å. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of {sigma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Fei [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu Pan [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Feng Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Han Xiaodong; Mao Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM micrograph of {sigma} phase; (b) HRTEM image of {sigma}/{gamma} interface corresponding to the area of the white frame in (a); (c) an enlarged image of area from the white frame in (b). The combination of {sigma}/{gamma} interface appears very well, and a two-atomic-layer step is shown on the {sigma}/{gamma} interface. In addition, {sigma} phase has the orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental characteristic of {sigma} phase is studied by HAADF techniques and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial characteristics of {sigma}/{gamma} interface are revealed by HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An atomic structural {sigma}/{gamma} interface with a two-atomic-layer step has been proposed. - Abstract: By means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field image technique (HAADF), morphological of plate-shaped {sigma} phase and interfacial characteristics between plate-shaped {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys have been studied. On the basis of HRTEM observations, an atomic structural interface between {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase with a step has been proposed. {sigma} Phase has the relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma},} (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. The compositional characteristics of the {sigma} phase which

  2. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  3. Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography for Structure Determination at Nanometer and Subnanometer Resolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Liu, Xiangan; Danev, Radostin; Jakana, Joanita; Schmid, Michael F; King, Jonathan; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-01

    Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy (ZPC-cryoEM) is an emerging technique which is capable of producing higher image contrast than conventional cryoEM. By combining this technique with advanced image processing methods, we achieved subnanometer resolution for two biological specimens: 2-D bacteriorhodopsin crystal and epsilon15 bacteriophage. For an asymmetric reconstruction of epsilon15 bacteriophage, ZPC-cryoEM can reduce the required amount of data by a factor of ~3 compared to...

  4. Metal-carbonyl organometallic polymers, PFpP, as resists for high-resolution positive and negative electron beam lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Cao, K; Wang, X S; Cui, B

    2015-12-25

    Metal-containing resists for electron beam lithography (EBL) are attracting attention owing to their high dry etching resistance and possibility for directly patterning metal-containing nanostructures. The newly developed organometallic metal carbonyl polymers, PFpP, can function as EBL resists with strong etching resistance. One significant feature of the PFpP resist is its high resolution. Line arrays with line-widths as narrow as 17 nm have been created. The resist can also be used in positive tone.

  5. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  6. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  7. Degradation of spatial resolution in thin-foil x-ray microchemical analysis due to plural scattering of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twigg, Mark Erickson [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based Monte Carlo simulation of incoherent plural scattering of electrons has been developed in order to estimate the broadening of an electron probe as it propagates through a solid. By applying this approach to modeling the spreading of a fine (50 A) probe focused on a thin foil in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we have estimated the spatial resolution of the compositional analysis obtainable using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Specifically, an attempt has been made to determine how the apparent microchemistry of a feature of finer dimensions than the broadened beam differs from the actual composition of the given feature. The apparent Ge concentration profile in the vicinity of a 200 A wide Ge platelet in a 5000 A thick Al foil was measured, using STEM and EDS, and compared with the profile predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Results are presented and discussed.

  8. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Lindsey, Laurence F; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-01-01

    Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2) (65.54 µm per side) at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) system, which were only 66.59 µm(2) (8.160 µm per side) at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2) and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm). Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems.

  9. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kuwajima

    Full Text Available Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2 (65.54 µm per side at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM system, which were only 66.59 µm(2 (8.160 µm per side at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2 and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm. Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems.

  10. Determining time resolution of microchannel plate detectors for electron time-of-flight spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Kun; Chang, Zenghu

    2010-07-01

    The temporal resolution of a 40 mm diameter chevron microchannel plate (MCP) detector followed by a constant fraction discriminator and a time-to-digital converter was determined by using the third order harmonic of 25 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses. The resolution was found to deteriorate from 200 to 300 ps as the total voltage applied on the two MCPs increased from 1600 to 2000 V. This was likely due to a partial saturation of the MCP and/or the constant fraction discriminator working with signals beyond its optimum range of pulse width and shape.

  11. A photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus for femtosecond time-resolved molecular dynamics with electron time-of-flight resolution of sigma=18 ps and energy resolution Delta E/E=3.5%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenborg, Arno; Roeterdink, Wim G; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2008-06-01

    We report on the construction and performance of a novel photoelectron-photoion coincidence machine in our laboratory in Amsterdam to measure the full three-dimensional momentum distribution of correlated electrons and ions in femtosecond time-resolved molecular beam experiments. We implemented sets of open electron and ion lenses to time stretch and velocity map the charged particles. Time switched voltages are operated on the particle lenses to enable optimal electric field strengths for velocity map focusing conditions of electrons and ions separately. The position and time sensitive detectors employ microchannel plates (MCPs) in front of delay line detectors. A special effort was made to obtain the time-of-flight (TOF) of the electrons at high temporal resolution using small pore (5 microm) MCPs and implementing fast timing electronics. We measured the TOF distribution of the electrons under our typical coincidence field strengths with a temporal resolution down to sigma=18 ps. We observed that our electron coincidence detector has a timing resolution better than sigma=16 ps, which is mainly determined by the residual transit time spread of the MCPs. The typical electron energy resolution appears to be nearly laser bandwidth limited with a relative resolution of DeltaE(FWHM)/E=3.5% for electrons with kinetic energy near 2 eV. The mass resolution of the ion detector for ions measured in coincidence with electrons is about Deltam(FWHM)/m=14150. The velocity map focusing of our extended source volume of particles, due to the overlap of the molecular beam with the laser beams, results in a parent ion spot on our detector focused down to sigma=115 microm.

  12. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied fast ion–atom and electron–atom collision processes using a reconditioned high resolution X-ray spectrometer. The X-rays, generated by the collisions, are dispersed by a curved ADP crystal (Johansson geometry) and detected by a gas proportional counter. A self-written LabVIEW based program has ...

  13. PMT electronics for high-resolution powder diffraction of CRISTAL and MARS beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordessoule, M.; Bucaille, T.; Elkaïm, E.; Sitaud, B.

    2013-03-01

    The design and performance characterization of a multi-crystal X-ray scintillation detector are presented. These set-ups are used on the CRISTAL and MARS beam-lines of SOLEIL. Main topics, such as the measurement of the dead-time of the amplifier, the compromise between the energy resolution and the dead-time, are addressed in this article.

  14. Novel method of simultaneous multiple immunogold localization on resin sections in high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebesářová, Jana; Wandrol, P.; Vancová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 105-517 ISSN 1549-9634 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : multiple immunolabeling * gold nanoparticles * high resolution SEM * STEM imaging * BSE imaging Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 5.720, year: 2016

  15. Resolution and Efficiency of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers with Final Read-out Electronics at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dubbert, J; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Rauscher, F; Richter, R; Staude, A; Stiller, W

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a monitored drift-tube chamber for ATLAS with the final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation facility at CERN under varyin photon irradiation rates of up to 990~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$ which corresponds to 10 times the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. The signal pulse-height measurement of the final read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections. The corrections improve the average single-tube resolution from 106~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the nominal discriminator threshold of 44~mV without irradiation, and from 114~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the maximum nominal irradiation rate in ATLAS of 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The reduction of the threshold from 44~mV to 34~mV and the time-slewing corrections lead to an average single-tube resolution of 82~$\\mu$m without photon background and of 89~$\\mu$m at 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The measured muon detection efficiency agrees with the expectation for the final read-out electronics.

  16. Near-Atomic Resolution Using Electron Cryomicroscopy and Single-Particle Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing Zhang; Ethan Settembre; Chen Xu; Philip R. Dormitzer; Richard Bellamy; Stephen C. Harrison; Nikolaus Grigorieff

    2008-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) yields images of macromolecular assemblies and their components, from which 3D structures can be determined, by using an image processing method commonly known as "single-particle reconstruction...

  17. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Lozano, J G; Pennycook, T J; Jones, L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2015-06-04

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures.

  18. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electronic states of solids probed by bulk-sensitive high-resolution soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiyama, A

    2003-01-01

    High-energy and high-resolution soft x-ray photoemission studies have been performed on strongly correlated Ce compounds and vanadium oxides at BL25SU of SPring-8. The bulk spectra of CeRu sub 2 are explained by a band-structure calculation (itinerant model) whereas the other Ce 4f spectra are well reproduced by calculations based on the single impurity Anderson model (model from a localized limit). In a strong contrast to so far reported results, the bulk spectral functions are revealed to be insensitive to x for Sr sub 1 sub - sub x Ca sub x VO sub 3. Our study has demonstrated the importance of high-energy and high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy for revealing detailed bulk electronic states of strongly correlated systems. (author)

  20. Combining wide-field super-resolution microscopy and electron tomography: rendering nanoscopic correlative arrays on subcellular architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, Filip; Cheng, Delfine; Huynh, Minh; Henriquez, Jeffrey; Shami, Gerry; Lampe, Marko

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors outline in full detail, an uncomplicated approach that enables the combination of wide-field fluorescence super-resolution microscopy with electron tomography, thereby providing an approach that affords the best possible confidence in the structures investigated. The methodical steps to obtain these high-throughput correlative nanoscopic arrays will be visually explored and outlined in detail. The authors will demonstrate the feasibility of the method on cultured Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells that are labeled for filamentous actin. The presented images, morphometric data, and generated models illustrate the strengths of our correlative approach for future advanced structural-biology-oriented questions. Correlative nanoscopy applications can be readily found in which there is a need to reveal biomolecular information at unprecedented resolution on subcellular behavior in various biological and pathobiological processes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hot-Electron Tunneling sensors for high-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; Netel, H.

    1997-02-07

    Over the past 2 years, we have been studying the use of Hot Electron Tunneling sensors for use in high-energy-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. These sensors promise several advantages over existing cryogenic sensors, including simultaneous high count rate and high resolution capability, and relative ease of use. Using simple shadow mask lithography, we verified the basic principles of operation of these devices and discovered new physics in their thermal behavior as a function applied voltage bias. We also began to develop ways to use this new sensor in practical x-ray and gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting absorbers. This requires the use of quasiparticle trapping to concentrate the signal in the sensing elements.

  2. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Readout Electronics Calibration and Energy Resolution Analysis for ATLAS New Small Wheel Phase I Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Trischuk, Dominique Anderson

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), a planned upgrade of the LHC for 2025, will provide a challenging environment the detectors. The ATLAS muon endcap system was not designed to operate at the high rates that will be provided by the HL-LHC and must be upgraded. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will replace the current Muon Small Wheel and will provide enhanced trigger and tracking capabilities. The VMM chip is a custom applied specific integrated circuit (ASIC), designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, that will serve as the frontend ASIC for the detectors in the NSW. In order to provide precise timing measurements, the VMM chip must be calibrated. The micromegas are one of two detectors that will be installed in the NSW. A measurement of the energy spectrum can be used to calculate the energy resolution of the micromegas. The calibration method for the VMM chips and energy resolution measurements of the micromegas are described in this report.

  4. Evaluation of a high-resolution negative-acting electron-beam resist GMC for photomask manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chih; Novembre, Anthony E.

    1991-03-01

    As mask and reticle designs continue to evolve in complexity and resolution requirements, maskmakers are investigating what advantages negative acting electron beam resists may have in meeting these requirements. One candidate is Poly (glycidyl methacrylate-co-3- chlorostyrene), GMC, which is an advanced negative resist used for the purpose of photomask fabrication. In this paper, a statistically designed experiment will be described in which GMC resist was evaluated for use on the MEBES system. Variables explored included exposure dosage, chrome etch time, resist descum and strip time. The effects of these variables on defect density, critical dimension (CD) size and uniformity will be presented.

  5. High-Resolution Structural and Electronic Properties of Epitaxial Topological Crystalline Insulator Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur; Zhou, Chao; Zou, Ke; Simon, Georg; Albright, Stephen; Mandal, Subhasish; Morales-Acosta, Mayra; Zhu, Xiaodong; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick; Ahn, Charles; Schwarz, Udo; Altman, Eric

    Revealing the local electronic properties of surfaces and their link to structural properties is an important problem for topological crystalline insulators (TCI) in which metallic surface states are protected by crystal symmetry. The microstructure and electronic properties of TCI SnTe film surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy were characterized using scanning probe microscopy. These results reveal the influence of various defects on the electronic properties: tilt boundaries leading to dislocation arrays that serve as periodic nucleation sites for pit growth; screw dislocations, and point defects. These features have varying length scale and display variations in the electronic structure of the surface, which are mapped with scanning tunneling microscopy images as standing waves superimposed on atomic scale images of the surface topography that consequently shape the wave patterns. Since the growth process results in symmetry breaking defects that patterns the topological states, we propose that the scanning probe tip can pattern the surface and electronic structure and enable the fabrication of topological devices on the SnTe surface. Financial support from the National Science Foundation through the Yale Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (Grant No. MRSEC DMR-1119826) and FAME.

  6. High-precision deformation mapping in finFET transistors with two nanometre spatial resolution by precession electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David; Bernier, Nicolas; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Wang, Yun-Yu; Weng, Weihao; Madan, Anita; Mochizuki, Shogo; Jagannathan, Hemanth

    2017-05-29

    Precession electron diffraction has been used to systematically measure the deformation in Si/SiGe blanket films and patterned finFET test structures grown on silicon-on-insulator type wafers. Deformation maps have been obtained with a spatial resolution of 2.0 nm and a precision of ±0.025%. The measured deformation by precession diffraction for the blanket films has been validated by comparison to energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, X-Ray diffraction, and finite element simulations. We show that although the blanket films remain biaxially strained, the patterned fin structures are fully relaxed in the crystallographic planes that have been investigated. We demonstrate that precession diffraction is a viable deformation mapping technique that can be used to provide useful studies of state-of-the-art electronic devices.

  7. High-resolution electron-beam-induced-current study of the defect structure in GaN epilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Shmidt, N M; Usikov, A S; Yakimov, E B; Zavarin, E E

    2002-01-01

    Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) investigations of GaN structures grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition on (0001) sapphire substrates have been carried out. It is shown that the widths of the EBIC profiles for individual extended defects can be as small as about 100 nm. This width is observed to decrease with decreasing diffusion length and/or with increasing electron beam energy. The high spatial resolution is explained by the small diffusion length in the samples under study. The diffusion length is small even in structures with dislocation densities of about 10 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 and carrier mobilities of about 600 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 at 300 K and 1800 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 at 125 K.

  8. Sub-micron resolution high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography in quality inspection for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, J.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fält, P.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.; Cense, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in quality inspection for printed electronics. The device used in the study is based on a supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer and high-speed spectrometer. The spectrometer in the presented spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup (SD-OCT) is centered at 600 nm and covers a 400 nm wide spectral region ranging from 400 nm to 800 nm. Spectra were acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function obtained from a Parylene C sample was 0:98 m. In addition to Parylene C layers, the applicability of sub-micron SD-OCT in printed electronics was studied using PET and epoxy covered solar cell, a printed RFID antenna and a screen-printed battery electrode. A commercial SD-OCT system was used for reference measurements.

  9. In situ electrical probing and bias-mediated manipulation of dielectric nanotubes in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, D.; Mitome, M.; Kurashima, K.; Zhi, C. Y.; Tang, C. C.; Bando, Y.; Lourie, O.

    2006-03-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes filled with magnesium oxides [MgO,MgO2] and/or hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] are electrically probed and delicately manipulated inside a 300kV JEOL-3000F high-resolution transmission analytical electron microscope equipped with a side-entry "Nanofactory Instruments" piezoholder. At a low bias the nanotubes demonstrate truly insulating behavior. At a high bias of ±30V they show reversible breakdown current of several dozens of nA. Under 300kV electron beam irradiation the nanotubes are positively charged that allows us to perform on-demand manipulation with them through tuning of polarity and/or value of a bias voltage on a gold counterelectrode from -140 to +140V, owing to the prominent electrostatic nanotube-electrode interactions.

  10. Direct observation of iron-induced conformational changes of mitochondrial DNA by high-resolution field-emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Yaffee, M; Walter, P; Richter, C; Müller, M

    1996-01-01

    When respiring rat liver mitochondria are incubated in the presence of Fe(III) gluconate, their DNA (mtDNA) relaxes from the supercoiled to the open circular form dependent on the iron dose. Anaerobiosis or antioxidants fail to completely inhibit the unwinding. High-resolution field-emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy imaging, in concert with backscattered electron detection, pinpoints nanometer-range iron colloids bound to mtDNA isolated from iron-exposed mitochondria. High-resolut...

  11. Resolution study of higher-order-mode-based beam position diagnostics using custom-built electronics in strongly coupled 3.9-GHz multi-cavity accelerating module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R.M.; Eddy, N.

    2012-11-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can provide remote diagnostics information of the beam position and cavity misalignment. In this paper we report on recent studies on the resolution with specially selected series of modes with custom-built electronics. This constitutes the first report of measurements of these cavities in which we obtained a resolution of 20 micron in beam offset. Details of the setup of the electronics and HOM measurements are provided.

  12. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R. P.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Afanasev, A. V.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peña, C.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GEp, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GEp from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (ɛ ) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ɛ at Q2=1.45 GeV2 . This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Δ intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2 - 3 GeV2 .

  13. Towards a resolution of the proton form factor problem: new electron and positron scattering data

    CERN Document Server

    Adikaram, D; Weinstein, L B; Raue, B; Khetarpal, P; Bennett, R P; Arrington, J; Brooks, W K; Adhikari, K P; Afanasev, A V; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Fradi, A; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, I; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, $G_E^p$, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of $G_E^p$ from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization ($\\varepsilon$) and momentum transfer ($Q^2$) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing $\\varepsilon$ at $Q^2 = 1.45 \\text{ GeV}^2$. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at $Q^2\\approx...

  14. Reconstructing virus structures from nanometer to near-atomic resolutions with cryo-electron microscopy and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juan; Liu, Xiangan; Rochat, Ryan H.; Baker, Matthew L.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    The past few decades have seen tremendous advances in single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). The field has matured to the point that near-atomic resolution density maps can be generated for icosahedral viruses without the need for crystallization. In parallel, substantial progress has been made in determining the structures of non-icosahedrally arranged proteins in viruses by employing either single particle cryo-EM or cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Implicit in this course has been the availability of a new generation of electron cryo-microscopes and the development of the computational tools that are essential for generating these maps and models. This methodology has enabled structural biologists to analyze structures in increasing detail for virus particles that are in different morphogenetic and biochemical states. Furthermore, electron imaging of frozen, hydrated cells, in the process of being infected by viruses, has also opened up a new avenue for studying virus structures “in situ”. Here we present the common techniques used to acquire and process cryo-EM and cryo-ET data and discuss their implications for structural virology both now and in the future. PMID:22297510

  15. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe [Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  16. Reconstructing virus structures from nanometer to near-atomic resolutions with cryo-electron microscopy and tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juan; Liu, Xiangan; Rochat, Ryan H; Baker, Matthew L; Chiu, Wah

    2012-01-01

    The past few decades have seen tremendous advances in single-particle electron -cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). The field has matured to the point that near-atomic resolution density maps can be generated for icosahedral viruses without the need for crystallization. In parallel, substantial progress has been made in determining the structures of nonicosahedrally arranged proteins in viruses by employing either single-particle cryo-EM or cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Implicit in this course have been the availability of a new generation of electron cryo-microscopes and the development of the computational tools that are essential for generating these maps and models. This methodology has enabled structural biologists to analyze structures in increasing detail for virus particles that are in different morphogenetic states. Furthermore, electron imaging of frozen, hydrated cells, in the process of being infected by viruses, has also opened up a new avenue for studying virus structures "in situ". Here we present the common techniques used to acquire and process cryo-EM and cryo-ET data and discuss their implications for structural virology both now and in the future.

  17. Structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates, studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Robert, E-mail: bobsinc@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Sang Chul, E-mail: sclee99@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Shi, Yezhou; Chueh, William C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    We have applied aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films, grown by pulsed laser deposition onto (001) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. There are few observable defects apart from the expected mismatch interfacial dislocations and so the films would be expected to have good potential for applications. Under high electron beam dose rate (above about 6000 e{sup -}/Å{sup 2}s) domains of an ordered structure appear and these are interpreted as being created by oxygen vacancy ordering. The ordered structure does not appear at lower lose rates (ca. 2600 e{sup -}/Å{sup 2}s) and can be removed by imaging under 1 mbar oxygen gas in an environmental TEM. EELS confirms that there is both oxygen deficiency and the associated increase in Ce{sup 3+} versus Ce{sup 4+} cations in the ordered domains. In situ high resolution TEM recordings show the formation of the ordered domains as well as atomic migration along the ceria thin film (001) surface. - Highlights: • The local structure and chemistry of ceria can be studied by TEM combined with EELS. • At lower electron, there are no observable changes in the ceria thin films. • At higher dose rates, an ordered phase is created due to oxygen vacancy ordering. • In situ HRTEM shows the oxygen vacancy ordering and the movement of surface atoms.

  18. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  19. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  20. Inorganic WS{sub 2} nanotubes revealed atom by atom using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar Sadan, Maya; Heidelmann, Markus; Houben, Lothar [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Juelich (Germany); Tenne, Reshef [Weizmann Institute of Science, Materials and Interfaces Department, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-08-15

    The characterization of nanostructures to the atomic dimensions becomes more important, as devices based on a single particle are being produced. In particular, inorganic nanotubes were shown to host interesting properties making them excellent candidates for various devices. The WS{sub 2} nanotubes outperform the bulk in their mechanical properties offering numerous applications especially as part of high strength nanocomposites. In contrast, their electrical properties are less remarkable. The structure-function relationship can be investigated by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), which enables the insight into their atomic structure as well as performing spectroscopic measurements down to the atomic scale. In the present work, the deciphering of atomic structure and the chiral angle of the different shells in a multiwall WS{sub 2} nanotube is demonstrated. In certain cases, the helicity of the structure can also be deduced. Finally, first electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of a single tube are presented, acquired by a new acquisition technique that allows for high spatial resolution (denoted StripeSTEM). The measured band gap values correspond with the values found in literature for thin films, obtained by spectroscopic techniques, and are higher than the values resulting from STM measurements. (orig.)

  1. Single-Cell Resolution of Uncultured Magnetotactic Bacteria via Fluorescence-Coupled Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Heng; Menguy, Nicolas; Benzerara, Karim; Wang, Fuxian; Lin, Xiaoting; Chen, Zhibao; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-06-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form intracellular chain-assembled nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite termed magnetosomes. The characterization of magnetosome crystals requires electron microscopy due to their nanoscopic sizes. However, electron microscopy does not provide phylogenetic information for MTB. We have developed a strategy for the simultaneous and rapid phylogenetic and biomineralogical characterization of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level. It consists of four steps: (i) enrichment of MTB cells from an environmental sample, (ii) 16S rRNA gene sequencing of MTB, and (iii) fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses coordinated with (iv) transmission or scanning electron microscopy of the probe-hybridized cells. The application of this strategy identified a magnetotactic Gammaproteobacteria strain, SHHR-1, from brackish sediments collected from the Shihe River estuary in Qinhuangdao City, China. SHHR-1 magnetosomes are elongated prismatic magnetites which can be idealized as hexagonal prisms. Taxonomic groups of uncultured MTB were also identified in freshwater sediments from Lake Miyun in northern Beijing via this novel coordinated fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy method based on four group-specific rRNA-targeted probes. Our analyses revealed that major magnetotactic taxonomic groups can be accurately determined only with coordinated scanning electron microscopy observations on fluorescently labeled single cells due to limited group coverage and specificity for existing group-specific MTB fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our reported strategy is simple and efficient, offers great promise toward investigating the diversity and biomineralization of MTB, and may also be applied to other functional groups of microorganisms.IMPORTANCE Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and biomineralize morphologically diverse magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed

  2. Optical Sideband Generation: a Longitudinal Electron Beam Diagnostic Beyond the Laser Bandwidth Resolution Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Tilborg, J. van; Matlis, N. H.; Plateau, G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    Electro-optic sampling (EOS) is widely used as a technique to measure THz-domain electric field pulses such asthe self-fields of femtosecond electron beams. We present an EOS-based approach for single-shot spectral measurement that excels in simplicity (compatible with fiber integration) and bandwidth coverage (overcomes the laser bandwidth limitation), allowing few-fs electron beams or single-cycle THz pulses to be characterized with conventional picosecond probes. It is shown that the EOS-induced optical sidebands on the narrow-bandwidth optical probe are spectrally-shifted replicas of the THz pulse. An experimental demonstration on a 0-3 THz source is presented.

