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Sample records for sub-humid tropical highlands

  1. Suspended sediment concentration–discharge relationships in the (sub- humid Ethiopian highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Guzman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Loss of top soil and subsequent filling up of reservoirs in much of the lands with variable relief in developing countries degrades environmental resources necessary for subsistence. In the Ethiopia highlands, sediment mobilization from rain-fed agricultural fields is one of the leading factors causing land degradation. Sediment rating curves, produced from long-term sediment concentration and discharge data, attempt to predict suspended sediment concentration variations, which exhibit a distinct shift with the progression of the rainy season. In this paper, we calculate sediment rating curves and examine this shift in concentration for three watersheds in which rain-fed agriculture is practiced to differing extents. High sediment concentrations with low flows are found at the beginning of the rainy season of the semi-monsoonal climate, while high flows and low sediment concentrations occur at the end of the rainy season. Results show that a reasonably unique set of rating curves were obtained by separating biweekly data into early, mid, and late rainfall periods and by making adjustments for the ratio of plowed cropland. The shift from high to low concentrations suggests that diminishing sediment supply and dilution from greater base flow during the end of the rainfall period play important roles in characterizing changing sediment concentrations during the rainy season.

  2. Suitability of multipurpose trees, shrubs and grasses to rehabilitate gullies in the sub-humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talema, Ayalew; Muys, Bart; Poesen, Jean; Padro, Roc; Dibaba, Hirko; Diels, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation plays a vital role for sustainable rehabilitation of degraded lands. However, the selection of suitable and effective plant species remains a long-lasting challenge in most parts of the sub-humid tropics. To address this challenge 18 multipurpose plant species (6 trees, 3 shrubs and 9 grasses), preselected from the regional species pool in Southwest Ethiopia were planted in severely degraded gullies and monitored from July 2011 to June 2014. The experiment had a split-plot design with farmyard manure (FYM) application, as main plot and plant species as sub-plot factors repeated in three blocks. The study revealed that grasses were the most successful to rehabilitate the gully within the monitoring period, compared to trees and shrubs. The survival rate of the four most successful grass species, Chrysopogon zizanioides, Pennisetum macrourum, Pennisetum polystachion and Pennisetum purpureum ranged from 61 to 90% with FYM application and from 20 to 85% without FYM, while most of the well-known indigenous and exotic trees and shrubs failed to survive. For the grass Pennisetum purpureum, shoot height, shoot and root dry biomass increased by 300%, 342% and 578% respectively due to FYM application, with a remarkably higher response to FYM compared to all the other studied species. The overall results demonstrate that severely degraded lands can be effectively restored by using early successional species such as locally adapted and selected grasses before the plantation of trees and shrubs.

  3. Hydrologic and Erosional Response to Natural Rainfall and Effects of Conservation and Rehabilitation Measures in a Degraded Dry Sub-Humid Watershed of the Ethiopian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, O. V.; Liu, B. M.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2005-12-01

    A good understanding of runoff and erosion under actual field conditions is essential for effective planning of land conservation in the Ethiopian highlands. Hydrologic and sediment yield response to natural rainfall was measured during 3 rainy seasons (2003-2004) at plot and catchment scales with and without conservation practices. Results show that as expected surface runoff generation and erosion rates are significantly influenced by rainfall intensity, land use, scale of measurement, land slope, and the presence or not of conservation measures. Seasonal runoff coefficient and sediment yield were significantly better correlated to number of storms with high 30-minute maximum rainfall intensity (I30 > 20 mm h-1) than to total seasonal rainfall depth. Under conventional management systems cropland on slopes greater than 3 % generated significantly more (over twice) surface runoff and sediment yield compared with shrub and open forest grazing land on steep slopes (34 %). Plot measured surface runoff coefficients (for crop and grazing land uses which cover over 90 % of the catchment area) exceeded total catchment streamflow discharge demonstrating a scale effect. The observed scale effect, a stronger correlation of runoff with maximum rainfall intensity than rainfall depth and average rainfall intensity, and observed significant increases in runoff with steeper land slopes indicate that Hortonian overland flow is the primary runoff generation mechanism in the study zone. Concerning slope effects, cropland on mild slopes produced relatively low seasonal sediment yields (land preparation practice. However, sediment yield was drastically high (up to 35 t ha-1) on steep slopes (9 -11 %) especially during seasons with several high intensity rainfall events. The community protected open forest grazing area soil loss was low at sustainable levels (land exceeded sustainable soil loss rates (7.4 t ha-1 season-1) during a season with high intensity rainfall. Gully

  4. Exclusion of soil macrofauna did not affect soil quality but increases crop yields in a sub-humid tropical maize-based system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, B.K.; Vanlauwe, B.; Hoogmoed, M.; Hurisso, T.T.; Ndabamenye, T.; Terano, Y.; Ayuke, F.O.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil macrofauna such as earthworms and termites are involved in key ecosystem functions and thus considered important for sustainable intensification of crop production. However, their contribution to tropical soil and crop performance, as well as relations with agricultural management (e.g.

  5. Introduction of deciduous fruit tree growing in the tropical highlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Orchard management as well training trees to develop an open architecture have been practiced. The original aim of the deciduous fruit tree introductions was to confirm their potential to produce viable fruits in the highland systems of Uganda and therefore offer an alternative source of income and nutrition. In addition it ...

  6. Distribution, diversity and environmental adaptation of highland papaya (Vasconcellea spp.) in tropical and subtropical America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheldeman, X.; Willemen, L.; Coppens D'eeckenbrugge, G.; Romeijn-Peeters, E.; Restrepo, M.T.; Romero Motoche, J.; Jimenez, D.; Lobo, M.; Medina, C.I.; Reyes, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Ocampo, J.A.; Damme, van P.; Goetghebeur, P.

    2007-01-01

    Vasconcellea species, often referred to as highland papayas, consist of a group of fruit species that are closely related to the common papaya (Carica papaya). The genus deserves special attention as a number of species show potential as raw material in the tropical fruit industry, fresh or in

  7. Preemergence infection of potato sprouts by Phytophthora infestans in the highland tropics of Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Peter; Taipe, Arturo; Andrade-Piedra, Jorge L.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether preemergence infection of potato sprouts by Phytophthora infestans occurs in the highland tropics of Ecuador. In three separate experiments in the field, P. infestans was identified on the preemerged sprouts of 49, 5, and 43% of tubers, respectively...... is consistent with high levels of disease sometimes seen in recently emerged potato fields. These experiments indicate a need to reconsider disease management approaches.......Experiments were conducted to determine whether preemergence infection of potato sprouts by Phytophthora infestans occurs in the highland tropics of Ecuador. In three separate experiments in the field, P. infestans was identified on the preemerged sprouts of 49, 5, and 43% of tubers, respectively......, which had been removed from soil prior to emergence. Tubers had been planted within 10 m of approximately 300-m2 plots with mature potato plants severely infected with late blight. Infection potential of potato sprouts also was evaluated in the greenhouse by applying 10-ml sporangial suspensions (50...

  8. Morphological, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of dry tropical shallow reservoirs in the Southern Mexican Highlands

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    José Luis ARREDONDO-FIGUEROA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The morphometry, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of eleven dry tropical shallow reservoirs situated in Southern Mexican Highlands were studied. The reservoirs are located at 1104 to 1183 meters above sea level in a sedimentary area. Seventeen morphometric and eight sediment and soil chemical parameters were measured. The results of the morphometric parameters showed that these reservoirs presented a soft and roughness bottom, with an ellipsoid form and a concave depression that permit the mix up of water and sediments, causing turbidity and broken thermal gradients; their slight slopes allowed the colonization of submerged macrophyte and halophyte plants and improved the incidence of sunlight on water surface increasing evaporation and primary productivity. Dry tropical shallow reservoirs have fluctuations in area, and volume according to the amount of rainfall, the effect of evaporation, temperature, lost volume for irrigation, and other causes. The sand-clay was the most important sediment texture and their values fluctuated with the flooded periods. The concentration-dilution cycle showed a direct relationship in the percentage of organic matter in the soil as well as with pH, soil nitrogen and phosphorus. El Tilzate, El Candelero and El Movil were related by the shore development and high concentrations of organic matter and nitrogen in the soil. Finally, we emphasize the importance of this study, in relation to possible future changes in morphometrical parameters as a consequence of human impact.

  9. Climate change adaptation and development: from theory and concepts to practices and processes in Peru's tropical highlands

    OpenAIRE

    VanDerwill, Christine Jill

    2008-01-01

    In Peru’s tropical highlands adaptation to climate change is underway as policy-makers and local inhabitants respond to warming trends and rapid glacier melt. This paper explores the social and economic aspects of climate change adaptation in the developing world. Key concepts common to climate change discourse are examined, along with the relationship that adaptation has with development agendas. By applying theories and concepts found in climate change literature to actual adaptation policy...

  10. Twelve years of continuous measurements of atmospheric electrical activity in Mexico's Tropical highland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troncoso Lozada, O. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-04-01

    Atmospheric electric activity measurements have been recorded continuously by a punctual lightning system at a tropical highland observatory from 1988 onwards, and were analyzed to obtain lightning statistical confident results for thunderstorms occurrence on the leeward side of the southern mountain ridge of Mexico's Valley. Shown, as examples, are individual profiles of the atmospheric electrical activity, associated with severe storms. The results make clear that the fastest possible sequence of electrical measurements is required to obtain significant and applications oriented data in connection with a whole series of thunderstorms taking into account the mean time variation of the atmospheric electricity measurements at an altitude of 2270 m a.s.l. The seasonal variation indicates that the lightning flash peak currents were found to be larger in summer with less than 10% occurring in the autumn and winter. With rainfall data from a network of 66 stations, we obtained a significant correlation with the lightning frequency. Special attention was undertaken concerning the question of the atmospheric electrical activity and climate at Valley of Mexico. [Spanish] Se midieron ininterrumpidamente las variaciones de la actividad electrica en la atmosfera, de enero de 1988 a diciembre de 1999, en un observatorio de altura (2,250 m s.n.m.), y se analizaron para obtener resultados estadisticos confiables con relacion a la ocurrencia de tormentas en la region sur del Valle de Mexico. Como ejemplos, se muestran los perfiles individuales de la actividad electrica atmosferica asociada con tormentas severas. Los resultados dejan claro que se requiere de la secuencia de medidas electricas lo mas rapida posible para obtener datos significativos y aplicables en relacion con una serie completa de tormentas, considerando la media del tiempo de variacion de las mediciones de la actividad electrica atmosferica a una altitud de 2,270 m s.n.m. La validacion estacional indica que

  11. Cladoceran community composition in tropical semi-arid highland reservoirs in Tigray (Northern Ethiopia): a metacommunity perspective applied to young reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejenie, T.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Asmelash, T.; Risch, S.; Mergeay, J.; De Bie, T.; De Meester, L.

    2012-01-01

    A field survey of zooplankton communities was carried out in 32 recently established tropical semi-arid reservoirs in the highlands of Northern Ethiopia with the aim to identify to what extent environmental factors determine species composition of the cladoceran community in such isolated and young

  12. Identifying soil erosion sources to better anticipate in and off site degradations in a tropical highland catchment of central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrault, S.; Bonté, P.; Duvert, C.; Esteves, M.; Evrard, O.; Gratiot, N.; Lefèvre, I.; Némery, J.; Poulenard, J.; Prat, C.; Saenz-Romero, C.

    2012-04-01

    Land degradation is intense in tropical regions where it causes for instance a decline in soil fertility and reservoir siltation. Two fingerprinting approaches (i.e., the conventional approach based on radionuclide and geochemical concentrations and the alternative DRIFT spectroscopy method) were conducted independently to outline the sources delivering sediment to the river network draining into the Cointzio reservoir, in Mexican tropical highlands. This study was conducted all throughout the rainy season in 2009 in three subcatchments representative of the different environments characterised by very altered soils and the dominance of Andisols and Acrisols. Both fingerprinting methods pointed out the dominant impact of gullies on sediment load at the outlet of the Huertita subcatchment. In contrast, in La Cortina subcatchment dominated by Andisols, the bulk of sediment was supplied by cropland. Sediment originating from Potrerillos subcatchment characterised by a mix of Acrisols and Andisols was supplied by both gullies and rangeland/cropland. In this latter subcatchment, results provided by both fingerprinting methods strongly differed. Our results outline the need to take the organic matter content of soils into account and the difficulty to use geochemical properties to fingerprint sediment in very altered volcanic catchments. However, combining our fingerprinting results with sediment export data provide a way to prioritise the implementation of erosion control measures to mitigate sediment supply to the Cointzio reservoir supplying drinking water to Morelia city. Such information will be particularly crucial in the coming years, as an increase of the aridity, combined with an increase of flood intensity are anticipated.

  13. Glacial age precipitation and temperature estimates for the tropical Guatemalan highlands

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    Roy, A. J.; Lachniet, M. S.

    2007-12-01

    The Sierra Cuchumatanes of Western Guatemala supported a large ice cap of approximately 44 square km area, and a group of 5-6 small valley glaciers during the local last glacial maximum (LLGM). We propose that a temperature reduction during the Guatemalan LLGM was between -4.5 degrees C and -6.0 degrees C from present accompanied by precipitation totals that fall between 80-100% of present day levels. Our new field work on moraine limits expands upon previous reconnaissance-level studies. Here we present a comprehensive reconstruction of the Guatemalan glacial geomorphology on a high limestone plateau; including delineations between morphologically different moraine sequences, boundaries of sub-glacial till deposits and locations of dry moraine dammed lakes. The glacial geologic map was produced via field mapping and GPS surveying, coupled with aerial photographic analysis. A 50m digital elevation model (DEM) created for the mapping portion was employed as input for a physically based GIS mass-balance model, developed by Plummer and Phillips (2003). The mass-balance model data was calculated for varying precipitation, temperature, environmental lapse rates, cloudiness, wind speed and humidity. A sensitivity analysis using variations in temperature and precipitation provided constraints on Guatemalan highland paleoclimate. Although the ages of the glaciations are unconstrained, a qualitative assessment of moraine morphology suggests correlation with the LLGM (20 - 17.5 ka) moraines of Mexico.

