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Sample records for sub-linear intensity dependence

  1. Asymptotic inference for jump diffusions with state-dependent intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becheri, Gaia; Drost, Feico; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We establish the local asymptotic normality property for a class of ergodic parametric jump-diffusion processes with state-dependent intensity and known volatility function sampled at high frequency. We prove that the inference problem about the drift and jump parameters is adaptive with respect to

  2. Intensity dependence of electron gas kinetics in a laser corona

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    Mašek Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In various experimental situations relevant to the laser fusion, such as plasma near the light entrance holes of hohlraum in the indirect drive experiments or more recently in the shock ignition direct drive a relatively long underdense plasma of corona type is encountered, which is subject to an intense nanosecond laser beam. The plasma is only weakly collisional and thus in the electron phase space a complicated kinetic evolution is going on, which is taking the electron gas fairly far from the thermal equilibrium and contributes to its unstable behaviour. These phenomena impede the absorption and thermalization of the incoming laser energy, create groups of fast electrons and also may lead to a non-linear reflection of the heating laser beam. One of the key processes leading to the electron acceleration is the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS in its non-linear phase. The SRS in the presence of electron-ion collisions requires a certain threshold intensity above which the mentioned non-dissipative phenomena can occur and develop to the stage, where they may become unpleasant for the fusion experiments. To assess this intensity limit a computational model has been developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell kinetics describing such a plasma in 1D geometry. At a relatively high intensity of 1016 W/cm2 a number of non-linear phenomena are predicted by the code such as a saturation of Landau damping, which is then translated in an unfavourable time dependence of the reflected light intensity and formation of accelerated electron groups due to the electron trapping. The purpose of the present contribution is to map the intensity dependence of this non-linear development with the aim of assessing its weight in fusion relevant situations.

  3. Intensity and wavelength dependence of bimolecular recombination in P3HT:PCBM solar cells: A white-light biased external quantum efficiency study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Sarah R.; Wang, Jian; Yi, Juan; Lee, Yun-Ju; Olson, Dana C.; Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2013-04-01

    Bimolecular recombination is often a major photogenerated charge carrier loss mechanism in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, resulting in lower fill factor (FF) compared to inorganic devices. The recombination parameter α can be obtained from the power law fitting of short-circuit current (Jsc) on illumination intensity (I), Jsc∝Iα, with α values less than unity taken as an indication of reduced photon-to-electron extraction efficiency and the presence of bimolecular recombination in OPV. Here, we show that this intensity-averaged measurement is inadequate. An external quantum efficiency (EQE) apparatus under constant white-light bias can be used to measure the recombination parameter (αEQE*) as a function of wavelength and carrier density (white-light intensity). Examining the dependence of α on background white-light bias intensity and excitation wavelength provides further understanding of photon-to-electron conversion loss mechanisms in P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction devices in standard and inverted architectures. In order to compare EQE and current-voltage (JV) measurements, we discuss the special case of devices exhibiting sub-linear intensity response (α method of measuring bimolecular recombination compared to existing methods, including sensitivity in probing intensity-dependent recombination compared to steady-state JV measurements, the correlation of αEQE* and FF in devices, elucidation of recombination mechanisms through spectral dependence of carrier loss, and the robustness of αEQE* obtained via integration over the entire absorption region. Furthermore, this technique for measuring recombination is immediately accessible to the vast majority of researchers as the EQE apparatus is ubiquitous in PV research laboratories.

  4. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Short Round Sub-Linear Zero-Knowledge Argument for Linear Algebraic Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jae Hong

    Zero-knowledge arguments allows one party to prove that a statement is true, without leaking any other information than the truth of the statement. In many applications such as verifiable shuffle (as a practical application) and circuit satisfiability (as a theoretical application), zero-knowledge arguments for mathematical statements related to linear algebra are essentially used. Groth proposed (at CRYPTO 2009) an elegant methodology for zero-knowledge arguments for linear algebraic relations over finite fields. He obtained zero-knowledge arguments of the sub-linear size for linear algebra using reductions from linear algebraic relations to equations of the form z = x *' y, where x, y ∈ Fnp are committed vectors, z ∈ Fp is a committed element, and *' : Fnp × Fnp → Fp is a bilinear map. These reductions impose additional rounds on zero-knowledge arguments of the sub-linear size. The round complexity of interactive zero-knowledge arguments is an important measure along with communication and computational complexities. We focus on minimizing the round complexity of sub-linear zero-knowledge arguments for linear algebra. To reduce round complexity, we propose a general transformation from a t-round zero-knowledge argument, satisfying mild conditions, to a (t - 2)-round zero-knowledge argument; this transformation is of independent interest.

  6. Benefits of physical activity on COPD hospitalisation depend on intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Balcells, Eva; de Batlle, Jordi; Ramon, Maria A; Rodriguez, Esther; Farrero, Eva; Benet, Marta; Guerra, Stefano; Sauleda, Jaume; Ferrer, Antoni; Ferrer, Jaume; Barberà, Joan A; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Gea, Joaquim; Agustí, Alvar; Antó, Josep M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims to disentangle the independent effects of the quantity and the intensity of physical activity on the risk reduction of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) hospitalisations.177 patients from the Phenotype Characterization and Course of COPD (PAC-COPD) cohort (mean±sd age 71±8 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 52±16% predicted) wore the SenseWear Pro 2 Armband accelerometer (BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA, USA) for eight consecutive days, providing data on quantity (steps per day, physically active days and daily active time) and intensity (average metabolic equivalent tasks) of physical activity. Information on COPD hospitalisations during follow-up (2.5±0.8 years) was obtained from validated centralised datasets. During follow-up 67 (38%) patients were hospitalised. There was an interaction between quantity and intensity of physical activity in their effects on COPD hospitalisation risk. After adjusting for potential confounders in the Cox regression model, the risk of COPD hospitalisation was reduced by 20% (hazard ratio (HR) 0.79, 95% CI 0.67-0.93; p=0.005) for every additional 1000 daily steps at low average intensity. A greater quantity of daily steps at high average intensity did not influence the risk of COPD hospitalisations (HR 1.01, p=0.919). Similar results were found for the other measures of quantity of physical activity. Greater quantity of low-intensity physical activity reduces the risk of COPD hospitalisation, but high-intensity physical activity does not produce any risk reduction. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  7. Stretch Intensity vs. Inflammation: A Dose-dependent Association?

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    Nikos Apostolopoulos BPHE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of stretching is rarely reported in scientific literature. In this study, we examined the effects of stretching intensities at 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum range of movement (mROM on the inflammatory response of the right hamstring muscle. Methods: A randomised within-subject trial was conducted with 11 healthy recreationally active males over a three week period. Participants were strapped into an isokinetic dynamometer in the supine position, with the right knee fastened in a knee immobilizer. After randomising the ROM percentages, the hamstring muscle was moved to one of the three chosen ROM percentages for that week and held there for 5 x 60 seconds followed by a 10 second rest between repetitions. A 5ml blood sample was collected pre-, immediately post, and at 24 hours post intervention for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP assessments. Results: Significant increases in hsCRP levels were observed between 30% mROM and 90% mROM (p=0.004 and 60% mROM and 90% mROM (p=0.034, but not between 30% and 60% (p>0.05. Conclusions: Muscle stretching at submaximal levels does not elicit a significant systemic inflammatory responses. Keywords: Stretch intensity, inflammation, hsCRP

  8. Ambiguous dependence of fluorescence intensity of trees on chlorophyll concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoruev, Valeriy V.; Zavorueva, Elena N.

    2014-11-01

    Using fluorimetry Junior PAM (Heinz Walz GmbH, Germany) fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Crataegus chlorocarca M, Acer negúndo, Bétula péndula are studied. It was found that the dependence of maximum fluorescence (Fm) plants on the concentration of chlorophyll depends on the sampling method during of vegetation. The correctness of sampling proves during vegetation is substantiated.

  9. MORPHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS OF THE RADIAL NERVE ARE INTENSITY-DEPENDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Oliva Carbone

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Peripheral nerve adaptation is critical for strength gains. However, information about intensity effects on nerve morphology is scarce. Objective: To compare the effects of different intensities of resistance training on radial nerve structures. Methods: Rats were divided into three groups: control (GC, training with 50% (GF1 and training 75% (GF2 of the animal’s body weight. The morphological analysis of the nerve was done by light and transmission electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey’s post hoc test were applied and the significance level was set at p≤0.05. Results: Training groups had an increase of strength compared to GC (p≤0.05. All measured nerve components (mean area and diameter of myelin fibers and axons, mean area and thickness of the myelin sheath, and of neurofilaments and microtubules were higher in GF2 compared to the other (p≤0.05. Conclusion: Results demonstrated greater morphological changes on radial nerve after heavier loads. This can be important for rehabilitation therapies, training, and progression.

  10. Selective bond breaking of CO2 in phase-locked two-color intense laser fields: laser field intensity dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tomoyuki; Fujise, Hikaru; Kawachi, Yuuna; Ishihara, Ayaka; Matsuda, Akitaka; Fushitani, Mizuho; Kono, Hirohiko; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Selective bond breaking of CO2 in phase-locked ω-2ω two-color intense laser fields (λ = 800 nm and 400 nm, total field intensity I ∼ 10(14) W cm(-2)) has been investigated by coincidence momentum imaging. The CO(+) and O(+) fragment ions produced by two-body Coulomb explosion, CO2(2+) → CO(+) + O(+), exhibit asymmetric distributions along the laser polarization direction, showing that one of the two equivalent C-O bonds is selectively broken by the laser fields. At a field intensity higher than 2 × 10(14) W cm(-2), the largest fragment asymmetry is observed when the relative phase ϕ between the ω and 2ω laser fields is ∼0 and π. On the other hand, an increase of the asymmetry and a shift of the phase providing the largest asymmetry are observed at lower field intensities. The selective bond breaking and its dependence on the laser field intensity are discussed in terms of a mechanism involving deformation of the potential energy surfaces and electron recollision in intense laser fields.

  11. Intensity-dependent modulatory effects of vagus nerve stimulation on cortical excitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollet, L.; Grimonprez, A.; Raedt, R.; Delbeke, J.; El Tahry, R.; De Herdt, V.; Meurs, A.; Wadman, W.; Boon, P.; Vonck, K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES - Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective treatment for refractory epilepsy. It remains unknown whether VNS efficacy is dependent on output current intensity. The present study investigated the effect of various VNS output current intensities on cortical excitability in the motor

  12. Intensity and pressure dependence of resonance fluorescence of OH induced by a tunable UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, D. K.; Wang, C. C.; Hanabusa, M.

    1976-01-01

    The intensity and pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum of OH in the presence of N2 and H2O molecules was studied. Saturation of the absorption transition was observed at low pressures, and the corresponding fluorescence signal was found to vary as the square root of the exciting intensity. This observed dependence agreed with the predicted dependence which took into account the presence of laser modes in the spectrum of the exciting radiation. With full laser power incident, a saturation parameter as high as 3 x 10 to the 5th was observed. The fluorescence spectrum was found to peak at 3145 and at 3090 A, with the relative peak intensities dependent upon gas pressures and upon the particular rotational electronic transition used for excitation. It is concluded that vibrational relaxation of the electronically excited OH due to water vapor in the system plays a dominant role in determining the observed fluorescence spectrum.

  13. PGC-1α and exercise intensity dependent adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Brandt

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the role of PGC-1α in intensity dependent exercise and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle. Whole body PGC-1α knockout (KO and littermate wildtype (WT mice performed a single treadmill running bout at either low intensity (LI for 40 min or moderate intensity (MI for 20 min. Blood and quadriceps muscles were removed either immediately after exercise or at 3h or 6h into recovery from exercise and from resting controls. In addition PGC-1α KO and littermate WT mice were exercise trained at either low intensity (LIT for 40 min or at moderate intensity (MIT for 20 min 2 times pr. day for 5 weeks. In the first and the last week of the intervention period, mice performed a graded running endurance test. Quadriceps muscles were removed before and after the training period for analyses. The acute exercise bout elicited intensity dependent increases in LC3I and LC3II protein and intensity independent decrease in p62 protein in skeletal muscle late in recovery and increased LC3II with exercise training independent of exercise intensity and volume in WT mice. Furthermore, acute exercise and exercise training did not increase LC3I and LC3II protein in PGC-1α KO. In addition, exercise-induced mRNA responses of PGC-1α isoforms were intensity dependent. In conclusion, these findings indicate that exercise intensity affected autophagy markers differently in skeletal muscle and suggest that PGC-1α regulates both acute and exercise training-induced autophagy in skeletal muscle potentially in a PGC-1α isoform specific manner.

  14. MD468: Electron Cloud Reference Fills and Dependence on the Bunch Intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Mether, Lotta; Romano, Annalisa; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This note describes a Machine Development session performed to investigate the dependence of e-cloud build-up and instabilities on the bunch population of the circulating beam. Three fills were performed with identical filling schemes and RF settings and with different injected bunch intensities. The fill with the largest intensity has also been used as a reference to assess the scrubbing evolution during 2016.

  15. Nonlinear totally reflecting prism coupler: thermomechanic effects and intensity-dependent refractive index of thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigneault, H; Flory, F; Monneret, S

    1995-07-20

    Starting with an accurate linear electromagnetic theory of a totally reflecting prism coupled to a dielectric waveguide, we implement a numerical technique to take into account optogeometric perturbations in stratified media. We calculate both the reflected fields in intensity on the prism base (near field) and in infinity (far field) for an incident Gaussian beam. The study of the variations of the intensity in the reflected beam (near and far fields) versus light power shows thermoinduced dilation of the prism and an intensity-dependent refractive index of thin films composed of tantalium pentoxyde and titanium dioxide.

  16. Size- and intensity-dependent photoelectron spectra from gas-phase gold nanoparticles irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J.; Robatjazi, S. J.; Makhija, V.; Vajdi, A.; Li, X.; Malakar, Y.; Pearson, W. L.; Rudenko, A.; Sorensen, C.; Stierle, J.; Kling, M. F.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles bridge the gap between atomic/molecular and bulk matter offering unique opportunities to study light interactions with complex systems, in particular, near-field enhancements and excitation of plasmons. Here we report on a systematic study of photoelectron emission from isolated gold nanoparticles irradiated by 800 nm, 25 fs laser pulses at 10-50 TW/ cm2 peak intensities. A combination of an aerodynamic lens nanoparticle injector, high-energy velocity-map imaging spectrometer and a high-speed, single-shot camera is employed to record shot by shot photoelectron emission patterns from individual particles. By sorting the recorded images according to the number of emitted electrons, we select the events from the regions of particular laser intensities within the laser focus, thus, essentially avoiding focal volume averaging. Using this approach, we study the intensity- and size-dependence of photoelectron energy and angular distributions for particle sizes ranging from 5 nm to 400 nm. This work is supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. JRML operations and personal are supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of BES, Office of Science, U. S. DOE.

  17. Written emotional expression during recovery from cocaine dependence: group and individual differences in craving intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasing, Kenneth; Mathur, Deepan; Desouza, Cherilyn

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial to evaluate effects of written emotional expression in patients receiving intensive treatment for cocaine dependence in a residential-unit setting. Randomization to the emotional expression treatment produced changes in blood pressure and mood during writing sessions, possibly because of its ability to stimulate active coping behavior. At an initial follow-up visit, patients that had received written emotional expression reported lower values for craving intensity and were less likely to self-report use of cocaine. These results may indicate a therapeutic effect of written emotional expression during recovery from cocaine dependence.

  18. The Raman Contribution to the Intensity Dependent Refractive Index in Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Pálsson, Tómas; Jespersen, Kim G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the Raman contribution to the intensity dependent refractive index in step-index fibers with germanium doped silica core. The fR value is found to be 0.157 ± 0.07 for a field weighted germanium concentration between 5 and 25 mol %.......We report on the Raman contribution to the intensity dependent refractive index in step-index fibers with germanium doped silica core. The fR value is found to be 0.157 ± 0.07 for a field weighted germanium concentration between 5 and 25 mol %....

  19. Human skeletal muscle HSP70 response to physical training depends on exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Lormes, W; Baur, C; Opitz-Gress, A; Altenburg, D; Lehmann, M; Steinacker, J M

    2000-07-01

    We have previously reported that HSP70 in human skeletal muscle could be induced by training. However, whether HSP70 induction is dependent upon exercise volume or exercise intensity remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between HSP70 and training intensity in rowers. Fourteen well-trained male rowers were divided into two groups (group A, n = 6; group B, n = 8). Group A performed higher intensity exercise during 1st phase, whereas group B performed higher intensity exercise during 2nd training phase. Training volume in 2nd phase increased in both groups. Both training intensity and volume were reduced in 3rd phase. Muscle samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis by fine needle biopsy before training, at the end of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd training phases. HSP70 was quantitatively determined using SDS-PAGE with silver stain. In group A, HSP70 increased significantly from 38 +/- 12 etag before training to 59 +/- 16 etag at the end of the lst training phase (loaded total protein 2.5microg), and decreased afterwards. In group B, HSP70 increase (from 36 +/- 11 etag to 50 +/- 13 etag) in the 1st phase was significantly smaller, there was a further increase of HSP70 in the 2nd phase (60 +/- 14 etag). At the end of the training, HSP70 decreased in both groups. Thus, HSP70 response to training seems to be dependent upon exercise intensity.

  20. Long Range Dependence Prognostics for Bearing Vibration Intensity Chaotic Time Series

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    Qing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the chaotic features and typical fractional order characteristics of the bearing vibration intensity time series, a forecasting approach based on long range dependence (LRD is proposed. In order to reveal the internal chaotic properties, vibration intensity time series are reconstructed based on chaos theory in phase-space, the delay time is computed with C-C method and the optimal embedding dimension and saturated correlation dimension are calculated via the Grassberger–Procaccia (G-P method, respectively, so that the chaotic characteristics of vibration intensity time series can be jointly determined by the largest Lyapunov exponent and phase plane trajectory of vibration intensity time series, meanwhile, the largest Lyapunov exponent is calculated by the Wolf method and phase plane trajectory is illustrated using Duffing-Holmes Oscillator (DHO. The Hurst exponent and long range dependence prediction method are proposed to verify the typical fractional order features and improve the prediction accuracy of bearing vibration intensity time series, respectively. Experience shows that the vibration intensity time series have chaotic properties and the LRD prediction method is better than the other prediction methods (largest Lyapunov, auto regressive moving average (ARMA and BP neural network (BPNN model in prediction accuracy and prediction performance, which provides a new approach for running tendency predictions for rotating machinery and provide some guidance value to the engineering practice.

  1. PGC-1α and exercise intensity dependent adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Dethlefsen, Maja Munk; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-01-01

    LC3I and LC3II protein in PGC-1α KO. In addition, exercise-induced mRNA responses of PGC-1α isoforms were intensity dependent. In conclusion, these findings indicate that exercise intensity affected autophagy markers differently in skeletal muscle and suggest that PGC-1α regulates both acute......The aim of the present study was to examine the role of PGC-1α in intensity dependent exercise and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle. Whole body PGC-1α knockout (KO) and littermate wildtype (WT) mice performed a single treadmill running bout at either low...... and exercise training-induced autophagy in skeletal muscle potentially in a PGC-1α isoform specific manner....

  2. Surface plasmon peak intensity dependence on the oxygen coverage at metal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskoboinikov, A.; Voskoboinikov, A.; Nakhodkin, N.; Kryn'ko, Y.; Kulik, S.; Melnik, P.; Sheka, D.

    1994-01-01

    The dependence of the surface plasmon peak intensity on a submonolayer coverage of oxygen in the reflection electron energy loss spectra has been investigated for non-monocrystalline aluminium, magnesium, and indium surfaces. It will be shown that the decrease of the surface plasmon peaks can be

  3. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them w...

  4. Analyzing the Actual Execution of a Large Software-Intensive System for Determining Dependencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callo Arias, Trosky B.; Avgeriou, Paris; America, Pierre; Hassan, AE; Zaidman, A; DiPenta, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic analysis approach to increase the understandability of a large software-intensive system, more particularly to enable the identification of dependencies between its execution entities. This approach analyzes the execution of a software system in a top-down fashion

  5. Intensity-dependent change in polarization state of light in normal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These equations clearly show the intensity dependence of polarization state of the reflected and transmitted light beams. From eqs (13) and (14) it is clear that when incident light is plane polarized (pinc = p∗ inc) or circularly polarized (pinc = ±i), then pref = pinc and ptra = pinc, i.e., there is no change in polarization state of.

  6. Cognitive Costs of Reappraisal Depend on Both Emotional Stimulus Intensity and Individual Differences in Habitual Reappraisal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Nicole Marie Ortner

    Full Text Available Recent models of emotion regulation suggest that the cognitive costs of reappraisal depend on stimulus intensity and habitual reappraisal. In the current experiment, we tested these hypotheses by manipulating the intensity of unpleasant and pleasant images, which participants reappraised, viewed, or suppressed their emotions to. To assess cognitive costs, we measured participants' performance on a concurrent simple reaction time task. Participants also reported on their everyday use of reappraisal and suppression. Higher intensity stimuli were associated with greater cognitive costs of reappraisal, for unpleasant, but not pleasant pictures. Also, greater habitual reappraisal predicted lower cognitive costs of reappraisal and greater reductions in subjective feelings. Results support the role of stimulus intensity and habitual use of reappraisal in predicting the cognitive costs of reappraisal.

  7. Polarization dependence of two-photon transition intensities in rare-earth doped crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Nguyen, An-Dien [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A polarization dependence technique has been developed as a tool to investigate phonon scattering (PS), electronic Raman scattering (ERS), and two-photon absorption (TPA) transition intensities in vanadate and phosphate crystals. A general theory for the polarization dependence (PD) of two-photon transition intensities has been given. Expressions for the polarization dependent behavior of two-photon transition intensities have been tabulated for the 32 crystallographic point groups. When the wavefunctions for the initial and final states of a rare-earth doped in crystals are known, explicit PD expressions with no unknown parameters can be obtained. A spectroscopic method for measuring and interpreting phonon and ERS intensities has been developed to study PrVO4, NdVO4, ErVO4, and TmVO4 crystals. Relative phonon intensities with the polarization of the incident and scattered light arbitrarily varied were accurately predicted and subsequently used for alignment and calibration in ERS measurements in these systems for the first time. Since ERS and PS intensities generally follow different polarization curves as a function of polar angles, the two can be uniquely identified by comparing their respective polarization behavior. The most crucial application of the technique in ERS spectroscopy is the establishment of a stringent test for the Axe theory. For the first time, the F1/F2 ratio extracted from the experimental fits of the ERS intensities were compared with those predicted by theories which include both the second- and third-order contributions. Relatively good agreement between the fitted values of F1/F2 and the predicted values using the second-order theory has been found.

  8. Intensity-Dependent Effect of Treadmill Running on Knee Articular Cartilage in a Rat Model

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    Guo-Xin Ni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand the changes of femoral cartilage in response to treadmill running with different intensities in the hope of differentiating “moderate” and “strenuous” running in a rat model. Method. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into groups of sedentary (SED, low-intensity running (LIR, medium-intensity running (MIR, and high-intensity running (HIR. Rats in LIR, MIR, and HIR groups underwent 8 weeks’ treadmill running programs. After sacrificed, femoral condyles were collected to take histomorphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry for collagen II. Results. Gross and histological observation showed osteoarthritic changes in group HIR. In comparison to SED group, there was significant increase in cartilage thickness, number of chondrocytes, and GAG content in groups LIR and MIR. Conversely, decrease in cartilage thickness, chondrocyte number, and GAG content was found in rats of HIR group, without significant difference though. In addition, in comparison to SED group, HIR group exhibited disorganization of collagen fibril and significantly lower content of collagen type II. Conclusion. An intensity-dependent effect was suggested on the articular cartilage. Our results also demonstrated that running with low-to-medium intensity applied in the present study should be regarded as “moderate” running, whereas high-intensity running as “strenuous” running.

  9. A threat to the understanding of oneself: intensive care patients' experiences of dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkegaard, Kristina; Delmar, Charlotte

    2013-06-28

    This study examines the meaning of dependency on care as experienced by intensive care patients. Literature on the subject is sparse, but research from nonintensive settings shows that dependency is often experienced negatively. The study is based on in-depth qualitative semistructured interviews with three former patients characterized as narratives. The analysis is inspired by a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The study has found that dependency is experienced as difficult and that the experience seems to be attached to the relationship to oneself. Patients feel powerless and experience shame, their understanding of self is threatened, and they fight for independence in the course after intensive care. The findings might be influenced by the study being conducted in a Western country setting, where independence is valued. They can be used as means of reflection on nursing practice and matters such as communication and patient participation.

  10. Intensive intervention for alcohol-dependent smokers in early recovery: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Timothy P; Delucchi, Kevin; Duncan, Carol L; Banys, Peter; Simon, Joel A; Solkowitz, Sharon N; Huggins, Joy; Lee, Sharon K; Hall, Sharon M

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an intensive tobacco cessation intervention for alcohol-dependent smokers in early recovery. A total of 162 alcohol-dependent smokers were randomized to either intensive intervention for smoking cessation or usual care. The intensive intervention consisted of 16 sessions of individual cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and combination nicotine replacement therapy that lasted 26 weeks. Usual care involved referral to a free-standing smoking cessation program that provided smoking cessation counseling of varying duration and guideline-concordant medications. The primary cessation outcome was verified 7-day point prevalence abstinence (PPA) at 12, 26, 38, and 52 weeks. At 12 and 26 weeks, the verified 7-day point-prevalence quit rate was significantly higher for the intensive intervention group than for the usual care group (both p=0.03). However, the quit rates for the two treatment groups were not significantly different at 38 or 52 weeks. Verified 30-day alcohol abstinence rates were not significantly different for the two treatment groups at any of the follow-up assessments. The intensive smoking cessation intervention yielded a higher short-term smoking quit rate without jeopardizing sobriety. A chronic care model might facilitate maintenance of smoking cessation during the first year of alcohol treatment and perhaps for longer periods of time. It is hoped that studies such as this will inform the development of more effective interventions for concurrent alcohol and tobacco use disorders. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Determining intensity dependence of ultrashort laser processes through focus z-scanning intensity-difference spectra: application to laser-induced dissociation of H{sup +}{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayler, A M; Wang, P Q; Carnes, K D; Ben-Itzhak, I [J R Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2007-11-28

    A focal spot scanning intensity-difference spectra method is developed to allow one to determine the intensity dependence of laser produced features while improving experimental statistics. This method is applicable to focused Gaussian beam interactions with approximately uniform planar targets. Furthermore, it can be applied to disentangle the intensity dependence of thick targets. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by applying it to the kinetic energy release spectrum resulting from the dissociation of an H{sup +}{sub 2} beam in an intense ultrashort laser pulse.

  12. Intensity and temperature-dependent photoluminescence of tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajward, A. M.; Wang, X.; Wagner, H. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the recombination of excitons in tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films by intensity and temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). At low temperature (15 K) and elevated excitation intensity the radiative emission is quenched by singlet-singlet annihilation processes. With rising temperature the PL quenching is strongly reduced resulting in a PL efficiency maximum at ∼170 K. The reduced exciton annihilation is attributed to thermally activated occupation of non-quenchable trapped exciton states. Above 170 K the PL efficiency decreases due to thermal de-trapping of radiative states and subsequent migration to non-radiative centers.

  13. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  14. Dynamics for a two-atom two-mode intensity-dependent Raman coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S., E-mail: vasudha-rnc1@rediffmail.com, E-mail: sudhhasingh@gmail.com; Gilhare, K. [Ranchi University, Department of Physics (India)

    2016-06-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a two-atom Raman coupled model interacting with a quantized bimodal field with intensity-dependent coupling terms in a lossless cavity. The unitary transformation method used to solve the time-dependent problem also gives the eigensolutions of the interaction Hamiltonian. We study the atomic-population dynamics and dynamics of the photon statistics in the two cavity modes, and present evidence of cooperative effects in the production of antibunching and anticorrelations between the modes. We also investigate the effect of detuning on the evolution of second-order correlation functions and observe that the oscillations become more rapid for large detuning.

  15. Intense Two-Cycle Laser Pulses Induce Time-Dependent Bond Hardening in a Polyatomic Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dota, K.; Garg, M.; Tiwari, A. K.; Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Mathur, D.

    2012-02-01

    A time-dependent bond-hardening process is discovered in a polyatomic molecule (tetramethyl silane, TMS) using few-cycle pulses of intense 800 nm light. In conventional mass spectrometry, symmetrical molecules such as TMS do not exhibit a prominent molecular ion (TMS+) as unimolecular dissociation into [Si(CH3)3]+ proceeds very fast. Under a strong field and few-cycle conditions, this dissociation channel is defeated by time-dependent bond hardening: a field-induced potential well is created in the TMS+ potential energy curve that effectively traps a wave packet. The time dependence of this bond-hardening process is verified using longer-duration (≥100fs) pulses; the relatively slower falloff of optical field in such pulses allows the initially trapped wave packet to leak out, thereby rendering TMS+ unstable once again.

  16. The Effect of Lamotrigine and Levetiracetam on TMS-Evoked EEG Responses Depends on Stimulation Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Premoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG has uncovered underlying mechanisms of two anti-epileptic medications: levetiracetam and lamotrigine. Despite their different mechanism of action, both drugs modulated TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs in a similar way. Since both medications increase resting motor threshold (RMT, the current aim was to examine the similarities and differences in post-drug TEPs, depending on whether stimulation intensity was adjusted to take account of post-drug RMT increase. The experiment followed a placebo controlled, double blind, crossover design, involving a single dose of either lamotrigine or levetiracetam. When a drug-induced increase of RMT occurred, post-drug measurements involved two blocks of stimulations, using unadjusted and adjusted stimulation intensity. A cluster based permutation analysis of differences in TEP amplitude between adjusted and unadjusted stimulation intensity showed that lamotrigine induced a stronger modulation of the N45 TEP component compared to levetiracetam. Results highlight the impact of adjusting stimulation intensity.

  17. Photolysis of Caged-GABA Rapidly Terminates Seizures In Vivo: Concentration and Light Intensity Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of focal epilepsy remains unsatisfactory for as many as 25% of patients. The photolysis of caged-γ-aminobutyric acid (caged-GABA represents a novel and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Our previous experimental results have demonstrated that the use of blue light produced by light-emitting diode to uncage ruthenium-bipyridine-triphenylphosphine-c-GABA (RuBi-GABA can rapidly terminate paroxysmal seizure activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, the optimal concentration of RuBi-GABA, and the intensity of illumination to abort seizures, remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the optimal anti-seizure effects of RuBi-GABA by using implantable fibers to introduce blue light into the neocortex of a 4-aminopyridine-induced acute seizure model in rats. We then investigated the effects of different combinations of RuBi-GABA concentrations and light intensity upon seizure. Our results show that the anti-seizure effect of RuBi-GABA has obvious concentration and light intensity dependence. This is the first example of using an implantable device for the photolysis of RuBi-GABA in the therapy of neocortical seizure, and an optimal combination of RuBi-GABA concentration and light intensity was explored. These results provide important experimental data for future clinical translational studies.

  18. Intensity-dependent transitions between different pathways of strong-field double ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; de Jesus, V. L. B.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2008-07-01

    Momentum distributions of Ne2+ and Ar2+ ions created by linearly polarized 795nm , 25fs laser pulses have been traced at intensities from 1014to3×1015W/cm2 using a “reaction microscope.” Apart from the transition from nonsequential to sequential ionization, characterized by significant changes in longitudinal momentum distributions developing from a double hump, over a triple-peak structure to a narrow single Gaussian observed for both ions, for Ar2+ we find a similar behavior but reversed in its intensity dependence in the purely nonsequential regime, pointing to contributions of recollision excitation plus subsequent field ionization, or to the role of “Z trajectories” recently predicted within classical calculations.

  19. Power-dependent upconversion luminescence intensity in NaYF4,Yb3+,Er3+ nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A. H.; Lü, Q.

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge of the power density for which luminescence intensity reversal begins with power increase is of valuable importance for practical applications. Under 980 nm CW diode laser excitation, the maximum upconversion luminescence intensities were obtained at 4800, 5700, and 7100 W/cm2 for 2H9/2→4I15/2, 2H11/2&4S3/2→4I15/2, and 4F9/2→4I15/2 transition luminescences, respectively, in compact powder composed by cubic-phase NaYF4: Yb3+,Er3+ nanoparticles with a most probable diameter of ~46 nm. It was revealed experimentally that the reversal power density decreases as luminescent level rises. Excitation increase combined with radiative quantum efficiency decrease as power increase can reproduce this "n"-shape power dependence relationship.

  20. Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lombard’s effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author’s own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. Material and Methods: The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160–430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37–1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6–0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015. Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003. The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A-weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Results: Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B – 21%, and in group C – 60% of lectors were using raised voice. Conclusions: It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time exert their effect on lecturer’s vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice, which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard’s effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. Med Pr 2015;66(4:487–496

  1. [Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Lombard's effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author's own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms) and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160-430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37-1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6-0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015). Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003). The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A--weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B--21%, and in group C--60% of lectors were using raised voice. It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time) exert their effect on lecturer's vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice), which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard's effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. Polarization extinction ratio and polarization dependent intensity noise in long-pulse supercontinuum generation (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Catherine; Engelsholm, Rasmus Dybbro; Moselund, Peter Morten

    2017-01-01

    polarization extinction ratios (PER) of over 10 dB. We experimentally demonstrate how the spectrally resolved polarization develops with increasing power and along the length of the nonlinear fiber. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations of coupled polarization states mimicking...... the experimental conditions. Subsequently, a single-shot pulse-to-pulse polarization dependent relative intensity noise (PD-RIN) was measured and the noise characteristics were analyzed using long-tailed and rogue wave statistics. To do this, we used a range of 10 nm narrow bandpass filters (BPF) between 550 nm...

  3. Reversing the temperature dependence of the sensitized Er3+ luminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, F.; Hryciw, A.; DeCorby, R.; Meldrum, A.

    2009-08-01

    The temperature-induced quenching of the Er3+ luminescence is a significant problem in silicon-based materials systems ultimately designed for room-temperature applications. Here, we show that amorphous silicon-rich oxide, moderately annealed in order to avoid growth of Si nanocrystals, exhibits a reversed temperature dependence in which the integrated Er3+ luminescence increases in intensity upon heating from 77 up to 300 K. This behavior is attributed to a unique spectrum of interacting defects that efficiently sensitize the Er3+ levels, even in the absence of nanocrystals. The effect could have ramifications in fiber-optic emitters or amplifiers to be operated at noncryogenic temperatures.

  4. Current State of Pediatric Intensive Care and High Dependency Care in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Aayush; Sharma, Arun; Basnet, Sangita

    2016-11-01

    To describe the state of pediatric intensive care and high dependency care in Nepal. Pediatric intensive care is now a recognized specialty in high-income nations, but there are few reports from low-income countries. With the large number of critically ill children in Nepal, the importance of pediatric intensive care is increasingly recognized but little is known about its current state. Survey. All hospitals in Nepal that have separate physical facilities for PICU and high dependency care. All children admitted to these facilities. None. A questionnaire survey was sent to the chief of each facility. Eighteen hospitals were eligible and 16 responded. Two thirds of the 16 units were established in the last 5 years; they had a total of 93 beds, with median of 5 (range, 2-10) beds per unit. All 16 units had a monitor for each bed but only 75% could manage central venous catheters and only 75% had a blood gas analyzer. Thirty two percent had only one functioning mechanical ventilator and another 38% had two ventilators, the other units had 3-6 ventilators. Six PICUs (38%) had a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:2 and the others had 1:3 to 1:6. Only one institution had a pediatric intensive care specialist. The majority of patients (88%) came from families with an income of just over a dollar per day. All patients were self funded with a median cost of PICU bed being $25 U.S. dollars (interquartile range, 15-31) per day. The median stay was 6 (interquartile range, 4.8-7) days. The most common age group was 1-5. Sixty percent of units reported respiratory distress/failure as their primary cause for admission. Mortality was 25% (interquartile range, 20-35%) with mechanical ventilation and 1% (interquartile range, 0-5%) without mechanical ventilation. Pediatric intensive care in Nepal is still in its infancy, and there is a need for improved organization, services, and training.

  5. Time-dependent ionization models designed for intense and short laser pulse propagation in dielectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeade, Antoine; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2012-05-01

    When an intense and short laser pulse propagates in a dielectric material, significant production of conduction electrons through multiphoton absorption (MPA) may occur. In addition to the laser intensity, the MPA process depends mainly on the laser frequency spectrum which may evolve significantly during the course of laser propagation in the material. Simple models for MPA accounting for possible time-dependent evolution of the laser frequency spectrum (as harmonic generation, chirping or broadening) are addressed. The first model is based on Bloch-Volkov states whereas the second approach relies on the density matrix formalism which has been adapted for the present study. Both models are well adapted for their introduction in a propagation code and are shown to correctly account for the MPA process whatever the characteristics of the laser frequency spectrum. The reliability of these approaches has been studied in two cases of practical interest. First, in the case where a second harmonic is present within the fundamental pulse, calculations show that the ionization rate may be significantly enhanced. Second, in the case of a chirped pulse, models are shown to correctly account for possible change in the multiphoton order during the course of interaction.

  6. Simulations of the polarisation-dependent Raman intensity of β-carotene in photosystem II crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brose, K., E-mail: katharina.brose@gmx.net [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Zouni, A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Müh, F. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mroginski, M.A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Maultzsch, J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • First polarisation-dependent Raman spectroscopy on photosystem II crystals. • Orientation-dependent Raman intensity simulations for di- and monomeric crystals. • Simulations account for all β-carotenes (β-Car) in the unit cell for the first time. • Prediction for identificationy of the β-Car cation in side-path electron transport. - Abstract: In order to clarify possibilities to identify the β-carotene (β-Car) radicals in secondary electron transfer (ET) reactions in the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc), Raman intensities of all 96 β-Car cofactors in the unit cell of PSIIcc-dimer crystals as a function of polarisation and crystal orientation were simulated based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure. The Raman-active symmetry A{sub g} in the C{sub 2h} group is assigned to the β-Car modes ν{sub 66} and ν{sub 67}. Simulations are in agreement with experiment for off-resonant excitation at 1064 nm. Resonant measurements at 476 and 532 nm excitation can not be explained, which is attributed to mode mixing in the excited state and the existence of different spectral pools. The identity of the β-Car oxidised in secondary ET can not be resolved by Raman measurements on PSIIcc-dimer crystals. Additional simulations show that similar measurements on PSIIcc-monomer crystals could provide a possible route to solve this issue.

  7. Sea-state Dependence of Sea Surface Temperature Cooling and its Feedback on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, A.; Reichl, B. G.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Thomas, B.

    2016-02-01

    Air-sea momentum and heat fluxes underneath tropical cyclones (TCs) are important controls on storm intensity. Increased upper ocean mixing due to TC winds can upwell cooler waters to the surface, reducing the heat flux from the ocean and weakening the storm. Therefore, improved representation of the wind forcing and the resulting sea surface temperature cooling in coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere models can help increase the accuracy of intensity predictions. However, the impact of surface waves (sea state) on these processes is not fully understood. The three most significant sea state dependent effects on upper ocean processes are the Coriolis-Stokes forcing, the air-sea flux budget (effect of growing/decaying surface waves), and the Langmuir turbulence (enhancement of the upper ocean mixing due to surface waves). In this study we focus on the first two effects. To examine these two effects a comparison is made using a series of idealized storms, with a range of translation speeds, with individual and combined implementations of these two components in a fully coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model. The Princeton Ocean Model is used with a 1/12th degree resolution and 23 half-sigma levels and an initial temperature profile based on the Gulf of Mexico climatology. It is coupled to the WaveWatch III wave model, also at 1/12th degree resolution. The atmospheric component is the NOAA/GFDL hurricane model, which has 42 vertical levels and a three-level nested mesh. The inner two meshes are 1/18th and 1/6th degree resolution, with the finer inside the coarser, and move with the storm. It is found that both the Coriolis-stokes forcing and the sea state dependent air-sea flux modify the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the sea surface cooling, and that the combined effect may significantly modify the storm intensity predictions.

  8. Infrared cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene: Temperature-dependent studies

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2014-01-01

    Propylene, a by-product of biomass burning, thermal cracking of hydrocarbons and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, is a ubiquitous molecule found in the environment and atmosphere. Accurate infrared (IR) cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene are essential for quantitative measurements and atmospheric modeling. We measured absolute IR cross-sections of propylene using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy over the wavenumber range of 400-6500cm-1 and at gas temperatures between 296 and 460K. We recorded these spectra at spectral resolutions ranging from 0.08 to 0.5cm-1 and measured the integrated band intensities for a number of vibrational bands in certain spectral regions. We then compared the integrated band intensities measured at room temperature with values derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) databases. Our results agreed well with the results reported in the two databases with a maximum deviation of about 4%. The peak cross-sections for the primary bands decreased by about 20-54% when the temperature increased from 296 to 460K. Moreover, we determined the integrated band intensities as a function of temperature for certain features in various spectral regions; we found no significant temperature dependence over the range of temperatures considered here. We also studied the effect of temperature on absorption cross-section using a Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser system. We compared the DFG results with those obtained from the FTIR study at certain wavenumbers over the 2850-2975cm-1 range and found a reasonable agreement with less than 10% discrepancy. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Linear coupling dependence on intensity and a next step towards a feedback (MD1850)

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Gasior, Marek; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Olexa, Jakub; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Valuch, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Transverse coupling has proven to be an important variable to control beam dynamics and performance in the LHC. In this report, we present the first measurement of transverse coupling vs beam intensity. The analysis shows no dependency within the experimental uncertainties. This study was made possible with the new implementation of an AC-dipole-like excitation using the ADT. It provides the functionality to excite a single bunch in a train. The demonstration of this functionality is also an important step towards creating an automatic coupling correction tool for the LHC. Transverse coupling has been observed to vary with time at injection. In this report, a quantitative measurement of the coupling as a function of time after ramp-down is presented. Turn-by-turn data was also acquired to compare the performance of the new DOROS system to the standard BPMs.

  10. Simulation of thermal ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound with temperature-dependent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C W; Sun, M K; Chen, B T; Shieh, J; Chen, C S; Chen, W S

    2015-11-01

    An integrated computational framework was developed in this study for modeling high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation. The temperature field was obtained by solving the bioheat transfer equation (BHTE) through the finite element method; while, the thermal lesion was considered as a denatured material experiencing phase transformation and modeled with the latent heat. An equivalent attenuation coefficient, which considers the temperature-dependent properties of the target material and the ultrasound diffraction due to bubbles, was proposed in the nonlinear thermal transient analysis. Finally, a modified thermal dose formulation was proposed to predict the lesion size, shape and location. In-vitro thermal ablation experiments on transparent tissue phantoms at different energy levels were carried out to validate this computational framework. The temperature histories and lesion areas from the proposed model show good correlation with those from the in-vitro experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Theoretical investigation of intensity-dependent optical nonlinearity in graphene-aided D-microfiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manoj Kumar; Lu, Rongguo; Zhang, Yali; Ye, Shengwei; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the intensity-dependent optical nonlinearity in graphene-aided D-microfiber, by tuning the chemical potential of graphene and varying radial distance and radii of the D-microfiber. Utilizing an interplay between graphene and the enhanced evanescent field of a guided mode in the waveguide of interest, the net utility of nonlinear coefficient is harnessed up to a very high value of 106 W-1m-1. Importantly, which is ∼ two orders of magnitude larger than in PMMA-graphene-PMMA waveguide. The highly dispersive nature of the waveguide, D ∼ 103 ps/nm-km, and large nonlinear figure-of-merit, FOMNL ∼ 1.29, have raised the possibilities of utilizing slow light structures to operate devices at few watts power level with microscale length. These studies have opened one window towards the next-generation all fiber-optic graphene nonlinear optical devices.

  12. Adaptation of grapevine flowers to cold involves different mechanisms depending on stress intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélodie Sawicki

    Full Text Available Grapevine flower development and fruit set are influenced by cold nights in the vineyard. To investigate the impact of cold stress on carbon metabolism in the inflorescence, we exposed the inflorescences of fruiting cuttings to chilling and freezing temperatures overnight and measured fluctuations in photosynthesis and sugar content. Whatever the temperature, after the stress treatment photosynthesis was modified in the inflorescence, but the nature of the alteration depended on the intensity of the cold stress. At 4°C, photosynthesis in the inflorescence was impaired through non-stomatal limitations, whereas at 0°C it was affected through stomatal limitations. A freezing night (-3°C severely deregulated photosynthesis in the inflorescence, acting primarily on photosystem II. Cold nights also induced accumulation of sugars. Soluble carbohydrates increased in inflorescences exposed to -3°C, 0°C and 4°C, but starch accumulated only in inflorescences of plants treated at 0 and -3°C. These results suggest that inflorescences are able to cope with cold temperatures by adapting their carbohydrate metabolism using mechanisms that are differentially induced according to stress intensity.

  13. Intensity-dependent EMG response for the biceps brachii during sustained maximal and submaximal isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joshua C; Beck, Travis W; Ye, Xin; Wages, Nathan P

    2016-09-01

    There have been recent attempts to characterize the mechanisms associated with fatigue-induced task failure. We compared the time to failure and the corresponding changes in the surface electromyogram (EMG) during sustained maximal and submaximal isometric force tasks. EMG activity was measured from the biceps brachii of 18 male participants as they sustained either a maximal or submaximal (60 % MVC) isometric contraction of the dominant elbow flexors until force could not be maintained above 55 % MVC. Intensity-dependent patterns of change were observed for EMG amplitude and mean power frequency (MNF) between the two force tasks. Interestingly, the only significant predictor of failure time was the rate of change in EMG MNF during the submaximal task (r (2) = 0.304). In addition, EMG amplitude at submaximal failure was significantly lower (p EMG response emphasize the basis of neuromuscular fatigue and task dependency. Additionally, our data suggest that the EMG MNF should be used when monitoring the progression of local muscle fatigue.

  14. Size dependent ionization dynamics of argon clusters in intense x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, D.; Swiggers, M.; Coffee, R. N.; Messerschmidt, M.; Williams, G.; Bozek, J. D.; Wada, S.-I.; Möller, T.; Bostedt, C.

    2012-06-01

    Free Electron Lasers open the door for novel experiments in many science areas ranging from ultrafast chemical dynamics to single shot imaging of molecules. For the success of virtually all experiments with free electron lasers a detailed understanding of the light - matter interaction in the x-ray regime is pivotal. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser in Stanford allows for the first time to study innershell ionization dynamics of intense x-ray pulses on a femtosecond time scale. We performed experiments on the ionization dynamics of Argon clusters at different pulse length using the slotted spoiler foil in the second LCLS bunch compressor [1]. The Auger rate of argon clusters is predicted to be size dependent and lower than in atoms due to delocalization of the valence electrons [2]. We observe a dependence of the ionization dynamics on pulse length and cluster size. The results are discussed and also compared to recent atomic and molecular data from LCLS.[4pt] [1] P. Emma et al. PRL 92, 074801 (2004)[0pt] [2] U. Saalmann, JM Rost PRL 89, 14 (2002)

  15. Grassland resistance and resilience after drought depends on management intensity and species richness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Vogel

    Full Text Available The degree to which biodiversity may promote the stability of grasslands in the light of climatic variability, such as prolonged summer drought, has attracted considerable interest. Studies so far yielded inconsistent results and in addition, the effect of different grassland management practices on their response to drought remains an open question. We experimentally combined the manipulation of prolonged summer drought (sheltered vs. unsheltered sites, plant species loss (6 levels of 60 down to 1 species and management intensity (4 levels varying in mowing frequency and amount of fertilizer application. Stability was measured as resistance and resilience of aboveground biomass production in grasslands against decreased summer precipitation, where resistance is the difference between drought treatments directly after drought induction and resilience is the difference between drought treatments in spring of the following year. We hypothesized that (i management intensification amplifies biomass decrease under drought, (ii resistance decreases with increasing species richness and with management intensification and (iii resilience increases with increasing species richness and with management intensification.We found that resistance and resilience of grasslands to summer drought are highly dependent on management intensity and partly on species richness. Frequent mowing reduced the resistance of grasslands against drought and increasing species richness decreased resistance in one of our two study years. Resilience was positively related to species richness only under the highest management treatment. We conclude that low mowing frequency is more important for high resistance against drought than species richness. Nevertheless, species richness increased aboveground productivity in all management treatments both under drought and ambient conditions and should therefore be maintained under future climates.