  3. High-resolution electron microscopical study of cyst walls of Entamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the fine structural organization, molecular composition and permeability properties of the cell surface of intestinal protozoan cysts is important to understand the biologic basis of their resistance. Recent studies on the biology of the cyst walls of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba invadens have considerably advanced knowledge on the cellular processes involved in the transport and surface deposition of the main cyst wall components. Using transmission electron microscopy, cytochemistry, scanning electron microscopy and freeze-fracture techniques, we have obtained new information. In mature cysts the permeability of Entamoeba cysts is limited to small molecules not by the cyst wall, but by the plasma membrane, as demonstrated with the use of ruthenium red as an electron-dense tracer. Cell walls of E. histolytica cysts are made up of five to seven layers of unordered fibrils 7-8 nm thick. Alcian blue stains a regular mesh of fibrils approximately 4 nm thick, running perpendicularly to the cyst wall. In addition, abundant ionogenic groups are seen in cyst walls treated with cationized ferritin. In the mature cysts of E. histolytica and E. invadens small cytoplasmic vesicles with granular material were in close contact with the plasma membrane, suggesting a process of fusion and deposition of granular material to the cell wall. The plasma membrane of mature cysts is devoid of intramembrane particles when analyzed with the freeze-fracture technique. When viewed with scanning electron microscopy the surface of E. histolytica cysts clearly differs from that of Entamoeba coli and E. invadens. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    satellite lines of Al have been studied in collision with 3–12 keV electrons and 40 MeV. C. 4+ ions. In ion collisions as large as ... bilities to resolve complex multiplet structures in the atomic spectra. Following the first crystal spectrometer .... The Bragg's equation (nλ = 2d sin θ) and slope of the straight line (nrot vs. sin θ, not ...

  5. Organic electronics for high-resolution electrocorticography of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodagholy, Dion; Gelinas, Jennifer N; Zhao, Zifang; Yeh, Malcolm; Long, Michael; Greenlee, Jeremy D; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Buzsáki, György

    2016-11-01

    Localizing neuronal patterns that generate pathological brain signals may assist with tissue resection and intervention strategies in patients with neurological diseases. Precise localization requires high spatiotemporal recording from populations of neurons while minimizing invasiveness and adverse events. We describe a large-scale, high-density, organic material-based, conformable neural interface device ("NeuroGrid") capable of simultaneously recording local field potentials (LFPs) and action potentials from the cortical surface. We demonstrate the feasibility and safety of intraoperative recording with NeuroGrids in anesthetized and awake subjects. Highly localized and propagating physiological and pathological LFP patterns were recorded, and correlated neural firing provided evidence about their local generation. Application of NeuroGrids to brain disorders, such as epilepsy, may improve diagnostic precision and therapeutic outcomes while reducing complications associated with invasive electrodes conventionally used to acquire high-resolution and spiking data.

  6. Spatial resolution and cathodoluminescence intensity dependence on acceleration voltage in electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy using Y2O3:Eu3+ film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yu; Kamiya, Masashi; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro

    2017-11-01

    This study presents relationship between acceleration voltage and spatial resolution of electron-beam assisted (EXA) optical microscope. The nanometric illumination light sources of the present EXA microscope was red-emitting cathodoluminescence (CL) in the Y2O3:Eu3+ thin film excited by focused electron beam. Our experimental results demonstrated that the spatial resolutions of the EXA microscope were higher as the acceleration voltage was higher. We managed to make images of the scattered gold particles with approximately 90 nm-resolutions at the voltages higher than 20 kV. The dependence of the spatial resolution on the acceleration voltage was explained by the distribution of simulated electron scattering trajectories in the luminescent thin film. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ducournau

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements.

  8. High-resolution electron spectroscopy and structures of lithium-nucleobase (adenine, uracil, and thymine) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Lee, Jung Sup; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2010-01-28

    Li complexes of adenine, uracil, and thymine were produced by laser vaporization of rods made of Li and nucleobase powders in a metal-cluster beam source and studied by pulsed-field-ionization zero-electron-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The ZEKE measurements determined the adiabatic ionization energies of the three neutral complexes and frequencies of several vibrational modes for the metal-adenine and -uracil ions. The measured spectra were compared with spectral simulations to determine the preferred metal binding sites. For adenine, the most stable structure is formed by Li/Li(+) bidentately binding to both the N7 atom of the imidazole ring and the NH(2) group of the pyrimidine ring. For uracil and thymine, the ideal site for Li/Li(+) coordination is the O4 atom. Although it has only a small effect on the geometries of uracil and thymine, lithium coordination forces the rotation of the NH(2) group out of the adenine plane. The adiabatic ionization energies of the three complexes follow the trend of uracil (33910+/-5 cm(-1))>thymine (33386+/-5 cm(-1))>adenine (32240+/-5 cm(-1)), whereas their metal-ligand bond dissociation energies are about the same, (92-97) +/-6 kJ mol(-1). For all three complexes, the neutral bond energies are smaller than those of the corresponding ions due to a weaker electrostatic interaction and stronger electron repulsion.

  9. Area-selective atomic layer deposition of Ru on electron-beam-written Pt(C) patterns versus SiO2 substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junige, Marcel; Löffler, Markus; Geidel, Marion; Albert, Matthias; Bartha, Johann W.; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Rellinghaus, Bernd; van Dorp, Willem F.

    2017-09-01

    Area selectivity is an emerging sub-topic in the field of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which employs opposite nucleation phenomena to distinct heterogeneous starting materials on a surface. In this paper, we intend to grow Ru exclusively on locally pre-defined Pt patterns, while keeping a SiO2 substratum free from any deposition. In a first step, we study in detail the Ru ALD nucleation on SiO2 and clarify the impact of the set-point temperature. An initial incubation period with actually no growth was revealed before a formation of minor, isolated RuO x islands; clearly no continuous Ru layer formed on SiO2. A lower temperature was beneficial in facilitating a longer incubation and consequently a wider window for (inherent) selectivity. In a second step, we write C-rich Pt micro-patterns on SiO2 by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), varying the number of FEBID scans at two electron beam acceleration voltages. Subsequently, the localized Pt(C) deposits are pre-cleaned in O2 and overgrown by Ru ALD. Already sub-nanometer-thin Pt(C) patterns, which were supposedly purified into some form of Pt(O x ), acted as very effective activation for the locally restricted, thus area-selective ALD growth of a pure, continuous Ru covering, whereas the SiO2 substratum sufficiently inhibited towards no growth. FEBID at lower electron energy reduced unwanted stray deposition and achieved well-resolved pattern features. We access the nucleation phenomena by utilizing a hybrid metrology approach, which uniquely combines in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry, in-vacuo x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ex-situ high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, and mapping energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Reconstruction of the projected electrostatic potential in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy including phenomenological absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentzen, M., E-mail: m.lentzen@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy, Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The projected electrostatic potential is reconstructed from a high-resolution exit wave function through a maximum-likelihood refinement algorithm. The theory of an already existing algorithm is extended to include the effects of phenomenological absorption. Various tests with a simulated exit wave function of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} in [1 0 0] orientation used as a source show that the reconstruction is successful, regardless of the strongly differing scattering power of atomic columns, even for the case of strong dynamical diffraction. Object thickness, the amount of absorption, and a residual defocus aberration of the wave function-parameters often unknown or difficult to measure in experiments-can be determined accurately with the aid of the refinement algorithm in a self-consistent way. For the next generation of instruments, with information limits of 0.05 nm and better, reconstruction accuracies of better than 2% can be expected, which is sufficient to measure and display the structural and chemical information with the aid of an accurate projected potential map.

  11. Crystal interface and high-resolution electron microscopy—the best partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ichinose

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Several contributions of HRTEM on the interface science are reviewed in chronological order. The first contribution of HRTEM is the observation of gold (113Σ°11 boundary, giving experimental proof of the CSL model. An observation of the asymmetric (112Σ°3 boundary follows. A SiC grain boundary is effectively assessed not by the density of CSL point but the number of dangling bonds in the boundary. A ZnO/Pd interface provides an example that a misfit dislocation does not necessarily accommodate the lattice mismatch. Segregated interface shows characteristic HRTEM image contrast, suggesting change in atomic bonding. An atomic height step in the semiconductor hetero interface is observed by the Chemical Lattice Image technique. In the diamond grain boundary a dangling bond may not elevate the boundary energy, being contradictory of the least dangling bond rule. Super-high resolution of the HVHRTEM enable us to determine atomic species in the grain boundary. Combined use of HRTEM and EELSE allows us to discuss the correlation between atomic structure and nature of the corresponding interface. It is not exaggeration to say that modern interface science does not exist witout HRTEM. On the other hand, many complicated interfaces found by HRTEM remained as unaswered questions. An innovative structural model is requested to appear on the scene.

  12. A Voltammetric Electronic Tongue for the Resolution of Ternary Nitrophenol Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreu González-Calabuig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the applicability of a voltammetric sensor array able to quantify the content of 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, and picric acid in artificial samples using the electronic tongue (ET principles. The ET is based on cyclic voltammetry signals, obtained from an array of metal disk electrodes and a graphite epoxy composite electrode, compressed using discrete wavelet transform with chemometric tools such as artificial neural networks (ANNs. ANNs were employed to build the quantitative prediction model. In this manner, a set of standards based on a full factorial design, ranging from 0 to 300 mg·L−1, was prepared to build the model; afterward, the model was validated with a completely independent set of standards. The model successfully predicted the concentration of the three considered phenols with a normalized root mean square error of 0.030 and 0.076 for the training and test subsets, respectively, and r ≥ 0.948.

  13. Preparation of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea for high-resolution histology and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, John L; Vieira, Ana P; Newmark, Phillip A

    2014-03-01

    The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging model species in fields such as stem cell biology, regeneration and evolutionary biology. Excellent molecular tools have been developed for S. mediterranea, but ultrastructural techniques have received far less attention. Processing specimens for histology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is notoriously idiosyncratic for particular species or specimen types. Unfortunately, however, most methods for S. mediterranea described in the literature lack numerous essential details, and those few that do provide them rely on specialized equipment that may not be readily available. Here we present an optimized protocol for ultrastructural preparation of S. mediterranea. The protocol can be completed in 6 d, much of which is 'hands-off' time. To aid with troubleshooting, we also illustrate the major effects of seemingly minor variations in fixative, buffer concentration and dehydration steps. This procedure will be useful for all planarian researchers, particularly those with relatively little experience in tissue processing.

  14. Ultrastable gold substrates for electron cryomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances, the structures of many proteins cannot be determined by electron cryomicroscopy because the individual proteins move during irradiation. This blurs the images so they cannot be aligned with each other to calculate a 3D density. Much of this movement stems from instabilities in the carbon substrates used to support frozen samples in the microscope. Here we demonstrate a new gold specimen support that nearly eliminates substrate motion during irradiation. This increases the sub-nanometer image contrast such that α-helices of individual proteins are resolved. With this improvement we determine the structure of apoferritin, a smooth, octahedral shell of α–helical subunits that is particularly difficult to solve by electron microscopy. This advance in substrate design will enable the solution of currently intractable protein structures. PMID:25504723

  15. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the high temperature crystal structures of GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) phase change material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structures of GeSb2Te4, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge3Sb2Te6 were determined using electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structure determined for the former two crystals deviates from the ones proposed in the literature. These crystal structures were

  16. Visualization of the funis of Giardia lamblia by high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy--new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchimol, Marlene; Piva, Bruno; Campanati, Loraine; de Souza, Wanderley

    2004-08-01

    Giardia lamblia is a multiflagellar parasite and one of the earliest diverging eukaryotic cells. It possesses a cytoskeleton made of several microtubular structures-an adhesive disc, four pairs of flagella, median body, and funis. This protozoan displays different types of movements, including a lateral and dorso-ventral dislocation of its posterior region, which has not been completely elucidated. In the present study, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the funis structure of G. lamblia trophozoites. It was shown that the funis is made of short arrays of microtubules emanating from the axonemes of the caudal flagella, which are anchored to dense rods that run parallel to the posterior-lateral flagella. After emergence of the posterior-lateral flagella, funis microtubules are anchored to the epiplasm, a fibrous layer that underlies the portion of membrane that presents tail contractility. Based on these observations a model for the tail flexion of G. lamblia is proposed.

  17. StatSTEM: An efficient program for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; van den Bos, K. H. W.; Van den Broek, W.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2017-09-01

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced in order to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for the overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, is investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license.

  18. Beta-Barrel Detection for Medium Resolution Cryo-Electron Microscopy Density Maps Using Genetic Algorithms and Ray Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Albert; Si, Dong

    2017-10-16

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a technique that produces three-dimensional density maps of large protein complexes. This allows for the study of the structure of these proteins. Identifying the secondary structures within proteins is vital to understanding the overall structure and function of the protein. The [Formula: see text]-barrel is one such secondary structure, commonly found in lipocalins and membrane proteins. In this article, we present a novel approach that utilizes genetic algorithms, kd-trees, and ray tracing to automatically detect and extract [Formula: see text]-barrels from cryo-EM density maps. This approach was tested on simulated and experimental density maps with zero, one, or multiple barrels in the density map. The results suggest that the proposed approach is capable of performing automatic detection of [Formula: see text]-barrels from medium resolution cryo-EM density maps.

  19. Structure and orbital ordering of ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} probed by atomic resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela; Engelmayer, Johannes; Loosdrecht, Paul H.M. van [II. Physikalisches Institut, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Jin, Lei; Jia, Chun-Lin [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-5) and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Himcinschi, Cameliu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Hensling, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Dittmann, Regina [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Orbital ordering has been less investigated in epitaxial thin films, due to the difficulty to evidence directly the occurrence of this phenomenon in thin film samples. Atomic resolution electron microscopy enabled us to observe the structural details of the ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films. The transition to orbital ordering of epitaxial layers as thin as ∼4 nm was probed by temperature-dependent Raman scattering spectroscopy of multilayer samples. From the occurrence and temperature dependence of the 700 cm{sup -1} Raman active mode it can be inferred that the structural phase transition associated with orbital ordering takes place in ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films at about 130 K. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Tools for Model Building and Optimization into Near-Atomic Resolution Electron Cryo-Microscopy Density Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, F; Chiu, W

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) has advanced dramatically to become a viable tool for high-resolution structural biology research. The ultimate outcome of a cryoEM study is an atomic model of a macromolecule or its complex with interacting partners. This chapter describes a variety of algorithms and software to build a de novo model based on the cryoEM 3D density map, to optimize the model with the best stereochemistry restraints and finally to validate the model with proper protocols. The full process of atomic structure determination from a cryoEM map is described. The tools outlined in this chapter should prove extremely valuable in revealing atomic interactions guided by cryoEM data. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Compositional Analysis With Atomic Column Spatial Resolution by 5th Order Aberration-corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, David [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Herrera, Miriam [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Alonso-Gonzalez, Pablo [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gonzalez, Yolanda [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gonzalez, Luisa [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Guerrero, M. P. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Pizarro, Joaquin [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Galindo, Pedro [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Molina, S. I. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain

    2011-01-01

    We show in this article that it is possible to obtain elemental compositional maps and profiles with atomic-column resolution across an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As multilayer structure from 5th-order aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The compositional profiles obtained from the analysis of HAADF-STEM images describe accurately the distribution of In in the studied multilayer in good agreement with Muraki's segregation model [Muraki, K., Fukatsu, S., Shiraki, Y. & Ito, R. (1992)]. Surface segregation of In atoms during molecular beam epitaxy and its influence on the energy levels in InGaAs/GaAs quantums wells.

  2. In vivo virus structures: simultaneous classification, resolution enhancement, and noise reduction in whole-cell electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Fu, Chi-Yu; Khayat, Reza; Doerschuk, Peter C; Johnson, John E

    2011-06-01

    Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV) experiences an extra-cellular environment of near boiling acid (80°C, pH 3) and particles purified under these conditions were previously analyzed by cryo electron microscopy and image reconstruction. Here we describe cryo-tomograms of Solfolobus cells infected with STIV and the maximum likelihood algorithm employed to compute reconstructions of virions within the cell. Virions in four different tomograms were independently reconstructed with an average of 91 particles per tomogram and their structures compared with each other and with the higher resolution single-particle reconstruction from purified virions. The algorithm described here automatically classified and oriented two different particle types within each cell and generated reconstructions of full and empty particles. Because the particles are randomly oriented within the cell, the reconstructions do not suffer from the missing wedge of data absent from the reciprocal-space tomogram. The fact that the particles have icosahedral symmetry is used to dramatically improve the signal to noise ratio in the reconstructions. The reconstructions have approximately 60Å resolution (based on Fourier Shell Correlation analysis among reconstructions computed by the algorithm described here from four different tomograms). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation of High Resolution Vibrational and Electronic Spectra with a Multifrequency Virtual Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Moving from the common practice of extracting numerical data from experiment to be compared with quantum mechanical (QM) results toward a direct vis-à-vis} comparison of experimental and simulated spectra would strongly reduce any arbitrariness in analysis of complex experimental outcomes and allow a proper account of the information connected to both position and shape of spectral bands. The development of such ``virtual ab initio spectrometers'' for a wide range of wavelengths has been one of our major research goals in the last years [1,2]. Recent methodological advances from our group allow simulation of optical (IR, Raman, UV-vis, etc.) spectra line-shapes for medium-to-large closed- and open-shell molecular systems. Vibrational spectra are computed including anharmonicities through perturbative corrections while electronic spectra line-shapes are simulated accounting for the vibrational structure. Well resolved and accurate theoretical spectra provide data as close as possible to the results directly available from experiment allowing to avoid ambiguities in analysis of the latter. Several examples illustrating interpretation, assignment or revision of experimental spectra for prototypes of bio-molecular systems (phenyl radical, glycine, thymine, pyrimidine, anisole dimer) will be presented. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, 2012 2. M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, G. Brancato, et al. Theor. Chem. Acc. 113, 1201, 2012

  4. Smoking and fluidity of erythrocyte membranes: a high resolution scanning electron and atomic force microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; du Plooy, Jeanette N; Soma, Prashilla; Keyser, Ina; Buys, Antoinette V

    2013-11-30

    Smoking affects the general health of an individual, however, the red blood cells (RBCs) and their architecture are particularly vulnerable to inhaled toxins related to smoking. Smoking is one of the lifestyle diseases that are responsible for the most deaths worldwide and an individual who smokes is exposed to excessive amounts of oxidants and toxins which generate up to 10(18) free radicals in the human body. Recently, it was reported that smoking decreases RBC membrane fluidity. Here we confirm this and we show changes visible in the topography of RBC membranes, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RBC membranes show bubble formation of the phospholipid layer, as well as balloon-like smooth areas; while their general discoid shapes are changed to form pointed extensions. We also investigate membrane roughness using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and these results confirm SEM results. Due to the vast capability of RBCs to be adaptable, their state of well-being is a major indication for the general health status of an individual. We conclude that these changes, using an old technique in a novel application, may provide new insights and new avenues for future improvements in clinical medicine pertaining to conditions like COPD. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Bos, K.H.W. van den [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Broek, W. [AG Strukturforschung/Elektronenmikroskopie, Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license. - Highlights: • An efficient model-based method for quantitative electron microscopy is introduced. • Images are modelled as a superposition of 2D Gaussian peaks. • Overlap between neighbouring columns is taken into account. • Structure parameters can be obtained with the highest precision and accuracy. • StatSTEM, auser friendly program (GNU public license) is developed.

  6. Soot structure and reactivity analysis by Raman microspectroscopy, temperature-programmed oxidation, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, Markus; Schuster, Manfred E; Su, Dangsheng; Schlögl, Robert; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P

    2009-12-17

    Raman microspectroscopy (RM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were combined to get comprehensive information on the relationship between structure and reactivity of soot in samples of spark discharge (GfG), heavy duty engine diesel (EURO VI and IV) soot, and graphite powder upon oxidation by oxygen at increasing temperatures. GfG soot and graphite powder represent the higher and lower reactivity limits. Raman microspectroscopic analysis was conducted by determination of spectral parameters using a five band fitting procedure (G, D1-D4) as well as by evaluation of the dispersive character of the D mode. The analysis of spectral parameters shows a higher degree of disorder and a higher amount of molecular carbon for untreated GfG soot samples than for samples of untreated EURO VI and EURO IV soot. The structural analysis based on the dispersive character of the D mode revealed substantial differences in ordering descending from graphite powder, EURO IV, VI to GfG soot. HRTEM images and EELS analysis of EURO IV and VI samples indicated a different morphology and a higher structural order as compared to GfG soot in full agreement with the Raman analysis. These findings are also confirmed by the reactivity of soot during oxidation (TPO), where GfG soot was found to be the most reactive and EURO IV and VI soot samples exhibited a moderate reactivity.

  7. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  8. High-spatial-resolution electron density measurement by Langmuir probe for multi-point observations using tiny spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, H.; Røed, K.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Trondsen, E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Miloch, W. J.; Moen, J. I.

    2017-11-01

    A method for evaluating electron density using a single fixed-bias Langmuir probe is presented. The technique allows for high-spatio-temporal resolution electron density measurements, which can be effectively carried out by tiny spacecraft for multi-point observations in the ionosphere. The results are compared with the multi-needle Langmuir probe system, which is a scientific instrument developed at the University of Oslo comprising four fixed-bias cylindrical probes that allow small-scale plasma density structures to be characterized in the ionosphere. The technique proposed in this paper can comply with the requirements of future small-sized spacecraft, where the cost-effectiveness, limited space available on the craft, low power consumption and capacity for data-links need to be addressed. The first experimental results in both the plasma laboratory and space confirm the efficiency of the new approach. Moreover, detailed analyses on two challenging issues when deploying the DC Langmuir probe on a tiny spacecraft, which are the limited conductive area of the spacecraft and probe surface contamination, are presented in the paper. It is demonstrated that the limited conductive area, depending on applications, can either be of no concern for the experiment or can be resolved by mitigation methods. Surface contamination has a small impact on the performance of the developed probe.

  9. Prominent conjugate processes in the PCI recapture of photoelectrons revealed by high resolution Auger electron measurements of Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Yoshiro; Kosugi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Shigemasa, Eiji; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Xe (N5O2 , 3O2 , 3) Auger electron spectrum originating from 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization was measured with the photon energy tuned very close above the ionization threshold. As the photon energy approached the 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization threshold, Rydberg series structures including several angular momentum components were formed within the Auger profile by the recapture of the photoelectrons into high-lying final ion orbitals. Our spectrum with resolution much narrower than the lifetime width of the corresponding core excited state allowed us to resolve detailed structures due to the orbital angular momenta very clearly. Unexpectedly, conjugate peaks originating from the exchange of angular momentum between the photoelectron and the Auger electron through Post-Collision-Interaction were found to dominate the spectrum. The new assignments were in accord with the quantum defect values obtained for the high Rydberg series for singly charged ionic Xe + 5 p(1S0) ml. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 23600009.

  10. An Inexpensive High-Temporal Resolution Electronic Sun Journal for Monitoring Personal Day to Day Sun Exposure Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Downs

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to natural sunlight, specifically solar ultraviolet (UV radiation contributes to lifetime risks of skin cancer, eye disease, and diseases associated with vitamin D insufficiency. Improved knowledge of personal sun exposure patterns can inform public health policy; and help target high-risk population groups. Subsequently, an extensive number of studies have been conducted to measure personal solar UV exposure in a variety of settings. Many of these studies, however, use digital or paper-based journals (self-reported volunteer recall, or employ cost prohibitive electronic UV dosimeters (that limit the size of sample populations, to estimate periods of exposure. A cost effective personal electronic sun journal (ESJ built from readily available infrared photodiodes is presented in this research. The ESJ can be used to complement traditional UV dosimeters that measure total biologically effective exposure by providing a time-stamped sun exposure record. The ESJ can be easily attached to clothing and data logged to personal devices (including fitness monitors or smartphones. The ESJ improves upon self-reported exposure recording and is a cost effective high-temporal resolution option for monitoring personal sun exposure behavior in large population studies.