  14. Combining ability of highland tropic adapted potato for tuber yield and yield components under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirut, Betaw; Shimelis, Hussein; Fentahun, Mengistu; Bonierbale, Merideth; Gastelo, Manuel; Asfaw, Asrat

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent drought and late blight disease are the major factors limiting potato productivity in the northwest Ethiopian highlands. Incorporating drought tolerance and late blight resistance in the same genotypes will enable the development of cultivars with high and stable yield potential under erratic rainfall conditions. The objectives of this study were to assess combining ability effects and gene action for tuber yield and traits related to drought tolerance in the International Potato Centre's (CIP's) advanced clones from the late blight resistant breeding population B group 'B3C2' and to identify promising parents and families for cultivar development. Sixteen advanced clones from the late blight resistant breeding population were crossed in two sets using the North Carolina Design II. The resulting 32 families were evaluated together with five checks and 12 parental clones in a 7 x 7 lattice design with two water regimes and two replications. The experiment was carried out at Adet, in northwest Ethiopia under well-watered and water stressed conditions with terminal drought imposed from the tuber bulking stage. The results showed highly significant differences between families, checks, and parents for growth, physiological, and tuber yield related traits. Traits including marketable tuber yield, marketable tuber number, average tuber weight and groundcover were positively correlated with total tuber yield under both drought stressed and well-watered conditions. Plant height was correlated with yield only under drought stressed condition. GCA was more important than SCA for total tuber yield, marketable tuber yield, average tuber weight, plant height, groundcover, and chlorophyll content under stress. This study identified the parents with best GCA and the combinations with best SCA effects, for both tuber yield and drought tolerance related traits. The new population is shown to be a valuable genetic resource for variety selection and improvement of potato

  15. Combining ability of highland tropic adapted potato for tuber yield and yield components under drought.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betaw Hirut

    Full Text Available Recurrent drought and late blight disease are the major factors limiting potato productivity in the northwest Ethiopian highlands. Incorporating drought tolerance and late blight resistance in the same genotypes will enable the development of cultivars with high and stable yield potential under erratic rainfall conditions. The objectives of this study were to assess combining ability effects and gene action for tuber yield and traits related to drought tolerance in the International Potato Centre's (CIP's advanced clones from the late blight resistant breeding population B group 'B3C2' and to identify promising parents and families for cultivar development. Sixteen advanced clones from the late blight resistant breeding population were crossed in two sets using the North Carolina Design II. The resulting 32 families were evaluated together with five checks and 12 parental clones in a 7 x 7 lattice design with two water regimes and two replications. The experiment was carried out at Adet, in northwest Ethiopia under well-watered and water stressed conditions with terminal drought imposed from the tuber bulking stage. The results showed highly significant differences between families, checks, and parents for growth, physiological, and tuber yield related traits. Traits including marketable tuber yield, marketable tuber number, average tuber weight and groundcover were positively correlated with total tuber yield under both drought stressed and well-watered conditions. Plant height was correlated with yield only under drought stressed condition. GCA was more important than SCA for total tuber yield, marketable tuber yield, average tuber weight, plant height, groundcover, and chlorophyll content under stress. This study identified the parents with best GCA and the combinations with best SCA effects, for both tuber yield and drought tolerance related traits. The new population is shown to be a valuable genetic resource for variety selection and

  16. A qualitative study exploring barriers related to use of footwear in rural highland ethiopia: implications for neglected tropical disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayode, Desta; McBride, Colleen M; de Heer, Hendrik D; Watanabe, Emi; Gebreyesus, Tsega; Tora, Abebayehu; Tadele, Getnet; Davey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    The role of footwear in protection against a range of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) is gaining increasing attention. Better understanding of the behaviors that influence use of footwear will lead to improved ability to measure shoe use and will be important for those implementing footwear programs. Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model we assessed social, behavioral, environmental, educational and ecological needs influencing whether and when children wear shoes in a rural highland Ethiopian community endemic for podoconiosis. Information was gathered from 242 respondents using focus groups, semi-structured interviews and extended case studies. Shoe-wearing norms were said to be changing, with going barefoot increasingly seen as 'shameful'. Shoes were thought to confer dignity as well as protection against injury and cold. However, many practical and social barriers prevented the desire to wear shoes from being translated into practice. Limited financial resources meant that people were neither able to purchase more than one pair of shoes to ensure their longevity nor afford shoes of the preferred quality. As a result of this limited access, shoes were typically preserved for special occasions and might not be provided for children until they reached a certain age. While some barriers (for example fit of shoe and fear of labeling through use of a certain type of shoe) may be applicable only to certain diseases, underlying structural level barriers related to poverty (for example price, quality, unsuitability for daily activities and low risk perception) are likely to be relevant to a range of NTDs. Using well established conceptual models of health behavior adoption, we identified several barriers to shoe wearing that are amenable to intervention and which we anticipate will be of benefit to those considering NTD prevention through shoe distribution.

  17. Ethnoecology of the tropical Andes avian indicators of landscape change in highland Ecuador.

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    Sarmiento, F. O.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Andean birds offer clues to rethink the ethnoecology of neotropical cloud forests, challenging the notion of conservation based only in water resources and biodiversity. Using both archaeological and actuoecological evidence, the role of humans in shaping high Andean landscapes' location and maintenance is argued as an important factor for conservation priorities of tropical montane cloud forests, particularly in the equatorial mountains. Avian examples demonstrate intricate linkages of culture and nature in the tropical Andes. Traditional knowledge associated to ornithological clues, helps understanding the dynamics of cultural landscapes, with birds as proxy of synergisms affecting the complexities of both, nature and culture. A paradox of conservation is highlighted with avian indicators. The four selected species were cases where landscape change and biodiversity help in determining ethnoecological insights. Unlike the preservation of absolute nature reserves, landscape stewardship, conservation easements and cultural la^tdscapes are listed as options for inclusion in the repertoire of conservation scenarios for cloud forests survival, which includes sacred places and spiritual domains as intangibles worth protecting in the Tropical Andes.

    [fr] Quatre oiseaux andins nous donnent des raisons pour repenser Vethnoécologie des forêts néotropicales humides, ce qui met en question l'idée de la conservation basée sur les ressources d'eau et la biodiversité seules. En se servant des évidences archéologiques et écologiques actuelles, on soutient que les êtres humains ont un rôle dans la formation des hauts paysages andins. On soutient aussi que l'entretien est un facteur important dans la conservation des forêts tropicales humides en montagne, surtout dans les montagnes équatoriales. Les exemples aviaires démontrent les liens compliqués entre la culture et la nature dans les Andes tropicales. Les connaissances

  18. Comparison of two strategies for use of translaminar and contact fungicide in the control of potato late blight in the highland tropics of Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Peter; Leon, D.; Andrade-Piedra, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Strategies based on using the translaminar fungicide cymoxanil for control of potato late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, were compared in the highland tropics of Ecuador in three separate field experiments. In one strategy, a commercial formulation of cymoxanil mixed with mancozeb...... a valve and using a damaged nozzle. All treatment combinations gave adequate disease control and no consistent effect of application strategy or application quality could be measured on disease severity or yield. However, approximately twice the volume of fungicide was applied using poor quality equipment...

  19. Water use of tree lines: importance of leaf area and micrometeorology in sub-humid Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radersma, S.; Ong, C.K.; Coe, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this research the relative importance of leaf area and microclimatic factors in determining water use of tree lines was examined in sub-humid Western Kenya. Measurements of tree water-use by a heat-balance technique, leaf area, bulk air saturation deficit, daily radiation, and soil water content

  20. Modelling soil moisture under different land covers in a sub-humid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a sub-humid environment of Western Ghats, India. B Venkatesh1,∗. , Lakshman Nandagiri2, B K Purandara1 and V B Reddy3. 1National Institute of Hydrology, Hanuman Nagar, Belgaum 590 001, India. 2Department of Applied Mechanics & Hydraulics, National Institute of Technology,. Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025, ...

  1. Using ALOS PALSAR derived high-resolution DInSAR to detect slow-moving landslides in tropical forest: Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

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    Mustafa Neamah Jebur

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Landslide is one of the natural hazards that pose maximum threat for human lives and property in mountainous regions. Mitigation and prediction of this phenomenon can be done through the detection of landslide-susceptible areas. Therefore, an appropriate landslide analysis is needed in order to map and consequently understand the characteristic of this disaster. One of the recent popular remote sensing techniques in deformation analysis is the differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar which is popularly known as DInSAR. Due to the mass vegetation condition in Malaysia, a long-wavelength synthetic aperture radar (∼24 cm is required in order to be able to penetrate through the forests and reach the bare land. For that reason, ALOS PALSAR HH imagery was used in this study to derive a deformation map of the Gunung Pass area located in the tropical forest of the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. In this study, the ascending orbit ALOS PALSAR images were acquired in September 2008, January 2009 and December 2009. Subsequently the displacement measurements of the study site (Gunung Pass were calculated. The accuracy of the result was evaluated through its comparison with ground truth data using the R2 and root mean square error (RMSE methods. The resulted deformation map showed the landslide locations in the study area from interpretation of the results with 0.84 R2 and 0.151 RMSE. The DInSAR precision was 11.8 cm which proved the efficiency of the proposed method in detecting landslides in a tropical country like Malaysia. It is highly recommended to use the proposed method for any other deformation studies.

  2. Tropical and Highland Temperate Forest Plantations in Mexico: Pathways for Climate Change Mitigation and Ecosystem Services Delivery

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    Vidal Guerra-De la Cruz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Forest plantations are a possible way of increasing forest productivity in temperate and tropical forests, and therefore also increasing above- and belowground carbon pools. In the context of climate change, monospecific plantations might become an alternative to mitigate global warming; however, their contribution to the structural complexity, complementarity, and biodiversity of forests has not been addressed. Mixed forest plantations can ensure that objectives of climate change mitigation are met through carbon sequestration, while also delivering anticipated ecosystem services (e.g., nutrient cycling, erosion control, and wildlife habitat. However, mixed forest plantations pose considerable operational challenges and research opportunities. For example, it is essential to know how many species or functional traits are necessary to deliver a set of benefits, or what mixture of species and densities are key to maintaining productive plantations and delivering multiple ecosystem services. At the same time, the establishment of forest plantations in Mexico should not be motivated solely by timber production. Forest plantations should also increase carbon sequestration, maintain biodiversity, and provide other ecosystem services. This article analyzes some matters that affect the development of planted forests in the Mexican national context, and presents alternatives for forest resources management through the recommendation of mixed forest plantations as a means of contributing to climate change mitigation and the delivery of ecosystem services.

  3. Flight performance and feather quality: paying the price of overlapping moult and breeding in a tropical highland bird.

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    Maria Angela Echeverry-Galvis

    Full Text Available A temporal separation of energetically costly life history events like reproduction and maintenance of the integumentary system is thought to be promoted by selection to avoid trade-offs and maximize fitness. It has therefore remained somewhat of a paradox that certain vertebrate species can undergo both events simultaneously. Identifying potential costs of overlapping two demanding life history stages will further our understanding of the selection pressures that shape the temporal regulation of life history events in vertebrates. We studied free-living tropical Slaty brush-finches (Atlapetes schistaceus, in which individuals spontaneously overlap reproduction and moult or undergo both events in separation. To assess possible costs of such an overlap we quantified feather quality and flight performance of individuals in different states. We determined individual's life history state by measuring gonad size and scoring moult stage, and collected a newly grown 7(th primary wing feather for later analysis of feather quality. Finally, we quantified flight performance for each individual in the wild. Overlapping individuals produced lighter and shorter wing feathers than individuals just moulting, with females decreasing feather quality more strongly during the overlap than males. Moreover, overlapping individuals had a reduced flight speed during escape flights, while their foraging flight speed was unaffected. Despite overlappers being larger and having a smaller wing area, their lower body mass resulted in a similar wing load as in breeders or moulters. Individuals measured repeatedly in different states also showed significant decreases in feather quality and escape flight speed during the overlap. Reduced escape flight speed may represent a major consequence of the overlap by increasing predation risk. Our data document costs to undergoing two life history stages simultaneously, which likely arise from energetic trade-offs. Impairments in

  4. Application of artificial intelligence to estimate the reference evapotranspiration in sub-humid Doon valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Manish K.; Khare, Deepak; Chandniha, Surendra K.

    2017-11-01

    Estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential component of the hydrologic cycle, which is also requisite for efficient irrigation water management planning and hydro-meteorological studies at both the basin and catchment scales. There are about twenty well-established methods available for ET estimation which depends upon various meteorological parameters and assumptions. Most of these methods are physically based and need a variety of input data. The FAO-56 Penman-Monteith method (PM) for estimating reference evapotranspiration (ET0) is recommend for irrigation scheduling worldwide, because PM generally yields the best results under various climatic conditions. This study investigates the abilities of artificial neural networks (ANN) to improve the accuracy of monthly evaporation estimation in sub-humid climatic region of Dehradun. In the first part of the study, different ANN models, comprising various combinations of training function and number of neutrons were developed to estimate the ET0 and it has been compared with the Penman-Monteith (PM) ET0 as the ideal (observed) ET0. Various statistical approaches were considered to estimate the model performance, i.e. Coefficient of Correlation ( r), Sum of Squared Errors, Root Mean Square Error, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency Index (NSE) and Mean Absolute Error. The ANN model with Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm, single hidden layer and nine number of neutron schema was found the best predicting capabilities for the study station with Coefficient of Correlation ( r) and NSE value of 0.996 and 0.991 for calibration period and 0.990 and 0.980 for validation period, respectively. In the subsequent part of the study, the trend analysis of ET0 time series revealed a rising trend in the month of March, and a falling trend during June to November, except August, with more than 90% significance level and the annual declining rate was found to 1.49 mm per year.

  5. Evaluating partial root-zone irrigation and mulching in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. under a sub-humid tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanatan Pradhan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The field experiments were conducted to compare the alternate partial root-zone irrigation (APRI with and without black plastic mulch (BPM with full root-zone irrigation (FRI in furrow-irrigated okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench at Bhubaneswar, India. APRI means that one of the two neighbouring furrows was alternately irrigated during consecutive watering. FRI was the conventional method where every furrow was irrigated during each watering. The used irrigation levels were 25% available soil moisture depletion (ASMD, 50% ASMD, and 75% ASMD. The plant growth and yield parameters were observed to be significantly (p < 0.05 higher with frequent irrigation (at 25% ASMD under all irrigation strategies. However, APRI + BPM produced the maximum plant growth and yield using 22% and 56% less water over APRI without BPM and FRI, respectively. The highest pod yield (10025 kg ha-1 was produced under APRI at 25% ASMD + BPM, which was statistically at par with the pod yield under APRI at 50% ASMD + BPM. Irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE, which indicates the pod yield per unit quantity of irrigation water, was estimated to be highest (12.3 kg m-3 under APRI at 50% ASMD + BPM, followed by APRI at 25% ASMD + BPM. Moreover, the treatment APRI at 50% ASMD + BPM was found economically superior to other treatments, generating more net return (US $ 952 ha-1 with higher benefit–cost ratio (1.70.

  6. Yield, Phenotypical Stability and Micronutrients Contents in the Biofortified Bean in the Colombian Sub-humid Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Patricia Tofiño-Rivera,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The intake of protein and micronutrients in the Colombian sub-humid Caribbean has been a concern in recent years. About 57 % of the population in the sub-humid Caribbean region, has a deficit of amino acids —iron (Fe and zinc (Zn— in their diet. This study shows the results of the agronomic evaluation of the performance and quality of nine genotypes of biofortified bean and one local control in four environments of Cesar. The methodology included chemical and microbio-logical soil characterization, reaction evaluation to pests and diseases, multi-sited valuation by AMMI and selection of two varieties with better yield and nutritional content by ACP. In addition to these two prioritized genotypes, the Pearson correlation coefficient between seed micronutrient content for locations and years was determined. The biofortified genotypes surpassed the control group significantly in both yield and precocity. According to the ACP, the biofortified group differed from the control group in iron and zinc content in the seed, confirming its superior characteristics in nutritional quality, and resistance to pests and diseases. The AMMI showed that the genotype SMR43 reflected stability and predi-ctability between environments and SMR39 had specific adaptation in the best location for grain production. Both genotypes retained high levels of micronutrients between locations and years as according to the Pearson correlation.

  7. Mapping Annual Forest Cover in Sub-Humid and Semi-Arid Regions through Analysis of Landsat and PALSAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanwei Qin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping the spatial distribution of forests in sub-humid to semi-arid regions over time is important for forest management but a challenging task. Relatively large uncertainties still exist in the spatial distribution of forests and forest changes in the sub-humid and semi-arid regions. Numerous publications have used either optical or synthetic aperture radar (SAR remote sensing imagery, but the resultant forest cover maps often have large errors. In this study, we propose a pixel- and rule-based algorithm to identify and map annual forests from 2007 to 2010 in Oklahoma, USA, a transitional region with various climates and landscapes, using the integration of the L-band Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS PALSAR Fine Beam Dual Polarization (FBD mosaic dataset and Landsat images. The overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient of the PALSAR/Landsat forest map were about 88.2% and 0.75 in 2010, with the user and producer accuracy about 93.4% and 75.7%, based on the 3270 random ground plots collected in 2012 and 2013. Compared with the forest products from Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA, National Land Cover Database (NLCD, Oklahoma Ecological Systems Map (OKESM and Oklahoma Forest Resource Assessment (OKFRA, the PALSAR/Landsat forest map showed great improvement. The area of the PALSAR/Landsat forest was about 40,149 km2 in 2010, which was close to the area from OKFRA (40,468 km2, but much larger than those from JAXA (32,403 km2 and NLCD (37,628 km2. We analyzed annual forest cover dynamics, and the results show extensive forest cover loss (2761 km2, 6.9% of the total forest area in 2010 and gain (3630 km2, 9.0% in southeast and central Oklahoma, and the total area of forests increased by 684 km2 from 2007 to 2010. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of data fusion between PALSAR and Landsat images for mapping annual forest cover dynamics in sub-humid to semi-arid regions, and the resultant forest maps would be

  8. Effect of Small-Scale Variations in Environmental Factors on the Distribution of Woody Species in Tropical Deciduous Forests of Vindhyan Highlands, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in the composition of mature, naturally established and unmanaged TDF in response to small-scale variations in environmental factors. All woody species with a minimum circumference of 10 cm at 1.37 m height were surveyed in forty-five 20×50 m plots distributed over 5 sites in the TDF of Vindhyan highlands, India. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of plots. Group 1 plots had higher soil moisture content (SMC, clay, organic C, total N, total P, and light attenuation than group 2 plots. A total of 48 native species belonging to 25 families were encountered in the sampled area. High eigenvalues for the first two Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA axes indicated the occurrence of species in distinct groups, and significant correlations of the axes with environmental variables indicated the effect of these variables on species grouping. In conclusion, patchiness in the soil resources needs to be considered in restoration efforts. The results of this study are expected to facilitate the decision regarding choice of species in afforestation programmes for restoring the TDF.