  16. Impaired Pulmonary V˙O2 Kinetics in Cystic Fibrosis Depend on Exercise Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saynor, Zoe Louise; Barker, Alan Robert; Oades, Patrick John; Williams, Craig Anthony

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of mild-to-moderate cystic fibrosis (CF) on the pulmonary oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics of seven pediatric patients (13.5 ± 2.8 yr) versus seven healthy matched controls (CON; 13.6 ± 2.4 yr). We hypothesized that CF would slow the V˙O2 kinetic response at the onset of moderate (MOD) and very heavy (VH) intensity cycling. Changes in breath-by-breath V˙O2, near-infrared spectroscopy-derived muscle deoxygenation ([HHb]) at the vastus lateralis muscle and thoracic bioelectrical impedance-derived heart rate (HR), stroke volume index, and cardiac index were measured during repeat transitions to MOD (90% of the gas exchange threshold) and VH (Δ60%) intensity cycling exercise. During MOD, the phase II V˙O2 τ (P = 0.84, effect size [ES] = 0.11) and the overall mean response time (MRT) (P = 0.52, ES = 0.11) were not significantly slower in CF versus CON. However, during VH exercise, the phase II V˙O2 τ (P = 0.02, ES = 1.28) and MRT (P = 0.01, ES = 1.40) were significantly slower in CF. Cardiac function, central O2 delivery (stroke volume index and cardiac index), and muscle [HHb] kinetics were unaltered in CF. However, the arteriovenous O2 content difference ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) was reduced during VH at 30 s (P = 0.03, ES = 0.37), with a trend for reduced levels at 0 s (P = 0.07, ES = 0.25), 60 s (P = 0.05, ES = 0.28), and 120 s (P = 0.07, ES = 0.25) in CF. Furthermore, (Equation is included in full-text article.)significantly correlated with the VH phase II V˙O2 τ (r = -0.85, P = 0.02) and MRT (r = -0.79, P = 0.03) in CF only. Impairments in muscle oxidative metabolism during constant work rate exercise are intensity dependent in young people with mild-to-moderate CF. Specifically, V˙O2 kinetics are slowed during VH but not MOD cycling and appear to be mechanistically linked to impaired muscle O2 extraction and utilization.

  17. Illumination intensity dependent photoresponse of ultra-thin ZnO/graphene/ZnO heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusza, M.; Granek, F.; Strek, W.

    2017-12-01

    A heterostructure of zinc oxide (ZnO) and single layer graphene is fabricated by sandwiching a transferred graphene between two thin ZnO films (∼20 nm each). ZnO thin films were grown using decomposition of Zn(acac)2 and spin-coating technique. Graphene transfer route with PMMA temporary carrier and metal etching process was used to transfer high quality commercial graphene from copper foil on the zinc oxide surface on glass. This novel and ultra-thin heterostructure (∼40 nm) is sensitive for UV illumination and works as a photodetector (PD). In this device, both positive and negative photoconductivity (PC) were observed depends on illumination intensity and spectrum of incident light. Relatively long response and recovery times obtained in ZnO/G/ZnO structure are related to the metastable defect states of ZnO and its interfaces with graphene and/or silver contacts. The obtained results show that the transferred single layer graphene sheet between thin ZnO films could be a novel route for improvement properties this low-cost metal oxide.

  18. Enhanced Intensity Dependence as a Marker of Low Serotonergic Neurotransmission in High Optimistic College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibiao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology focuses were on the merits of individuals, such as optimism and positive attitude, and the subsequent cultivation of these virtues. Optimism or pessimism is a significant predictor of physical health outcomes. The present study examined whether optimism or pessimism is associated with the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP, a biological indicator of serotonergic neurotransmission, for the N1, P2, and N1/P2 peaks in college students. The amplitudes and amplitude-stimulus intensity function (ASF slopes of the N1, P2, and N1/P2 peaks were determined in the 24 (10 males high optimistic and 24 (14 males high pessimistic individuals. Significantly higher P2 ASF slopes were found in the optimistic group relative to the pessimistic group. Concerning peaks and ASF slopes of N1 and N1/P2, no significant differences were observed. Our results suggest that the serotonergic neurotransmission of the high optimistic college students was inferior to that of the pessimistic ones. Further investigations are needed to provide sufficient support for our results.

  19. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  20. Intensity dependence of auditory P2 in monozygotic twins discordant for Vietnam combat: Associations with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Linda J.; Pitman, Roger K.; Miller, Gregory A.; Paige, Stephen R.; Orr, Scott P.

    2010-01-01

    Two studies have reported decreased intensity dependence of the P2 event-related potential (ERP) in male combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a response pattern presumed to reflect central nervous system-induced protective inhibition and heightened central serotonergic activity. We used an identical twin, case-control design to investigate whether intensity dependence abnormalities reflect pretrauma vulnerability or are an acquired consequence of PTSD. ERPs were measured in male Vietnam combat veterans and their noncombat-exposed monozygotic twin brothers during a four-tone, stimulus-intensity modulation procedure. Contrary to previous findings in male veterans, the PTSD group had significantly steeper P2 amplitude intensity slopes, similar to those reported for female veterans and abused children with PTSD. Additionally, increased P2 amplitude intensity slope was associated with increased PTSD symptom severity, particularly the severity of reexperiencing symptoms. A mixed-model, random-effects analysis that included the combat-unexposed twins revealed a significant diagnosis by combat exposure interaction. Inspection of group means suggests that the observed increased P2 intensity dependence is a consequence of PTSD. Our findings further suggest that low serotonergic tone may emerge as one potential consequence of this disorder. PMID:18629752

  1. Polarization extinction ratio and polarization dependent intensity noise in long-pulse supercontinuum generation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Catherine; Dybbro Engelsholm, Rasmus; Moselund, Peter Morten; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian; Bang, Ole

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the polarization of supercontinuum generated in nominally non-birefringent silica photonic crystal fibers over the entire spectrum of the source (450-2400 nm). We demonstrate that the degree of polarization varies over the spectrum but that some parts of the spectrum show stable polarization extinction ratios (PER) of over 10 dB. We experimentally demonstrate how the spectrally resolved polarization develops with increasing power and along the length of the nonlinear fiber. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations of coupled polarization states mimicking the experimental conditions. Subsequently, a single-shot pulse-to-pulse polarization dependent relative intensity noise (PD-RIN) was measured and the noise characteristics were analyzed using long-tailed and rogue wave statistics. To do this, we used a range of 10 nm narrow bandpass filters (BPF) between 550 nm to 2200 nm, and fast photo detectors, to record 800 consecutive pulses. Peaks from these pulses are first extracted, then distribution of their pulse height histogram (PHH) is constructed. Analysis using higher-order moments about the mean (variance, skewness and kurtosis) showed that: (1) around the pump wavelength of 1064nm, the PD-RIN is lowest, PHH exhibits a Gaussian distribution, and higher order moments are zero, (2) further away from pump, PD-RIN increases in parabolic fashion, PHH follows a left-skewed long-tailed Gamma distribution, and higher-order moments increase. Spectrally, the difference of the PD-RIN in the two orthogonal axes increases with PER.

  2. Polarization-angle dependence of photoluminescence intensity of ordered GaInP{sub 2} layers: observation of polarization memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Brito-Orta, R. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2008-09-15

    We compare measured and calculated polarization-angle dependencies of the intensity of the photoluminescence emission from MOVPE-grown GaInP{sub 2} layers with different ordering parameters. We measured the polarization-angle dependencies of the emission propagating along the [001],[110] and [1 anti 10] directions at room temperature. Symmetry considerations were used to calculate the dependence of the relative intensity of the PL emission which was linearly polarized along different directions and to estimate the value of the valence-band splitting by fitting the measured dependencies with calculated curves. An intriguing influence of the polarization of the exciting beam on the relative amount of the polarized PL emission was observed in the emission from the (110) plane. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. The Effect of Physiotherapy on Ventilatory Dependency and the Length of Stay in an Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Mehtap; Karadibak, Didem; Yldrm, Yucel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of physiotherapy on ventilator dependency and lengths of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Patients were divided into two groups. The control group, which received standard nursing care, was a retrospective chart review. The data of control patients who were not receiving physiotherapy were obtained…

  4. Cholesterol dependent and Amphotericin B resistant isolates of a Candida glabrata strain from an Intensive Care Unit patient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezusta, A.; Aspiroz, C.; Boekhout, T.; Cano, J.F.; Theelen, B.; Guarro, J.; Rubio, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Here we report on two isolates of Candida glabrata recovered from urine samples collected from of an Intensive Care Unit patient. D1/D2 and ITS 1+2 rDNA sequence analysis confirmed its identification. The isolates were cholesterol dependent and resistant to Amphotericin B.

  5. The Flux of Euglena gracilis Cells Depends on the Gradient of Light Intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuma Ogawa

    Full Text Available We have quantified the photomovement behavior of a suspension of Euglena gracilis representing a behavioral response to a light gradient. Despite recent measurements of phototaxis and photophobicity, the details of macroscopic behavior of cell photomovements under conditions of light intensity gradients, which are critical to understand recent experiments on spatially localized bioconvection patterns, have not been fully understood. In this paper, the flux of cell number density under a light intensity gradient was measured by the following two experiments. In the first experiment, a capillary containing the cell suspension was illuminated with different light intensities in two regions. In the steady state, the differences of the cell numbers in the two regions normalized by the total number were proportional to the light difference, where the light intensity difference ranged from 0.5-2.0 μmol m-2 s-1. The proportional coefficient was positive (i.e., the bright region contained many microorganisms when the mean light intensity was weak (1.25 μmol m-2 s-1, whereas it was negative when the mean intensity was strong (13.75 μmol m-2 s-1. In the second experiment, a shallow rectangular container of the suspension was illuminated with stepwise light intensities. The cell number density distribution exhibited a single peak at the position where the light intensity was about Ic ≃ 3.8 μmol m-2 s-1. These results suggest that the suspension of E. gracilis responded to the light gradient and that the favorable light intensity was Ic.

  6. The Flux of Euglena gracilis Cells Depends on the Gradient of Light Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takuma; Shoji, Erika; Suematsu, Nobuhiko J; Nishimori, Hiraku; Izumi, Shunsuke; Awazu, Akinori; Iima, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We have quantified the photomovement behavior of a suspension of Euglena gracilis representing a behavioral response to a light gradient. Despite recent measurements of phototaxis and photophobicity, the details of macroscopic behavior of cell photomovements under conditions of light intensity gradients, which are critical to understand recent experiments on spatially localized bioconvection patterns, have not been fully understood. In this paper, the flux of cell number density under a light intensity gradient was measured by the following two experiments. In the first experiment, a capillary containing the cell suspension was illuminated with different light intensities in two regions. In the steady state, the differences of the cell numbers in the two regions normalized by the total number were proportional to the light difference, where the light intensity difference ranged from 0.5-2.0 μmol m-2 s-1. The proportional coefficient was positive (i.e., the bright region contained many microorganisms) when the mean light intensity was weak (1.25 μmol m-2 s-1), whereas it was negative when the mean intensity was strong (13.75 μmol m-2 s-1). In the second experiment, a shallow rectangular container of the suspension was illuminated with stepwise light intensities. The cell number density distribution exhibited a single peak at the position where the light intensity was about Ic ≃ 3.8 μmol m-2 s-1. These results suggest that the suspension of E. gracilis responded to the light gradient and that the favorable light intensity was Ic.

  7. Study of terahertz intensity dependence on time resolved dynamic fringes in the interferometric autocorrelation setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, M.; Chaudhary, A. K.

    2014-10-01

    Terahertz signal is generated from Low temperature gallium arsenide photoconductive dipole antennas (gap = 5μm, length = 20μm) by focusing 15 fs laser pulses and applying 12V DC across it. Terahertz intensity is detected by Pyroelectric detector (THZ1.5MB-USB). The collinear autocorrelation arrangement provides dynamic fringes which are allowed to be incident on photoconductive antennas to study the variation in terahertz intensity with respect to delay between laser pulses. Interestingly, the profile of THz intensity variation was similar to interferometric autocorrelation signal of laser pulses. The THz power attenuation with its propagation distance in atmosphere was measured.

  8. Intense Collaboration In Globally Distributed Teams: Evolving Patterns Of Dependencies And Coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kumar (Kuldeep); P.C. van Fenema (Paul); M.A. von Glinow

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAs multi-national firms and major offshore outsourcing companies develop experience with global work, their globally distributed teams face the challenge of collaborating intensely without the common interaction advantages associated with collocated work. This chapter analyzes the

  9. Magnetic field dependent intensity variation in the hyperfine split Rb D1 and D2 lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianping; Ummal Momeen, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present the variation of intensity in Doppler-free hyperfine lines for rubidium atoms with the application of magnetic field. Different polarization configurations have been studied systematically with varying magnetic fields. There is a significant increase in the intensity variation with applied magnetic field related to different polarization configurations. These variations are explained with the theoretical calculations. The calculations are performed by adopting Nakayama's four level model with the varying magnetic field induced transition probability.

  10. A Bloch equation approach to intensity dependent optical spectra of light harvesting complex II: excitation dependence of light harvesting complex II pump-probe spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Marten; Renger, Thomas; Knorr, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the recent progress in the resolution of the structure of the antenna light harvesting complex II (LHC II) of the photosystem II, we propose a microscopically motivated theory to predict excitation intensity-dependent spectra. We show that optical Bloch equations provide the means to include all 2( N ) excited states of an oligomer complex of N coupled two-level systems and analyze the effects of Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation on pump-probe spectra. We use LHC Bloch equations for 14 Coulomb coupled two-level systems, which describe the S (0) and S (1) level of every chlorophyll molecule. All parameter introduced into the Hamiltonian are based on microscopic structure and a quantum chemical model. The derived Bloch equations describe not only linear absorption but also the intensity dependence of optical spectra in a regime where the interplay of Pauli Blocking effects as well as exciton-exciton annihilation effects are important. As an example, pump-probe spectra are discussed. The observed saturation of the spectra for high intensities can be viewed as a relaxation channel blockade on short time scales due to Pauli blocking. The theoretical investigation is useful for the interpretation of the experimental data, if the experimental conditions exceed the low intensity pump limit and effects like strong Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation need to be considered. These effects become important when multiple excitations are generated by the pump pulse in the complex.

  11. Disruptive effects of light pollution on sleep in free-living birds: Season and/or light intensity-dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Thomas; Sun, Jiachen; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic environmental pollutant posing an important potential threat for wildlife. Evidence of its effects on animal physiology and behaviour is accumulating. However, in order to effectively mitigate light pollution it is important to determine which factors contribute to the severity of effects of ALAN. In this experimental study we explored whether there are seasonal-dependent effects of ALAN on sleep in free-living great tits (Parus major), an important model species. Additionally, we looked at whether light intensity determined the severity of effects of ALAN on sleep. We therefore exposed animals to artificial light inside the nest box (3lx) in December (winter) and February (pre-breeding season). Results from February were compared with the results from a previous study in February, using a lower light intensity (1.6lx). We found little evidence for a season-dependent response. Effects of ALAN hardly differed between high and low light intensity. ALAN disrupted sleep with as main effect a decrease in sleep duration (≈-40min) as animals woke up earlier (≈-24min). However, compared to a natural dark situation sleep onset was delayed by high but not by low light intensity of ALAN. Our study underlines earlier found disruptive effects of ALAN on sleep of free-living animals. While we found no conclusive evidence for seasonal or light intensity-dependent effects of ALAN, additional experimental work using lower light intensities might show such differences. Examining potential management options is crucial in mitigating disruptive effects of light pollution, which will be an important focus for future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Size-dependent ultrafast ionization dynamics of nanoscale samples in intense femtosecond x-ray free-electron-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Swiggers, Michelle L; Coffee, Ryan N; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Bozek, John D; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Kornilov, Oleg; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2012-06-08

    All matter exposed to intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser is strongly ionized on time scales competing with the inner-shell vacancy lifetimes. We show that for nanoscale objects the environment, i.e., nanoparticle size, is an important parameter for the time-dependent ionization dynamics. The Auger lifetimes of large Ar clusters are found to be increased compared to small clusters and isolated atoms, due to delocalization of the valence electrons in the x-ray-induced nanoplasma. As a consequence, large nanometer-sized samples absorb intense femtosecond x-ray pulses less efficiently than small ones.

  13. Lifetime of fluorescence from light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins: excitation intensity dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, T.M. (Univ. of Rochester, NY); Knox, W.H.

    1981-10-01

    The fluorescence from a purified, aggregate form of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein has a lifetime of 1.2 +/- 0.5 ns at low excitation intensity, but the lifetime decreases significantly when the intensity of the 20-ps, 5300nm excitation pulse is increased above about 10/sup 16/ photons/cm/sup 2/. A solubilized, monomeric form of the protein, on the other hand, has a fluorescence lifetime of 3.1 +/- 0.3 ns independent of excitation intensity from 10/sup 14/-10/sup 18/ photons/cm/sup 2//pulse. We interpret the lifetime shortening in the aggregates and the lack of shortening in monomers in terms of exciton annihilation, facilitated in the aggregate by the larger population of interacting chlorophylls.

  14. Increased slow wave sleep and reduced stage 2 sleep in children depending on exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworak, Markus; Wiater, Alfred; Alfer, Dirk; Stephan, Egon; Hollmann, Wildor; Strüder, Heiko K

    2008-03-01

    There is controversy about the consequences of physical exercise on human sleeping behaviors. Evidence suggests that voluntary physical exercise affects brain structures and functions. However, there are inconsistent data regarding the effects of exercise on sleep architecture and sleep continuity, especially the amounts of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of moderate and high intense physical exercise on vigilance state and sleep patterns in school-aged children. Eleven healthy children (12.6+/-0.8 years old) were recruited for this polysomnographic study and underwent two exercise sessions. The two exercise sessions on a bicycle ergometer were performed 3-4h prior to bedtime, lasted 30min and varied in intensity. The moderate-intensity exercise was at 65-70% of maximal heart rate (HR(max)) while the high-intensity exercise was at 85-90% HR(max) to exhaustion. Polysomnographic and physiological measurements, including oximetry, were made on three nights in random order and separated by 1 week. Vigilance tests were carried out before and after the three sleep periods. Only high-intensity exercise resulted in a significantly elevated SWS proportion and less sleep in stage 2 as well as a higher sleep efficiency and shorter sleep onset latency. No significant effects on REM sleep were found. The results suggest that exercise intensity is responsible for the effects on stage 2 sleep and SWS in children and support the hypothesis of homeostatic sleep regulation.

  15. Light intensity dependence of open-circuit voltage of polymer: fullerene solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    The open-circuit voltage V-oc of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells is investigated as a function of light intensity for different temperatures. Devices consisted of a blend of a poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative as the hole conductor and 6,6-phenyl C-61-butyric acid methyl ester as the electron conductor. The observed photogenerated current and V-oc are at variance with classical p-n junction-based models. The influence of light intensity and recombination strength on V-oc...

  16. Luminescent Ag12-metallothionein: dependence of emission intensity on silver-thiolate cluster formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, M J; Zelazowski, A J; Gasyna, Z

    1988-11-21

    We report the observation of emission intensity at 77 K that is a function of Ag(I)-thiolate bonds formation within the protein metallothionein. The emission characteristics (a large, 250 nm, Stokes shift and long emission lifetime) suggests that the transition occurs from the excited triplet state. The emission intensity and circular dichroism both indicate that silver(I) clusters form with stoichiometric ratios of 12 Ag(I) to the 20 thiolate sulfur groups that are present in the protein. These data are the first to show that Ag(I)-metallothionein complexes are luminescent and that a specific Ag12-MT species forms.

  17. Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles in Three-dimensional Interplanetary Magnetic Fields: Radial Dependence of Peak Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H.-Q.; Zhou, G.; Wan, W.

    2017-06-01

    A functional form {I}\\max (R)={{kR}}-α , where R is the radial distance of a spacecraft, was usually used to model the radial dependence of peak intensities {I}\\max (R) of solar energetic particles (SEPs). In this work, the five-dimensional Fokker-Planck transport equation incorporating perpendicular diffusion is numerically solved to investigate the radial dependence of SEP peak intensities. We consider two different scenarios for the distribution of a spacecraft fleet: (1) along the radial direction line and (2) along the Parker magnetic field line. We find that the index α in the above expression varies in a wide range, primarily depending on the properties (e.g., location and coverage) of SEP sources and on the longitudinal and latitudinal separations between the sources and the magnetic foot points of the observers. Particularly, whether the magnetic foot point of the observer is located inside or outside the SEP source is a crucial factor determining the values of index α. A two-phase phenomenon is found in the radial dependence of peak intensities. The “position” of the break point (transition point/critical point) is determined by the magnetic connection status of the observers. This finding suggests that a very careful examination of the magnetic connection between the SEP source and each spacecraft should be taken in the observational studies. We obtain a lower limit of {R}-1.7+/- 0.1 for empirically modeling the radial dependence of SEP peak intensities. Our findings in this work can be used to explain the majority of the previous multispacecraft survey results, and especially to reconcile the different or conflicting empirical values of the index α in the literature.

  18. Light intensity dependence of open-circuit voltage of polymer : fullerene solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    The open-circuit voltage V-oc of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells is investigated as a function of light intensity for different temperatures. Devices consisted of a blend of a poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative as the hole conductor and 6,6-phenyl C-61-butyric acid methyl ester

  19. Temperature- and excitation intensity-dependent photoluminescence in TlInSeS single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Gasanly, N M; Yuksek, N S

    2002-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of TlInSeS layered single crystals were investigated in the wavelength region 460-800 nm and in the temperature range 10-65 K. We observed one wide PL band centred at 584 nm (2.122 eV) at T=10 K and an excitation intensity of 7.5 W cm sup - sup 2. We have also studied the variation of the PL intensity versus excitation laser intensity in the range from 0.023 to 7.5 W cm sup - sup 2. The red shift of this band with increasing temperature and blue shift with increasing laser excitation intensity was observed. The PL was found to be due to radiative transitions from the moderately deep donor level located at 0.243 eV below the bottom of the conduction band to the shallow acceptor level at 0.023 eV located above the top of the valence band. The proposed energy-level diagram permits us to interpret the recombination processes in TlInSeS layered single crystals.

  20. Describing the light intensity dependence of polymer : fullerene solar cells using an adapted Shockley diode model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff, L. H.; Veenstra, S. C.; Kroon, J. M.; Verhees, W.; Koster, L. J. A.; Galagan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Solar cells are generally optimised for operation under AM1.5 100 mW cm(-2) conditions. This is also typically done for polymer solar cells. However, one of the entry markets for this emerging technology is portable electronics. For this market, the spectral shape and intensity of typical

  1. Hypoalgesia in response to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) depends on stimulation intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Fidelma; Leonard, Tracey; Hawthorne, Stephanie; Hughes, Ciara M; McCrum-Gardner, Evie; Johnson, Mark I; Rakel, Barbara A; Sluka, Kathleen A; Walsh, Deirdre M

    2011-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrophysical modality used for pain management. This study investigated the dose response of different TENS intensities on experimentally induced pressure pain. One hundred and thirty TENS naïve healthy individuals (18-64 years old; 65 males, 65 females) were randomly allocated to 5 groups (n = 26 per group): Strong Non Painful TENS; Sensory Threshold TENS; Below Sensory Threshold TENS; No Current Placebo TENS; and Transient Placebo TENS. Active TENS (80 Hz) was applied to the forearm for 30 minutes. Transient Placebo TENS was applied for 42 seconds after which the current amplitude automatically reset to 0 mA. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded from 2 points on the hand and forearm before and after TENS to measure hypoalgesia. There were significant differences between groups at both the hand and forearm (ANOVA; P = .005 and .002). At 30 minutes, there was a significant hypoalgesic effect in the Strong Non Painful TENS group compared to: Below Sensory Threshold TENS, No Current Placebo TENS and Transient Placebo TENS groups (P TENS and No Current Placebo TENS groups at the hand (P = .001). There was no significant difference between Strong Non Painful TENS and Sensory Threshold TENS groups. The area under the curve for the changes in PPT significantly correlated with the current amplitude (r(2) = .33, P = .003). These data therefore show that there is a dose-response effect of TENS with the largest effect occurring with the highest current amplitudes. This study shows a dose response for the intensity of TENS for pain relief with the strongest intensities showing the greatest effect; thus, we suggest that TENS intensity should be titrated to achieve the strongest possible intensity to achieve maximum pain relief. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Time-dependent Unrestricted Hartree-Fock Method for Electron Dynamics in Intense Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    Time-dependent restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock (TD-RHF and TD-UHF) methods are comparatively assessed for the description of the electron dynamics in intense laser fields. These methods are applied to the one-dimensional H2 molecule exposed to an intense laser field, and compared to the results from the time-dependent Schrödinger (TDSE) equation. Around the equilibrium interatomic distance, where the initial RHF and UHF wavefunctions coincide, TD-UHF keeps an initial closed-shell, thus underestimates large amplitude electron motions. At a longer interatomic distance, where the UHF wavefunction differs from the RHF one, TD-UHF better reprodeces the TDSE result than TD-RHF does.

  3. Numerical study of threshold intensity dependence on gas pressure in the breakdown of molecular hydrogen induced by excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Nassef, O. Aied

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, a numerical analysis is performed to investigate the threshold intensity dependence on gas pressure in laser spark ignition of the H2 plasma. The analysis considered the experimental measurements that were carried out by Yagi and Huo [Appl. Opt. 35, 3183 (1996)]. In their experiment, H2 in a pressure range of 150-3000 Torr is irradiated by a focused excimer laser source using a 96 cm lens at a wavelength of 248 nm and a pulse duration of 20 ns. The study, based on a modified electron cascade model [K. A. Hamam et al., J. Mod. Phys. 4, 311 (2013)], solves numerically a time-dependent energy equation for the distribution of the electron energy as well as a set of rate equations that describe the change in the formed excited molecule population. This model enabled the determination of the threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure. The validity of the model was tested by comparing the calculated thresholds with the experimentally measured ones. Moreover, the calculation of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters justified the role of the electron gain and loss processes in controlling the value of threshold intensity in relation to the gas pressure. The effect of loss processes on the threshold intensity is also presented.

  4. Phase- and intensity-dependence of ultrafast dynamics in hydrocarbon molecules in few-cycle laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kübel, Matthias; Siemering, Robert; Kling, Nora G; Bergues, Boris; Alnaser, Ali S; Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Moshammer, Robert; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Kling, Matthias F

    2016-01-01

    In strong laser fields, sub-femtosecond control of chemical reactions with the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) becomes feasible. We have studied the control of reaction dynamics of acetylene and allene in intense few-cycle laser pulses at 750 nm, where ionic fragments are recorded with a reaction microscope. We find that by varying the CEP and intensity of the laser pulses it is possible to steer the motion of protons in the molecular dications, enabling control over deprotonation and isomerization reactions. The experimental results are compared to predictions from a quantum dynamical model, where the control is based on the manipulation of the phases of a vibrational wave packet by the laser waveform. The measured intensity dependence in the CEP-controlled deprotonation of acetylene is well captured by the model. In the case of the isomerization of acetylene, however, we find differences in the intensity dependence between experiment and theory. For the isomerization of allene, an inversion of the CEP-dependen...

  5. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation for electron-ion dynamics in molecules under intense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Y; Nakatsukasa, T; Yabana, K

    2009-02-11

    We have developed a simulation method to describe three-dimensional dynamics of electrons and ions in a molecule based on the time-dependent density-functional theory. We solve the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation for electrons employing the real-space and real-time method, while the ion dynamics are described in classical mechanics by the Ehrenfest method. For an efficient calculation in massively parallel computers, the code is parallelized dividing the spatial grid points. We apply the method to the Coulomb explosion of the H(2)S molecule under an intense and ultrashort laser pulse and investigate the mechanism of the process.

  6. Time-dependent change of blood flow in the prostate treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Sunao; Tonooka, Akiko; Hashimoto, Akio; Nakamoto, Masahiko; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Nakano, Mayura; Sato, Haruhiro; Terachi, Toshiro; Koike, Junki; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2014-09-01

    Avascular areas on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have been considered to be areas of localized prostate cancer successfully treated by high-intensity focused ultrasound. However, the optimal timing of magnetic resonance imaging has not been discussed. The thermal effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound is degraded by regional prostatic blood flow. Conversely, the mechanical effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (cavitation) is not affected by blood flow, and can induce vessel damage. In this series, the longitudinal change of blood flow on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was observed from postoperative day 1 to postoperative day 14 in 10 patients treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. The median rates of increase in the non-enhanced volume of the whole gland, transition zone and peripheral zone from postoperative day 1 to postoperative day 14 were 36%, 39%, and 34%, respectively. In another pathological analysis of the prostate tissue of 17 patients immediately after high-intensity focused ultrasound without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, we observed diffuse coagulative degeneration and partial non-coagulative prostate tissue around arteries with vascular endothelial cell detachment. These observations on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging support a time-dependent change of the blood flow in the prostate treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. Additionally, our pathological findings support the longitudinal changes of these magnetic resonance imaging findings. Further large-scale studies will investigate the most appropriate timing of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the effectiveness of high-intensity focused ultrasound for localized prostate cancer. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Different facets of tree sapling diversity influence browsing intensity by deer dependent on spatial scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohse, Bettina; Seele, Carolin; Holzwarth, Frédéric; Wirth, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Browsing of tree saplings by deer hampers forest regeneration in mixed forests across Europe and North America. It is well known that tree species are differentially affected by deer browsing, but little is known about how different facets of diversity, such as species richness, identity, and composition, affect browsing intensity at different spatial scales. Using forest inventory data from the Hainich National Park, a mixed deciduous forest in central Germany, we applied a hierarchical approach to model the browsing probability of patches (regional scale) as well as the species-specific proportion of saplings browsed within patches (patch scale). We found that, at the regional scale, the probability that a patch was browsed increased with certain species composition, namely with low abundance of European beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) and high abundance of European ash ( Fraxinus excelsior L.), whereas at the patch scale, the proportion of saplings browsed per species was mainly determined by the species' identity, providing a "preference ranking" of the 11 tree species under study. Interestingly, at the regional scale, species-rich patches were more likely to be browsed; however, at the patch scale, species-rich patches showed a lower proportion of saplings per species browsed. Presumably, diverse patches attract deer, but satisfy nutritional needs faster, such that fewer saplings need to be browsed. Some forest stand parameters, such as more open canopies, increased the browsing intensity at either scale. By showing the effects that various facets of diversity, as well as environmental parameters, exerted on browsing intensity at the regional as well as patch scale, our study advances the understanding of mammalian herbivore-plant interactions across scales. Our results also indicate which regeneration patches and species are (least) prone to browsing and show the importance of different facets of diversity for the prediction and management of browsing intensity

  8. Earthquake Magnitude and Shaking Intensity Dependent Fragility Functions for Rapid Risk Assessment of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-José Nollet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated web application, referred to as ER2 for rapid risk evaluator, is under development for a user-friendly seismic risk assessment by the non-expert public safety community. The assessment of likely negative consequences is based on pre-populated databases of seismic, building inventory and vulnerability parameters. To further accelerate the computation for near real-time analyses, implicit building fragility curves were developed as functions of the magnitude and the intensity of the seismic shaking defined with a single intensity measure, input spectral acceleration at 1.0 s implicitly considering the epicentral distance and local soil conditions. Damage probabilities were compared with those obtained with the standard fragility functions explicitly considering epicentral distances and local site classes in addition to the earthquake magnitudes and respective intensity of the seismic shaking. Different seismic scenarios were considered first for 53 building classes common in Eastern Canada, and then a reduced number of 24 combined building classes was proposed. Comparison of results indicate that the damage predictions with implicit fragility functions for short (M ≤ 5.5 and medium strong motion duration (5.5 < M ≤ 7.5 show low variation with distance and soil class, with average error of less than 3.6%.

  9. Study of laser preheating dependence on laser wavelength and intensity for MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M. S.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Glinsky, M.; Nagayama, T.; Weis, M.; Geissel, M.; Peterson, K.; Fooks, J.; Krauland, C.; Giraldez, E.; Davies, J.; Campbell, E. M.; Bahr, R.; Edgell, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Emig, J.; Heeter, R.; Strozzi, D.

    2017-10-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) scheme requires preheating underdense fuel to 100's eV temperature by a TW-scale long pulse laser via collisional absorption. To better understand how laser preheat scales with laser wavelength and intensity as well as to provide data for code validation, we have conducted a well-characterized experiment on OMEGA to directly compare laser propagation, energy deposition and laser plasma instabilities (LPI) using 2 ω (527 nm) and 3 ω (351 nm) lasers with intensity in the range of (1-5)x1014 Wcm-2. The laser beam (1 - 1.5 ns square pulse) enters the gas-filled plastic liner though a 2-µm thick polyimide window to heat an underdense Ar-doped deuterium gas with electron density of 5.5% of critical density. Laser propagation and plasma temperature are diagnosed by time-resolved 2D x-ray images and Ar emission spectroscopy, respectively. LPI is monitored by backscattering and hard x-ray diagnostics. The 2 ω beam propagation shows a noticeable larger lateral spread than the 3 ω beam, indicating laser spray due to filamentation. LPI is observed to increase with laser intensity and the 2 ω beam produces more hot electrons compared with the 3 ω beam under similar conditions. Results will be compared with radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Work supported by the U.S. DOE ARPA-E and NNSA.

  10. Perceived Intensity and Discrimination Ability for Lingual Electrotactile Stimulation Depends on Location and Orientation of Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie M. Stone-Roy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Malfunctioning sensory systems can severely impact quality of life and repair is not always possible. One solution, called sensory substitution, is to use another sensory system to bring lost information to the brain. This approach often involves the use of bioengineered devices that electrically stimulate somatosensory fibers. Interestingly, the tongue is an ideal location for electrotactile stimulation due to its dense innervation, moisture, and protected environment. Success with transmitting visual and vestibular information through the tongue indicates promise for future applications. However, sensitivity and discrimination ability varies between individuals and across the tongue surface complicating efforts to produce reliable and consistent sensations. The goals of the present study were to investigate these differences more precisely to better understand the mechanosensory innervation of the tongue so that future electrotactile devices can be designed more effectively. Specifically, we tested whether stimulation of certain regions of the tongue consistently result in better perception, whether the spacing of stimulating electrodes affects perceived intensity, and whether the orientation of electrodes affects perceived intensity and discrimination. To test these hypotheses, we built a custom tongue stimulation device, recruited 25 participants, and collected perceived intensity and discrimination data. We then subjected the data to thorough statistical analyses. Consistent with previous studies, we found that stimulation of the anterior medial tongue region was perceived as more intense than stimulation of lateral and posterior regions. This region also had the best discrimination ability for electrodes. Dividing the stimulated tongue area into 16 distinct regions allowed us to compare perception ability between anterior and posterior regions, medial and lateral regions, and the left and right sides of the tongue. Stimulation of the most

  11. Super-Resolution Definition of Coordinates of Single Semiconductor Nanocrystal (Quantum Dot): Luminescence Intensity Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremchev, M. Yu.; Eremchev, I. Yu.; Naumov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    In this research a relation between the accuracy of restoration of the single quantum dots (QD) CdSe/CdS/ZnS cross-cut coordinates and luminescence intensity was investigated. It was shown that the limit of the accuracy of determining the coordinates of a single QD for a considerable total amount of registered photons approaches its limiting value that is comparable to the size of the QD. It also means that the installation used in the research is mechanically stable enough to reach the limiting values of determination accuracy of point emitters coordinates.

  12. Super-Resolution Definition of Coordinates of Single Semiconductor Nanocrystal (Quantum Dot: Luminescence Intensity Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremchev M. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research a relation between the accuracy of restoration of the single quantum dots (QD CdSe/CdS/ZnS cross-cut coordinates and luminescence intensity was investigated. It was shown that the limit of the accuracy of determining the coordinates of a single QD for a considerable total amount of registered photons approaches its limiting value that is comparable to the size of the QD. It also means that the installation used in the research is mechanically stable enough to reach the limiting values of determination accuracy of point emitters coordinates.

  13. Tolerance, withdrawal, and physical dependency after long-term sedation and analgesia of children in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, J D

    2000-06-01

    To describe the consequences of the prolonged administration of sedative and analgesic agents to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patient. The problems to be investigated include tolerance, physical dependency, and withdrawal. A MEDLINE search was performed of literature published in the English language. Cross-reference searches were performed using the following terms: sedation, analgesia with PICU, children, physical dependency, withdrawal; tolerance with sedative, analgesics, benzodiazepines, opioids, inhalational anesthetic agents, nitrous oxide, ketamine, barbiturates, propofol, pentobarbital, phenobarbital. Studies dealing with the problems of tolerance, physical dependency, and withdrawal in children in the PICU population were selected. All of the above-mentioned studies were reviewed in the current manuscript. A case by case review is presented, outlining the reported problems of tolerance, physical dependency, and withdrawal after the use of sedative/analgesic agents in the PICU population. This is followed up by a review of the literature discussing current treatment options for these problems. Tolerance, physical dependency, and withdrawal can occur after the prolonged administration of any agent used for sedation and analgesia in the PICU population. Important components in the care of such patients include careful observation to identify the occurrence of withdrawal signs and symptoms. Treatment options after prolonged administration of sedative/analgesic agents include slowly tapering the intravenous administration of these agents or, depending on the drug, switching to subcutaneous or oral administration.

  14. Intensity-dependent modulation of optically active signals in a chiral metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sean P.; Lan, Shoufeng; Kang, Lei; Cui, Yonghao; Panuski, Patrick W.; Wang, Shengxiang; Urbas, Augustine M.; Cai, Wenshan

    2017-01-01

    Chiral media exhibit optical phenomena that provide distinctive responses from opposite circular polarizations. The disparity between these responses can be optimized by structurally engineering absorptive materials into chiral nanopatterns to form metamaterials that provide gigantic chiroptical resonances. To fully leverage the innate duality of chiral metamaterials for future optical technologies, it is essential to make such chiroptical responses tunable via external means. Here we report an optical metamaterial with tailored chiroptical effects in the nonlinear regime, which exhibits a pronounced shift in its circular dichroism spectrum under a modest level of excitation power. Strong nonlinear optical rotation is observed at key spectral locations, with an intensity-induced change of 14° in the polarization rotation from a metamaterial thickness of less than λ/7. The modulation of chiroptical responses by manipulation of input powers incident on chiral metamaterials offers potential for active optics such as all-optical switching and light modulation. PMID:28240288

  15. Intensity-dependent modulation of optically active signals in a chiral metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sean P; Lan, Shoufeng; Kang, Lei; Cui, Yonghao; Panuski, Patrick W; Wang, Shengxiang; Urbas, Augustine M; Cai, Wenshan

    2017-02-27

    Chiral media exhibit optical phenomena that provide distinctive responses from opposite circular polarizations. The disparity between these responses can be optimized by structurally engineering absorptive materials into chiral nanopatterns to form metamaterials that provide gigantic chiroptical resonances. To fully leverage the innate duality of chiral metamaterials for future optical technologies, it is essential to make such chiroptical responses tunable via external means. Here we report an optical metamaterial with tailored chiroptical effects in the nonlinear regime, which exhibits a pronounced shift in its circular dichroism spectrum under a modest level of excitation power. Strong nonlinear optical rotation is observed at key spectral locations, with an intensity-induced change of 14° in the polarization rotation from a metamaterial thickness of less than λ/7. The modulation of chiroptical responses by manipulation of input powers incident on chiral metamaterials offers potential for active optics such as all-optical switching and light modulation.

  16. Size-dependence of LaF3:Eu3+ nanocrystals on Eu3+ photo-luminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoting; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Nogami, Masayuki

    2009-02-01

    Size-dependence of Eu3+-doped LaF3 nanocrystals on the 5D0-7FJ photoluminescence intensity was investigated, where LaF3:Eu3+ nanocrystals were prepared through a hydrothermal route with a cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as size-controlled agent and by post-annealing at an appropriate temperature at N2 atmosphere. It was found that LaF3:Eu3+ obtained was in hexagonal structure with space group P3c1 and had good crystalinity. When LaF3:Eu3+ nanocrystals were synthesized with 0.006 mol/L CTAB the average particle size was maximized to be 25.4 nm and the luminescence intensity was 1.5 times higher than that prepared without CTAB or with more CTAB concentration. The mechanism of the particle growth was also discussed in this paper.

  17. Light at night acutely impairs glucose tolerance in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; Stenvers, Dirk J; Jansen, Remi D; Foppen, Ewout; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to light at night (LAN) has increased dramatically in recent decades. Animal studies have shown that chronic dim LAN induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, several studies in humans have demonstrated that chronic exposure to artificial LAN may have adverse health effects with an increased risk of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes. It is well-known that acute exposure to LAN affects biological clock function, hormone secretion and the activity of the autonomic nervous system, but data on the effects of LAN on glucose homeostasis are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of LAN on glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to i.v. glucose or insulin tolerance tests while exposed to 2 h of LAN in the early or late dark phase. In subsequent experiments, different light intensities and wavelengths were used. LAN exposure early in the dark phase at ZT15 caused increased glucose responses during the first 20 min after glucose infusion (p effect of LAN was both intensity- and wavelength-dependent. White light of 50 and 150 lx induced greater glucose responses than 5 and 20 lx, whereas all intensities other than 5 lx reduced locomotor activity. Green light induced glucose intolerance, but red and blue light did not, suggesting the involvement of a specific retina-brain pathway. Together, these data show that exposure to LAN has acute adverse effects on glucose metabolism in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner.

  18. Climate mitigation by dairy intensification depends on intensive use of spared grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, David; Gonzalez-Mejia, Alejandra; Moorby, Jon; Foskolos, Andreas; Gibbons, James

    2018-02-01

    Milk and beef production cause 9% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have shown that dairy intensification reduces the carbon footprint of milk by increasing animal productivity and feed conversion efficiency. None of these studies simultaneously evaluated indirect GHG effects incurred via teleconnections with expansion of feed crop production and replacement suckler-beef production. We applied consequential LCA to incorporate these effects into GHG mitigation calculations for intensification scenarios among grazing-based dairy farms in an industrialized country (UK), in which milk production shifts from average to intensive farm typologies, involving higher milk yields per cow and more maize and concentrate feed in cattle diets. Attributional LCA indicated a reduction of up to 0.10 kg CO 2 e kg -1 milk following intensification, reflecting improved feed conversion efficiency. However, consequential LCA indicated that land use change associated with increased demand for maize and concentrate feed, plus additional suckler-beef production to replace reduced dairy-beef output, significantly increased GHG emissions following intensification. International displacement of replacement suckler-beef production to the "global beef frontier" in Brazil resulted in small GHG savings for the UK GHG inventory, but contributed to a net increase in international GHG emissions equivalent to 0.63 kg CO 2 e kg -1 milk. Use of spared dairy grassland for intensive beef production can lead to net GHG mitigation by replacing extensive beef production, enabling afforestation on larger areas of lower quality grassland, or by avoiding expansion of international (Brazilian) beef production. We recommend that LCA boundaries are expanded when evaluating livestock intensification pathways, to avoid potentially misleading conclusions being drawn from "snapshot" carbon footprints. We conclude that dairy intensification in industrialized

  19. Origin of the light intensity dependence of the short-circuit current of polymer/fullerene solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Xie, H.; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    A typical feature of polymer/fullerene based solar cells is that the current density under short-circuit conditions (J(sc)) does not scale exactly linearly with light intensity (I). Instead, a power law relationship is found given by J(sc)proportional to I-alpha, where alpha ranges from 0.85 to 1. In a number of reports this deviation from unity is speculated to arise from the occurrence of bimolecular recombination. We demonstrate that the dependence of the photocurrent in bulk heterojunctio...

  20. Dependences of up-conversional luminescence of LiNbO3:Yb3+, Er3+ crystals on pump intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babajanyan, V. G.; Kostanyan, R. B.; Muzhikyan, P. H.; Sargsyan, R. V.

    2010-10-01

    The up-converted luminescence at 525, 550 nm and 670 nm wavelengths, as well as the ordinary luminescence near 1600 nm wavelength of the LiNbO3:Yb3+, Er3+ crystal are investigated under optical excitations at 808 nm and 980 nm. Dependencies of luminescence on intensities of optical pumping at both wavelengths are presented. The possible mechanisms of up-converted emissions obtaining as well as population mechanisms of the Er3+ ion 4I13/2 energy level in the LiNbO3 matrix are discussed.

  1. Toward nonlinear magnonics: Intensity-dependent spin-wave switching in insulating side-coupled magnetic stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Odintsov, S. A.; Beginin, E. N.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate that the nonlinear spin-wave transport in two laterally parallel magnetic stripes exhibit the intensity-dependent power exchange between the adjacent spin-wave channels. By the means of Brillouin light scattering technique, we investigate collective nonlinear spin-wave dynamics in the presence of magnetodipolar coupling. The nonlinear intensity-dependent effect reveals itself in the spin-wave mode transformation and differential nonlinear spin-wave phase shift in each adjacent magnetic stripe. The proposed analytical theory, based on the coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations, predicts the geometry design involving the reduction of power requirement to the all-magnonic switching. A very good agreement between calculation and experiment was found. In addition, a micromagnetic and finite-element approach has been independently used to study the nonlinear behavior of spin waves in adjacent stripes and the nonlinear transformation of spatial profiles of spin-wave modes. Our results show that the proposed spin-wave coupling mechanism provides the basis for nonlinear magnonic circuits and opens the perspectives for all-magnonic computing architecture.

  2. Grid dependent noise and entropy growth in anisotropic 3d particle-in-cell simulation of high intensity beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hofmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The numerical noise inherent to particle-in-cell (PIC simulation of 3d anisotropic high intensity bunched beams in periodic focusing is compared with the analytical model by Struckmeier [Part. Accel. 45, 229 (1994]. The latter assumes that entropy growth can be related to Markov type stochastic processes due to temperature anisotropy and the artificial “collisions” caused by using macro-particles and calculating the space charge effect. The PIC simulations are carried out with the tracewin code widely used for high intensity beam simulation. The resulting noise can lead to growth of the six-dimensional rms emittance. The logarithm of the latter is shown to qualify as rms-based entropy. We confirm the dependence of this growth on the bunch temperature anisotropy as predicted by Struckmeier. However, we also find a grid and focusing dependent component of noise not predicted by Struckmeier. Although commonalities exist with well-established models for collision effects in PIC-simulation of extended plasmas, a distinctive feature is the presence of a periodic focusing potential, wherein the beam one-component plasma extends only over relatively few Debye lengths. Our findings are applied in particular to noise in high current linac beam simulation, where they help for optimization of the balance between the number of simulation particles and the grid resolution.