  11. High resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS) of ultrathin Al sub 2 O sub 3 films on metal substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, M B

    1999-01-01

    Long-range ordered Al sub O sub 3 films were prepared in a thickness range of 5 approx 30 A by oxidizing single-crystal NiAl(110) surfaces at a temperature between 300 and 1300 K. The typical phonon structure of the Al sub 2 O sub 3 films on NiAl(110) was investigated as a function of the probe electron beam energy and specular scattering angle by using HREELS (high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy). The measured relative intensity of the distinct phonon features to the elastic peak follows well the general trends of the probe beam energy and angular dependence predicted by DT (dielectric theory) calculations. On a semi-empirical basis, the three phonon loss features, nu sub 1 (380 approx 430 cm sup - sup 1), nu sub 2 (620 approx 660 cm sup - sup 1), and nu sub 3 (850 approx 900 cm sup - sup 1), of crystalline Al sub 2 O sub 3 films were assigned to collective excitations of the microscopic vertical stretching motion of in-phase O-Al layers and to the stretching motions of the tetrahedrally and oc...

  12. Energy resolution and power consumption of Timepix detector for different detector settings and saturation of front-end electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, M.; Hoang, S.; Stoffle, N.; Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2014-05-01

    An ongoing research project in the area of radiation monitoring employing the Timepix technology from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration profits greatly from optimizing the precision of the position and energy information obtained for the detected quanta. Wider applications of the Timepix technology as a radiation monitor also puts new demands on the precision and speed of the energy calibration. We compare the analog signal in pixel front-end electronics for different sources used during detector evaluation and energy calibration. We use the direct measurement of the analog signal from the pixel preamplifier and comparator to characterize pulse shape differences for different sources, e.g. internal test pulses, external test pulses, ionizing radiation, etc. and study their interchangeability. Accurate per-pixel energy calibration of the Timepix detector enables the direct measurement of the energy deposited by different types of ionizing radiation. The energy calibration process requires the application of a known charge to front-end electronics of each pixel. The small pixel size limits use of the radioactive sources. The 59.54 keV line from 241Am is commonly used as the highest point in calibration curve. The heavy ion dosimetry as encountered in the space radiation environment requires a considerable extrapolation to the energies in the MeV range. We have observed that for energies around and beyond 1 MeV the response of the Timepix's front-end electronics no longer follows the extrapolated calibration function. We have investigated this non-linearity and identified its source. We also propose both hardware and software solutions to suppress this effect. In this paper we show the impact on pixel calibration and the subsequent energy resolution for different detector settings as well as the resulting power consumptions. We discuss the parameter optimization for several different real-world applications.

  13. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pennacchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect. Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons.

  14. Attainment of 40.5 pm spatial resolution using 300 kV scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with fifth-order aberration corrector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ryo; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-12-22

    The achievement of a fine electron probe for high-resolution imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy requires technological developments, especially in electron optics. For this purpose, we developed a microscope with a fifth-order aberration corrector that operates at 300 kV. The contrast flat region in an experimental Ronchigram, which indicates the aberration-free angle, was expanded to 70 mrad. By using a probe with convergence angle of 40 mrad in the scanning transmission electron microscope at 300 kV, we attained the spatial resolution of 40.5 pm, which is the projected interatomic distance between Ga-Ga atomic columns of GaN observed along [212] direction. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of manganese oxides: Application to Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffont, L., E-mail: Lydia.laffont@ensiacet.fr [Institut Carnot, Laboratoire CIRIMAT (equipe MEMO), CNRS UMR 5085, ENSIACET, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 74233, 31432 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Gibot, P. [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides CNRS UMR 6007, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens cedex 9 (France)

    2010-11-15

    Manganese oxides particularly Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} Hausmannite are currently used in many industrial applications such as catalysis, magnetism, electrochemistry or air contamination. The downsizing of the particle size of such material permits an improvement of its intrinsic properties and a consequent increase in its performances compared to a classical micron-sized material. Here, we report a novel synthesis of hydrophilic nano-sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, a bivalent oxide, for which a precise characterization is necessary and for which the determination of the valency proves to be essential. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and particularly High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) allow us to perform these measurements on the nanometer scale. Well crystallized 10-20 nm sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles with sphere-shaped morphology were thus successfully synthesized. Meticulous EELS investigations allowed the determination of a Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio of 1.5, i.e. slightly lower than the theoretical value of 2 for the bulk Hausmannite manganese oxide. This result emphasizes the presence of vacancies on the tetrahedral sites in the structure of the as-synthesized nanomaterial. - Research Highlights: {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} bulk and nano were studied by XRD, TEM and EELS. {yields}XRD and TEM determine the degree of crystallinity and the narrow grain size. {yields}HREELS gave access to the Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio. {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nano have vacancies on the tetrahedral sites.

  16. Genesis of presolar diamonds: Comparative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of meteoritic and terrestrial nano-diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, T. L.; Eisenhour, D. D.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Buseck, P. R.

    1996-12-01

    Nano-diamonds isolated from acid dissolution residues of primitive carbonaceous meteorites (Allende and Murchison) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To discriminate among their most likely formation mechanisms, high-pressure shock-induced metamorphism or low-pressure vapor condensation, the microstructures of presolar diamond crystallites were compared to those of (terrestrial) synthesized nano-diamonds. The synthesized diamonds used for comparison in this study were produced by high-pressure shock waves generated in controlled detonations and by direct nucleation and homoepitaxial growth from the vapor phase in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-type processes. Microstructural features were identified that appear unique to shock metamorphism and to nucleation from the vapor phase, respectively. A comparison of these features to the microstructures found in presolar diamonds indicates that the predominant mechanism for presolar diamond formation is a vapor deposition process, suggesting a circumstellar condensation origin. A new presolar grain component has also been identified in the meteoritic residues, the (2H) hexagonal polytype of diamond (lonsdaleite).

  17. Genesis of presolar diamonds: Comparative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of meteoritic and terrestrial nano-diamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daulton, T.L. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Eisenhour, D.D.; Buseck, P.R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    Nano-diamonds isolated from acid dissolution residues of primitive carbonaceous meteorites (Allende and Murchison) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To discriminate among their most likely formation mechanisms, high-pressure shock-induced metamorphism or low-pressure vapor condensation. the microstructures of presolar diamond crystallites were compared to those of (terrestrial) synthesized nano-diamonds. The synthesized diamonds used for comparison in this study were produced by high-pressure shock waves generated in controlled detonations and by direct nucleation and homoepitaxial growth from the vapor phase in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-type processes. Microstructural features were identified that appear unique to shock metamorphism and to nucleation from the vapor phase, respectively. A comparison of these features to the microstructures found in presolar diamonds indicates that the predominant mechanism for presolar diamond formation is a vapor deposition process, suggesting a circumstellar condensation origin. A new presolar grain component has also been identified in the meteoritic residues, the (2H) hexagonal polytype of diamond (lonsdaleite). 93 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  18. High resolution electron microscopy of Ag-clusters in crystalline and non-crystalline morphologies grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Koch, Markus; Fisslthaler, Evelin; Grogger, Werner; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-06-07

    We present a first investigation of structural properties of Ag clusters with a diameter of up to 5.5 nm grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets (He(N)) and deposited on an amorphous C surface. With high resolution transmission electron microscope images we are able to show that in addition to the crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure, noncrystalline icosahedral (Ih), and decahedral (Dh) morphologies are grown. Relative abundances (56% fcc, 31% Dh, and 13% Ih) as well as the size distribution of each morphology (mean diameters d(fcc)=2.62(5) nm, d(Dh)=3.34(7) nm, and d(Ih)=3.93(2) nm) do not reflect the situation expected from pure energetic considerations, where small Ihs should be followed by medium sized Dhs and large fccs. Instead, kinetic factors seem to play an important role in the formation of these structures, as it appears to be the case for clusters formed by inert gas aggregation. Considering the low temperatures (0.37 K) and extremely high cooling rates, we discuss basic ideas that might lead to a qualitative picture of the cluster formation process inside He(N).

  19. Subnanometer-resolution electron cryomicroscopy-based domain models for the cytoplasmic region of skeletal muscle RyR channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serysheva, Irina I; Ludtke, Steven J; Baker, Matthew L; Cong, Yao; Topf, Maya; Eramian, David; Sali, Andrej; Hamilton, Susan L; Chiu, Wah

    2008-07-15

    The skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RyR1), a homotetramer, regulates the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate muscle contraction. In this work, we have delineated the RyR1 monomer boundaries in a subnanometer-resolution electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) density map. In the cytoplasmic region of each RyR1 monomer, 36 alpha-helices and 7 beta-sheets can be resolved. A beta-sheet was also identified close to the membrane-spanning region that resembles the cytoplasmic pore structures of inward rectifier K(+) channels. Three structural folds, generated for amino acids 12-565 using comparative modeling and cryo-EM density fitting, localize close to regions implicated in communication with the voltage sensor in the transverse tubules. Eleven of the 15 disease-related residues for these domains are mapped to the surface of these models. Four disease-related residues are found in a basin at the interfaces of these regions, creating a pocket in which the immunophilin FKBP12 can fit. Taken together, these results provide a structural context for both channel gating and the consequences of certain malignant hyperthermia and central core disease-associated mutations in RyR1.

  20. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Béché, Armand

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. A strain value of 5.4%60.1% has been determined which...

  1. Achievable Resolution from Images of Biological Specimens Acquired from a 4k × 4k CCD Camera in a 300-kV Electron Cryomicroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-Hua; Jakana, Joanita; Liu, Xiangan; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin and ε 15 bacteriophage were used as biological test specimens to evaluate the potential structural resolution with images captured from a 4k × 4k charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in a 300-kV electron cryomicroscope. The phase residuals computed from the bacteriorhodopsin CCD images taken at 84,000 × effective magnification averaged 15.7° out to 5.8-Å resolution relative to Henderson’s published values. Using a single-particle reconstruction technique, we obtained an 8.2-Å icosahedral structure of ε 15 bacteriophage with the CCD images collected at an effective magnification of 56,000 ×. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to retrieve biological structures to a resolution close to 2/3 of the Nyquist frequency from the CCD images recorded in a 300-kV electron cryomicroscope at a moderately high but practically acceptable microscope magnification. PMID:18514542

  2. Achievable resolution from images of biological specimens acquired from a 4k x 4k CCD camera in a 300-kV electron cryomicroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-Hua; Jakana, Joanita; Liu, Xiangan; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2008-07-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin and epsilon 15 bacteriophage were used as biological test specimens to evaluate the potential structural resolution with images captured from a 4k x 4k charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in a 300-kV electron cryomicroscope. The phase residuals computed from the bacteriorhodopsin CCD images taken at 84,000x effective magnification averaged 15.7 degrees out to 5.8-A resolution relative to Henderson's published values. Using a single-particle reconstruction technique, we obtained an 8.2-A icosahedral structure of epsilon 15 bacteriophage with the CCD images collected at an effective magnification of 56,000x. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to retrieve biological structures to a resolution close to 2/3 of the Nyquist frequency from the CCD images recorded in a 300-kV electron cryomicroscope at a moderately high but practically acceptable microscope magnification.

  3. Large-volume reconstruction of brain tissue from high-resolution serial section images acquired by SEM-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-01-01

    With recent improvements in instrumentation and computational tools, serial section electron microscopy has become increasingly straightforward. A new method for imaging ultrathin serial sections is developed based on a field emission scanning electron microscope fitted with a transmitted electron detector. This method is capable of automatically acquiring high-resolution serial images with a large field size and very little optical and physical distortions. In this chapter, we describe the procedures leading to the generation and analyses of a large-volume stack of high-resolution images (64 μm × 64 μm × 10 μm, or larger, at 2 nm pixel size), including how to obtain large-area serial sections of uniform thickness from well-preserved brain tissue that is rapidly perfusion-fixed with mixed aldehydes, processed with a microwave-enhanced method, and embedded into epoxy resin.

  4. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Pan Heng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Grigoropoulos, Costas P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Luscombe, Christine K [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Frechet, Jean M J [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Poulikakos, Dimos [Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-08-29

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates.

  5. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  6. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  7. High-resolution spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for surface structure determination and the study of correlated electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, Jr., Edward John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The surface structure of three molecular adsorbate systems on transition metal surfaces, (√3 x √3)R30° and (1.5 x 1.5)R18° CO adsorbed on Cu(111), and c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), have been determined using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS). The adsorption site and bond lengths are reported for the adsorbate-metal bond and the first two substrate layers. The ARPEFS diffraction pattern of the shake-up peak for c(2x2) N2/Ni(100) is also discussed. A unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level satellites is presented. We show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. Specifically, we present data for the C 1s from (√3x√3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110), N is from c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), and Ni 3p from clean nickel(111). The satellite peaks in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature. A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FF-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The spectrometer is designed for ultra-high resolution theoretical resolving power E/ΔE≈-106 in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  8. Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Francesca; Zhao, Wenting; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Duan, Liting; Schnitker, Jan; van de Burgt, Yoeri; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Liu, Bofei; Salleo, Alberto; Cui, Lifeng; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2017-08-22

    The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

  9. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  10. Identifying the crystallinity, phase, and arsenic uptake of the nanomineral schwertmannite using analytical high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Kim, B.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Schwertmannite, an iron oxyhydroxide sulfate nanomineral, plays a significant role in the geochemistry of acid mine drainage (AMD) as a metastable phase with respect to goethite and by retaining toxic metals, e.g. arsenic [1]. Schwertmannite’s characteristic morphology is needles 100-300 nm long and only 5-10 nm in diameter extending from a dense aggregate. The poorly-and nano-crystalline nature of this mineral requires using high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) to be fully characterized. We used HRTEM to identify the polyphasic nature of natural samples of schwertmannite collected from the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain. In order to analyze the dense core, samples were prepared in thin section using an ultramicrotome. Data on a sample identified as pure schwertmannite through powder XRD shows the presence of 5-10 nm goethite nanocrystals making up a significant portion of one of the nanoneedle tips (Figure 1). These nanocrystals exhibit lattice fringes and faceted surfaces, both of which match that expected for goethite. The great majority of the nanoneedles are poorly-crystalline (no lattice fringes) with atomically rough surfaces which may be highly active in the uptake of As. The presence of a range of phases and crystallinities in this sample demonstrate incipient stages of the mechanism that results in transformation of schwertmannite to goethite. Further analytical TEM analyses will help us track sorption/desorption, as well as the specific locations of As within these materials upon initial formation, as well as during transformation. [1] Acero et al. (2006) GCA 70, 4130-4139. Figure 1. HRTEM image of 'schwertmannite' nanoneedle with FFT data (inset).

  11. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. High-Resolution "Fleezers": Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers Combined with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Kevin D; Comstock, Matthew J; Chemla, Yann R

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in optical tweezers have greatly expanded their measurement capabilities. A new generation of hybrid instrument that combines nanomechanical manipulation with fluorescence detection-fluorescence optical tweezers, or "fleezers"-is providing a powerful approach to study complex macromolecular dynamics. Here, we describe a combined high-resolution optical trap/confocal fluorescence microscope that can simultaneously detect sub-nanometer displacements, sub-piconewton forces, and single-molecule fluorescence signals. The primary technical challenge to these hybrid instruments is how to combine both measurement modalities without sacrificing the sensitivity of either one. We present general design principles to overcome this challenge and provide detailed, step-by-step instructions to implement them in the construction and alignment of the instrument. Lastly, we present a set of protocols to perform a simple, proof-of-principle experiment that highlights the instrument capabilities.

  13. Localization of Post-Translational Modifications in Peptide Mixtures via High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Followed by Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Matthew A.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-12-01

    Precise localization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins and peptides is an outstanding challenge in proteomics. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has dramatically advanced PTM analyses, mixtures of localization variants that commonly coexist in cells often require prior separation. Although differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) achieves broad variant resolution, the need for standards to identify the features has limited the utility of approach. Here we demonstrate full a priori characterization of variant mixtures by high-resolution FAIMS coupled to ETD and the procedures to systematically extract the FAIMS spectra for all variants from such data.

  14. Label-free cellular structure imaging with 82 nm lateral resolution using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-07-25

    We present label-free and high spatial-resolution imaging for specific cellular structures using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope (EXA microscope). Images of the actin filament and mitochondria of stained HeLa cells, obtained by fluorescence and EXA microscopy, were compared to identify cellular structures. Based on these results, we demonstrated the feasibility of identifying label-free cellular structures at a spatial resolution of 82 nm. Using numerical analysis, we calculated the imaging depth region and determined the spot size of a cathodoluminescent (CL) light source to be 83 nm at the membrane surface.

  15. Piezoelectric field around threading dislocation in GaN determined on the basis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, G; Kret, S; Ruterana, P

    2006-09-01

    A new method of determining the piezoelectric field around dislocations from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images is presented. In order to determine the electrical potential distribution near a dislocation core, we used the distortion field, obtained using the geometrical phase method and the non-linear finite element method. The electrical field distribution was determined taking into account the inhomogeneous strain distribution, finite geometry of the sample and the full couplings between elastic and electrical fields. The results of the calculation for a transmission electron microscopy thin sample are presented.

  16. Efficient 3D-CTF correction for cryo-electron tomography using NovaCTF improves subtomogram averaging resolution to 3.4Å.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turoňová, Beata; Schur, Florian K M; Wan, William; Briggs, John A G

    2017-09-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) allows cellular ultrastructures and macromolecular complexes to be imaged in three-dimensions in their native environments. Cryo-electron tomograms are reconstructed from projection images taken at defined tilt-angles. In order to recover high-resolution information from cryo-electron tomograms, it is necessary to measure and correct for the contrast transfer function (CTF) of the microscope. Most commonly, this is performed using protocols that approximate the sample as a two-dimensional (2D) plane. This approximation accounts for differences in defocus and therefore CTF across the tilted sample. It does not account for differences in defocus of objects at different heights within the sample; instead, a 3D approach is required. Currently available approaches for 3D-CTF correction are computationally expensive and have not been widely implemented. Here we simulate the benefits of 3D-CTF correction for high-resolution subtomogram averaging, and present a user-friendly, computationally-efficient 3D-CTF correction tool, NovaCTF, that is compatible with standard tomogram reconstruction workflows in IMOD. We validate the approach on synthetic data and test it using subtomogram averaging of real data. Consistent with our simulations, we find that 3D-CTF correction allows high-resolution structures to be obtained with much smaller subtomogram averaging datasets than are required using 2D-CTF. We also show that using equivalent dataset sizes, 3D-CTF correction can be used to obtain higher-resolution structures. We present a 3.4Å resolution structure determined by subtomogram averaging. Copyright © 2017 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC-triple quadrupole MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Hans G.J., E-mail: hans.mol@wur.nl; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg{sup −1}) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg{sup −1}. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive

  19. High resolution low dose transmission electron microscopy real-time imaging and manipulation of nano-scale objects in the electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jr., R. Malcolm; Barnes, Zack [Austin, TX; Sawatari, Chie [Shizuoka, JP; Kondo, Tetsuo [Kukuoka, JP

    2008-02-26

    The present invention includes a method, apparatus and system for nanofabrication in which one or more target molecules are identified for manipulation with an electron beam and the one or more target molecules are manipulated with the electron beam to produce new useful materials.

  20. Clinical count rate performance of an LSO PET/CT scanner utilizing a new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J. P. J.; Townsend, D. W.

    2006-12-01

    A new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution has recently been incorporated into a 16 slice LSO PET/CT scanner for imaging applications in oncology. The new electronics are designed to work optimally with the lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillator. Clinical performance of the LSO PET/CT is examined before and after upgrading to the new PICO 3D electronics, and compared with results using the NEMA NU 2 standard for evaluating scanner performance. Improved noise-equivalent count rates are seen in clinical studies, and reduced scatter fractions are observed, consistent with the increased lower-level energy threshold used to reject scatter events in the upgraded configuration.

  1. Electron transport simulation in the range 1 keV-4 MeV for the purpose of high-resolution dosimetric application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V. [Univ. de Cergy-Pontoise, Neuville/Oise (France). Lab. Pharmacophores Redox, Phytochimie et Radiobiologie; Cirioni, L.; Patau, J.P. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Faculte de Pharmacie

    2001-07-01

    Experimental spectrometry and dosimetry can offer some reliable answers. However, they are not easy to implement in some specific situations. Furthermore, information on dose distributions cannot always be obtained with the desirable geometrical resolution. A way to get rid of these disadvantages consist in simulating every successive individual interactions suffered by electrons and photons along their path. We applied this principle to simulate the response of a detector placed in the field of beta-gamma sources, which maximum energy does not exceed 4 MeV. A part of this work is presented here, which concerns Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in materials encountered in experimental dosimetric devices. Electrons were followed down to a cutoff energy of 1 keV. (orig.)

  2. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  3. Proposal to assemble a high resolution-electron sensitive-energy flow calorimeter in the NEULAND spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A ..gamma.. catcher and a liquid scintillation calorimeter module in a simple configuration that is well suited to the investigation of several different neutrino induced processes are described. The variety of neutrino beams now available at Fermilab and synchrotron intensity and energy together with the high resolution calorimeter allow a multiplicity of experiments to be carried out with a single detector configuration.

  4. Focused ion beam (FIB) combined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy: a promising tool for 3D analysis of chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Pérez-Willard, Fabián; Zeile, Ulrike; Wanner, Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling in combination with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was applied to investigations of metaphase barley chromosomes, providing new insight into the chromatin packaging in the chromosome interior and 3D distribution of histone variants in the centromeric region. Whole mount chromosomes were sectioned with FIB with thicknesses in the range of 7-20nm, resulting in up to 2000 sections, which allow high resolution three-dimensional reconstruction. For the first time, it could be shown that the chromosome interior is characterized by a network of interconnected cavities, with openings to the chromosome surface. In combination with immunogold labeling, the centromere-correlated distribution of histone variants (phosphorylated histone H3, CENH3) could be investigated with FIB in three dimensions. Limitations of classical SEM analysis of whole mount chromosomes with back-scattered electrons requiring higher accelerating voltages, e.g. faint and blurred interior signals, could be overcome with FIB milling: from within the chromosome even very small labels in the range of 10nm could be precisely visualized. This allowed direct quantification of marker molecules in a three-dimensional context. Distribution of DNA in the chromosome interior could be directly analyzed after staining with a DNA-specific platinorganic compound Platinum Blue. Higher resolution visualization of DNA distribution could be performed by preparation of FIB lamellae with the in situ lift-out technique followed by investigation in dark field with a scanning transmission electron detector (STEM) at 30kV.

  5. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A/sup 2/ in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure.

  6. Quantitative measurement of mean inner potential and specimen thickness from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms of ultra-thin layered WSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Florian, E-mail: f.winkler@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Tavabi, Amir H. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gemeinschaftslabor für Elektronenmikroskopie (GFE), RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Duchamp, Martial [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Yucelen, Emrah [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, Eindhoven 5600 KA (Netherlands); Borghardt, Sven; Kardynal, Beata E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9 (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); and others

    2017-07-15

    The phase and amplitude of the electron wavefunction that has passed through ultra-thin flakes of WSe{sub 2} is measured from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms. Both the experimental measurements and corresponding computer simulations are used to show that, as a result of dynamical diffraction, the spatially averaged phase does not increase linearly with specimen thickness close to an [001] zone axis orientation even when the specimen has a thickness of only a few layers. It is then not possible to infer the local specimen thickness of the WSe{sub 2} from either the phase or the amplitude alone. Instead, we show that the combined analysis of phase and amplitude from experimental measurements and simulations allows an accurate determination of the local specimen thickness. The relationship between phase and projected potential is shown to be approximately linear for extremely thin specimens that are tilted by several degrees in certain directions from the [001] zone axis. A knowledge of the specimen thickness then allows the electrostatic potential to be determined from the measured phase. By using this combined approach, we determine a value for the mean inner potential of WSe{sub 2} of 18.9±0.8 V, which is 12% lower than the value calculated from neutral atom scattering factors. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of high resolution electron holograms of WSe{sub 2}. • Local specimen thickness determination and estimation of tilt angle. • Mean inner potential evaluation of WSe2 avoiding dynamical diffraction.

  7. Two color multichannel heterodyne interferometer set up for high spatial resolution electron density profile measurements in TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira, P.; Criado, A. R.; Acedo, P. [Department of Electronics Technology, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Madrid 28911 (Spain); Esteban, L.; Sanchez, M.; Sanchez, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por ConfinamientoMagnetico-CIEMAT, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    A high spatial resolution two color [CO{sub 2}, {lambda}=10.6 {mu}m/Nd:YAG (Nd:YAG denotes neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), and {lambda}=1.064 {mu}m] expanded-beam multichannel heterodyne interferometer has been installed on the TJ-II stellarator. Careful design of the optical system has allowed complete control on the evolution of both Gaussian beams along the interferometer, as well as the evaluation and optimization of the spatial resolution to be expected in the measurements. Five CO{sub 2} (measurement) channels and three Nd:YAG (vibration compensation) channels have been used to illuminate the plasma with a probe beam of 100 mm size. An optimum interpolation method has been applied to recover both interferometric phasefronts prior to mechanical vibration subtraction. The first results of the installed diagnostic are presented in this paper.