  9. Transient peat properties in two pond-peatland complexes in the sub-humid Western Boreal Plain, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Petrone

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Canadian Western Boreal Plain (WBP, wetlands (ponds and peatlands comprise up to 50% of the landscape and represent unique habitat where summer precipitation is often outpaced by evapotranspiration and hillslope groundwater position does not follow topography. In this sub-humid location, groundwater fluxes and stores in riparian peatlands influence pond water levels and root zone moisture sources for forested uplands. To accurately describe the transport and retention of water in peat, it is important to consider peat subsidence. This paper quantifies the amount and effect of seasonal subsidence in a riparian peatland in the Utikuma Lake region in north-central Alberta, Canada. Results demonstrate that the deep and poorly decomposed peat deposits are resistant to compression, and that thick (and persistent ground frost hinders pore collapse (shrinkage above the water table until late summer when the ground has thawed. Even then, subsidence is still limited to the top 50 cm and is not closely related to changes in peatland water table or pond water level. Thus the water balance of these ponds and riparian areas appears to be less sensitive to peat volume changes than it is to the persistence of a substantial frost layer well into the snow-free period.

  10. A Comprehensive Characterisation of Rosemary tea Obtained from Rosmarinus officinalis L. Collected in a sub-Humid Area of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Mariem; Mateos, Raquel; Ben Fredj, Maha; Mtiraoui, Ali; Bravo, Laura; Saguem, Saad

    2018-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) is an aromatic plant common in Tunisia and it is widely consumed as a tea in traditional cuisine and in folk medicine to treat various illnesses. Currently, most research efforts have been focused on rosemary essential oil, alcoholic and aqueous extracts, however, little is reported on rosemary infusion composition. To investigate compounds present in rosemary tea obtained from Rosmarinus officinalis L. collected in a sub-humid area of Tunisia in order to assess whether the traditional rosemary tea preparation method could be considered as a reference method for rosemary's compounds extraction. Qualitative characterisation of Rosmarinus officinalis tea obtained after rosemary infusion in boiled water was determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS). Quantitative analysis relies on high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). Forty-nine compounds belonging to six families, namely flavonoids, phenolic acids, phenolic terpenes, jasmonate, phenolic glycosides, and lignans were identified. To the best of the authors' knowledge eucommin A is characterised for the first time in rosemary. Rosmarinic acid (158.13 μg/g dried rosemary) was the main compound followed then by feruloylnepitrin (100.87 μg/g) and luteolin-3'-O-(2″-O-acetyl)-β-d-glucuronide (44.04 μg/g). Among quantified compounds, luteolin-7-O-rutinoside was the compound with the lowest concentration. The infusion method allows several polyphenols present in rosemary tea to be extracted, therefore it could be a reference method for rosemary's compounds extraction. Moreover, traditional Tunisian Rosmarinus officinalis tea consumption is of interest for its rich phenolic content. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Association between recent internal travel and malaria in Ugandan highland and highland fringe areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Caroline A; Bruce, Jane; Bhasin, Amit; Roper, Cally; Cox, Jonathan; Abeku, Tarekegn A

    2015-06-01

    To examine the association between travel (recency of travel, transmission intensity at destination compared to origin and duration of travel) and confirmed malaria in Uganda. Health facility-based case-control study in highland (~2200 m), and highland fringe (~1500 m) areas with adjustment for other covariates. In the highland site, patients who had travelled to areas of higher transmission intensity than their home (origin) areas recently were nearly seven times more likely to have confirmed malaria than those who had not (OR 6.9; P = 0.01, 95% CI: 1.4-33.1). In the highland fringe site, there was also a statistically significant association between travel and malaria (OR 2.1; P = 0.04, 95% CI: 1.1-3.9). For highland areas, or areas of low malaria transmission, health authorities need to consider internal migrants when designing malaria control programs. Control interventions should include information campaigns reminding residents in these areas of the risk of malaria infection through travel and to provide additional mosquito nets for migrants to use during travel. Health authorities may wish to improve diagnosis in health facilities in highland areas by adding travel history to malaria case definitions. Where routine monitoring data are used to evaluate the impact of interventions on the malaria burden in highland areas, health authorities and donors need ensure that only cases from the local area and not 'imported cases' are counted. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Highland Medical Research Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the Highland Medical Research Journal is to publish scientific research in various fields of medical science and to communicate such research findings to the larger world community. It aims to promote cooperation and understanding amoungst workers in various fields of medical science.

  13. The Ozark Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Max

    2009-01-01

    The Ozark Highlands include diverse topographic, geologic, soil, and hydrologic conditions that support a broad range of habitat types. The landscape features rugged uplands - some peaks higher than 2,500 feet above sea level - with exposed rock and varying soil depths and includes extensive areas of karst terrain. The Highlands are characterized by extreme biological diversity and high endemism (uniqueness of species). Vegetation communities are dominated by open oak-hickory and shortleaf pine woodlands and forests. Included in this vegetation matrix is an assemblage of various types of fens, forests, wetlands, fluvial features, and carbonate and siliceous glades. An ever-growing human population in the Ozark Highlands has become very dependent on reservoirs constructed on major rivers in the region and, in some cases, groundwater for household and public water supply. Because of human population growth in the Highlands and increases in industrial and agricultural activities, not only is adequate water quantity an issue, but maintaining good water quality is also a challenge. Point and nonpoint sources of excessive nutrients are an issue. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership programs to monitor water quality and develop simulation tools to help stakeholders better understand strategies to protect the quality of water and the environment are extremely important. The USGS collects relevant data, conducts interpretive studies, and develops simulation tools to help stakeholders understand resource availability and sustainability issues. Stakeholders dependent on these resources are interested in and benefit greatly from evolving these simulation tools (models) into decision support systems that can be used for adaptive management of water and ecological resources. The interaction of unique and high-quality biological and hydrologic resources and the effects of stresses from human activities can be evaluated best by using a multidisciplinary approach that the USGS

  14. Non-target effect of continuous application of chlorpyrifos on soil microbes, nematodes and its persistence under sub-humid tropical rice-rice cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Adak, Totan; Rath, Prakash C; Dey, Avro; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad N; Panneerselvam, P; Kumar, Anjani; Mohapatra, Shyamranjan D

    2017-01-01

    Application of pesticide in agricultural fields is "unnecessary evil" for non-target microflora and fauna. Hence, to identify the safer pesticide molecules against non-target microbes, a long-term pesticide experiment was initiated at National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, India. In the present study, the effect of continuous application of chlorpyrifos (0.5kgha -1 ) in rice fields on non-target groups of soil microbes and nematodes was studied for seven seasons (four wet and three dry seasons) during 2009-2013. Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications of chlorpyrifos-treated (0.5kg a.i. ha -1 ) (CT) and untreated control (UT) plots. During seven seasons of experimentation, regular application of chlorpyrifos had no significant effect on population of heterotrophic aerobic, anaerobic, oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria in CT compared to UT, whereas, population of asymbiotic aerobic nitrogen fixer, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, gram positive and spore-forming bacteria were significantly reduced by nearly 0.25-2 fold in CT than UT. However, comparatively less deviation in population of actinomycetes, fungi, phosphate solubilizing and sulfur oxidizing bacteria were observed in CT than UT. Significant interactions were found between effects of chlorpyrifos with time in population dynamics of microbes. In plant parasitic nematode species, Meloidogyne graminicola (RRKN) and Hirschmanniella spp. (RRN), were significantly lower (p<0.01) in CT compared to UT after first year onwards. The overall observation of five years data indicated that the RRKN population showed a decreasing trend (R 2 =0.644) whereas RRN showed increasing trend (R 2 =0.932) in CT. The drastic chlorpyrifos dissipation was noticed after 15 days of application from the initial residue of 0.25mgkg -1 soil, which indicated that chlorpyrifos residue in rice field soil was not persistent and its half-life was found to be 4.02 days. Overall, the present findings revealed that non-target effect of repetitive application of chloropyrifos (0.5kgha -1 ) on soil microbes and nematodes was found less under rice-rice cropping system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Soil moisture retrieval model by using RISAT-1, C-band data in tropical dry and sub-humid zone of Bankura district of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousik Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soils play a key role in various hydrological and meteorological applications. The objective of this paper is to analyze the spatial variability of very high resolution (3.3 m RISAT-1 (5.35 GHz data with surface soil parameters to produce soil moisture retrieval model. The behaviors of the RISAT-1 signal were analyzed for two configurations, RH and RV at high incident angle (48.11°, with regard to several soil conditions: volumetric moisture content (Mv, root mean square surface roughness (r.m.s. and soil composition (texture. The relationship between the backscattering coefficient (σ° and the soil parameters (moisture, surface roughness and texture was examined by means of satellite images, as well as ground truth measurements, of each of the 23 plots, recorded during several field campaigns in the January 2015. RISAT-1 images demonstrate high potential for the identification of local variations of soil dielectric constant (ɛ, texture and Mv. σ° has a positive relationship with Mv both for σ° (RH and σ° (RV with R2 = 0.588 and R2 = 0.525. The roughness component was derived in terms of r.m.s. having a positive correlation with σ° (RH (R2 = 0.009 and σ° (RV (R2 = 0.029. Dielectric constant (ε has a positive relationship with σ° (RH having R2 = 0.656 and σ° (RV having R2 = 0.534. By considering all the major influencing factors (σ° (RH, σ° (RV, ε and r.m.s. a semi-empirical model has been developed, where Mv is a function of σ° (RH, σ° (RV, ε and r.m.s. This model has adjusted R2 = 0.956 and RMSE = 0.010 at 95% confidence level.

  16. Highland Medical Research Journal: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highland Medical Research Journal: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Highland Medical Research Journal: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Connecting landscape function to hyperspectral reflectance in a dry sub-humid native grassland in southern Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy; Apan, Armando; Alchin, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Native grasslands cover over 80% of significant ecosystems in Australia, stretching across arid, semi-arid, tropical, sub-tropical and savannah landscapes. Scales of pastoral operations in Australia range from hundreds of hectares to thousands of square kilometres and are predominately found in regions with highly variable rainfall. Land use is governed by the need to cope with droughts, floods and fires. Resilience to climatic extremes can be attained through effective soil management. Connecting landscape function on the fine scale to broad land management objectives is a critical step in evaluation and requires an understanding of the relevant spectral properties in remotely sensed images. The aim of this study was to assess key landscape function indices across spatial scales in order to examine their correlation with hyperspectral reflectance measurements. The results from this study could be applied as a model for land management centred on remote sensing. The study site is located at Stonehenge (southern Queensland) on a moderately deep texture contrast soil with hard setting gravelly topsoil. Mean annual rainfall of 667 mm supports open forest and native perennial pastures with a diverse biocrust dominated by N-fixing cyanobacteria. Land use history is continuous grazing however; it had been destocked for several years prior to our study. There was some evidence of cattle, kangaroos and feral herbivores (rabbits, deer and goats) although impacts appeared to be minimal. We established four land cover types: native pasture - NP1 (~100% FPC - foliage projective cover), native pasture - NP2 (~50% FPC, 50% biocrust), natural bare soil - BC (>80% biocrust), bare and eroded soil - BE (<1% biocrust). Duplicate 0.25 m2 quadrats of each land cover type were selected contiguous with a 100 m transect across the slope. The quadrats were analysed as five micro-transects with each row consisting of five sub-cells. Stability, infiltration and nutrient cycling indices were

  18. Genotypic and symbiotic diversity of Rhizobium populations associated with cultivated lentil and pea in sub-humid and semi-arid regions of Eastern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riah, Nassira; Béna, Gilles; Djekoun, Abdelhamid; Heulin, Karine; de Lajudie, Philippe; Laguerre, Gisèle

    2014-07-01

    The genetic structure of rhizobia nodulating pea and lentil in Algeria, Northern Africa was determined. A total of 237 isolates were obtained from root nodules collected on lentil (Lens culinaris), proteaginous and forage pea (Pisum sativum) growing in two eco-climatic zones, sub-humid and semi-arid, in Eastern Algeria. They were characterised by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region (IGS), and the nodD-F symbiotic region. The combination of these haplotypes allowed the isolates to be clustered into 26 distinct genotypes, and all isolates were classified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. Symbiotic marker variation (nodD-F) was low but with the predominance of one nod haplotype (g), which had been recovered previously at a high frequency in Europe. Sequence analysis of the IGS further confirmed its high variability in the studied strains. An AMOVA analysis showed highly significant differentiation in the IGS haplotype distribution between populations from both eco-climatic zones. This differentiation was reflected by differences in dominant genotype frequencies. Conversely, no host plant effect was detected. The nodD gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that symbiotic gene diversity in pea and lentil nodulating rhizobial populations in Algeria was low compared to that reported elsewhere in the world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Landslide monitoring in the Atlantic Highlands area, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Pamela A.; Ashland, Francis X.; Fiore, Alex R.

    2017-08-25

    Shallow and deep-seated landslides have occurred episodically on the steep coastal bluffs of the Atlantic Highlands area (Boroughs of Atlantic Highlands and Highlands) in New Jersey. The oldest documented deep-seated landslide occurred in April 1782 and significantly changed the morphology of the bluff. However, recent landslides have been mostly shallow in nature and have occurred during large storms with exceptionally heavy rainfall. These shallow landslides have resulted in considerable damage to residential property and local infrastructure and threatened human safety.The recent shallow landslides in the area (locations modified from New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection) consist primarily of slumps and flows of earth and debris within areas of historical landslides or on slopes modified by human activities. Such landslides are typically triggered by increases in shallow soil moisture and pore-water pressure caused by sustained and intense rainfall associated with spring nor’easters and late summer–fall tropical cyclones. However, the critical relation between rainfall, soil-moisture conditions, and landslide movement has not been fully defined. The U.S. Geological Survey is currently monitoring hillslopes within the Atlantic Highlands area to better understand the hydrologic and meteorological conditions associated with shallow landslide initiation.