  3. Apoptotic cell death during Drosophila oogenesis is differentially increased by electromagnetic radiation depending on modulation, intensity and duration of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagioglou, Niki E; Manta, Areti K; Giannarakis, Ioannis K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2016-01-01

    Present generations are being repeatedly exposed to different types and doses of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) from wireless technologies (FM radio, TETRA and TV stations, GSM and UMTS phones/base stations, Wi-Fi networks, DECT phones). Although there is controversy on the published data regarding the non-thermal effects of NIR, studies have convincingly demonstrated bioeffects. Their results indicate that modulation, intensity, exposure duration and model system are important factors determining the biological response to irradiation. Attempting to address the dependence of NIR bioeffectiveness on these factors, apoptosis in the model biological system Drosophila melanogaster was studied under different exposure protocols. A signal generator was used operating alternatively under Continuous Wave (CW) or Frequency Modulation (FM) emission modes, at three power output values (10 dB, 0, -10 dB), under four carrier frequencies (100, 395, 682, 900 MHz). Newly emerged flies were exposed either acutely (6 min or 60 min on the 6th day), or repeatedly (6 min or 60 min daily for the first 6 days of their life). All exposure protocols resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death (ACD) observed in egg chambers, even at very low electric field strengths. FM waves seem to have a stronger effect in ACD than continuous waves. Regarding intensity and temporal exposure pattern, EMF-biological tissue interaction is not linear in response. Intensity threshold for the induction of biological effects depends on frequency, modulation and temporal exposure pattern with unknown so far mechanisms. Given this complexity, translating such experimental data into possible human exposure guidelines is yet arbitrary.

  4. Formation of the angular dependence of intensity of the light scattered on the optically dense atomic ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Larionov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The probe light scattering on the cold optically dense atomic ensemble is studied theoretically in the paper. In order to describe multiple scattering of light in the context of quantum electrodynamics, the Konstantinov–Perel–Keldysh diagram technique has been used. This technique allows to rewrite the considered case of light scattering in terms of diagram series where each term describes incoherent scattering of certain order. Decoding these terms allowed us to obtain the explicit analytical expression for the cross-section of multiple incoherent scattering for the case of stationary two-level atoms (transition Jg = 0 → Je = 1. The numerical analysis of this expression carried out by applying the Monte-Carlo simulation made it possible to find an influence of different orders of scattering on forming the angular dependence of scattered light intensity.

  5. Using radiation intensity dependence on excitation level for the analysis of surface plasmon resonance effect on ZnO luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S. I.; Tarasov, A. P.; Briskina, C. M.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Markushev, V. M.; Lotin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    For the analysis of ZnO luminescence the system of rate equations (SRE) was proposed. It contains a set of parameters that characterizes processes participating in luminescence: zone-zone excitation, excitons formation and recombination, formation and disappearance of photons and surface plasmons (SP). It is shown that experimental ZnO microstructure radiation intensity dependence on photoexcitation level can be approximated by using SRE. Thus, the values of these parameters can be estimated and used for luminescence analysis. This approach was applied for the analysis of ZnO microfilms radiation with different thickness of Ag island film covering. It was revealed that the increase of cover thickness leads to the increase of losses and decrease of probability of photons to SP conversion. In order to take into account visible emission, rate equations for levels populations in band-gap and for corresponding photons and SP were added to SRE. By using such SRE it is demonstrated that the form of visible luminescence intensity dependence on excitation level (P) like P1/3, as obtained elsewhere [1], is possible only in case of donor-acceptor pairs existence. The proposed approach was applied for consideration of experimental results obtained in [5-8] taking into account their interpretation of these results based on assumption about transfer of electrons from defect level in ZnO band-gap to metal and then to conduction band in ZnO. Results of performed calculations using modified SRE revealed that effects observed in these papers can exist under only low pumping level. This result will be experimentally checked later.

  6. Putative null distributions corresponding to tests of differential expression in the Golden Spike dataset are intensity dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaile Daniel P

    2007-04-01

    detect these intensity related defects in the processed data. Conclusion We agree with Dabney and Storey that the null p-values considered in Choe et al. are indeed non-uniform. We also agree with the conclusion that, given current pre-processing technologies, the Golden Spike dataset should not serve as a reference dataset to evaluate false discovery rate controlling methodologies. However, we disagree with the assessment that the non-uniform p-values are merely the byproduct of testing for differential expression under the incorrect assumption that chip data are approximate to biological replicates. Whereas Dabney and Storey attribute the non-uniform p-values to violations of the Stage II model assumptions, we provide evidence that the non-uniformity can be attributed to the failure of the Stage I analyses to correct for systematic biases in the raw data matrix. Although we do not speculate as to the root cause of these systematic biases, the observations made in Irizarry et al. appear to be consistent with our findings. Whereas Irizarry et al. describe the effect of the experimental design on the feature level data, we consider the effect on the underlying multivariate distribution of putative null p-values. We demonstrate that the putative null distributions corresponding to the pre-processing algorithms considered in Choe et al. are all intensity dependent. This dependence serves to invalidate statistical inference based upon standard two sample test statistics. We identify a flaw in the characterization of the appropriate "null" probesets described in Choe et al. and we provide a corrected analysis which reduces (but does not eliminate the intensity dependent effects.

  7. Energy dependence of normal branch quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Guy S.; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the approximately 6 Hz quasi-periodic X-ray intensity oscillations observed in the low-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-2 when it is on the normal spectral branch are shown to be consistent with a model in which photons from a central source with a fixed spectrum are Comptonized by an oscillating radial inflow. As the electron scattering optical depth of the flow varies, the spectrum of the escaping X-rays appears to rotate about a pivot energy that depends mainly on the electron temperature in the flow. The temperature derived from the observed energy dependence of the Cyg X-2 normal branch oscillations is approximately 1 keV, in good agreement with the estimated Compton temperature of its X-ray spectrum. The mean optical depth tau of the Comptonizing flow is inferred to be about 10, while the change in tau over an oscillation is estimated to be about 1; both values are in good agreement with radiation hydrodcode simulations of the radial flow.

  8. PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE LEVELS AND INDEXES OF ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHRITIS IS DEPENDENT ON THE PAIN INTENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Aleksenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of hypertension in patients with osteoarthritis is rather high. According to published data, a combination of osteoarthritis and hypertension is registered in 45 to 80% of the patients, dependent on the age group. Pathogenesis of arterial hypertension developing in patients with osteoarthritis is of sufficient interest to the clinicians. We studied systolic and diastolic blood pressure, levels of some cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, TNFα and markers of endothelial function (EDN1, vWF activity in 83 patients (mean age 45.7±6.3 years with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints (radiographic stage II-III accompanied by chronic pain. Local pain intensity over last month was evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale. According to the data obtained, the patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 27 patients with mild pain (the pain index ≤ 3 points, the 2nd group included 34 persons with moderate pain (3 to 7 points, and the 3rd group consisted of 22 people with highest pain ratings (pain index ≥ 7. Increased pain intensity correlated with elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Meanwhile, higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and increased activity of EDN1 and vWF were observed in patients with moderate osteoarthritis and severe pain syndrome. Minimal values of cytokines were observed in patients with mild pain, whereas maximal levels, in the patients with severe pain and arterial hypertension. Inflammatory mediators are able to induce activation and injury of endothelium causing its dysfunction. vWF activity and EDN1 contents increased in all the studied groups, along with increased pain intensity. Higher EDN1 concentration and vWF activity may be considered objective signs of endotheliosis in the osteoarthritis patients. In turn, endothelial dysfunction is among major pathophysiological mechanisms of arterial hypertension. This may suggest a sufficient contribution of pain to occurrence and

  9. Intensity dependence of the back reaction and transport of electrons in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A.C.; Peter, L.M.; Ponomarev, E.A.; Walker, A.B.; Wijayantha, K.G.U.

    2000-02-10

    The lifetime {tau}{sub n} and diffusion coefficient D{sub n} of photoinjected electrons have been measured in a dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} solar cell over 5 orders of magnitude of illumination intensity using intensity-modulated photovoltage and photocurrent spectroscopies. {tau}{sub n} was found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the steady-state light intensity, I{sub 0}, whereas D{sub n} varied with I{sub 0}{sup 0.68}. The intensity dependence of {tau}{sub n} is interpreted as evidence that the back reaction of electrons with I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} may be second order in electron density. The intensity dependence of D{sub n} is attributed to an exponential trap density distribution of the form N{sub t}(E) {proportional{underscore}to} exp[{minus}{beta}(E - E{sub c})/(K{sub B}T)] with {beta} {approximately} 0.6. since {tau}{sub n} and D{sub n} vary with intensity in opposite senses, the calculated electron diffusion length L{sub n} = (D{sub n}{tau}{sub n}){sup 1/2} falls by less than a factor of 5 when the intensity is reduced by 5 orders of magnitude. The incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) is predicted to decrease by less than 10% over the same range of illumination intensity, and the experimental results confirm this prediction.

  10. Transitioning opioid-dependent patients from detoxification to long-term treatment: efficacy of intensive role induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Elizabeth C; Brown, Barry S; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; King, Stuart D; Gandhi, Devang

    2011-08-01

    Despite findings that opioid detoxification serves little more than a palliative function, few patients who enter detoxification subsequently transition to long-term treatment. The current study evaluated intensive role induction (IRI), a strategy adapted from a single-session intervention previously shown to facilitate engagement of substance-dependent patients in drug-free treatment. IRI was delivered either alone or combined with case management (IRI+CM) to determine the capacity of each condition to enhance transition and engagement in long-term treatment of detoxification patients. Study participants were 240 individuals admitted to a 30-day buprenorphine detoxification delivered at a publicly funded outpatient drug treatment clinic. Following clinic intake, participants were randomly assigned to IRI, IRI+CM, or standard clinic treatment (ST). Outcomes were assessed in terms of adherence and satisfaction with the detoxification program, detoxification completion, and transition and retention in treatment following detoxification. Participants who received IRI and IRI+CM attended more counseling sessions during detoxification than those who received ST (both pstreatment for more days following detoxification (p=.005), than ST participants. The current study demonstrated that an easily administered psychosocial intervention can be effective for enhancing patient involvement in detoxification and for enabling their engagement in long-term treatment following detoxification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Red-Shift Effects in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Spectral or Intensity Dependence of the Near-Field?

    KAUST Repository

    Colas, Florent

    2016-06-06

    Optimum amplification in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from individual nanoantennas is expected when the excitation is slightly blue-shifted with respect to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR), so that the LSPR peak falls in the middle between the laser and the Stokes Raman emission. Recent experiments have shown when moving the excitation from the visible to the near-infrared that this rule of thumb is no more valid. The excitation has to be red-shifted with respect to the LSPR peak, up to 80nm, to obtain highest SERS. Such discrepancy is usually attributed to a Near-Field (NF) to Far-Field (FF) spectral shift. Here we critically discuss this hypothesis for the case of gold nanocylinders. By combining multi-wavelength excitation SERS experiments with numerical calculations, we show that the red-shift of the excitation energy does not originate from a spectral shift between the extinction (FF) and the near-field distribution (NF), which is found to be not larger than 10nm. Rather, it can be accounted for by looking at the peculiar spectral dependence of the near-field intensity on the cylinders diameter, characterized by an initial increase, up to 180nm diameter, followed by a decrease and a pronounced skewness.

  12. Linear dependence between the wavefront gradient and the masked intensity for the point source with a CCD sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huizhen; Ma, Liang; Wang, Bin

    2018-01-01

    In contrast to the conventional adaptive optics (AO) system, the wavefront sensorless (WFSless) AO system doesn't need a WFS to measure the wavefront aberrations. It is simpler than the conventional AO in system architecture and can be applied to the complex conditions. The model-based WFSless system has a great potential in real-time correction applications because of its fast convergence. The control algorithm of the model-based WFSless system is based on an important theory result that is the linear relation between the Mean-Square Gradient (MSG) magnitude of the wavefront aberration and the second moment of the masked intensity distribution in the focal plane (also called as Masked Detector Signal-MDS). The linear dependence between MSG and MDS for the point source imaging with a CCD sensor will be discussed from theory and simulation in this paper. The theory relationship between MSG and MDS is given based on our previous work. To verify the linear relation for the point source, we set up an imaging model under atmospheric turbulence. Additionally, the value of MDS will be deviate from that of theory because of the noise of detector and further the deviation will affect the correction effect. The theory results under noise will be obtained through theoretical derivation and then the linear relation between MDS and MDS under noise will be discussed through the imaging model. Results show the linear relation between MDS and MDS under noise is also maintained well, which provides a theoretical support to applications of the model-based WFSless system.

  13. Change point analysis of matrix dependent photoluminescence intermittency of single CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with intermediate intensity levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Robert [Institute of Physics and Center for Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, D 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Krasselt, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.krasselt@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Institute of Physics and Center for Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, D 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Borczyskowski, Christian von [Institute of Physics and Center for Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, D 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2012-10-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study single blinking CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The blinking dynamics were analysed with respect to intermediate intensity levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The On-times show a matrix dependent deviation from a truncated power law. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviation relates to well defined intensities, intensity jumps and state dwell times. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum dots are coupled to hydroxyl groups which induce hole traps. -- Abstract: Blinking dynamics of single CdSe/ZnS quantum dots are analyzed by change point analysis, which gives access to intermediate photoluminescence (PL) intensities observed during PL intermittency. The on-times show systematic deviations from a (truncated) power law. This deviation is manifested in variations of the PL intensity distribution and is related with well defined PL intensity jumps. Varying the matrix from polystyrene (PS) to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) changes the on-time blinking dynamics and reveals coupling of the QDs either to OH-groups of the SiO{sub x} interface or to OH-groups of PVA. Analysis of dwell times in respective intensity correlated traps reveals that OH-related traps are strongly stabilized with much longer dwell times as compared to otherwise broadly distributed trap states.

  14. Does Swimming at a Moderate Altitude Favor a Lower Oxidative Stress in an Intensity-Dependent Manner? Role of Nonenzymatic Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casuso, Rafael A; Aragón-Vela, Jerónimo; López-Contreras, Gracia; Gomes, Silvana N; Casals, Cristina; Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira; Mercadé, Jordi J; Huertas, Jesus R

    2017-03-01

    Casuso, Rafael A., Jerónimo Aragón-Vela, Gracia López-Contreras, Silvana N. Gomes, Cristina Casals, Yaira Barranco-Ruiz, Jordi J. Mercadé, and Jesus R. Huertas. Does swimming at a moderate altitude favor a lower oxidative stress in an intensity-dependent manner? Role of nonenzymatic antioxidants. High-Alt Med Biol. 18:46-55, 2017.-we aimed to describe oxidative damage and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant responses to swimming at different intensities in hypoxia. We recruited 12 highly experienced swimmers who have been involved in competitive swimming for at least 9 years. They performed a total of six swimming sessions carried out at low (LOW), moderate (MOD), or high (HIGH) intensity at low altitude (630 m) and at 2320 m above sea level. Blood samples were collected before the session (Pre), after the cool down (Post), and after 15 minutes of recovery (Rec). Blood lactate (BL) and heart rate were recorded throughout the main part of the session. Average velocities did not change between hypoxia and normoxia. We found a higher BL in response to MOD intensity in hypoxia. Plasmatic hydroperoxide level decreased at all intensities when swimming in hypoxia. This effect coincided with a lower glutation peroxidase activity and a marked mobilization of the circulating levels of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q10 in an intensity-dependent manner. Our results suggest that, regardless of the intensity, no oxidative damage is found in response to hypoxic swimming in well-trained swimmers. Indeed, swimmers show a highly efficient antioxidant system by stimulating the mobilization of nonenzymatic antioxidants.

  15. A Semi-Empirical Formula of the Dependence of the Fluorescence Intensity of Naphthalene on Temperature and the Oxygen Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, B.; Wang, Z.-G.; Yang, L.-C.; Li, X.-P.

    2017-09-01

    Two-ring aromatics, such as naphthalene, are important fluorescent components of kerosene in the planar laser-induced fluorescent (PLIF) technique. Quantifying measurements of kerosene vapor concentrations by PLIF require a prior knowledge of the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene over a wide temperature and oxygen concentration range. To promote the application of PLIF, a semi-empirical formula based on the collision theory and experimental data at the laser wavelength of 266 nm and a pressure of 0.1 MPa is established to predict the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene at different temperatures and oxygen concentrations. This formula takes vibrational states, temperature, and oxygen quenching into account. Verified by published experimental data, the formula can predict the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene with an error less than 9%.

  16. Light illumination intensity dependence of photovoltaic parameter in polymer solar cells with ammonium heptamolybdate as hole extraction layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Niu, Shengli; Wang, Ning

    2018-01-01

    A low-temperature, solution-processed molybdenum oxide (MoOX) layer and a facile method for polymer solar cells (PSCs) is developed. The PSCs based on a MoOX layer as the hole extraction layer (HEL) is a significant advance for achieving higher photovoltaic performance, especially under weaker light illumination intensity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show that the (NH4)6Mo7O24 molecule decomposes and forms the molybdenum oxide (MoOX) molecule when undergoing thermal annealing treatment. In this study, PSCs with the MoOX layer as the HEL exhibited better photovoltaic performance, especially under weak light illumination intensity (from 100 to 10mWcm(-2)) compared to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)-based PSCs. Analysis of the current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics at various light intensities provides information on the different recombination mechanisms in the PSCs with a MoOX and PEDOT:PSS layer as the HEL. That the slopes of the open-circuit voltage (VOC) versus light illumination intensity plots are close to 1 unity (kT/q) reveals that bimolecular recombination is the dominant and weaker monomolecular recombination mechanism in open-circuit conditions. That the slopes of the short-circuit current density (JSC) versus light illumination intensity plots are close to 1 reveals that the effective charge carrier transport and collection mechanism of the MoOX/indium tin oxide (ITO) anode is the weaker bimolecular recombination in short-circuit conditions. Our results indicate that MoOX is an alternative candidate for high-performance PSCs, especially under weak light illumination intensity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of smooth exterior scaling method to study the time dependent dynamics of H2(+) in intense laser field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Dhruba Jyoti; Gupta, Ashish K

    2010-10-07

    A study of the multiphoton dissociation of H(2)(+) in intense laser field using the smooth exterior scaling method to calculate resonance states is presented. This method is very attractive as it does not disturb the interaction region. The wave functions calculated with this method provide indisputable proof in support of the mechanisms of the different phenomena happening during photodissociation. Wave functions corresponding to the "vibrationally trapped" (bond-hardening) states are found. A unequivocal mechanism for "bond-softening" is provided. It is observed that with an increase in intensity, the lifetime of low vibrational level increases. The mechanism for this novel phenomenon is also explained.

  18. Origin of the light intensity dependence of the short-circuit current of polymer/fullerene solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Xie, H; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    A typical feature of polymer/fullerene based solar cells is that the current density under short-circuit conditions (J(sc)) does not scale exactly linearly with light intensity (I). Instead, a power law relationship is found given by J(sc)proportional to I-alpha, where alpha ranges from 0.85 to 1.

  19. Nonlinearity in Intensity versus Concentration Dependence for the Deep UV Resonance Raman Spectra of Toluene and Heptane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2013-01-01

    by absorption and Resonance Raman effects. Raman spectra of toluene and heptane mixtures - with progressively increasing concentrations of heptane - were measured by use of 229 nm excitation. The results show that the characteristic band intensities are not directly proportional to the relative concentrations...

  20. The effect of aerobic exercise intensity on attenuation of postprandial lipemia is dependent on apolipoprotein E genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aparecido Pimentel; Ferreira, Cristiane Batisti; Brito, Ciro José; Souza, Vinícius Carolino; Córdova, Cláudio; Nóbrega, Otávio Toledo; França, Nancí Maria

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of aerobic exercise intensity on postprandial lipemia according to allelic variants of the apolipoprotein E gene. Three groups of 10 healthy men each were formed based genotyping of the APOE gene, rested or performed 500 Kcal tests in a random sequence separated by a minimum 48 h interval, as follows: (a) no exercise (control), (b) intense intermittent exercise, (c) moderate continuous exercise. Each test series was completed 30-min before ingestion of a high-fat meal (1 g fat/kg). Venous blood was collected before and at 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after the high-fat meal. Postprandial lipemia was assessed using the area under the curve approach as well as the kinetic profile of mean lipid variables. Statistical significance was adopted at P ≤ 0.05 level. The main results show that, in the moderate continuous exercise, total postprandial cholesterolemia was higher in ɛ4 than in ɛ2 carriers, whereas under intense intermittent exercise, total and LDL cholesterolemia were higher in ɛ4 than in ɛ2 and ɛ3 carriers. There was no difference in the lipemic profile of the subjects across APOE genotypes at baseline. Moderate and intense exercise were effective in attenuating PPL in both ɛ2 and ɛ3 subjects, with ɛ2 subjects being more susceptible to the lipid lowering effect of moderate training than ɛ3 subjects. Carriers of the ɛ4 allele, however, showed no attenuation of postprandial lipemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Describing the light intensity dependence of polymer:fullerene solar cells using an adapted Shockley diode model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff, L.H.; Veenstra, S.C.; Kroon, J.M.; Verhees, W.; Koster, L.J.A.; Galagan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Solar cells are generally optimised for operation under AM1.5 100 mW cm-2 conditions. This is also typically done for polymer solar cells. However, one of the entry markets for this emerging technology is portable electronics. For this market, the spectral shape and intensity of typical illumination

  2. Age dependent accumulation patterns of advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE) ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in the liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Chung, Wook-Jin; Oh, Seyeon; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Chang Hu; Hong, Suntaek; Park, Kook Yang; Son, Kuk Hui; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-01-01

    Much evidence indicates receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) related inflammation play essential roles during aging. However, the majority of studies have focused on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and not on other RAGE ligands. In the present study, the authors evaluated whether the accumulation of RAGE ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle during aging. In C57BL/6 N mice aged 12 weeks, 12 months, and 22 months, ligands accumulation, binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands, activated macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 macrophage expression, glyoxalase-1expression, and signal pathways related to inflammation were evaluated. The RAGE ligands age-associated accumulation patterns were found to be organ dependent. Binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands in kidney and liver increased with age, but those in skeletal muscle were unchanged. Infiltration of activated macrophages in kidney and liver increased with age, but infiltration in the skeletal muscle was unchanged. M1 expression increased and M2 and glyoxalase-1 expression decreased with age in kidney and liver, but their expressions in skeletal muscle were not changed. These findings indicate patterns of RAGE ligands accumulation, RAGE/ligands binding intensities, or inflammation markers changes during aging are organs dependent.

  3. Stationary Light Waves in Anizotropy and Nonolinear Plane Media, whose Dielectric Tensor's Principal Values Arbitrarily Depend upon Intensity Case of Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Ochirbat, G

    2000-01-01

    A plane medium, whose dielectric tensor's principal values arbitrarily depend upon intensity, is considered. The problems of the TM and TE waves, within the problem of light scattering, are reduced to quadrature. A question of integrability of the full system of Maxwell equations is discussed. A closed equation has been obtained for an auxiliary variable for a nonlinearity of Kerr type. A scheme for integrating the full system of Maxwell equations by solving the equation over the auxiliary variable is suggested.

  4. Temperature dependence of the luminescence intensity in optical fibers of oxyfluoride glass with CdS and CdS x Se1 - x quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, D. S.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sidorov, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    The temperature dependences of the integral luminescence intensity in optical fibers of oxyfluoride glass with CdS and CdS x Se1 - x quantum dots have been studied in a temperature range of 25-250°C. It is established that heating in this range leads to luminescence quenching in accordance with a nearly linear law. This effect can be used for the creation of fiber-optic temperature sensors.

  5. Intensity dependent absorption bleaching of high subband excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, S H; Lee, E H; Chae, K M; Park, S H; Kim, U

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of carrier generation on the absorption bleaching of the n=2 and n=3 excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs). With the excitation near the resonance of the n=1 exciton absorption, the long range coulomb screening and collision broadening had significant effects on the exciton bleaching. At low excitation intensity, the absorption bleaching of the n=2 exciton in 75 A-thick MQWs and that of the n=3 exciton in 150 A-thick MQWs were due to linewidth broadening by the collision broadening effect only. At high excitation intensity, however, the reduction of oscillator strength due to the long range coulomb screening contributed dominantly to absorption bleaching.

  6. LM-OSL signals from some insulators: an analysis of the dependency of the detrapping probability on stimulation light intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    is not always correct. The initial decay rates of the blue (similar to 470 nm) light stimulated constant power OSL decay curves were examined to test the relation between the detrapping rates and the stimulation light intensity. In SiO2, Al2O3 : C and BeO a linear relation between the detrapping rates......Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals from various insulators including quartz, Al2O3 : C, BeO and NaCl have been studied using the linear modulation OSL (LM-OSL) technique. LM-OSL is based on the linear increase of the stimulation light power from zero to a maximum during the measurement....... The resultant OSL curve initially increases and then decays after reaching a maximum, The analysis of LM-OSL data usually assumes a linear relationship between the detrapping rate and the stimulation light intensity. However, experiments carried out using various insulators have shown that this assumption...

  7. Induction of complete wound healing in recalcitrant ulcers by low-intensity laser irradiation depends on ulcer cause and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindl, M; Kerschan, K; Schindl, A; Schön, H; Heinzl, H; Schindl, L

    1999-02-01

    Chronic skin ulcers still represent a therapeutic challenge in dermatology. Among the various non-invasive treatment modalities used for the improvement of impaired wound healing, low-intensity laser irradiations are gaining an increasing body of interest. We used low-intensity laser irradiations delivered by a 30 mW helium-neon laser at an energy density of 30 J/cm2 three times weekly for the induction of wound healing in ulcers of diverse causes. Twenty patients with the same number of ulcers, which had previously been treated by conventional wound care for a median period of 34 weeks (range: 3-120 weeks) without any significant evidence of healing, were included in the study. Concerning the underlying disorders, patients were divided into four groups: diabetes, arterial insufficiency, radio damage and autoimmune vasculitis. In all ulcers, complete epithelization could be induced by laser therapy. No amputation or any other surgical intervention was necessary and no adverse effects of any kind were noted during low-intensity laser treatment. Regarding the different diagnoses, a statistically significant difference was noted (P = 0.008): ulcers due to radio damage healed significantly faster than those caused by diabetes (6 weeks [range: 3-10 weeks] vs. 16 weeks [range: 9-45 weeks], P = 0.005). Wound healing in autoimmune vasculitis (24 weeks [range: 20-35 weeks]) required longer than in radiodermitis, although the difference was not significant. In addition to the diagnosis, wound size was found to be an important factor influencing the duration of wound closure (P = 0.028), whereas duration of previous conventional treatment (P = 0.24) and depth (P = 0.14) showed no effect. Our results indicate that low-intensity laser irradiation could be a valuable non-invasive tool for the induction of wound healing in recalcitrant ulcers, and that healing time is correlated with the ulcer cause and size.

  8. Time dependence of the luminescence intensity in CdI2-Cd and CdI2-Ag crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolesta, I. M.; Vel'gosh, S. R.; Karbovnik, I. D.; Lesivtsiv, V. N.; Rovetskii, I. N.

    2012-10-01

    The decrease in the luminescence intensity (luminescence "fatigue") of long-wavelength emission bands with time in CdI2-Cd (λmax = 700 nm) and CdI2-Ag (λmax = 680 nm) crystals upon exposure to light in the fundamental absorption region has been studied. The process parameters, i.e., the capture cross section σ and the fraction β of centers disappeared during interband irradiation, have been determined. The model of electronic processes has been proposed, within which experimental data have been consistently explained.

  9. Steady-state entanglement and normal-mode splitting in an atom-assisted optomechanical system with intensity-dependent coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzanjeh, Sh. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jerib, 81746-73441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Naderi, M. H.; Soltanolkotabi, M. [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jerib, 81746-73441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    In this paper, we study theoretically bipartite and tripartite continuous variable entanglement as well as normal-mode splitting in a single-atom cavity optomechanical system with intensity-dependent coupling. The system under consideration is formed by a Fabry-Perot cavity with a thin vibrating end mirror and a two-level atom in the Gaussian standing wave of the cavity mode. We first derive the general form of the Hamiltonian describing the tripartite intensity-dependent atom-field-mirror coupling due to the presence of the cavity mode structure. We then restrict our treatment to the first vibrational sideband of the mechanical resonator and derive a tripartite atom-field-mirror Hamiltonian. We show that when the optical cavity is intensely driven, one can generate bipartite entanglement between any pair in the tripartite system and that, due to entanglement sharing, atom-mirror entanglement is efficiently generated at the expense of optical-mechanical and optical-atom entanglement. We also find that in such a system, when the Lamb-Dicke parameter is large enough, one can simultaneously observe the normal mode splitting into three modes.

  10. The effect of the sedation protocol on the level of consciousness in ventilator-dependent trauma patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit( ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Tabas E

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background& Objective: The ultimate goal of treatment of patients in intensive care unit is increasing their level of consciousness. The present study was conducted aimed to determine the effect of sedation protocol on level of consciousness in ventilator-dependent trauma patients who hospitalized in intensive care unit.  Material & Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 80 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICU of selected hospitals in Zahedan in 2013. At first, patients were selected through purposive sampling and then randomly allocated into intervention and control groups. Patients in intervention group received the sedation protocol proposed by Society of Critical Care Medicine. Data were gathered through Richmond-Agitation Sedation Scale, behavioral pain scale and Glasgow Coma Scale. Data were analyzed in SPSS 18 through using the independent t-tests.  Results: Level of patient’s sedation was near to ideal score for Richmond in intervention group in compare with the patients in control group (-1 to +1. There was significant difference between two groups regarding the relaxation of patients (p<0.001. Also, the level of consciousness in patients has significant increase in intervention group in compare with control group (p=0.02  Conclusion: The results showed that the use of sedation protocol can increase the level of consciousness in the hospitalized patients in intensive care unit. Thus, it is recommended that this protocol was used by nurses.

  11. Towards Dependence of Tropical Cyclone Intensity on Sea Surface Temperature and Its Response in a Warming World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopal Arora

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tropical Cyclone (TC systems affect global ocean heat transport due to mixing of the upper ocean and impact climate dynamics. A higher Sea Surface Temperature (SST, other influencing factors remaining supportive, fuels TC genesis and intensification. The atmospheric thermodynamic profile, especially the sea-air temperature contrast (SAT, also contributes due to heat transfer and affects TC’s maximum surface wind speed (Vmax explained by enthalpy exchange processes. Studies have shown that SST can approximately be used as a proxy for SAT. As a part of an ongoing effort in this work, we simplistically explored the connection between SST and Vmax from a climatological perspective. Subsequently, estimated Vmax is applied to compute Power Dissipation Index (an upper limit on TC’s destructive potential. The model is developed using long-term observational SST reconstructions employed on three independent SST datasets and validated against an established model. This simple approach excluded physical parameters, such as mixing ratio and atmospheric profile, however, renders it generally suitable to compute potential intensity associated with TCs spatially and weakly temporally and performs well for stronger storms. A futuristic prediction by the HadCM3 climate model under doubled CO2 indicates stronger storm surface wind speeds and rising SST, especially in the Northern Hemisphere.

  12. Time-dependent simulation of plasma and electrodes in high-intensity discharge lamps with different electrode shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Flesch, P

    2003-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the modelling of d.c. and a.c. high-intensity Hg-discharge lamps with differently shaped electrodes. Different arc attachments on the electrodes are studied and insight for the development of new electrodes is gained. The model includes the entire discharge plasma (plasma column, hot plasma spots in front of electrodes, near-electrode non-LTE-plasma) as well as anode and cathode. No subdivision of the discharge space into different regions is necessary (like space charge layer, ionization zone, plasma column). This is achieved by using a differential equation for a non-LTE electrical conductivity which is applicable for local thermal equilibrium (LTE-)regions as well as for non-LTE plasma regions close to the electrodes in a high pressure plasma. Modelling results for a 0.6 MPa mercury discharge considering six different electrode shapes (anode and cathode) are presented and compared with experimental results. The electrodes have different diameters and different electrode tips, s...

  13. Effects of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency depend on the response of stomatal conductance to dynamic light intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eLi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD.Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars (‘Pink Champion’ and ‘Royal Champion’ were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (gs varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in ‘Royal Champion’, whereas it remained relatively constant in ‘Pink Champion’. Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (Pn in both cultivars approached steady state Pn in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in ‘Pink Champion’. These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8% in ‘Royal Champion’ in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in ‘Pink Champion’. We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent.

  14. Stress among nurses working in emergency, anesthesiology and intensive care units depends on qualification: a Job Demand-Control survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trousselard, Marion; Dutheil, Frédéric; Naughton, Geraldine; Cosserant, Sylvie; Amadon, Sylvie; Dualé, Christian; Schoeffler, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The nurse stress literature reports an overwhelming culture of acceptance and expectation of work stressors, ironically linked to the control of the workplace to effectively and proactively manage stress. The stressors involved in delivering "stress management" have been well studied in nursing-related workplaces, especially in acute care settings in accordance with the Karasek Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model. However, little is known about the effects of specificity of an acute care unit and the level of qualifications on stress experienced by nurses. A survey using the JDCS model was conducted among 385 nurses working in three different acute care units (anesthesiology, emergency and intensive care unit) from a university hospital. Specific questions explored variables such as gender, acute care units, level of qualification and working experience. Two hundred questionnaires were returned. A high level of job strain was highlighted without a gender effect and in the absence of isostrain. Nurses from acute care units were located in the high stress quadrant of the JDCS model. Conversely, other nurses were commonly located in the "active" quadrant. Independent of acute care settings, the highest level of education was associated with the highest job strain and the lowest level of control. In an acute care setting, a high level of education was a key factor for high job stress and was associated with a perception of a low control in the workplace, both of which may be predictors of adverse mental health. In particular, the lack of control has been associated with moral distress, a frequently reported characteristic of acute care settings. To enhance the personal and professional outcomes of the advanced registered nurses, strategies for supporting nurses manage daily stressors in acute care are urgently required.

  15. A multi-institution pooled analysis of gastrostomy tube dependence in patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setton, Jeremy; Lee, Nancy Y; Riaz, Nadeem; Huang, Shao-Hui; Waldron, John; O'Sullivan, Brian; Zhang, Zhigang; Shi, Weij; Rosenthal, David I; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Garden, Adam S

    2015-01-15

    Severe swallowing dysfunction necessitating enteral support is a well known late sequela of nonsurgical therapy for oropharyngeal cancer, but its incidence after intensity-modulated radiotherapy has not been quantified comprehensively outside of small single-institution series. This was a multi-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective study. Consecutive patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who had received definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy from 1998 to 2011 were identified from 3 academic centers. In total, 2315 patients were included. The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging distribution was as follows: stage I, 2.1%; stage II, 4.4%; stage III, 14.7%; and stage IV, 77.3%. Among 1459 patients (63%) who received a gastrostomy tube (g-tube), placement was prophylactic in 52% and reactive in 48%. Among patients with stage III and IV disease, 58% received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 43.7 months (range, 0.1-164 months). The g-tube dependence rate was 7% at 1 year and 3.7% at 2 years. Among 1238 patients with stage III and IV disease who received concurrent chemotherapy, the 1-year and 2-year rates of g-tube dependence were 8.6% and 4.4%, respectively. The 1-year g-tube dependence rate was 5% for patients with stage I and II disease; 5.2% for patients with stage III and IV, T1-T2/N0-N2 disease; and 10.1% for patients with stage III and IV, T3-T4 or N3 disease. On multivariate analysis, advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.066; Ptherapy for oropharyngeal cancer is associated with a low rate of long-term g-tube dependence. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  16. Use of radiation intensity dependence on excitation level for the analysis of surface plasmon resonance effect on ZnO luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Stepan; Tarasov, Andrey; Briskina, Charus; Ryzhkov, Mikhail; Markushev, Valery; Lotin, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    For the analysis of ZnO luminescence, a set of rate equations (SRE) is proposed. It contains a set of parameters that characterize processes participating in luminescence: zone-zone excitation, excitons formation and recombination, formation and disappearance of photons, surface plasmons (SP), and phonons. It is shown that experimental ZnO microstructure radiation intensity dependence on photoexcitation levels can be approximated by using SRE. This approach was applied for the analysis of ZnO microfilm radiation with different thicknesses of Ag island film covering. It was revealed that the increase of cover thickness leads to an increase of losses and a decrease of the probability of photon-to-SP conversion. In order to take into account visible emission, rate equations for level populations in the bandgap and for corresponding photons and SPs were added to the SRE. By using such an SRE, it is demonstrated that the form of visible luminescence intensity dependence on excitation level (P) like P, as obtained elsewhere, is possible only if donor-acceptor pairs exist. The proposed approach was also applied for consideration of experimental results obtained in several papers taking into account the interpretation of these results based on assumptions about the transfer of electrons from the defect level in the ZnO bandgap to metal and then to the conduction band.

  17. Density-dependent processes in the transmission of human onchocerciasis: intensity of microfilariae in the skin and their uptake by the simuliid host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basáñez, M G; Boussinesq, M; Prod'hon, J; Frontado, H; Villamizar, N J; Medley, G F; Anderson, R M

    1994-01-01

    The transmission success of Onchocerca volvulus is thought to be influenced by a variety of regulatory or density-dependent processes that act at various points in the two-host life-cycle. This paper examines one component of the life-cycle, namely, the ingestion of microfilariae by the simuliid vector, to assess the relationship between intake of larvae and the density of parasites in the skin of the human host. Analysis is based on data from three areas in which onchocerciasis is endemic and includes published information as well as new data collected in field studies. The three areas are: Guatemala (Simulium ochraceum s.l.), West and Central Africa (savanna members of the S. damnosum complex), and South Venezuela (S. guianense). The data record experimental studies of parasite uptake by flies captured in the field and fed to repletion on locally infected subjects who harboured varying intensities of dermal microfilarial infection. Regression analyses of log transformed counts of parasite burdens ingested by the flies plotted against log transformed counts of microfilariae per mg of skin revealed little evidence for saturation in parasite uptake by the flies as the intensity in the human host increased. There was a positive and highly significant rank correlation between both variables for the three blackfly species. In an alternative analysis a model was fitted to data on prevalence of flies with ingested microfilariae (mff) versus dermal mean intensities. The model assumed an overdispersed distribution of the number of mff/fly and a given functional relationship between intake and skin load. The results of both approaches were consistent. It is concluded that parasite ingestion by the vector host is not strongly density dependent in the three geographical areas and ranges of dermal loads examined. It therefore appears that this transmission process is of reduced importance as a regulatory mechanism in the dynamics of parasite population growth.

  18. Intensity dependence of auditory evoked dipole source activity in polydrug ecstasy users: evidence from an 18 months longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumann, Jörg; Till, Bianca; Fischermann, Thomas; Rezk, Markus; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2006-03-01

    Numerous animal studies have been able to demonstrate neurotoxic damage to central serotonergic systems after exposure to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy). It has been suggested that a high loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) and, particularly, of the tangential N1/P2 source activity is associated with a low functioning of serotonergic activity. Therefore, the LDAEP may be used as a non-invasive indicator for a possible neurotoxic damage caused by the long-term use of ecstasy in recreational users. We recorded auditory evoked potentials (AEP) with a passive listening paradigm in 18 polydrug ecstasy users at baseline (t1) and after 18 months (t2). Several aspects of ecstasy use, such as frequency of use, cumulative lifetime dose or period of abstinence were associated with the LDAEP for several tangential dipoles at both measuring times. However, we failed to demonstrate any significant relationship between drug use reported at follow-up and AEP changes from baseline to follow-up. Despite some incertitude these data suggest, yet do not unambiguously con.rm, the hypothesis that abstinent ecstasy users present with diminished central serotonergic activity. This feature of information processing is potentially related to the neurotoxic potential of ecstasy. However, alternative interpretations of these data refer to possible preexisting traits and the potential impact of other illicit drugs, particularly amphetamine, since ecstasy users typically exhibit polydrug use patterns. Thus, further research with larger sample sizes and prospective study designs are needed to definitively establish a causative link between ecstasy use and neurotoxicity-related dysfunctions in sensory processing.

  19. Skeletal muscle eEF2 and 4EBP1 phosphorylation during endurance exercise is dependent on intensity and muscle fiber type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Bisiani, Bruno; Vistisen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    that the increase in skeletal muscle eEF2 Thr(56) phosphorylation was restricted to type I myofibers. Taken together, these data suggest that the depression of skeletal muscle protein synthesis with endurance-type exercise may be regulated at both initiation (i.e. 4EBP1) and elongation (i.e. eEF2) steps, with eEF2......Protein synthesis in skeletal muscle is known to decrease during exercise and it has been suggested that this may depend on the magnitude of the relative metabolic stress within the contracting muscle. To examine the mechanisms behind this, the effect of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle...... eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1) phosphorylation, key components in the mRNA translation machinery, were examined together with AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) in healthy young men. Skeletal muscle eEF2 phosphorylation at Thr(56...

  20. Intensity-dependent exciton dynamics of (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes: momentum selection rules, diffusion, and nonlinear interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, D Mark; Schneck, Jude R; Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C; Ziegler, Lawrence D; Swan, Anna K

    2011-12-27

    The exciton dynamics for an ensemble of individual, suspended (6,5), single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by single color E(22) resonant pump-probe spectroscopy for a wide range of pump fluences are reported. The optically excited initial exciton population ranges from approximately 5 to 120 excitons per ∼725 nm nanotube. At the higher fluences of this range, the pump-probe signals are no longer linearly dependent on the pump intensity. A single, predictive model is described that fits all data for two decades of pump fluences and three decades of delay times. The model introduces population loss from the optically active zero momentum E(22) state to the rest of the E(22) subband, which is dark due to momentum selection rules. In the single exciton limit, the E(11) dynamics are well described by a stretched exponential, which is a direct consequence of diffusion quenching from an ensemble of nanotubes of different lengths. The observed change in population relaxation dynamics as a function of increasing pump intensity is attributed to exciton-exciton Auger de-excitation in the E(11) subband and, to a lesser extent, in the E(22) subband. From the fit to the model, an average defect density 1/ρ = 150 nm and diffusion constants D(11) = 4 cm(2)/s and D(22) = 0.2 cm(2)/s are determined.

  1. NOX2-dependent ROS is required for HDAC5 nuclear efflux and contributes to HDAC4 nuclear efflux during intense repetitive activity of fast skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yewei; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Randall, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to oxidation and nuclear efflux of class IIa histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) in cardiac muscle. Here we use HDAC-GFP fusion proteins expressed in isolated adult mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers to study ROS mediation of HDAC localization in skeletal muscle. H2O2 causes nuclear efflux of HDAC4-GFP or HDAC5-GFP, which is blocked by the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Repetitive stimulation with 100-ms trains at 50 Hz, 2/s (“50-Hz trains”) increased ROS production and caused HDAC4-GFP or HDAC5-GFP nuclear efflux. During 50-Hz trains, HDAC5-GFP nuclear efflux was completely blocked by NAC, but HDAC4-GFP nuclear efflux was only partially blocked by NAC and partially blocked by the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) inhibitor KN-62. Thus, during intense activity both ROS and CaMK play roles in nuclear efflux of HDAC4, but only ROS mediates HDAC5 nuclear efflux. The 10-Hz continuous stimulation did not increase the rate of ROS production and did not cause HDAC5-GFP nuclear efflux but promoted HDAC4-GFP nuclear efflux that was sensitive to KN-62 but not NAC and thus mediated by CaMK but not by ROS. Fibers from NOX2 knockout mice lacked ROS production and ROS-dependent nuclear efflux of HDAC5-GFP or HDAC4-GFP during 50-Hz trains but had unmodified Ca2+ transients. Our results demonstrate that ROS generated by NOX2 could play important roles in muscle remodeling due to intense muscle activity and that the nuclear effluxes of HDAC4 and HDAC5 are differentially regulated by Ca2+ and ROS during muscle activity. PMID:22648949

  2. Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toots, Annika; Littbrand, Håkan; Lindelöf, Nina; Wiklund, Robert; Holmberg, Henrik; Nordström, Peter; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types. Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study. Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden. Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N=186). Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity. Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months. Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-1.6-4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=-0.2-1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=-2.2-3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=-0.3-1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8-6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months. In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toots, Annika; Littbrand, Håkan; Lindelöf, Nina; Wiklund, Robert; Holmberg, Henrik; Nordström, Peter; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of  daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types. Design Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study. Setting Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden. Participants Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N = 186). Intervention Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity. Measurements Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months. Results Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=−1.6–4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.2–1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=−2.2–3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.3–1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8–6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months. Conclusion In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:26782852

  4. Dependences of mucosal dose on photon beams in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, James C.L., E-mail: james.chow@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Owrangi, Amir M. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Dependences of mucosal dose in the oral or nasal cavity on the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration, and mucosal thickness were studied for small photon fields using Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based code), which were validated by measurements. Cylindrical mucosa phantoms (mucosal thickness = 1, 2, and 3 mm) with and without the bone and air inhomogeneities were irradiated by the 6- and 18-MV photon beams (field size = 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2}) with gantry angles equal to 0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign , and 180 Degree-Sign , and multibeam configurations using 2, 4, and 8 photon beams in different orientations around the phantom. Doses along the central beam axis in the mucosal tissue were calculated. The mucosal surface doses were found to decrease slightly (1% for the 6-MV photon beam and 3% for the 18-MV beam) with an increase of mucosal thickness from 1-3 mm, when the beam angle is 0 Degree-Sign . The variation of mucosal surface dose with its thickness became insignificant when the beam angle was changed to 180 Degree-Sign , but the dose at the bone-mucosa interface was found to increase (28% for the 6-MV photon beam and 20% for the 18-MV beam) with the mucosal thickness. For different multibeam configurations, the dependence of mucosal dose on its thickness became insignificant when the number of photon beams around the mucosal tissue was increased. The mucosal dose with bone was varied with the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration and mucosal thickness for a small segmental photon field. These dosimetric variations are important to consider improving the treatment strategy, so the mucosal complications in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be minimized.

  5. Dependence of Changes of Histogram Shapes from Time and Space Direction is the Same when Fluctuation Intensities of Both Light-Diode Light Flow and 239-Pu Alpha-Activity are Measured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinshtein I. A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper tells that spectra of fluctuation amplitudes, that is, shapes of corresponding histograms, resulting measurements of intensity of light fluxes issued by a light-diode and measurements of intensity of 239 Pu alpha-particles issues change synchronously. Experiments with light beams show the same diurnal periodicity and space direction dependencies as experiments with radioactivity. Thus new possibilities for investigation of “macroscopic fluctuations” come.

  6. Exercise intensity-dependent changes in the inflammatory response in sedentary women: role of neuroendocrine parameters in the neutrophil phagocytic process and the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, E; Garcia, J J; Hinchado, M D; Ortega, E

    2009-01-01

    . Only the intense exercise affected the epinephrine, oestradiol, and progesterone concentrations, with increases in epinephrine and oestradiol immediately after exercise, and a decrease in progesterone after 24 h. Both moderate and intense exercise stimulate the phagocytic process of neutrophils in sedentary women, but the profile of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine release seems to be better following the moderate exercise. The possible participation of stress (catecholamines and cortisol) and sex (oestradiol and progesterone) hormones in these intensity-dependent immune changes is discussed. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Effect of Epidural Neuraxial Blockade-dependent Sedation on the Ramsay Sedation Scale and the Composite Auditory Evoked Potentials Index in Surgical Intensive Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueng-He Lu

    2010-08-01

    Conclusion: Epidural lidocaine analgesia could potentiate sedation in patients evaluated by the AAI, but had no effect on the RSS. The present study suggests that the AAI could provide an objective and more precise index than the RSS in evaluation of sedation level in patients who are undergoing epidural pain management in the intensive care unit.

  8. Domain Decomposition Methods and High-Order Absorbing Boundary Conditions for the Numerical Simulation of the Time Dependent Schrödinger Equation with Ionization and Recombination by Intense Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine, Xavier; Lorin, Emmanuel; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper is devoted to the efficient computation of the Time Dependent Schrödinger Equation (TDSE) for quantum particles subject to intense electromagnetic fields including ionization and recombination of electrons with their parent ion. The proposed approach is based on a domain decomposition technique, allowing a fine computation of the wavefunction in the vicinity of the nuclei located in a domain Ω 1 and a fast computation in a roughly meshed domain Ω 2 far from ...