  8. Features of reovirus outer capsid protein mu1 revealed by electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction of the virion at 7.0 Angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Ji, Yongchang; Zhang, Lan; Harrison, Stephen C; Marinescu, Dan C; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2005-10-01

    Reovirus is a useful model for addressing the molecular basis of membrane penetration by one of the larger nonenveloped animal viruses. We now report the structure of the reovirus virion at approximately 7.0 A resolution as obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. Several features of the myristoylated outer capsid protein mu1, not seen in a previous X-ray crystal structure of the mu1-sigma3 heterohexamer, are evident in the virion. These features appear to be important for stabilizing the outer capsid, regulating the conformational changes in mu1 that accompany perforation of target membranes, and contributing directly to membrane penetration during cell entry.

  9. High resolution electron microscopy studies of twin boundary structures in B19{prime} martensite in the Ti-Ni shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, M.; Itai, I.; Ohgi, H.; Chiba, A. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Resource Engineering; Yamauchi, K. [Tokin Corp., Sendai (Japan). Materials Science and Development Lab.

    1995-03-01

    The boundary structure of the <011> Type II, {l_brace}11{bar 1}{r_brace} Type I, {l_brace}011{r_brace} Type I, (100) compound and (001) compound twins in the B19{prime} martensite in the Ti-Ni shape memory alloy was observed in the edge-on state by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The lattice images of the Type I and the compound twins exhibit the well-defined crystallographic features of those boundaries. Lattice image of the <011> Type II twin taken from the unique {eta}{sub 1} axis suggests that neither ledge nor step structures are present at the irrational boundary.

  10. Spatially-resolved in-situ structural study of organic electronic devices with nanoscale resolution: the plasmonic photovoltaic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, B; Bailo, D; Albertini, V Rossi; Wright, J; Ferrero, C; Spyropoulos, G D; Stratakis, E; Kymakis, E

    2013-09-14

    A novel high spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction stratigraphy technique has been applied in-situ to an integrated plasmonic nanoparticle-based organic photovoltaic device. This original approach allows for the disclosure of structure-property relations linking large scale organic devices to length scales of local nano/hetero structures and interfaces between the different components. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Multiple resolution chirp reflectometry for fault localization and diagnosis in a high voltage cable in automotive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seung Jin; Lee, Chun Ku; Shin, Yong-June; Park, Jin Bae

    2016-12-01

    A multiple chirp reflectometry system with a fault estimation process is proposed to obtain multiple resolution and to measure the degree of fault in a target cable. A multiple resolution algorithm has the ability to localize faults, regardless of fault location. The time delay information, which is derived from the normalized cross-correlation between the incident signal and bandpass filtered reflected signals, is converted to a fault location and cable length. The in-phase and quadrature components are obtained by lowpass filtering of the mixed signal of the incident signal and the reflected signal. Based on in-phase and quadrature components, the reflection coefficient is estimated by the proposed fault estimation process including the mixing and filtering procedure. Also, the measurement uncertainty for this experiment is analyzed according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we conduct comparative experiments to detect and measure faults under different conditions. Considering the installation environment of the high voltage cable used in an actual vehicle, target cable length and fault position are designed. To simulate the degree of fault, the variety of termination impedance (10 Ω , 30 Ω , 50 Ω , and 1 \\text{k} Ω ) are used and estimated by the proposed method in this experiment. The proposed method demonstrates advantages in that it has multiple resolution to overcome the blind spot problem, and can assess the state of the fault.

  12. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium.

  13. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  14. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  15. Building Atomic Models of the Ion Channels Based on Low Resolution Electron Microscopy Maps and Homology Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoseletsky, Valery; Malak, Olfat A; Loussouarn, Gildas; Sokolova, Olga S

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels play pivotal roles in excitable and non-excitable cells. For many decades, structural properties and molecular mechanisms of these channels were inferred from functional observations. At the turn of the twenty-first century, structural biology revealed major aspects in the structural basis of ion channel organization, permeation, and gating. Among the available tools, homology modeling associated with low resolution microscopy helps in delineating the different structural elements of voltage-gated channels. Here, we describe in detail the methodology of homology modeling, using the 3D structure of the Kv2.1ΔCTA ion channel as a reference.

  16. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic structure investigation of novel superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buling, Anna

    2014-05-15

    The discovery of superconductivity in iron-based pnictides in 2008 gave rise to a high advance in the research of high-temperature superconductors. But up to now there is no generally admitted theory of the non-BCS mechanism of these superconductors. The electron and hole doped Ba122 (BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}) compounds investigated in this thesis are supposed to be suitable model systems for studying the electronic behavior in order to shed light on the superconducting mechanisms. The 3d-transition metal doped Ba122 compounds are investigated using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), while the completely hole doped K122 is observed using XPS. The experimental measurements are complemented by theoretical calculations. A further new class of superconductors is represented by the electride 12CaO*7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Here superconductivity can be realized by electrons accommodated in the crystallographic sub-nanometer-sized cavities, while the mother compound is a wide band gap insulator. Electronic structure investigations, represented by XPS, XAS and resonant X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ResPES), carried out in this work, should help to illuminate this unconventional superconductivity and resolve a debate of competing models for explaining the existence of superconductivity in this compound.

  18. Arbitrary Angular Momentum Electron Repulsion Integrals with Graphical Processing Units: Application to the Resolution of Identity Hartree-Fock Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Wennmohs, Frank; Neese, Frank

    2017-07-11

    A resolution of identity based implementation of the Hartree-Fock method on graphical processing units (GPUs) is presented that is capable of handling basis functions with arbitrary angular momentum. For practical reasons, only functions up to (ff|f) angular momentum are presently calculated on the GPU, thus leaving the calculation of higher angular momenta integrals on the CPU of the hybrid CPU-GPU environment. Speedups of up to a factor of 30 are demonstrated relative to state-of-the-art serial and parallel CPU implementations. Benchmark calculations with over 3500 contracted basis functions (def2-SVP or def2-TZVP basis sets) are reported. The presented implementation supports all devices with OpenCL support and is capable of utilizing multiple GPU cards over either MPI or OpenCL itself.

  19. Fabrication of high resolution n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer alpha particle detectors, defect characterization and electronic noise analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavalla, Kelvin J.; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2013-09-01

    In the present work high-resolution alpha particle detectors have been fabricated on high quality 20 μm thick n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers. Schottky barrier detectors have been fabricated by depositing 10 nm thick nickel contacts on the Si face of the epilayers. The detectors were characterized using current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (CV), alpha spectroscopic measurements, and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). I-V measurements revealed a barrier height of ~1.6 eV, diode ideality factor of 1.09, and leakage current of the order of 14 pA at an operating bias of 110 V. C-V measurements revealed low effective doping concentrations of 3.1 × 1014 cm-3 in the epilayers. A micropipe density lower than 1 cm-2 was evaluated in the epilayers. Pulse-height spectroscopy exhibited energy resolution as high as 0.37 % for 5.48 MeV alpha particles with a detector active area of 11 mm2. A diffusion length of ~13.2 μm for holes has been determined in these detectors following a calculation based on a drift-diffusion model. Detailed electronic noise analysis in terms of equivalent noise charge (ENC) was carried out to study the effect of various noise components that contribute to the total electronic noise in the detection system. The noise analysis revealed that the white series noise due to the detector capacitance has substantial effect on the detector's overall performance. DLTS measurements have revealed the presence of at least four majority (electron) carrier trap levels that can act as recombination/generation or trapping centers.

  20. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz, E-mail: gchojnowski@genesilico.pl [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Waleń, Tomasz [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Bujnicki, Janusz M. [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  1. Atomic-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Movies for Study of Organic Molecules, Assemblies, and Reactions: The First 10 Years of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2017-06-20

    A molecule is a quantum mechanical entity. "Watching motions and reactions of a molecule with our eyes" has therefore been a dream of chemists for a century. This dream has come true with the aid of the movies of atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopic (AR-TEM) molecular images through real-time observation of dynamic motions of single organic molecules (denoted hereafter as single-molecule atomic-resolution real-time (SMART) TEM imaging). Since 2007, we have reported movies of a variety of single organic molecules, organometallic molecules, and their assemblies, which are rotating, stretching, and reacting. Like movies in the theater, the atomic-resolution molecular movies provide us information on the 3-D structures of the molecules and also their time evolution. The success of the SMART-TEM imaging crucially depends on the development of "chemical fishhooks" with which fish (organic molecules) in solution can be captured on a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT, serving as a "fishing rod"). The captured molecules are connected to a slowly vibrating CNT, and their motions are displayed on a monitor in real time. A "fishing line" connecting the fish and the rod may be a σ-bond, a van der Waals force, or other weak connections. Here, the molecule/CNT system behaves as a coupled oscillator, where the low-frequency anisotropic vibration of the CNT is transmitted to the molecules via the weak chemical connections that act as an energy filter. Interpretation of the observed motions of the molecules at atomic resolution needs us to consider the quantum mechanical nature of electrons as well as bond rotation, letting us deviate from the conventional statistical world of chemistry. What new horizons can we explore? We have so far carried out conformational studies of individual molecules, assigning anti or gauche conformations to each C-C bond in conformers that we saw. We can also determine the structures of van der Waals assemblies of organic molecules

  2. Structure of AAV-DJ, a Retargeted Gene Therapy Vector: Cryo-Electron Microscopy at 4.5Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; O’Donnell, Jason K.; Meyer, Nancy L.; Xie, Qing; Taylor, Kenneth A.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary AAV-DJ, a leading candidate vector for liver gene therapy, was created through random homologous recombination followed by directed evolution, selecting for in vivo liver tropism and resistance to in vitro immune neutralization. Here, the 4.5Å resolution cryo-EM structure is determined, the first for an engineered AAV vector, revealing structural features that underscore its unique phenotype. The heparan sulfate receptor-binding site in AAV-DJ is little changed from AAV-2, binding measurements revealing similar heparin affinity. A loop that is antigenic in other serotypes has a unique conformation in AAV-DJ that would conflict with the binding of an AAV-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody. This is consistent with increased resistance to neutralization by human polyclonal sera, suggesting that the selected changed tropism may be a secondary effect of altered immune interactions. The reconstruction exemplifies analysis of fine structural changes and the potential of cryo-EM, in favorable cases, to characterize mutant or ligand-bound complexes. PMID:22727812

  3. Structure of AAV-DJ, a retargeted gene therapy vector: cryo-electron microscopy at 4.5 Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas F; O'Donnell, Jason K; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Taylor, Kenneth A; Stagg, Scott M; Chapman, Michael S

    2012-08-08

    AAV-DJ, a leading candidate vector for liver gene therapy, was created through random homologous recombination followed by directed evolution, selecting for in vivo liver tropism and resistance to in vitro immune neutralization. Here, the 4.5 Å resolution cryo-EM structure is determined for the engineered AAV vector, revealing structural features that illuminate its phenotype. The heparan sulfate receptor-binding site is little changed from AAV-2, and heparin-binding affinity is similar. A loop that is antigenic in other serotypes has a unique conformation in AAV-DJ that would conflict with the binding of an AAV-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody. This is consistent with increased resistance to neutralization by human polyclonal sera, raising the possibility that changed tropism may be a secondary effect of altered immune interactions. The reconstruction exemplifies analysis of fine structural changes and the potential of cryo-EM, in favorable cases, to characterize mutant or ligand-bound complexes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ photoemission spectroscopy for chemical reaction dynamics study of Si (001) oxidation by using high-energy-resolution synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Teraoka, Y

    2002-01-01

    The translation kinetic energy of incident molecules is an important parameter for the study of surface chemical reaction mechanisms. New adsorption reactions, which have been induced by the O sub 2 translational kinetic energy up to 3 eV, have been found in the O sub 2 Si(001) system by applying surface-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy with supersonic molecular beam techniques and high-energy-resolution synchrotron radiation. The termination of dangling bonds of the topmost Si-dimers strongly affected the oxidation of their backbonds. By controlling the translational kinetic energy of incident O sub 2 molecules, the formation of oxide layers at a sub-nanometer scale is possible at room temperature. (author)

  5. A high-resolution electron microscopy investigation of TiO sub 2 (B)-supported vanadium oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallenberg, L.R.; Sanati, M.; Andersson, A. (Lund Institute of Technology (Sweden))

    1990-11-01

    TiO{sub 2}(B) crystals were found to be isomorphic with those of its precursor, K{sub 2}TI{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The former crystals had a large number of facetted voids, 3-30 nm, formed as a result of the removal of potassium and water in preceding hydrolysis and calcination steps, respectively. TiO{sub 2}(B)-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings in the range 0.25-10 theoretical layers were prepared by impregnation of the support with an oxalic acid solution of NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} followed by calcination in air. HREM micrographs of catalysts with a low vanadium loading, recorded using a low electron-dose imaging technique, showed that the surfaces, in the initial stage, were without any anomalous surface structure. This observation may be due to a similar structure of the support and the deposited vanadia phase. At high vanadium loadings, both amorphous and crystalline particles were seen, in agreement with the features revealed by the use of IR spectroscopy. For catalysts with low vanadium loadings, the IR difference spectra showed the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated V{sup 4+} and V{sub 5+} species. In a fully converged electron beam, reduction of the support and the vanadia phases occurred, resulting in the formation of small crystallites. The catalysts were used for the oxidation of toluene to benzaldehyde. However, contrary to what has been observed for the ammoxidation producing benzonitrile, no enhanced catalytic properties, in comparison with those of crystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, were obtained using TiO{sub 2}(B) as support.

  6. Electronic band structure of ReS2 by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James L.; Hart, Lewis S.; Wolverson, Daniel; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-09-01

    The rhenium-based transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are atypical of the TMD family due to their highly anisotropic crystalline structure and are recognized as promising materials for two-dimensional heterostructure devices. The nature of the band gap (direct or indirect) for bulk, few-, and single-layer forms of ReS2 is of particular interest, due to its comparatively weak interplanar interaction. However, the degree of interlayer interaction and the question of whether a transition from indirect to direct gap is observed on reducing thickness (as in other TMDs) are controversial. We present a direct determination of the valence band structure of bulk ReS2 using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find a clear in-plane anisotropy due to the presence of chains of Re atoms, with a strongly directional effective mass which is larger in the direction orthogonal to the Re chains (2.2 me ) than along them (1.6 me ). An appreciable interplane interaction results in an experimentally measured difference of ≈100 -200 meV between the valence band maxima at the Z point (0,0,1/2 ) and the Γ point (0,0,0) of the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. This leads to a direct gap at Z and a close-lying but larger gap at Γ , implying that bulk ReS2 is marginally indirect. This may account for recent conflicting transport and photoluminescence measurements and the resulting uncertainty about the nature of the band gap in this material.

  7. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058577 (Japan); Xu, Z., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kvashnin, D. G. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Sorokin, P. B. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutsky Lane 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  8. Features of Reovirus Outer Capsid Protein μ1 Revealed by Electron Cryomicroscopy and Image Reconstruction of the Virion at 7.0 Å Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Ji, Yongchang; Zhang, Lan; Harrison, Stephen C.; Marinescu, Dan C.; Nibert, Max L.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reovirus is a useful model for addressing the molecular basis of membrane penetration by one of the larger nonenveloped animal viruses. We now report the structure of the reovirus virion at 7.0 Å resolution as obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. Several features of the myristoylated outer capsid protein μ1, not seen in a previous X-ray crystal structure of the μ1-σ3 heterohexamer, are evident in the virion. These features appear to be important for stabilizing the outer capsid, regulating the conformational changes in μ1 that accompany perforation of target membranes, and contributing directly to membrane penetration during cell entry. PMID:16216585

  9. High-resolution radial distribution function of pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon measured using tilted-illumination selected-area electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecki, Alexander; Liu, Amelia C Y; Petersen, Timothy C

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution radial distribution functions of as-implanted and thermally relaxed amorphous silicon created by ion implantation were measured using tilted-illumination selected area electron diffraction at room temperature. The diffracted intensities were measured out to a maximum scattering vector 2 sin(θ)/λ of 3.3-3.7 Å-1. The volume-averaged pair-correlation statistics of as-implanted and relaxed ion-implanted amorphous silicon are virtually indistinguishable with coordination numbers of 3.7 ± 0.3 and 3.9 ± 0.3 (for neighbors closer than 3 Å) and average bond angles of 109 ± 0.5° and 110 ± 0.6°, respectively. The atomic rearrangements in ion-implanted amorphous silicon due to a low temperature anneal are subtle.

  10. Suggestive evidence of a vesicle-mediated mode of cell degranulation in chromaffin cells. A high-resolution scanning electron microscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellato, Enrico; Solinas, Paola; Isola, Raffaella; Ribatti, Domenico; Riva, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In this study we used a modified osmium maceration method for high-resolution scanning electron microscopy to study some ultrastructural details fitting the schema of piecemeal degranulation in chromaffin cells. Piecemeal degranulation refers to a particulate pattern of cell secretion that is accomplished by vesicle-mediated extracellular transport of granule-stored material. We investigated adrenal samples from control and angiotensin II-treated rats, and identified a variable proportion of smooth, 30–60-nm-diameter vesicles in the cytoplasm of chromaffin cells. A percentage of these vesicles were interspersed in the cytosol among chromaffin granules but the majority appeared to be attached to granules. Remarkably, the number of unattached cytoplasmic vesicles was greatly increased in chromaffin cells from angiotensin II-treated animals. Vesicles of the same structure and dimension were detected close to or attached to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane; these, too, were increased in number in chromaffin cells from rats stimulated with angiotensin II. In specimens shaken with a rotating agitator during maceration, the cytoplasmic organelles could be partially removed and the fine structure of the vesicular interaction with the inner side of the plasma membrane emerged most clearly. A proportion of chromaffin granules showed protrusions that we interpreted as vesicular structures budding from the granular envelope. In some instances, the transection plane intersected granules with putative vesicles emerging from the surfaces. In these cases, the protrusions of budding vesicles could be observed from the internal side. This study provides high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images compatible with a vesicle-mediated degranulation mode of cell secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells. The data indicating an increase in the number of vesicles observed in chromaffin cells after stimulation with the chromaffin cell secretagogue angiotensin II suggests

  11. Label-Free Analysis of Single Viruses with a Resolution Comparable to That of Electron Microscopy and the Throughput of Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling; Zhu, Shaobin; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Wenqiang; Wang, Shuo; Chen, Chaoxiang; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-08-22

    Viruses are by far the most abundant biological entities on our planet, yet existing characterization methods are limited by either their speed or lack of resolution. By applying a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) to precisely quantify the extremely weak elastically scattered light from single viral particles, we herein report the label-free analysis of viruses with a resolution comparable to that of electron microscopy and the throughput of flow cytometry. The detection of single viruses with diameters down to 27 nm is described. T7 and lambda bacteriophages, which differ in size by as little as 4 nm, could be baseline-resolved. Moreover, subtle structural differences of the same viral particles can be discriminated. Using monodisperse silica nanoparticles as the size reference standards, the virus sizes measured by the HSFCM are in agreement with the equivalent particle diameters derived from their structural dimensions. The HSFCM opens a new avenue for virus characterization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Quantifying B Site Disorder in Polycrystalline and Single Crystal Yb2Ti2O7 Pyrochlore by Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy at Atomic Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Xin, Yan; Zhou, Haidong

    The cubic pyrochlore oxides, A2B2O7, have attracted much attention over the past 20 years. A and B ions reside on two distinct interpenetrating lattices of corner-sharing tetrahedral. It has been noticed that the magnetic ground states of Yb2Ti2O7 are sample dependent. It could have long-range ordered collinear ferromagnetic state, or non-collinear ferromagnetic fluctuations, or short ranged fluctuations. In particular, the specific heat shows sharp peaks at 265 mK for polycrystalline samples, but a broad peak at 214 mK to 250 mK for optical floating zone (OFZ) single crystals. Neutron scattering study shows that OFZ single crystals are lightly stuffed pyrochlore with 2.3% Yb on to Ti sites. We have studied this disorder by quantitative scanning electron microscopy at atomic resolution for both polycrystals and single crystals. We have carried out atomic resolution imaging of Yb2Ti2O7 along [110] and by comparing image simulations, we have quantified the Yb atoms on the Ti atomic columns, and compared the disorders for both crystals. We also related the degree of the disorder to their magnetic ground states.

  13. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Mogi, D. [Development and Marketing Department, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka, Kogyo Co., Ltd., Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0063 (Japan); Tanioka, T. [Shibukawa Development Research Laboratory, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka Kogyo Co., Ltd., Shibukawa City, Gunma 377-8513 (Japan); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, allée de la Chimie 3, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  14. Resolução lamelar num novo microscópio eletrônico de varredura Lamellar resolution in a new scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Kestenbach

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Trabalhando com elétrons de baixa energia (na faixa de 1keV, o novo microscópio eletrônico de varredura dispensa a etapa de metalização e permite a observação direta da estrutura lamelar de polímeros semicristalinos, sem a necessidade de preparação de amostras. São apresentados exemplos da morfologia lamelar do PVDF em função das condições de processamento e da temperatura de cristalização, em filmes contendo as fases a, b e g. Um outro exemplo revela o crescimento inicial da camada transcristalina que se formou ao longo de uma fibra de polietileno de ultra-alto peso molecular embutida em matriz de polietileno de alta densidade.ABSTRACT: Working with low energy electrons (in the range of 1keV, the new scanning electron microscope permits the lamellar (supermolecular structure of semicrystalline polymers to be observed directly without the need of specimen coating or of any other sample preparation technique. Microscope performance is demonstrated by several examples of high resolution micrographs which show spherulitic, lamellar and fibrilar morphologies developed by the a, b and g phases of PVDF as a function of processing conditions and crystallization temperature. Another example reveals the early stages of transcrystalline layer formation in HDPE reinforced by UHMWPE fibers.

  15. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. - Highlights: • It is explained how and why symmetry improves the efficiency of inelastic scattering calculations in general. • This includes approximate symmetries, which are often easier to specify. • Specific examples are given for core-loss scattering in STEM. • The utilization of approximate symmetries associated with ELNES, the detector geometry, and the energy loss are also discussed.