  20. Accuracy of an anaemia scoring chart applied on goats in sub-humid Kenya and its potential for control of Haemonchus contortus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlertsen, M; Githigia, S M; Otieno, R O; Thamsborg, S M

    2006-11-05

    We tested the practical application of an anaemia scoring chart (the FAMACHA chart) as a method for controlling Haemonchus contortus in goats kept under smallholder conditions in a sub-humid area of Central Kenya. The objectives were: (1) to test the accuracy of the FAMACHA chart in identifying anaemic goats (PCVFAMACHA group (F1 (n=34) and F2 (n=31) on farms 1 and 2, respectively) and a control group (C1 (n=34) and C2 (n=30)). In F1 and F2 goats with a FAMACHA score of 3, 4 or 5 were treated with anthelmintic after scoring. In C1 and C2 goats were treated every 4 weeks from 15 February to 20 July. Every 2 weeks all goats were scored with the FAMACHA chart and weighed. Furthermore, faecal samples were collected for faecal egg counts (FEC) and blood samples were collected for packed cell volume (PCV) determination. H. contortus was found to be the predominant nematode on both farms. The mean FECs were higher on farm 1 compared to farm 2, while in contrast the mean PCV levels were lowest on farm 2. The latter was most likely due to the presence of Fasciola spp., flea and tick infections on farm 2. The accuracy of the chart was evaluated by using PCV as the gold standard for anaemia (PCVFAMACHA chart can be a valuable tool for decision-making in control of H. contortus in goats kept under smallholder conditions, without morbidity or mortality unacceptable to the farmer. The application may further reduce the risk of development of anthelmintic resistance by increasing refugia. However, caution should be taken under conditions where other anaemia-causing parasites are present (e.g. Fasciola spp. and ecto-parasites), since this possibly decreases the accuracy of the FAMACHA chart.

  1. Processes and factors controlling N{sub 2}O production in an intensively managed low carbon calcareous soil under sub-humid monsoon conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju Xiaotang; Lu Xing [Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, and College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, 2 Yuanmingyuan West Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Gao Zhiling [College of Agricultural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Hebei Agricultural University, Baoding 071001 (China); Chen Xinping; Su Fang [Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, and College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, 2 Yuanmingyuan West Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Kogge, Martin; Roemheld, Volker [Institute for Plant Nutrition, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart 70599 (Germany); Christie, Peter [Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, and College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, 2 Yuanmingyuan West Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Agri-Environment Branch, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, BelfastBT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Zhang Fusuo, E-mail: zhangfs@cau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, and College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, 2 Yuanmingyuan West Road, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2011-04-15

    An automated system for continuous measurement of N{sub 2}O fluxes on an hourly basis was employed to study N{sub 2}O emissions in an intensively managed low carbon calcareous soil under sub-humid temperate monsoon conditions. N{sub 2}O emissions occurred mainly within two weeks of application of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-based fertilizer and total N{sub 2}O emissions in wheat (average 0.35 or 0.21 kg N ha{sup -1} season{sup -1}) and maize (average 1.47 or 0.49 kg N ha{sup -1} season{sup -1}) under conventional and optimum N fertilization (300 and 50-122 kg N ha{sup -1}, respectively) were lower than previously reported from low frequency measurements. Results from closed static chamber showed that N{sub 2}O was produced mainly from nitrification of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-based fertilizer, with little denitrification occurring due to limited readily oxidizable carbon and low soil moisture despite consistently high soil nitrate-N concentrations. Significant reductions in N{sub 2}O emissions can be achieved by optimizing fertilizer N rates, using nitrification inhibitors, or changing from NH{sub 4}{sup +}- to NO{sub 3}{sup -}-based fertilizers. - Research highlights: > N{sub 2}O was produced mainly from nitrification of NH{sub 4}{sup +} based fertilizers. > Denitrification played minor role on N{sub 2}O emission due to C and soil moisture limitation. > Using NO{sub 3}{sup -} base fertilizer or NI is an effective way to reduce N{sub 2}O emission. - Nitrification of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-based fertilizer is the main N{sub 2}O production process with little denitrification due to limited readily oxidizable carbon and low soil moisture.

  2. Genetic structure of the population of Phytophthora infestans attacking Solanum ochranthum in the highlands of Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacón, M.G.; Adler, N.E.; Jarrin, F.; Flier, W.G.; Gessler, C.; Forbes, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-nine isolates of Phytophthora infestans were collected from the wild host Solanum ochranthum in the highland tropics of Ecuador and characterized with a set of phenotypic and molecular markers (mating type, metalaxyl sensitivity, the allozyme loci Gpi, and Pep, mitochondrial DNA haplotype,

  3. Emergence or improved detection of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Himalayan highlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Matthew; Barker, Christopher M; Caminade, Cyril; Joshi, Bhoj R; Pant, Ganesh R; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Reisen, William K; Impoinvil, Daniel E

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in the Himalayan highlands is of significant veterinary and public health concern and may be related to climate warming and anthropogenic landscape change, or simply improved surveillance. To investigate this phenomenon, a One Health approach focusing on the phylogeography of JEV, the distribution and abundance of the mosquito vectors, and seroprevalence in humans and animal reservoirs would be useful to understand the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in highland areas. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Malaria in highlands of Ecuador since 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinault, Lauren L; Hunter, Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    A recent epidemic of malaria in the highlands of Bolivia and establishment of multiple Anopheles species mosquitoes in the highlands of Ecuador highlights the reemergence of malaria in the Andes Mountains in South America. Because malaria was endemic to many highland valleys at the beginning of the 20th century, this review outlines the 20th century history of malaria in the highlands of Ecuador, and focuses on its incidence (e.g., geographic distribution) and elimination from the northern highland valleys of Pichincha and Imbabura and the role of the Guayaquil to Quito railway in creating highland larval habitat and inadvertently promoting transportation of the vector and parasite. Involvement of control organizations in combating malaria in Ecuador is also outlined in a historical context.

  5. Tropical pyomyositis (pyomyositis tropicans) in a child: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highland Medical Research Journal ... Presentation is commonly as a single abscess but multiple abscesses could occur. ... Methods: This is a presentation of an 18 months old child with tropical pyomyositis to make physicians aware of the possibility of tropical pyomyositis in a case of a child presenting with fever, inability ...

  6. Turbocharging Normalization in Highland Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Filippov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure many production processes are used compressors of various types, including turbochargers, which produce compressed air. The actual performance values of turbochargers used in highlands are significantly different from the certified values, and parameters of compressed air do not always guarantee the smooth and efficient functioning for consumers.The paper presents research results of the turbochargers of 4CI 425MX4 type, a series of "CENTAC", manufactured by INGERSOL – RAND Company. The research has been conducted in industrial highland conditions in difficult climatic environment. There were almost no investigations of turbochargers running in highland conditions. The combination of low atmospheric pressure with high temperature of the intake air causes the abnormal operating conditions of a turbocharger. Only N. M. Barannikov in his paper shows the results of theoretical studies of such operating conditions, but as to the practical research, there is no information at all.To normalize the turbocharger operation an option of the mechanical pressurization in the suction pipe is adopted. As a result of theoretical research, a TurboMAX blower MAX500 was chosen as a supercharger. The next stage of theoretical research was to construct characteristics of the turbocharger 4CI 425MX4 with a mechanical supercharger in the suction pipe. The boost reduces to the minimum the time of using additional compressors when parameters of the intake air are changed and ensures the smooth and efficient functioning for consumers.To verify the results of theoretical studies, namely, the technique for recalculation of the turbocharger characteristics under the real conditions of suction, were carried out the experimental researches. The average error between experimental and theoretical data is 2,9783 %, which confirms the validity of the technique used for reduction of the turbocharger characteristics to those under the real conditions of suction.

  7. Imagery Exercises for Young Highland Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Irene L.; Munroe-Chandler, Krista J.

    2017-01-01

    Scottish Highland Dance (Highland Dance), known for its accompaniment of bagpipe music and traditional wearing of the kilt, has captured the interest of many dancers and spectators worldwide. It requires strength, stamina, coordination, and very controlled movements. Such intricate technique and movements can be difficult to master, especially for…

  8. Highland Medical Research Journal: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highland Medical Research Journal: About this journal. Journal Home > Highland Medical Research Journal: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ...

  9. Onchocerciasis in the Thyolo highlands of Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Skin snips for 23,373 persons living in the Thyolo highlands showed infection with Onchocerca vol- vulus to be widely but unevenly distributed within the Thyolo highlands. Although 60% of adults in some areas were infected, the intensity of infec- tion was light. Infection with O. volvulus is associ- ated with blindness in the ...

  10. A synthesis of lunar highlands compositional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotev, R. L.; Haskin, L. A.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1980-01-01

    Based on compositions of lunar soils and endogeneous highland rocks and mineral phase relationships, a composition for the non-KREEP, mafic portion of the lunar highlands is determined through the use of a mixing model. It is found that the most common materials making up the surface highlands appear to be ferroan anorthosite (FAN) and a material of olivine norite composition (HON, highlands olivine norite) in roughly equal proportions. It is also found that the composition of HON is similar to that of the residual liquid from crystallization of FAN and that the proportion of FAN to HON at the lunar surface appears to be much higher than the phase relations allow for the extent of evolution of HON from a primitive plagioclase-saturated liquid. This is seen as implying an excess of FAN in the upper highlands.

  11. highlanders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malignant melanoma is a fatal skin cancer that is curable when detected and treated early. Recent reports ... Methods: The histology records of patients diagnosed as cases of malignant melanoma in the pathology laboratory of Jos .... spontaneous regression of a cutaneous primary lesion, now inapparent. 2,16 ...

  12. Land Degradation Processes in the Humid Ethiopian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Tebebu, Tigist; Belachew, Meseret; Langendoen, Eddy; Giri, Shree; Tilahun, Seifu

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation after forest clearing forces a distinct pattern on agricultural production starting with high yields just after clearing to poor productivity or even abandonment after 30-40 years. In the humid Ethiopian highlands forest soils have initial a high organic matter content that decreases with time after clearing. When the organic matter becomes less than 3%, aggregates break up, other cementing elements are being leached out and the texture becomes finer. Since settling velocity in water is related to particle size, the finer soil increases sediment concentration in the infiltration water and hardpan formation accelerates restricting deep percolation of water. This in turn affect the hydrology in which an excess water flows more rapidly as lateral flow to valley bottoms which become wetter with gully formation starting to transmit the additional water down slope approximately 10 years after the initial clearing. This degradation pattern occurs in all soils in the Ethiopian highlands, but the severity varies with climate and parent material. Although we do not yet understand to what degree these factors influence the degradation pattern, it is important to recognize the process because it directly affects the effectiveness of imposed management practices. In this presentation, we will highlight the degradation process for two watersheds in the semi humid Ethiopian highlands. We will document how soil properties changes and discuss hardpan formation and gully development. In addition, we will consider the effect of presently implemented governmental sponsored conservation practices and alternative management practices that might be more beneficial. We are looking forward to discussions on combating the effect of soil degradation in tropical monsoonal regions.

  13. Introduction of deciduous fruit tree growing in the tropical highlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    to develop the deciduous fruit tree growing as a profitable enterprise. Twenty-four out .... altitudes. Significance levels were considered at 95% confidence limits. Results. Fruiting species and Cultivars. Four major deciduous fruit tree species, namely; apples, ... 71.02. 10.00. On-farm performance and management practices.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of ancient Peruvian highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Ken-ichi; Adachi, Noboru; Guillen, Sonia; Shimada, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    Ancient DNA recovered from 57 individuals excavated by Hiram Bingham at the rural communities of Paucarcancha, Patallacta, and Huata near the famed Inca royal estate and ritual site of Machu Picchu was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and the results were compared with ancient and modern DNA from various Central Andean areas to test their hypothesized indigenous highland origins. The control and coding regions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 35 individuals in this group were sequenced, and the haplogroups of each individual were determined. The frequency data for the haplogroups of these samples show clear proximity to those of modern Quechua and Aymara populations in the Peruvian and Bolivian highlands, and contrast with those of pre-Hispanic individuals of the north coast of Peru that we defined previously. Our study suggests a strong genetic affinity between sampled late pre-Hispanic individuals and modern Andean highlanders. A previous analysis of the Machu Picchu osteological collection suggests that the residents there were a mixed group of natives from various coastal and highland regions relocated by the Inca state for varied purposes. Overall, our study indicates that the sampled individuals from Paucarcancha and Patallacta were indigenous highlanders who provided supportive roles for nearby Machu Picchu. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. [Changes of China agricultural climate resources under the background of climate change. IV. Spatiotemporal change characteristics of agricultural climate resources in sub-humid warm-temperate irrigated wheat-maize agricultural area of Huang-Huai-Hai Plain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-juan; Yang, Xiao-guang; Wang, Wen-feng

    2011-04-01

    Based on the 1961-2007 observation data from 66 meteorological stations in the sub-humid and warm-temperate irrigated wheat-maize agricultural area of Huang-Huai-Hai Plain, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal change characteristics of agro-climate resources for chimonophilous and thermophilic crops in the area in 1961-1980 and 1981-2007. The analyzed items included the length of temperature-defined growth season and the active accumulative temperature, sunshine hours, precipitation, reference evapotranspiration, and aridity index during the temperature-defined growth season. With climate warming, the length of temperature-defined growth season of chimonophilous and thermophilic crops in the area in 1981-2007 extended by 7. 4 d and 6. 9 d, and the > or = 0 degrees C and > or = 10 degrees C accumulative temperature increased at a rate of 4.0-137.0 and 1.0-142.0 degrees C d (10 a)(-1), respectively, compared with those in 1961-1980. The sunshine hours during the temperature-defined growth season of the crops decreased markedly; and the precipitation during the temperature-defined growing season decreased in most parts of the area, being obvious in Hebei and north Shandong Province, but increased in north Anhui and southeast Henan Province. In most parts of the area, the reference evapotranspiration of chimonophilous and thermophilic crops during their temperature-defined growth season decreased, and the aridity index increased.

  16. Management of grassy bald communities in the Roan Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Donaldson; N. Schubert; Lisa C. Huff

    2010-01-01

    No place better exemplifies that which is rare and unique within high-elevation communities of the Appalachian Mountains than the highlands of Roan Mountain. The Roan Highlands are protected through a landscape-level conservation initiative originally established by the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and the U.S. Forest Service in 1974.

  17. Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN THE HIGHLANDS OF EASTERN AFRICA. This book documents a decade of research, methodological innovation, and lessons learned in an eco-regional research-for-development program operating in the eastern African highlands, the African Highlands Initiative ...

  18. GENOTYPES IN THE CENTRAL HIGHLANDS OF ETHIOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight promising bread wheat lines and one standard check cultivar were evaluated for grain yield performance, stability and adaptation across nine environments of the central highlands of Ethiopia. Results of the combined analysis of variance for grain yield showed highly significant effects of genotypes, environments, and ...

  19. VEGETATION OF CHENCHA HIGHLANDS IN SOUTHERN ETHIOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    ABSTRACT: The relationship between environmental factors and plant communities identified using multivariate numerical analyses were investigated in the highlands of southern Ethiopia. Vegetation data were obtained from relevés placed in belt transects along altitudinal gradients on the mountain slopes following the ...

  20. Avian influenza: another influenza pandemic? | Banwat | Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB Banwat, MJ Muhammad, DZ Egah, JKA Madaki. Abstract. No Abstract. Highland Medical Research Journal Vol. 4(1) 2006: 1-14. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  1. Replanting hope in Africa's highlands | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-11-17

    Nov 17, 2010 ... Increased potato crops and incomes in Uganda; more effective pest control in Ethiopia; added income from vegetable crops in Tanzania; women's collective seed banks in Madagascar. These are a few results of 15 years of research carried out by the African Highlands Initiative in five East African countries, ...

  2. Staking a Claim in Cambodia's Highlands

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Not only is the forest one of their main sources of food and income, it is also essential for their swidden system of agriculture. Moreover, although Highlanders form close to three-quarters of. Ratanakiri's population, they are a minority group in Cambodia as a whole. They had never spoken up for their rights in Cambodia's ...

  3. Molecular embryology & gene therapy | Mador | Highland Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highland Medical Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1-2 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  4. OF EAST AFRICAN HIGHLAND BANANA CV ' NAKYETENGU'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    establishment of their embryogénie cell suspensions. The present study was therefore instituted to investigate somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration of East African highland bananas using male flowers of cultivar. 'Nakyetengu'. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ten male buds ofcv 'Nakyetengu' were harvested.

  5. Towards sustainable Highland Banana production in Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East Africa highland bananas (Musa sp., AAA-EAHB) are an important starchy food and cash crop in Uganda and the Great Lakes region of East Africa. Widespread reports of declining yields in Uganda since the 1930s and the low yields today do raise serious sustainability and food security concerns, especially as food ...