  9. Coverage dependent interaction of N2O and O2 with Si(001)2x1 as monitored by the O KLL Auger intensity ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keim, Enrico G.; Wormeester, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of O2 on Si(001)2×1 at 100 K sample temperature has been studied by measuring the intensity ratio of the KL 1 L 1 and KL 2,3 L 2,3 O Auger transitions α as a function of the fractional oxygen coverage in an attempt to solve a longstanding discussion whether this reaction also

  10. Description of molecular dynamics in intense laser fields by the time-dependent adiabatic state approach: application to simultaneous two-bond dissociation of CO2 and its control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukio; Kono, Hirohiko; Koseki, Shiro; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2003-07-02

    We theoretically investigated the dynamics of structural deformations of CO(2) and its cations in near-infrared intense laser fields (approximately 10(15) W cm(-2)) by using the time-dependent adiabatic state approach. To obtain "field-following" adiabatic potentials for nuclear dynamics, the electronic Hamiltonian including the interaction with the instantaneous laser electric field is diagonalized by the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field molecular orbital method. In the CO(2) and CO(2+) stages, ionization occurs before the field intensity becomes high enough to deform the molecule. In the CO(2)(2+) stage, simultaneous symmetric two-bond stretching occurs as well as one-bond stretching. Two-bond stretching is induced by an intense field in the lowest time-dependent adiabatic state |1> of CO(2)(2+), and this two-bond stretching is followed by the occurrence of a large-amplitude bending motion mainly in the second-lowest adiabatic state |2> nonadiabatically created at large internuclear distances by the field from |1>. It is concluded that the experimentally observed stretched and bent structure of CO(2)(3+) just before Coulomb explosions originates from the structural deformation of CO(2)(2+). We also show in this report that the concept of "optical-cycle-averaged potential" is useful for designing schemes to control molecular (reaction) dynamics, such as dissociation dynamics of CO(2), in intense fields. The present approach is simple but has wide applicability for analysis and prediction of electronic and nuclear dynamics of polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields.

  11. Physical exercise-induced changes in the core body temperature of mice depend more on ambient temperature than on exercise protocol or intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Costa, Kátia Anunciação; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying physical exercise-induced hyperthermia may be species specific. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and ambient temperature on the core body temperature ( T core) of running mice, which provide an important experimental model for advancing the understanding of thermal physiology. We evaluated the influence of different protocols (constant- or incremental-speed exercises), treadmill speeds and ambient temperatures ( T a) on the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. To measure T core, a telemetric sensor was implanted in the abdominal cavity of male adult Swiss mice under anesthesia. After recovering from the surgery, the animals were familiarized to running on a treadmill and then subjected to the different running protocols and speeds at two T a: 24 °C or 34 °C. All of the experimental trials resulted in marked increases in T core. As expected, the higher-temperature environment increased the magnitude of running-induced hyperthermia. For example, during incremental exercise at 34 °C, the maximal T core achieved was increased by 1.2 °C relative to the value reached at 24 °C. However, at the same T a, neither treadmill speed nor exercise protocol altered the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. We conclude that T core of running mice is influenced greatly by T a, but not by the exercise protocols or intensities examined in the present report. These findings suggest that the magnitude of hyperthermia in running mice may be regulated centrally, independently of exercise intensity.

  12. Daily 2% chlorhexidine gluconate bath wash in a tertiary adult intensive care and high dependency units to reduce risk of hospital acquired multi resistant organisms: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Lizanne; Jhattu, Hardeep; Gomersall, Judith Streak

    2015-07-17

    There is growing evidence that the incidence of hospital acquired multi resistant organisms are increasing worldwide. Intensive care patients are particularly prone to hospital-acquired infections. In an effort to combat increasing nosocomial infections rates within the intensive care/high dependency unit setting, Canberra Hospital has implemented a daily 2% chlorhexidine gluconate bath wash in combination as part of a best practice policy to reduce hospital acquired multi resistant organism rates of colonization. This project focused on auditing the extent to which the protocol was implemented and on promoting its implementation. The primary aim of this evidence implementation project was to promote best practice in the use of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate body cleansing in the Canberra Hospital intensive care unit and high dependency unit settings. A secondary aim was to improve intensive care/high dependency unit patient outcomes and resource utilization. The project used the Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tools for promoting change in 2% chlorhexidine gluconate wash health practice. A baseline audit was conducted followed by a three-prong education approach strategy targeted at clinicians and finalized using a follow-up audit. There was an improvement in best practice for all criteria monitored in the follow-up audit compared to the initial audit. The most significant improvement was education and allergy assessment with 90% and 46% improvements respectively. Wipe application compliance improved by 28% to 55%, suggesting a need for continual education. Minor decreases in compliance were also noted in allergy documentation and application technique by 2% and 7% respectively. The project was successful in increasing knowledge surrounding 2% chlorhexidine gluconate wash administration and has provided a future direction for sustaining evidence-based practice change. Further audits

  13. Exercise increases sphingoid base-1-phosphate levels in human blood and skeletal muscle in a time- and intensity-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baranowski, Marcin; Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U; Charmas, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates cardiovascular function and plays an important role in muscle biology. We have previously reported that cycling exercise increased plasma S1P. Here, we investigated the effect of exercise duration and intensity on plasma and skeletal muscle S1P...... sphingosine was released from both working and resting leg at the highest workload (p ... increased availability of sphingosine released by skeletal muscle. In addition, exercise markedly affects S1P dynamics across the leg. We speculate that S1P may play an important role in adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise....

  14. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the vibration-rotational absorption band ν2 of H2O trapped in an argon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsevich, G.; Doroshenko, I.; Malevich, A..; Shalamberidze, E.; Sapeshko, V.; Pogorelov, V.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    Using two sets of effective rotational constants for the ground (000) and the excited bending (010) vibrational states the calculation of frequencies and intensities of vibration-rotational transitions for J″ = 0 - 2; and J‧ = 0 - 3; was carried out in frame of the model of a rigid asymmetric top for temperatures from 0 to 40 K. The calculation of the intensities of vibration-rotational absorption bands of H2O in an Ar matrix was carried out both for thermodynamic equilibrium and for the case of non-equilibrium population of para- and ortho-states. For the analysis of possible interaction of vibration-rotational and translational motions of a water molecule in an Ar matrix by 3D Schrödinger equation solving using discrete variable representation (DVR) method, calculations of translational frequencies of H2O in a cage formed after one argon atom deleting were carried out. The results of theoretical calculations were compared to experimental data taken from literature.

  15. Human Schistosoma haematobium antifecundity immunity is dependent on transmission intensity and associated with immunoglobulin G1 to worm-derived antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Jones, Frances M.; van Dam, Govert J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunity that reduces worm fecundity and, in turn, reduces morbidity is proposed for Schistosoma haematobium, a parasite of major public health importance. Mathematical models of epidemiological trends suggest that antifecundity immunity is dependent on antibody responses to adult-wor...

  16. Exercise intensity-dependent regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α mRNA abundance is associated with differential activation of upstream signalling kinases in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brendan; Carson, Brian P; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M; Chibalin, Alexander V; Sarsfield, Fiona M; Barron, Niall; McCaffrey, Noel; Moyna, Niall M; Zierath, Juleen R; O’Gorman, Donal J

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction increases intracellular ATP turnover, calcium flux, and mechanical stress, initiating signal transduction pathways that modulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)-dependent transcriptional programmes. The purpose of this study was to determine if the intensity of exercise regulates PGC-1α expression in human skeletal muscle, coincident with activation of signalling cascades known to regulate PGC-1α transcription. Eight sedentary males expended 400 kcal (1674 kj) during a single bout of cycle ergometer exercise on two separate occasions at either 40% (LO) or 80% (HI) of. Skeletal muscle biopsies from the m. vastus lateralis were taken at rest and at +0, +3 and +19 h after exercise. Energy expenditure during exercise was similar between trials, but the high intensity bout was shorter in duration (LO, 69.9 ± 4.0 min; HI, 36.0 ± 2.2 min, P < 0.05) and had a higher rate of glycogen utilization (P < 0.05). PGC-1α mRNA abundance increased in an intensity-dependent manner +3 h after exercise (LO, 3.8-fold; HI, 10.2-fold, P < 0.05). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (2.8-fold, P < 0.05) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylation (84%, P < 0.05) increased immediately after HI but not LO. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation increased after both trials (∼2.0-fold, P < 0.05), but phosphorylation of the downstream transcription factor, activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), increased only after HI (2.4-fold, P < 0.05). Cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was elevated at +3 h after both trials (∼80%, P < 0.05) and class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) phosphorylation increased only after HI (2.0-fold, P < 0.05). In conclusion, exercise intensity regulates PGC-1α mRNA abundance in human skeletal muscle in response to a single bout of exercise. This effect is mediated by differential activation of multiple

  17. Exercise intensity-dependent regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1 mRNA abundance is associated with differential activation of upstream signalling kinases in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brendan; Carson, Brian P; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M; Chibalin, Alexander V; Sarsfield, Fiona M; Barron, Niall; McCaffrey, Noel; Moyna, Niall M; Zierath, Juleen R; O'Gorman, Donal J

    2010-05-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction increases intracellular ATP turnover, calcium flux, and mechanical stress, initiating signal transduction pathways that modulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha)-dependent transcriptional programmes. The purpose of this study was to determine if the intensity of exercise regulates PGC-1alpha expression in human skeletal muscle, coincident with activation of signalling cascades known to regulate PGC-1alpha transcription. Eight sedentary males expended 400 kcal (1674 kj) during a single bout of cycle ergometer exercise on two separate occasions at either 40% (LO) or 80% (HI) of . Skeletal muscle biopsies from the m. vastus lateralis were taken at rest and at +0, +3 and +19 h after exercise. Energy expenditure during exercise was similar between trials, but the high intensity bout was shorter in duration (LO, 69.9 +/- 4.0 min; HI, 36.0 +/- 2.2 min, P < 0.05) and had a higher rate of glycogen utilization (P < 0.05). PGC-1alpha mRNA abundance increased in an intensity-dependent manner +3 h after exercise (LO, 3.8-fold; HI, 10.2-fold, P < 0.05). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (2.8-fold, P < 0.05) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylation (84%, P < 0.05) increased immediately after HI but not LO. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation increased after both trials (2.0-fold, P < 0.05), but phosphorylation of the downstream transcription factor, activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), increased only after HI (2.4-fold, P < 0.05). Cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was elevated at +3 h after both trials (80%, P < 0.05) and class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) phosphorylation increased only after HI (2.0-fold, P < 0.05). In conclusion, exercise intensity regulates PGC-1alpha mRNA abundance in human skeletal muscle in response to a single bout of exercise. This effect is mediated by differential activation of

  18. Long-term survival and dialysis dependency following acute kidney injury in intensive care: extended follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gallagher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI is increasing globally and it is much more common than end-stage kidney disease. AKI is associated with high mortality and cost of hospitalisation. Studies of treatments to reduce this high mortality have used differing renal replacement therapy (RRT modalities and have not shown improvement in the short term. The reported long-term outcomes of AKI are variable and the effect of differing RRT modalities upon them is not clear. We used the prolonged follow-up of a large clinical trial to prospectively examine the long-term outcomes and effect of RRT dosing in patients with AKI.We extended the follow-up of participants in the Randomised Evaluation of Normal vs. Augmented Levels of RRT (RENAL study from 90 days to 4 years after randomization. Primary and secondary outcomes were mortality and requirement for maintenance dialysis, respectively, assessed in 1,464 (97% patients at a median of 43.9 months (interquartile range [IQR] 30.0-48.6 months post randomization. A total of 468/743 (63% and 444/721 (62% patients died in the lower and higher intensity groups, respectively (risk ratio [RR] 1.04, 95% CI 0.96-1.12, p = 0.49. Amongst survivors to day 90, 21 of 411 (5.1% and 23 of 399 (5.8% in the respective groups were treated with maintenance dialysis (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.63-2.00, p = 0.69. The prevalence of albuminuria among survivors was 40% and 44%, respectively (p = 0.48. Quality of life was not different between the two treatment groups. The generalizability of these findings to other populations with AKI requires further exploration.Patients with AKI requiring RRT in intensive care have high long-term mortality but few require maintenance dialysis. Long-term survivors have a heavy burden of proteinuria. Increased intensity of RRT does not reduce mortality or subsequent treatment with dialysis.www.ClinicalTrials.govNCT00221013.

  19. Differences in human antibody reactivity to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens are dependent on age and malaria transmission intensity in northeastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Lasse S; Lusingu, John P; Nielsen, Morten A

    2008-01-01

    at population level, we conducted an immunoepidemiological study in nearby communities in northeastern Tanzania, situated at different altitudes and therefore exposed to different levels of P. falciparum transmission intensity. Samples of plasma and infected red blood cells (IRBC) were collected from 759......-VSA IgG response developed dramatically in individuals at 1 to 2 years of age in the high-transmission area, reaching a maximum level at around 10 years of age; only a modest further increase was observed among older children and adults. In contrast, at lower levels of malaria transmission, anti-VSA Ig...... and functional characteristics of the variant-specific antibody response, which is likely to be important for protection against malaria....

  20. Light Intensity-Dependent Modulation of Chlorophyll b Biosynthesis and Photosynthesis by Overexpression of Chlorophyllide a Oxygenase in Tobacco1[C][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Pandey, Shiv S.; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Reddy, Vanga S.; Govindjee; Tripathy, Baishnab C.

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyll b is synthesized by the oxidation of a methyl group on the B ring of a tetrapyrrole molecule to a formyl group by chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO). The full-length CAO from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was overexpressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that grows well at light intensities much higher than those tolerated by Arabidopsis. This resulted in an increased synthesis of glutamate semialdehyde, 5-aminolevulinic acid, magnesium-porphyrins, and chlorophylls. Overexpression of CAO resulted in increased chlorophyll b synthesis and a decreased chlorophyll a/b ratio in low light-grown as well as high light-grown tobacco plants; this effect, however, was more pronounced in high light. The increased potential of the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase activity and chlorophyll biosynthesis compensated for the usual loss of chlorophylls in high light. Increased chlorophyll b synthesis in CAO-overexpressed plants was accompanied not only by an increased abundance of light-harvesting chlorophyll proteins but also of other proteins of the electron transport chain, which led to an increase in the capture of light as well as enhanced (40%–80%) electron transport rates of photosystems I and II at both limiting and saturating light intensities. Although the quantum yield of carbon dioxide fixation remained unchanged, the light-saturated photosynthetic carbon assimilation, starch content, and dry matter accumulation increased in CAO-overexpressed plants grown in both low- and high-light regimes. These results demonstrate that controlled up-regulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis comodulates the expression of several thylakoid membrane proteins that increase both the antenna size and the electron transport rates and enhance carbon dioxide assimilation, starch content, and dry matter accumulation. PMID:22419827

  1. The response of Hordeum spontaneum desert ecotype to drought and excessive light intensity is characterized by induction of O2 dependent photochemical activity and anthocyanin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppel, Amir; Keren, Nir; Salomon, Eitan; Volis, Sergei; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the current research was to study the role of anthocyanin accumulation, O(2)-related photochemical processes and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the response of desert and Mediterranean plants to drought and excessive light. Plants of Hordeum spontaneum were collected from Mediterranean and desert environments and were subjected to terminal drought for 25 days and then measured for PSII yield at 2 and 21% O(2), NPQ, net carbon assimilation, stomatal conductance, leaf relative water content (LRWC), anthocyanin concentration and leaf absorbance. Under terminal drought, LRWC, carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance decreased similarly and significantly in both the Mediterranean and the desert ecotypes. Anthocyanin accumulated more in the desert ecotype than in the Mediterranean ecotype. NPQ increased more in the Mediterranean ecotype as compared with the desert ecotype. PSII yield decreased significantly in the Mediterranean ecotype under drought and was much lower than in the desert ecotype under drought. The relatively high PSII yield under drought in the desert ecotype was O(2) dependent. The response of the H. spontaneum ecotype from a desert environment to drought stress was characterized by anthocyanin accumulation and induction of O(2) dependent photochemical activity, while the response of the Mediterranean ecotype was based on a higher induction of NPQ. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Diffuse Light on Radiation Use Efficiency of Two Anthurium Cultivars Depend on the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Dynamic Light Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Kromdijk, Johannes; Heuvelink, Ep; van Noort, F R; Kaiser, Elias; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars ('Pink Champion' and 'Royal Champion') were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control) and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (g s) varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in 'Royal Champion,' whereas it remained relatively constant in 'Pink Champion.' Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (P n) in both cultivars approached steady state P n in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in 'Pink Champion.' These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8%) in 'Royal Champion' in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in 'Pink Champion.' We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent.

  3. Outcome of older persons admitted to intensive care unit, mortality, prognosis factors, dependency scores and ability trajectory within 1 year: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Level, Claude; Tellier, Eric; Dezou, Patrick; Chaoui, Karim; Kherchache, Aissa; Sejourné, Philippe; Rullion-Pac Soo, Anne Marie

    2017-12-06

    The outcome and functional trajectory of older persons admitted to intensive care (ICU) unit remain a true question for critical care physicians and geriatricians, due to the heterogeneity of geriatric population, heterogeneity of practices and absence of guidelines. To describe the 1-year outcome, prognosis factors and functional trajectory for older people admitted to ICU. In a prospective 1-year cohort study, all patients aged 75 years and over admitted to our ICU were included according to a global comprehensive geriatric assessment. Follow-up was conducted for 1 year survivors, in particular, ability scores and living conditions. Of 188 patients included [aged 82.3 ± 4.7 years, 46% of admissions, median SAPS II 53.5 (43-74), ADL of Katz's score 4.2 ± 1.6, median Barthel's index 71 (55-90), AGGIR scale 4.5 ± 1.5], the ICU, hospital and 1-year mortality were, respectively, 34, 42.5 and 65.5%. Prognosis factors were: SAPS 2, mechanical ventilation, comorbidity (Lee's and Mc Cabe's scores), disability scores (ADL of Katz's score, Barthel's index and AGGIR scale), admission creatinin, hypoalbuminemia, malignant haemopathy, cognitive impairment. One-year survivors lived in their own home for 83%, with a preserved physical ability, without significant variation of the three ability assessed scores compared to prior ICU admission. The mortality of older people admitted to ICU is high, with a significant impact of disabilty scores, and preserved 1-year survivor independency. Other studies, including a better comprehensive geriatric assessment, seem necessary to determine a predictive "phenotype" of survival with a "satisfactory" level of autonomy.

  4. Spatial resolution and cathodoluminescence intensity dependence on acceleration voltage in electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy using Y2O3:Eu3+ film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yu; Kamiya, Masashi; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro

    2017-11-01

    This study presents relationship between acceleration voltage and spatial resolution of electron-beam assisted (EXA) optical microscope. The nanometric illumination light sources of the present EXA microscope was red-emitting cathodoluminescence (CL) in the Y2O3:Eu3+ thin film excited by focused electron beam. Our experimental results demonstrated that the spatial resolutions of the EXA microscope were higher as the acceleration voltage was higher. We managed to make images of the scattered gold particles with approximately 90 nm-resolutions at the voltages higher than 20 kV. The dependence of the spatial resolution on the acceleration voltage was explained by the distribution of simulated electron scattering trajectories in the luminescent thin film. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced protection against malaria by indoor residual spraying in addition to insecticide treated nets: is it dependent on transmission intensity or net usage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Philippa A; Protopopoff, Natacha; Wright, Alexandra; Kivaju, Zuhura; Tigererwa, Robinson; Mosha, Franklin W; Kisinza, William; Rowland, Mark; Kleinschmidt, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide treated nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) are effective vector control tools that protect against malaria. There is conflicting evidence regarding whether using ITNs and IRS in combination provides additional benefit over using either of these methods alone. This study investigated factors that may modify the effect of the combined use of IRS and ITNs compared to using ITNs alone on malaria infection prevalence. Secondary analysis was carried out on data from a cluster randomised trial in north-west Tanzania. 50 clusters received ITNs from a universal coverage campaign; of these 25 were randomly allocated to additionally receive two rounds of IRS in 2012. In cross-sectional household surveys children 0.5-14 years old were tested for Plasmodium falciparum infections (PfPR) two, six and ten months after the first IRS round. IRS protected those sleeping under nets (OR = 0.38, 95%CI 0.26-0.57) and those who did not (OR = 0.43, 95%CI 0.29-0.63). The protective effect of IRS was not modified by community level ITN use (ITN use = 50%, OR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.28-0.74). The additional protection from IRS was similar in low (areas (≥10% PfPR, OR = 0.34, 95%CI 0.18-0.67). ITN use was protective at the individual-level regardless of whether the village had been sprayed (OR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.70-0.98). Living in a sprayed village was protective regardless of whether the individual slept under an ITN last night (OR = 0.41, 95%CI 0.29-0.58). Implementing IRS in addition to ITNs was beneficial for individuals from villages with a wide range of transmission intensities and net utilisation levels. Net users received additional protection from IRS. ITNs were providing some individual protection, even in this area with high levels of pyrethroid insecticide resistance. These results demonstrate that there is a supplementary benefit of IRS even when ITNs are effective. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01697852.

  6. Enhanced protection against malaria by indoor residual spraying in addition to insecticide treated nets: is it dependent on transmission intensity or net usage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa A West

    Full Text Available Insecticide treated nets (ITNs and indoor residual spraying (IRS are effective vector control tools that protect against malaria. There is conflicting evidence regarding whether using ITNs and IRS in combination provides additional benefit over using either of these methods alone. This study investigated factors that may modify the effect of the combined use of IRS and ITNs compared to using ITNs alone on malaria infection prevalence.Secondary analysis was carried out on data from a cluster randomised trial in north-west Tanzania. 50 clusters received ITNs from a universal coverage campaign; of these 25 were randomly allocated to additionally receive two rounds of IRS in 2012. In cross-sectional household surveys children 0.5-14 years old were tested for Plasmodium falciparum infections (PfPR two, six and ten months after the first IRS round.IRS protected those sleeping under nets (OR = 0.38, 95%CI 0.26-0.57 and those who did not (OR = 0.43, 95%CI 0.29-0.63. The protective effect of IRS was not modified by community level ITN use (ITN use = 50%, OR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.28-0.74. The additional protection from IRS was similar in low (<10% PfPR, OR = 0.38, 95%CI 0.19-0.75 and high transmission areas (≥10% PfPR, OR = 0.34, 95%CI 0.18-0.67. ITN use was protective at the individual-level regardless of whether the village had been sprayed (OR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.70-0.98. Living in a sprayed village was protective regardless of whether the individual slept under an ITN last night (OR = 0.41, 95%CI 0.29-0.58.Implementing IRS in addition to ITNs was beneficial for individuals from villages with a wide range of transmission intensities and net utilisation levels. Net users received additional protection from IRS. ITNs were providing some individual protection, even in this area with high levels of pyrethroid insecticide resistance. These results demonstrate that there is a supplementary benefit of IRS even when ITNs are effective.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01697852.

  7. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  8. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  9. Identification and molecular characterization of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that shows a light intensity dependent progressive chlorophyll deficiency [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1b6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip B Grovenstein

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. These tetrapyrroles are synthesized via a common branched pathway that involves mainly nuclear encoded enzymes. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel which inserts Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto to form Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto, the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. The GUN4 (genomes uncoupled 4 protein is not essential for the MgChel activity but has been shown to significantly stimulate its activity. We have isolated a light sensitive mutant, 6F14, by random DNA insertional mutagenesis. 6F14 cannot tolerate light intensities higher than 90-100 μmol photons m-2 s-1. It shows a light intensity dependent progressive photo-bleaching. 6F14 is incapable of photo-autotrophic growth under light intensity higher than 100 μmol photons m-2 s-1. PCR based analyses show that in 6F14 the insertion of the plasmid outside the GUN4 locus has resulted in a genetic rearrangement of the GUN4 gene and possible deletions in the genomic region flanking the GUN4 gene. Our gun4 mutant has a Chl content very similar to that in the wild type in the dark and is very sensitive to fluctuations in the light intensity in the environment unlike the earlier identified Chlamydomonas gun4 mutant. Complementation with a functional copy of the GUN4 gene restored light tolerance, Chl biosynthesis and photo-autotrophic growth under high light intensities in 6F14. 6F14 is the second gun4 mutant to be identified in C. reinhardtii. Additionally, we show that our two gun4 complements over-express the GUN4 protein and show a higher Chl content per cell compared to that in the wild type strain.

  10. Intensive mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory......This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  11. Pressure dependence of emission intensity of rare-gas excimer light produced by silent discharge; Teikiatsu ryoiki ni okeru musei hoden reiki ki gas excimer hikari shutsuryoku no atsuryoku izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yukimura, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-09-20

    To establish the pressure dependence of silent discharge excited rare gas excimer light emission, a vacua ultraviolet light was subjected to spectroscopic analysis at a pressure lower than 20kPa. Researches are under way to apply the discharge excited rare gas excimer lamp as a vacuum ultraviolet light source for the development of new materials and for the conservation of environments. When the pressure is as low as 1.8kPa or 4.4kPa, the emission has peaks at wavelengths centering on 147nm and 149nm, both of which are the resonance lines of the xenon atom. Excimer generation becomes prominent as the pressure increases, with the second continuum of light growing dominant at 35kPa to weaken relatively the resonance lines and the first continuum of light. In the first continuum, emission increases only at a suppressed rate, as compared with emission in the second continuum, due for instance to a collision caused relaxation process in which excimers are lost. In the case of xenon in the vicinity of 10-11kPa, the first continuum of light and the second continuum of light are approximately equal in emission intensity, producing a vacuum ultraviolet light source with a bandwidth relatively large for a single gas spectrum. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggu Cai

    Full Text Available Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2 and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3. Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  13. Subjective intensity and pleasantness in taste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on intensity and pleasantness in taste perception. There is a formal relationship between intensity and hedonic value of stimuli, which can be expressed in an inverted U. The fact that pleasantness depends partially on stimulus intensity poses a problem when one wants to

  14. High Intensity Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, M.; Brodin, G.; Lundin, J.; Ilderton, A.

    2009-11-01

    The capability to produce high field strengths, and thereby obtain a new means for doing fundamental physics, has over the last thirty years taken great leaps forward. Both superconducting cavities as well ultra-intense lasers can now reach field strengths of the order 50 MV/m (stationary) and 1012 V/m (peak value, time-dependent field), respectively. Here we will describe a collection of problems that catches the flavor of the nonlinear quantum vacuum and the possibility to use high field strengths as a low-energy probe of fundamental physics.

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

  16. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction {alpha}/{beta} for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method {alpha}/{beta} for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F{sub r}) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple ...

  19. Concentration dependence of intensity parameters and radiative properties of Sm{sup 3+} ions doped in BaO–ZnO–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Kirti; Kundu, R.S.; Pal, Inder [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Punia, R., E-mail: rajeshpoonia13@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Department of Physics, Indira Gandhi University, Mirpur, Rewari 123401 (India); Kishore, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar 125001 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Glass samples with compositions xSm{sub 2}O{sub 3}- (100−x)[0.1BaO–0.4ZnO–0.5B{sub 2}O{sub 3}]; x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 have been prepared using melt quench technique. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectra have been recorded for prepared glass samples at room temperature. The spectral intensities of Sm{sup 3+} transition observed in absorption spectra have been calculated by using Judd–Ofelt theory. The intensity parameters (Ω{sub 2}, Ω{sub 4} and Ω{sub 6}) have been estimated by applying least square fit method on the experimental (f{sub exp}) and calculated (f{sub cal}) oscillator strengths. The variation of Ω{sub 2} observed with the increase in Sm{sup 3+} ion concentration, is attributed to decease in covalency of rare earth oxygen bond due to change in optical basicity of host glass matrix. From the fluorescence spectra, four emission spectral lines have been observed that correspond to the transition from {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ground state to lower lying {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 9/2} and {sup 6}H{sub 11/2} states with an excitation wavelength of 402 nm. The intensity parameters and the emission measurements have been used to estimate the various radiative parameters such as transition probabilities (A{sub R}), radiative lifetime (τ{sub R}), branching ratio (β{sub R}) and stimulated emission cross-sections (σ{sub e}) of luminescent levels. The value of σ{sub e} is found to decrease with increase in concentration of Sm{sup 3+} ions and it possesses higher value for glass sample with x = 0.5 for transition lying in the visible region indicating its importance for photonic applications. - Highlights: • Sm{sup 3+} ions doped BaO–ZnO–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses have been prepared by melt-quench technique. • Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters have been obtained from absorption spectra. • Radiative properties have been estimated from Judd–Ofelt theory.

  20. Seasonal variations in the content of dust particles pm10 and pm2.5 in the air of resort cities depending on intensity transport traffic and other conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, Valeriy; Sergina, Natalia; Sidyakin, Pavel; Kovtunov, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation aimed at evaluating the content of dust particles PM10 and PM2.5 in the air of Yessentuki, one of the resort cities in the Caucasus Mineral Waters region. It gives the data on the size distribution and concentration of fine dust in the city atmosphere with regard to the specific features of urban territory zoning, the climatic factors and seasonal changes in the number of citizens as well as to the remoteness from the industrial zone, the intensity of public and transport traffic. The authors show that it is reasonable to use sequences of random values for the purpose of air quality evaluation in various zones of the city in case of the absence of monitoring stations with continuous measurements checking the probability of the standard values exceedance for fine dust content. Similar investigations are carried out in other resort cities of the Caucasus Mineral Waters region.

  1. Energy Intensity of the Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław Dziubiński

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy intensity is a dependency between continuous energy intensity and energy intensity of movement. In the paper it is proposed analyze energy intensity of the movement, as the size specifying the power demand to the wheel drive and presented the balance of power of an electric car moving in the urban cycle. The object of the test was the hybrid vehicle with an internal combustion engine and electric motor. The measurements were carried out for 4 speeds and 2 driving profiles.

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. ... Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a breath. Absolute Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project Checklist CDC’s Example Related Resources ... Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, ...

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but ...

  6. Iowa Intensive Archaeological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file contains intensive level archaeological survey areas for the state of Iowa. All intensive Phase I surveys that are submitted to the State Historic...

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. In general, if you're ...

  8. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  9. Stochastic conditional intensity processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauwens, Luc; Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the so-called stochastic conditional intensity (SCI) model by extending Russell’s (1999) autoregressive conditional intensity (ACI) model by a latent common dynamic factor that jointly drives the individual intensity components. We show by simulations that the propos...... for a joint latent factor and show that its inclusion allows for an improved and more parsimonious specification of the multivariate intensity process...

  10. The effect of intensity on relative pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William Forde; Peter, Varghese; Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the effect of intensity and intensity change on judgements of pitch differences or interval size. In Experiment 1, 39 musically untrained participants rated the size of the interval spanned by two pitches within individual gliding tones. Tones were presented at high intensity, low intensity, looming intensity (up-ramp), and fading intensity (down-ramp) and glided between two pitches spanning either 6 or 7 semitones (a tritone or a perfect fifth interval). The pitch shift occurred in either ascending or descending directions. Experiment 2 repeated the conditions of Experiment 1 but the shifts in pitch and intensity occurred across two discrete tones (i.e., a melodic interval). Results indicated that participants were sensitive to the differences in interval size presented: Ratings were significantly higher when two pitches differed by 7 semitones than when they differed by 6 semitones. However, ratings were also dependent on whether the interval was high or low in intensity, whether it increased or decreased in intensity across the two pitches, and whether the interval was ascending or descending in pitch. Such influences illustrate that the perception of pitch relations does not always adhere to a logarithmic function as implied by their musical labels, but that identical intervals are perceived as substantially different in size depending on other attributes of the sound source.

  11. Path Dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Setterfield

    2015-01-01

    Path dependency is defined, and three different specific concepts of path dependency – cumulative causation, lock in, and hysteresis – are analyzed. The relationships between path dependency and equilibrium, and path dependency and fundamental uncertainty are also discussed. Finally, a typology of dynamical systems is developed to clarify these relationships.

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion (Borg Rating of ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart Rate & Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion (Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale) ...

  14. Low intensity radiation: radiobiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlakova, E.B. [Institute of Chemical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Biochemical, biophysical and functional properties of the genetic and membrane apparatus of the cell have been considered in mice exposed to radiation in the wide range of doses of 6 to 1800 mGy with the radiation intensity of 4.1 x 10{sup -3} and 41 x 10{sup -3} mGy.min{sup -1}. Properties considered include adsorption of DNA on nitrocellulose filters, genome restructuring, microviscosity of lipids of nuclear, mitochondrial, microsomatic, plasmatic membranes, and composition and antioxidising activity of membrane lipids, activity and regulatory properties of the membrane and cytosolic enzymes of organs and tissues. It was shown that the dose dependence of the changes in the investigated properties is of a non-linear polymodal (bimodal) nature. The first low dose maximum was observed at doses of 10 to 50 mGy. The value of the maximum and the dose at which it was observed depend on the subject`s nature, the radiation intensity and the time passed after irradiation. An essential factor is that sensitivity to other damaging effects of molecules, cells, organs and animals changes after exposure to low dose radiation. The indices of health of people exposed to low dose irradiation also change. The bimodal dose-dependence of the effect was illustrated by the leucoses death rate. The explanation is given in terms of the changes in the relation between the quantity of damage and the activity of repair systems induced by low dose irradiation. (Author).

  15. Fourth Order Nonlinear Intensity and the corresponding Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes how the fourth order nonlinear intensity and the corresponding effective refractive index that is intensity dependent can be obtained using Maxwell's equations. Applications have been elucidated for some uniaxial crystals. Keywords: Refractive index, Nonlinear effects, Maxwell's equations, Intensity and ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water aerobics Bicycling slower than 10 miles per hour ...

  17. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  18. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, J G

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron-positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  19. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  20. Dependency Parsing

    CERN Document Server

    Kubler, Sandra; Nivre, Joakim

    2009-01-01

    Dependency-based methods for syntactic parsing have become increasingly popular in natural language processing in recent years. This book gives a thorough introduction to the methods that are most widely used today. After an introduction to dependency grammar and dependency parsing, followed by a formal characterization of the dependency parsing problem, the book surveys the three major classes of parsing models that are in current use: transition-based, graph-based, and grammar-based models. It continues with a chapter on evaluation and one on the comparison of different methods, and it close

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than 10 miles per hour Tennis (doubles) Ballroom dancing General gardening Vigorous Intensity Race walking, jogging, or running Swimming laps Tennis (singles) Aerobic dancing Bicycling 10 miles per hour or faster Jumping ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Wellness Walkability Audit Tool Sample Audit Glossary Selected References Discount Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest ... Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, ... If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists ... upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate ...

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion (Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale) Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your ... ...

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Absolute Intensity The ... per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water aerobics Bicycling slower than 10 miles per hour ...

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Absolute Intensity The ... site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test ... Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. ... Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of ... 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion (Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale) Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email ... ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity ... Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ways to understand and measure the intensity ...

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... activity. If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Absolute ... ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational ... relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target ...

  18. Data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Critchlow, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Data-intensive science has the potential to transform scientific research and quickly translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, and economic success. But this collaborative science is still lacking the effective access and exchange of knowledge among scientists, researchers, and policy makers across a range of disciplines. Bringing together leaders from multiple scientific disciplines, Data-Intensive Science shows how a comprehensive integration of various techniques and technological advances can effectively harness the vast amount of data being generated and significan

  19. Towards higher intensities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 weeks, commissioning of the machine protection system has advanced significantly, opening up the possibility of higher intensity collisions at 3.5 TeV. The intensity has been increased from 2 bunches of 1010 protons to 6 bunches of 2x1010 protons. Luminosities of 6x1028 cm-2s-1 have been achieved at the start of fills, a factor of 60 higher than those provided for the first collisions on 30 March.   The recent increase in LHC luminosity as recorded by the experiments. (Graph courtesy of the experiments and M. Ferro-Luzzi) To increase the luminosity further, the commissioning crews are now trying to push up the intensity of the individual proton bunches. After the successful injection of nominal intensity bunches containing 1.1x1011 protons, collisions were subsequently achieved at 450 GeV with these intensities. However, half-way through the first ramping of these nominal intensity bunches to 3.5 TeV on 15 May, a beam instability was observed, leading to partial beam loss...

  20. anion dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUMAN Das

    the lifetime distributions show a pronounced anion dependence and suggest cluster stability time up to a few nanoseconds. Keywords. Amide deep eutectics; simulations; cluster size and lifetime distributions; anion dependence. 1. Introduction ... industrial applications.11–15 In chemical industry, they are used as ...

  1. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  2. Drug dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are not there (hallucinations) and can lead to psychological addiction. Marijuana (cannabis, or hashish). There are several ... work, or family are being harmed Episodes of violence Hostility when confronted about drug dependence Lack of ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ... intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test ...

  4. Intensive culture”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2012-01-01

    Scott Lash argumenterer i bogen Intensive Culture for en vending fra ”ekstensiv” til ”intensiv” i den nutidige globalisering. Bogens udgangspunkt er en stadig mere ekstensiv og gennemtrængende globalisering af kultur, forbrugs- og vareformer, ”comtemporary culture, today’s capitalism – our global...

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stair Usage Project Checklist CDC’s Example Related Resources Walking Step It Up! Surgeon General’s Call to Action ... doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but ...

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ...

  7. Water intensity of transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carey W; Webber, Michael E

    2008-11-01

    As the need for alternative transportation fuels increases, it is important to understand the many effects of introducing fuels based upon feedstocks other than petroleum. Water intensity in "gallons of water per mile traveled" is one method to measure these effects on the consumer level. In this paper we investigate the water intensity for light duty vehicle (LDV) travel using selected fuels based upon petroleum, natural gas, unconventional fossil fuels, hydrogen, electricity, and two biofuels (ethanol from corn and biodiesel from soy). Fuels more directly derived from fossil fuels are less water intensive than those derived either indirectly from fossil fuels (e.g., through electricity generation) or directly from biomass. The lowest water consumptive (electricity, and electricity derived from nonthermal renewable sources. LDVs running on electricity and hydrogen derived from the aggregate U.S. grid (heavily based upon fossil fuel and nuclear steam-electric power generation) withdraw 5-20 times and consume nearly 2-5 times more water than by using petroleum gasoline. The water intensities (gal H20/mile) of LDVs operating on biofuels derived from crops irrigated in the United States at average rates is 28 and 36 for corn ethanol (E85) for consumption and withdrawal, respectively. For soy-derived biodiesel the average consumption and withdrawal rates are 8 and 10 gal H2O/mile.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

  9. Path Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mogens Ove

    Begrebet Path Dependence blev oprindelig udviklet inden for New Institutionel Economics af bl.a. David, Arthur og North. Begrebet har spredt sig vidt i samfundsvidenskaberne og undergået en udvikling. Dette paper propagerer for at der er sket så en så omfattende udvikling af begrebet, at man nu kan...... tale om 1. og 2. generation af Path Dependence begrebet. Den nyeste udvikling af begrebet har relevans for metodologi-diskusionerne i relation til Keynes...

  10. Ontological dependency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamper, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Successful ontological analysis depends upon having the right underlying theory. The work described here, exploring how to understand organisations as systems of social norms found that the familiar objectivist position did not work, eventually replacing it with a radically subjectivist ontology

  11. On intensities of modulated Cox measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jewgeni H. Dshalalow

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce and study functionals of the intensities of random measures modulated by a stochastic process ξ, which occur in applications to stochastic models and telecommunications. Modulation of a random measure by ξ is specified for marked Cox measures. Particular cases of modulation by ξ as semi-Markov and semiregenerative processes enabled us to obtain explicit formulas for the named intensities. Examples in queueing (systems with state dependent parameters, Little's and Campbell's formulas demonstrate the use of the results.

  12. Intensities of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissell, David; Vannini, Phillip; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    to complex social and geographical dynamics of transport, housing, lifestyle, and employment. Yet, the experiential dimensions of long-distance commuting have not received the attention that they deserve within research on mobilities. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in Australia, Canada, and Denmark...... this paper aims to further develop our collective understanding of the experiential particulars of long-distance workers or ‘supercommuters’. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in broad social patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions......This paper explores the intensities of long-distance commuting journeys in order to understand how bodily sensibilities become attuned to the regular mobilities which they undertake. More people are travelling farther to and from work than ever before, owing to a variety of factors which relate...

  13. CIM - compact intensity modulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, M.; Lang, E.; Gahler, G.; Lal, J.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Inst. Lau Langevin

    2008-07-21

    Compact intensity modulation (CIM), a new method to modulate the intensity of a neutron beam is demonstrated. CIM allows the production of arbitrary signals where the focus point can be chosen and changed without any constraints. A novel feature in this technique compared to spin echo techniques is that the neutron polarization is kept parallel or anti-parallel to the static fields during the passage through the magnetic fields and the beating pattern at the detector is produced by an amplitude modulation (AM) of the adiabatic RF-spin flippers rather than Larmor precession like in neutron spin echo (NSE) instruments; thus, the achievable contrast is very high and the instrument resolution can be changed very quickly. This gives the fascinating possibility at pulsed neutron sources to sweep the modulation frequency of the flippers in order to increase dynamic resolution range during the same neutron pulse.

  14. Ultra-intense lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mourou, G

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the applications of ultra-intense lasers in domains like particle acceleration, gamma-gamma collisions, cancer diagnostic, eye surgery and inertial fusion. The main characteristic of such lasers is to deliver impulses carrying the same amount of energy as did previous generations of lasers but in a far shorter time which increases their power dramatically. Typically an ultra-intense laser releases 1 joule through an impulse that lasts 100 femtoseconds which means a power of 10 sup 1 sup 3 Watt. The method of the amplification of impulses through frequency shift (CPA) has allowed power lasers to reach power levels that were beyond the technological limits of amplifying equipment (10 sup 9 W). The powerful electrical field of a femtosecond laser impulse make electrons oscillate with speeds nearing the speed of light while its magnetic field accelerates them in the perpendicular direction of the oscillation plane. Ultra-intense lasers generate electric fields from 10 sup 1 sup 2 to 10 sup 1 ...

  15. The Enhanced Coronal Green Line Intensity and the Magnetic Field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Sun: Corona—emergence of magnetic flux. Extended abstract. Ramesh, Nagabhushana and Varghese (1999) have shown that the green line intensity enhancement does not depend entirely on the strength of the underlying spot magnetic field though the coronal intensity enhanced feature is almost sure to occur at the.

  16. [Dependency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorisalo, Sailaritta

    2013-01-01

    The most common causes of lower limb edema include cardiac insufficiency, venous insufficiency, insufficiency of lymph flow, and side effects of drugs. It can also be due to dependency syndrome, in which the edema and skin changes can only be explained by a passive calf muscle pump and the resulting venous hypertension. Underlying the drop foot is always immobilization for one reason or other. The patient must be given an explanation about the situation, activated to move if possible, and in any case guided to the use of support stockings and postural therapy.

  17. 21 cm Intensity Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Aleksan, Roy; Ansari, Reza; Bandura, Kevin; Bond, Dick; Bunton, John; Carlson, Kermit; Chang, Tzu-Ching; DeJongh, Fritz; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Darhmaoui, Hassane; Gnedin, Nick; Halpern, Mark; Hogan, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Using the 21 cm line, observed all-sky and across the redshift range from 0 to 5, the large scale structure of the Universe can be mapped in three dimensions. This can be accomplished by studying specific intensity with resolution ~ 10 Mpc, rather than via the usual galaxy redshift survey. The data set can be analyzed to determine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation wavelengths, in order to address the question: 'What is the nature of Dark Energy?' In addition, the study of Large Scale Structure acro...

  18. Intense pulsed light therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltes, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) is an FDA-approved photo therapy for the treatment of a variety of conditions such as acne and hirsutism. It utilizes the principle of selective photothermolysis. Photothermolysis allows a specific wavelength to be delivered to a chromophore of a designated tissue while leaving the surrounding tissue unaffected. The results of IPL are similar to that of laser treatments but it offers the advantage of a relative low cost. It is a safe and rapid treatment with minimal discomfort to the patient. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. with Bounded Failure Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Wanti Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Bayes prediction of the future failures of a deteriorating repairable mechanical system subject to minimal repairs and periodic overhauls. To model the effect of overhauls on the reliability of the system a proportional age reduction model is assumed and the 2-parameter Engelhardt-Bain process (2-EBP is used to model the failure process between two successive overhauls. 2-EBP has an advantage over Power Law Process (PLP models. It is found that the failure intensity of deteriorating repairable systems attains a finite bound when repeated minimal repair actions are combined with some overhauls. If such a data is analyzed through models with unbounded increasing failure intensity, such as the PLP, then pessimistic estimates of the system reliability will arise and incorrect preventive maintenance policy may be defined. On the basis of the observed data and of a number of suitable prior densities reflecting varied degrees of belief on the failure/repair process and effectiveness of overhauls, the prediction of the future failure times and the number of failures in a future time interval is found. Finally, a numerical application is used to illustrate the advantages from overhauls and sensitivity analysis of the improvement parameter carried out.

  20. French intensive truck garden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T D

    1983-01-01

    The French Intensive approach to truck gardening has the potential to provide substantially higher yields and lower per acre costs than do conventional farming techniques. It was the intent of this grant to show that there is the potential to accomplish the gains that the French Intensive method has to offer. It is obvious that locally grown food can greatly reduce transportation energy costs but when there is the consideration of higher efficiencies there will also be energy cost reductions due to lower fertilizer and pesticide useage. As with any farming technique, there is a substantial time interval for complete soil recovery after there have been made substantial soil modifications. There were major crop improvements even though there was such a short time since the soil had been greatly disturbed. It was also the intent of this grant to accomplish two other major objectives: first, the garden was managed under organic techniques which meant that there were no chemical fertilizers or synthetic pesticides to be used. Second, the garden was constructed so that a handicapped person in a wheelchair could manage and have a higher degree of self sufficiency with the garden. As an overall result, I would say that the garden has taken the first step of success and each year should become better.

  1. Phenibut dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Paton-Gay, C Lindsay; Balchand, Kam; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Phenibut is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist designed and used as an anxiolytic in Russia. In Western countries, phenibut is not a registered medication but is available through online stores as a supplement. We present a case of a patient who used phenibut to self-medicate anxiety, insomnia and cravings for alcohol. While phenibut was helpful initially, the patient developed dependence including tolerance, significant withdrawal symptoms within 3–4 h of last use and failure to fulfil his roles at work and at home. He finally sought medical assistance in our addictions clinic. We have gradually, over the course of 9 weeks, substituted phenibut with baclofen, which has similar pharmacological properties, and then successfully tapered the patient off baclofen. This required approximately 10 mg of baclofen for each gram of phenibut. PMID:23391959

  2. Compton scattering at high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinzl@plymouth.ac.u [University of Plymouth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    High-intensity Compton scattering takes place when an electron beam is brought into collision with a high power laser. We briefly review the main intensity signatures using the formalism of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

  3. 21-cm Intensity Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Aleksan, Roy; Ansari, Réza; Bandura, Kevin; Bond, Dick; Bunton, John; Carlson, Kermit; Chang, Tzu-Ching; DeJongh, Fritz; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Darhmaoui, Hassane; Gnedin, Nick; Halpern, Mark; Hogan, Craig; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Legrouri, Ahmed; Loeb, Avi; Loudiyi, Khalid; Magneville, Christophe; Marriner, John; McGinnis, David P.; McWilliams, Bruce; Moniez, Marc; Palanque-Delabruille, Nathalie; Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Pen, Ue-Li; Rich, Jim; Scarpine, Vic; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sigurdson, Kris; Seljak, Uros; Stebbins, Albert; Steffen, Jason H.; Stoughton, Chris; Timbie, Peter T.; Vallinotto, Alberto; Teche, Christophe

    Using the 21 cm line, observed all-sky and across the redshift range from 0 to 5, the large scale structure of the Universe can be mapped in three dimensions. This can be accomplished by studying specific intensity with resolution ~ 10 Mpc, rather than via the usual galaxy redshift survey. The data set can be analyzed to determine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation wavelengths, in order to address the question: 'What is the nature of Dark Energy?' In addition, the study of Large Scale Structure across this range addresses the questions: 'How does Gravity effect very large objects?' and 'What is the composition our Universe?' The same data set can be used to search for and catalog time variable and transient radio sources.