  16. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1'-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Szymon; Vdovin, Alexander; Rijs, Anouk; van Walree, Cornelis A; Zgierski, Marek Z; Buma, Wybren J

    2011-09-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We find that the excitation spectrum of S(1) displays extensive vibrational progressions that we identify to arise from large changes in the torsional angles of the phenyl rings upon electronic excitation. The extensive activity of the antisymmetric inter-ring torsional vibration provides conclusive evidence for a loss of symmetry upon excitation, leading to an inequivalence of the two phenyl rings. Nonresonant zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy from the ground state of the neutral molecule to the ground state of the radical cation, on the other hand, demonstrates that upon ionization symmetry is retained, and that the geometry changes are considerably smaller. Apart from elucidating how removal of an electron affects the structure of the molecule, these measurements provide an accurate value for the adiabatic ionization energy (65274 ± 1 cm(-1) (8.093 eV)). Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectra obtained after excitation of vibronic levels in S(1) confirm these conclusions and provide us with an extensive atlas of ionic vibronic energy levels. For higher excitation energies the excitation spectrum of S(1) becomes quite congested and shows unexpected large intensities. Ab initio calculations strongly suggest that this is caused by a conical intersection between S(1) and S(2). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Quantitative measurement of mean inner potential and specimen thickness from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms of ultra-thin layered WSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Florian; Tavabi, Amir H; Barthel, Juri; Duchamp, Martial; Yucelen, Emrah; Borghardt, Sven; Kardynal, Beata E; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E

    2017-07-01

    The phase and amplitude of the electron wavefunction that has passed through ultra-thin flakes of WSe2 is measured from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms. Both the experimental measurements and corresponding computer simulations are used to show that, as a result of dynamical diffraction, the spatially averaged phase does not increase linearly with specimen thickness close to an [001] zone axis orientation even when the specimen has a thickness of only a few layers. It is then not possible to infer the local specimen thickness of the WSe2 from either the phase or the amplitude alone. Instead, we show that the combined analysis of phase and amplitude from experimental measurements and simulations allows an accurate determination of the local specimen thickness. The relationship between phase and projected potential is shown to be approximately linear for extremely thin specimens that are tilted by several degrees in certain directions from the [001] zone axis. A knowledge of the specimen thickness then allows the electrostatic potential to be determined from the measured phase. By using this combined approach, we determine a value for the mean inner potential of WSe2 of 18.9±0.8V, which is 12% lower than the value calculated from neutral atom scattering factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAA receptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Marta

    2017-10-17

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABAA Receptors (GABAARs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABAAR clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABAAR clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  19. Correlating Fluorescence and High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) for the study of GABAAreceptor clustering induced by inhibitory synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Marta; Ravasenga, Tiziana; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Falqui, Andrea; Marotta, Roberto; Barberis, Andrea

    2017-10-23

    Both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts display activity dependent dynamic changes in their efficacy that are globally termed synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamatergic synaptic plasticity have been extensively investigated and described, those responsible for inhibitory synaptic plasticity are only beginning to be unveiled. In this framework, the ultrastructural changes of the inhibitory synapses during plasticity have been poorly investigated. Here we combined confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to characterize the fine structural rearrangements of post-synaptic GABA A Receptors (GABA A Rs) at the nanometric scale during the induction of inhibitory long-term potentiation (iLTP). Additional electron tomography (ET) experiments on immunolabelled hippocampal neurons allowed the visualization of synaptic contacts and confirmed the reorganization of post-synaptic GABA A R clusters in response to chemical iLTP inducing protocol. Altogether, these approaches revealed that, following the induction of inhibitory synaptic potentiation, GABA A R clusters increase in size and number at the post-synaptic membrane with no other major structural changes of the pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  20. Lanthanum Gadolinium Oxide: A New Electronic Device Material for CMOS Logic and Memory Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojan P. Pavunny

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the ternary dielectric, LaGdO3, synthesized and qualified in our laboratory as a novel high-k dielectric material for logic and memory device applications in terms of its excellent features that include a high linear dielectric constant (k of ~22 and a large energy bandgap of ~5.6 eV, resulting in sufficient electron and hole band offsets of ~2.57 eV and ~1.91 eV, respectively, on silicon, good thermal stability with Si and lower gate leakage current densities within the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS specified limits at the sub-nanometer electrical functional thickness level, which are desirable for advanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS, bipolar (Bi and BiCMOS chips applications, is presented in this review article.

  1. High-resolution electron microscopy studies of the precipitation of copper under neutron irradiation in an Fe-1.3WT % Cu alloy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, A. C.

    1998-12-21

    We have studied by electron microscopy the copper-rich precipitates in an Fe-1.3wt%Cu model alloy irradiated with neutrons to doses of 8.61 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa and 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa at a temperature of {approximately}270 C. In the lower dose material a majority (ca. 60%)of the precipitates visible in high-resolution electron microscopy were timed 9R precipitates of size {approximately}2-4 nm, while ca. 40% were untwinned. In the higher dose material, a majority (ca. 75%) of visible precipitates were untwinned although many still seemed to have a 9R structure. The average angle {alpha} between the herring-bone fringes in the twin variants was measured as 125{degree}, not the 129{degree} characteristic of precipitates in thermally-aged and electron-irradiated material immediately after the bcc{r_arrow}9R martensitic transformation. We argue that these results imply that the bcc{r_arrow}9R transformation of small (<4 nm) precipitates under neutron irradiation takes place at the irradiation temperature of 270 C rather than after subsequent cooling. Preliminary measurements showed that precipitate sizes did not depend strongly on dose, with a mean diameter of 3.4 {+-} 0.7 nm for the lower dose material, and 3.0 {+-} 0.5 nm for the higher dose material. This result agrees with the previous assumption that the lack of coarsening in precipitates formed under neutron irradiation is a consequence of the partial dissolution of larger precipitates by high-energy cascades.

  2. Evolution of graphene nanoribbons under low-voltage electron irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Wenpeng

    2012-01-01

    Though the all-semiconducting nature of ultrathin graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) has been demonstrated in field-effect transistors operated at room temperature with ∼105 on-off current ratios, the borderline for the potential of GNRs is still untouched. There remains a great challenge in fabricating even thinner GNRs with precise width, known edge configurations and specified crystallographic orientations. Unparalleled to other methods, low-voltage electron irradiation leads to a continuous reduction in width to a sub-nanometer range until the occurrence of structural instability. The underlying mechanisms have been investigated by the molecular dynamics method herein, combined with in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations. The structural evolution reveals that the zigzag edges are dynamically more stable than the chiral ones. Preferential bond breaking induces atomic rings and dangling bonds as the initial defects. The defects grow, combine and reconstruct to complex edge structures. Dynamic recovery is enhanced by thermal activation, especially in cooperation with electron irradiation. Roughness develops under irradiation and reaches a plateau less than 1 nm for all edge configurations after longtime exposure. These features render low-voltage electron irradiation an attractive technique in the fabrication of ultrathin GNRs for exploring the ultimate electronic properties. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweiacker, K., E-mail: Kai@zweiacker.org; Liu, C.; Wiezorek, J. M. K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, 648 Benedum Hall, 3700 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); McKeown, J. T.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H. [Materials Science Division, Physical and Life Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of the metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ∼1.3 m s{sup −1} to ∼2.5 m s{sup −1} during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s{sup −1} have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.

  4. High-Resolution Faraday Rotation and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Surface States of the Bulk-Insulating Topological Insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Tse, Wang-Kong; Brahlek, M; Morris, C M; Aguilar, R Valdés; Koirala, N; Oh, S; Armitage, N P

    2015-11-20

    We have utilized time-domain magnetoterahertz spectroscopy to investigate the low-frequency optical response of the topological insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} and Bi_{2}Se_{3} films. With both field and frequency dependence, such experiments give sufficient information to measure the mobility and carrier density of multiple conduction channels simultaneously. We observe sharp cyclotron resonances (CRs) in both materials. The small amount of Cu incorporated into the Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} induces a true bulk insulator with only a single type of conduction with a total sheet carrier density of ~4.9×10^{12}/cm^{2} and mobility as high as 4000 cm^{2}/V·s. This is consistent with conduction from two virtually identical topological surface states (TSSs) on the top and bottom of the film with a chemical potential ~145 meV above the Dirac point and in the bulk gap. The CR broadens at high fields, an effect that we attribute to an electron-phonon interaction. This assignment is supported by an extended Drude model analysis of the zero-field Drude conductance. In contrast, in normal Bi_{2}Se_{3} films, two conduction channels were observed, and we developed a self-consistent analysis method to distinguish the dominant TSSs and coexisting trivial bulk or two-dimensional electron gas states. Our high-resolution Faraday rotation spectroscopy on Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} paves the way for the observation of quantized Faraday rotation under experimentally achievable conditions to push the chemical potential in the lowest Landau level.

  5. High-resolution measurement of the time-modulated orbital electron capture and of the $\\beta^+$ decay of hydrogen-like $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kienle, P; Bosch, F; Boutin, D; Brandau, C; Bühler, P; Dillmann, I; Dimopoulou, Ch; Faestermann, T; Geissel, H; Hess, R; Hillebrand, P M; Ivanova, V; Izumikawa, T; Knöbel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Kuzminchuk, N; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, S A; Litvinov, Yu A; Maier, L; Ma, X X W; Mazzocco, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Ohtsubo. T; Sanjari, M S; Scheidenberger, Ch; Shubina, D B; Spillmann, U; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th; Sun, B H; Suzaki, F; Suzuki, T; Torilov, S.Yu; Trassinelli, M; Tu, X L; Wang, M; Weick, H; Winckler, N; Winters, D F F A; Winters, N; Woods, P P J; Yamaguchi, T; Yan, X L; Zhang, G G L

    2013-01-01

    The periodic time modulations, found recently in the two-body orbital electron-capture (EC) decay of both, hydrogen-like $^{140}$Pr$^{58+}$ and $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ ions, with periods near to 7s and amplitudes of about 20%, were re-investigated for the case of $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ by using a 245 MHz resonator cavity with a much improved sensitivity and time resolution. We observed that the exponential EC decay is modulated with a period $T = 7.11(11)$s, in accordance with a modulation period $T = 7.12(11)$ s as obtained from simultaneous observations with a capacitive pick-up, employed also in the previous experiments. The modulation amplitudes amount to $a_R = 0.107(24)$ and $a_P = 0.134(27)$ for the 245 MHz resonator and the capacitive pick-up, respectively. These new results corroborate for both detectors {\\it exactly} our previous findings of modulation periods near to 7s, though with {\\it distinctly smaller} amplitudes. Also the three-body $\\beta^+$ decays have been analyzed. For a supposed modulation period...

  6. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001 interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The stacking faults (SFs in an AlSb/GaAs (001 interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps εxx and εyy, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values. Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in εxx and εyy strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30° PDs. A pair of 30° PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  7. Imaging a pore network in a clay-rock at the sub-nanometer scale

    OpenAIRE

    Gaboreau, Stéphane; Pret², D; Tournassat, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Mini-Symposium Description (2.22) Clayey rocks properties are the focus of an ever-increasing interest from the geoscience community. These fine-grained sedimentary rocks (mudstone, argillite, shalesetc.) are recognized as key-components for energy-related technologies, for which they could serve as isolation material (in radioactive waste disposal), caprocks (in CO 2 capture and storage systems), or as reservoir rocks for hydrocarbons (gas and oil shales) (Bourg, 2015...

  8. Supported sub-nanometer Ta oxide clusters as model catalysts for the selective epoxidation of cyclooctene

    KAUST Repository

    Zwaschka, Gregor

    2018-01-22

    The preparation of organic ligands-free, isolated tantalum oxide atoms (Ta1) and small clusters (Tan>1) on flat silicate supports was accomplished by ultra-high vacuum (UHV) techniques followed by oxidation in air. The resulting surface complexes were thoroughly characterized and tested as supported catalysts for the epoxidation of cycloalkenes. The observed catalytic performance highlights the potential of the applied method for the production of active catalysts and the study of well-defined, ligand-free metal oxide moieties.

  9. Atomic-resolution studies of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of {proportional_to}1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In{sup 3+} atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  10. Coupling matrix-assisted ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry and electron transfer dissociation to characterize intact proteins and post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingming; Lietz, Christopher B; Li, Lingjun

    2017-09-12

    Matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) is a recently developed ionization technique that produces multiply charged ions on either electrospray ionization (ESI) or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) platform without the need of high voltage or laser ablation. In this study, MAI has been coupled to a high resolution accurate mass (HRAM) hybrid instrument, the Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer, with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) module for fast peptide and intact protein characterization. The softness of MAI process preserves labile post-translational modifications (PTM) and allows fragmentation and localization by ETD. Moreover, MAI on ESI platform allows rapid sample preparation and analysis (~ 1 min/sample) due to the easiness of sample introduction. It significantly improves the throughput compared to ESI direct infusion and MAI on MALDI platform, which usually takes more than 10 min/sample. Intact protein standards, protein mixtures, and neural tissue extracts have been characterized using this instrument platform with both full MS and MS/MS (CID, HCD, and ETD) analyses. Furthermore, the performances of ESI, MALDI, and MAI on both platforms have been tested to provide a systematic comparison among these techniques. With improved ETD performance and PTM analysis capabilities, we anticipate that the HRAM MAI-MS with ETD module will offer greater utilities in large molecule characterization with enhanced speed and coverage. These advancements will enable promising applications in bottom-up and top-down protein analyses. Graphical abstract Matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) for characterizing intact proteins and post-translational modifications with representative mass spectra from intact proteins.

  11. Characterization of crystallographic defects in SEM by electron channeling assisted by high resolution pseudo-Kikuchi patterns : application to IF-steel, UO2 and TiAl

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Haithem

    2016-01-01

    Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI) is a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) technique used to observe and characterize crystallographic defects. ECCI requires the crystal to be oriented relative to the electron beam with high accuracy (0.1°) in order to control the electron channeling conditions. The SEM techniques used to determine the crystallographic orientation, such as conventional Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD) or Rocking Beam, don’t satisfy the high accuracy required...

  12. Direct observation and analysis of york-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Asahina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in york-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO2, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the york-shell materials: (i resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  13. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled 1,1 '-Diphenylethylene: Electronically Excited and Ionic States of a Prototypical Cross-Conjugated System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C. A.; Zgierski, M. Z.; Buma, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated pi-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio

  14. GREECE -- Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment: High resolution rocket and ground-based investigations of small-scale auroral structure and dynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Methodology The methodology is based on making comparisons between downward electron flux, DC electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and auroral morphology. The...

  15. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  16. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1 '-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C.A.; Zgierski, M.Z.; Buma, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1′-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We

  17. Inkjet Printing of Conductive Inks with High Lateral Resolution on Omniphobic “R F Paper” for Paper-Based Electronics and MEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Lessing, Joshua; Glavan, Ana C.; Walker, S. Brett; Keplinger, Christoph; Lewis, Jennifer; Whitesides, George McClelland

    2014-01-01

    The use of omniphobic “fluoroalkylated paper” as a substrate for inkjet printing of aqueous inks that are the precursors of electrically conductive patterns is described. By controlling the surface chemistry of the paper, it is possible to print high resolution, conductive patterns that remain conductive after folding and exposure to common solvents.

  18. Inkjet printing of conductive inks with high lateral resolution on omniphobic "R(F) paper" for paper-based electronics and MEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Joshua; Glavan, Ana C; Walker, S Brett; Keplinger, Christoph; Lewis, Jennifer A; Whitesides, George M

    2014-07-16

    The use of omniphobic "fluoroalkylated paper" as a substrate for inkjet printing of aqueous inks that are the precursors of electrically conductive patterns is described. By controlling the surface chemistry of the paper, it is possible to print high resolution, conductive patterns that remain conductive after folding and exposure to common solvents. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Geloni, Gianluca [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, Anders [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd’ko, Yuri, E-mail: shvydko@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-12

    This article explores novel opportunities for ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) at high-repetition-rate self-seeded XFELs. These next-generation light sources are promising a more than three orders of magnitude increase in average spectral flux compared with what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. In combination with the advanced IXS spectrometer described here, this may become a real game-changer for ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectroscopies, and hence for the studies of dynamics in condensed matter systems. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup −1} spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup −1} are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10{sup 12} photons s{sup −1} in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  20. Electron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Tonomura, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Holography was devised for breaking through the resolution limit of electron microscopes The advent of a "coherent" field emission electron beam has enabled the use of Electron Holography in various areas of magnetic domain structures observation, fluxon observation in superconductors, and fundamental experiments in physics which have been inaccessible using other techniques After examining the fundamentals of electron holography and its applications to the afore mentioned fields, a detailed discussion of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the related experiments is presented Many photographs and illustrations are included to elucidate the text

  1. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Howard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H...H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  2. Resolution and super-resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J R

    2017-06-01

    Many papers have claimed the attainment of super-resolution, i.e. resolution beyond that achieved classically, by measurement of the profile of a feature in the image. We argue that measurement of the contrast of the image of a dark bar on a bright background does not give a measure of resolution, but of detection sensitivity. The width of a bar that gives an intensity at the center of the bar of 0.735 that in the bright region (the same ratio as in the Rayleigh resolution criterion) is λ/(13.9×numerical aperture) for the coherent case with central illumination. This figure, which compares with λ/(numerical aperture) for the Abbe resolution limit with central illumination, holds for the classical case, and so is no indication of super-resolution. Theoretical images for two points, two lines, arrays of lines, arrays of bars, and grating objects are compared. These results can be used a reference for experimental results, to determine if super-resolution has indeed been attained. The history of the development of the theory of microscope resolution is outlined. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Intrinsic limits on resolutions in muon- and electron-neutrino charged-current events in the KM3NeT/ORCA detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andre, M.; Androulakis, G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Avgitas, T.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Mart, J.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Billault, M.; Bondì, M.; Bormuth, R.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bourret, S.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buis, E.; Buompane, R.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; Celli, S.; Champion, C.; Cherubini, S.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, L.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cobas, D.; Cocimano, R.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Sio, C.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, A. F.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Durocher, M.; Eberl, T.; Eichie, S.; van Eijk, D.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Favaro, M.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Frascadore, G.; Furini, M.; Fusco, L. A.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Garufi, F.; Gay, P.; Gebyehu, M.; Giacomini, F.; Gialanella, L.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia, R.; Graf, K.; Grégoire, T.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Guerzoni, M.; Habel, R.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Harissopulos, S.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hevinga, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C. M. F.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; Jansweijerf, P.; Jongen, M.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Kießling, D.; Koffeman, E. N.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Leisos, A.; Leone, F.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Lo Presti, D.; Löhner, H.; Lonardo, A.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manzali, M.; Margiotta, A.; Margotti, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maris, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Marzaioli, F.; Mele, R.; Melis, K. W.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Mijakowski, P.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Moussa, A.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nicolau, C. A.; Olcina, I.; Olivetto, C.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălas, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrini, G.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Pfutzner, M.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Pleinert, M.-O.; Poma, G. E.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Pratolongo, F.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rauch, T.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez García, A.; Sánchez Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schimmel, F.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sciacca, V.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spisso, B.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Terrasi, F.; Tézier, D.; Theraube, S.; Timmer, P.; Tönnis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Travaglini, R.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Versari, F.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Volkert, M.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Zachariadou, K.; Zani, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-05-01

    Studying atmospheric neutrino oscillations in the few-GeV range with a multi-megaton detector promises to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. This is the main science goal pursued by the future KM3NeT/ORCA water Cherenkov detector in the Mediterranean Sea. In this paper, the processes that limit the obtainable resolution in both energy and direction in charged-current neutrino events in the ORCA detector are investigated. These processes include the composition of the hadronic fragmentation products, the subsequent particle propagation and the photon-sampling fraction of the detector. GEANT simulations of neutrino interactions in seawater produced by GENIE are used to study the effects in the 1-20 GeV range. It is found that fluctuations in the hadronic cascade in conjunction with the variation of the inelasticity y are most detrimental to the resolutions. The effect of limited photon sampling in the detector is of significantly less importance. These results will therefore also be applicable to similar detectors/media, such as those in ice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Structural characterization of Al0.55Ga0.45N epitaxial layer determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing-Jun; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Shi-Ying; Tao, Tao; Xie, Zi-Li; Xiu, Xiang-Qian; Chen, Dun-Jun; Chen, Peng; Han, Ping; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou

    2017-04-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Project of China (Grant No. 2016YFB0400100), the Hi-tech Research Project of China (Grant Nos. 2014AA032605 and 2015AA033305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274003, 61422401, 51461135002, and 61334009), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BY2013077, BK20141320, and BE2015111), the Project of Green Young and Golden Phenix of Yangzhou City, the Postdoctoral Sustentation Fund of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 1501143B), the Project of Shandong Provinceial Higher Educational Science and Technology Program, China (Grant No. J13LN08), the Solid State Lighting and Energy-saving Electronics Collaborative Innovation Center, Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), and Research Funds from NJU-Yangzhou Institute of Opto-electronics.

  5. STEM Electron Diffraction and High Resolution Images Used in the Determination of the Crystal Structure of Au144(SR)60Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahena, Daniel; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Santiago, Ulises; Tlahuice, Alfredo; Ponce, Arturo; Bach, Stephan B H; Yoon, Bokwon; Whetten, Robert L; Landman, Uzi; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2013-03-07

    Determination of the total structure of molecular nanocrystals is an outstanding experimental challenge that has been met, in only a few cases, by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Described here is an alternative approach that is of most general applicability and does not require the fabrication of a single crystal. The method is based on rapid, time-resolved nanobeam electron diffraction (NBD) combined with high-angle annular dark field scanning/transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images in a probe corrected STEM microscope, operated at reduced voltages. The results are compared with theoretical simulations of images and diffraction patterns obtained from atomistic structural models derived through first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The method is demonstrated by application to determination of the structure of the Au 144 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 60 cluster.

  6. Study of superconducting and non-superconducting (Cu, Cr)-1212 compounds by high-resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Anan, Y; Kurami, H; Hatano, J; Tsutsumi, S; Kimoto, K; Matsui, Y

    2001-01-01

    Structure of YSr/sub 2-x/Ba/sub x/Cu/sub 2.8/Cr/sub 0.2/O/sub y/ (x =0-1.5) superconductors are examined by electron diffraction, HRTEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). YSr/sub 2/Cu/sub 2.8/Cr /sub 0.2/O/sub y/ (x=0) shows incommensurate superstructure with 3.67a/sub 0/ due to lattice strain and mixed intergrowth of -(Cr-Cu- Cu-Cu-Cr)- and -(Cr-Cu-Cu-Cr)- sequences. In the h 0 l electron diffraction pattern the wavevector [~0.27, 0, 1/2] due to the incommensurate superstructure disappear in the crystal with high Ba contain (x>or=1.0). This suggests that structural distortion decreases with Ba substitution. At the same time, Cr-L3, L2 edge of EELS spectra shifts toward the low-energy side with increase of Ba content. (13 refs).

  7. High-resolution chemical analysis on cycled LiFePO4 battery electrodes using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Joshua D.; El Gabaly, Farid; Chueh, William C.; Fenton, Kyle R.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Kotula, Paul G.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an ex situ method for analyzing the chemistry of battery electrode particles after electrochemical cycling using the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The arrangement of particles during our analysis is the same as when the particles are being cycled. We start by sectioning LiFePO4 battery electrodes using an ultramicrotome. We then show that mapping of the Fe2+ and Fe3+ oxidation state using energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) and multivariate statistical analysis techniques can be used to determine the spatial distribution of Li in the particles. This approach is validated by comparison with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis of the same samples [Chueh et al. Nanoletters, 13 (3) (2013) 866-72]. EFTEM uses a parallel electron beam and reduces the electron-beam dose (and potential beam-induced damage) to the sample when compared to alternate techniques that use a focused probe (e.g. STEM-EELS). Our analysis confirms that under the charging conditions of the analyzed battery, mixed phase particles are rare and thus Li intercalation is limited by the nucleation of new phases.

  8. Local atomic and electronic structure of oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si interfaces using high-resolution XPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical structures of thin SiO2 films, thin native oxides of GaAs (20-30 A), and the respective oxide-semiconductor interfaces, have been investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Depth profiles of these structures have been obtained using argon ion bombardment and wet chemical etching techniques. The chemical destruction induced by the ion profiling method is shown by direct comparison of these methods for identical samples. Fourier transform data-reduction methods based on linear prediction with maximum entropy constraints are used to analyze the discrete structure in oxides and substrates. This discrete structure is interpreted by means of a structure-induced charge-transfer model.

  9. Separating spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F.; Klaeui, M.; Backes, D.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of domain wall motion and transformations due to injected current pulses in permalloy zigzag structures using off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy are reported. Heating on membranes leads to thermally activated random behavior at low current densities and by backcoating...... the SiN membranes with Al, heating effects are significantly reduced. A set of indicators is devised to separate unambiguously spin torque effects from heating and it is shown that by using the Al layer the structures are sufficiently cooled to exhibit current-induced domain wall motion due to spin...

  10. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G

    2014-09-29

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  11. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  12. Converged and consistent high-resolution low-energy electron-hydrogen scattering. I. Data below n = 4 threshold for applications in stellar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2018-01-01

    In this article we present converged datasets containing scattering data for collisions of electrons on the atomic hydrogen for total energies below the n = 4 excitation threshold. The data have been obtained from an ab initio solution of the two-electron Schrödinger equation in the B-spline basis with the exterior complex scaling boundary condition and are well converged both radially and in terms of partial waves, often to a greater accuracy than currently available data. The data consist of partial T-matrices and can be combined to various secondary quantities, most notably the differential and integral cross sections. We compare the cross sections with previously published theoretical and experimental results and with available data from on-line databases. It is demonstrated that the new data are superior to the generally available results. The consistency of the cross section datasets is checked using the theorem of detailed balance. The energy sampling is fine enough to contain all major resonances in the considered energy range.