  6. Highland Medical Research Journal: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The aim of the Highland Medical Research Journal is to publish scientific research in various fields of medical science and to communicate such research findings to the larger world community. It aims to promote cooperation and understanding amoungst workers in various fields of medical science.

  7. Amodiaquine – Induced Thrombocytopenia | Nwauche | Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report highlights the probable direct toxic effect of Amodiaquine on bone marrow megakaryocytes and the role of phamacogenomics and pharmacogenetics in identifying the subpopulation at risk of developing untoward reactions to drugs such as Amodiaquine. Highland Medical Research Journal Vol.2(1) 2004: 81-83.

  8. Human malaria in the highlands of Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Mekhlafi, A M; AL-Mekhlafi, H M; Mahdy, M A K; Azazy, A A; Fong, M Y

    2011-01-01

    Between June 2008 and March 2009, a cross-sectional study of human malaria was carried out in four governorates of Yemen, two (Taiz and Hodiedah) representing the country’s highlands and the others (Dhamar and Raymah) the country’s coastal plains/foothills. The main aims were to determine the prevalences of Plasmodium infection among 455 febrile patients presenting for care at participating health facilities and to investigate the potential risk factors for such infection. Malarial infection was detected in 78 (17·1%) of the investigated patients and was more likely to be detected among the febrile patients from the highlands than among those presenting in the coastal plains/foothills (22·6% v.13·9%; χ2 = 10·102; P = 0·018). Binary logistic-regression models identified low household income [odds ratio (OR) = 13·52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2·62–69·67; P = 0·002], living in a household with access to a water pump (OR = 4·18; CI = 1·60–10·96; P = 0·004) and living in a household near a stream (OR = 4·43; CI = 1·35–14·56; P = 0·014) as significant risk factors for malarial infection in the highlands. Low household income was the only significant risk factor identified for such infection in the coastal plains and foothills (OR = 8·20; CI = 1·80–37·45; P = 0·007). It is unclear why febrile patients in the highlands of Yemen are much more likely to be found to have malarial infection than their counterparts from the coastal plains and foothills. Although it is possible that malarial transmission is relatively intense in the highlands, it seems more likely that, compared with those who live at lower altitudes, those who live in the highlands are less immune to malaria, and therefore more likely to develop febrile illness following malarial infection. Whatever the cause of the symptomatic malarial infection commonly found in the highlands of Yemen, it is a matter of serious

  9. Mapping of government land encroachment in Cameron Highlands using multiple remote sensing datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, M. H. M.; Ahmad, B.

    2014-02-01

    The cold and refreshing highland weather is one of the factors that give impact to socio-economic growth in Cameron Highlands. This unique weather of the highland surrounded by tropical rain forest can only be found in a few places in Malaysia. It makes this place a famous tourism attraction and also provides a very suitable temperature for agriculture activities. Thus it makes agriculture such as tea plantation, vegetable, fruits and flowers one of the biggest economic activities in Cameron Highlands. However unauthorized agriculture activities are rampant. The government land, mostly forest area have been encroached by farmers, in many cases indiscriminately cutting down trees and hill slopes. This study is meant to detect and assess this encroachment using multiple remote sensing datasets. The datasets were used together with cadastral parcel data where survey lines describe property boundary, pieces of land are subdivided into lots of government and private. The general maximum likelihood classification method was used on remote sensing image to classify the land-cover in the study area. Ground truth data from field observation were used to assess the accuracy of the classification. Cadastral parcel data was overlaid on the classification map in order to detect the encroachment area. The result of this study shows that there is a land cover change of 93.535 ha in the government land of the study area between years 2001 to 2010, nevertheless almost no encroachment took place in the studied forest reserve area. The result of this study will be useful for the authority in monitoring and managing the forest.

  10. Cultural Astronomy in the Armenian Highland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Suvaryan, Yu. M.; Mickaelian, A. M. (Eds.)

    2016-12-01

    The book contains 29 articles of the Proceedings of the Young Scientists Conference "Cultural Astronomy in the Armenian Highland" held at the Armenian National Academy of Sciences on 20-23 June 2016. It consists of 4 main sections: "Introductory", "Cultural Astronomy", "Archaeoastronomy", "Scientific Tourism and Journalism, Astronomical Education and Amateur Astronomy". The book may be interesting to astronomers, culturologists, philologists, linguists, historians, archaeologists, art historians, ethnographers and to other specialists, as well as to students.

  11. Menopause in highland Guatemala Mayan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donna E

    2003-04-25

    To explore any feelings and symptoms surrounding menopause among Mayan women in three ethnolinguistic groups in highland Guatemala and compare these with previous reports from Mexico. This was a qualitative exploratory study of the experiences around menopause of eight middle aged women and one local key informant in each of three villages in western highland Guatemala (n=27). Individual interviews were conducted in women with irregular menses or whose menses has ceased in the last 3 years. Field notes were kept and then an analysis undertaken by the author. Twenty-four Mayan women, aged 38-55, and three Mayan key informants (all women over age 50) were interviewed. Most women reported some symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, changes in libido, irritability, moodiness, abdominal cramps and menstrual clots occurring at some stage during the last 3 years. Although women reported symptoms, they mostly accepted them with equanimity; and rejoiced at the cessation of their periods. Highland Guatemalan Mayan women reported symptoms that were not reported in Mayan women in Yucatan, Mexico in the years surrounding menopause. The reasons for this disparity are unclear but may reflect differences in body weight and diet. Despite these symptoms, Mayan women looked forward to menopause and their newfound freedom and status. Symptoms in women in the years around menopause must be interpreted in geographical, nutritional, biological, psychological and cultural context.

  12. Tropical Rainforests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigh, Ronald B.; Nations, James D.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a summary of scientific knowledge about the rainforest environment, a tropical ecosystem in danger of extermination. Topics include the current state of tropical rainforests, the causes of rainforest destruction, and alternatives of rainforest destruction. (BT)

  13. Upper soil temperatures in the Kolyma Highland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains soil temperature and meteorological data for various sampling locations near the Aborigen research station in the Kolyma Highland,...

  14. Morphological dynamics of gully systems in the subhumid Ethiopian Highlands: the Debre Mawi watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Assefa D.; Langendoen, Eddy J.; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Dagnew, Dessalegn C.; Zimale, Fasikaw A.; Guzman, Christian D.; Yitaferu, Birru; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2016-09-01

    Gully expansion in the Ethiopian Highlands dissects vital agricultural lands with the eroded materials adversely impacting downstream resources, for example as they accumulate in reservoirs. While gully expansion and rehabilitation have been more extensively researched in the semiarid region of Ethiopia, few studies have been conducted in the (sub)humid region. For that reason, we assessed the severity of gully erosion by measuring the expansion of 13 selected permanent gullies in the subhumid Debre Mawi watershed, 30 km south of Lake Tana, Ethiopia. In addition, the rate of expansion of the entire drainage network in the watershed was determined using 0.5 m resolution aerial imagery from flights in 2005 and 2013. About 0.6 Mt (or 127 t ha-1 yr-1) of soil was lost during this period due to actively expanding gullies. The net gully area in the entire watershed increased more than 4-fold from 4.5 ha in 2005 to 20.4 ha in 2013 (> 3 % of the watershed area), indicating the growing severity of gully erosion and hence land degradation in the watershed. Soil losses were caused by upslope migrating gully heads through a combination of gully head collapse and removal of the failed material by runoff. Collapse of gully banks and retreat of headcuts was most severe in locations where elevated groundwater tables saturated gully heads and banks, destabilizing the soils by decreasing the shear strength. Elevated groundwater tables were therefore the most important cause of gully expansion. Additional factors that strongly relate to bank collapse were the height of the gully head and the size of the drainage area. Soil physical properties (e.g., texture and bulk density) only had minor effects. Conservation practices that address factors controlling erosion are the most effective in protecting gully expansion. These consist of lowering water table and regrading the gully head and sidewalls to reduce the occurrence of gravity-induced mass failures. Planting

  15. Ectrodactyly in a West Highland white terrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrand, K R

    2004-06-01

    A case of monomelic forelimb ectrodactyly (lobster-claw deformity) in a West Highland white terrier is reported. Clinical and radiographic findings are described. The dog was treated with a soft tissue reconstruction of the cleft. It later developed a slight varus-type deformity at the carpus but remained sound with occasional bouts of mild lameness following vigorous exercise. To the author's knowledge, this is the first reported case of canine ectrodactyly treated by simple cleft reconstruction, and only the second report of ectrodactyly in this breed.

  16. Seismicity study of Javakhety highland (Southrn Georgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godladze, T.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Dorbath, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Caucasus is a region of active tectonics and complex crustal structure located between the Caspian Sea to the East and the Black Sea to the west. To the North is the aseismic Eurasian shield and to the South-West and the South are the active tectonic regions of East Anatolia and the Zagros thrust and fault belt of Northwestern Iran. Main interest of our study is Javakheti highland, which is located in the central part of the Caucasus, belongs to the structure of the Lesser Caucasus and represents a history of neotectonic volcanism existed in the area. While the region is seismically active, most of the crustal models and earthquake locations are based on field work and seismic studies of the soviet era until 2003, when recent technical advances has continued in the former USSR republics of the Southern Caucasus. Before 2003 the only broadband digital instrumentation in the region was an IRIS station in Garni, Armenia. Now there are new regional networks in Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan. There is considerable interest in examining the tectonics and fault structure of the region in more detail and in obtaining seismic data to develop crustal models and improve our ability to accurately locate events as the inputs for the seismic hazard assessment of the Caucasus. Several field works have been conducted in the Javakheti highland from 2009 to 2011. The goal of the intensive field investigations was multidisciplinary study of the fault structure and better understanding seismicity of the area. We relocated hypocenters of the earthquakes in the region and improved local 3D velocity model. The hypocenters derived from recently deployed local seismic network in the Javakheti highland, clearly identified seismically active structures. Fault plane solutions of analog data of the soviet time have been carefully analyzed and examined. Moment tensor inversions were performed for the recent moderate size earthquakes of the Javakheti highland associated with the fault

  17. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  18. Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands. The Asian Highlands, including the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, are the source of most major rivers in Asia and sustain nearly three billion people living downstream. Global warming and related climatic changes are predicted to impact river flows, soil moisture ...

  19. Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2012 ... Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of Eastern Africa: From Concept to Practice. Book cover Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of Eastern Africa: From Concept to. Directeur(s) : Laura German, Jeremias Mowo, Tilahun Amede, and Kenneth Masuki. Maison(s) ...

  20. Prediction of rainfall in the southern highlands of Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QBOu50 is also a weak predictor for OND rainfall. It is therefore recommended that IOD, QBou30, OLR, QBOu50 and ENSO should be considered in rainfall forecasting in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania. Key words: Collinearity, Multicollinearity, PCR model, Rainfall Variability, Southern Highlands of Tanzania ...

  1. Genetic Diversity Among East African Highland Bananas For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are 84 distinct cultivars of highland bananas (Musa spp.) in Uganda, grouped in five clone sets and it is not known which among these are female fertile. The objective of the study reported herein was to identify female fertile highland bananas that can be used in a cross breeding program and to determine the ...

  2. prediction of rainfall in the southern highlands of tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    therefore recommended that IOD, QBou30, OLR, QBOu50 and ENSO should be considered in rainfall forecasting in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania. Key words: Collinearity, Multicollinearity, PCR model, Rainfall Variability, Southern Highlands of Tanzania. INTRODUCTION. Rainfall is an important parameter for crop.

  3. Registration of Ilani and Oda Durum Wheat Varieties for Highlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two durum wheat (Triticum durum desf.) varieties: Ilani (DZ 2234) and Oda (DZ 2227) developed by Sinana Agricultural Research Centers were released for production in highlands of Bale similar agro ecologies. These varieties were selected and evaluated at Sinana on-station and three onfarms in highlands of Bale for ...

  4. Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Jan 1, 2012 ... This book documents a decade of research, methodological innovation, and lessons learned in an eco-regional research-for-development program operating in the eastern African highlands, the African Highlands Initiative (AHI). It does this through reflections of the protagonists themselves—AHI site teams ...

  5. Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2012 ... Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of Eastern Africa : From Concept to Practice. Couverture du livre Integrated Natural Resource Management in the Highlands of Eastern Africa: From Concept. Directeur(s) : Laura German, Jeremias Mowo, Tilahun Amede et Kenneth Masuki.

  6. Elephantiasis of non-filarial origin (podoconiosis) in the highlands of north-western Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanji, S; Tendongfor, N; Esum, M; Che, J N; Mand, S; Tanga Mbi, C; Enyong, P; Hoerauf, A

    2008-09-01

    Lymphoedema, a condition of localized fluid retention, results from a compromised lymphatic system. Although one common cause in the tropics is infection with filarial worms, non-filarial lymphoedema, also known as podoconiosis, has been reported among barefoot farmers in volcanic highland zones of Africa, Central and South America and north-western India. There are conflicting reports on the causes of lymphoedema in the highland regions of Cameroon, where the condition is of great public-health importance. To characterise the focus of lymphoedema in the highlands of the North West province of Cameroon and investigate its real causes, a cross-sectional study was carried out on the adults (aged > or =15 years) living in the communities that fall within the Ndop and Tubah health districts. The subjects, who had to have lived in the study area for at least 10 years, were interviewed, examined clinically, and, when possible, checked for microfilaraemia. The cases of lymphoedema confirmed by ultrasonography and a random sample of the other subjects were also tested for filarial antigenaemia. The interviews, which explored knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP) relating to lymphoedema, revealed that the condition was well known, with each study community having a local name for it. Of the 834 individuals examined clinically, 66 (8.1%) had lymphoedema of the lower limb, with all the clinical stages of this condition represented. None of the 792 individuals examined parasitologically, however, had microfilariae of W. bancrofti (or any other filarial parasite) in their peripheral blood, and only one (0.25%) of the 399 individuals tested for the circulating antigens of W. bancrofti gave a positive result. In addition, none of the 504 mosquitoes caught landing on human bait in the study area and dissected was found to harbour any stage of W. bancrofti. These findings indicate that the elephantiasis seen in the North West province of Cameroon is of non-filarial origin.

  7. Venus Ovda Regio Stratigraphy and Tectonics: Highlands-Plains Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, R. S.

    1996-03-01

    The global plains materials of the Venusian lowlands, generally interpreted to be composed of flood basalts, lap onto the equatorial highlands of Western Aphrodite Regio. Systematic geologic mapping of the Ovda region using the Magellan global data (radar images, altimetry and gravity) has revealed that the contacts between highlands and plains have been tilted up toward the highlands after the plains emplacement. Analysis of the western part of Ovda Regio shows that the northern contact occurs at an average radius of 6053.8 km and the mean plains elevation 500 km to the north of the contact is at a radius of 6052.0 km, indicating that the boundary position has changed by nearly 2 km. Volcanic rilles are superposed on the tilted plains surfaces along both the northern and southern boundaries of the Ovda highlands. The local volcanicity that cut the rilles indicates that some local volcanic activity occurred subsequent to the marginal uplift. Models under study include post plains-emplacement uplift of the highlands or relative sinking of the plains. Isostatic mechanisms are likely in either case. Although complex structural models for the plains-highland margin are possible, simple structural models in which plains were emplaced as a nearly level geoidal surface and subsequently the highlands of Ovda were uplifted relative to the plains. Initial mapping is focused on 1:5,000,000 scale and is integrating observations of surface characteristics and geophysical inferences drawn from topography and gravity.