  4. The generation of high-quality, intense ion beams by ultra-intense lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, M; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, A; Brambrink, E; Cowan, T E; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, J C; Geissel, M; Hegelich, M; Karsch, S; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Schlegel, T; Stephens, R B

    2002-01-01

    Intense beams of protons and heavy ions have been observed in ultra-intense laser-solid interaction experiments. Thereby, a considerable fraction of the laser energy is transferred to collimated beams of energetic ions (e.g. up to 50 MeV protons; 100 MeV fluorine), which makes these beams highly interesting for various applications. Experimental results indicate a very short-pulse duration and an excellent beam quality, leading to beam intensities in the TW range. To characterize the beam quality and its dependence on laser parameters and target conditions we performed experiments using the 100 TW laser system at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses at the Ecole Polytechnique, France, with focused intensities exceeding 10 sup 1 sup 9 W cm sup - sup 2. We found a strong dependence on the target rear surface conditions allowing to tailor the ion beam by an appropriate target design. We also succeeded in the generation of heavy ion beams by suppressing the proton amount at the target surface. We wi...

  5. Intense XUV Radiation Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-30

    eisl dilos energ-- NU perra dIIj i lj a tpIs- e firc linte, or otiher subs ~true! L reS is ouhd aIppear It dile con1- t ak inrg the spectra. 11nut~ %sere...dependence of the VUV output vs laser the imaged source relative to the spectrograph slit, the energy for the Ng:YAG laser. Analysis of the depen...Mcllrath and M.L. Ginter, "Rare-Earth Plasma Light Source for VUV Applications" Appl. Opt. 20, 3043 (1981). 7. Standard Methods of Water Analysis , 6th

  6. Whistler intensities above thunderstorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fiser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a study of penetration of the VLF electromagnetic waves induced by lightning to the ionosphere. We compare the fractional hop whistlers recorded by the ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER satellite with lightning detected by the EUCLID detection network. To identify the fractional hop whistlers, we have developed software for automatic detection of the fractional-hop whistlers in the VLF spectrograms. This software provides the detection times of the fractional hop whistlers and the average amplitudes of these whistlers. Matching the lightning and whistler data, we find the pairs of causative lightning and corresponding whistler. Processing data from ~200 DEMETER passes over the European region we obtain a map of mean amplitudes of whistler electric field as a function of latitudinal and longitudinal difference between the location of the causative lightning and satellite magnetic footprint. We find that mean whistler amplitude monotonically decreases with horizontal distance up to ~1000 km from the lightning source. At larger distances, the mean whistler amplitude usually merges into the background noise and the whistlers become undetectable. The maximum of whistler intensities is shifted from the satellite magnetic footprint ~1° owing to the oblique propagation. The average amplitude of whistlers increases with the lightning current. At nighttime (late evening, the average amplitude of whistlers is about three times higher than during the daytime (late morning for the same lightning current.

  7. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

    2013-09-24

    The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

  8. Uso de solução bucal com sistema enzimático em pacientes totalmente dependentes de cuidados em unidade de terapia intensiva Use of oral rinse with enzymatic system in patients totally dependent in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio da Silva Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Os pacientes internados em unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI, na maioria das vezes, não possuem higienização oral adequada. Esta condição de deficiência de higiene oral em pacientes graves desencadeia freqüentemente periodontites, gengivites e outras complicações sistêmicas e orais. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a eficiência da ação antimicrobiana da solução bucal com sistema enzimático associada à higiene oral, em pacientes totalmente dependentes de cuidados internados em UTI. MÉTODO: Estudo piloto prospectivo duplamente encoberto, realizado com 20 pacientes internados em UTI, divididos em 2 grupos com protocolos de higienização bucal com a mesma técnica, mas utilizando-se soluções diferentes, sendo o grupo de estudo (n = 10 utilizando solução bucal com sistema enzimático e o grupo controle (n = 10 utilizando solução bucal à base de cetilpiridínio. RESULTADOS: Os resultados microbiológicos das culturas coletadas nos grupos de estudo e controle, antes e após o uso da solução enzimática, mostraram que não houve diferença significativa entre os grupos (p = 0,41. Na avaliação clínica do Índice de Higiene Oral Simplificada (IHOS houve significância estatística pelo teste Exato de Fisher (p = 0,01, quando comparados os grupos de estudo e controle. O valor de significância estatística foi estabelecido em 5%, ou p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU, in most cases do not have a proper oral hygiene. This deficient condition of oral hygiene in critical patients often triggers periodontitis, gingivitis and other systemic and oral complications. This research aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the antimicrobial action of a solution with bioactive enzymatic system for oral hygiene, in totally care-dependent patients admitted to ICU. METHODS: A prospective, double blind pilot study was conducted with 20 patients admitted to an ICU, divided

  9. Performance Measurement and Incentive Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Bayo-Moriones, Alberto; Galdon-Sanchez, Jose Enrique; Martinez-de-Morentin, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the factors that determine the intensity of pay for performance schemes. The results indicate that the use of individual and group incentives boost intensity, whereas plant or firm pay for performance do not seem to affect the variable of interest. In addition, the adoption of measures of results, such as productivity or quality, has a significant positive effect on intensity. On the contrary, measures of human resource management outcomes, subjective measures and financi...

  10. Intensity formulas for triplet bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budo, A.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work in this area is surveyed and the mathematics involved in determining the quantitative intensity measurements in triplet bands is presented. Explicit expressions for the intensity distribution in the branches of the 3 Sigma-3 Pi and 1 Sigma-3Pi bands valid for all values of the coupling constant Y of the 3 Pi terms are given. The intensity distribution calculated according to the formulas given is compared with measurements of PH, 3 Pi-3 Sigma. Good quantitative agreement is obtained.

  11. Passion and dependency in online shopping activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Chien; Yang, Hui-Wen

    2007-04-01

    This study examines the influence of harmonious passion (HP) and obsessive passion (OP) to online shopping dependency. The results show that both HP and OP might lead to online shopping dependency and online shoppers with OP are more dependent on online shopping activities. In addition, this study also found out that HP and OP could be denoted as a sequence of different intensities of passion, where HP might be a necessity of OP.

  12. A practice-driven systematic review of dependency analysis solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callo Arias, Trosky B.; Spek, Pieter van der; Avgeriou, Paris

    2011-01-01

    When following architecture-driven strategies to develop large software-intensive systems, the analysis of the dependencies is not an easy task. In this paper, we report a systematic literature review on dependency analysis solutions. Dependency analysis concerns making dependencies due to

  13. Tissue-Based MRI Intensity Standardization: Application to Multicentric Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Robitaille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensity standardization in MRI aims at correcting scanner-dependent intensity variations. Existing simple and robust techniques aim at matching the input image histogram onto a standard, while we think that standardization should aim at matching spatially corresponding tissue intensities. In this study, we present a novel automatic technique, called STI for STandardization of Intensities, which not only shares the simplicity and robustness of histogram-matching techniques, but also incorporates tissue spatial intensity information. STI uses joint intensity histograms to determine intensity correspondence in each tissue between the input and standard images. We compared STI to an existing histogram-matching technique on two multicentric datasets, Pilot E-ADNI and ADNI, by measuring the intensity error with respect to the standard image after performing nonlinear registration. The Pilot E-ADNI dataset consisted in 3 subjects each scanned in 7 different sites. The ADNI dataset consisted in 795 subjects scanned in more than 50 different sites. STI was superior to the histogram-matching technique, showing significantly better intensity matching for the brain white matter with respect to the standard image.

  14. Traffic light intensity meter, TIM®

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leden, N. van der; Varkevisser, J.; Vroom, J. de; Oijen, T van

    2005-01-01

    The intensity of traffic lights decreases over time as a result of pollution and ageing. The Dutch Traffic Research Centre of the Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management is searching for a convenient method for measuring the luminous intensity of traffic lights on the road, in order

  15. Geomorphic determinanats of landuse intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidi, C. L.

    2014-11-01

    Increasing population growth and lacking of further spatial expansion of various landuse have compelled to look intensity dimension of landuse. Grid cell based data extraction can give unique character of each locality of small land unit area which is very suitable technique for data extraction in the hill areas like Nepal. Landform plays an important role determining landuse intensity. Freely available 30m resolution Aster GDEM image has been used to extract geomorphic variables. Landuse data has been taken from aerial photo 1996. Quantitative weight has been given to landuse categories on the basis input, output and ecological importance for human life. One hectare square grid cells have been generated to extract geomorphic and landuse intensity information. The result shows that the average intensity of landuse is highly related to summarized categories of each geomorphic variable. Graphical presentation and quantitative analysis have been used to identify the effect of geomorphic variables on land use intensity. Simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis shows that there is higher control of altitude, slope gradient and slope aspect on landuse intensity. The average landuse intensity is highly determined by geomorphic variable then in local level. Multiple correlation coefficients is found to be 0.42 and the adjusted R² representing coefficient of determination is 0.178 which is significant at more than 99 % of confidence level. So, it can be concluded that geomorphic factors have contributed 17.8 % of the total variation determining landuse intensity in the study area.

  16. Triage of intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Danis, Marion; Iapichino, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) resources are limited in many hospitals. Patients with little likelihood of surviving are often admitted to ICUs. Others who might benefit from ICU are not admitted.......Intensive care unit (ICU) resources are limited in many hospitals. Patients with little likelihood of surviving are often admitted to ICUs. Others who might benefit from ICU are not admitted....

  17. Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, Craig; French, Mindy

    2017-06-01

    Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sub-linear, Secure Comparison With Two Non-Colluding Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    solution requires only a constant number of rounds, but increases complexity to O(√(κ + log())) arithmetic operations. For the motivating setting, each arithmetic operation requires a constant number of Paillier encryptions to be exchanged between Alice and Bob. This implies that both solutions require...

  19. Luminescent rise times of inorganic phosphors excited by high intensity ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R J; Ricchio, S G

    1973-11-01

    The relative delay between excitation and luminescence was measured for a number of common inorganic phosphors using short, high intensity excitation pulses. The delays were found to be much shorter than anticipated; on the basis of low intensity pulsed luminescence measurements and were found to be extremely intensity-dependent. Both the luminescence rise and decay times were found to be intensitydependent as well, with the luminescence pulse waveform tending to approach the exciting pulse at the higher excitation intensities.

  20. [Intensive care services resources in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M C; León, C; Cuñat, J; del Nogal, F

    2013-10-01

    To identify the resources related to the care of critically ill patients in Spain, which are available in the units dependent of the Services of Intensive Care Medicine (ICM) or other services/specialties, analyzing their distribution according to characteristics of the hospitals and by autonomous communities. Prospective observational study. Spanish hospitals. Heads of the Services of ICM. Number of units and beds for critically ill patients and functional dependence. The total number of registries obtained with at least one Service of ICM was 237, with a total of 100,198 hospital beds. Level iii (43.5%) and level ii (35%) hospitals predominated. A total of 73% were public hospitals and 55.3% were non-university centers. The total number of beds for adult critically ill patients, was 4,738 (10.3/100,000 inhabitants). The services of ICM registered had available 258 intensive are units (ICUs), with 3,363 beds, mainly polyvalent ICUs (81%) and 43 intermediate care units. The number of patients attended in the Services of ICM in 2008 was 174,904, with a percentage of occupation of 79.5% A total of 228 units attending critically ill patients, which are dependent of other services with 2,233 beds, 772 for pediatric patients or neonates, were registered. When these last specialized units are excluded, there was a marked predominance of postsurgical units followed by coronary and cardiac units. Seventy one per cent of beds available in the Critical Care Units in Spain are characterized by attending severe adult patients, are dependent of the services of ICM, and most of them are polyvalent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Intense pulsed light (IPL): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, Philipp; Schreml, Stephan; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Landthaler, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) devices use flashlamps and bandpass filters to emit polychromatic incoherent high-intensity pulsed light of determined wavelength spectrum, fluence, and pulse duration. Similar to lasers, the basic principle of IPL devices is a more or less selective thermal damage of the target. The combination of prescribed wavelengths, fluences, pulse durations, and pulse intervals facilitates the treatment of a wide spectrum of skin conditions. To summarize the physics of IPL, to provide guidance for the practical use of IPL devices, and to discuss the current literature on IPL in the treatment of unwanted hair growth, vascular lesions, pigmented lesions, acne vulgaris, and photodamaged skin and as a light source for PDT and skin rejuvenation. A systematic search of several electronic databases, including Medline and PubMed and the authors experience on intense pulsed light. Numerous trials show the effectiveness and compatibility of IPL devices. Most comparative trials attest IPLs similar effectiveness to lasers (level of evidence: 2b to 4, depending on the indication). However, large controlled and blinded comparative trials with an extended follow-up period are necessary.

  2. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. MAIN VARIABLES: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...

  3. [Burnout in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricou, Bara; Merlani, Paolo

    2012-12-12

    Intensive care units are highly stressful for the patients but for the caregivers as well, including nurse-assistants, nurses and physicians. The psychological syndrome of work exhaustion more commonly named burnout threatens these caregivers. The aims of the present paper are to describe: a) the incidence of burnout in intensive care units; b) the factors favoring burnout and c) the impacts of burnout at the individual, at the unit and institutional level. We suggest some possible ways to decrease the incidence of burnout. Finally, since the problematic of burnout is not specific to intensive care, we sought to underline some possible consequences of the burnout of caregivers on health systems.

  4. Coagulation disorders in intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    Coagulation disorders are common in intensive care patients and may range from isolated thrombocytopenia or prolonged clotting times to disseminated intravascular coagulation. There are many causes of disturbed coagulation in critically ill patients and each may require specific treatment

  5. Accelerators for high intensity beams

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    As particle accelerators strive forever increasing performance, high intensity particle beams become one of the critical demands requested across the board by a majority of accelerator users (proton, electron and ion) and for most applications. Much effort has been made by our community to pursue high intensity accelerator performance on a number of fronts. Recognizing its importance, we devote this volume to Accelerators for High Intensity Beams. High intensity accelerators have become a frontier and a network for innovation. They are responsible for many scientific discoveries and technological breakthroughs that have changed our way of life, often taken for granted. A wide range of topics is covered in the fourteen articles in this volume.

  6. [Communication in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, G; Kluge, S

    2012-05-01

    Communication plays a crucial role in the intensive care unit. Posttraumatic stress syndromes develop in a significant number of patients and their relatives after being in an intensive care unit. The syndromes may persist for several years. Regular open and empathic communication with patients and family members reduces the frequency and severity of the disease. Among the physicians and nurses in the intensive care unit, there is a high prevalence of burnout syndrome. The precipitating factors are mostly conflicts within the working staff, work overload and end-of-life situations. Working team communication reduces the rate of exhaustion syndromes. Rounds of discussions among the work groups are the basis for a healthy team structure. Inadequate communication, e.g., during emergencies or shift change, endangers the safety of patients and in the worst case, results in treatment mistakes. Measures for improved communication in the intensive care unit should always be implemented.

  7. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007 and incl......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...... and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. MAIN VARIABLES: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type...... of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II. The variables are recorded with 90...

  8. Impurities good and bad: Doped cluster nanoplasmas in intense ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doping of cluster-based targets can bring out considerable modifications in the evolution of the nanoplasma formed from clusters in intense laser fields. The consequence could be either an increase or, a decrease (depending upon the properties and proportion of the dopant) in the emission of the resulting charge particles ...

  9. Intensive Parole: The More You Watch, the More You Catch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, D. E.; Kronick, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Examined intensive parole supervision (IPS) as alternative to incarceration. Compared to regular parolee group (n=45), IPS group (n=55) had much higher parole officer and parolee activity in all areas except community counseling; performed about same on all dependent variables except type of parole warrant; and had more nonserious violations.…

  10. The Impact of Environmental Light Intensity on Experimental Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Duffield, Giles E

    2017-09-01

    Cancer research requires for consistent models that minimize environmental variables. Within the typical laboratory animal housing facility, animals may be exposed to varying intensities of light as a result of cage type, cage position, light source, and other factors; however, studies evaluating the differential effect of light intensity during the light phase on tumor growth are lacking. The effect of cage face light intensity, as determined by cage rack position was evaluated with two tumor models using the C57Bl/6NHsd mouse and transplantable B16F10 melanoma cells or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Animals were housed in individually-ventilated cages placed at the top, middle, or bottom of the rack in a diagonal pattern so that the top cage was closest to the ceiling light source, and cage face light intensity was measured. Following a two-week acclimation period at the assigned cage position, animals were subcutaneously administered either 1.3×106 B16F10 melanoma cells or 2.5×105 Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Weights of excised tumors were measured following euthanasia 18 days (melanoma) or 21 days (LCC) after tumor cell administration. Cage face light intensity was significantly different depending on the location of the cage, with cages closest to the light source have the greatest intensity. Mean tumor weights were significantly less (plight intensity mice compared to high and low light intensity mice. The environmental light intensity to which experimental animals are exposed may vary markedly with cage location and can significantly influence experimental tumor growth, thus supporting the idea that light intensity should be controlled as an experimental variable for animals used in cancer research. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Chinas carbon-intensity target: climate actors and policy developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stensdal, Iselin

    2012-11-01

    China has become the largest GHG emitting country, and announced in 2009 its first policy objective measured in carbon emissions. The carbon-intensity target is to reduce the carbon intensity by 40-45 % by 2020 compared to 200 levels. Since then there has been further policy developments in order to attain the reduction carbon intensity and steer China towards a low-carbon development. The 12th 5-year plan (2011-2015) is strong on incentives for reducing China's carbon intensity such as energy conservation measures and the establishment of new market-based mechanisms. While the central government forms the policies, the implementation is dependent on a range of actors. In addition to the climate change bureaucracy, the positive forces and actors on GHG mitigation is presented. All in all, there are promising developments in China for the years to come.(auth)

  12. "Burnout" in intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S M; McMurray, A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between burnout components and selected demographic variables in a group of intensive care unit nurses. This research hopes to heighten awareness of both intensive care nurses and hospital administrators of the importance of burnout in their work setting. A descriptive correlational study design was used to examine the extent of burnout according to selected demographic variables. Sixty-eight intensive care nurses from two hospitals and critical care courses at one university completed a demographic data form and the research questionnaire of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests. Study results indicated low to moderate levels of total component scores in all intensive care nurses and on all three subscales of the assessment instrument. Results also indicated that, in this sample, younger nurses (20-29 years of age), separated and divorced nurses, and staff who work full time in ICUs were the most prone to emotional exhaustion. These research findings recommend support for ICU nurses to prevent burnout in their work setting. Further research is necessary to examine what kinds of working environments (job related stress) are effective in mitigating burnout amongst staff in the intensive care field.

  13. Calculations of population transfer during intense laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, K.J.; Kulander, K.C.

    1993-08-01

    Recent experiments by several groups have examined the question of population transfer to resonantly excited states during intense short laser pulses, in particular the amount of population that remains ``trapped`` in excited states at the end of a laser pulse. In this chapter we present calculations of population transfer and resonant ionization in xenon at both 660 and 620 nm. At the longer wavelength, the seven photon channel closes at 2.5{times}10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. Pulses with peak intensities higher than this result in ``Rydberg trapping``, the resonant transfer of population to a broad range of high-lying states. The amount of population transferred depends on both the peak intensity and pulse duration. At 620 mm there are numerous possible six photon resonances to states with p or f angular momentum. We have done a large number of calculations for 40 fs pulses at different peak intensities and have examined the population transferred to these low-lying resonant states as a function of the peak laser intensity. We do not have room to comment upon the resonantly enhanced ionized electron energy spectra that we also determine in the same calculations. Our calculations involve the direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for an atom interacting with a strong laser field. The time-dependent wave function of a given valence electron is calculated on a spatial grid using a one-electron pseudo potential. This single active electron approximation (SAE) has been shown to be a good approximation for the rare gases at the intensities and wavelengths that we will consider. The SAE potential we use has an explicit angular momentum dependence which allows us to reproduce all of the excited state energies for xenon quite well.

  14. The accuracy of intensity ratings of emotions from facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Aleksandra P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study on the accuracy of intensity ratings of emotion from facial expressions are reported. The so far research into the field has shown that spontaneous facial expressions of basic emotions are a reliable source of information about the category of emotion. The question is raised of whether this can be true for the intensity of emotion as well and whether the accuracy of intensity ratings is dependent on the observer’s sex and vocational orientation. A total of 228 observers of both sexes and of various vocational orientations rated the emotional intensity of presented facial expressions on a scale-range from 0 to 8. The results have supported the hypothesis that spontaneous facial expressions of basic emotions do provide sufficient information about emotional intensity. The hypothesis on the interdependence between the accuracy of intensity ratings of emotion and the observer’s sex and vocational orientation has not been confirmed. However, the accuracy of intensity rating has been proved to vary with the category of the emotion presented.

  15. Associations between Intensity of RRT, Inflammatory Mediators, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Raghavan; Wen, Xiaoyan; Keener, Christopher; Pike, Francis; Palevsky, Paul M; Unruh, Mark; Finkel, Kevin; Vijayan, Anitha; Elder, Michele; Chen, Yi-Fan; Kellum, John A

    2015-06-05

    Critically ill patients requiring RRT have higher circulating plasma concentrations of inflammatory and apoptosis markers that are associated with subsequent RRT dependence and death. Whether intensive dosing of RRT is associated with changes in specific mediators is unknown. A multicenter, prospective, cohort study of 817 critically ill patients receiving RRT ancillary to the Veterans Affairs/National Institutes of Health Acute Renal Failure Trial Network study was conducted between November 2003 and July 2007. Plasma inflammatory (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor) and apoptosis (TNF receptor-I [TNFR-I], TNFR-II, and death receptor-5) biomarkers on days 1 and 8 were examined after initiation of intensive RRT. Whether intensive RRT, given day 1 biomarkers, is associated with RRT independence and lower mortality at day 60 was also examined. Overall, no differences were found in day 8 biomarker concentrations between intensive and less-intensive RRT groups. When adjusted for day 1 biomarkers and clinical variables, intensive RRT was not associated with renal recovery (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.56 to 1.14) or mortality (adjusted OR, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.64). Use of intensive RRT, however, was associated with lower day 8 concentrations when day 1 plasma IL-6, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and TNFR-I concentrations were high (interaction P value for all markers, RRT, intensive dosing of RRT has variable association with biomarker concentration and no association with renal recovery and mortality. However, elevated concentrations of inflammatory and apoptosis markers on day 8 of RRT were associated with RRT dependence and death. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Intensive behavioral therapy for agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuts, Inge J E; Esquivel, Gabriel; Overbeek, Thea; Schruers, Koen R J

    2015-03-15

    We investigated the efficacy of an intensive 1-week behavioral therapy program focusing on agoraphobia for panic disorder patients with agoraphobia (PDA). The study design was a case-control study. Main outcome measure was the agoraphobia score of the Fear Questionnaire (FQ-AGO). The outcomes on the FQ-AGO of a 1-week intensive therapy (96 patients) and a twice-weekly therapy (98 patients) were compared. Agoraphobia improved significantly in both groups, 1 week and 3 months after therapy. Effect size for changes in the 1-week intensive therapy on the FQ-AGO was 0.75. Limitations are use of antidepressants, no placebo group, and no long term follow-up. Behavioral therapy for agoraphobia can be shortened significantly if intensified without affecting therapy outcome, thus allowing patients a more rapid return to work and resumption of daily activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  18. Spartan models of spatial dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, D. T.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling the variability of spatially distributed data often involves the classical geostatistical framework, which requires calculating two-point variogram functions that characterize the spatial dependence. This is a computationally intensive procedure, especially for large-size samples. In addition, calculation of the variogram from a single sample realization relies on a number of assumptions. We propose an alternative method of modelling spatial dependence, which is based on random fields that we call Spartan, because their probability density function is determined from a small number of parameters. We present some general properties of Spartan random fields, and we further investigate specific models. We also present a specific algorithm for inferring the field parameters from available samples. The algorithm is illustrated with the help of synthetic samples, both with regular (lattice) and irregular (random) spatial distribution. The advantage of the Spartan models is the numerical efficiency of the model inference process, which is considerably faster than the standard variogram calculation.

  19. Optimum measurement criteria for the axial derivative intensity used in transport of intensity-equation-based solvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Carranza, J; Falaggis, K; Kozacki, T

    2014-01-15

    For several years, scientific, industrial, and biological fields have benefited from knowledge of phase information, which allows for the revealing of hidden features of various objects. An alternative to interferometry is single-beam phase retrieval techniques that are based on the transport of intensity equation, which describes the relation between the axial derivative of the intensity and the phase distribution for a given plane in the Fresnel region. The estimation of the axial intensity derivative is obtained from a series of intensity measurements, where the accuracy is subject to an optimum separation between the measurement planes depending on the number of planes, the level of noise, and the actual object phase distribution. In this Letter, a quantitative analysis of the error in estimated axial derivative is carried out and a model is reported that describes the interdependence between these parameters. The results of this work allow for estimation of the optimum separation between measurement planes with minimal error in the axial derivative.

  20. [Physiotherapy in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessizius, S

    2014-10-01

    A high amount of recently published articles and reviews have already focused on early mobilisation in intensive care medicine. However, in the clinical setting the problem of its practicability remains as each professional group in the mobility team has its own expectations concerning the interventions made by physiotherapy. Even though there are as yet no standard operation procedures (SOP), there do exist distinctive mobilisation concepts that are well implemented in certain intensive care units (http://www.fruehmobilisierung.de/Fruehmobilisierung/Algorithmen.html). Due to these facts and the urgent need for SOPs this article presents the physiotherapeutic concept for the treatment of patients in the intensive care unit which has been developed by the author: First the patients' respiratory and motor functions have to be established in order to classify the patients and allocate them to their appropriate group (one out of three) according to their capacities; additionally, the patients are analysed by checking their so-called "surrounding conditions". Following these criteria a therapy regime is developed and patients are treated accordingly. By constant monitoring and re-evaluation of the treatment in accordance with the functions of the patient a dynamic system evolves. "Keep it simple" is one of the key features of that physiotherapeutic concept. Thus, a manual for the classification and the physiotherapeutic treatment of an intensive care patient was developed. In this article it is demonstrated how this concept can be implemented in the daily routine of an intensive care unit. Physiotherapy in intensive care medicine has proven to play an important role in the patients' early rehabilitation if the therapeutic interventions are well adjusted to the needs of the patients. A team of nursing staff, physiotherapists and medical doctors from the core facility for medical intensive care and emergency medicine at the medical university of Innsbruck developed the

  1. Sound intensity and its measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    The paper summarises the basic theory of sound intensity and its measurement and gives an overview of the state of the art with particular emphasis on recent developments in the field. Eighty references are given, most of which to literature published in the past two years. The paper describes...... and discusses the sources of error in measurement of sound intensity and the resulting limitations imposed on various applications of such measurements. Finally, some unresolved problems are mentioned, and the possibility of improving the instrumentation is discussed....

  2. How is intensive care reimbursed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Donnelly, Maria; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2013-01-01

    Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can...... be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries' reimbursement schemes---despite all...

  3. Rainfall intensity-duration equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, David C.

    1988-01-01

    A method for rapidly developing a rainfall intensity-duration equation for durations less than one hour and recurrence intervals between 2 and 100 years for any location in the conterminous United States is presented. Optimal parameters of a general rainfall-intensity duration equation are determined using precipitation depths for durations of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes obtained from commonly available isopluvial maps. A single set of parameters applies to the entire western U.S. For the central and eastern U.S, a graphical means of determining the parameters is provided.

  4. Directional migration of cancer cells induced by a blue light intensity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chien-Chih; Lu, Eugene Youjhen; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2015-07-01

    We used a spatial light modulator to project an optical micropattern of 473 nm light with a quartic intensity gradient on a single lung cancer cell. We observed that the intracellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cancer cells were proportional to the intensity of the blue light, and the blue light intensity gradients could drive directional cell migration. This optically induced directional cell migration was inhibited by a ROS scavenger in the culture medium in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the ROS levels in fibroblasts were saturated by the blue light at low intensity and therefore the fibroblasts did not exhibit directional migration in the intensity gradient.

  5. Time dependent seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidoro, B.; Iervolino, I.; Chioccarelli, E.; Giorgio, M.

    2012-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard is usually computed trough a homogeneous Poisson process that even though it is a time-independent process it is widely used for its very convenient properties. However, when a single fault is of concern and/or the time scale is different from that of the long term, time-dependent processes are required. In this paper, different time-dependent models are reviewed with working examples. In fact, the Paganica fault (in central Italy) has been considered to compute both the probability of occurrence of at least one event in the lifespan of the structure, as well as the seismic hazard expressed in terms of probability of exceedance of an intensity value in a given time frame causing the collapse of the structure. Several models, well known or novel application to engineering hazard have been considered, limitation and issues in their applications are also discussed. The Brownian Passage Time (BPT) model is based on a stochastic modification of the deterministic stick-slip oscillator model for characteristic earthquakes; i.e., based on the addition of random perturbations (a Gaussian white noise) to the deterministic load path predicted by elastic rebound theory. This model assumes that the load state is at some ground level immediately after an event, increases steadly over time, reaches a failure threshold and relaxes instantaneously back to the ground level. For this model also a variable threshold has been considered to take into account the uncertainty of the threshold value. For the slip-predictable model it is assumed that the stress accumulates at a constant rate starting from some initial stress level. Stress is assumed to accumulate for a random period of time until an earthquake occurs. The size of the earthquake is governed by the stress release and it is a function of the elapsed time since the last event. In the time-predictable model stress buildup occurs at a constant rate until the accumulated stress reaches a threshold

  6. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development ...

  7. Difference thresholds for interaural intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafter, E.R.; Dye, R.H.; Neutzel, J.M.; Aronow, H.

    1977-03-01

    In an earlier paper, we examined the distribution of binaural resolvings power by measuring threshold increments of interaural delay as a function of overall delay (E. R. Hafter and J. Demaio, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 57, 181--187 (1975)). In the current study, similar measures were made for interaural increments of intensity. As before, the stimuli were bandpass clicks of either low (0. 1--2 kHz) or higsh (3--4 kHz) frequency. For overall interaural differences as great as 24 dB, it seems that performance was based on the interaural differences, and not on the monaural increments/decrements that are concommitant with a binaural change in level. As was the case with time, sensitivity to interaural intensity was reasonably constant across the range tested; thus unlike the case for vision, spatial resolution in the auditory system is not concentrated in the center. A simple binaural trading ratio which converts intensity to time can be shown to fit the data for low-frequency clicks quite well. However, the fit to high frequencies is so poor as to suggest that separate mechanisms were used for detecting time and intensity. Finally, a number like the binaural masking-level difference (MLD) was computed for the two kinds of clicks. Surprisingly, the MLD's for low and high frequencies were a similar 7.2 and 8.0 dB.

  8. Firm Size and Export Intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Verwaal (Ernst); A.C.D. Donkers (Bas)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a unifying theory, explaining the different relationships between firm size and export intensity that have been found in previous studies. We propose that transaction costs economies and different types of resources induce a moderating effect on the firm size and

  9. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development...

  10. [Biological rhythms for anaesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispersyn, G; Chassard, D; Pain, L

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of biological rhythms has led to better understanding of the time-of-day dependent effects of anaesthetic drugs. These chronopharmacological effects are currently explained by the biological rhythms modulating the pharmacokinetic, toxic and pharmacodynamic parameters of these substances. Such effect has been described for general anesthetics, local anaesthetics, analgesics as well as for antibiotics. But recent data also highlight that general anaesthetics, probably part of their brain effects, also alter the regulation of biological rhythms, including the sleep-wake or the endogenous circadian temperature rhythms. This desynchronization of biological rhythms can led to disturbance of the circadian secretion of many substances, including hormones. Finally, biological rhythms have been also described with regard to physiology of pain and cardiovascular physiopathology. The concept of biological rhythm should be present in mind not only for the clinical management of patients but also for setting studies in the field of anaesthesia, pain and intensive care. 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Intense Harmonic Emissions Observed in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Kurth, W. S.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Ye, S.-Y.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Hadid, L. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's first Grand Finale orbit was carried out in April 2017. This set of 22 orbits had an inclination of 63° with a periapsis grazing Saturn's ionosphere, thus providing unprecedented coverage and proximity to the planet. Cassini's Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument repeatedly detected intense electrostatic waves and their harmonics near closest approach in the dayside equatorial topside ionosphere. The fundamental modes were found to both scale and trend best with the H+ plasma or lower hybrid frequencies, depending on the plasma composition considered. The fine-structured harmonics are unlike previous observations, which scale with cyclotron frequencies. We explore their generation mechanism and show strong evidence of their association with whistler mode waves, consistent with theory. The possibility of Cassini's presence in the ionosphere influencing the resonance and harmonics is discussed. Given their link to the lower hybrid frequency, these emissions may offer clues to constraining Saturn's ionospheric properties.

  12. Production of high intensity radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1990-04-01

    The production of radioactive nuclear beams world-wide is reviewed. The projectile fragmentation and the ISOL approaches are discussed in detail, and the luminosity parameter is used throughout to compare different production methods. In the ISOL approach a thin and a thick target option are distinguished. The role of storage rings in radioactive beam research is evaluated. It is concluded that radioactive beams produced by the projectile fragmentation and the ISOL methods have complementary characteristics and can serve to answer different scientific questions. The decision which kind of facility to build has to depend on the significance and breadth of these questions. Finally a facility for producing a high intensity radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier is proposed, with an expected luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 39} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, which would yield radioactive beams in excess of 10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}. 9 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Intense fluorescence of Au 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Apra, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-21

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. We show that their fluorescence is an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the HOMO-LUMO diabatic bandgap of the cluster. The cluster shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral), therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorptionand predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in good agreement with experiment.

  14. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Agostini, P.A. [SPAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France). Centre d`Etudes de Saclay; Kulander, K.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  15. Evolution of coupled lives' dependency across generations and pricing impact

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano, E.; Spreeuw, J.; Vigna, E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the dependence between coupled lives - both within and across generations - and its effects on prices of reversionary annuities in the presence of longevity risk. Longevity risk is represented via a stochastic mortality intensity. Dependence is modelled through copula functions. We consider Archimedean single and multi-parameter copulas. We find that dependence decreases when passing from older generations to younger generations. Not only the level of dependence but also it...

  16. Methodology of peening intensity evaluation basing on the Almen tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fedoryszyn

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of casting products as well as cores and moulds require thorough cleaning and treatment. Several cleaning methods are available, depending on the type of the material, the surface’s geometry and condition, and the type of contamination. Shot peening treatment using rotor machines is a widely adopted solution and the peening performance is chiefly associated with shot peening intensity.A methodology of evaluating the peening intensity is outlined. The method uses the Almen test, widely employed when analysing the efficiency of dynamic, surface treatment methods. The evaluation method is illustrated by experimental data, process parameters and operational parameters of a shot peening machine manufactured in Poland.

  17. Results of evaluation of tailing dumps dust intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Masloboev V. A.; Baklanov A. A.; Amosov P. V.

    2016-01-01

    A set of most acceptable and well-known methods of dust intensity evaluation has been defined and tested (dependence of Westphal D. L. et al. and DEAD scheme) based on the analysis of exiting approaches (deserts, tailing dumps, etc.). The description of the chosen methods has been given. The determination of dynamic velocity u* and velocity at the height of +10 m above the dusting surface u10 which are necessary to evaluate the dust intensity has been demonstrated. The method is based on two-...

  18. Improving comparability between microarray probe signals by thermodynamic intensity correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, G. M.; Wernersson, Rasmus; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    determination of transcription start sites for a subset of yeast genes. In another application, we identify present/absent calls for probes hybridized to the sequenced Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 EDL933. The model improves the correct calls from 85 to 95% relative to raw intensity measures. The model thus......Signals from different oligonucleotide probes against the same target show great variation in intensities. However, detection of differences along a sequence e.g. to reveal intron/exon architecture, transcription boundary as well as simple absent/present calls depends on comparisons between...

  19. Dependency, Empathy, and Altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shirley Matile

    This study examined the relationship of dependency, empathy, and altruism. It was hypothesized that: (1) dependency would be related in a curvilinear manner to empathy, with children who are moderate in dependency scoring highest in empathy; (2) dependency would be positively related to visible altruism when such prosocial behavior results in…

  20. CIM-Compact intensity modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: mbleuel@anl.gov; Lang, E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gaehler, R. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue J. Horowitz, Grenoble 38042 (France); Lal, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-07-21

    Compact intensity modulation (CIM), a new method to modulate the intensity of a neutron beam is demonstrated. CIM allows the production of arbitrary signals where the focus point can be chosen and changed without any constraints. A novel feature in this technique compared to spin echo techniques is that the neutron polarization is kept parallel or anti-parallel to the static fields during the passage through the magnetic fields and the beating pattern at the detector is produced by an amplitude modulation (AM) of the adiabatic RF-spin flippers rather than Larmor precession like in neutron spin echo (NSE) instruments; thus, the achievable contrast is very high and the instrument resolution can be changed very quickly. This gives the fascinating possibility at pulsed neutron sources to sweep the modulation frequency of the flippers in order to increase dynamic resolution range during the same neutron pulse.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) uses linear accelerators ... and after this procedure? What is Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and how is it used? Intensity-modulated radiation ...

  2. Rapid amplitude-phase reconstruction of femtosecond pulses from intensity autocorrelation and spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Baltuška, Andrius; Pugžlys, Audrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1999-01-01

    The retrieval of time-dependent intensity and phase of femtosecond laser pulses is a long standing problem. To date, frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is probably the most trustworthy pulse measurement method. However, it requires a substantial experimental and numerical involvement. This motivates the quest for other simpler high-fidelity pulse measuring techniques. We present a new method of deciphering the pulse structure from the intensity autocorrelation trace and the intensity sp...

  3. A gap between Need and Reality: Neonatal Nursing Staff Requirements on a German Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Patry, Christian; Schindler, Monika; Reinhard, Julia; Hien, Steffen; Demirakca, Süha; Böhler, Thomas; Schaible, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU) were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care) of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive da...

  4. Tropical cyclone fullness: A new concept for interpreting storm intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Tan, Zhe-Min

    2017-05-01

    Intensity and size are two crucial factors in determining the destructiveness of a tropical cyclone (TC), but little is known about the relationship between them because of a lack of observations. TC fullness, a new concept, is proposed to quantitatively measure the storm wind structure, which is defined as the ratio of the extent of the outer-core wind skirt to the outer-core size of the TC. TC intensity is more strongly correlated with fullness than with other measures comprising just a single size parameter. A scale is introduced to classify TCs into four categories based on TC fullness (FS1 to FS4). Regardless of the specific inner-core and outer-core size, the FS4 fullness structure is necessary for an intense TC's development, while category FS1 and FS2 TCs are generally weak. Most major TCs achieve FS4 fullness structure earlier and more frequently than nonmajor TCs. Rapidly increasing fullness favors the intensification of TC.Plain Language SummaryTropical cyclone (TC) disasters caused tremendous property loss and casualties all over the world every year, while the knowledge on what essentially determines TC intensity is far beyond enough. Should a large TC ought to be intense and disastrous? And is a small TC doomed to be weak? It confused us when some dapper small TCs struck us with their fierce wind and torrential rain, while other large TCs that finally turned out to be a false alarm tricked us with their puffiness body. The underlying factor that truly controls TC intensity has been grasped here. We unveil the mysteries between TC intensity and size by raising a new concept: TC fullness. Either small or large TC can be intense; it depends on the fullness. TCs should possess FS4 fullness structure (high fullness) as long as they are intense; on the other hand, TCs with low fullness are weak in majority. In addition, rapidly increasing fullness is beneficial for the intensification of TC. The concept of TC fullness may provide a new path in the

  5. Intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira De Godoy, J M; Amador Franco Brigidio, P; Buzato, E; Fátima Guerreiro De Godoy, M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to report on a novel approach to the intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis of an underprivileged population. Prospective, random study, the diagnosis of lymphedema was clinical and the inclusion of patients was by order of arrival in the treatment center where all were invited to participate in the study. Intensive outpatient therapy was performed for 6 to 8 hours daily over a period of four weeks. Eleven legs with grade III elephantiasis of 8 patients were evaluated in a random prospective study. Three patients were men and five were women with ages ranging between 28 and 66 years old. Treatment included mechanical lymph drainage using the RAGodoy® apparatus for a period of 6 to 8 hours daily and the Godoy & Godoy cervical stimulation technique for 20 minutes per day, both associated to the use of a home-made medical compression stocking using a low-stretch cotton-polyester material. Additionally, manual lymph drainage using the Godoy & Godoy technique was performed for one hour. Perimetry was used to compare measurements made before and after treatment, of the three points of the limb with the largest circumferences. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error greater than 5% (P-value treatment program (P-value=0.001). Intensive outpatient treatment is an option for all types of lymphedema with large volumetric reductions being possible in a short period when treating elephantiasis.

  6. Rapid scenarios and observed intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Pettenati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available After a destructive earthquake, national Governments need to know the approximate amount of damage, the number of casualties, and the financial losses as soon as possible. Rapid scenarios are also used to inform the general public; see the widely used Shakemap package [Wald et al. 1999, 2006] of the US Geological Survey (USGS and the one modified by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV; National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology, which is reproduced for Figure 1. The general matter of the use of intensities in damage scenarios was discussed in a special session at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Seismological Society of America (http://www.seismosoc.org/meetings/2008/specialsessions.html, and was also discussed in the NIS-1 session of the European Congress in Moscow, in August 2012 (http://www.esc2012-moscow.org/esc_thematicareas.html. The purposes of the present report are to: (i compare different types of intensities; (ii check two rapid scenarios of intensity; and (iii understand whether the KF formula [Sirovich 1996, Sirovich et al. 2009] can be used as a new 'attenuation' relationship to improve rapid scenarios. […

  7. LHC Report: reaching high intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven

    2015-01-01

    After both beams having been ramped to their full energy of 6.5 TeV, the last two weeks saw the beam commissioning process advancing on many fronts. An important milestone was achieved when operators succeeded in circulating a nominal-intensity bunch. During the operation, some sudden beam losses resulted in beam dumps at top energy, a problem that needed to be understood and resolved.   In 2015 the LHC will be circulating around 2800 bunches in each beam and each bunch will contain just over 1 x 1011 protons. Until a few days ago commissioning was taking place with single bunches of 5 x 109 protons. The first nominal bunch with an intensity of 1 x 1011 protons was injected on Tuesday, 21 April. In order to circulate such a high-intensity bunch safely, the whole protection system must be working correctly: collimators, which protect the aperture, are set at preliminary values known as coarse settings; all kicker magnets for injecting and extracting the beams are commissioned with beam an...

  8. [Dependent patient and interpersonal dependency: psychotherapeutic strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaevel, C

    2012-04-01

    This article is a review of psychotherapies for patients suffering from dependent personality and interpersonal dependency. We synthesized articles making reference to this question, notably those written by Bornstein, author who refers to the dependent personality. We highlighted the psychotherapies that have been the object of an evaluation. The research on the subject is sparse: only eight studies permitting assessment of psychotherapies in this indication in 2005. Besides these psychotherapies, we detailed other approaches which are used by practitioners in these indications. The therapy does not aim at autonomy "at all costs", but that the patient finds a dependence "adapted" to his/her environment. Before starting a therapy, an evaluation is useful to specify the type of dependence. First of all, is there a "pathological" dependence? Is the suffering of the patient secondary to his personality or not supportive enough? Does insight exist? What is the reaction of the patient if we suggest the hypothesis of a dependence on his/her part? Does he/she consider this idea or reject it? Finally, is the dependence primary or secondary? For that purpose, it is necessary to study the biography of the patient and the appearance of the comorbidity over time. The primary dependence is seen in childhood and precedes the other psychological disorders. The secondary dependence follows after the comorbidity and events of life that alter self-esteem (depression, for example). Various therapeutic strategies arise from various currents. The therapies of analytical inspiration recommend replaying the relationship of object and explicitly evoking the transfer. The behavioural and cognitive psychotherapies aim at making the patient identify the cognitions which underlie the dependence, then leading the patient to modify his/her cognition and to behave in a more autonomous way, using the theory of learning. The humanist therapies aim at a therapeutic relationship of acceptance and

  9. Patient participation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandl, Anna; Falk, Ann-Charlotte; Frank, Catharina

    2017-10-01

    Patient participation in healthcare is important for optimizing treatment outcomes and for ensuring satisfaction with care. The purpose of the study wasto explore critical care nurses' perceptions of patient participation for critically ill patients. Qualitative data were collected in four separate focus group interviews with 17 nurses from two hospitals. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Initially, the nurses stated that patient participation in the intensive care unit (ICU) was dependent on the patient's health condition and consciousness. However, during the interviews three descriptive categories emerged from their experience, that is: passive patient participation, one-way communication and nurse/patient interaction. In the ICU, the possibilities for patient participation in nursing care are not only dependent on the patient's health condition but also on the nurse's ability to include patients in various care actions despite physical and/or mental limitations. When the patient is not able to participate, nurses strive to achieve participation through relatives' knowledge and/or other external sources of information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Accurate switching intensities and length scales in quasi-phase-matched materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ole; Graversen, Torben Winther; Corney, Joel Frederick

    2001-01-01

    We consider unseeded typeI second-harmonic generation in quasi-phase-matched quadratic nonlinear materials and derive an accurate analytical expression for the evolution of the average intensity. The intensity- dependent nonlinear phase mismatch that is due to the cubic nonlinearity induced...

  11. Active Provenance in Data-intensive Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Mihajlovski, Andrej; Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm

    2017-04-01

    Scientific communities are building platforms where the usage of data-intensive workflows is crucial to conduct their research campaigns. However managing and effectively support the understanding of the 'live' processes, fostering computational steering, sharing and re-use of data and methods, present several bottlenecks. These are often caused by the poor level of documentation on the methods and the data and how users interact with it. This work wants to explore how in such systems, flexibility in the management of the provenance and its adaptation to the different users and application contexts can lead to new opportunities for its exploitation, improving productivity. In particular, this work illustrates a conceptual and technical framework enabling tunable and actionable provenance in data-intensive workflow systems in support of reproducible science. It introduces the concept of Agile data-intensive systems to define the characteristic of our target platform. It shows a novel approach to the integration of provenance mechanisms, offering flexibility in the scale and in the precision of the provenance data collected, ensuring its relevance to the domain of the data-intensive task, fostering its rapid exploitation. The contributions address aspects of the scale of the provenance records, their usability and active role in the research life-cycle. We will discuss the use of dynamically generated provenance types as the approach for the integration of provenance mechanisms into a data-intensive workflow system. Enabling provenance can be transparent to the workflow user and developer, as well as fully controllable and customisable, depending from their expertise and the application's reproducibility, monitoring and validation requirements. The API that allows the realisation and adoption of a provenance type is presented, especially for what concerns the support of provenance profiling, contextualisation and precision. An actionable approach to provenance

  12. Divisia decomposition method and its application to changes of net oil import intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Hua Liao; Zhao-Yi; Ce Wang

    2013-01-01

    The existing oil import dependence index cannot exactly measure the economic cost or scales, and it is difficult to describe the economical aspect of oil security. To measure the foreign dependence of one country's economy and reflect its oil economic security, this paper defines the net oil import intensity as the ratio of net import cost to GDP. By using Divisia Index Decomposition, the change of net oil import intensity in five industrialized countries and five newly industrialized countri...