  13. Spatially resolved band alignments at Au-hexadecanethiol monolayer-GaAs(001) interfaces by ballistic electron emission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junay, A.; Guézo, S., E-mail: sophie.guezo@univ-rennes1.fr; Turban, P.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Tricot, S.; Ababou-Girard, S.; Solal, F. [Département Matériaux-Nanosciences, Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251, CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, Bât 11E, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2015-08-28

    We study structural and electronic inhomogeneities in Metal—Organic Molecular monoLayer (OML)—semiconductor interfaces at the sub-nanometer scale by means of in situ Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). BEEM imaging of Au/1-hexadecanethiols/GaAs(001) heterostructures reveals the evolution of pinholes density as a function of the thickness of the metallic top-contact. Using BEEM in spectroscopic mode in non-short-circuited areas, local electronic fingerprints (barrier height values and corresponding spectral weights) reveal a low-energy tunneling regime through the insulating organic monolayer. At higher energies, BEEM evidences new conduction channels, associated with hot-electron injection in the empty molecular orbitals of the OML. Corresponding band diagrams at buried interfaces can be thus locally described. The energy position of GaAs conduction band minimum in the heterostructure is observed to evolve as a function of the thickness of the deposited metal, and coherently with size-dependent electrostatic effects under the molecular patches. Such BEEM analysis provides a quantitative diagnosis on metallic top-contact formation on organic molecular monolayer and appears as a relevant characterization for its optimization.

  14. First test results from the Front-End Board with Cyclone V as a test high-resolution platform for the Auger-Beyond-2015 Front End Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew [University of Lodz, Department of Physics and Applied Informatics, Faculty of High-Energy Astrophysics, 90-236 Lodz, Pomorska 149, (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the first results from the Front- End Board (FEB) with the biggest Cyclone{sup R} V E FPGA 5CEFA9F31I7N, supporting 8 channels sampled up to 250 MSps at 14-bit resolution. Considered sampling for the SD is 120 MSps, however, the FEB has been developed with external anti-aliasing filters to keep a maximal flexibility. Six channels are targeted to the SD, two the rest for other experiments like: Auger Engineering Radio Array and additional muon counters. More channels and higher sampling generate larger size of registered events. We used the standard radio channel for a radio transmission from the detectors to the Central Data Acquisition Station (CDAS) to avoid at present a significant modification of a software in both sides: the detector and the CDAS (planned in a future for a final design). Seven FEBs have been deployed in the test detectors on a dedicated Engineering Array in a hexagon. Several variants of the FPGA code were tested for 120, 160, 200 and even 240 MSps DAQ. Tests confirmed a stability and reliability of the FEB design in real pampas conditions with more than 40 deg. C daily temperature variation and a strong sun exposition with a limited power budget only from a single solar panel. (authors)

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-03-22

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  16. Imaging of La/Sr vacancy defects in La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerva, H. [Siemens AG, Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    Defects on (100) planes of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3}, approximately 25 nm in size, were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM). A systematic comparison of experimental (100) and (110) HREM images of the defects with calculated images for defect models with vacant La/Sr or Mn atom columns was carried out. It turned out that the defects consist of pure La/Sr vacancy defects, one atomic layer thick, with zero cation occupancy. Due to the high density of defects the concentration of La/Sr vacancies corresponds to approximately 1 at% La/Sr. Under the chosen imaging conditions (110) HREM images are sensitive to defects with 75% La/Sr occupancy.

  17. Gas electron diffraction data: A representation of improved resolution in the frequency domain, a background correction for multiplicative and additive errors, and the effect of increased exposure of the photographic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Snefrid; Strand, Tor G.; Volden, Hans V.

    1998-04-01

    An improved version of the previously proposed modified autocorrelation power spectrum is described. The enhanced resolution of this spectrum in the frequency domain is demonstrated for lead tetrachloride and benzene data. A background which may simultaneously correct gas electron diffraction data for both multiplicative and additive long periodic (low frequency) errors is suggested. Application of this background revealed systematic non-constant multiplicative errors in our data. The multiplicative corrections previously done to the calculated intensities of lead tetrachloride by modifications of the Pb scattering factor could now be substituted by a multiplicative background correction to the experimental intensities. For weakly exposed benzene data, the applied 'blackness correction' seemed to introduce a linear multiplicative correction of negative slope. The need for this correction disappeared for benzene data when the exposure of the photographic plates was increased.

  18. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  19. A Novel Method for Profiling and Quantifying Short- and Medium-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Environmental Samples Using Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Negative Ionization High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dan; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui; Tian, Qichang; Huang, Huiting; Qiao, Lin

    2016-07-19

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex technical mixtures containing thousands of isomers. Analyzing CPs in environmental matrices is extremely challenging. CPs have broad, unresolved profiles when analyzed by one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC). Comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) can separate CPs with a high degree of orthogonality. A novel method for simultaneously profiling and quantifying short- and medium-chain CPs, using GC×GC coupled with electron capture negative ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, was developed. The method allowed 48 CP formula congener groups to be analyzed highly selectively in one injection through accurate mass measurements of the [M - Cl](-) ions in full scan mode. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) for the linear calibration curves for different chlorine contents were 0.982 for short-chain CPs and 0.945 for medium-chain CPs. The method was successfully used to determine CPs in sediment and fish samples. By using this method, with enhanced chromatographic separation and high mass resolution, interferences between CP congeners and other organohalogen compounds, such as toxaphene, are minimized. New compounds, with the formulas C9H14Cl6 and C9H13Cl7, were found in sediment and biological samples for the first time. The method was shown to be a powerful tool for the analysis of CPs in environmental samples.

  20. Unary resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Clément; Bagnol, Marc; Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We give a characterization of deterministic polynomial time computation based on an algebraic structure called the resolution semiring, whose elements can be understood as logic programs or sets of rewriting rules over first-order terms. This construction stems from an interactive interpretation ...

  1. Backscattered electron image of osmium-impregnated/macerated tissues as a novel technique for identifying the cis-face of the Golgi apparatus by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, D; Bochimoto, H; Watanabe, T; Ushiki, T

    2016-07-01

    The osmium maceration method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) enabled to demonstrate directly the three-dimensional (3D) structure of membranous cell organelles. However, the polarity of the Golgi apparatus (that is, the cis-trans axis) can hardly be determined by SEM alone, because there is no appropriate immunocytochemical method for specific labelling of its cis- or trans-faces. In the present study, we used the osmium impregnation method, which forms deposits of reduced osmium exclusively in the cis-Golgi elements, for preparation of specimens for SEM. The newly developed procedure combining osmium impregnation with subsequent osmium maceration specifically visualised the cis-elements of the Golgi apparatus, with osmium deposits that were clearly detected by backscattered electron-mode SEM. Prolonged osmication by osmium impregnation (2% OsO4 solution at 40°C for 40 h) and osmium maceration (0.1% OsO4 solution at 20°C for 24 h) did not significantly impair the 3D ultrastructure of the membranous cell organelles, including the Golgi apparatus. This novel preparation method enabled us to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus with enough information about the surrounding 3D ultrastructure by SEM, and will contribute to our understanding of the global organisation of the entire Golgi apparatus in various differentiated cells. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. High-resolution electron spectroscopy and rotational conformers of group 6 metal (Cr, Mo, and W) bis(mesitylene) sandwich complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudesh; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-12-19

    Group 6 metal-bis(mesitylene) sandwich complexes are produced by interactions between the laser-vaporized metal atoms and mesitylene vapor in a pulsed molecular beam source, identified by photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero-electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Although transition metal-bis(arene) sandwich complexes may adopt eclipsed and staggered conformations, the group 6 metal-bis(mesitylene) complexes are determined to be in the eclipsed form. In this form, rotational conformers with methyl group dihedral angles of 0 and 60° are identified for the Cr complex, whereas the 0° rotamer is observed for the Mo and W species. The 0° rotamer is in a C(2v) symmetry with the neutral ground state of (1)A1 and the singly positive charged ion state of (2)A1. The 60° rotamer is in a C(i) symmetry with the neutral ground state of (1)A(g) and the ion state of (2)A(g). Partial conversion of the 60 to 0° rotamer is observed from He to He/Ar supersonic expansion for Cr-bis(mesitylene). The unsuccessful observation of the 60° rotamer for the Mo and W complexes is the result of its complete conversion to the 0° rotamer in both He and He/Ar expansions. The adiabatic ionization energies of the 0° rotamers of the three complexes are in the order of Cr-bis(mesitylene) < W-bis(mesitylene) < Mo-bis(mesitylene), which is different from that of the metal atoms. These metal-bis(mesitylene) complexes have lower ionization energies than the corresponding metal-bis(benzene) and -bis(toluene) species.

  3. Ab initio calculations for structural, electronic and magnetic behaviors of nitrogenized monolayer graphene decorated with 5d transition metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Guohua; Guo, Yanming

    2017-09-01

    Graphene-based magnetic materials have revealed great potential for developing high-performance electronic units at sub-nanometer such as spintronic data storage devices. However, a significant ferromagnetism behavior and ample band gap in the electronic structure of graphene is required before it can be used for actual engineering applications. Based on first-principles calculations, here we demonstrate the structural, electronic and magnetic behaviors of 5d transition metal (TM) atom-substituted nitrogenized monolayer graphene. We find that, during TMN(3)4 cluster-substitution, tight bonding occurs between impurity atoms and graphene with significant binding energies. Charge transfer occurs from graphene layer to the TMN(3)4 clusters. Interestingly, PtN3, TaN4 and ReN4 cluster-doped graphene structures exhibit dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 1.00 μB, 1.04 μB and 1.05 μB magnetic moments, respectively. While, OsN4 and PtN4 cluster-doped structures display nonmagnetic direct band gap semiconductor behavior. Remaining, TMN(3)4 cluster-doped graphene complexes exhibit half metal properties. Detailed analysis of density of states (DOS) plots indicate that d orbitals of TM atoms should be responsible for arising magnetic moments in graphene. Given results pave a new route for potential applications of dilute magnetic semiconductors and half-metals in spintronic devices by employing TMN(3)4 cluster-doped graphene complexes.

  4. Electronic detectors for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, A R; Henderson, R

    2007-10-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) in the structural analysis of large biological molecules and macro-molecular complexes and the need for simple, rapid and efficient readout, there is a persuasive need for improved detectors. Commercial detectors, based on phosphor/fibre optics-coupled CCDs, provide adequate performance for many applications, including electron diffraction. However, due to intrinsic light scattering within the phosphor, spatial resolution is limited. Careful measurements suggest that CCDs have superior performance at lower resolution while all agree that film is still superior at higher resolution. Consequently, new detectors are needed based on more direct detection, thus avoiding the intermediate light conversion step required for CCDs. Two types of direct detectors are discussed in this review. First, there are detectors based on hybrid technology employing a separate pixellated sensor and readout electronics connected with bump bonds-hybrid pixel detectors (HPDs). Second, there are detectors, which are monolithic in that sensor and readout are all in one plane (monolithic active pixel sensor, MAPS). Our discussion is centred on the main parameters of interest to cryoEM users, viz. detective quantum efficiency (DQE), resolution or modulation transfer function (MTF), robustness against radiation damage, speed of readout, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the number of independent pixels available for a given detector.

  5. From high symmetry to high resolution in biological electron microscopy: a commentary on Crowther (1971) ‘Procedures for three-dimensional reconstruction of spherical viruses by Fourier synthesis from electron micrographs’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the structure of biological macromolecules and larger assemblies has been essential to understanding the roles they play in living processes. Methods for three-dimensional structure determination of biological assemblies from images recorded in the electron microscope were therefore a key development. In his paper published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1971, Crowther described new computational procedures applied to the first three-dimensional reconstruction of an icosahedral virus from images of virus particles preserved in negative stain. The method for determining the relative orientation of randomly oriented particles and combining their images for reconstruction exploited the high symmetry of the virus particle. Computational methods for image analysis have since been extended to include biological assemblies without symmetry. Further experimental advances, combined with image analysis, have led to the method of cryomicroscopy, which is now used by structural biologists to study the structure and dynamics of biological machines and assemblies in atomic detail. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750240

  6. From high symmetry to high resolution in biological electron microscopy: a commentary on Crowther (1971) 'Procedures for three-dimensional reconstruction of spherical viruses by Fourier synthesis from electron micrographs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Peter B

    2015-04-19

    Elucidation of the structure of biological macromolecules and larger assemblies has been essential to understanding the roles they play in living processes. Methods for three-dimensional structure determination of biological assemblies from images recorded in the electron microscope were therefore a key development. In his paper published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1971, Crowther described new computational procedures applied to the first three-dimensional reconstruction of an icosahedral virus from images of virus particles preserved in negative stain. The method for determining the relative orientation of randomly oriented particles and combining their images for reconstruction exploited the high symmetry of the virus particle. Computational methods for image analysis have since been extended to include biological assemblies without symmetry. Further experimental advances, combined with image analysis, have led to the method of cryomicroscopy, which is now used by structural biologists to study the structure and dynamics of biological machines and assemblies in atomic detail. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  7. Exploring the electron transfer pathways in photosystem I by high-time-resolution electron paramagnetic resonance: observation of the B-side radical pair P700(+)A1B(-) in whole cells of the deuterated green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Thomas; von Gromoff, Erika Donner; Santabarbara, Stefano; Stehle, Patricia; Link, Gerhard; Poluektov, Oleg G; Heathcote, Peter; Beck, Christoph F; Thurnauer, Marion C; Kothe, Gerd

    2012-03-28

    Crystallographic models of photosystem I (PS I) highlight a symmetrical arrangement of the electron transfer cofactors which are organized in two parallel branches (A, B) relative to a pseudo-C2 symmetry axis that is perpendicular to the membrane plane. Here, we explore the electron transfer pathways of PS I in whole cells of the deuterated green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-time-resolution electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at cryogenic temperatures. Particular emphasis is given to quantum oscillations detectable in the tertiary radical pairs P700(+)A1A(-) and P700(+)A1B(-) of the electron transfer chain. Results are presented first for the deuterated site-directed mutant PsaA-M684H in which electron transfer beyond the primary electron acceptor A0A on the PsaA branch of electron transfer is impaired. Analysis of the quantum oscillations, observed in a two-dimensional Q-band (34 GHz) EPR experiment, provides the geometry of the B-side radical pair. The orientation of the g tensor of P700(+) in an external reference system is adapted from a time-resolved multifrequency EPR study of deuterated and 15N-substituted cyanobacteria (Link, G.; Berthold, T.; Bechtold, M.; Weidner, J.-U.; Ohmes, E.; Tang, J.; Poluektov, O.; Utschig, L.; Schlesselman, S. L.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Kothe, G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 4211-4222). Thus, we obtain the three-dimensional structure of the B-side radical pair following photoexcitation of PS I in its native membrane. The new structure describes the position and orientation of the reduced B-side quinone A1B(-) on a nanosecond time scale after light-induced charge separation. Furthermore, we present results for deuterated wild-type cells of C. reinhardtii demonstrating that both radical pairs P700(+)A1A(-) and P700(+)A1B(-) participate in the electron transfer process according to a mole ratio of 0.71/0.29 in favor of P700(+)A1A(-). A detailed comparison reveals different orientations of A1A(-) and A1B(-) in their

  8. Nature of mixed symmetry 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo from high resolution electron and proton scattering and line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burda, Oleksiy

    2007-07-15

    The present work contains two parts. The first one is devoted to the investigation of mixed-symmetry structure in {sup 94}Mo and the second one to the astrophysical relevant line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be. In the first part of the thesis the nature of one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo is investigated with high-resolution inelastic electron and proton scattering experiments in a combined analysis. The (e,e') experiments were carried out at the 169 magnetic spectrometer at the S-DALINAC. Data were taken at a beam energy E e=70 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub e}=93 -165 . In dispersion-matching mode an energy resolution {delta}{sub E}=30-45 keV (full width at half maximum) was achieved. The (p,p') measurements were performed at iThemba LABS, South Africa, using a K600 magnetic spectrometer at a proton energy E p=200 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub p}=4.5 -26 . Typical energy resolutions were {delta}{sub E}{approx_equal}35 keV. The combined analysis reveals a dominant one-phonon structure of the transitions to the first and third 2{sup +} states, as well as an isovector character of the transition to the one-phonon mixed-symmetric state within the valence shell. Quantitatively consistent estimates of the one-phonon admixtures are obtained from both experimental probes when two-step contributions to the proton scattering cross sections are taken into account. In the second part of the thesis the line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be is studied. Spectra of the {sup 9}Be(e,e') reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at an electron energy E e=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93 and 141 with high energy resolution up to excitation energies E{sub x}=8 MeV. The form factor of the first excited state has been extracted from the data. The astrophysical relevant {sup 9}Be({gamma},n) cross sections have been extracted from the (e,e') data. The

  9. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  10. General implementation of the resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky representations of electron repulsion integrals within coupled-cluster and equation-of-motion methods: theory and benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Zuev, Dmitry; Feng, Xintian; Khistyaev, Kirill; Shao, Yihan; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-10-07

    We present a general implementation of the resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) representations of electron repulsion integrals within the coupled-cluster with single and double substitutions (CCSD) and equation-of-motion (EOM) family of methods. The CCSD and EOM-CCSD equations are rewritten to eliminate the storage of the largest four-index intermediates leading to a significant reduction in disk storage requirements, reduced I/O penalties, and, as a result, improved parallel performance. In CCSD, the number of rate-determining contractions is also reduced; however, in EOM the number of operations is increased because the transformed integrals, which are computed once in the canonical implementation, need to be reassembled at each Davidson iteration. Nevertheless, for large jobs the effect of the increased number of rate-determining contractions is surpassed by the significantly reduced memory and disk usage leading to a considerable speed-up. Overall, for medium-size examples, RI/CD CCSD calculations are approximately 40% faster compared with the canonical implementation, whereas timings of EOM calculations are reduced by a factor of two. More significant speed-ups are obtained in larger bases, i.e., more than a two-fold speed-up for CCSD and almost five-fold speed-up for EOM-EE-CCSD in cc-pVTZ. Even more considerable speedups (6-7-fold) are achieved by combining RI/CD with the frozen natural orbitals approach. The numeric accuracy of RI/CD approaches is benchmarked with an emphasis on energy differences. Errors in EOM excitation, ionization, and electron-attachment energies are less than 0.001 eV with typical RI bases and with a 10(-4) threshold in CD. Errors with 10(-2) and 10(-3) thresholds, which afford more significant computational savings, are less than 0.04 and 0.008 eV, respectively.

  11. Crystal defects and cation ordering domains in epitaxial PbSc{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} relaxor ferroelectric thin films investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birajdar, B.I., E-mail: balaji.birajdar@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Chopra, A.; Alexe, M.; Hesse, D. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, D-06120 Halle (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Epitaxial thin films of PbSc{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} grown by pulsed laser deposition. > Microstructure studied by transmission electron microscopy. > Microstructural defects: {pi} stacking faults and cation ordering domains. > Explanation for the formation of defects. > Explanation of reduced dielectric constant of relaxor thin films. - Abstract: Epitaxial thin films of the relaxor ferroelectric PbSc{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (PST) were grown by pulsed laser deposition on an SrTiO{sub 3} substrate with an SrRuO{sub 3} buffer layer and investigated by diffraction contrast imaging and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and plan-view. Crystal defects, viz. misfit dislocations, {pi} stacking faults and cation ordering domains, have been characterized and the mechanism of their formation is discussed. The state of the structural disorder in PST relaxor thin films is characterized by the high density of {pi} stacking faults and the rather small size (<10 nm) of the cation ordering domains, and is therefore markedly distinct from the state of the disorder in bulk relaxor PST. Polar nanoregions, supposed to be essential for explaining the relaxor properties, could not be detected using TEM, possibly due to their high fluctuation frequency. The dielectric constant of the relaxor PST thin films is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of bulk relaxor PST, which is attributed to the large density of {pi} stacking faults in the thin films.

  12. Gap Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-25

    Gap Resolution is a software package that was developed to improve Newbler genome assemblies by automating the closure of sequence gaps caused by repetitive regions in the DNA. This is done by performing the follow steps:1) Identify and distribute the data for each gap in sub-projects. 2) Assemble the data associated with each sub-project using a secondary assembler, such as Newbler or PGA. 3) Determine if any gaps are closed after reassembly, and either design fakes (consensus of closed gap) for those that closed or lab experiments for those that require additional data. The software requires as input a genome assembly produce by the Newbler assembler provided by Roche and 454 data containing paired-end reads.

  13. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of aluminophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulan, J.G.; Gronsky, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Szostak, R. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Sorby, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-04-01

    VPI-5 transforms to AlPO{sub 4}-8 under mild thermal treatment (100{degree}C, 18 hrs). HRTEM micrographs, oriented normal to the c axis, show extensive defect-free regions in VPI-5, while slip planes normal to the c axis are found in AlPO{sub 4}-8. Analysis of the HRTEM data, in conjunction with infrared and thermal analysis, adsorption studies and x-ray powder diffraction, has lead to a proposed structure for AlPO{sub 4}-8. Though the sheets containing the 18 member rings which define the pores in VPI-5 remain intact in AlPO{sub 4}-8, reduction in the porosity is attributed to blockages created by the movement of these sheets relative to each other. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Binding of an organo-osmium(II) anticancer complex to guanine and cytosine on DNA revealed by electron-based dissociations in high resolution Top-Down FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Christopher A; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Liu, Hong-Ke; Barrow, Mark P; Sadler, Peter J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-02-28

    The Os(II) arene anticancer complex [(η(6)-bip)Os(en)Cl](+) (Os1-Cl; where bip = biphenyl, and en = ethylenediamine) binds strongly to DNA. Here we investigate reactions between Os1-Cl and the self-complementary 12-mer oligonucleotide 5'-TAGTAATTACTA-3' (DNA12) using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Identification of the specific sites of DNA osmiation with {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) was made possible by the use of Electron Detachment Dissociation (EDD) which produced a wide range of assignable osmiated MS/MS fragments. In contrast, the more commonly used CAD and IRMPD techniques produced fragments which lose the bound osmium. These studies reveal that not only is guanine G3 a strong binding site for {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) but, unexpectedly, so too is cytosine C10. Interestingly, the G3/C10 di-osmiated adduct of DNA12 also formed readily but did not undergo such facile fragmentation by EDD, perhaps due to folding induced by van der Waal's interactions of the bound osmium arene species. These new insights into osmium arene DNA adducts should prove valuable for the design of new organometallic drugs and contribute to understanding the lack of cross resistance of this organometallic anticancer complex with cisplatin.

  15. Single-Molecule X-Ray Interferometry: Controlling Coupled Electron-Nuclear Quantum Dynamics and Imaging Molecular Potentials by Ultrahigh-Resolution Resonant Photoemission and Ab Initio Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kimberg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an advanced study of the excited ionic states of the gas-phase nitrogen molecule in the binding-energy region of 22–34 eV, combining ultrahigh-resolution resonant photoemission (RPE and ab initio configuration-interaction calculations. The RPE spectra are recorded for nine photon energies within the N 1s→π^{*} absorption resonance of N_{2} by using a photon bandwidth that is considerably smaller than lifetime broadening, and the dependence on excitation energy of the decay spectra is analyzed and used for the first assignment of 12 highly overlapped molecular states. The effect on the RPE profile of avoided curve crossings between the final N_{2}^{+} ionic states is discussed, based on theoretical simulations that account for vibronic coupling, and compared with the experimental data. By use of synchrotron radiation with high spectral brightness, it is possible to selectively promote the molecule to highly excited vibrational sublevels of a core-excited electronic state, thereby controlling the spatial distribution of the vibrational wave packets, and to accurately image the ionic molecular potentials. In addition, the mapping of the vibrational wave functions of the core-excited states using the bound final states with far-from-equilibrium bond lengths has been achieved experimentally for the first time. Theoretical analysis has revealed the rich femtosecond nuclear dynamics underlying the mapping phenomenon.

  16. Ordered La(Sr)-deficient nonstoichiometry in La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerva, H. [Siemens AG Research Labs., Munich (Germany)

    1995-11-15

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) was used to identify a La(Sr)-deficient ordered nonstoichiometry in perovskite-like La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} which is used in solid oxide fuel cell technology. Experimental 400 kV HREM images were recorded in the crystal projections (112) and (110) with the objective lens defocused to {Delta}f = -40 nm and {Delta}f = -185 nm. They show very good agreement with simulated images which are based on an ideal perovskite structure with 12.5 {+-} 5% of the La(Sr) atoms being deficient on every second (111) plane. The actual rhombohedral distortion of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} alone, as determined by X-ray diffraction, is not responsible for the observed HREM image contrasts. In addition, possible ordering of the strontium atoms could be excluded with the help of image simulations.