  8. Classic to postclassic in highland central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumond, D E; Muller, F

    1972-03-17

    The data and argument we have presented converge on three points. 1) With the decline and abandonment of Teotihuacan by the end of the Metepec phase (Teotihuacan IV), the valleys of Mexico and of Puebla-Tlax-cala witnessed the development of a ceramic culture that was represented, on the one hand, by obvious Teotihuacan derivations in presumably ritual ware and possible Teotihuacan derivations in simpler pottery of red-on-buff, and, on the other hand, by elements that seem to represent a resurgence of Preclassic characteristics. Whether the development is explained through a measure of outside influence or as a local phenomenon, the direct derivation of a substantial portion of the complex from Classic Teotihuacan is unmistakable. This transitional horizon predated the arrival of plumbate tradeware in highland central Mexico. 2) The transitional horizon coincided with (and no doubt was an integral part of) an alteration of Classic settlement patterns so drastic that it must bespeak political disruption. Nevertheless, there is no evidence that the Postclassic center of Tula represented a significant force in the highlands at that time. There is no evidence that the center of Cholula, which may even have been substantially abandoned during the previous period, was able to exert any force at this juncture; it appears more likely that Cholula was largely reoccupied after the abandonment of Teotihuacan. There is no direct evidence of domination by Xochicalco or any other known major foreign center, although some ceramic traits suggest that relatively minor influences may have emanated from Xochicalco; unfortunately, the state of research at that center does not permit a determination at this time. Thus the most reasonable view on the basis of present evidence is that the abandonment of Teotihuacan was not the direct result of the strength of another centralized power, although some outside populations may have been involved in a minor way. Whatever the proximate cause

  9. Tropical Veterinarian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TROPICAL VETERINARIAN is an international journal devoted to all aspects of veterinary science as practiced in the tropics, including livestock production and management, animal disease (domestic and wild), various aspects of preventive medicine and public health and basic and applied research in these areas.

  10. Sustainable Land Management in the Ethiopian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan; Araya, Tesfay

    2014-05-01

    Through centuries of farming practices the farmers and pastoralists in Ethiopia were managing their land resources pertaining to the needs of prevalent populations. With an increasing population and growing demands, more land was put under cultivation. Subsequently forest areas were cleared, encroaching agriculture into steep slopes and areas that were not suitable for agricultural activities. Land degradation and particularly soil erosion by water not only reduced the productivity of the land but also aggravated the effects of drought, such as famine and migration. Obvious signs of degradation in the highlands of Ethiopia are wide gullies swallowing fertile lands and rock outcrops making farming a risky business. But also less visible sheet erosion processes result in a tremendous loss of fertile topsoil, particularly on cropland. Efforts have been made by the farming communities to mitigate land degradation by developing local practices of conserving soil and water. With keen interest and openness one can observe such indigenous practices in all corners of Ethiopia. Notwithstanding these practices, there were also efforts to introduce other soil and water conservation interventions to control erosion and retain the eroded soils. Since the early 1980s numerous campaigns were carried out to build terraces in farmlands and sloping areas. Major emphasis was given to structural technologies rather than on vegetative measures. Currently the landscape of the northern highlands is dotted with millions of hectares of terraced fields and in some places with planned watershed management interventions including exclosures. Apparently these interventions were introduced without prior investigating the detailed problems and conservation needs of the local population. Intensive research is undertaken on the processes of degradation, the impact of the different intervention measures and the role of communities in sustainably managing their land. This paper attempts to review the

  11. Ancient and Medieval Cosmology in Armenian Highland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, Sona V.; Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2016-12-01

    Humankind has always sought to recognize the nature of various sky related phenomena and tried to give them explanations. It is especially vivid in ancient cultures, many of which are related to the Middle East. The purpose of this study is to identify ancient Armenian's pantheistic and cosmological perceptions, world view, notions and beliefs. By this study we answer the question "How did the Universe work in Ancient Armenian Highland?" The paper focuses on the structure of the Universe and many phenomena of nature that have always had major influence on ancient Armenians thinking. Here we weave together astronomy, anthropology and mythology of Armenia, and scientific thinking revealed in local astronomy traditions. The initial review of the study covers Moses of Khoren, Yeznik of Koghb, Anania Shirakatsi and other 5th-7th centuries historians' and scientists' records about the Universe related superstitious beliefs and cosmological understanding. By discussing and comparing Universe structure in various regional traditions, myths, folk songs and phraseological units we very often came across "seven worlds", "seven earths" and "seven layers" concepts. We draw parallels between scientific and mythological Earth and Heaven and thus find similar number of layers on both of the ancient and modern thinking. In the article we also give some details about the tripartite structure of the Universe and how these parts are connected with axis. This axis is either a column or a Cosmic Tree (Kenatz Tsar). In Armenian culture the preliminary meanings of the Kenatz Tsar are more vivid in folk songs (Jan gyulums), plays, epic, and so on, which was subsequently mixed with religious and spiritual views. We conclude that the perception of the Universe structure and celestial objects had a significant impact on culture and worldview of the people of the Armenian Highland; particularly it was one of the bases of the regional cultural diversity.

  12. Prevalence of classic erythrocyte polymorphisms among 749 children in southern highland Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahutu, Jean-Bosco; Musemakweri, André; Harms, Gundel; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2012-01-01

    Classic erythrocyte polymorphisms were assessed by PCR-based methods among 749 children in southern highland Rwanda. Sickle cell trait, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, and α(+)-thalassaemia were observed in 2.8%, 9.6%, and 15.1%, respectively. Malariologic parameters did not correlate with these traits. Haemoglobin concentrations were significantly reduced in α(+)-thalassaemia but only homozygosity (0.8%) was a rare cause of anaemia in this population. The frequencies of malaria-protective polymorphisms reflect the high altitude (1700-1800 metres) of the study area. α(+)-thalassaemia and G6PD deficiency have previously been underestimated in Rwanda which may be of importance in the diagnosis and treatment of common childhood diseases. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding growth of East Africa highland banana: experiments and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyombi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: leaf area; radiation interception; QUEFTS model; fertilizer recovery fractions; nutrient mass fractions; crop growth; calibration; validation; radiation use efficiency; sensitivity analysis East Africa Highland banana yields on smallholder farms in the Great Lakes region are small

  14. Holt- Oram syndrome: a case report | Ige | Highland Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highland Medical Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 13, No 1 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. The Geology of the North-west Highlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GEIKIE, ARCH

    1893-01-01

    .... de Lapparent, when alluding to the solution of the problem of the geological structure of the Northwest Highlands, makes no reference to the distinguished part taken in that subject by Prof. Lapworth...

  16. Guiana Highlands, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] These two images show exactly the same area in South America, the Guiana Highlands straddling the borders of Venezuela, Guyana and Brazil. The image on the left was created using the best global topographic data set previously available, the U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30. In contrast, the image on the right was generated with a new data set recently released by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) called SRTM30, which represents a significant improvement in our knowledge of the topography of much of the world.GTOPO30, with a resolution of about 928 meters (1496 feet), was developed over a three-year period and published in 1996, and since then has been the primary source of digital elevation data for scientists and analysts involved in global studies. However, since it was compiled from a number of different map sources with varying attributes, the data for some parts of the globe were inconsistent or of low quality.The SRTM data, on the other hand, were collected within a ten-day period using the same instrument in a uniform fashion, and were processed into elevation data using consistent processing techniques. Thus SRTM30 provides a new resource of uniform quality for all parts of the Earth, and since the data, which have an intrinsic resolution of about 30 meters, were averaged and resampled to match the GTOPO30 sample spacing and format, and can be used by the same computer software without modification.The Guiana Highlands are part of the Guyana Shield, which lies in northeast South America and represent one of the oldest land surfaces in the world. Chemical weathering over many millions of years has created a landscape of flat-topped table mountains with dramatic, steep cliffs with a large number of spectacular waterfalls. For example Angel Falls, at 979 meters the highest waterfall in the world, plunges from Auyan Tebuy, part of a mesa of the type that may have been the inspiration for Arthur Conan

  17. Respiratory Toxicity of Lunar Highland Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Wallace, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar dust exposures occurred during the Apollo missions while the crew was on the lunar surface and especially when microgravity conditions were attained during rendezvous in lunar orbit. Crews reported that the dust was irritating to the eyes and in some cases respiratory symptoms were elicited. NASA s vision for lunar exploration includes stays of 6 months on the lunar surface hence the health effects of periodic exposure to lunar dust need to be assessed. NASA has performed this assessment with a series of in vitro and in vivo tests on authentic lunar dust. Our approach is to "calibrate" the intrinsic toxicity of lunar dust by comparison to a nontoxic dust (TiO2) and a highly toxic dust (quartz) using intratrachael instillation of the dusts in mice. A battery of indices of toxicity is assessed at various time points after the instillations. Cultures of selected cells are exposed to test dusts to assess the adverse effects on the cells. Finally, chemical systems are used to assess the nature of the reactivity of various dusts and to determine the persistence of reactivity under various environmental conditions that are relevant to a space habitat. Similar systems are used to assess the dissolution of the dust. From these studies we will be able to set a defensible inhalation exposure standard for aged dust and predict whether we need a separate standard for reactive dust. Presently-available data suggest that aged lunar highland dust is slightly toxic, that it can adversely affect cultured cells, and that the surface reactivity induced by grinding the dust persists for a few hours after activation.

  18. Genetic variation and population structure of maize inbred lines adapted to the mid-altitude sub-humid maize agro-ecology of Ethiopia using single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertiro, Berhanu Tadesse; Semagn, Kassa; Das, Biswanath; Olsen, Michael; Labuschagne, Maryke; Worku, Mosisa; Wegary, Dagne; Azmach, Girum; Ogugo, Veronica; Keno, Tolera; Abebe, Beyene; Chibsa, Temesgen; Menkir, Abebe

    2017-10-12

    Molecular characterization is important for efficient utilization of germplasm and development of improved varieties. In the present study, we investigated the genetic purity, relatedness and population structure of 265 maize inbred lines from the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT) and the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) using 220,878 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers obtained using genotyping by sequencing (GBS). Only 22% of the inbred lines were considered pure with population structure analysis consistently suggested the presence of three groups, which generally agreed with pedigree information (genetic background). Although not distinct enough, the SNP markers showed some level of separation between the two CIMMYT heterotic groups A and B established based on pedigree and combining ability information. The high level of heterogeneity detected in most of the inbred lines suggested the requirement for purification or further inbreeding except those deliberately maintained at early inbreeding level. The genetic distance and relative kinship analysis clearly indicated the uniqueness of most of the inbred lines in the maize germplasm available for breeders in the mid-altitude maize breeding program of Ethiopia. Results from the present study facilitate the maize breeding work in Ethiopia and germplasm exchange among breeding programs in Africa. We suggest the incorporation of high density molecular marker information in future heterotic group assignments.

  19. for Tropical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The importance of local variations in patterns of health and disease are increasingly recognised, but, particularly in the case of tropical infections, available methods and resources for characterising disease clusters in time and space are limited. Whilst the Global Positioning System. (GPS) allows accurate and ...

  20. Tropical Deforestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Peter H.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the deforestation problem and some efforts for solving the problem. Considers the impact of population growth, poverty, and ignorance. Includes a discussion of the current rapid decline in tropical forests, the consequences of destruction, and an outlook for the future. (YP)

  1. Long-range variability and predictability of the Ozark Highlands climate elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Won

    Interannual variations and intraannual variation of regional-scale and global-scale climate variables are characterized by principal component analysis (PCA). Climate consistency is detected among the entire United States, the North Central states, and the Ozark Highlands (OZHI). The regional-scale modes of the OZHI climate are classified as the predictands of the statistical climate model. Characteristic patterns and time coefficients are examined in global-scale climate variables as the predictor of the models. Relationships between regional-scale and global-scale climate variables are identified by the month lead cross- correlation analysis. The OZHI temperatures in January and July are highly correlated to lead time global-scale climate variables in the tropical and subtropical Pacific and Atlantic and those of lead time in the eastern subtropical and midlatitude Pacific, respectively. The OZHI precipitation levels in January and May are highly correlated to lead time global-scale climate variables in the western tropical Pacific and in the western tropical Indian, and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), respectively. From multiple linear regression (MLR) and principal components regression (PCR) analysis, the predictability of OZHI regional temperature and precipitation are discussed with model diagnostics and measurements of forecasting performance. This study suggests that PCR can clearly eliminate the multicollinearity among predictors. For the purpose of building the statistical climate model, the sensitivities of the main predictors (i.e., temperature and precipitation) are investigated, and relatively long-memory and short-memory predictors are uncovered. The sea surface temperatures have a relatively long-memory effect.

  2. Hydrogeology of the Mogollon Highlands, central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John T.C.; Steinkampf, William C.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2005-01-01

    The Mogollon Highlands, 4,855 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain at the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau in central Arizona, is characterized by a bedrock-dominated hydrologic system that results in an incompletely integrated regional ground-water system, flashy streamflow, and various local water-bearing zones that are sensitive to drought. Increased demand on the water resources of the area as a result of recreational activities and population growth have made necessary an increased understanding of the hydrogeology of the region. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geology and hydrology of the region in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources under the auspices of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative, a program launched in 1998 to assist rural areas in dealing with water-resources issues. The study involved the analysis of geologic maps, surface-water and ground-water flow, and water and rock chemical data and spatial relationships to characterize the hydrogeologic framework. The study area includes the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau and the Mogollon Rim, which is the eroded edge of the plateau. A 3,000- to 4,000-foot sequence of early to late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks forms the generally south-facing scarp of the Mogollon Rim. The area adjacent to the edge of the Mogollon Rim is an erosional landscape of rolling, step-like terrain exposing Proterozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks. Farther south, the Sierra Ancha and Mazatzal Mountain ranges, which are composed of various Proterozoic rocks, flank an alluvial basin filled with late Cenozoic sediments and volcanic flows. Eight streams with perennial to intermittent to ephemeral flow drain upland regions of the Mogollon Rim and flow into the Salt River on the southern boundary or the Verde River on the western boundary. Ground-water flow paths generally are controlled by large-scale fracture systems or by karst features in carbonate rocks. Stream

  3. External Review and Impact Assessment of the African Highlands ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-21

    Apr 21, 2016 ... Since agro-ecosystems are driven by the interactions of ecological, economic, and social variables, INRM research has to work back and forth across all three dimensions. The prevailing serious degradation of the natural resource base in the intensively cultivated and overpopulated highlands of Eastern ...

  4. External review and impact assessment of the African Highlands ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The prevailing serious degradation of the natural resource base in the intensively cultivated and overpopulated highlands of Eastern and Central Africa resulted from poor land management systems associated with traditional farming practices, on the one hand, and the concerted effort to improve agricultural productivity ...

  5. External review and impact assessment of the African Highlands ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Dec 15, 2010 ... Since agro-ecosystems are driven by the interactions of ecological, economic, and social variables, INRM research has to work back and forth across all three dimensions. The prevailing serious degradation of the natural resource base in the intensively cultivated and overpopulated highlands of Eastern ...

  6. Report on stakeholder evaluation of highland aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren

    degradation, changing demand for goods and services and modified highland aquatic resources management practices on these values has also been assessed. To help structure this analysis stakeholder Delphi studies have been undertaken in each country involving representatives from all stakeholder groups...

  7. 'Dar' + gerund in Ecuadorian Highland Spanish: contact-induced grammaticalization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbertz, H.

    2008-01-01

    The benefactive construction dar + gerund is used in the North Andean region only and is unknown elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking world. Based on the analysis of spontaneous data from Ecuadorian Highland Spanish, this paper provides a linguististic description of dar + gerund and of the social and

  8. Going to Scale : Sustainable Land Management in the Highlands of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Journal articles. Farmers' preference for soil and water conservation practices in Central highlands of Ethiopia. Download PDF. Journal articles. Implications of market access on soil and water conservation investment in Sebei sub region of eastern Uganda. Download PDF. Journal articles. Devolution : a mechanism for ...

  9. Social capital in water user organizations of the Ecuadorian Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogesteger van Dijk, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I explore how new water user organizations have developed in formerly state managed irrigation systems in the Ecuadorian highlands since the 1990s. The article is based on an in-depth case study of the Pillaro irrigation system and illustrations of other cases. These water user

  10. Virulence diversity of Uromyces Appendiculatus in the Highlands of Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common bean is planted throughout Guatemala, especially in the highlands of the South East, North East, and South West regions. In these regions, temperatures fluctuate between 16 y 20 °C and the average rain precipitation is about 1000 mm. These conditions are optimum for the rust disease and b...