  13. Variational Phase Imaging Using the Transport-of-Intensity Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Emrah; Froustey, Emmanuel; Nilchian, Masih; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a variational phase retrieval algorithm for the imaging of transparent objects. Our formalism is based on the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE), which relates the phase of an optical field to the variation of its intensity along the direction of propagation. TIE practically requires one to record a set of defocus images to measure the variation of intensity. We first investigate the effect of the defocus distance on the retrieved phase map. Based on our analysis, we propose a weighted phase reconstruction algorithm yielding a phase map that minimizes a convex functional. The method is nonlinear and combines different ranges of spatial frequencies - depending on the defocus value of the measurements - in a regularized fashion. The minimization task is solved iteratively via the alternating-direction method of multipliers. Our simulations outperform commonly used linear and nonlinear TIE solvers. We also illustrate and validate our method on real microscopy data of HeLa cells.

  14. Towards Perfect Water Line Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last ten years the increased availability of computational resources and the steady refinement of theoretical methods have permitted more and more accurate first principle calculations of water-vapor spectra as exemplified, e.g., by the very successful BT2 line list both line positions and intensities, a reliable dipole moment surface (DMS), affecting line intensities. It is also very useful to several application to give reasonable uncertainty bars for computed quantities, an aspect which traditionally has received little attention. We report here recent progress leading to very accurate room-temperature linelists covering the range 0.05-20 000 cm-1, complete with uncertainty bars, for the H_218O and H_217O water isotopologues Line intensities were produced using a recent DMS produced by our group which is capable of giving line intensites accurate to 1% for most medium and strong transitions. Line positions are based if possible on the experimentally derived energy levels recently produced by a IUPAC task group and have a typical accuracy of 0.0002 cm-1; when experimentally derived energy levels are unavailable calculated line position are provided, with an accuracy of the order of 0.2 cm-1. An extension to the main isotopologue H_216O is currently underway. R. J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G. J. Harris and R. N. Tolchenov, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. {368}, 1087-1094 (2006). L. Lodi and J. Tennyson, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. (2012), doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.02.023 L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O. L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011). J. Tennyson at al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. {110}, 573-96 (2009).

  15. [Intensive care medicine -- update 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, S; Lendemans, S; Schmitz, D; Waydhas, C

    2006-06-01

    This manuscript gives a review about important studies addressing problems in intensive care medicine that have been published in journals focussing on critical care medicine and surgery in 2005. Only clinical studies are included in this review, mostly meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials and a few important or interesting observational studies. In addition to describing major results a critical appraisal of each study is undertaken, which, however, is neither comprehensive nor complete. It is merely intended to address some important aspects for the reader who should be stimulated to go deeper into one or the other topic or study. The publication of the new CPR-guidelines of the American Heart Association and the European Resuscitation Council as well as the newly developed SAPS III score to predict intensive care unit outcome are among the outstanding topics. Several randomized trials and meta-analyses deal with aspects of drug therapy of septic patients. Some important and relevant findings have been reported with respect to the efficiency of the open-lung concept, non-invasive ventilation, the use of heat and moisture exchanger filters compared to active humidifiers and of closed systems for endotracheal suctioning. The role of immuno-nutrition in adults and children as well as of early enteral nutrition can be defined more clearly. Whether corticosteroids should be used in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury can be definitely answered now. There are some new insights reported into the management of patients infected or contaminated with MRSA in the intensive care unit. Last but not least an impressive study shows that not only the newest therapeutic developments but the stringent use of the already known treatment options may result in dramatic improvements of patient outcome.

  16. Intensive treatment of leg lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy Jose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of all the problems caused by lymphedema, this disease continues to affect millions of people worldwide. Thus, the identification of the most efficacious forms of treatment is necessary. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel intensive outpatient treatment for leg lymphedema. Methods: Twenty-three legs of 19 patients were evaluated in a prospective randomized study. The inclusion criteria were patients with Grade II and III lymphedema, where the difference, measured by volumetry, between the affected limb below the knee and the healthy limb was greater than 1.5 kg. Intensive treatment was carried out for 6- to 8-h sessions in the outpatient clinic. Analysis of variance was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P-value < 0.05 being considered significant. Results: All limbs had significant reductions in size with the final mean loss being 81.1% of the volume of edema. The greatest losses occurred in the first week (P-value < 0.001. Losses of more than 90% of the lymphedema occurred in 9 (39.13% patients; losses of more than 80% in 13 (56.52%, losses of more than 70% in 17 (73.91% and losses of more than 50% were recorded for 95.65% of the patients; only 1 patient lost less than 50% (37.9% of the edema. Conclusion: The intensive treatment of lymphedema in the outpatient clinic can produce significant reductions in the volume of edema over a short period of time and can be recommended for any grade of lymphedema, in particular the more advanced degrees.

  17. The Danish Intensive Care Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik; Christensen, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007 and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II. The variables are recorded with 90%-100% completeness in the recent years, except for SAPS II score, which is 73%-76% complete. The DID currently includes five quality indicators. Process indicators include out-of-hour discharge and transfer to other ICUs for capacity reasons. Outcome indicators include ICU readmission within 48 hours and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II) for all patients and for patients with septic shock. The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005-2015 (average 31,958 ICU admissions per year). The DID provides a valuable data source for quality monitoring and improvement, as well as for research.

  18. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antal, A.; Alekseichuk, I.; Bikson, M.

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...... to suboptimal electrode-skin contact. Very rarely mania or hypomania was induced in patients with depression (11 documented cases), yet a causal relationship is difficult to prove because of the low incidence rate and limited numbers of subjects in controlled trials. Mild AEs (MAEs) include headache and fatigue...

  19. Intensive and critical care medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aochi, Osamu (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Amaha, Keisuke (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Takeshita, Hiroshi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    Eight papers in this volume are in INIS scope, respectively dealing with the scientific use of the chest radiograph in intensive care unit, xenon computed tomography cerebral blood flow in diagnosis and management of symptomatic vasospasm and severe head injury, therapeutic relevance of MRI in acute head trauma, computerized tomography in the diagnosis of cerebral air embolism, thallium 201 myocardial perfusion during weaning from mechanical ventilation, thoracic computed tomography for ICU patients, and the effect of xenon inhalation upon internal carotid artery blood flow in awake monkeys. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs.

  20. Neonatal intensive care and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzi, E.; Herrera, A.J.; Herbert, L.

    1978-01-01

    Radiography plays an important role in a neonatal intensive care nursery. Diagnostic radiation was measured in 96 newborns. Mean exposure per neonate was 68.1 milliroentgens (mR) (SD = 132.7) with a median exposure per neonate of 28 mR. Radiation received by neonates was low, but further studies are needed to show the safety of radiation or its delayed effects. The measurement of radiation is simple, and routine radiation recording can prove useful in future evaluations of this high-risk population.

  1. Photoelectric effect at ultrahigh intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A A; Bobashev, S V; Feigl, T; Tiedtke, K; Wabnitz, H; Richter, M

    2007-11-23

    In the spectral range of the extreme ultraviolet at a wavelength of 13.3 nm, we have studied the photoionization of xenon at ultrahigh intensities. For our ion mass-to-charge spectroscopy experiments, irradiance levels from 10(12) to 10(16) W cm(-2) were achieved at the new free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH by strong beam focusing with the aid of a spherical multilayer mirror. Ion charges up to Xe21+ were observed and investigated as a function of irradiance. Our surprising results are discussed in terms of a perturbative and nonperturbative description.

  2. Results of evaluation of tailing dumps dust intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masloboev V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of most acceptable and well-known methods of dust intensity evaluation has been defined and tested (dependence of Westphal D. L. et al. and DEAD scheme based on the analysis of exiting approaches (deserts, tailing dumps, etc.. The description of the chosen methods has been given. The determination of dynamic velocity u* and velocity at the height of +10 m above the dusting surface u10 which are necessary to evaluate the dust intensity has been demonstrated. The method is based on two-dimensional numerical model of atmosphere aerodynamics in the area of "tailing dumps of ANOF-2 ‒ the town of Apatity". The study provides calculations of horizontal velocity at the height of +10 m above the dusting surface at the wind speed varying from 5 to 23 m/sec. The work also suggests the results of graphical data processing related to tailing grain size distribution from the surface of the firmly established surface of the tailing dumps of ANOF-2. Comparative analysis has been given and the peculiarities of interval (based on grains sizes dust intensity of the tailing dumps of ANOF-2 have been shown using the dependence of Westphal D. L. et al. and DEAD scheme within the wind speed range. The received values of dust intensity at the lower range limit are close to the "maximum specific dust off" value which is used by project specialists for documentation development

  3. Strategic ICT-Use Intensity of Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Olumuyiwa O. Olamade; Timothy O. Oyebisi; Samuel. O. Olabode

    2014-01-01

    ICT is strategic to a firm if it helps to gain a competitive advantage and or reduce a competitive disadvantage. The intensity of ICT application in shaping or sustaining strategy will depend on the competition faced by companies, their strategic response to the competition, and their capability to dynamically integrate ICT and competitive strategies. Based on a sample of manufacturing firms, three questions were formulated to determine if manufacturing companies in Nigeria strategically depl...

  4. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Das; Upendra Hansda

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and u...

  5. Transient effect in high intensity proton linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senichev, Yu

    1993-09-01

    We study the possible mechanism of the separatrix destruction during the transient in the linear accelerator. This effect is due to the parametric resonance of the beam in the longitudinal plane caused by the perturbations of electromagnetic field. The magnitude of time-space perturbations of the electromagnetic field depends on the disperse feature of resonator and the beam intensity. In the paper we discuss how to avoid this effect or to decrease its influence.

  6. The Incidence and Intensity of Formal Lifelong Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Lars

    across genders. We consider both the incidence (take-up in a given year) and intensity (hours conditional on enrolment) of training. We find evidence of considerable lifelong learning with regards to enrolment in basic and vocational training regardless of gender, whereas post-secondary training...... hours in post-secondary training are strongly age dependent. Hours in basic training do decrease significantly with age but the effects are very small....

  7. Blood Pulsation Intensity Video Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Pedro Henrique de M

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we make non-invasive, remote, passive measurements of the heart beat frequency and determine the map of blood pulsation intensity in a region of interest (ROI) of skin. The ROI used was the forearm of a volunteer. The method employs a regular video camera and visible light, and the video acquisition takes less than 1 minute. The mean cardiac frequency found in our volunteer was within 1 bpm of the ground-truth value simultaneously obtained via earlobe plethysmography. Using the signals extracted from the video images, we have determined an intensity map for the blood pulsation at the surface of the skin. In this paper we present the experimental and data processing details of the work and well as limitations of the technique. ----------------------------------------- Neste estudo medimos a frequ\\^encia card\\'iaca de forma n\\~ao invasiva, remota e passiva e determinamos o mapa da atividade de pulsa\\c{c}\\~ao sangu\\'inea numa regi\\~ao de interesse (ROI) da pele. A ROI utilizada foi o antebra\\c{c}o...

  8. Predictors of intensive care unit refusal in French intensive care units: a multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Montuclard, Luc; Timsit, Jean-François; Reignier, Jean; Desmettre, Thibault; Karoubi, Philippe; Moreau, Delphine; Montesino, Laurent; Duguet, Alexandre; Boussat, Sandrine; Ede, Christophe; Monseau, Yannick; Paule, Thierry; Misset, Benoit; Carlet, Jean

    2005-04-01

    To identify factors associated with granting or refusing intensive care unit (ICU) admission, to analyze ICU characteristics and triage decisions, and to describe mortality in admitted and refused patients. Observational, prospective, multiple-center study. Four university hospitals and seven primary-care hospitals in France. None. Age, underlying diseases (McCabe score and Knaus class), dependency, hospital mortality, and ICU characteristics were recorded. The crude ICU refusal rate was 23.8% (137/574), with variations from 7.1% to 63.1%. The reasons for refusal were too well to benefit (76/137, 55.4%), too sick to benefit (51/137, 37.2%), unit too busy (9/137, 6.5%), and refusal by the family (1/137). In logistic regression analyses, two patient-related factors were associated with ICU refusal: dependency (odds ratio [OR], 14.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-38.25; p refused patients, and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.28-1.75) for later-admitted patients. ICU refusal rates varied greatly across ICUs and were dependent on both patient and organizational factors. Efforts to define ethically optimal ICU admission policies might lead to greater homogeneity in refusal rates, although case-mix variations would be expected to leave an irreducible amount of variation across ICUs.

  9. The Impact of Urbanization on Energy Intensity in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Belloumi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the long-term and causal relationship between energy intensity, real GDP per capita, urbanization and industrialization in Saudi Arabia over the period 1971–2012 using the breakpoint unit root tests developed by Perron (1989 and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL model bounds testing to cointegration proposed by Pesaran et al. (2001 and employing a modified version of the Granger causality test proposed by Toda and Yamamoto (1995. Additionally, to test the robustness of the results, the fully modified ordinary least squares (OLS regression, the dynamic OLS regression, and the Hansen test are used. Our results show that the variables are cointegrated when energy intensity is the dependent variable. It is also found that urbanization positively affects energy intensity in both the short term and the long term. Causality tests indicate that urbanization causes economic output that causes energy intensity in the long term. Our results do not support the urban compaction hypothesis where urban cities benefit from basic public services and economies of scale for public infrastructure. Therefore, measures that slow down the rapid urbanization process should be taken to reduce energy intensity in Saudi Arabia. In addition, reducing energy inefficiency in energy consumption should be a strategy to attain sustainable development in the near future in Saudi Arabia.

  10. Repeatability of feather mite prevalence and intensity in passerine birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Diaz-Real

    Full Text Available Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Here we analysed the repeatability (R of the intensity and the prevalence of feather mites to partition within- and among-host species variance components. We compiled the largest dataset so far available: 119 Paleartic passerine bird species, 75,944 individual birds, ca. 1.8 million mites, seven countries, 23 study years. Several analyses and approaches were made to estimate R and adjusted repeatability (R(adj after controlling for potential confounding factors (breeding period, weather, habitat, spatial autocorrelation and researcher identity. The prevalence of feather mites was moderately repeatable (R = 0.26-0.53; R(adj = 0.32-0.57; smaller values were found for intensity (R = 0.19-0.30; R(adj = 0.18-0.30. These moderate repeatabilities show that prevalence and intensity of feather mites differ among species, but also that the high variation within species leads to considerable overlap among bird species. Differences in the prevalence and intensity of feather mites within bird species were small among habitats, suggesting that local factors are playing a secondary role. However, effects of local climatic conditions were partially observed for intensity.

  11. [Cannabis: Use and dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervaux, Alain; Laqueille, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    The main characteristics of cannabis dependence are craving, persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control cannabis use and important social, occupational, or recreational activities given up or reduced because of cannabis use. Withdrawal symptoms include insomnia, irritability, anger, restlessness, depression, mood swings and cravings. Regular cannabis use induces cognitive impairment, especially of attention, episodic memory and working memory. Alcohol and other substances abuse or dependence are frequently found in patients with cannabis dependence. Psychiatric comorbidities are frequent in patients with cannabis dependence, in particular anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and personality disorders. The treatment of cannabis dependence includes behavioral psychotherapy, especially motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioral therapy, alongside treatment of co-occurring mental health and substance use conditions. There are currently no available pharmacological treatment interventions for cannabis dependence. The treatment of cannabis dependence and withdrawal remains nonspecific. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Intensive Care for Eclampic Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of treatment of puerperas with eclampic coma, by substantiating, developing, and introducing new algorithms for correction of systemic hemodynamic, metabolic disturbances, and perfusion-metabolic changes in brain tissues. Subjects and methods. Studies were conducted in 18 puerperas with eclampic coma (Group 2 in whom the authors used a new treatment algorithm aimed at maintaining baseline cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP, restoring volemic levels at the expense of interstitial fluid. A control group (Group 1 included 30 patients who received conventional standard therapy. Regional cerebral circulation was measured by a non-invasive (inhalation radioisotopic method, by applying the tracer 131Xe, as described by V. D. Obrist et al., on a modified КПРДИ-1 apparatus (USSR. The rate of brain oxygen uptake was determined from the oxygen content between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Central hemodynamic parameters were studied by the direct method of right heart catheterization using a flow-directed Swan-Ganz catheter. The volumes of total and extracellular fluids were estimated using 20% urea and mannitol solutions, respectively, at 0.2 g/kg weight by the procedure of V. M. Mogen. Circulating blood volume (CBV was determined by a radioisotopic method using 131iodine albumin on an УPI-7 apparatus (USSR. Cerebral spinal fluid pressure was measured by an ИиНД apparatus. Studies were made in four steps: 1 on admission; 2 on days 2—3; 3 during emergence from coma; 4 before transition. Results. The use of the new algorithm for intensive care for eclampic coma, which is aimed at improving the perfusion metabolic provision of brain structures, with a reduction in mean blood pressure by 10—15% of the baseline level, by administering magnesium sulfate and nimodipine, and at compensating for CBV by high-molecular-weight hydroxyethylated starch (stabizol, ensured early emergence from a comatose state

  13. Human Influence on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity.We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  14. Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intensive insulin therapy: Tight blood sugar control Intensive insulin therapy can help prevent long-term diabetes complications. Consider the benefits — and understand the commitment. By Mayo Clinic ...

  15. Photon intensity interferometry with multidetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badala, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy)); Barbera, R. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy)); Palmeri, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy)); Pappalardo, G.S. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy)); Riggi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy)); Russo, A.C. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy)); Russo, G. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Catania, 57, Corso Italia, I-95129 Catania (Italy) Istit

    1994-12-01

    The technique of two-photon interferometry in heavy ion collisions at the intermediate energies is discussed and the importance of a new methodology, used in the treatment of the experimental data, is evidenced. For the first time, both the relative momentum, q[sub rel], and the relative energy, q[sub 0], of the two correlated photons have been simultaneously used to extract the source size and lifetime of the emitting source. As an application, the performances of the BaF[sub 2] ball of the MEDEA multidetector as a photon intensity interferometer have been evaluated. The response of such a detector to correlated pairs of photons has been studied through full GEANT3 simulations. The effects of the experimental filter on the photon correlation function have been investigated, and the noise, induced in the correlation signal by cosmic radiation, neutral pion decay, and [gamma]-conversion, has also been estimated. ((orig.))

  16. Photon intensity interferometry with multidetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalà, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.

    1994-12-01

    The technique of two-photon interferometry in heavy ion collisions at the intermediate energies is discussed and the importance of a new methodology, used in the treatment of the experimental data, is evidenced. For the first time, both the relative momentum, qrel, and the relative energy, q0, of the two correlated photons have been simultaneously used to extract the source size and lifetime of the emitting source. As an application, the performances of the BaF 2 ball of the MEDEA multidetector as a photon intensity interferometer have been evaluated. The response of such a detector to correlated pairs of photons has been studied through full GEANT3 simulations. The effects of the experimental filter on the photon correlation function have been investigated, and the noise, induced in the correlation signal by cosmic radiation, neutral pion decay, and γ-conversion, has also been estimated.

  17. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine......" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study. We monitored sleep by PSG.The standard (American Association of Sleep...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...

  18. Generation and propagation of intense supersonic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, K; Christen, W; Even, U

    2011-06-30

    Computer simulations and experiments have been performed to quantify the effects of nozzle shape and skimmer placement on high-density supersonic jets. It is shown that the on axis beam intensity achieved is much higher than intensity achieved using standard sonic nozzles. Changes in skimmer design and positioning are required to allow this intense jet to propagate in a typical supersonic beam setup.

  19. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... The process of intensive care triage. Intensive Care. Med 2001;27:1441‑5. 4. Marshall MF, Schwenzer KJ, Orsina M, Fletcher JC, Durbin CG Jr. Influence of political power, medical provincialism, and economic incentives on the rationing of surgical intensive care unit beds. Crit Care Med 1992;20:387‑94. 5.

  20. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  1. Treatment Intensity and Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aravind K.; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Hard, Jennifer; Rudzicz, Frank; Rietveld, Toni; Maassen, Ben; Kroll, Robert; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intensive treatment has been repeatedly recommended for the treatment of speech deficits in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, differences in treatment outcomes as a function of treatment intensity have not been systematically studied in this population. Aim: To investigate the effects of treatment intensity on outcome…

  2. Assessing the energy intensities of imports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes, J.J; Noorman, K.J.; Biesiot, W

    Embodied energy intensities denote the amount of energy (direct and indirect) that is required to produce one unit of economic output. These embodied energy intensities should include imports. The energy intensities of imports are in most cases unknown and are therefore often neglected or assumed to

  3. Analytical Approach to Predict the Draft Intensity in the Premises with the Heat Producing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurilenko Nikolai I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the theoretical and experimental research in the field of the ventilation operating modes of the unit-type heat producing facilities. The analytical dependence is given to estimate the draft intensity indoors of the boiler room. The test data are compared to the derived analytical dependences.

  4. Stress Intensity Factor calculation from displacement fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Beretta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, visual image techniques such as Digital Image Correlation (DIC enabled to experimentally determine the crack tip displacement and strain fields at small scales. The displacements are tracked during loading, and parameters as the Stress Intensity Factor (SIF, opening and closing loads, T-stress can be readily measured. In particular, the SIFs and the T-stress can be obtained by fitting the analytical equation of the Williamstype expansion with the experimentally-determined displacement fields. The results in terms of fracture mechanics parameters strictly depend on the dimension of the area considered around the crack tip in conjunction with the crack length, the maximum SIF (and thus the plastic tip radius, and the number of terms to be considered in the Williams-type expansion. This work focuses in understanding the accuracy of the SIF calculation based on these factors. The study is based on Finite Element Analysis simulations where purely elastic material behavior is considered. The accuracy of the estimation of the SIF is investigated and a guide-line is provided to properly set the DIC measurements. The analysis is then experimentally validated for crack closure measurements adopting the SENT specimen geometry.

  5. Dynamics of triacylglycerol and EPA production in Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen starvation at different light intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse M Remmers

    Full Text Available Lipid production in microalgae is highly dependent on the applied light intensity. However, for the EPA producing model-diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, clear consensus on the impact of incident light intensity on lipid productivity is still lacking. This study quantifies the impact of different incident light intensities on the biomass, TAG and EPA yield on light in nitrogen starved batch cultures of P. tricornutum. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum TAG and EPA contents were found to be independent of the applied light intensity. The lipid yield on light was reduced at elevated light intensities (>100 μmol m-2 s-1. The highest TAG yield on light (112 mg TAG molph-1 was found at the lowest light intensity tested (60 μmol m-2 s-1, which is still relatively low to values reported in literature for other algae. Furthermore, mass balance analysis showed that the EPA fraction in TAG may originate from photosynthetic membrane lipids.

  6. Forgetting feelings: Opposite biases in reports of the intensity of past emotion and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robin L; Levine, Linda J; Lench, Heather C; Safer, Martin A

    2016-04-01

    Memory for feelings is subject to fading and bias over time. In 2 studies, the authors examined whether the magnitude and direction of bias depend on the type of feeling being recalled: emotion or mood. A few days after the U.S. Presidential elections in 2008 and 2012, participants reported how they felt about the election outcome (emotion) and how they felt in general (mood). A month after the elections, participants recalled their feelings. The intensity of past emotion was recalled more accurately than the intensity of past mood. Participants underestimated the intensity of emotion but overestimated the intensity of mood. Participants' appraisals of the importance of the election, which diminished over time, contributed to underestimating the intensity of emotion. In contrast, participants' strong emotional response to the election contributed to overestimating the intensity of mood. These opposing biases have important implications for decision making and clinical assessment. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Intensity and Volume in Strength Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Gregory Haff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Editor's Note By:Associate Professor G. Gregory Haff, Ph.D.   As a former weightlifter I have spent numerous hours training in an attempt to not only maximize my technical proficiency but to also increase my ability to exert maximal force. The numerous years spent training led me to begin a life long quest to better understand how to maximize an athletes strength levels. It is very evident that strength is a primary biomotorability that has wide spread implications to athletic performance and more recently health and wellness. There are many forms of resistance training that can be used to stimulate physiological adaptations which underpin increases in muscular strength and hypertrophy. Thus the primary question we can ask is how do we manipulate resistance training interventions in order to maximize muscular adaptations? Fundamentally, resistance training programs can be modified in numerous ways, but the most common method is related to alterations in training volume and intensity. It is well documented that there is an inverse relationship between training load and volume, such that as the load lifted is increased the number of repetitions that can be completed decrease. However, if we consider that training volume can be increased by either reducing the training load to increase the number of repetitions performed in a given set or we can increase the number of sets that can be performed with a given load. Both methods have merit depending upon the targeted training outcomes. For example, recent research suggests that low load training (i.e. 30% of 1 repetition maximum can be performed to muscular failure and induce significant increases in muscle hypertrophy, without large increases in strength. Conversely, it is also well documented that if higher loads are used (I.e. ~75-80% of 1 repetition maximum we can increase muscle hypertrophy and strength when sufficient volume (i.e. number of repetitions and sets are undertaken. If we consider

  8. Aspects of long - term intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Picková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    My thesis deals with aspects of long-term intensive care. The goal of my thesis is to determine the basic needs of patients and family preparedness aspects of intensive home care. Other stated goals is find out the possibility of returning patients to home care and also find out what is the use of basal stimulation in long-term intensive care department. In the theoretical part of my thesis are included the chapters about definition of intensive care and home intensive care, for the full comp...

  9. European Gas Dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Antonsen, Iben; Bieber, Martin; Gandrup, Tobias; Lehmann, Tina; Weinberger, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    The focal point of the project is, as it is implied in the title, European gas dependency, to be more specific; the dependency of Russian gas. We chose Russia, because the EU's import of gas is mainly supplied by Russia. We present background information and knowledge to describe why the case is of relevance and that a situation of dependency exists. We solely look at the dependency from the European Union's point of view, taking point of departure in the Green Paper. The Green Paper is a pap...

  10. Systems dependability assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Presents recent developments of probabilistic assessment of systems dependability based on stochastic models, including graph theory, finite state automaton and language theory, for both dynamic and hybrid contexts.

  11. [Tetanus in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana-San Martín, C; Su, H; Bustamante-Durán, D; Velásquez-Pagoaga, L

    Tetanus is medical disease with a high mortality rate, even in high tech centres and in Intensive Care Units (ICU). AIMS. To analyse the appearance and evolution of tetanus in the ICU at our hospital. This retrospective descriptive study, made up of 26 patients admitted to hospital with tetanus in the ICU at the Hospital Escuela during the period between January 1995 and December 2001, examined the clinico epidemiological of the disease and the clinical evolution of the patients. Of the cases reviewed (n= 26), 34.6% were females and 65.4% males. The main clinical manifestations were: trismus (88%), dysphagia (77%) and cervical rigidity (69%). The incubation period varies from 3 days to 4 weeks. Most cases resulted from cut wounds (54%), to a lesser extent from excoriations (15%), and one case was associated with gynaecological surgery. The entry sites of the injuries were mainly on the upper (42%) and lower limbs (34.6%). Three patients had been vaccinated and 17 had not. Six cases were not recorded. The chief complications that developed were: dysautonomia (73%) and pneumonia (42%). The mortality rate was 69%. In spite of having suitable equipment available with which to treat tetanus, mortality is high, mainly because of dysautonomias. Prevention is therefore the most effective way of controlling this disease

  12. Gradle dependency management

    CERN Document Server

    Ikkink, Hubert Klein

    2015-01-01

    If you work on Java projects, use Gradle as a build automation tool, and you use dependencies in your project, this is the book for you. Additionally, if you want to deploy your project artifacts as dependencies for other developers using Gradle, you've found the right book.

  13. Adam Smith and dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozler, Sule

    2012-06-01

    The focus of this paper is the works and life of Adam Smith, who is widely recognized as the father and founder of contemporary economics. Latent content analysis is applied to his seminal text in economics, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The results reveal that Smith considers dependence on others a problem and sees the solution to this problem in impersonalized interdependence. In addition, his views on social dependency and personal dependency, reflected in his Lectures on Jurisprudence (1963) and The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), are analyzed. This analysis suggests a central tension between dependence and independence in Smith's writings. The personal dependency patterns he exhibited in his life, which also suggest a tension between dependence and independence, are identified through a reading of his biographies. Based on insights from psychoanalytic literature, this paper proposes that developing the ideas in the Wealth of Nations was part of Smith's creative solution to this tension. In particular, his solution to one individual's dependence on another was through a system of impersonalized interdependence. In other words, Smith defended against his personal dependence through his economic theorizing.

  14. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve th...

  15. The Politics of Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Patrick Joseph

    The central claim of this book is that thinking about ‘dependence’ should be at the core of political theory principally because it helps us to think about issues of economic justice. Unlike political theories that either condemn or celebrate dependence, the book argues that dependence...... is an inescapable fact of social life, neither good nor bad in itself. The real political issues are about how we as a society organise and judge various forms of dependence. And this is, in fact, what much political debate is about if we dig beneath the surface. On the one hand, we disagree about how we should...... organise vulnerability; on the other hand, we disagree about who we should condemn as parasitical. Vulnerability and parasitism are thus key concepts for understanding political debate about forms of dependence. Showing the tension between these two sides to the problem of economic dependence...

  16. Computer generated holography with intensity-graded patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Conti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer Generated Holography achieves patterned illumination at the sample plane through phase modulation of the laser beam at the objective back aperture. This is obtained by using liquid crystal-based spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs, which modulate the spatial phase of the incident laser beam. A variety of algorithms are employed to calculate the phase modulation masks addressed to the LC-SLM. These algorithms range from simple gratings-and-lenses to generate multiple diffraction-limited spots, to iterative Fourier-transform algorithms capable of generating arbitrary illumination shapes perfectly tailored on the base of the target contour. Applications for holographic light patterning include multi-trap optical tweezers, patterned voltage imaging and optical control of neuronal excitation using uncaging or optogenetics. These past implementations of computer generated holography used binary input profile to generate binary light distribution at the sample plane. Here we demonstrate that using graded input sources, enables generating intensity graded light patterns and extend the range of application of holographic light illumination. At first, we use intensity-graded holograms to compensate for LC-SLM position dependent diffraction efficiency or sample fluorescence inhomogeneity. Finally we show that intensity-graded holography can be used to equalize photo evoked currents from cells expressing different level of chanelrhodopsin2 (ChR2, one of the most commonly used optogenetics light gated channels, taking into account the non-linear dependence of channel opening on incident light.

  17. The impact of soil suction variation on earthquake intensity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biglari Mahnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil properties can completely change the ground motion characteristics as they travel from the bedrock to the surface because, soil as a low-pass filter, may amplify or deamplify seismic motions in some frequencies on the wave travelling path. Recent studies about the advanced unsaturated soil mechanics clearly shows that dynamic properties of soils, including small-strain shear modulus (Gmax, shear modulus reduction (G/Gmax, and damping ratio (D curves are affected by changes in the soil suction level. The current study present nonlinear time-dependent analysis of three different unsaturated soils available in the literature with different ranges of nonlinear behaviour that earlier have been studied on unsaturated dynamic models. Since, the earthquake intensity parameters can be used to describe the damage potential of an earthquake, the focus of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the suction variation on the engineering ground motion parameters, including peak values of strong motion, Vmax/Amax, root-mean-square acceleration, Arias intensity, characteristic intensity, cumulative absolute velocity, acceleration spectrum intensity, effective design acceleration, A95 parameter and predominant period separately under the near-field and the far-field seismicity categories.

  18. Efficacy beliefs predict collaborative practice among intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blanc, Pascale M; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Nap, Raoul E

    2010-03-01

    This paper is a report of an investigation of whether intensive care nurses' efficacy beliefs predict future collaborative practice, and to test the potential mediating role of team commitment in this relationship. Recent empirical studies in the field of work and organizational psychology have demonstrated that (professional) efficacy beliefs are reciprocally related to workers' resources and well-being over time, resulting in a positive gain spiral. Moreover, there is ample evidence that workers' affective commitment to their organization or work-team is related to desirable work behaviours such as citizenship behaviour. A longitudinal design was applied to questionnaire data from the EURICUS-project. Structural Equation Modelling was used to analyse the data. The sample consisted of 372 nurses working in 29 different European intensive care units. Data were collected in 1997 and 1998. However, our research model deals with fundamental psychosocial processes that are not time-dependent. Moreover, recent empirical literature shows that there is still room for improvement in ICU collaborative practice. The hypotheses that (i) the relationship between efficacy beliefs and collaborative practice is mediated by team commitment and (ii) efficacy beliefs, team commitment and collaborative practice are reciprocally related were supported, suggesting a potential positive gain spiral of efficacy beliefs. Healthcare organizations should create working environments that provide intensive care unit nurses with sufficient resources to perform their job well. Further research is needed to design and evaluate interventions for the enhancement of collaborative practice in intensive care units.

  19. Pointwise intensity-based dynamic speckle analysis with binary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoykova, Elena; Mateev, Georgy; Nazarova, Dimana; Berberova, Nataliya; Ivanov, Branimir

    2017-06-01

    Non-destructive detection of physical or biological activity through statistical processing of speckle patterns on the surface of diffusely reflecting objects is an area of active research. A lot of pointwise intensity-based algorithms have been proposed over the recent years. Efficiency of these algorithms is deteriorated by the signal-dependent speckle data, non-uniform illumination or varying reflectivity across the object, especially when the number of the acquired speckle patterns is limited. Pointwise processing of a sequence of 2D images is also time-consuming. In this paper, we propose to transform the acquired speckle images into binary patterns by using for a sign threshold the mean intensity value estimated at each spatial point from the temporal sequence of intensities at this point. Activity is characterized by the 2D distribution of a temporal polar correlation function estimated at a given time lag from the binary patterns. Processing of synthetic and experimental data confirmed that the algorithm provided correct activity determination with the same accuracy as the temporal normalized correlation function. It is efficient without the necessity to apply normalization at non-uniform distribution of intensity in the illuminating laser beam and offers acceleration of computation.

  20. Reproducibility of intensity-based estimates of lung ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kaifang; Bayouth, John E.; Ding, Kai; Christensen, Gary E.; Cao, Kunlin; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Lung function depends on lung expansion and contraction during the respiratory cycle. Respiratory-gated CT imaging and image registration can be used to estimate the regional lung volume change by observing CT voxel density changes during inspiration or expiration. In this study, the authors examine the reproducibility of intensity-based estimates of lung tissue expansion and contraction in three mechanically ventilated sheep and ten spontaneously breathing humans. The intensity-based estimates are compared to the estimates of lung function derived from image registration deformation field. Methods: 4DCT data set was acquired for a cohort of spontaneously breathing humans and anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep. For each subject, two 4DCT scans were performed with a short time interval between acquisitions. From each 4DCT data set, an image pair consisting of a volume reconstructed near end inspiration and a volume reconstructed near end exhalation was selected. The end inspiration and end exhalation images were registered using a tissue volume preserving deformable registration algorithm. The CT density change in the registered image pair was used to compute intensity-based specific air volume change (SAC) and the intensity-based Jacobian (IJAC), while the transformation-based Jacobian (TJAC) was computed directly from the image registration deformation field. IJAC is introduced to make the intensity-based and transformation-based methods comparable since SAC and Jacobian may not be associated with the same physiological phenomenon and have different units. Scan-to-scan variations in respiratory effort were corrected using a global scaling factor for normalization. A gamma index metric was introduced to quantify voxel-by-voxel reproducibility considering both differences in ventilation and distance between matching voxels. The authors also tested how different CT prefiltering levels affected intensity-based ventilation reproducibility. Results

  1. Burnout in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggio, B; Malacarne, P

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study in intensive care unit (ICU) the impact of variable ''professional role'' and ''gender'' on the defence mechanisms, on the troubles of mood and on the markers of the burnout syndrome, and to study the correlation between specific defence mechanisms or specific troubles of mood and the onset of burnout syndrome. An observational study by administration of psychometric tests was carried out. Twenty-five nurses and 25 doctors working in two differents ICU of the Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Pisana were enrolled. Three psychometric tests concerning the defence mechanisms (Defense Mechanism Inventory), the troubles of mood (Profile of Moods States) and the burnout syndrome (Maslach Burnout Inventory) were administered and the three tests were analysed to study the features of each person enrolled. The study shows the presence within doctors of two dimensions of burnout syndrome (emotional exhaustion in women and depersonalization in men) much greater than nurses. The doctors show the presence of defence mechanism as overturning, aggressiveness and rationalization, and troubles of mood as depression-despondency and aggressiveness-anger. Compared to men, women show turning to one self as defence mechanisms, whereas the men show aggressiveness-anger as trouble of mood. The women doctors show depression-disheartement as trouble of mood, the men doctors show tension-anxiety. We showed a correlation between tiredness-indolence, depression-disheartement and onset of emotional exhaustion, as a correlation between aggressiveness, aggressiveness-anger in man and oncet of depersonalization. Finally we correlated the absence of tension-anxiety as trouble of mood and overturning as defence mechanism with a good personal accomplishment at work. The burnout syndrome is present in health-care workers in ICU and it is significantly affected by operating role and gender. We must be aware of this phenomenon in order to study it and to reduce it.

  2. The intensity of A. Wat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kandziora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a collection of literary essays Elementy do portretu. Szkice o twórczości Aleksandra Wata published and edited by Poznań-based specialists in Polish literature and dedicated to Professor Ewa Wiegandt. The starting point for the discussion is the observation that the authors of the essays had to grapple with the elusiveness and multidimensional character of the output of A. Wat, with the entanglement of the text of his works with the text of his biography, and finally with the multitude of its cultural contexts. The reviewer distinguishes four research currents in the collection of essays, each being a different answer to these particular traits of Wat’s writing. Historical and literary studies in the book show the author in his relations and as a non-categorizable author, and challenge the Futurist character of his juvenile writings by juxtaposing them with earlier Symbolism and later Catastrophism. The interpretative study current tries to find ways to define Wat through reading his individual works. Here, the overriding opposition between ”closeness” and ”openness”, so pivotal in the poet’s works, becomes apparent. The current of thematology that present Wat’s literary topoi in relation to his biography is well represented in the volume. Finally, the studies that cross the strictly literary horizon try to capture the multi-tier structures of Wat’s works, reinterpreting them from the sociological, historical or axiological perspectives. The final conclusion of the review is the acknowledgement of the richness offered by the book that corresponds well to the intensity of works and the biography of the author.

  3. Compulsivity in opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, Serenella; Matthews, Keith; Steele, Douglas; Baldacchino, Alex

    2018-02-02

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between compulsivity versus impulsivity and structural MRI abnormalities in opioid dependence. We recruited 146 participants: i) patients with a history of opioid dependence due to chronic heroin use (n=24), ii) heroin users stabilised on methadone maintenance treatment (n=48), iii) abstinent participants with a history of opioid dependence due to heroin use (n=24) and iv) healthy controls (n=50). Compulsivity was measured using Intra/Extra-Dimensional (IED) Task and impulsivity was measured using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT). Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were also obtained. As hypothesised, compulsivity was negatively associated with impulsivity (p<0.02). Testing for the neural substrates of compulsivity versus impulsivity, we found a higher compulsivity/impulsivity ratio associated with significantly decreased white matter adjacent to the nucleus accumbens, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and rostral cingulate in the abstinent group, compared to the other opioid dependent groups. In addition, self-reported duration of opioid exposure correlated negatively with bilateral globus pallidus grey matter reductions. Our findings are consistent with Volkow & Koob's addiction models and underline the important role of compulsivity versus impulsivity in opioid dependence. Our results have implications for the treatment of opioid dependence supporting the assertion of different behavioural and biological phenotypes in the opioid dependence and abstinence syndromes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Visual dependence and BPPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, K; Bronstein, A M; Faldon, M E; Mandalà, M; Murray, K; Silove, Y

    2012-06-01

    The increased visual dependence noted in some vestibular patients may be secondary to their vertigo. We examine whether a single, brief vertigo attack, such as in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), modifies visual dependency. Visual dependency was measured before and after the Hallpike manoeuvre with (a) the Rod and Frame and the Rod and Disc techniques whilst seated and (b) the postural sway induced by visual roll-motion stimulation. Three subject groups were studied: 20 patients with BPPV (history and positive Hallpike manoeuvre; PosH group), 20 control patients (history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre; NegH group) and 20 normal controls. Our findings show that while both patient groups showed enhanced visual dependency, the PosH and the normal control group decreased visual dependency on repetition of the visual tasks after the Hallpike manoeuvre. NegH patients differed from PosH patients in that their high visual dependency did not diminish on repetition of the visual stimuli; they scored higher on the situational characteristic questionnaire ('visual vertigo' symptoms) and showed higher incidence of migraine. We conclude that long term vestibular symptoms increase visual dependence but a single BPPV attack does not increase it further. Repetitive visual motion stimulation induces adaptation in visual dependence in peripheral vestibular disorders such as BPPV. A positional form of vestibular migraine may underlie the symptoms of some patients with a history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre. The finding that they have non adaptable increased visual dependency may explain visuo-vestibular symptoms in this group and, perhaps more widely, in patients with migraine.

  5. Security of Dependable Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    2011-01-01

    Security and dependability are crucial for designing trustworthy systems. The approach “security as an add-on” is not satisfactory, yet the integration of security in the development process is still an open problem. Especially, a common framework for specifying dependability and security is very...... much needed. There are many pressing challenges however; here, we address some of them. Firstly, security for dependable systems is a broad concept and traditional view of security, e.g., in terms of confidentiality, integrity and availability, does not suffice. Secondly, a clear definition of security...

  6. Low-intensity conflict in multinational corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Andersen, Poul Houman; Storgaard, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    in four Danish MNCs. Findings: They describe consequences of low-intensity conflict and identify three types of actions by headquarters’ representatives that could lead to the development of low-intensity conflicts, namely, ignoring, bypassing and educating. Originality/value: Very few studies have dealt......Purpose: This paper aims to identify antecedents for, and consequences of, low-intensity inter-unit conflict in multinational corporations (MNCs). Inter-unit conflict in MNCs is an important and well-researched theme. However, while most studies have focused on open conflict acknowledged by both...... parties, much less research has dealt with low-intensity conflicts. Still, low-intensity conflicts can be highly damaging – not least because they are rarely resolved. Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a qualitative approach to understanding low-intensity conflict relying on 170 interviews...

  7. Craving and other characteristics of the comorbidity of alcohol and nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertling, Ines; Ramskogler, Katrin; Dvorak, Alexander; Klingler, Anton; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda; Schoberberger, Rudolf; Walter, Henriette; Kunze, Michael; Lesch, Otto Michael

    2005-08-01

    In this cross-sectional study we compared alcohol-dependent smokers and non-alcohol-dependent smokers with respect to intensity of nicotine dependence, craving conditions, sleep disturbances, comorbidity with major depression, reasons for smoking, accompanying somatic diseases and patients' prolonged abstinence from smoking during the 3 years preceding the study. Fifty-one alcohol-dependent smokers and 327 non-alcohol-dependent smokers diagnosed as ICD-10 and DSM-IV-nicotine dependent, were investigated by means of the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, the Lübeck Craving-Recurrence Risk Questionnaire and the Lesch Alcohol Dependence Typology (both adapted to smoking). The intensity of nicotine dependence was more enhanced in alcohol-dependent smokers compared to non-alcohol-dependent smokers. Several variables of all factors of craving ("depressive mood", "stimulation", "relaxation", "socially triggered tension") were significantly increased in alcohol-dependent patients (Pstress release and weight control. Our study demonstrates that the intensity of nicotine dependence, several conditions of craving for nicotine, sleep disturbances and symptoms of depression appear to be enhanced in alcohol-dependent smokers compared with non-alcohol-dependent smokers. Conclusions. - It is hoped that the factors of craving and reasons for smoking identified in this study will contribute to a better understanding of smoking temptation in alcohol-dependent smokers and non-alcohol-dependent smokers in future.

  8. Ecstasy (MDMA) dependence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansen, Karl L.R

    1999-01-01

    ... that high intensity MDMA use may cause lasting changes to serotonergic nerve terminals ( Ricuarte et al. 1988, McCann et al. 1996 ). 2 Results 2.1 Case A A 19-year-old nightclub promoter (A) was seen 2 weeks after having a seizure, following the use of 20–40 MDMA tablets, and about 1 g/24 h of amphetamine sulphate powder, every week-end fo...

  9. Excitation wavelength dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    phobic location whose polarity is intermediate be- tween cyclohexane and ethyl acetate. The 530 nm emission peak of C153 may arise from a polar and hydrophilic region which is similar to ethanol. The relative intensity (area) of the two emission spectra. (A480/A530) decreases from 3⋅5 at λex = 375 nm to 0.6 at λex = 435 ...

  10. Variability in Echolocation Call Intensity in a Community of Horseshoe Bats: A Role for Resource Partitioning or Communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Maike; Siemers, Björn M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Only recently data on bat echolocation call intensities is starting to accumulate. Yet, intensity is an ecologically crucial parameter, as it determines the extent of the bats' perceptual space and, specifically, prey detection distance. Interspecifically, we thus asked whether sympatric, congeneric bat species differ in call intensities and whether differences play a role for niche differentiation. Specifically, we investigated whether R. mehelyi that calls at a frequency clearly above what is predicted by allometry, compensates for frequency-dependent loss in detection distance by using elevated call intensity. Maximum echolocation call intensities might depend on body size or condition and thus be used as an honest signal of quality for intraspecific communication. We for the first time investigated whether a size-intensity relation is present in echolocating bats. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured maximum call intensities and frequencies for all five European horseshoe bat species. Maximum intensity differed among species largely due to R. euryale. Furthermore, we found no compensation for frequency-dependent loss in detection distance in R. mehelyi. Intraspecifically, there is a negative correlation between forearm lengths and intensity in R. euryale and a trend for a negative correlation between body condition index and intensity in R. ferrumequinum. In R. hipposideros, females had 8 dB higher intensities than males. There were no correlations with body size or sex differences and intensity for the other species. Conclusions/Significance Based on call intensity and frequency measurements, we estimated echolocation ranges for our study community. These suggest that intensity differences result in different prey detection distances and thus likely play some role for resource access. It is interesting and at first glance counter-intuitive that, where a correlation was found, smaller bats called louder than large individuals. Such negative

  11. Average Light Intensity Inside a Photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herby Jean

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For energy production, microalgae are one of the few alternatives with high potential. Similar to plants, algae require energy acquired from light sources to grow. This project uses calculus to determine the light intensity inside of a photobioreactor filled with algae. Under preset conditions along with estimated values, we applied Lambert-Beer's law to formulate an equation to calculate how much light intensity escapes a photobioreactor and determine the average light intensity that was present inside the reactor.

  12. Moderate vs. high exercise intensity: differential effects on aerobic fitness, cardiomyocyte contractility, and endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemi, Ole J; Haram, Per M; Loennechen, Jan P; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Wisløff, Ulrik; Ellingsen, Øyvind

    2005-07-01

    Current guidelines are controversial regarding exercise intensity in cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation. Although high-intensity training induces larger increases in fitness and maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), moderate intensity is often recommended as equally effective. Controlled preclinical studies and randomized clinical trials are required to determine whether regular exercise at moderate versus high intensity is more beneficial. We therefore assessed relative effectiveness of 10-week HIGH versus moderate (MOD) exercise intensity on integrative and cellular functions. Sprague-Dawley rats performed treadmill running intervals at either 85%-90% (HIGH) or 65%-70% (MOD) of VO2max 1 h per day, 5 days per week. Weekly VO2max-testing adjusted exercise intensity. HIGH and MOD increased VO2max by 71% and 28%, respectively. This was paralleled by intensity-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, 14% and 5% in HIGH and MOD, respectively. Cardiomyocyte function (fractional shortening) increased by 45% and 23%, contraction rate decreased by 43% and 39%, and relaxation rate decreased by 20% and 10%, in HIGH and MOD, respectively. Ca2+ transient time-courses paralleled contraction/relaxation, whereas Ca2+ sensitivity increased 40% and 30% in HIGH and MOD, respectively. Carotid artery endothelial function improved similarly with both intensities. EC50 for acetylcholine-induced relaxation decreased 4.3-fold in HIGH (p hypertrophy, contractility and vasorelaxation also correlated significantly with VO2max. The present study demonstrates that cardiovascular adaptations to training are intensity-dependent. A close correlation between VO2max, cardiomyocyte dimensions and contractile capacity suggests significantly higher benefit with high intensity, whereas endothelial function appears equivalent at moderate levels. Thus, exercise intensity emerges as an important variable in future preclinical and clinical investigations.