  17. Electron density distribution and Madelung potential in alpha-spodumene, LiAl(SiO3)2, from two-wavelength high-resolution X-ray diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzinger; Ghermani

    1999-06-01

    The electron density distribution in alpha-spodumene, LiAl(SiO(3))(2), was derived from high-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments. The results obtained from both Mo Kalpha- and Ag Kalpha-wavelength data sets are reported. The features of the Si-O and Al-O bonds are related to the geometrical parameters of the Si-O-Al and Si-O-Si bridges on the one hand and to the O.Li(+) interaction on the other. Kappa refinements against the two data sets yielded almost the same net charges for the Si (+1.8 e) and O (-1.0 e) atoms in spodumene. However, the Al net charge obtained from the Ag Kalpha data (+1.9 e) is larger than the net charge derived from the Mo Kalpha data (+1.5 e). This difference correlates with a more contracted Al valence shell revealed by the shorter X-ray wavelength (kappa = 1.4 for the Ag Kalpha data set). The derived net charges were used to calculate the Madelung potential at the spodumene atomic sites. The electrostatic energy for the chemical formula LiAl(SiO(3))(2) was -8.60 e(2) Å(-1) (-123.84 eV) from the net charges derived from the Ag Kalpha data and -6.97 e(2) Å(-1) (-100.37 eV) from the net charges derived from the Mo Kalpha data.

  18. Holography and transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    1993-01-01

    The basic principles and methods of off-axis electron holography are presented and illustrated by means of three examples related to its application in high resolution electron microscopy and the investigation of electric and magnetic fields in thin specimens.

  19. PALM and STORM: unlocking live-cell super-resolution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henriques, R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available of molecular visualization at the nanometer scale. Resolutions previously only attained with electron microscopes are now within the grasp of light microscopes. However, until recently, live-cell imaging approaches have eluded super-resolution microscopy...

  20. Development of a helium-beam diagnostic for the measurement of the electron density and temperature with high space and time resolution; Entwicklung einer Heliumstrahldiagnostik zur Messung der Elektronendichte und -temperatur mit hoher raeumlicher und zeitlicher Aufloesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruezi, U.

    2006-11-15

    A cvoncept for the control of teh particle and energy removal is available with the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) at the TEXTOR tokamak and is studied there. In the framework of this thesis a new diagnostic fot the study of short-time events in the plasma boundary layer was developed and constructed. It allows spatially (2 mm) and timely (10 {mu}s) highly resolved measurements of the electron density n{sub e} and electron temperaturew T{sub e}. This occurs by spectroscopy on helium atoms injected into the plasma, for whose measured line intensities respectively intensity ratios by means of a collision-radiation model n{sub e} and T{sub e} can be determined. In order to fulfil the requirements for the measurement of the plasma fluctuations up to 100 kHz, an injection system was developed, which can produce a supersonic helium beam of high particle density (1.5.10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and simulataneously low deivergence {+-}1 . Parallely for this an observation system consisting of many-channel photomultipliers (PMT) with high and a CCD camera with lower time resolution. The signals of the different MT channels are calibrated on the intensities of the comparable spatial channels of the CCD camera. The first spectroscopic measurement of T{sub e} fluctuations resulted for the characterizing parameters: velocity v{sub r}=(380{+-}60) m/s, correlation length L{sub r}{approx}(5{+-}1) mm, and lifetime {tau}{sub L}{approx}(10{+-}1.25) {mu}s. Under the influence of resonant disturbing magnetic fields by the DED because of the not negligible photon noise no quantitative fluctuation characteristics could be determined. Furthermore during the dynamic AC operation of the DED with rotating disturbing field (974 Hz) n{sub e} and T{sub e} could be spatially and timely resolved and showed because of dynamically co-moved plasma structures a strong modulation by a factor 3 respectively 2. Beside an expected pressure decreasement in the laminar flux tube a hitherto unknown increasement

  1. Super-resolution biomolecular crystallography with low-resolution data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Gunnar F; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T

    2010-04-22

    X-ray diffraction plays a pivotal role in the understanding of biological systems by revealing atomic structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes, with much recent interest in very large assemblies like the ribosome. As crystals of such large assemblies often diffract weakly (resolution worse than 4 A), we need methods that work at such low resolution. In macromolecular assemblies, some of the components may be known at high resolution, whereas others are unknown: current refinement methods fail as they require a high-resolution starting structure for the entire complex. Determining the structure of such complexes, which are often of key biological importance, should be possible in principle as the number of independent diffraction intensities at a resolution better than 5 A generally exceeds the number of degrees of freedom. Here we introduce a method that adds specific information from known homologous structures but allows global and local deformations of these homology models. Our approach uses the observation that local protein structure tends to be conserved as sequence and function evolve. Cross-validation with R(free) (the free R-factor) determines the optimum deformation and influence of the homology model. For test cases at 3.5-5 A resolution with known structures at high resolution, our method gives significant improvements over conventional refinement in the model as monitored by coordinate accuracy, the definition of secondary structure and the quality of electron density maps. For re-refinements of a representative set of 19 low-resolution crystal structures from the Protein Data Bank, we find similar improvements. Thus, a structure derived from low-resolution diffraction data can have quality similar to a high-resolution structure. Our method is applicable to the study of weakly diffracting crystals using X-ray micro-diffraction as well as data from new X-ray light sources. Use of homology information is not restricted to X

  2. Femtosecond gas phase electron diffraction with MeV electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Wang, Xijie; Centurion, Martin

    2016-12-16

    We present results on ultrafast gas electron diffraction (UGED) experiments with femtosecond resolution using the MeV electron gun at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. UGED is a promising method to investigate molecular dynamics in the gas phase because electron pulses can probe the structure with a high spatial resolution. Until recently, however, it was not possible for UGED to reach the relevant timescale for the motion of the nuclei during a molecular reaction. Using MeV electron pulses has allowed us to overcome the main challenges in reaching femtosecond resolution, namely delivering short electron pulses on a gas target, overcoming the effect of velocity mismatch between pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, and maintaining a low timing jitter. At electron kinetic energies above 3 MeV, the velocity mismatch between laser and electron pulses becomes negligible. The relativistic electrons are also less susceptible to temporal broadening due to the Coulomb force. One of the challenges of diffraction with relativistic electrons is that the small de Broglie wavelength results in very small diffraction angles. In this paper we describe the new setup and its characterization, including capturing static diffraction patterns of molecules in the gas phase, finding time-zero with sub-picosecond accuracy and first time-resolved diffraction experiments. The new device can achieve a temporal resolution of 100 fs root-mean-square, and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. The collimation of the beam is sufficient to measure the diffraction pattern, and the transverse coherence is on the order of 2 nm. Currently, the temporal resolution is limited both by the pulse duration of the electron pulse on target and by the timing jitter, while the spatial resolution is limited by the average electron beam current and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection system. We also discuss plans for improving both the temporal resolution and the spatial resolution.

  3. Single particle electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Folea, Mihaela; Kouril, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) in combination with image analysis is a powerful technique to study protein structures at low, medium, and high resolution. Since electron micrographs of biological objects are very noisy, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by image processing is an integral part of

  4. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  5. Electronic detectors for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, A R; McMullan, G

    2011-08-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is an important tool for high-resolution structure determination in applications ranging from condensed matter to biology. Electronic detectors are now used in most applications in EM as they offer convenience and immediate feedback that is not possible with film or image plates. The earliest forms of electronic detector used routinely in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were charge coupled devices (CCDs) and for many applications these remain perfectly adequate. There are however applications, such as the study of radiation-sensitive biological samples, where film is still used and improved detectors would be of great value. The emphasis in this review is therefore on detectors for use in such applications. Two of the most promising candidates for improved detection are: monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) and hybrid pixel detectors (of which Medipix2 was chosen for this study). From the studies described in this review, a back-thinned MAPS detector appears well suited to replace film in for the study of radiation-sensitive samples at 300 keV, while Medipix2 is suited to use at lower energies and especially in situations with very low count rates. The performance of a detector depends on the energy of electrons to be recorded, which in turn is dependent on the application it is being used for; results are described for a wide range of electron energies ranging from 40 to 300 keV. The basic properties of detectors are discussed in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of spatial frequency.

  6. Introduction to electron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovmoeller, S.; Zou, Xiaodong [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University and Berzeeli Center Exselent 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-06-15

    Everything in Nature, macroscopic or microscopic, inorganic, organic or biological, has its specific properties. Most properties of matter depend on the atomic structures, and many techniques have been developed over the centuries for structure analysis. The greatest of them all, structure analysis of single crystals by X-ray diffraction, X-ray crystallography, was founded in 1912, and remains the most important technique for studying structures of periodically ordered objects at atomic resolution. Electron diffraction of single crystals was discovered fifteen years later by Thomson, Davisson and Germer. The wave property of electrons was exploited in the invention of the electron microscope by Knoll and Ruska in 1932. Since then, electron microscopes have been used in many fields as a tool for exploring and visualising the microscopic world in all its beauty. Between the first blurred images and today's sharp atomic resolution lies seventy years of untiring engineering. More recently, the unprecedented power of computers has made it possible to analyse quantitatively, and even further improve, these images. The amalgamation of electron diffraction and atomic resolution electron microscopy with crystallographic image processing has created a new powerful tool for structure analysis - electron crystallography. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Crowdsourced online dispute resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimov, D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Solving disputes often takes a considerable amount of time and money. That holds for everyone involved. A new type of dispute resolution called Crowdsourced Online Dispute Resolution (CODR) seems to have the potential to offer a cheap, fast, and democratic dispute resolution procedure. Since it is

  8. ALICE physics with electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R

    2005-01-01

    The ALICE potential for measurements of dielectron decays of quarkonia J/psi and of the Upsilon-family is discussed. The electron trigger capability of the ALICE transition radiation detector (TRD) is reviewed, and the anticipated pion rejection power is given. Furthermore, the invariant mass resolution achieved for quarkonia states is given and the signal to background ratio is presented.

  9. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  10. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  11. High resolution analysis of interphase chromosome domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Jaunin, F.; Fakan, S.; Aten, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome territories need to be well defined at high resolution before functional aspects of chromosome organization in interphase can be explored. To visualize chromosomes by electron microscopy (EM), the DNA of Chinese hamster fibroblasts was labeled in vivo with thymidine analogue BrdU. Labeled

  12. Advanced computing in electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkland, Earl J

    2010-01-01

    This book features numerical computation of electron microscopy images as well as multislice methods High resolution CTEM and STEM image interpretation are included in the text This newly updated second edition will bring the reader up to date on new developments in the field since the 1990's The only book that specifically addresses computer simulation methods in electron microscopy

  13. Mapping cation diffusion through lattice defects in epitaxial oxide thin films on the water-soluble buffer layer Sr3Al2O6 using atomic resolution electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Baek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the synthesis of oxide thin films have led to the discovery of novel functionalities that are not accessible in bulk structures. However, their physical properties are vulnerable to the presence of crystal defects, which can give rise to structural, chemical, and electronic modifications. These issues are central to optimizing the opportunities to create freestanding oxide films using the recently developed buffer layer Sr3Al2O6, which is soluble in room temperature water. To evaluate the general possibility to create atomic scale freestanding oxide heterostructures, it is critical to understand the formation, structure, and role of defects as this buffer layer is employed. Here, using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy, we reveal cation segregation and diffusion along crystal defects that form during growth of an oxide multilayer structure on the Sr3Al2O6 buffer layer. We demonstrate that mass transport of film material can occur either through open dislocation core channels or site-specifically in the crystal lattice, causing local variations in stoichiometry. However, by reducing the thermal driving force for diffusion during growth, we suppress the role of extended defects as cation segregation sites, thereby retaining the inherent properties of the overlaying film.

  14. High resolution IVEM tomography of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Electron tomography is a powerful tool for elucidating the three-dimensional architecture of large biological complexes and subcellular organelles. The introduction of intermediate voltage electron microscopes further extended the technique by providing the means to examine very large and non-symmetrical subcellular organelles, at resolutions beyond what would be possible using light microscopy. Recent studies using electron tomography on a variety of cellular organelles and assemblies such as centrosomes, kinetochores, and chromatin have clearly demonstrated the power of this technique for obtaining 3D structural information on non-symmetric cell components. When combined with biochemical and molecular observations, these 3D reconstructions have provided significant new insights into biological function.

  15. Non-diffracting multi-electron vortex beams balancing their electron-electron interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutzafi, Maor; Kaminer, Ido; Harari, Gal; Segev, Mordechai

    2017-09-21

    The wave-like nature of electrons has been known for almost a century, but only in recent years has the ability to shape the wavefunction of EBeams (Electron-Beams) become experimentally accessible. Various EBeam wavefunctions have been demonstrated, such as vortex, self-accelerating, Bessel EBeams etc. However, none has attempted to manipulate multi-electron beams, because the repulsion between electrons rapidly alters the beam shape. Here, we show how interference effects of the quantum wavefunction describing multiple electrons can be used to exactly balance both the repulsion and diffraction-broadening. We propose non-diffracting wavepackets of multiple electrons, which can also carry orbital angular momentum. Such wavefunction shaping facilitates the use of multi-electron beams in electron microscopy with higher current without compromising on spatial resolution. Simulating the quantum evolution in three-dimensions and time, we show that imprinting such wavefunctions on electron pulses leads to shape-preserving multi-electrons ultrashort pulses. Our scheme applies to any beams of charged particles, such as protons and ion beams.Vortex electron beams are generated using single electrons but their low beam-density is a limitation in electron microscopy. Here the authors propose a scheme for the realization of non-diffracting electron beams by shaping wavepackets of multiple electrons and including electron-electron interactions.

  16. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  17. Valence and ionic lowest-lying electronic states of ethyl formate as studied by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption, He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmiałek, M. A., E-mail: smialek@pg.gda.pl [Department of Control and Energy Engineering, Faculty of Ocean Engineering and Ship Technology, Gdańsk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Łabuda, M.; Guthmuller, J. [Department of Theoretical Physic and Quantum Information, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdańsk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Département de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules (PhLAM), UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V.; Jones, N. C. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, Building 1520, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-09-14

    The highest resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of ethyl formate, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OCHO, yet reported is presented over the wavelength range 115.0–275.5 nm (10.75–4.5 eV) revealing several new spectral features. Valence and Rydberg transitions and their associated vibronic series, observed in the photoabsorption spectrum, have been assigned in accordance with new ab initio calculations of the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths. Calculations have also been carried out to determine the ionization energies and fine structure of the lowest ionic state of ethyl formate and are compared with a newly recorded He(I) photoelectron spectrum (from 10.1 to 16.1 eV). New vibrational structure is observed in the first photoelectron band. The photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of ethyl formate in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  18. Low-power cholesteric LCDs and electronic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asad A.; Huang, Xiao-Yang; Doane, Joseph W.

    2004-09-01

    We discuss the state of the art of the bistable reflective cholesteric liquid crystal display technology. Numerous applications from low resolutions signs, to medium resolution instrumentation type displays, and high resolution electronic books are discussed. Different modes of the technology are discussed as being viable for the respective display applications. Special emphasis is paid to electronic book applications.

  19. Wide-range high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals morphological and distributional changes of endomembrane compartments during log to stationary transition of growth phase in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Higaki, Takumi; Sawaki, Fumie; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Goto, Yumi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Nagata, Noriko; Matsuoka, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Rapid growth of plant cells by cell division and expansion requires an endomembrane trafficking system. The endomembrane compartments, such as the Golgi stacks, endosome and vesicles, are important in the synthesis and trafficking of cell wall materials during cell elongation. However, changes in the morphology, distribution and number of these compartments during the different stages of cell proliferation and differentiation have not yet been clarified. In this study, we examined these changes at the ultrastructural level in tobacco Bright yellow 2 (BY-2) cells during the log and stationary phases of growth. We analyzed images of the BY-2 cells prepared by the high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution technique with the aid of an auto-acquisition transmission electron microscope system. We quantified the distribution of secretory and endosomal compartments in longitudinal sections of whole cells by using wide-range gigapixel-class images obtained by merging thousands of transmission electron micrographs. During the log phase, all Golgi stacks were composed of several thick cisternae. Approximately 20 vesicle clusters (VCs), including the trans-Golgi network and secretory vesicle cluster, were observed throughout the cell. In the stationary-phase cells, Golgi stacks were thin with small cisternae, and only a few VCs were observed. Nearly the same number of multivesicular body and small high-density vesicles were observed in both the stationary and log phases. Results from electron microscopy and live fluorescence imaging indicate that the morphology and distribution of secretory-related compartments dramatically change when cells transition from log to stationary phases of growth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Bank Resolution in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Gordon, Jeffery; Ringe, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Bank resolution is a key pillar of the European Banking Union. This column argues that the current structure of large EU banks is not conducive to an effective and unbiased resolution procedure. The authors would require systemically important banks to reorganise into a ‘holding company’ structure...

  1. abour Dispute Resolution System

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA). Even though the Labour. Relations Act 66/95 (LRA) has brought statutory dispute resolution within reach of the ordinary worker, it might actually have compounded the problems relating to dispute resolution in the country. The high rate of individual unfair dismissal cases ...

  2. Automated conflict resolution issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  3. Single-Particle Cryo-EM at Crystallographic Resolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Until only a few years ago, single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) was usually not the first choice for many structural biologists due to its limited resolution in the range of nanometer to subnanometer...

  4. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%)

  5. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  6. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator ... observed by high-resolution electron microscopy in both ..... 1988 Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B34 228. Kato N 1992 J. Acta Crystallogr. A48 834. Kaur B, Bhat M, Licci F, Kumar R, Kotru P N and Bamzai K K. 2004 Nucl. Instrum. Meth ...

  7. Microstructural investigations of manganese-doped gallium nitride by modern methods of high resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy; Mikrostrukturelle Untersuchungen an Mangan-dotiertem Galliumnitrid mittels fortgeschrittener Methoden der hochaufloesenden und analytischen Transmissionselektronenmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niermann, T.

    2006-10-30

    The magnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor depend on the microstructure of the material. In this work transmission electron microscopy was applied to Mn-doped GaN to investigate the incorporation of Mn and the occurring crystal defects. The novel method of object wave reconstruction was used for the imaging of extended defects. This technique allowed the observation of core structures of various defects. The strain fields of these defects were measured using geometric phase analysis. Precipitates of GaMn{sub 3}N were identified by analytical measurements. A further investigation of material free of precipitates revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of the Mn, which is reported for the first time. The ratio between substitutional and interstitial incorporation of Mn was measured by angular resolved X-ray spectroscopy. The Mn was found predominantly on the substitutional site. (orig.)

  8. Resolution exchange simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edward; Ytreberg, F Marty; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2006-01-20

    We extend replica-exchange simulation in two ways and apply our approaches to biomolecules. The first generalization permits exchange simulation between models of differing resolution--i.e., between detailed and coarse-grained models. Such "resolution exchange" can be applied to molecular systems or spin systems. The second extension is to "pseudoexchange" simulations, which require little CPU usage for most levels of the exchange ladder and also substantially reduce the need for overlap between levels. Pseudoexchanges can be used in either replica or resolution exchange simulations. We perform efficient, converged simulations of a 50-atom peptide to illustrate the new approaches.

  9. LHCb VELO Tracking Resolutions

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The excellent tracking performance of the Vertex Locator (VELO) at LHCb is presented. The resolutions it achieves on single hits, impact parameters, and primary vertex positions are shown, with particular attention paid to measurement of impact parameters.

  10. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  11. Polymer Physics Prize Lecture: Self-assemblies of Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles as a New Platform for Engineering Structures with Sub-Nanometer Feature Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2013-03-01

    Utilizing nano-building blocks rather than atoms to construct and engineer new structures is a fresh approach to design and develop functional materials for the purpose of transferring and amplifying microscopic functionality to macroscopic materials' property. As one of the important elements of these nano-building blocks, giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) provide a latest platform for generating self-assembled ordered structures at nanometer scale, which are stabilized by collective physical bonds (such as collective hydrogen bonding). In this talk, two topics will be focused on. First, composed of functionalized hydrophilic molecular nanoparticles as the heads with rigid shape and fixed volume, and tethered polymer chains as the tails (such as giant molecular surfactants and lipids and other topologies), these GMSAs of various architectures can self-assemble into highly diversified, thermodynamically stable microstructures at sub-10 nm length scale in the bulk, thin film and solution states. Second, GMSAs could also be constructed solely from nanoparticles interconnected via different numbers of the rigid linkages in specific symmetry, simulating the overall shapes of small molecules but with sizes that are one-order of magnitude larger in length and three-order of magnitude larger in volume. Giant crystal structures can then be obtained from this class of ``giant molecules'' via supramolecular crystallization. These findings are not only scientifically intriguing in understanding the physical principles underlying their self-assembly, but also technologically relevant in industrial applications.

  12. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  13. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  14. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  15. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  16. Dynamic systemic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakulsombat, Morakot; Zhang, Yan; Ramström, Olof

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic Systemic Resolution is a powerful technique for selecting optimal constituents from dynamic systems by applying selection pressures, either externally by addition of target entities, or internally within the system constraints. This concept is a subset of Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry, and the dynamic systems are generally based on reversible covalent interactions between a range of components where the systems are maintained under thermodynamic control. In the present chapter, the concept will be described in detail, and a range of examples will be given for both selection classes. For external pressure generation, target enzymes, in aqueous and/or organic solution, have been used to demonstrate the resolution processes. In a first example, a dynamic transthiolesterification system was generated in aqueous solution at neutral pH, and resolved by hydrolysis using serine hydrolases (cholinesterases). In organic solution, lipase-catalyzed acylation was chosen to demonstrate asymmetric resolution in different dynamic systems, generating chiral ester and amide structures. By use of such biocatalysts, the optimal constituents were selectively chosen and amplified from the dynamic systems in one-pot processes. In internal selection pressure resolution, self-transformation and crystallization-induced diastereomeric resolution have been successfully used to challenge dynamic systems. The technique was, for example, used to identify the best diastereomeric substrate from a large and varied dynamic system in a single resolution reaction.

  17. Resolution Of A Shadow Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, Harold E.

    1982-02-01

    The 19th century art of shadow imaging, as started by Wedgwood (1803), and as used by William Henry Fox-Talbot (1851) in England, has been revived by using a small-area electronic flash lamp and fine grain film. One immediate application has been the photographic recording of large samples of living plankton. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the resolution of the shadow system, and to describe some of the strobe light sources that are presently available. Also, a modified method of shadow photography is described where enhanced color images give interesting and, perhaps, important color effects that may be useful in the study of plankton and other semitrans-parent subjects.

  18. Resolution enhancement in second-derivative spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Mirosław A

    2015-01-01

    Derivative spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the resolution enhancement in infrared, near-infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Despite its great significance in analytical chemistry, not all aspects of the applications of this method have been explored as yet. This is the first systematic study of the parameters that influence the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra. The derivative spectra were calculated with the Savitzky-Golay method with different window size (5, 15, 25) and polynomial order (2, 4). The results obtained in this work show that the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra strongly depends on the data spacing in the original spectra, window size, polynomial order, and peak profile. As shown, the resolution enhancement is related to variations in the width of the peaks upon the differentiation. The present study reveals that in order to maximize the separation of the peaks in the second derivative spectra, the original spectra should be recorded at high resolution and differentiated using a small window size and high polynomial order. However, working with the real spectra one has to compromise between the noise reduction and optimization of the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  20. High resolution resist-free lithography in the SEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hari, S.

    2017-01-01

    Focussed Electron Beam Induced Processing is a high resolution direct-write nanopatterning technique. Its ability to fabricate sub-10 nm structures together with its versatility and ease of use, in that it is resist-free and implementable inside a Scanning Electron Microscope, make it attractive for

  1. Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center is EPA's primary resource for services and expertise in the areas of consensus-building, collaborative problem solving, alternative dispute resolution, and environmental collaboration and conflict resolution.

  2. The spatial resolution of the time projection chamber at triumf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, C. K.; Mes, H.; Bennett, A.; Bryman, D. A.; Hasinoff, M.; Macdonald, J. A.; Poutissou, J. M.; Numao, T.; Spuller, J.; Azuelos, G.; Poutissou, R.; Blecher, M.; Gotow, K.; Carter, A. L.