  11. Participatory policy development for integrated watershed management in Uganda's highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutekanga, F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Soil erosion is a serious problem in the densely populated Uganda highlands and previous interventions were ineffective. This study, on the Ngenge watershed, Mount Elgon, was aimed at developing policy for the implementation of a new strategy for solving the problem, Integrated Watershed Management

  12. Changes in farmers' knowledge of maize diversity in highland Guatemala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etten, van J.

    2006-01-01

    Small-scale studies on long-term change in agricultural knowledge might uncover insights with broader, regional implications. This article evaluates change in farmer knowledge about crop genetic resources in highland Guatemala between 1927/37 and 2004. It concentrates on maize (Zea mays ssp. mays

  13. Economic value of ecosystem attributes in the Southern Appalachian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Holmes; Brent Sohngen; Linwood Pendleton; Robert Mendelsohn

    1997-01-01

    The hedonic travel cost method was used to make preliminary estimates of the economic value of ecosystem attributes found in the Southern Appalachian highlands. Travel costs were estimated using origin-destination data from Wilderness Area permits, and site attribute data were collected by field crews. Ecosystem attribute price frontiers were estimated and used to...

  14. Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    These case studies, coupled with climate data and an analysis of water policies, customary rights, and water management practices, will form the basis for local and regional ... Outputs. Journal articles. Integrating local hybrid knowledge and state support for climate change adaptation in the Asian Highlands. Download PDF ...

  15. Building Effective Water Governance in the Asian Highlands | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers at the Kunming Institute of Botany in China will develop regional bioclimatic maps and model climate scenarios to predict climate change impacts in the Asian Highlands. HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation will partner with the Kunming Institute to assess vulnerability and capacity to adapt to climate change in ...

  16. Herd dynamics of smallholder dairy in the Kenya highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bebe, B.O.

    2003-01-01

    Smallholder dairy farmers in the Kenya highlands generally intensify their farming systems by integrating dairy with crop production and shifting from free-grazing to semi-zero- or zero-grazing. They consequently change the breed composition, size and structure of their herds with resultant change

  17. Descartes highlands: Possible analogs around the Orientale Basin, part D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two possible analogs, although not entirely satisfactory, offer reasonable alternatives to the volcanic interpretation of the Descartes highlands. Reconsideration of this complex terrain, prompted by the preliminary results of the Apollo 16 mission, will lead to the revision of some theories on lunar volcanism and also to a better understanding of the landforms caused by the formation of multi-ring basins.

  18. Registration of Urjii, Field Pea Variety for Bale Highlands, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urjii (Acc. 32615-1) a semi-erect white seeded field pea variety has been selected and developed by Sinana Agricultural Research Center. The variety was released in 2007 for Bale highlands and similar agroecologies. This variety was tested in a regional variety trial in 12 environments, at four locations (Sinana, Sinja, ...

  19. 27 CFR 9.122 - Western Connecticut Highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Highlands. 9.122 Section 9.122 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... (Litchfield-Hartford-New Haven County line); (6) The boundary then travels approximately 7 miles west along the Litchfield-New Haven County line to Connecticut Route #8 at Waterville in the Town of Waterbury...

  20. Spontaneous rupture of an incisional hernia | Eke | Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She tested positive for HIV infection. The rupture was repaired under antibodies cover. She made an uneventful recovery but has since been lost to follow up. Lesson: The risk of spontaneous rupture is an indication for the elective repair of incisional hernias. Highland Medical Research Journal Vol. 4(1) 2006: 86-88 ...

  1. Liver function profile and benzom | Otokwula | Highland Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... interfere with elimination of certain hypertension inducing hormones and their breakdown products may at least be partially contributory to the elevated blood pressure seen in this group. Keywords: primary hypertension, hippuric acid conjugation test, Nigerians Highland Medical Research Journal Vol. 3(2) 2005: 38-44 ...

  2. Predation drives nesting success in moist highland grasslands: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By focusing on process-oriented data rather than inventory-type data, this study provides a robust understanding of the effects of agricultural management on grassland bird reproductive output in the moist highland grasslands (MHGs) of South Africa. Four-hundred and four nests of 12 grassland-breeding bird species were ...

  3. Tropical Warm Semi-Arid Regions Expanding Over Temperate Latitudes In The Projected 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaud, A.; de Noblet, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    Two billion people today live in drylands, where extreme climatic conditions prevail, and natural resources are limited. Drylands are expected to expand under several scenarios of climatic change. However, relevant adaptation strategies need to account for the aridity level: it conditions the equilibrium tree-cover density, ranging from deserts (hyper-arid) to dense savannas (sub-humid). Here we focus on the evolution of climatically defined warm semi-arid areas, where low-tree density covers can be maintained. We study the global repartition of these regions in the future and the bioclimatic shifts involved. We adopted a bioclimatological approach based on the Köppen climate classification. The warm semi-arid class is characterized by mean annual temperatures over 18°C and a rainfall-limitation criterion. A multi-model ensemble of CMIP5 projections for three representative concentration pathways was selected to analyze future conditions. The classification was first applied to the start, middle and end of the 20th and 21st centuries, in order to localize past and future warm semi-arid regions. Then, time-series for the classification were built to characterize trends and variability in the evolution of those regions. According to the CRU datasets, global expansion of the warm semi-arid area has already started (~+13%), following the global warming trend since the 1900s. This will continue according to all projections, most significantly so outside the tropical belt. Under the "business as usual" scenario, the global warm semi-arid area will increase by 30% and expand 12° poleward in the Northern Hemisphere, according to the multi-model mean. Drying drives the conversion from equatorial sub-humid conditions. Beyond 30° of latitude, cold semi-arid conditions become warm semi-arid through warming, and temperate conditions through combined warming and drying processes. Those various transitions may have drastic but also very distinct ecological and sociological

  4. Sustainable Highland Development through Stakeholders’ Perceptions on Agro EcoTourism in Cameron Highlands: A Preliminary Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ariffin Ati Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cameron Highlands was discovered in 1885 and was developed as a hill station. It first served as a quaint retreat destination for the British residence where the urban morphology of its little town centres were strongly characterised by colonial architecture such as bungalows, institutional buildings and government offices, shophouses and market stalls. Eventually due to economic pressure and location potentials, more land was opened for tea plantations and vegetable and flower industries. Conversely, recent rapid uncontrolled developments in the built environment and agricultural sectors have tarnished its natural environment, old-world charm and historical values.\tIf this trend persists, the popularity of Cameron Highlands as a vacation destination for local and foreign visitors may be badly affected. This research paper seeks to determine the perception of local stakeholders and tourists of the development in Cameron Highlands and whether they agree that agro-ecotourism can be used as a tool to achieve sustainability in the area. This paper is an assessment of a pilot test to determine initial perceptions toward Cameron Highlands development. The pilot test sample size was 41 respondents, comprising local authorities, local communities and NGOs, as well as local and international tourists. The results showed that the majority agreed that agro-ecotourism can generate a sustainable income and preserve the environment while ensuring sustainability through fair trade.

  5. Willingness to pay for highlands' agro-tourism recreational facility: A case of Boh Tea plantation, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Syamsul Herman M.; M, Nur A'in C.; S, Ahmad; S, Ramachandran

    2014-03-01

    The increase in tourist demand for highland experience is inevitable. Cameron Highlands, established as a Tea Plantation Estate during the British Colonial era in 1929, has evolved into a major highland tourism destination providing a cool climatic experience coupled with scenic beauty in the midst of Tudor concept architecture which enhances the destinations historical value. Realising such tourism potential, the Boh Plantation management has provided a visitor centre as recreational facility for tourist utilisation. However, the absence in imposing an entrance fee has left a vacuum in determining the recreational economic value of this facility as the benefit of this agro-tourism product to tourists remains unknown. It would be important for the management to identify the benefit since the development and maintenance of the facility is costly. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to estimate the benefit of such establishment in highlands area by assessing visitor's Willingness to pay (WTP). The study examines, explores and debates the issues in a critical yet supportive environment especially highlands. The study obtained 179 usable questionnaires from visitors during weekends, weekdays and public holidays. The result showed that 59% of the visitors were willing to pay for the agro-tourism product. The WTP was estimated at RM 7.21 (1.81). Three factors were found to be influencing WTP which were monthly income, years of education and perception on scenery. Although the study was conducted post development, the finding indicated the WTP for current management practise. Should the management change its style, it would also affect WTP and also the total economic value. Since WTP is established concept, the finding of the study reflects on the opportunities, barriers and challenges inherent in embracing post-disciplinary approaches to research and suggest ways to further enhance the approach.

  6. MAPPING TROPICAL FOREST FOR SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT USING SPOT 5 SATELLITE IMAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Huong Thi Thanh

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the combination of multi-data in stratifying the natural evergreen broadleaved tropical forest of the Central Highlands of Vietnam. The forests were stratified using both unsupervised and supervised classification methods based on SPOT5 and field data. The forests were classified into 3 and 4 strata separably. Correlation between stratified forest classes and forest variables was analyzed in order to find out 1) how many classes is suitable to stratify for the forest in t...

  7. Raised temperatures over the Kericho tea estates: revisiting the climate in the East African highlands malaria debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether or not observed increases in malaria incidence in the Kenyan Highlands during the last thirty years are associated with co-varying changes in local temperature, possibly connected to global changes in climate, has been debated for over a decade. Studies, using differing data sets and methodologies, produced conflicting results regarding the occurrence of temperature trends and their likelihood of being responsible, at least in part, for the increases in malaria incidence in the highlands of western Kenya. A time series of quality controlled daily temperature and rainfall data from Kericho, in the Kenyan Highlands, may help resolve the controversy. If significant temperature trends over the last three decades have occurred then climate should be included (along with other factors such as land use change and drug resistance as a potential driver of the observed increases in malaria in the region. Methods Over 30 years (1 January 1979 to 31 December 2009 of quality controlled daily observations ( > 97% complete of maximum, minimum and mean temperature were used in the analysis of trends at Kericho meteorological station, sited in a tea growing area of Kenya's western highlands. Inhomogeneities in all the time series were identified and corrected. Linear trends were identified via a least-squares regression analysis with statistical significance assessed using a two-tailed t-test. These 'gold standard' meteorological observations were compared with spatially interpolated temperature datasets that have been developed for regional or global applications. The relationship of local climate processes with larger climate variations, including tropical sea surface temperatures (SST, and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO was also assessed. Results An upward trend of ≈0.2°C/decade was observed in all three temperature variables (P Conclusion This study presents evidence of a warming trend in observed maximum, minimum and mean

  8. Hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Rick M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water supply in Highlands County, Florida. As the demand for water in the county increases, additional information about local groundwater resources is needed to manage and develop the water supply effectively. To address the need for additional data, a study was conducted to evaluate the hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County. Total groundwater use in Highlands County has increased steadily since 1965. Total groundwater withdrawals increased from about 37 million gallons per day in 1965 to about 107 million gallons per day in 2005. Much of this increase in water use is related to agricultural activities, especially citrus cultivation, which increased more than 300 percent from 1965 to 2005. Highlands County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer, which is underlain by the intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system, which consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, as many as three middle confining units, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer consists primarily of fine-to-medium grained quartz sand with varying amounts of clay and silt. The aquifer system is unconfined and underlies the entire county. The thickness of the surficial aquifer is highly variable, ranging from less than 50 to more than 300 feet. Groundwater in the surficial aquifer is recharged primarily by precipitation, but also by septic tanks, irrigation from wells, seepage from lakes and streams, and the lateral groundwater inflow from adjacent areas. The intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit acts as a confining layer (except where breached by sinkholes) that restricts the vertical movement of water between the surficial aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The sediments have varying degrees of permeability and consist of permeable limestone, dolostone, or

  9. The megalithic complex of highland Jambi: An archaeological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The highlands of Sumatra remain one of the most neglected regions of insular Southeast Asia in terms of history and archaeology. No comprehensive research program incorporating both a survey and excavations within a defined geographical or environmental zone has been carried out there since Van der Hoop (1932 conducted his study of the megaliths on the Pasemah plateau in the 1930s. Meanwhile, Van der Hoop’s investigations and several other archaeological research activities at places such as northwest Lampung (McKinnon 1993, Pasemah (Sukendar and Sukidjo 1983-84; Caldwell 1997; Kusumawati and Sukendar 2000, Kerinci (Laporan 1995a, 1996a, and the Minangkabau heartland (Miksic 1986, 1987, 2004 have placed special emphasis on the megalithic remains. As a result, the megaliths are by far the bestknown archaeological attraction of the Sumatran highlands.

  10. Piomiosite tropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Ghiotti de Siqueira

    Full Text Available A piomiosite tropical, apesar de ser uma patologia reconhecida em nosso meio há mais de cem anos, ainda é pouco divulgada no Brasil, e pode-se perder tempo e dinheiro em exames para afastar a possibilidade de tumores ou tratar sua incidência vem aumentando em regiões de clima temperado, devido à disseminação do Vírus da lmunodeticiência Humana e aos tratamentos imúnossupressivos. Apesar de realizado em instituições que muitas vezes não apresentam recursos diagnósticos de primeira linha, demonstramos que o tratamento pode ser adequado se houver experiência clínica e bom senso. São descritos quarenta casos de piomiosite tropical, atendidos consecutivamente por um mesmo cirurgião; a idade média dos pacientes foi de 16 anos e o sexo predominante o masculino. O diagnóstico foi clínico em 73% dos casos e o tratamento realizado foi drenagem por incisão direta sobre a massa, deixando dreno tubular, usado para irrigação do abscesso. O tempo médio de permanência do dreno no local foi de cinco dias, e a média de permanência hospitalar, sete dias. Dois casos (5% evoluíram para osteomielite e um caso foi a óbito. A evolução foi satisfatória em 93% dos pacientes.

  11. The Dalradian rocks of the northern Grampian Highlands of Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, A. Graham; Robertson, Steven; Smith, Martin; Banks, Christopher J.; Mendum, John R.; Stephenson, David

    2013-01-01

    The northern Grampian Highlands are dominated by the outcrop of the Grampian Group, together with infolds and structural outliers of Appin Group strata and inliers of pre-Dalradian ‘basement’, consisting of Badenoch Group metasedimentary rocks. The south-eastern limit of this mountainous region corresponds with the regionally continuous Grampian Group-Appin Group boundary, which in the south is marked by a high-strain zone corresponding to the Boundary Slide of some authors. The more arbitrar...

  12. External Review and Impact Assessment of the African Highlands ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    External Review and Impact Assessment of the African Highlands Initiative (AHI). 15 décembre 2010. RPE Editors. Sommaire. Il est généralement reconnu que la gestion intégrée des ressources naturelles (GIRN) contribue à l'atteinte du triple objectif de sécurité alimentaire, d'atténuation de la pauvreté et de protection du ...

  13. Herd dynamics of smallholder dairy in the Kenya highlands

    OpenAIRE

    Bebe, B.O.

    2003-01-01

    Smallholder dairy farmers in the Kenya highlands generally intensify their farming systems by integrating dairy with crop production and shifting from free-grazing to semi-zero- or zero-grazing. They consequently change the breed composition, size and structure of their herds with resultant change in herd demographic rates. The intensification of smallholder dairying has underpinned changes in the farming systems to sustain more intensive land use and support more people per unit area of land...

  14. Severe bullying risk factors in three Peruvian highland private schools

    OpenAIRE

    Amemiya, Isabel; Departamento Académico de Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Oliveros, Miguel; Departamento Académico de Pediatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Barrientos, Armando; Ingeniero Estadístico. Unidad de Investigación, Instituto de Salud del Niño. Lima, Perú.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify severe bullying risk factors in three highland Peruvian zones private school students. Design: Survey type study. Setting: Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru. Participants: Fifth elementary school to fifth high school private school students. Interventions: A survey validated in previous studies to identify school violence (bullying) was applied to 736 students from Ayacucho, Huancavelica and Cusco (Sicuani) private schools between...