  13. Arrhythmias in the intensive care patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim; Brandts, Bodo; Weismueller, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, AV-nodal reentry tachycardia with rapid ventricular response, atrial ectopic tachycardia, and preexcitation syndromes combined with atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachyarrhythmias are typical arrhythmias in intensive care patients. Most frequently, the diagnosis of the underlying arrhythmia is possible from the physical examination, the response to maneuvers or drugs, and the 12-lead surface electrocardiogram. In all patients with unstable hemodynamics, immediate DC-cardioversion is indicated. Conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm is possible using antiarrhythmic drugs. Amiodarone has a conversion rate in atrial fibrillation of up to 80%. However, caution in the use of short-term administration of intravenous amiodarone in critically ill patients with recent-onset atrial fibrillation is absolutely necessary, and the duration of therapy should not exceed 24 to 48 hours. Ibutilide represents a relatively new class III antiarrhythmic agent that has been reported to have conversion rates of 50% to 70%; it seems that ibutilide is even successful when intravenous amiodarone failed to convert atrial fibrillation. Newer studies compared the outcome of patients with atrial fibrillation and rhythm- or rate-control. Data from these studies (AFFIRM, RACE) clearly showed that rhythm control is not superior to rate control for the prevention of death and morbidity from cardiovascular causes. Therefore, rate-control may be an appropriate therapy in patients with recurrent atrial fibrillation after DC-cardioversion. Acute therapy of atrial flutter in intensive care patients depends on the clinical presentation. Atrial flutter can most often be successfully cardioverted to sinus rhythm with energies less than 50 joules. Ibutilide trials showed efficacy rates of 38-76% for conversion of atrial flutter to sinus rhythm compared with conversion rates of 5-13% when intravenous flecainide, propafenone, or verapamil was administered. In

  14. Public perceptions and acceptance of intensive forestry in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemström, Kerstin; Mahapatra, Krushna; Gustavsson, Leif

    2014-03-01

    The use of intensive forestry on part of the forested area in Sweden increases the production of forest biomass and enables an increased use of such biomass to mitigate climate change. However, with increasing conflicting interests in forests and forestry, the success of such a strategy depends on the public acceptance. In this paper, the results of a mail survey show that although a majority of the general public in Sweden supports measures to increase forest growth, they oppose the use of intensive forestry practices such as the cultivation of exotic tree species, clones, and forest fertilization. The acceptance of such practices is mainly influenced by the perceptions of their environmental consequences. Public acceptance was highest for forest fertilization, whereas clone cultivation was the least accepted practice.

  15. Debriefing depends on purpose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.A.M. Peters (Vincent); G. Vissers; F.B.L. van der Meer (Frans-Bauke)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractSocial simulation techniques are used for a multiplicity of goals, e.g. training, education, assessment, exploration, development and research. In all cases is necessary. However its shape and aims depend on the specific purpose of the simulation.

  16. Apache Maven dependency management

    CERN Document Server

    Lalou, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    An easy-to-follow, tutorial-based guide with chapters progressing from basic to advanced dependency management.If you are working with Java or Java EE projects and you want to take advantage of Maven dependency management, then this book is ideal for you. This book is also particularly useful if you are a developer or an architect. You should be well versed with Maven and its basic functionalities if you wish to get the most out of this book.

  17. Affective Dependence and Aggression: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Petruccelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Emotionally dependent subjects may engage in controlling, restrictive, and aggressive behaviours, which limit their partner’s autonomy. The underlying causes of such behaviours are not solely based on levels of aggression, but act as a mean of maintaining the subject’s own sense of self-worth, identity, and general functioning. Objective. The aim of the paper is to explore the correlation between affective dependency and reactive/proactive aggression and to evaluate individual differences as predisposing factors for aggressive behaviour and emotional dependency. Methods. The Spouse-Specific Dependency Scale (SSDS and the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ were administered to a sample of 3375 subjects. Results. In the whole sample, a positive correlation between emotional dependency and proactive aggression was identified. Differences with regard to sex, age group, and geographical distribution were evidenced for the scores of the different scales. Conclusion. A fundamental distinction between reactive and proactive aggression was observed, anchoring proactive aggression more strictly to emotional dependency. Sociocultural and demographical variables, together with the previous structuring of attachment styles, help to determine the scope, frequency, and intensity of the demands made to the partner, as well as to feed the fears of loss, abandonment, or betrayal.

  18. Affective dependence and aggression: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruccelli, Filippo; Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Verrastro, Valeria; Petruccelli, Irene; Federico, Roberta; Martinotti, Giovanni; Fossati, Andrea; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Janiri, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Emotionally dependent subjects may engage in controlling, restrictive, and aggressive behaviours, which limit their partner's autonomy. The underlying causes of such behaviours are not solely based on levels of aggression, but act as a mean of maintaining the subject's own sense of self-worth, identity, and general functioning. The aim of the paper is to explore the correlation between affective dependency and reactive/proactive aggression and to evaluate individual differences as predisposing factors for aggressive behaviour and emotional dependency. The Spouse-Specific Dependency Scale (SSDS) and the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ) were administered to a sample of 3375 subjects. In the whole sample, a positive correlation between emotional dependency and proactive aggression was identified. Differences with regard to sex, age group, and geographical distribution were evidenced for the scores of the different scales. A fundamental distinction between reactive and proactive aggression was observed, anchoring proactive aggression more strictly to emotional dependency. Sociocultural and demographical variables, together with the previous structuring of attachment styles, help to determine the scope, frequency, and intensity of the demands made to the partner, as well as to feed the fears of loss, abandonment, or betrayal.

  19. Ultra Dependable Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shuichi; Goshima, Masahiro; Irie, Hidetsugu

    This paper presents the processor architecture which provides much higher level dependability than the current ones. The features of it are: (1) fault tolerance and secure processing are integrated into a modern superscalar VLSI processor; (2) light-weight effective soft-error tolerant mechanisms are proposed and evaluated; (3) timing errors on random logic and registers are prevented by low-overhead mechanisms; (4) program behavior is hidden from the outer world by proposed address translation methods; (5) information leakage can be avoided by attaching policy tags for all data and monitoring them for each instruction execution; (6) injection attacks are avoided with much higher accuracy than the current systems, by providing tag trackings; (7) the overall structure of the dependable processor is proposed with a dependability manager which controls the detection of illegal conditions and recovers to the normal mode; and (8) an FPGA-based testbed system is developed where the system clock and the voltage are intentionally varied for experiment. The paper presents the fundamental scheme for the dependability, elemental technologies for dependability and the whole architecture of the ultra dependable processor. After showing them, the paper concludes with future works.

  20. How to `Subtract' Spectrally Determined Intensities from a Coronal Loop on the Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Cirtain, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.

    2002-05-01

    There are two main problems in the determination of plasma emissions within a coronal loop. First, the line of sight adds the ambient background to the measurement. Second, scattering elevates the intensity for pixels close to a structure (i.e. a loop) by counting photons that actually are emitted from that structure. Here we have a possible solution for these two problems. We show that the intensities for the spectral lines are shown to have scale height dependence when the plasma is not confined to a structure. Accordingly, at any distance greater than its scale height, the ion will not have a statistically significant contribution to the measure of intensity. Additionally, an isolated coronal structure will have a maximum intensity value along an exposure and within a range of pixels that effectively slice a leg of the loop. The maximum is the location of the pixel that is most likely the one containing the loop. All other pixels are considered scatter until the point spread function can deconvolve the true value for intensity per pixel. The resulting values for intensity have then been reduced to approximate the value for intensity for the plasma within the loop. Now the intensity has been reduced to the intensity of the ion within the loop and the analysis of an accurate DEM is now possible. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783.

  1. Intense Activity of the Raphe Spinal Pathway Depresses Motor Activity via a Serotonin Dependent Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Jørgensen, Lone K

    2018-01-01

    Motor fatigue occurring during prolonged physical activity has both peripheral and central origins. It was previously demonstrated that the excitability of motoneurons was decreased when a spillover of serotonin could activate extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS......) of motoneurons. Here we investigated the impact of massive synaptic release of serotonin on motor behavior in an integrated preparation of the adult turtle performing fictive scratching behaviors. We found that a prolonged electrical stimulation of the raphe spinal pathway induced a reversible inhibition...... of the motor behavior that lasted several tens of seconds. The effect disappeared when the spinal cord was perfused with an antagonist for 5-HT1A receptors. By demonstrating a direct impact of serotonin on motor behavior, we suggest a central role of this monoamine behind central fatigue....

  2. Analysis of excitation-intensity-dependent diffraction and acceleration characteristics of finite half-Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyookeun; Lee, Il-min; Lee, Byoungho

    2013-06-01

    A half-Bessel beam (HBB) is one of nonparaxial and nondiffracting accelerating beams that follows a circular trajectory. Since the ideal HBB is a beam of infinite energy, it is impossible to generate an ideal HBB. Therefore, truncation is necessary to make the beam be square integrable. There exist two ways of such truncation. One is simply cutting off some portion of the beam, and the other is modulating the angular spectrum of the beam. For the latter method, Fourier transformation optics based on a lensed system can be applied. In this study, we suggest and numerically evaluate several methods to achieve finite HBBs using conventional Fourier-optic 2-f system. To this objective, we first derive an angular spectrum representation of the ideal HBB. From this, we show that the obtained spectrum has poles in Fourier domain. After that, several forms of square integrable finite HBBs, where the poles are eliminated, are suggested. And then, the characteristics of the proposed finite HBBs in terms of diffraction and acceleration are presented.

  3. An Analysis of Determinants of Agriculture Trade Intensities of South Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Dembatapitiya, Pradeepa

    2012-01-01

    South Asian agricultural trade depends on few sectors in the economy and it exports primary products for limited number of countries. It shows regional outward orientation and thus there is still gaining in agricultural trade in South Asian region. Reinforcement of trade relationships within South Asia will be a solution for that and the study is focused on analyzing agriculture trade intensities in South Asia. Trade intensity measures the level of trade relationships between two nations. The...

  4. Repeatability of Feather Mite Prevalence and Intensity in Passerine Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Real, Javier; Serrano, David; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Fernández-González, Sofía; Bermejo, Ana; Calleja, Juan A.; De la Puente, Javier; De Palacio, Diana; Martínez, José L.; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Ponce, Carlos; Frías, Óscar; Tella, José L.; Møller, Anders P.; Figuerola, Jordi; Pap, Péter L.; Kovács, István; Vágási, Csongor I.; Meléndez, Leandro; Blanco, Guillermo; Aguilera, Eduardo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Galván, Ismael; Atiénzar, Francisco; Barba, Emilio; Cantó, José L.; Cortés, Verónica; Monrós, Juan S.; Piculo, Rubén; Vögeli, Matthias; Borràs, Antoni; Navarro, Carlos; Mestre, Alexandre; Jovani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Here we analysed the repeatability (R) of the intensity and the prevalence of feather mites to partition within- and among-host species variance components. We compiled the largest dataset so far available: 119 Paleartic passerine bird species, 75,944 individual birds, ca. 1.8 million mites, seven countries, 23 study years. Several analyses and approaches were made to estimate R and adjusted repeatability (Radj) after controlling for potential confounding factors (breeding period, weather, habitat, spatial autocorrelation and researcher identity). The prevalence of feather mites was moderately repeatable (R = 0.26–0.53; Radj = 0.32–0.57); smaller values were found for intensity (R = 0.19–0.30; Radj = 0.18–0.30). These moderate repeatabilities show that prevalence and intensity of feather mites differ among species, but also that the high variation within species leads to considerable overlap among bird species. Differences in the prevalence and intensity of feather mites within bird species were small among habitats, suggesting that local factors are playing a secondary role. However, effects of local climatic conditions were partially observed for intensity. PMID:25216248

  5. Limitations in intense exercise performance of athletes - effect of speed endurance training on ion handling and fatigue development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying fatigue development and limitations for performance during intense exercise have been intensively studied during the past couple of decades. Fatigue development may involve several interacting factors and depends on type of exercise undertaken and training level...... into the beneficial effects of SET have been conducted in untrained and recreationally active individuals, making extrapolation towards athletes' performance difficult. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that only few weeks of SET enhances intense exercise performance in highly-trained individuals...

  6. Influence of excitation power density on temperature dependencies of NaYF4: Yb, Er nanoparticles luminescence spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustalkov, Sergey O.; Kozlova, Ekaterina A.; Savenko, Olga A.; Mohammed, Ammar H. M.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.

    2017-03-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles are good candidates for nanothermometry. The wavelength of the excitation and luminescence lie in optical window. The influence of the excitation power density on the luminescence temperature dependences is studded. Ratio of luminescence intensities linearly depends on temperature.

  7. Trait impulsivity and increased pre-attentional sensitivity to intense stimuli in bipolar disorder and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Swann, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity and sensation seeking are stimulus-oriented traits. Because they differ in degree of intention and planning, they may have distinct neurophysiological mechanisms. Impulsivity is prominent in bipolar disorder, and may be related to pre-attentional information filtering and stimulus-orientation. We investigated specificity of relationships between impulsivity and sensitivity to stimulus intensity in bipolar disorder and controls, using intensity-sensitivity of auditory evoked potentials. Seventy-six subjects (37 healthy controls, 39 with bipolar disorder) were administered an intensity-sensitivity paradigm. Additional measures included Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and Eysenck Impulsivity and Venturesomeness scores. State-dependent rapid-response impulsivity was measured using the Immediate Memory Task. Intensity-sensitivities of the auditory evoked P1N1, N1P2, P1, N1, and P2 potentials were assessed as the slope of amplitude relative to loudness. Analyses used general linear models (GLM) with impulsivity-related measures as dependent variables and age, gender, education, and diagnosis as dependent variables. BIS-11 total, motor, and attentional impulsivity scores correlated positively with pre-attentional N1 and P1N1 intensity-sensitivity slopes in bipolar disorder, but not in controls. BIS-11 nonplanning and Eysenck Venturesomeness scores did not correlate with intensity-sensitivity. Intensity-sensitivity slopes did not correlate with rapid-response impulsivity. Correlations between N1 or P1N1 slopes and BIS-11 scores in bipolar disorder were not affected by age, education, WAIS, treatment, symptoms, or gender. Trait impulsivity in bipolar disorder may be related to poorly modulated stimulus-driven late pre-attentional responses to stimuli, potentially resulting in exaggerated responses to intense stimuli even before conscious awareness. Components of trait impulsivity are physiologically heterogenous relative to intensity-sensitivity. Copyright

  8. The Intensity of Victimization : Associations with Children's Psychosocial Well-Being and Social Standing in the Classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Rozemarijn; Steglich, Christian; Salmivalli, Christina; Veenstra, René

    2015-01-01

    The association between experienced victimization and students' psychological and social adjustment depends on the intensity of victimization. We examined how frequency and multiplicity of victimization, and the number of bullies involved, account for differences in students' psychosocial well-being

  9. The Intensity of Victimization : Associations with Children’s Psychosocial Well-Being and Social Standing in the Classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Rozemarijn; Steglich, Christian; Salmivalli, Christina; Veenstra, René

    2015-01-01

    The association between experienced victimization and students' psychological and social adjustment depends on the intensity of victimization. We examined how frequency and multiplicity of victimization, and the number of bullies involved, account for differences in students’ psychosocial well-being

  10. Sound radiation from an infinite elastic cylinder with dual-wave propagation-intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an elastic cylindrical shell filled with fluid and supporting multiwave propagation is studied analytically. Combinations of supersonic and subsonic shell waves are considered. The radiated field is mapped by using acoustic intensity vectors evaluated at various locations. Both time averaged and instantaneous intensity are investigated. The acoustic intensity is seen to vary markedly with axial distance down the cylinder. The effect is shown to be associated with cross terms in the intensity relations, and its magnitude and location to depend upon the relative phase and amplitudes of individual waves. Subsonic shell waves are demonstrated to interact strongly with supersonic shell waves to cause a large modification in the radiated intensity distributions near the shell surface.

  11. Industrial Capital Intensity and Comparative Advantages Dynamism of Indonesian Export Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Wiwin Setyari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of new trade theory which incorporates the interaction between trade and international capital flows indicates if the possibility of changes in a country's comparative advantage due to the opening of international capital flows. International capi tal flows allow for changes in the industrial structure of a country depends on the composition of the products produced in that coun try. More capital-intensive types of products produced by a country, the greater the need for capital and the higher marginal rate of capital that can be given to attract greater international capital flows. Therefore, a comparative advantage should be seen as dynamic rather than static. As a country with large population, Indonesia tends to specialize in labor -intensive products. The other hand, efforts to attract foreign direct investment are very intensively conducted. The estimation results indicate if there was a shift in the pattern of industrial specialization Indonesia, from labor –intensive tends toward capital intensive.

  12. Effect of laser intensity on radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of atmospheric air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P., E-mail: premkiranuoh@gmail.com, E-mail: prem@uohyd.ac.in [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-06-07

    The studies on the effect of input laser intensity, through the variation of laser focusing geometry, on radio frequency (RF) emissions, over 30–1000 MHz from nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of atmospheric air are presented. The RF emissions from the ns and ps LIB were observed to be decreasing and increasing, respectively, when traversed from tight to loose focusing conditions. The angular and radial intensities of the RF emissions from the ns and ps LIB are found to be consistent with sin{sup 2}θ/r{sup 2} dependence of the electric dipole radiation. The normalized RF emissions were observed to vary with incident laser intensity (Iλ{sup 2}), indicating the increase in the induced dipole moment at moderate input laser intensities and the damping of radiation due to higher recombination rate of plasma at higher input laser intensities.

  13. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  14. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors.

  15. The psychological aspects of intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dannenfeldt

    1982-01-01

    The technical and physical care of the critically ill patient has been perfected, but the psychological aspects of intensive nursing care have to a greater or lesser extent been neglected. The objective of this article is to highlight the causes of psychological problems in an intensive care unit, how to recognise these problems and above all how to prevent or correct them.

  16. Nitrous oxide emission from intensively managed grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthof, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this thesis are to quantify nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emission from intensively managed grasslands in the Netherlands, to increase the insight in the factors controlling N 2 O emission from intensively managed grasslands and to explore

  17. Stroke: Critical appraissal of intensive care management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a common medical condition in the medical units.Stroke patients are usually managed on the medical wards while some that needs organ support are admitted into the intensive care unit.However there is conflicting data on the benefits or otherwise of admitting stroke patients into the intensive care ...

  18. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  19. Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, J.L.; Brock, R.; Butler, J.N.; Casey, B.C.K.; Collar, J.; de Gouvea, A.; Essig, R.; Grossman, Y.; Haxton, W.; Jaros, J.A.; Jung, C.K.; Lu, Z.T.; Pitts, K.; Ligeti, Z.; Patterson, J.R.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Ritchie, J.L.; Roodman, A.; Scholberg, K.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Zeller, G.P.; Aefsky, S.; Afanasev, A.; Agashe, K.; Albright, C.; Alonso, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Aoki, M.; Arguelles, C.A.; Arkani-Hamed, N.; Armendariz, J.R.; Armendariz-Picon, C.; Arrieta Diaz, E.; Asaadi, J.; Asner, D.M.; Babu, K.S.; Bailey, K.; Baker, O.; Balantekin, B.; Baller, B.; Bass, M.; Batell, B.; Beacham, J.; Behr, J.; Berger, N.; Bergevin, M.; Berman, E.; Bernstein, R.; Bevan, A.J.; Bishai, M.; Blanke, M.; Blessing, S.; Blondel, A.; Blum, T.; Bock, G.; Bodek, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boyce, J.; Breedon, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Brice, S.J.; Briere, R.A.; Brodsky, S.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Browder, T.E.; Bryman, D.A.; Buckley, M.; Burnstein, R.; Caden, E.; Campana, P.; Carlini, R.; Carosi, G.; Castromonte, C.; Cenci, R.; Chakaberia, I.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Cheng, C.H.; Choudhary, B.; Christ, N.H.; Christensen, E.; Christy, M.E.; Chupp, T.E.; Church, E.; Cline, D.B.; Coan, T.E.; Coloma, P.; Comfort, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, J.; Cooper, R.J.; Cowan, R.; Cowen, D.F.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Datta, A.; Davies, G.S.; Demarteau, M.; DeMille, D.P.; Denig, A.; Dermisek, R.; Deshpande, A.; Dewey, M.S.; Dharmapalan, R.; Dhooghe, J.; Dietrich, M.R.; Diwan, M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dobbs, S.; Duraisamy, M.; Dutta, B.; Duyang, H.; Dwyer, D.A.; Eads, M.; Echenard, B.; Elliott, S.R.; Escobar, C.; Fajans, J.; Farooq, S.; Faroughy, C.; Fast, J.E.; Feinberg, B.; Felde, J.; Feldman, G.; Fierlinger, P.; Fileviez Perez, P.; Filippone, B.; Fisher, P.; Flemming, B.T.; Flood, K.T.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.J.; Freyberger, A.; Friedland, A.; Gandhi, R.; Ganezer, K.S.; Garcia, A.; Garcia, F.G.; Gardner, S.; Garrison, L.; Gasparian, A.; Geer, S.; Gehman, V.M.; Gershon, T.; Gilchriese, M.; Ginsberg, C.; Gogoladze, I.; Gonderinger, M.; Goodman, M.; Gould, H.; Graham, M.; Graham, P.W.; Gran, R.; Grange, J.; Gratta, G.; Green, J.P.; Greenlee, H.; Group, R.C.; Guardincerri, E.; Gudkov, V.; Guenette, R.; Haas, A.; Hahn, A.; Han, T.; Handler, T.; Hardy, J.C.; Harnik, R.; Harris, D.A.; Harris, F.A.; Harris, P.G.; Hartnett, J.; He, B.; Heckel, B.R.; Heeger, K.M.; Henderson, S.; Hertzog, D.; Hill, R.; Hinds, E.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Holt, R.J.; Holtkamp, N.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Huelsnitz, W.; Imber, J.; Irastorza, I.; Jaeckel, J.; Jaegle, I.; James, C.; Jawahery, A.; Jensen, D.; Jessop, C.P.; Jones, B.; Jostlein, H.; Junk, T.; Kagan, A.L.; Kalita, M.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Karle, A.; Katori, T.; Kayser, B.; Kephart, R.; Kettell, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Kirby, M.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.; Kneller, J.; Kobach, A.; Kohl, M.; Kopp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Korsch, W.; Kourbanis, I.; Krisch, A.D.; Krizan, P.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kulkarni, S.; Kumar, K.S.; Kuno, Y.; Kutter, T.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lamm, M.; Lancaster, J.; Lancaster, M.; Lane, C.; Lang, K.; Langacker, P.; Lazarevic, S.; Le, T.; Lee, K.; Lesko, K.T.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, M.; Lindner, A.; Link, J.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.S.; Littlejohn, B.; Liu, C.Y.; Loinaz, W.; Lorenzon, W.; Louis, W.C.; Lozier, J.; Ludovici, L.; Lueking, L.; Lunardini, C.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Machado, P.A.N.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Maloney, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Marsh, W.; Marshak, M.; Martin, J.W.; Mauger, C.; McFarland, K.S.; McGrew, C.; McLaughlin, G.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Meadows, B.T.; Mehdiyev, R.; Melconian, D.; Merkel, H.; Messier, M.; Miller, J.P.; Mills, G.; Minamisono, U.K.; Mishra, S.R.; Mocioiu, I.; Sher, S.Moed; Mohapatra, R.N.; Monreal, B.; Moore, C.D.; Morfin, J.G.; Mousseau, J.; Moustakas, L.A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, P.; Muether, M.; Mumm, H.P.; Munger, C.; Murayama, H.; Nath, P.; Naviliat-Cuncin, O.; Nelson, J.K.; Neuffer, D.; Nico, J.S.; Norman, A.; Nygren, D.; Obayashi, Y.; O'Connor, T.P.; Okada, Y.; Olsen, J.; Orozco, L.; Orrell, J.L.; Osta, J.; Pahlka, B.; Paley, J.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papucci, M.; Parke, S.; Parker, R.H.; Parsa, Z.; Partyka, K.; Patch, A.; Pati, J.C.; Patterson, R.B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Paz, Gil; Perdue, G.N.; Perevalov, D.; Perez, G.; Petti, R.; Pettus, W.; Piepke, A.; Pivovaroff, M.; Plunkett, R.; Polly, C.C.; Pospelov, M.; Povey, R.; Prakesh, A.; Purohit, M.V.; Raby, S.; Raaf, J.L.; Rajendran, R.; Rajendran, S.; Rameika, G.; Ramsey, R.; Rashed, A.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Rebel, B.; Redondo, J.; Reimer, P.; Reitzner, D.; Ringer, F.; Ringwald, A.; Riordan, S.; Roberts, B.L.; Roberts, D.A.; Robertson, R.; Robicheaux, F.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Rott, C.; Rubin, P.; Saito, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schellman, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, D.W.; Schneps, J.; Schopper, A.; Schuster, P.; Schwartz, A.J.; Schwarz, M.; Seeman, J.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Seth, K.K.; Shafi, Q.; Shanahan, P.; Sharma, R.; Sharpe, S.R.; Shiozawa, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Sigurdson, K.; Sikivie, P.; Singh, J.; Sivers, D.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H.; Soderberg, M.; Song, Y.H.; Soni, A.; Souder, P.; Sousa, A.; Spitz, J.; Stancari, M.; Stavenga, G.C.; Steffen, J.H.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoeckinger, D.; Stone, S.; Strait, J.; Strassler, M.; Sulai, I.A.; Sundrum, R.; Svoboda, R.; Szczerbinska, B.; Szelc, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Tanedo, P.; Taneja, S.; Tang, J.; Tanner, D.B.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, I.; Thomas, J.; Thorn, C.; Tian, X.; Tice, B.G.; Tobar, M.; Tolich, N.; Toro, N.; Towner, I.S.; Tsai, Y.; Tschirhart, R.; Tunnell, C.D.; Tzanov, M.; Upadhye, A.; Urheim, J.; Vahsen, S.; Vainshtein, A.; Valencia, E.; Van de Water, R.G.; Van de Water, R.S.; Velasco, M.; Vogel, J.; Vogel, P.; Vogelsang, W.; Wah, Y.W.; Walker, D.; Weiner, N.; Weltman, A.; Wendell, R.; Wester, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitmore, J.; Widmann, E.; Wiedemann, G.; Wilkerson, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R.J.; Winter, W.; Wise, M.B.; Wodin, J.; Wojcicki, S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wongjirad, T.; Worcester, E.; Wurtele, J.; Xin, T.; Xu, J.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yavin, I.; Yeck, J.; Yeh, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Young, A.; Zimmerman, E.; Zioutas, K.; Zisman, M.; Zupan, J.; Zwaska, R.; Intensity Frontier Workshop

    2012-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

  20. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is to provide a medium for the dissemination of original works in Africa and other parts of the world about anaesthesia and intensive care including the application of basic sciences ...

  1. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This article presents an overview of the physics and applications of the interaction of high intensity laser light with matter. It traces the crucial advances that have occurred over the past few decades in laser technology and nonlinear optics and then discusses physical phenomena that occur in intense laser fields and their ...

  2. Treatment intensity and childhood apraxia of speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namasivayam, Aravind K.; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Hard, Jennifer; Rudzicz, Frank; Rietveld, Toni; Maassen, Ben; Kroll, Robert; van Lieshout, Pascal

    BackgroundIntensive treatment has been repeatedly recommended for the treatment of speech deficits in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, differences in treatment outcomes as a function of treatment intensity have not been systematically studied in this population. AimTo investigate the

  3. Threat intensity widens fear generalization gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunsmoor, J.E.; Kroes, M.C.W.; Braren, S.H.; Phelps, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    Research in nonhuman animals reveals threat-sensitive generalization of defensive behavior that favors widespread generalization when threat intensity is high and limited generalization (i.e., specificity) when threat intensity is low. Here, we used Pavlovian fear conditioning to systematically

  4. Development and comparison of different intensity duration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is aimed at developing and comparing different intensity duration frequency models. Twenty three years peak rainstorm intensity data with their corresponding durations was collected from the Nigerian Meteorological Agency, Calabar, Nigeria. Microsoft Excel software was used to develop exponential, ...

  5. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Hermans, G.

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is

  6. Origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bernadotte, Stephan; Jacob, Christoph R

    2012-01-01

    For electronic excitations in the ultraviolet and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, the intensities are usually calculated within the dipole approximation, which assumes that the oscillating electric field is constant over the whole molecule. For the short wavelengths used in X-ray spectroscopy, this dipole approximation breaks down and it becomes necessary to include higher-order contributions. In quantum-chemical approaches to X-ray spectroscopy, these so-called quadrupole intensities have so far been calculated by including contributions depending on the square of the electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transition moments. However, the resulting quadrupole intensities depend on the choice of the origin of the coordinate system. Here, we show that for obtaining an origin-independent theory, one has to include all contributions that are of the same order in the wave vector consistently. This leads to two additional contributions depending on products of the electric-dipole and electric-octup...

  7. Knowledge Intensive Entrepreneurship in a Social Capital Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Madsen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    In 1989 Mitton suggested that success for start-ups not only depends on who you are but also on whom you know. To study the importance of social capital and networks in relation to entrepreneurial activities, research in a Danish start-up context in two knowledge-intensive sectors has been carried...... out. The research methodology was based on a triangulation approach including a general questionnaire-based survey conducted through the Internet combined with a 85 in-depth interviews in purposefully sampled ventures. The analysis of the content and structure of social capital in relation...

  8. Design of Automatic Intensity Varying Smart Street Lighting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Gupta, Shipra

    2017-08-01

    The paper is proposed with an aim of power conservation. In this era of development, it is essential to develop a streetlight that turns on and off automatically without human interference. To achieve this light sensor have been placed in each panel which turns the street light on and off automatically. For energy conservation cool-white LED’s have been used in street light panel and dimmer modules have been installed which changes the intensity of the streetlight depending on the darkness.

  9. Early Birds by Light at Night: Effects of Light Color and Intensity on Daily Activity Patterns in Blue Tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Maaike; Caro, Samuel P.; Gienapp, Phillip; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Visser, Marcel E.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial light at night disturbs the daily rhythms of many organisms. To what extent this disturbance depends on the intensity and spectral composition of light remain obscure. Here, we measured daily activity patterns of captive blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) exposed to similar intensities of

  10. Motor intensive anti-gravity training improves performance in dynamic balance related tasks in persons with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Anne Sofie Bøgh; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the effect of training on motor performance in persons with Parkinson's disease (PDP) is dependent on motor intensity. However, training of high motor intensity can be hard to apply in PDP due to e.g. bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor and postural instability. Therefore...

  11. Intensity of climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiene Rodrigues dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the characteristics and intensity of climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. Methods: a cross-sectional, descriptive study with systematic sampling, consisting of 247 women in post menopause, who answered the Questionnaire of Women’s Health. To evaluate the intensity of climacteric symptoms the Menopausal Index of Blatt and Kupperman was used. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software version 17, a significance level of 5% and 95% confidence intervals for all analyzes were adopted. Results: 36.8% of women had mild climacteric symptoms, 56.3% moderate and 6.9% severe. In descending order hot flushes, irritability and sleep disorders reached the highest intensity ratios. Conclusion: the Menopausal index of Blatt and Kupperman (25.34 showed symptoms of moderate intensity. Hot flushes showed to be the symptom of highest intensity of discomfort.

  12. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, Inez; Dalgas, Ulrik; Vandenabeele, Frank

    2015-01-01

    exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body......±5%) and lean tissue mass (+1.4±0.5%) only increased in HITR. Finally self-reported physical activity levels increased 73±19% and 86±27% in HCTR and HITR, respectively. Conclusion High intensity cardiovascular exercise combined with resistance training was safe, well tolerated and improved muscle contractile......Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2...

  13. The effect of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sevinc, Pelin [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biotechnology; Guenduez, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus is a purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium which can produce hydrogen by photofermentation on acetate and lactate. Hydrogen productivity depends on several parameters such as medium composition, pH, light intensity and temperature. In the present study, the effects of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production were investigated. The cell growth curve has been fitted to the logistic model and hydrogen productivity was interpreted by Modified Gompertz Equation. The maximum productivity was obtained at 30 C and light intensity of 4000 lux. (orig.)

  14. Intensive case management for severe mental illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials (7328 participants) in this review. The trials provided data for two

  15. On extreme rainfall intensity increases with air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Gaal, Ladislav; Szolgay, Jan; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The water vapour holding capacity of air increases at about 7% per degree C according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. This is one of the arguments why a warmer future atmosphere, being able to hold more moisture, will generate higher extreme precipitation intensities. However, several empirical studies have recently demonstrated an increase in extreme rain intensities with air temperature above CC rates, in the range 7-14% per degree C worldwide (called super-CC rates). This was observed especially for shorter duration rainfall, i.e. in hourly and finer resolution data (e.g. review in Westra et al., 2014). The super-CC rate was attributed to positive feedbacks between water vapour and the updraft dynamics in convective clouds and lateral supply (convergence) of moisture. In addition, mixing of storm types was shown to be potentially responsible for super-CC rates in empirical studies. Assuming that convective events are accompanied by lightning, we will show on a large rainfall dataset in Switzerland (30 year records of 10-min and 1-hr data from 59 stations) that while the average rate of increase in extreme rainfall intensity (95th percentile) is 6-7% in no-lightning events and 8-9% in lightning events, it is 11-13% per degree C when all events are combined (Molnar et al., 2015). These results are relevant for climate change studies which predict shifts in storm types in a warmer climate in some parts of the world. The observation that extreme rain intensity and air temperature are positively correlated has consequences for the stochastic modelling of rainfall. Most current stochastic models do not explicitly include a direct rain intensity-air temperature dependency beyond applying factors of change predicted by climate models to basic statistics of precipitation. Including this dependency explicitly in stochastic models will allow, for example in the nested modelling approach of Paschalis et al. (2014), the random cascade disaggregation routine to be

  16. [Benzodiazepine dependence: causalities and treatment options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, A; Bleich, S; Kornhuber, J; Hillemacher, T

    2009-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are very often prescribed because of their anxiolytic, sedative and hypnotic properties. However, long term treatment is associated with development of benzodiazepine dependence. Besides development of physical dependence, which is linked to a typical benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome when drug intake is discontinued, also behavioural addiction to benzodiazepines has been described. Benzodiazepines are known to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission. Counter regulation of enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission by enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission is thought to be one reason underlying the typical symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Also alterations in the expression of neuropeptides like Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Neuropeptide Y are thought to be involved in the development of benzodiazepine dependence. However, until today the knowledge of neural mechanisms underlying the development of benzodiazepine dependence remains incomplete. Because even long term treatment with small doses of benzodiazepines is associated with adverse reactions like cognitive dysfunctions withdrawal from benzodiazepines should be aimed. Anticonvulsants and antidepressants seem to reduce the intensity of benzodiazepine withdrawal and to enhance long term prognosis of dependence.

  17. Temperature dependencies of frequency characteristics of HTSC RLC curcuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatyan, Vahe V.; Aroutiounian, V. M.; Shmavonyan, G. Sh.; Buniatyan, Vaz. V.

    2006-05-01

    Analytical expressions of temperature dependencies of magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of a HTSC RLC parallel circuit are obtained, where the resistance and inductance are non-linearly depended on the optical signal modulated by the intensity. It is shown that the magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of circuits can be controlled by choosing the parameters of the HTSC thin film and optical "pump".

  18. State Dependence in Unemployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Nisar

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the extent state dependence among unemployed immigrants in a dynamic discrete choice framework. Three alternative methodologies are employed to control for the problem of the initial condition. The empirical findings show that there is a considerable correlation between the un...

  19. Aspects, Dependencies, and Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitchyan, R; Fabry, J.; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Südholt, M.; Consel, C.

    2007-01-01

    For Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) the topic of Aspects, Dependencies and Interactions is of high importance across the whole range of development activities – from requirements engineering through to language design. Aspect interactions must be adequately addressed all across the

  20. Empirically sampling Universal Dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schluter, Natalie; Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Universal Dependencies incur a high cost in computation for unbiased system development. We propose a 100% empirically chosen small subset of UD languages for efficient parsing system development. The technique used is based on measurements of model capacity globally. We show that the diversity...

  1. Reference-Dependent Sympathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Natural disasters and other traumatic events often draw a greater charitable response than do ongoing misfortunes, even those that may cause even more widespread misery, such as famine or malaria. Why is the response disproportionate to need? The notion of reference dependence critical to Prospect Theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979) maintains that…

  2. Path dependence and creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garud, Raghu; Karnøe, Peter

    the place of agency in these theories that take history so seriously. In the end, they are as interested in path creation and destruction as they are in path dependence. This book is compiled of both theoretical and empirical writing. It shows relatively well-known industries such as the automobile...

  3. Beyond Dependency Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Pedro

    1983-01-01

    Dependency theory was part of the reaction against the thesis that proclaimed the benefits of economic integration into the capitalist world. The theory emphasizes the interplay between the internal structures of developing nations and international structures, and analyzes desirable national strategies and policies for structural changes. (CS)

  4. Aspects, Dependencies and Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanen, F.; Chitchyan, R; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Fabry, J.; Sudholt, M.; Mehner, K.; Cebulla, M.

    2008-01-01

    The topics on aspects, dependencies and interactions are among the key remaining challenges to be tackled by the Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) community to enable a wide adoption of AOSD technology. This second workshop, organized and supported by the AOSD-Europe project, aimed to

  5. Oxygen Dependent Biocatalytic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard

    to aldehydes and ketones, oxyfunctionalization of C-H bonds, and epoxidation of C-C double bonds. Although oxygen dependent biocatalysis offers many possibilities, there are numerous chal-lenges to be overcome before an enzyme can be implemented in an industrial process. These challenges requires the combined...

  6. Intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese intensive care patients: A hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robstad, Nastasja; Söderhamn, Ulrika; Fegran, Liv

    2017-06-21

    To obtain a deeper understanding of qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care. Admission of obese patients with complex healthcare needs to intensive care units is increasing. Caring for obese critically ill patients can be challenging and demanding for the intensive care nurse because of the patients' weight, critical situation and physical challenges. There is a gap in knowledge at present about qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care units. A qualitative hermeneutic approach. The study took place in 2016 at intensive care units of two different hospitals. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 13 qualified intensive care nurses. The interviews were analysed according to a Gadamerian-inspired research method. Intensive care nurses perceived caring for obese intensive care patients as emotionally demanding owing to these patients' vulnerability, dissimilarity and physical challenges compared to normal weight patients. They experienced ambivalent feelings caring for these patients: while they endeavoured to provide good and equal care to all patients, they simultaneously held negative beliefs and attitudes towards obese patients. Furthermore, frustration arose among the intensive care nurses relating to the physically demanding care situations and an unwillingness to care for such patients among some colleagues. The qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients revealed ambivalent feelings, attitudes and beliefs towards these patients, which must be considered in intensive care unit practice as well as in the education of these nurses. The results have implications for clinical practice with respect to increasing intensive care nurses' awareness of their attitudes and beliefs towards obese intensive care patients and to improve the education of these nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  8. [Ziconotide: an innovative alternative for intense chronic neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valía-Vera, J C; Villanueva, V L; Asensio-Samper, J M; López-Alarcón, M D; de Andrés, J A

    Intense chronic pain is a very important health problem, as it has a high prevalence (5-10%), a multifactorial aetiology and its management is very often a very complex affair. Treatment of severe cases sometimes requires interventional approaches, such as continuous intrathecal infusion of opioids. We report the case of a 38-year-old female with intense neuropathic pain in the lower back and the lower limbs secondary to three operations on the L5-S1 lumbar segment. After implementing several different pharmacological regimes involving both oral and implanted systems (spinal cord stimulation and subarachnoid infusion pump with different pharmacological combinations) with no clinical improvement, intrathecal infusion with ziconotide was included in the protocol. Ziconotide is the first specific neuronal blocker that acts on the calcium channel by blocking the N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. It is a new non-opioid analgesic with approved indication in the treatment of intense chronic pain, in patients who require intrathecal analgesics and are refractory to other analgesic treatments. Therefore, we shall have to consider this drug as a therapeutic alternative in patients do not experience sufficient relief with the pharmacological agents and means currently available to treat them.

  9. [Analysis of NIC interventions in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Daniel; Rodríguez, Magdalena; Rodríguez, Dolores; Gómez, Dolores; Estrella, Pilar; Liz, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and analyze the nursing interventions NIC developed in the clinical practice by specialized nurses in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Descriptive study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of University Complex Hospital of León. The study population included all the neonates admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from 1 march to 30 november of 2011. Database was created with the statistical program Epi Info where NIC interventions were collected between the selected by the panel of experts. We collected a sum of 283 records of 44 neonates admitted with an average weight of 1705.5 gr and 14.3 days of age. Nurses have performed a total of 8861 NIC interventions. The highest percentage of interventions (47,1%) belong to the complex physiological domain, followed by the basic physiological (17,7%). We found 40,1%; 30,6% and 29,1% interventions in the early, late and night shifts. The highest percentage of interventions belong to the complex physiological domain although we can conclude that in the nursing clinical practice the solution of problems not only depend of interventions in that area but other areas such as family key intervention in the neonatal care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Cigar burning under different smoking intensities and effects on emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethloff, Ole; Mueller, Christian; Cahours, Xavier; Colard, Stéphane

    2017-10-24

    The effect of smoking intensity on cigar smoke emissions was assessed under a range of puff frequencies and puff volumes. In order to potentially reduce emissions variability and to identify patterns as accurately as possible, cigar weights and diameters were measured, and outliers were excluded prior to smoking. Portions corresponding to 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the cigar, measured down to the butt length, were smoked under several smoking conditions, to assess nicotine, CO and water yields. The remaining cigar butts were analysed for total alkaloids, nicotine, and moisture. Results showed accumulation effects during the burning process having a significant impact on smoke emission levels. Condensation and evaporation occur and lead to smoke emissions dependent on smoking intensity. Differences were observed for CO on one side as a gas phase compound and nicotine on the other side as a particulate phase compound. For a given intensity, while CO emission increases linearly as the cigar burns, nicotine and water emissions exhibited an exponential increase. Our investigations showed that a complex phenomena occurs during the course of cigar smoking which makes emission data: difficult to interpret, is potentially misleading to the consumer, and inappropriate for exposure assessment. The results indicate that, tobacco content and physical parameters may well be the most robust basis for product characterisation and comparison rather than smoke emission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dissociative ionization of acetonitrile in intense femtosecond laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, Y.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Sayrac, M.; Kaya, N.; Schuessler, H. A.; Strohaber, J.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the formation of positively charged fragments of acetonitrile (CH3CN) in intense 800 nm, 50 fs pulses of radiation using a reflectron time-of-flight (TOF) ion mass spectrometer. Singly-charged ions of CHnCN+ (n={0-3}), HCN+, CN+, {{{{CH}}}3}+, {{{{CH}}}2}+, CH+, C+ and H+; and the multiply charged ions of C2+, C3+, {{{{CH}}}2}2+, and {{{{CH}}}2}3+ were observed in the mass spectra. Quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) of appearance energies for the parent molecule and daughter fragments have been carried out. Intensity dependent ion yields were measured for intensities between 4.4× {10}13 {{W}} {{{cm}}}-2 and 3.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{{cm}}}-2. Angular distributions of most fragment ions were found to peak when the laser radiation was polarized parallel to the TOF axis, while the carbon ions, C+ and C2+, were found to have maxima for both polarizations parallel and perpendicular to this axis. Kinetic energies of H+ fragments were experimentally measured and three different photo dissociation mechanisms were identified.

  12. Palliative care in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restau, Jame; Green, Pamela

    2014-12-01

    Most patients who receive terminal care in the intensive care setting die after withdrawing or limiting of life-sustaining measures provided in the intensive care setting. The integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) provides care, comfort, and planning for patients, families, and the medical staff to help decrease the emotional, spiritual, and psychological stress of a patient's death. Quality measures for palliative care in the ICU are discussed along with case studies to demonstrate how this integration is beneficial for a patient and family. Integrating palliative care into the ICU is also examined in regards to the complex adaptive system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neutron intensity of fast reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    Neutron intensity of spent fuel of the JOYO Mk-II core with a burnup of 62,500 MWd/t and cooling time of 5.2 years was measured at the spent fuel storage pond. The measured data were compared with the calculated values based on the JOYO core management code system `MAGI`, and the average C/E approximately 1.2 was obtained. It was found that the axial neutron intensity didn`t simply follow the burnup distribution, and the neutron intensity was locally increased at the bottom end of the fuel region due to an accumulation of {sup 244}Cm. (author)

  14. Primary palliative care in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L; English, Nancy K

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the 2014 Institute of Medicine׳s recommendation concerning primary palliative care as integral to all neonates and their families in the intensive care setting. We review trends in neonatology and barriers to implementing palliative care in intensive care settings. Neonatal primary palliative care education should address the unique needs of neonates and their families. The neonatal intensive care unit needs a mixed model of palliative care, where the neonatal team provides primary palliative care and the palliative subspecialist consults for more complex or refractory situations that exceed the primary team׳s skills or available time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic jump intensities and risk premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Ornthanalai, Chayawat; Jacobs, Kris

    2012-01-01

    We build a new class of discrete-time models that are relatively easy to estimate using returns and/or options. The distribution of returns is driven by two factors: dynamic volatility and dynamic jump intensity. Each factor has its own risk premium. The models significantly outperform standard...... models without jumps when estimated on S&P500 returns. We find very strong support for time-varying jump intensities. Compared to the risk premium on dynamic volatility, the risk premium on the dynamic jump intensity has a much larger impact on option prices. We confirm these findings using joint...

  16. Studying Cosmic Evolution with 21 cm Intensity Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher

    This thesis describes early work in the developing field of 21-cm intensity mapping. The 21-cm line is a radio transition due to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state of neutral hydrogen (HI). Intensity mapping utilizes the aggregate redshifted 21-cm emission to map the three-dimensional distribution of HI on large scales. In principle, the 21-cm line can be utilized to map most of the volume of the observable Universe. But the signal is small, and dedicated instruments will be required to reach a high signal-to-noise ratio. Large spectrally smooth astrophysical foregrounds, which dwarf the 21-cm signal, present a significant challenge to the data analysis. I derive the fundamental physics of the 21-cm line and the size of the expected cosmological signal. I also provide an overview of the desired characteristics of a dedicated 21-cm instrument, and I list some instruments that are coming on-line in the next few years. I then describe the data analysis techniques and results for 21-cm intensity maps that were made with two existing radio telescopes, the Green Bank telescope (GBT) and the Parkes telescope. Both observations have detected the 21-cm HI signal by cross-correlating the 21-cm intensity maps with overlapping optical galaxy surveys. The GBT maps have been used to constrain the neutral hydrogen density at a mean redshift (z) of 0.8. The Parkes maps, at a mean redshift of 0.08, probe smaller scales. The Parkes 21-cm intensity maps reveal a lack of small-scale clustering when they are cross-correlated with 2dF optical galaxy maps. This lack of small-scale clustering is partially due to a scale-dependent and galaxy-color-dependent HI-galaxy cross- correlation coefficient. Lastly, I provide an overview of planned future analyses with the Parkes maps, with a proposed multi-beam receiver for the Green Bank telescope, and with simulations of systematic effects on foregrounds.