    1984-02-01

    The spatial resolution of the time projection chamber at TRIUMF has been investigated. The best resolution, σ ⋍ 200 μ m, occurs at the minimum drift length and for an optimum track to anode crossing angle determined by the magnetic field. The resolution worsens for tracks crossing at larger or smaller angles and for longer drift lengths. The observed resolution is quantitatively reproduced by considering the diffusion of the drifting electrons, the track to anode crossing angle, E × B effects near the anode wire and the discrete nature of the ionization process.

  3. Spatial resolutions of the time projection chamber at TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, C.K.; Mes, H.; Bennett, A.; Bryman, D.A.; Hasinoff, M.; Macdonald, J.A.; Poutissou, J.M.; Numao, T.; Spuller, J.; Azuelos, G.

    1984-02-01

    The spatial resolution of the time projection chamber at TRIUMF has been investigated. The best resolution, sigmaapprox.=200 ..mu..m, occurs at the minimum drift length and for an optimum track to anode crossing angle determined by the magnetic field. The resolution worsens for tracks crossing at larger or smaller angles and for longer drift lengths. The observed resolution is quantitatively reproduced by considering the diffusion of the drifting electrons, the track to anode crossing angle, ExB effects near the anode wire and the discrete nature of the ionization process.

  4. arXiv Time resolution of silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, W.

    2017-11-21

    We derive expressions for the time resolution of silicon detectors, using the Landau theory and a PAI model for describing the charge deposit of high energy particles. First we use the centroid time of the induced signal and derive analytic expressions for the three components contributing to the time resolution, namely charge deposit fluctuations, noise and fluctuations of the signal shape due to weighting field variations. Then we derive expressions for the time resolution using leading edge discrimination of the signal for various electronics shaping times. Time resolution of silicon detectors with internal gain is discussed as well.

  5. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for lithium-ion batteries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danna Qian; Cheng Ma; Karren L More; Ying Shirley Meng; Miaofang Chi

    2015-01-01

    ... and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM...

  6. Resolution and termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina FOLTIŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The resolution, the termination and the reduction of labour conscription are regulated by articles 1549-1554 in the new Civil Code, which represents the common law in this matter. We appreciate that the new regulation does not conclusively clarify the issue related to whether the existence of liability in order to call upon the resolution is necessary or not, because the existence of this condition has been inferred under the previous regulation from the fact that the absence of liability shifts the inexecution issue on the domain of fortuitous impossibility of execution, situation in which the resolution of the contract is not in question, but that of the risk it implies.

  7. Super-Resolution for Color Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    University of Maryland, College Park , MD S Susan Young Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL Approved for public...separately; however, it requires performing the super-resolution computation 3 times. We transform images in the default red, green, blue (RGB) color space...chrominance components based on ARL’s alias-free image upsampling using Fourier-based windowing methods. A reverse transformation is performed on

  8. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  9. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  10. Ultrafast free electron quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Maria Gabriel

    Free electron quantum optics is an emerging sub-field of physics that uses laser light, often in combination with nano-structures, to manipulate electrons in free space. Integration of femtosecond lasers into this technology is facilitating the move of free electron quantum optics into the ultrafast regime. A vision for this technology is ultrahigh temporal resolution in free electron time-of-flight experiments. Such a system would make fundamental physics studies involving small forces accessible that are not feasible with current technology. Realization of this vision will require an ultrafast source and an ultrafast detection scheme. Tungsten nano-tip sources capable of generating sub-100 fs electron pulses are already in use in our lab. Elsewhere, this type of source has been reported to emit on a sub-cycle timescale. Following up on a proposed scheme for observing sub-cycle emission, a two-color interferometer has been built and pump-probe electron emission measurements have been performed. Other efforts to develop ultrafast sources have involved implementing additional control parameters. GaAs has been investigated as a possible ultrafast source of spin-polarized electrons, and tungsten nano-tips have been modified with an ion beam to create a double tip source. Spin control and transverse separation control are expected to make studies of Pauli degeneracy pressure possible. The temporal resolution of current electronic particle detectors is ~1 ns. Schemes involving the interaction of laser pulses with nanostructures could improve this resolution by several orders of magnitude. As a first step towards a femtosecond electron switch, the temporal resolution of a nano-fabricated plasmonic antenna has been measured in a femtosecond pump-probe experiment. The possibility of an ultrafast diffraction switch has also been analyzed for nonrelativistic and relativistic electrons. In an application of a free electron time-of-flight system, the prediction of

  11. New trend in electron holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Harada, Ken; Murakami, Yasukazu; Niitsu, Kodai; Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Sugawara, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke

    2016-06-01

    Electron holography using a coherent electron wave is a promising technique for high-resolution visualization of electromagnetic fields in and around objects. The capability of electron holography has been enhanced by the development of new technologies and has thus become an even more powerful tool for exploring scientific frontiers. This review introduces these technologies including split-illumination electron holography and vector-field electron tomography. Split-illumination electron holography, which uses separated coherent waves, overcomes the limits imposed by the lateral coherence requirement for electron waves in electron holography. Areas that are difficult to observe using conventional electron holography are now observable. Exemplified applications include observing a singular magnetic domain wall in electrical steel sheets, local magnetizations at anti-phase boundaries, and electrostatic potentials in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. Vector-field electron tomography can be used to visualize magnetic vectors in three dimensions. Two components of the vectors are reconstructed using dual-axis tomography, and the remaining one is calculated using div B   =  0. A high-voltage electron microscope can be used to achieve precise magnetic reconstruction. For example, magnetic vortices have been visualized using a 1 MV holography electron microscope.

  12. Electronic Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-01-01

    Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks...

  13. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  14. Vacuum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Eichmeier, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen experts from the electronics industry, research institutes and universities have joined forces to prepare this book. ""Vacuum Electronics"" covers the electrophysical fundamentals, the present state of the art and applications, as well as the future prospects of microwave tubes and systems, optoelectronics vacuum devices, electron and ion beam devices, light and X-ray emitters, particle accelerators and vacuum interrupters. These topics are supplemented by useful information about the materials and technologies of vacuum electronics and vacuum technology.

  15. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  16. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically associated with other data and which is intended by the user to serve as a signature;. The suggested new definition for an electronic signature reads as follows: 'electronic signature' means a sound, symbol or process that is (i) uniquely linked to the ...

  17. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    (a) facilitate ecommerce;2. (b) remove and prevent barriers to electronic communications in South Africa;3. (c) ensure that electronic transactions in the Republic conform to the highest international standards;4. (d) promote the development of electronic transactions services which are responsive to the needs of users and ...

  18. Bank Resolution in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Jeffrey N.; Ringe, Georg

    of taxpayer assistance. A holding company structure in which the public parent holds unsecured term debt sufficient to cover losses at an operating financial subsidiary would facilitate a “Single Point of Entry” resolution procedure that would minimize knock-on effects from the failure of a systemically...

  19. Bank Resolution in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Gordon, Jeffery; Ringe, Georg

    2015-01-01

    of taxpayer assistance. A holding company structure in which the public parent holds unsecured term debt sufficient to cover losses at an operating financial subsidiary would facilitate a “Single Point of Entry” resolution procedure that would minimize knock-on effects from the failure of a systemically...

  20. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  1. Sticker electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-09-08

    Electronic stickers may be manufactured on flexible substrates (110, 120, 130) as layers and packaged together. The package may then have an adhesive applied to one side to provide capability for sticking the electronic devices to surfaces. The stickers can be wrappable, placed on surfaces, glued on walls or mirrors or wood or stone, and have electronics (112, 122, 132) which may or may not be ultrathin. Packaging for the electronic sticker can use polymer on cellulose manufacturing and/or three dimensional (3-D) printing. The electronic stickers may provide lighting capability, sensing capability, and/or recharging capabilities.

  2. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  3. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahme, S; Kealhofer, C; Krausz, F; Baum, P

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration.

  4. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lahme

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration.

  5. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  6. Electronic Government and Electronic Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambouris, E.; Scholl, H.J.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tarabanis, K.; Gascó, M.; Klievink, A.J.; Lindgren, I.; Milano, M.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Pardo, T.A.; Parycek, P.; Sæbø, O.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic government and electronic participation continue to transform the public sector and society worldwide and are constantly being transformed themselves by emerging information and communication technologies. This book presents papers from the 14th International Federation for Information

  7. Electronic Government and Electronic Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambouris, E; Scholl, H.J.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tarabanis, K; Gascó, M; Klievink, A.J.; Lindgren, I; Milano, M; Panagiotopoulos, P; Pardo, T.A.; Parycek, P; Sæbø, Ø

    2016-01-01

    Electronic government and electronic participation continue to transform the public sector and society worldwide and are constantly being transformed themselves by emerging information and communication technologies.This book presents papers from the 14th International Federation for Information

  8. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  9. CTF Correction in Cryo-Electron Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Nanometer resolution inside the cell will allow us to study the fundamentals of life at the smallest scale. This thesis addresses what is needed to obtain this resolution using cryo-electron tomography (CET). CET is a microscopy modality with the unique potential to visualize proteins,

  10. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  11. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    and aerial imaging to medical image processing, to facial image analysis, text image analysis, sign and number plates reading, and biometrics recognition, to name a few. This has resulted in many research papers, each developing a new super-resolution algorithm for a specific purpose. The current...... comprehensive survey provides an overview of most of these published works by grouping them in a broad taxonomy. For each of the groups in the taxonomy, the basic concepts of the algorithms are first explained and then the paths through which each of these groups have evolved are given in detail, by mentioning...... the contributions of different authors to the basic concepts of each group. Furthermore, common issues in super-resolution algorithms, such as imaging models and registration algorithms, optimization of the cost functions employed, dealing with color information, improvement factors, assessment of super...

  12. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  13. ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Irina IONESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative dispute resolution (ADR includes dispute resolution processes and techniques that act as a means for disagreeing parties to come to an agreement short of litigation. It is a collective term for the ways that parties can settle disputes, with (or without the help of a third party. Despite historic resistance to ADR by many popular parties and their advocates, ADR has gained widespread acceptance among both the general public and the legal profession in recent years. In fact, some courts now require some parties to resort to ADR of some type, before permitting the parties' cases to be tried. The rising popularity of ADR can be explained by the increasing caseload of traditional courts, the perception that ADR imposes fewer costs than litigation, a preference for confidentiality, and the desire of some parties to have greater control over the selection of the individual or individuals who will decide their dispute. Directive 2013/11/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council on alternative dispute resolution for consumer disputes and amending Regulation (EC No 2006/2004 and Directive 2009/22/EC (hereinafter „Directive 2013/11/EU” aims to ensure a high level of consumer protection and the proper functioning of the internal market by ensuring that complaints against traders can be submitted by consumers on a voluntary basis, to entities of alternative disputes which are independent, impartial, transparent, effective, simple,quick and fair. Directive 2013/11/EU establishes harmonized quality requirements for entities applying alternative dispute resolution procedure (hereinafter "ADR entity" to provide the same protection and the same rights of consumers in all Member States. Besides this, the present study is trying to present broadly how are all this trasposed in the romanian legislation.

  14. Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks, including the Internet. Electronic commerce is not limited just to buying and selling, but it also includes all pre-sales and after-sales ongoing activities along the supply chain. Introducing electronic commerce, using the Internet and Web services in business, realizes the way to a completely new type of economy - internet economy.

  15. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    . Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... rate-controlled large-scale simultaneous hypothesis testing is used as a statistical framework for interpretation of results. The first sample yields, as expected, a homogeneous distribution of carbon–carbon (C–C) bond lengths. The second sample exhibits regions of shorter C–C bond lengths...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  16. Resolution of two distinct electron transfer sites on azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Blatt, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    studied by the temperature-jump method. Though similar chemical relaxation spectra were observed for native and modified systems, they differ quantitatively. Analysis of the concentration dependences of the relaxation times and amplitudes showed that both obey the same mechanism but that the specific...

  17. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  18. Micropower electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Keonjian, Edward

    1964-01-01

    Micropower Electronics deals with the operation of modern electronic equipment at micropower levels and the problems associated with micropower electronics. Topics covered include the relations between minimum required power density and frequency response for semiconductor triode amplifiers; physical realization of digital logic circuits; micropower microelectronic subsystems; and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect devices for micropower logic circuitry. This book is comprised of 10 chapters and begins with an analysis of fundamental relationships and basic requirements pertinent to the ph

  19. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  20. Electron Bifurcation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, John W.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Jones, Anne K.; King, Paul W.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-04-01

    Electron bifurcation is the recently recognized third mechanism of biological energy conservation. It simultaneously couples exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions to circumvent thermodynamic barriers and minimize free energy loss. Little is known about the details of how electron bifurcating enzymes function, but specifics are beginning to emerge for several bifurcating enzymes. To date, those characterized contain a collection of redox cofactors including flavins and iron-sulfur clusters. Here we discuss the current understanding of bifurcating enzymes and the mechanistic features required to reversibly partition multiple electrons from a single redox site into exergonic and endergonic electron transfer paths.

  1. Polymer electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Hsin-Fei, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Polymer semiconductor is the only semiconductor that can be processed in solution. Electronics made by these flexible materials have many advantages such as large-area solution process, low cost, and high performance. Researchers and companies are increasingly dedicating time and money in polymer electronics. This book focuses on the fundamental materials and device physics of polymer electronics. It describes polymer light-emitting diodes, polymer field-effect transistors, organic vertical transistors, polymer solar cells, and many applications based on polymer electronics. The book also disc

  2. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R. P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S. R.; Hillyer, T. R.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. T. P. Team,

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 mu s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low

  3. Integral photography capture and electronic holography display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes electronic holography output of three-dimensional (3D) video with integral photography as input. A real-time 3D image reconstruction system was implemented by using a 4K (3840×2160) resolution IP camera to capture 3D images and converting them to 8K (7680×4320) resolution holograms. Multiple graphics processing units (GPUs) were used to create 8K holograms from 4K IP images. In addition, higher resolution holograms were created to successfully reconstruct live-scene video having a diagonal size of 6 cm using a large electronic holography display.

  4. Radiation damage in electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay A; Rubinstein, John L

    2010-01-01

    In an electron microscope, the electron beam used to determine the structures of biological tissues, cells, and molecules destroys the specimen as the image is acquired. This destruction occurs before a statistically well-defined image can be obtained and is consequently the fundamental limit to resolution in biological electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Damage from the destructive interaction of electrons with frozen-hydrated specimens occurs in three stages: primary damage, as electrons ionize the sample, break bonds, and produce secondary electrons and free radicals; secondary damage, as the secondary electrons and free radicals migrate through the specimen and cause further chemical reactions; and tertiary damage, as hydrogen gas is evolved within the sample, causing gross morphological changes to the specimen. The deleterious effects of radiation are minimized in cryo-EM by limiting the exposure of the specimen to incident electrons and cooling the sample to reduce secondary damage. This review emphasizes practical considerations for minimizing radiation damage, including measurement of electron exposure, estimation of absorbed doses of energy, selection of microscope voltage and specimen temperature, and selection of electron exposure to optimize images. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A gas secondary electron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Drouart, A; Alamanos, N; Auger, F; Besson, P; Bougamont, E; Bourgeois, P; Lobo, G; Pollacco, E C; Riallot, M

    2002-01-01

    A new Secondary Electron gas Detector (SED) is under development to be used in conjunction with an emissive foil to detect low energy heavy ions as an alternative to micro-channel plates. It could measure position and time of flight. Secondary electrons are accelerated to 10 keV so that they can cross through the 0.9 mu m Mylar entrance window. The electrons then are multiplied in the isobutane gas of the detector at 4-10 Torr. A time resolution of 150 ps and a spatial resolution of 3 mm have been obtained by using californium fission fragments on a prototype detector of 7x7 cm sup 2. The advantage of the SED against MCP is that its size is not limited. Our final goal is to build a large size detector (15x40 cm sup 2) that will operate at the focal plane of the VAMOS magnetic spectrometer at GANIL.

  6. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbraith, Amy E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  7. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  8. Electronic Cereal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentrup, Julie R.; Phillips, Donald B.

    1996-01-01

    Describes activities that use Froot Loops breakfast cereal to help students master the concepts of valence electrons and chemical bonding and the implications of the duet and octet rules. Involves students working in groups to create electron dot structures for various compounds. (JRH)

  9. Failure Diameter Resolution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-19

    Previously the SURFplus reactive burn model was calibrated for the TATB based explosive PBX 9502. The calibration was based on fitting Pop plot data, the failure diameter and the limiting detonation speed, and curvature effect data for small curvature. The model failure diameter is determined utilizing 2-D simulations of an unconfined rate stick to find the minimum diameter for which a detonation wave propagates. Here we examine the effect of mesh resolution on an unconfined rate stick with a diameter (10mm) slightly greater than the measured failure diameter (8 to 9 mm).

  10. LHCb VELO tracking resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M. T.; LHCb VELO Group

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is designed to make precision measurements of mesons and baryons containing b and c quarks. Many analyses performed using data from LHCb examine properties of particles and anti-particles as a function of proper decay time. Precise measurements of production and decay vertices are thus essential. The Vertex Locator (VELO) subdetector of LHCb performs this task. The excellent performance of the VELO with respect to the resolutions it achieves on single hits, impact parameters, and primary vertex positions is presented, with particular attention paid to measurement of impact parameters.

  11. Development of New High Resolution Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostella, L. D., III; Rajabali, M.; Loureiro, D. P.; Grzywacz, R.

    2017-09-01

    Beta-delayed neutron emission is a prevalent form of decay for neutron-rich nuclei. This occurs when an unstable nucleus undergoes beta decay, but produces a daughter nucleus in an excited state above the neutron separation energy. The daughter nucleus then de-excites by ejecting one or more neutrons. We wish to map the states from which these nuclei decay via neutron spectroscopy using NEXT, a new high resolution neutron detector. NEXT utilizes silicon photomultipliers and 6 mm thick pulse-shape discriminating plastic scintillators, allowing for smaller and more compact modular geometries in the NEXT array. Timing measurements for the detector were performed and a resolution of 893 ps (FWHM) has been achieved so far. Aspects of the detector that were investigated and will be presented here include scintillator geometry, wrapping materials, fitting functions for the digitized signals, and electronic components coupled to the silicon photomultipliers for signal shaping.

  12. Resolution of praziquantel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Woelfle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Praziquantel remains the drug of choice for the worldwide treatment and control of schistosomiasis. The drug is synthesized and administered as a racemate. Use of the pure active enantiomer would be desirable since the inactive enantiomer is associated with side effects and is responsible for the extremely bitter taste of the pill. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified two resolution approaches toward the production of praziquantel as a single enantiomer. One approach starts with commercially available praziquantel and involves a hydrolysis to an intermediate amine, which is resolved with a derivative of tartaric acid. This method was discovered through an open collaboration on the internet. The second method, identified by a contract research organisation, employs a different intermediate that may be resolved with tartaric acid itself. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both resolution procedures identified show promise for the large-scale, economically viable production of praziquantel as a single enantiomer for a low price. Additionally, they may be employed by laboratories for the production of smaller amounts of enantiopure drug for research purposes that should be useful in, for example, elucidation of the drug's mechanism of action.

  13. Low temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, S.B.

    1978-09-01

    The structure of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was studied by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, primarily at low temperature. The handedness of the purple membrane diffraction pattern with respect to the cell membrane was determined by electron diffraction of purple membranes adsorbed to polylysine. A new method of preparing frozen specimens was used to preserve the high resolution order of the membranes in the electron microscope. High resolution imaging of glucose-embedded purple membranes at room temperature was used to relate the orientation of the diffraction pattern to the absolute orientation of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The purple membrane's critical dose for electron beam-induced damage was measured at room temperature and at -120/sup 0/C, and was found to be approximately five times greater at -120/sup 0/C. Because of this decrease in radiation sensitivity, imaging of the membrane at low temperature should result in an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and thus better statistical definition of the phases of weak reflections. Higher resolution phases may thus be extracted from images than can be determined by imaging at room temperature. To achieve this end, a high resolution, liquid nitrogen-cooled stage was built for the JEOL-100B. Once the appropriate technology for taking low dose images at very high resolution has been developed, this stage will hopefully be used to determine the high resolution structure of the purple membrane.

  14. Electron Cryomicroscopy: From Molecules to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, W.

    2014-06-01

    Today's biomolecular electron microscopy uses essentially three different imaging modalities: (i) electron crystallography, (ii) single particle analysis and (iii) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimum preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Electron crystallography requires the existence of two-dimensional crystals. In principle, electron crystallography is a high-resolution technique and it has indeed been demonstrated in a number of cases that near-atomic resolution can be attained. Single-particle analysis is particularly suited for structural studies of large macromolecular complexes. The amount of material needed is minute and some degree of heterogeneity is tolerable since image classification can be used for further 'purification in silico'. In principle, single particle analysis can attain high-resolution but, in practice, this often remains an elusive goal. However, since medium resolution structures can be obtained relatively easily, it often provides an excellent basis for hybrid approaches in which high-resolution structures of components are integrated into the medium resolution structures of the holocomplexes. Electron tomography can be applied to non-repetitive structures. Most supramolecuar structures inside cells fall into this category. In order to obtain three-dimensional structures of objects with unique topologies it is necessary to obtain different views by physical tilting. The challenge is to obtain large numbers of projection images covering as wide a tilt range as possible and, at the same time, to minimize the cumulative electron dose. Cryoelectron tomography provides medium resolution three-dimensional images of a wide range of biological structures from isolated supramolecular assemblies to organelles and cells. It allows the visualization of molecular machines in their functional environment (in situ) and the mapping of entire molecular landscapes.

  15. Digital electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, John

    2013-01-01

    An essential companion to John C Morris's 'Analogue Electronics', this clear and accessible text is designed for electronics students, teachers and enthusiasts who already have a basic understanding of electronics, and who wish to develop their knowledge of digital techniques and applications. Employing a discovery-based approach, the author covers fundamental theory before going on to develop an appreciation of logic networks, integrated circuit applications and analogue-digital conversion. A section on digital fault finding and useful ic data sheets completes th

  16. Electronic diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Diagrams is a ready reference and general guide to systems and circuit planning and in the preparation of diagrams for both newcomers and the more experienced. This book presents guidelines and logical procedures that the reader can follow and then be equipped to tackle large complex diagrams by recognition of characteristic 'building blocks' or 'black boxes'. The goal is to break down many of the barriers that often seem to deter students and laymen in learning the art of electronics, especially when they take up electronics as a spare time occupation. This text is comprised of nin

  17. Electronic identity

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Norberto Nuno Gomes; Argles, David

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing availability of electronic services, security and a reliable means by which identity is verified is essential.Written by Norberto Andrade the first chapter of this book provides an overview of the main legal and regulatory aspects regarding electronic identity in Europe and assesses the importance of electronic identity for administration (public), business (private) and, above all, citizens. It also highlights the role of eID as a key enabler of the economy.In the second chapter Lisha Chen-Wilson, David Argles, Michele Schiano di Zenise and Gary Wills discuss the user-cent

  18. Polymer electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Polymer electronics is the science behind many important new developments in technology, such as the flexible electronic display (e-ink) and many new developments in transistor technology. Solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and transistors are all areas where plastic electronics is likely to, or is already having, a serious impact on our daily lives. With polymer transistors and light-emitting diodes now being commercialised, there is a clear need for a pedagogic text thatdiscusses the subject in a clear and concise fashion suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate students. The content

  19. Stretchable electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Someya, Takao

    2012-01-01

    With its comprehensive coverage this handbook and ready reference brings together some of the most outstanding scientists in the field to lay down the undisputed knowledge on how to make electronics stretchable.As such, it focuses on gathering and evaluating the materials, designs, models and technologies that enable the fabrication of fully elastic electronic devices which can sustain high strain. Furthermore, it provides a review of those specific applications that directly benefit from highly compliant electronics, including transistors, photonic devices and sensors. In addition to stre

  20. Electron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Grivet, Pierre; Bertein, F; Castaing, R; Gauzit, M; Septier, Albert L

    1972-01-01

    Electron Optics, Second English Edition, Part I: Optics is a 10-chapter book that begins by elucidating the fundamental features and basic techniques of electron optics, as well as the distribution of potential and field in electrostatic lenses. This book then explains the field distribution in magnetic lenses; the optical properties of electrostatic and magnetic lenses; and the similarities and differences between glass optics and electron optics. Subsequent chapters focus on lens defects; some electrostatic lenses and triode guns; and magnetic lens models. The strong focusing lenses and pris