  17. [Prevention of alcohol dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trova, A C; Paparrigopoulos, Th; Liappas, I; Ginieri-Coccossis, M

    2015-01-01

    With the exception of cardiovascular diseases, no other medical condition causes more serious dysfunction or premature deaths than alcohol-related problems. Research results indicate that alcohol dependent individuals present an exceptionally poor level of quality of life. This is an outcome that highlights the necessity of planning and implementing preventive interventions on biological, psychological or social level, to be provided to individuals who make alcohol abuse, as well as to their families. Preventive interventions can be considered on three levels of prevention: (a) primary prevention, which is focused on the protection of healthy individuals from alcohol abuse and dependence, and may be provided on a universal, selective or indicated level, (b) secondary prevention, which aims at the prevention of deterioration regarding alcoholic dependence and relapse, in the cases of individuals already diagnosed with the condition and (c) tertiary prevention, which is focused at minimizing deterioration of functioning in chronically sufferers from alcoholic dependence. The term "quaternary prevention" can be used for the prevention of relapse. As for primary prevention, interventions focus on assessing the risk of falling into problematic use, enhancing protective factors and providing information and health education in general. These interventions can be delivered in schools or in places of work and recreation for young people. In this context, various programs have been applied in different countries, including Greece with positive results (Preventure, Alcolocks, LST, SFP, Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device). Secondary prevention includes counseling and structured help with the delivery of programs in schools and in high risk groups for alcohol dependence (SAP, LST). These programs aim at the development of alcohol refusal skills and behaviors, the adoption of models of behaviors resisting alcohol use, as well as reinforcement of general social skills. In the

  18. A Clinic Model: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome and Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elizabeth L; Bloom, Sarah L; Stollings, Joanna L; Camp, Mildred; Sevin, Carla M; Jackson, James C

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients surviving critical illness in the United States has increased with advancements in medicine. Post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family are terms developed by the Society of Critical Care Medicine in order to address the cognitive, psychological, and physical sequelae emerging in patients and their families after discharge from the intensive care unit. In the United Kingdom and Europe, intensive care unit follow-up clinics have been used to address the complications of post-intensive care syndrome for some time. However, the interprofessional clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among the first in the United States to address the wide variety of problems experienced by intensive care survivors and to provide patients and their families with care after discharge from the intensive care unit.

  19. Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations

  20. Regional Seismic Intensity Anomalies in the Korean Peninsula and Its Implications for Seismic-Hazard Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Hong, Tae-Kyung

    2017-07-01

    The strength of seismic ground motion is a consequence of seismic source strength and medium response. The dependence of seismic amplitudes and seismic intensity on regional geological structures and crustal properties in the stable intraplate region around the Korean Peninsula is investigated. An instrumental seismic intensity scale based on spectral accelerations are proposed after calibrating with the reported macroseismic intensities. A representative seismic intensity attenuation curve for the Korean Peninsula is given by I(M_{ {L}},l,h) = -0.998 (± 0.222) + 1.72 (± 0.04) M_{ {L}} - 0.322 (± 0.027) {ln}(l^2 + h^2) - 0.00608 (± 0.00049) √{l^2 + h^2}, where I(M_{ {L}},l,h) is the seismic intensity at an epicentral distance l in km for an earthquake with local magnitude M_{ {L}} and focal depth h in km. Seismic intensities decay slowly with distance in the Korean Peninsula. The observed decay rate for the Korean Peninsula is comparable with those for other stable intraplate regions, while are lower than those for active regions. The regional seismic intensity anomalies present a characteristic correlation with geological structures. Positive seismic intensity anomalies appear in the Yeongnam massif, Okcheon belt and Gyeongsang basin, while negative seismic intensity anomalies in the Gyeonggi massif. The regional seismic intensity anomalies display positive correlations with crustal thicknesses, crustal amplifications, and seismicity density and negative correlations with heat flows. Positive seismic intensity anomalies are observed in the Yeongnam massif and Gyeongsang basin, suggesting high seismic-hazard potentials in the regions. The regional crustal properties may provide useful information on potential seismic hazards.

  1. Psychobiological Responses to Preferred and Prescribed Intensity Exercise in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jacob D; Ellingson, Laura D; Koltyn, Kelli F; Stegner, Aaron J; Kim, Jee-Seon; Cook, Dane B

    2016-11-01

    Exercise acutely improves mood in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unknown whether benefits differ depending on whether exercise intensity is self-selected or prescribed. This study aimed to compare psychological and biological responses to preferred and prescribed steady-state exercise intensities to a patient-selected preferred intensity. Female adults (N = 24, age = 38.6 ± 14.0 yr) diagnosed with MDD completed four 30-min sessions of cycling exercise at three prescribed intensities (RPE of 11, 13, and 15) and one session with a self-selected intensity (preferred). Order was randomized and counterbalanced. Depressed mood (DM) was evaluated before, 10 min, and 30 min postexercise using the Profile of Mood States. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was measured before and within 10 min postexercise. Changes in BDNF and DM for the preferred session were compared with the following prescribed sessions: 1) performed at the most similar intensity (matched on RPE; closest) and 2) with the greatest improvement in DM (greatest). Compared with the preferred session, improvement in DM was significantly larger after the greatest session (30 min postexercise: -11.8 ± 7.4 vs -3.4 ± 4.8), and the BDNF response was significantly greater after the closest session (5.4 ± 6.9 vs -1.4 ± 9.8 ng·mL). Permitting patients to select their own exercise intensity did not maximize improvements in mood. Further, preferred intensity exercise was also associated with a smaller BDNF response. Overall, the results suggest that exercise undertaken to improve mood should be prescribed on an individual basis in MDD and not necessarily based on the patient's preferred intensity. Clinicians, psychologists, and other practitioners should consider providing clear exercise intensity recommendations for symptom management in depression rather than allowing patients to self-select their intensity.

  2. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed "whispering" can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm...... and the louder open space hunting bats have been recorded at above 135 dB SPL. This implies that maximum emitted intensities are generally 30 dB or more above initial estimates. Bats' dynamic control of acoustic features also includes the intensity and directionality of their sonar calls. Aerial hawking bats...... will increase signal directionality in the field along with intensity thus increasing sonar range. During the last phase of prey pursuit, vespertilionid bats broaden their echolocation beam considerably, probably to counter evasive maneuvers of eared prey. We highlight how multiple call parameters (frequency...

  3. Applications in Data-Intensive Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anuj R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Choudhury, Sutanay; Gorton, Ian; Gracio, Deborah K.; Halter, Todd D.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Johnson, John R.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Macduff, Matt C.; Marquez, Andres; Monroe, Matthew E.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Pike, William A.; Scherrer, Chad; Villa, Oreste; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Zuljevic, Nino

    2010-04-01

    This book chapter, to be published in Advances in Computers, Volume 78, in 2010 describes applications of data intensive computing (DIC). This is an invited chapter resulting from a previous publication on DIC. This work summarizes efforts coming out of the PNNL's Data Intensive Computing Initiative. Advances in technology have empowered individuals with the ability to generate digital content with mouse clicks and voice commands. Digital pictures, emails, text messages, home videos, audio, and webpages are common examples of digital content that are generated on a regular basis. Data intensive computing facilitates human understanding of complex problems. Data-intensive applications provide timely and meaningful analytical results in response to exponentially growing data complexity and associated analysis requirements through the development of new classes of software, algorithms, and hardware.

  4. Physics Prospects with an Intense Neutrino Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Solomey, N

    2000-01-01

    With new forthcoming intense neutrino beams, for the study of neutrino oscillations, it is possible to consider other physics experiments that can be done with these extreme neutrino fluxes available close to the source.

  5. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  6. WWW-intensive concept mapping for metacognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Kommers, Piet

    2008-01-01

    Stoyanov, S., & Kommers, P. (2006). WWW-intensive concept mapping for metacognition in solving ill-structured problems. International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Lifelong Learning, 16(3/4), 297-316.

  7. Intelligent agents in data-intensive computing

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Luís; Molina, José

    2016-01-01

    This book presents new approaches that advance research in all aspects of agent-based models, technologies, simulations and implementations for data intensive applications. The nine chapters contain a review of recent cross-disciplinary approaches in cloud environments and multi-agent systems, and important formulations of data intensive problems in distributed computational environments together with the presentation of new agent-based tools to handle those problems and Big Data in general. This volume can serve as a reference for students, researchers and industry practitioners working in or interested in joining interdisciplinary work in the areas of data intensive computing and Big Data systems using emergent large-scale distributed computing paradigms. It will also allow newcomers to grasp key concepts and potential solutions on advanced topics of theory, models, technologies, system architectures and implementation of applications in Multi-Agent systems and data intensive computing. .

  8. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... in the Scandinavian countries to help critically ill patients come to terms with their illness after hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the emergence and evolution of intensive care patient diaries in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The study had a comparative international design using...... secondary analysis of qualitative data generated by key-informant telephone interviews with intensive care nurses (n=114). The study showed that diaries were introduced concurrently in the three Scandinavian countries as a grass-roots initiative by mutual cross-national inspiration. The concept has evolved...

  9. Intensive educational course in allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, A; Perez, E E; Sriaroon, P; Nguyen, D; Lockey, R F; Dorsey, M J

    2012-09-01

    A one-day intensive educational course on allergy and immunology theory and diagnostic procedure significantly increased the competency of allergy and immunology fellows-in-training. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and xerostomia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chambers, Mark S; Weber, Randal S; Garden, Adam S

    2006-01-01

    Conformal radiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy, IMRT, is a radiation technique that potentially can minimize the dose to salivary glands and thereby decrease the incidence of xerostomia...

  11. Context Dependent Spectral Unmixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Symposium (IGARSS), july 2008, vol. 2, pp. II–371 –II–374. [81] H. Frigui, L. Zhang, and P. Gader, “Context-dependent multisensor fusion and its...is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of

  12. Counting Dependence Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-02

    cs.utexas.edu Supervising Professor: Doug Burger Second Reader: Stephen W. Keckler May 2, 2008 Abstract Modern processors rely on memory dependence...be improved further for large windows without compromising its ability to support fully distributed execution. 8 Acknowledgements I thank Doug Burger ...by the Intel Undergraduate Research Fellowship for 2007- 2008. References [1] D. Burger , S. W. Keckler, K. S. McKinley, M. Dahlin, L. K. John, C. Lin

  13. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  14. Reference Dependent Altruism

    OpenAIRE

    Breitmoser, Yves; Tan, Jonathan H.W.

    2014-01-01

    In view of behavioral patterns left unorganized by current social preference theories, we propose a theory of reference dependent altruism (RDA). With RDA, one's degree of altruism increases at reference points. It induces equity and efficiency effects that are conditional on whether or not payoffs meet reference points. We verify the theory first by experimentally analyzing majority bargaining, where observed behavior contradicts existing theories but confirms RDA. Using parameter estimates ...

  15. Dependency Tree Annotation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    CoNLL is organized by the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL) Special Interest Group on Natural Language Learning (SIGNLL). 2. Features...The system supports interactive visualization and editing of dependency trees—a formalism frequently used in computational linguistics to represent...between words. DTE supports the widely used Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL)-X format as well as several other file

  16. Time dependence of ICD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    We will discuss experimental studies of ICD in van der Vaals dimers of rare gas atoms and small molecules using the COLTRIMS technique. The talk will cover ICD after resonant Auger excitation (Nature 505, 664 (2014)) and two studies unveiling the time dependence of ICD in the energy (PRL 111, 233004 (2013)) and in the time domain (PRL 111, 093401 (2013)). A new technique to make ultrafast movies without the use of short pulses will be discussed.

  17. Intensity of plant collecting in southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Gibbs Russell

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of plant collecting in southern Africa is mapped using records from the Pretoria National Herbarium Computerized Information System (PRECIS, For the entire area, over 85% of the quarter degree grid squares have fewer than 100 specimens recorded. Collecting intensities are compared for different countries, biomes and climatic zones. Future field work from the National Herbarium will be concentrated in areas most seriously under-collected.

  18. The psychological aspects of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dannenfeldt

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available The technical and physical care of the critically ill patient has been perfected, but the psychological aspects of intensive nursing care have to a greater or lesser extent been neglected. The objective of this article is to highlight the causes of psychological problems in an intensive care unit, how to recognise these problems and above all how to prevent or correct them.

  19. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Awareness of sequelae due to the original illness and its treatment may result in changes in treatment and support during and after the acute phase. To determine the current knowledge on physical and ...

  20. Intensive care unit family satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S M; So, H M; Fok, S K; Li, S C; Ng, C P; Lui, W K; Heyland, D K; Yan, W W

    2015-10-01

    To examine the level of family satisfaction in a local intensive care unit and its performance in comparison with international standards, and to determine the factors independently associated with higher family satisfaction. Questionnaire survey. A medical-surgical adult intensive care unit in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Adult family members of patients admitted to the intensive care unit for 48 hours or more between 15 June 2012 and 31 January 2014, and who had visited the patient at least once during their stay. Of the 961 eligible families, 736 questionnaires were returned (response rate, 76.6%). The mean (± standard deviation) total satisfaction score, and subscores on satisfaction with overall intensive care unit care and with decision-making were 78.1 ± 14.3, 78.0 ± 16.8, and 78.6 ± 13.6, respectively. When compared with a Canadian multicentre database with respective mean scores of 82.9 ± 14.8, 83.5 ± 15.4, and 82.6 ± 16.0 (Pcare were concern for patients and families, agitation management, frequency of communication by nurses, physician skill and competence, and the intensive care unit environment. A performance-importance plot identified the intensive care unit environment and agitation management as factors that required more urgent attention. This is the first intensive care unit family satisfaction survey published in Hong Kong. Although comparable with published data from other parts of the world, the results indicate room for improvement when compared with a Canadian multicentre database. Future directions should focus on improving the intensive care unit environment, agitation management, and communication with families.

  1. MEASURING PATH DEPENDENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Juhasz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While risk management gained popularity during the last decades even some of the basic risk types are still far out of focus. One of these is path dependency that refers to the uncertainty of how we reach a certain level of total performance over time. While decision makers are careful in accessing how their position will look like the end of certain periods, little attention is given how they will get there through the period. The uncertainty of how a process will develop across a shorter period of time is often “eliminated” by simply choosing a longer planning time interval, what makes path dependency is one of the most often overlooked business risk types. After reviewing the origin of the problem we propose and compare seven risk measures to access path. Traditional risk measures like standard deviation of sub period cash flows fail to capture this risk type. We conclude that in most cases considering the distribution of the expected cash flow effect caused by the path dependency may offer the best method, but we may need to use several measures at the same time to include all the optimisation limits of the given firm

  2. Combining psychosocial treatment with pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Kueppenbender, Karsten D

    2006-12-01

    Pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence is always delivered in a psychosocial context that may affect the outcome of the treatment. The rigorous study of different psychotherapeutic treatments for alcohol dependence has shown several distinct approaches to be effective. This article reviews the combination of alcohol dependence pharmacotherapies, including disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate, with different psychosocial interventions. Many psychosocial interventions for alcohol dependence, including Alcoholics Anonymous, can be integrated successfully with pharmacotherapy. Psychosocial interventions, ranging from brief medical management to more intensive manualized psychotherapies, have all been shown to produce positive outcomes in certain studies, depending on the specific medication and the study context. Particularly successful combinations may include the use of behavioral marital therapy plus a disulfiram contract for patients taking that medication, and the combination of naltrexone or acamprosate with cognitive-behavioral therapy or psychosocial support. Ongoing research examining the optimal combinations of medications with different psychosocial treatments for alcohol dependence may further inform the field.

  3. Effect of acute nitrate ingestion on V̇O2response at different exercise intensity domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiarone, Thaysa; Ataide-Silva, Thays; Bertuzzi, Romulo; McConell, Glenn Kevin; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    While nitrate supplementation influences oxygen uptake (V̇O 2 ) response to exercise, this effect may be intensity dependent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute nitrate supplementation on V̇O 2 response during different exercise intensity domains in humans. Eleven men ingested 10 mg·kg -1 body mass (8.76 ± 1.35 mmol) of sodium nitrate or sodium chloride (placebo) 2.5 h before cycling at moderate (90% of gas exchange threshold; GET), heavy (GET + 40% of the difference between GET and peak oxygen uptake (V̇O 2peak ), Δ 40) or severe (GET + 80% of the difference between GET and V̇O 2peak , Δ 80) exercise intensities. Volunteers performed exercise for 10 min (moderate), 15 min (heavy) or until exhaustion (severe). Acute nitrate supplementation had no effect on any V̇O 2 response parameters during moderate and severe exercise intensities. However, the V̇O 2 slow amplitude (nitrate: 0.93 ± 0.36 L·min -1 vs. placebo: 1.13 ± 0.59 L·min -1 , p = 0.04) and V̇O 2 slow gain (nitrate: 5.81 ± 2.37 mL·min -1 ·W -1 vs. placebo: 7.09 ± 3.67 mL·min -1 ·W -1 , p = 0.04) were significantly lower in nitrate than in placebo during the heavy exercise intensity. There was no effect of nitrate on plasma lactate during any exercise intensity (p > 0.05). Time to exhaustion during the severe exercise intensity was also not affected by nitrate (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute nitrate supplementation reduced the slow component of V̇O 2 only when performing heavy-intensity exercise, which might indicate an intensity-dependent effect of nitrate on V̇O 2 response.

  4. Energy Intensity analysis of Indian manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Soni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy has been recognized as one of the key inputs for the economic growth and social development of a country. India being one of the largest and rapidly growing developing countries, there is an impending energy crisis which requires immediate measures to be adopted. In this situation the concept of Energy Intensity comes under special focus to ensure energy security in an environmentally sustainable way. Energy Intensity of Indian manufacturing industries is among the highest in the world and stands for enormous energy consumption. Hence, reducing the Energy Intensity of Indian manufacturing industries is one of the challenges. This study attempts to analyse the factors which influence the Energy Intensity of Indian manufacturing industries and how they can be improved to reduce the Energy Intensity. The paper considers five of the largest energy consuming manufacturing industrial sectors in India viz. Aluminium, Cement, Iron & Steel Industries, Textile Industries and Fertilizer Industries and conducts a detailed Energy Intensity analysis using the data from PROWESS database of the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE for the period 2005–2014.

  5. Training for intense exercise performance: high-intensity or high-volume training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, P B

    2010-10-01

    Performance in intense exercise events, such as Olympic rowing, swimming, kayak, track running and track cycling events, involves energy contribution from aerobic and anaerobic sources. As aerobic energy supply dominates the total energy requirements after ∼75s of near maximal effort, and has the greatest potential for improvement with training, the majority of training for these events is generally aimed at increasing aerobic metabolic capacity. A short-term period (six to eight sessions over 2-4 weeks) of high-intensity interval training (consisting of repeated exercise bouts performed close to or well above the maximal oxygen uptake intensity, interspersed with low-intensity exercise or complete rest) can elicit increases in intense exercise performance of 2-4% in well-trained athletes. The influence of high-volume training is less discussed, but its importance should not be downplayed, as high-volume training also induces important metabolic adaptations. While the metabolic adaptations that occur with high-volume training and high-intensity training show considerable overlap, the molecular events that signal for these adaptations may be different. A polarized approach to training, whereby ∼75% of total training volume is performed at low intensities, and 10-15% is performed at very high intensities, has been suggested as an optimal training intensity distribution for elite athletes who perform intense exercise events. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Functional and psychological features immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesz, Patrini Silveira; Costanzi, Monise; Stolnik, Débora; Dietrich, Camila; de Freitas, Karen Lisiane Chini; Silva, Letícia Aparecida; de Almeida, Carolina Schünke; de Souza, Camila Oliveira; Ondere, Jorge; Souza, Dante Lucas Santos; Neves, Taciano Elias de Oliveira; Meister, Mariana Vianna; Barbosa, Eric Schwellberger; de Paiva, Marília Paz; Carvalho, Taiana Silva; Savi, Augusto; Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Cremonese, Rafael Viégas; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2013-01-01

    To assess the functional and psychological features of patients immediately after discharge from the intensive care unit. Prospective cohort study. Questionnaires and scales assessing the degree of dependence and functional capacity (modified Barthel and Karnofsky scales) and psychological problems (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), in addition to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, were administered during interviews conducted over the first week after intensive care unit discharge, to all survivors who had been admitted to this service from August to November 2012 and had remained longer than 72 hours. The degree of dependence as measured by the modified Barthel scale increased after intensive care unit discharge compared with the data before admission (57 ± 30 versus 47 ± 36; p psychological changes identified mood disorders (anxiety and/or depression) in 31% of the sample, whereas sleep disorders occurred in 43.3%. Patients who remained in an intensive care unit for 72 hours or longer exhibited a reduced functional capacity and an increased degree of dependence during the first week after intensive care unit discharge. In addition, the incidence of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and sleep disorders was high among that population.

  7. Technology-dependent Children and Home Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Akçay Didişen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, with the rapid development in the field of healthcare technology which is reflected in medicine and patient care, the number of children who are dependent on technological tools and in need of special care, and sustain life in the home environment is rapidly increasing. These children require a multidisciplinary, multifunctional care at home. In the provision of care, healthcare workers, such as physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and psychologists, work in coordination. The aim of this review was to draw attention to the care of the technology-dependent children at home. In order to achieve the goals of the care given to the technology-dependent child, inclusion of the family in the provision of care is of importance. In order to improve the care given to these children at home, home care services must be well planned and their families should be trained on the issue because delaying the discharge of these children may increase their risk of developing a hospital-acquired infection and can extend the length of their stay in the hospital. This not only increases hospital costs but also leads to the occupation of a bed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Therefore, home healthcare is an alternative for technology-dependent children with chronic diseases and for their families. Therefore, more efforts should be made to plan and evaluate home care services, to set up support and training systems, and to make legal arrangements.

  8. Suitability of cerebrospinal fluid as a signal-intensity reference on MRI: evaluation of signal-intensity variations in the lumbosacral dural sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luoma, E.K.; Luukkonen, R.; Riihimaeki, H.A. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Raininko, R.; Manninen, H.I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital (Finland); Nummi, P.J. [Picker Nordstar, Inc. (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The suitability of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the lumbosacral dural sac as an internal signal-intensity reference was studied on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine using a surface coil and motion artefact suppression technique. A signal-intensity reference is needed when signal is compared between images, studies or subjects. Homogeneity of the CSF was estimated visually on T2-weighted images of 60 subjects at 1.5 T and of another 60 subjects at 0.1 T. Spines with a severely narrowed dural sac or marked scoliosis were excluded from the study to avoid partial volume effect. CSF was homogeneous in 82% and 73% of the examinations at 1.5 T and 0.1 T, respectively. The type and location of the local inhomogeneities did not relate to local narrowings of the dural sac. The signal intensity of CSF was measured in 108 examinations at 0.1 T after correcting the spatially-dependent signal-intensity nonuniformities with a phantom-based method. The signal-intensity difference between the CSF in the upper and lower lumbar dural sac was less than 10% in 73% of the examinations. The CSF in the lumbosacral dural sac can be a useful signal-intensity reference for estimation of the signal of the adjacent structures in patients without severe narrowing of the dural sac or marked scoliosis. It may contribute to assessing spinal disease processes. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Spouses’ Dependence across Generations and Pricing Impact on Reversionary Annuities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Luciano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the dependence between coupled lives, i.e., the spouses’ dependence, across different generations, and its effects on prices of reversionary annuities in the presence of longevity risk. Longevity risk is represented via a stochastic mortality intensity. We find that a generation-based model is important, since spouses’ dependence decreases when passing from older generations to younger generations. The independence assumption produces quantifiable mispricing of reversionary annuities, with different effects on different generations. The research is conducted using a well-known dataset of double life contracts.

  10. Validity of four pain intensity rating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Valente, Maria Alexandra; Pais-Ribeiro, José Luís; Jensen, Mark P

    2011-10-01

    The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), Verbal Rating Scale (VRS), and the Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) are among the most commonly used measures of pain intensity in clinical and research settings. Although evidence supports their validity as measures of pain intensity, few studies have compared them with respect to the critical validity criteria of responsivity, and no experiment has directly compared all 4 measures in the same study. The current study compared the relative validity of VAS, NRS, VRS, and FPS-R for detecting differences in painful stimulus intensity and differences between men and women in response to experimentally induced pain. One hundred twenty-seven subjects underwent four 20-second cold pressor trials with temperature order counterbalanced across 1°C, 3°C, 5°C, and 7°C and rated pain intensity using all 4 scales. Results showed statistically significant differences in pain intensity between temperatures for each scale, with lower temperatures resulting in higher pain intensity. The order of responsivity was as follows: NRS, VAS, VRS, and FPS-R. However, there were relatively small differences in the responsivity between scales. A statistically significant sex main effect was also found for the NRS, VRS, and FPS-R. The findings are consistent with previous studies supporting the validity of each scale. The most support emerged for the NRS as being both (1) most responsive and (2) able to detect sex differences in pain intensity. The results also provide support for the validity of the scales for use in Portuguese samples. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Climate Change and Wildland Fire Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, M.; Wotton, M.; Marshall, G.

    2016-12-01

    Wildland fires are a frequent occurrence in many regions of the world. These fires are the result of interactions between climate/weather, fuels, and people. Our climate and associated day-to-day weather may be changing rapidly due to human activities that may have dramatic and unexpected impacts on regional and global fire activity. A warmer world means longer fire seasons, more lightning activity, and most importantly drier fuels. Existing studies suggest a general overall increase in fire occurrence and area burned although there is significant temporal and spatial variability. Future trends in fire severity and intensity are more difficult to project due to the complex and non-linear interactions between weather, vegetation and people. However, there are indications that fire severity and intensity are increasing. In this study we examine future fire intensity in Canada. We use 3 GCMs and 3 RCP scenarios to estimate potential fire intensity, fuel consumption and number of significant spread days throughout the boreal forest. We examine not only absolute change in fireline intensity and consumption, but also changing frequency of exceeding intensity thresholds used today to inform fire management decisions about resource effectiveness. We find that potential fuel consumption increases more than 25% in the most extreme scenarios for the majority of the boreal by the end of the century. Similarly, we observe an absolute increase in the number of days that could support significant fire spread by up to 50 days per year and a greater than threefold increase in the potential number of days where head fire intensity exceeds 10000kW/m in the most extreme cases. While fire severity increases in general, it is these changes in the exceedance of certain critical threshold for fire suppression effectiveness that have the potential to significantly impact fire operations. Fire management will be even more challenging in a warmer world.

  12. Burnout contagion among intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Le Blanc, Pascale M; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2005-08-01

    This paper reports a study investigating whether burnout is contagious. Burnout has been recognized as a problem in intensive care units for a long time. Previous research has focused primarily on its organizational antecedents, such as excessive workload or high patient care demands, time pressure and intensive use of sophisticated technology. The present study took a totally different perspective by hypothesizing that--in intensive care units--burnout is communicated from one nurse to another. A questionnaire on work and well-being was completed by 1849 intensive care unit nurses working in one of 80 intensive care units in 12 different European countries in 1994. The results are being reported now because they formed part of a larger study that was only finally analysed recently. The questionnaire was translated from English to the language of each of these countries, and then back-translated to English. Respondents indicated the prevalence of burnout among their colleagues, and completed scales to assess working conditions and job burnout. Analysis of variance indicated that the between-unit variance on a measure of perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was statistically significant and substantially larger than the within-unit variance. This implies that there is considerable agreement (consensus) within intensive care units regarding the prevalence of burnout. In addition, the results of multilevel analyses showed that burnout complaints among colleagues in intensive care units made a statistically significant and unique contribution to explaining variance in individual nurses' and whole units' experiences of burnout, i.e. emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Moreover, for both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was the most important predictor of burnout at the individual and unit levels, even after controlling for the impact of well-known organizational

  13. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  14. [Pediatric intensive care in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Miño, S; Sasbón, J S; von Dessauer, B

    2012-01-01

    To describe the practice of pediatric intensive care in Latin America and compare it with two European countries. Analysis of data presented by member countries of the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cuidado Intensivo Pediátrico (SLACIP), Spain and Portugal, in the context of a Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese - speaking pediatric intensivists during the Fifth World Congress on Pediatric Intensive Care. Pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Pediatric intensivists in representation of each member country of the SLACIP, Spain and Portugal. None. Each country presented its data on child health, medical facilities for children, pediatric intensive care units, pediatric intensivists, certification procedures, equipment, morbidity, mortality, and issues requiring intervention in each participating country. Data from 11 countries was analyzed. Nine countries were from Latin America (Argentina, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Ecuador, Honduras, México, Dominican Republic and Uruguay), and two from Europe (Spain and Portugal). Data from Bolivia and Guatemala were partially considered. Populational, institutional, and operative differences were identified. Mean PICU mortality was 13.29% in Latin America and 5% in the European countries (P=0.005). There was an inverse relationship between mortality and availability of pediatric intensive care units, pediatric intensivists, number of beds, and number of pediatric specialty centers. Financial and logistic limitations, as well as deficiencies in support disciplines, severity of diseases, malnutrition, late admissions, and inadequate initial treatments could be important contributors to mortality at least in some of these countries. There are important differences in population, morbidity and mortality in critically ill children among the participating countries. Mortality shows an inverse correlation to the availability of pediatric intensive care units, intensive care beds, pediatric intensivists, and pediatric subspecialty centers

  15. Effectiveness of low-intensity endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T; Auracher, M; Heeg, K; Urhausen, A; Kindermann, W

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies point to the preventive efficacy of low-intensity endurance training in terms of cardiovascular risk factor modification and mortality reduction. In addition, it is frequently recommended as a means of stimulating fat metabolism. It was the intention of this study to clarify if endurance training effectiveness remains unimpaired when exercise intensity is reduced by a certain amount from "moderate" to "low", but total energy expenditure held constant. For this purpose, 39 healthy untrained subjects (44 +/- 7 yrs, 82 +/- 19 kg; 173 +/- 9 cm) were stratified for endurance capacity and sex and randomly assigned to 3 groups: "moderate intensity" (MOD, n = 13, 5 sessions per week, 30 min each, intensity 90 % of the anaerobic threshold [baseline lactate + 1.5 mmol/l]), "low intensity" (LOW, n = 13, 5 sessions per week, intensity 15 bpm below MOD, duration proportionally longer to arrive at the same total energy output as MOD), and control (CO, n = 13, no training). Training was conducted over 12 weeks and each session monitored by means of portable heart rate (HR) recorders. Identical treadmill protocols prior to and after the training program served for exercise prescription and documentation of endurance effects. VO (2max) improved similarly in both training groups (MOD + 1.5 ml x min (-1) x kg (-1); LOW + 1.7 ml x min (-1) x kg (-1); p = 0.97 between groups). Compared with CO (- 1.0 ml x min (-1) x kg (-1)) this effect was significant for LOW (p exercise decreased significantly by 9 bpm (MOD, p population of healthy untrained subjects, endurance training effectiveness might be slightly impaired when the training heart rate is chosen 15 bpm lower as compared to moderate intensity, but the total energy output held equal.

  16. Path dependence and creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garud, Raghu; Karnøe, Peter

    the place of agency in these theories that take history so seriously. In the end, they are as interested in path creation and destruction as they are in path dependence. This book is compiled of both theoretical and empirical writing. It shows relatively well-known industries such as the automobile......, biotechnology and semi-conductor industries in a new light. It also invites the reader to learn more about medical practices, wind power, lasers and synthesizers. Primarily for academicians, researchers and PhD students in fields related to technology management, this book is a research-oriented textbook...

  17. Physiological responses at the lactate-minimum-intensity with and without prior high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Padulo, Johnny; Silva, Adelino Ramos Sanchez da; Müller, Paulo de Tarso Guerrero; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the physiological responses during exercise-to-exhaustion at the lactate-minimum-intensity with and without prior high-intensity exercise. Eleven recreationally trained males performed a graded exercise test, a lactate minimum test and two constant-load tests at lactate-minimum-intensity until exhaustion, which were applied with or without prior hyperlactatemia induction (i.e., 30-s Wingate test). The physiological responses were significantly different (P  0.05). In conclusion, the constant-load exercises performed at lactate-minimum-intensity with or without prior high-intensity exercise did not lead to the steady state of all analysed parameters; however, variables such as [La(-)], pH and [HCO3] - altered at the beginning of effort performed after high-intensity exercise - were reestablished after approximately 30 min of exercise.

  18. Pain-Related and Negative Semantic Priming Enhances Perceived Pain Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Richter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Negative affective and pain-related cues, such as pictures or words, have been shown to act as primes and enhance the perceived intensity of subsequent painful events. For pain-related semantic primes, it remains unclear whether this effect depends on negative valence itself or, specifically, on the pain-relatedness of the words.

  19. Line Shape Effects on Intensity Measurements of Solar Features: Brightness Correction to SOHO MDI Continuum Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Criscuoli, S.; Ermolli, I.; Del Moro, D.; Giorgi, F.; Tritschler, A.; Uitenbroek, H.; Vitas, N.

    2011-01-01

    Continuum intensity observations obtained with theMichelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the SOHO mission provide long time series of filtergrams that are ideal for studying the evolution of large-scale phenomena in the solar atmosphere and their dependence on solar activity. These filtergrams,

  20. Multichannel Raman polarizer with suppressed relative intensity noise for wavelength division multiplexing transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Victor V; Nuño, Javier; Ania-Castañón, Juan Diego; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method of suppressing the relative intensity noise caused by polarization-dependent gain that is inherent to Raman polarizers (RPs). This method involves bit-synchronously scrambling the state of polarization of a pulse (bit) before the pulse enters the RP. The proposed solution works for RPs operating in a depleted regime and is compatible with multichannel configurations.

  1. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  2. Electrophysiological study of interaural sound intensity difference in the dolphin Inia geoffrensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Klishin, V O

    1991-09-15

    A wave observed in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR), sensitive to the side of sound presentation, is described in a dolphin (Inia geoffrensis). Dependence of the wave threshold on location of the sound source showed that the interaural intensity difference was more than 20 dB.

  3. Rapid amplitude-phase reconstruction of femtosecond pulses from intensity autocorrelation and spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltuška, Andrius; Pugžlys, Audrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1999-01-01

    The retrieval of time-dependent intensity and phase of femtosecond laser pulses is a long standing problem. To date, frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is probably the most trustworthy pulse measurement method. However, it requires a substantial experimental and numerical involvement. This

  4. Thinning method and intensity influence long-term mortality trends in a red pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew D. Powers; Brian J. Palik; John B. Bradford; Shawn Fraver; Christopher R. Webster

    2010-01-01

    Tree mortality shapes forest development, but rising mortality can represent lost production or an adverse response to changing environmental conditions. Thinning represents a strategy for reducing mortality rates, but different thinning techniques and intensities could have varying impacts depending on how they alter stand structure. We analyzed trends in stand...

  5. Extensive Variability in Vasoactive Agent Therapy: A Nationwide Survey in Chinese Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Bo Pei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Vasoactive agent use for treatment of shock is inconsistent according to self-report by Chinese intensive care physicians; however, the variation in use depends upon the form of shock being treated and the type of hospital; thus, corresponding educational programs about vasoactive agent use for shock management should be considered.

  6. Interrogation of orbital structure by elliptically polarized intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation and present investigations of the imprint of the orbital angular node in photoelectron momentum distributions of an aligned atomic p-type orbital following ionization by an intense elliptically polarized laser pulse of femtosecond...

  7. Stretching Effects: High-intensity & Moderate-duration vs. Low-intensity & Long-duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Andrade, R; Mil-Homens, P

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a high-intensity, moderate-duration bout of stretching would produce the same acute effects as a low-intensity, long-duration bout of stretching. 17 volunteers performed 2 knee-flexor stretching protocols: a high-intensity stretch (i. e., 100% of maximum tolerable passive torque) with a moderate duration (243.5 ± 69.5-s); and a low-intensity stretch (50% of tolerable passive torque) with a long duration (900-s). Passive torque at a given sub-maximal angle, peak passive torque, maximal range of motion (ROM), and muscle activity were assessed before and after each stretching protocol (at intervals of 1, 30 and 60 min). The maximal ROM and tolerable passive torque increased for all time points following the high-intensity stretching (p0.05). 1 min post-stretching, the passive torque decreased in both protocols, but to a greater extent in the low-intensity protocol. 30 min post-test, torque returned to baseline for the low-intensity protocol and had increased above the baseline for the high-intensity stretches. The following can be concluded: 1) High-intensity stretching increases the maximal ROM and peak passive torque compared to low-intensity stretching; 2) low-intensity, long-duration stretching is the best way to acutely decrease passive torque; and 3) high-intensity, moderate-duration stretching increases passive torque above the baseline 30 min after stretching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Selection of intense rainfall events based on intensity thresholds and lightning data in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    L. Gaal; P. Molnar; J. Szolgay

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to identify intense warm season storms of convective character based on intensity thresholds and lightning, and analyzes their statistical properties. Long records of precipitation and lightning data at 4 stations and 10 min resolution in different climatological regions in Switzerland are used. Our premise is that thunderstorms associated with lightning generate bursts of high rainfall intensity. We divided all storms into those...

  9. Dependent seniors garment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, A. L.; Carvalho, M. A.; Lopes, H. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is part of a PhD research in Textile Engineering at University of Minho and aims to establish an ergonomic pattern design methodology to be used in the construction of garments for elderly women, aged 65 and over, dependent of care. The research was developed with a close contact with four institutions involved in supporting this aged population, located in the cities of Guimarães (Portugal) and Teresina (Brazil). These clothes should be adequate to their anthropometrics and their special needs, in accordance with important functional factors for the dependency of their caregiver, such as: care for the caregiver and comfort for the user. Questions regarding the functional properties of the materials, the pattern design process, trimmings and the assembling process of the garments are specially considered in the desired comfort levels, in order to provide an adequate handling by facilitating the dressing and undressing tasks, but also to assure the user the needed comfort in all its variables.

  10. Parenthood and opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pihkala H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Heljä Pihkala, Mikael Sandlund Institution of Clinical Sciences/Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Introduction: Many patients in maintenance treatment programs for opioid dependence are parents to underage children. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore how parents who are regular patients in maintenance treatment perceive their parenthood. Methods: The study used a qualitative approach. The informants were recruited by staff at a substance abuse clinic in Sweden. Criteria for inclusion were participation in the local maintenance treatment program, having a child or children younger than 18 years, and being in contact with the child or children. Data were collected in 2012–2013 by in-depth interviews of seven fathers and five mothers and analyzed using concepts and procedures of qualitative content analysis. Results: The central findings of the study were: 1 the parents’ concerns about possible future discrimination against their children, ie, stigma by association; and 2 the patients’ own parents’ role as the most important support in parenthood. Conclusion: The issue of anticipated discrimination against the children of parents undergoing maintenance treatment might be an aspect to consider in the development of interventions and support. Considering the role of the patients' own parents also seems important. Keywords: parenthood, opiod dependence, maintenance treatment, qualitative analysis, anticipated stigma, stigma by association

  11. Angle-Dependent Ionization of Small Molecules by Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction and an Absorbing Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2015-06-04

    The angle-dependence of strong field ionization of O2, N2, CO2, and CH2O has been studied theoretically using a time-dependent configuration interaction approach with a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). Calculation of the ionization yields as a function of the direction of polarization of the laser pulse produces three-dimensional surfaces of the angle-dependent ionization probability. These three-dimensional shapes and their variation with laser intensity can be interpreted in terms of ionization from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lower lying orbitals, and the Dyson orbitals for the ground and excited states of the cations.

  12. Geometrical theory to predict eccentric photorefraction intensity profiles in the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roorda, Austin; Campbell, Melanie C. W.; Bobier, W. R.

    1995-08-01

    In eccentric photorefraction, light returning from the retina of the eye is photographed by a camera focused on the eye's pupil. We use a geometrical model of eccentric photorefraction to generate intensity profiles across the pupil image. The intensity profiles for three different monochromatic aberration functions induced in a single eye are predicted and show good agreement with the measured eccentric photorefraction intensity profiles. A directional reflection from the retina is incorporated into the calculation. Intensity profiles for symmetric and asymmetric aberrations are generated and measured. The latter profile shows a dependency on the source position and the meridian. The magnitude of the effect of thresholding on measured pattern extents is predicted. Monochromatic aberrations in human eyes will cause deviations in the eccentric photorefraction measurements from traditional crescents caused by defocus and may cause misdiagnoses of ametropia or anisometropia. Our results suggest that measuring refraction along the vertical meridian is preferred for screening studies with the eccentric photorefractor.

  13. Nutritional enrichment increases courtship intensity and improves mating success in male spiders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, Johannes Peter; Toft, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The development of male sexual ornaments and the intensity of male courtship behavior are often used by females as criteria for mate choice and by other males to evaluate the strength of a rival. We tested the hypotheses that courtship intensity and mating success depend on the males' nutritional...... status (enriched or deficient) and that courtship intensity predicts mating success in males of the same nutritional status. We used wolf spiders, Pardosa prativaga, which have an elaborate display of courtship behaviors, including encircling, palp vibrations, abdomen vibrations, hopping, etc. Viability...... indicated that diet effects on courtship intensity were indirect, through its effect on size. In competition tests between males of equal mass and the same diet treatment, the previously most active male (high levels of palp vibrating, abdomen vibrating, and hopping) had the highest mating success, though...

  14. Enhancement of single-walled nanotubes luminescence intensity upon dithiothreitol doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Linnik, A. S.; Leontiev, V. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work the influence of reducing agent dithiothreitol doping on photoluminescence spectra of nanotubes with adsorbed biopolymers (single-stranded DNA and polyC) in aqueous suspensions and films was studied. It is revealed that greater intensity enhancement at 10-3 mol/L dithiothreitol concentration is observed for (7,5) and (6,5) nanotubes in suspension with single-stranded DNA (by more than 150% of initial intensity) comparing to polyC suspension (less than 60%) while for (6,4) and (9,1) nanotubes enhancement is less than 50% for both suspensions. Photoluminescence intensity increasing for nanotube film with DNA is less than 50% without noticeable dependence on nanotube chirality. It is assumed, that different influence of biopolymers on nanotube luminescence intensity enhancement is due to their different coverage of nanotube surface.

  15. Knowledge sharing behavior and intensive care nurse innovation: the moderating role of control of care quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Paunova, Minna; Egerod, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the influence of intensive care unit nurses’ knowledge sharing behaviour on nurse innovation, given different conditions of care quality control. Background Health-care organisations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling care quality. We have little...... insight on how the control of care quality interacts with the knowledge sharing behaviour of intensive care nurses to affect their innovative behaviours. Methods We developed a multi-source survey study of more than 200 intensive care nurses at 22 intensive care units of 17 Danish hospitals. Two versions...... of the questionnaire were used – one designed for nurse employees and the other for the managing nurse(s). An ordinary least squares regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Results Different aspects of knowledge sharing affect innovation differently, depending on the strength of the control of care...

  16. Coulomb explosion of hydrogen clusters irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyu; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ni, Guoquan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2006-08-01

    The explosion dynamics of hydrogen clusters driven by an ultrashort intense laser pulse has been analyzed analytically and numerically by employing a simplified Coulomb explosion model. The dependence of average and maximum proton kinetic energy on cluster size, pulse duration, and laser intensity has been investigated respectively. The existence of an optimum cluster size allows the proton energy to reach the maximum when the cluster size matches with the intensity and the duration of the laser pulse. In order to explain our experimental results such as the measured proton energy spectrum and the saturation effect of proton energy, the effects of cluster size distribution as well as the laser intensity distribution on the focus spot should be considered. A good agreement between them is obtained.

  17. Gait Recognition and Walking Exercise Intensity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Shing Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients’ exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD was used to filter the noise of patients’ attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study.

  18. Exercise intensity and blood pressure during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H; George, K; Edwards, B; Atkinson, G

    2009-02-01

    Exercise, of appropriate intensity and duration, could help maintain normotension if post-exercise hypotension persists over subsequent everyday activities. Therefore, we monitored ambulatory blood pressure (BP) for 24 h following four separate exercise bouts which differed in intensity, duration and total work completed. At 08:00 h, six normotensive males completed a no exercise control and, in two further trials, 30 min of cycling at 70 % V O (2 peak) and 40 % V O (2 peak). A fourth trial involved cycling at 40 % V O (2 peak) for a time which equated total work with that in the most intense exercise trial. Between 20 min and 24 h after exercise, ambulatory BP, heart rate (HR) and wrist-activity were compared between trials using general linear models. Participants slept normally at night. Post-exercise changes in BP and HR were not affected by exercise intensity or total work completed from 20 min after exercise until nocturnal sleep-onset (p > 0.21). During sleep, mean arterial BP was lower following exercise at 70 % V O (2 peak) compared to the other trials (p = 0.03), including the 40 % V O (2 peak) trial equated for total work (90 % CI for difference = - 22.1 to - 0.1). We conclude that daytime exercise can elicit a physiologically meaningful lower BP during sleep and exercise intensity is the most important factor in this phenomenon.

  19. Optical mapping at increased illumination intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaporis, Giedrius; Martišienė, Irma; Jurevičius, Jonas; Vosyliūtė, Rūta; Navalinskas, Antanas; Treinys, Rimantas; Matiukas, Arvydas; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2012-09-01

    Voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes have become a major tool in cardiac and neuro-electrophysiology. Achieving high signal-to-noise ratios requires increased illumination intensities, which may cause photobleaching and phototoxicity. The optimal range of illumination intensities varies for different dyes and must be evaluated individually. We evaluate two dyes: di-4-ANBDQBS (excitation 660 nm) and di-4-ANEPPS (excitation 532 nm) in the guinea pig heart. The light intensity varies from 0.1 to 5 mW/mm2, with the upper limit at 5 to 10 times above values reported in the literature. The duration of illumination was 60 s, which in guinea pigs corresponds to 300 beats at a normal heart rate. Within the identified duration and intensity range, neither dye shows significant photobleaching or detectable phototoxic effects. However, light absorption at higher intensities causes noticeable tissue heating, which affects the electrophysiological parameters. The most pronounced effect is a shortening of the action potential duration, which, in the case of 532-nm excitation, can reach ˜30%. At 660-nm excitation, the effect is ˜10%. These findings may have important implications for the design of optical mapping protocols in biomedical applications.

  20. Damage-consistent hazard assessment - the revival of intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, Jens-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Proposed key-note speech (Introduction of session). Current civil engineering standards for residential buildings in many countries are based on (frequently probabilistic) seismic hazard assessments using ground motion parameters like peak ground accelerations or pseudo displacements as hazard parameters. This approach has its roots in the still wide spread force-based design of structures using simplified methods like linear response spectra in combination with equivalent static forces procedures for the design of structures. In the engineering practice this has led to practical problems because it's not economic to design structures against the maximum forces of earthquakes. Furthermore, a completely linear-elastic response of structures is seldom required. Different types of reduction factors (performance-dependent response factors) considering for example overstrength, structural redundancy and structural ductility have been developed in different countries for compensating the use of simplified and conservative design methods. This has the practical consequence that the methods used in engineering as well as the output results of hazard assessment studies are poorly related to the physics of damaging. Reliable predictions for the response of structures under earthquake loading using such simplified design methods are not feasible. In dependence of the type of structures damage may be controlled by hazard parameters that are different from ground motion accelerations. Furthermore, a realistic risk assessment has to be based on reliable predictions of damage. This is crucial for effective decision-making. This opens the space for a return to the use of intensities as the key output parameter of seismic hazard assessment. Site intensities (e.g. EMS-98) are very well correlated to the damage of structures. They can easily be converted into the required set of engineering parameters or even directly into earthquake time-histories suitable for structural analysis