  15. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J.; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C.; Buckler, Edward S.; Hufford, Matthew B.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize. PMID:26078279

  16. The first Late Eocene continental faunal assemblage from tropical North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hidalgo, Eduardo; Smith, Krister T.; Guerrero-Arenas, Rosalia; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    To date, the terrestrial faunal record of the North American late Eocene has been recovered from its subtropical and temperate regions. We report the first late Eocene continental faunal assemblage from tropical North America, in southern Mexico. Fossil specimens were collected from mudstones that crop out in the Municipality of Santiago Yolomécatl, in northwestern Oaxaca. Previously published K-Ar ages of 32.9 ± 0.9 and 35.7 ± 1.0 Ma in overlain nearby volcanic rocks and biostratigraphy of these new localities suggests a Chadronian mammal age for this new local fauna. The assemblage is composed by two turtle taxa, Rhineura, two caniform taxa, a sciurid, a jimomyid rodent, a geomyine rodent, Gregorymys, Leptochoerus, Perchoerus probus, Merycoidodon, a protoceratid, Poebrotherium, Nanotragulus, Miohippus assinoboiensis, a chalicotherid, a tapiroid, cf. Amynodontopsis, Trigonias and the hymenopteran ichnofossils Celliforma curvata and Fictovichnus sciuttoi. The records of these taxa in northwestern Oaxaca greatly expand southerly their former geographic distribution in North America. The records of the geomorph rodents and Nanotragulus extend their former known biochronological range to the late Eocene. The hymenopteran ichnofossils in the localities suggest the presence of a bare soil after periodic waterlogging, under a sub-humid to sub-arid climate. This new local fauna represents the first glimpse of Eocene vertebrate and invertebrate terrestrial life from tropical North America.

  17. Ranking Malaria Risk Factors to Guide Malaria Control Efforts in African Highlands

    OpenAIRE

    Protopopoff, Natacha; Van Bortel, Wim; Speybroeck, Niko; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Baza, Dismas; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Malaria is re-emerging in most of the African highlands exposing the non immune population to deadly epidemics. A better understanding of the factors impacting transmission in the highlands is crucial to improve well targeted malaria control strategies. Methods and Findings: A conceptual model of potential malaria risk factors in the highlands was built based on the available literature. Furthermore, the relative importance of these factors on malaria can be estimated through...

  18. PHOSPHORUS IN THE SUB-HUMID ZONES DE WESTERN KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thé statistically significant treatments of this experiment were subjected to economie analysis using the partial budget procedure to determine rates ofN: P that would give acceptable returns at low risk to farmers. Économie analysis on the interaction across location showed that two N: P combinations. i.e. 3010 and 60: 40 kg ...

  19. PHOSPHORUS IN THE SUB-HUMID ZONES OF WESTERN KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Dominance analysis, grain yield, interaction effects, partial budget, price variability. RÉSUMÉ. Les expériences ... l'interaction entre les différentes locations a montré que les deux combinaisons i.e 30:0 et 60:40 kg ha4 étaient économiquement ... homogeneity of farming conditions have thus, partly contributed to ...

  20. Revolutionary and Christian Ecumenes and Desire for Modernity in the Vietnamese Highlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salemink, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by a critical reading of James Scott's The Art of Not Being Governed (2009) which argued that Highlanders in Southeast Asia have intentionally evaded ‘state capture and state formations’, I offer a contrasting vision of Highlander motivations and desires from the Central Highlands...... in scholarship but in such phrases as ‘remote and backward areas’. For postcolonial Vietnam, I show that Highlanders were often motivated by the desire to become modern, and enacted such desires by joining ecumenes that embody modern universals, in particular revolutionary and Christian ecumenes, exemplifying...

  1. Piomiosite tropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio José de Araújo Torres

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available O autor descreve 7 casos de piomiosite tropical, enfatizando a exceção que constituem, quando se considera a extrema raridade da supuração muscular em outras doenças e citando várias idéias existentes quanto à sua patogenia. O quadro clínico dos 7 casos é semelhante à maioria dos já relatados em outros trabalhos, aparecendo entretanto piodermite em 2 doentes, o que não é comum. A freqüência da eosinofilia e a normalidade de enzimas geralmente elevadas em outras miopatias, estão de acordo com as publicações existentes. Embora o tratamento seja basicamente cirúrgico, aceita a possibilidade de cura com antibióticos, cujo uso empírico poderia abortar inúmeros casos, contribuindo para o virtual desconhecimento da doença no meio brasileiro. Considera provável ser grande número de doentes tratado como portadores de abscessos como quaisquer outros, sem se atentar para a já referida resistência dos músculos esqueléticos à supuração. Dá importância ao desconhecimento da doença como causa de demora no diagnóstico, com possíveis repercussões no prognóstico. Esse fato, aliado a semelhanças climáticas de certas regiões brasileiras com zonas africanas onde a incidência é alta, justifica, segundo o autor, maior interesse pela doença.Seven cases of tropical pyomyositis are reported emphasizing the unique character of muscular suppuration, an exceedingly unusual occurrence in other diseases; possible explanations as to the pathogenical mechanismsare reviewed. Clinical aspects are similar to those of previously described cases but for pyodermitis, an unconmmon feature found in two cases. Eosinophila and normal leveis of serum enzymes usually altered in other muscle diseases are also in accordance to previous papers. Surgical drainage is the treatment of choice, but the early administration of antibiotics might abort the evolution of many cases; the empirical use of such drugs modifies clinical course and most patients

  2. Temperature suitability for malaria climbing the Ethiopian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bradfield; Dinku, Tufa; Raman, Anita; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2017-06-01

    While the effect of climate change on the prevalence of malaria in the highlands of Eastern Africa has been the topic of protracted debate, temperature is widely accepted as a fundamentally important environmental factor constraining its transmission. Air temperatures below approximately 18 °C and 15 °C, respectively, prohibit the development of the Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax parasites responsible for the majority of malaria cases in Ethiopia. Low temperatures also impede the development rates of the Anopheles mosquito vectors. While locations of sufficiently high elevation have temperatures below these transmission thresholds, a fundamental question is how such temperature ‘threshold elevations’ are changing with time. A lack of high quality, high spatial resolution climate data has previously prohibited a rigorous investigation. Using a newly developed national temperature dataset for Ethiopia that combines numerous in-situ surface observations with downscaled reanalysis data, we here identify statistically significant increases in elevation for both the 18 °C and 15 °C thresholds in highland areas between 1981-2014. Substantial interannual and spatial variations in threshold elevations are identified, the former associated with the El Niño Southern-Oscillation and the latter with the complex climate of the region. The estimated population in locations with an upward trend in the 15 °C threshold elevation is approximately 6.5 million people (2.2 million for 18 °C). While not a direct prediction of the additional population made vulnerable to malaria through a shift to higher temperature, our results underscore a newly acquired ability to investigate climate variability and trends at fine spatial scales across Ethiopia, including changes in a fundamental constraint on malaria transmission in the Ethiopian Highlands.

  3. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in West Highland white terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä-Laurila, Henna P; Rajamäki, Minna M

    2014-01-01

    Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (CIPF) is a chronic, progressive, interstitial lung disease affecting mainly middle-aged and old West Highland white terriers. Other dogs, especially terriers, have been diagnosed with the disease. The cause is largely unknown, but it is likely to arise from interplay between genetic and environmental factors. CIPF shares several features with human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This article summarizes the current literature; describes the findings in physical examination, arterial blood gas analysis, bronchoscopy, bronchoalveolar lavage, diagnostic imaging, and histopathology; compares the canine and human diseases; gives an overview of potential treatments; and discusses biomarker research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gaining ground : land reform and the constitution of community in the Tojolabal Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, van der G.

    2001-01-01

    This study reconstructs the process of land redistribution in an indigenous region of Chiapas, the Tojolabal Highlands, situated between the better known Central Highlands and the Lacandona Rainforest. Until 1930 this region was dominated by large private estates or fincas ,

  5. Century scale climate change in the central highlands of Sri Lanka

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Century scale climate change in the central highlands of Sri Lanka. J De Silva and D U J Sonnadara∗. Department of Physics, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka. ∗Corresponding author. e-mail: upul@phys.cmb.ac.lk. In this study, an analysis of century scale climate trends in the central highlands of Sri Lanka is ...

  6. Feed resources, livestock production and soil carbon dynamics in Teghane, Northern Highlands of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abegaz Yimer, A.; Keulen, van H.; Oosting, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    In the Northern Highlands of Ethiopia, integrated crop-livestock production within smallholder farms is the dominant form of agricultural production. Feed availability and quality are serious constraints to livestock production in Ethiopia in general, and in its Northern Highlands in particular. The

  7. A New Turnaround Model: Michigan's Highland Park Goes Charter. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    This brief examines the series of events that led to the Highland Park school district being converted to a system of charter public schools in 2012. Used as a strategy to help the district eliminate its large fiscal debt while still providing resident students with a local public school option, Highland Park's charter conversion is one of the…

  8. Survey of Barley and Wheat Diseases in the Central Highlands of Eritrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Yahyaoui

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Annual surveys of barley and wheat diseases were conducted in Eritrea from 2000 to 2002. The surveys covered six zones of the central highlands where barley and wheat are grown. The main diseases of barley were netform net blotch, spot-form net blotch, leaf rust and scald. Other, less important diseases were loose smut, covered smut, barley stripe and septoria leaf blotch. Wheat was mainly affected by yellow rust and leaf rust. Loose smut, septoria leaf spot and tan spot diseases were less prevalent. The average incidence of these diseases varied according to the zone. Among barley diseases, net blotch incidence was high in four of the six zones surveyed. Leaf rust occurred at medium incidence in five zones. Loose smut was more severe in the southern highland plains, while covered smut was more common in the south-eastern highland terraces. For wheat, yellow rust incidence was high in two zones. Areas with a high incidence of yellow rust were not necessarily those with a high incidence of leaf rust. Leaf rust was important in the south-eastern and western highland terraces and in the western highland plains. The number of diseases found in the same field varied from 2 to 5. The south eastern highland terraces, the western highland terraces and the northern highland terraces had the highest proportions of individual barley fields with three or more diseases.

  9. Ky'osimba Onaanya: Understanding Productivity of East African Highland Banana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taulya, G.

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress, potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) deficiencies are major constraints to East African highland banana (Musa spp. AAA-EA; hereafter referred to as ‘highland banana’), a primary staple food crop for over 30 million people in East Africa. This study explored the main and interactive effects

  10. Tropical Soil Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.

    and environmental protection. Tropical Soil Chemistry by Ole K. Borggaard provides an overview of the composition, occurrence, properties, processes, formation, and environmental vulnerability of various tropical soil types (using American Soil Taxonomy for classification). The processes and the external factors...... soil chemical issues are also presented to assess when, why, and how tropical soils differ from soils in other regions. This knowledge can help agricultural specialists in the tropics establish sustainable crop production. Readers are assumed to be familiar with basic chemistry, physics...

  11. Quality maintenance Tropical Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Moraes Dias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The climatic characteristics of the country favor the cultivation of tropical flowers. The continued expansion of this market is due the beauty, exoticit nature and postharvest longevity of flower. However, little is known about the postharvest of tropical plants. Therefore, this paper provides information on harvest, handling and storage of cut tropical plantspostharvest, storage temperature, conditioning solution.

  12. Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Freshwater Biology promotes the publication of scientific contributions in the field of freshwater biology in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. One issue is published annually but this number may be increased. Original research papers and short communications on any aspect of tropical freshwater ...

  13. Non-native species in the vascular flora of highlands and mountains of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The highlands and mountains of Iceland are one of the largest remaining wilderness areas in Europe. This study aimed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date data on non-native plant species in these areas and to answer the following questions: (1) How many non-native vascular plant species inhabit highland and mountainous environments in Iceland? (2) Do temporal trends in the immigration of alien species to Iceland differ between highland and lowland areas? (3) Does the incidence of alien species in the disturbed and undisturbed areas within Icelandic highlands differ? (4) Does the spread of non-native species in Iceland proceed from lowlands to highlands? and (5) Can we detect hot-spots in the distribution of non-native taxa within the highlands? Overall, 16 non-native vascular plant species were detected, including 11 casuals and 5 naturalized taxa (1 invasive). Results showed that temporal trends in alien species immigration to highland and lowland areas are similar, but it is clear that the process of colonization of highland areas is still in its initial phase. Non-native plants tended to occur close to man-made infrastructure and buildings including huts, shelters, roads etc. Analysis of spatio-temporal patterns showed that the spread within highland areas is a second step in non-native plant colonization in Iceland. Several statically significant hot spots of alien plant occurrences were identified using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic and these were linked to human disturbance. This research suggests that human-mediated dispersal is the main driving force increasing the risk of invasion in Iceland’s highlands and mountain areas. PMID:26844017

  14. Non-native species in the vascular flora of highlands and mountains of Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Wasowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The highlands and mountains of Iceland are one of the largest remaining wilderness areas in Europe. This study aimed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date data on non-native plant species in these areas and to answer the following questions: (1 How many non-native vascular plant species inhabit highland and mountainous environments in Iceland? (2 Do temporal trends in the immigration of alien species to Iceland differ between highland and lowland areas? (3 Does the incidence of alien species in the disturbed and undisturbed areas within Icelandic highlands differ? (4 Does the spread of non-native species in Iceland proceed from lowlands to highlands? and (5 Can we detect hot-spots in the distribution of non-native taxa within the highlands? Overall, 16 non-native vascular plant species were detected, including 11 casuals and 5 naturalized taxa (1 invasive. Results showed that temporal trends in alien species immigration to highland and lowland areas are similar, but it is clear that the process of colonization of highland areas is still in its initial phase. Non-native plants tended to occur close to man-made infrastructure and buildings including huts, shelters, roads etc. Analysis of spatio-temporal patterns showed that the spread within highland areas is a second step in non-native plant colonization in Iceland. Several statically significant hot spots of alien plant occurrences were identified using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic and these were linked to human disturbance. This research suggests that human-mediated dispersal is the main driving force increasing the risk of invasion in Iceland’s highlands and mountain areas.

  15. Evidence for the microbial degradation of imidacloprid in soils of Cameron Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sabourmoghaddam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Imidacloprid (1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinylmethyl]-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine, with a novel mode of action is a recent systemic and contact insecticide with high activity against a wide range of pests. Continuous dispersion of this pesticide in the environment and its stability in soil results in environmental pollution which demands remediation. The present research was attempted to isolate and characterize imidacloprid degrading bacteria from vegetable farms of Cameron Highlands in Malaysia. The degradation ability of the isolates was tested in minimal salt medium (MSM for a duration of 25 days and the selected strains were characterized based on their biochemical and molecular characteristics. Levels of imidacloprid in MSM medium were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Among 50 soil bacterial isolates Bacillus sp., Brevibacterium sp., Pseudomonas putida F1, Bacillus subtilis and Rhizobium sp. were able to degrade 25.36–45.48% of the initial amount of imidacloprid at the concentration of 25 mg L−1 in C limited media. Brevibacterium sp. was isolated from organic farms that had never been exposed to imidacloprid while the other farms had previously been exposed to different levels of imidacloprid. All bacteria introduced in this study were among the first reports of imidacloprid degrading isolates in C limited media from tropical soil. Therefore, the results of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of using soil bacteria for microbial degradation of imidacloprid. These findings suggest that these strains may be promising candidates for bioremediation of imidacloprid-contaminated soils.

  16. Hymenolepis nana Impact Among Children in the Highlands of Cusco, Peru: An Emerging Neglected Parasite Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Morales, Maria Luisa; Lopez, Martha; Reynolds, Spencer T; Vilchez, Elizabeth C; Lescano, Andres G; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Garcia, Hector Hugo; White, Clinton A

    2016-11-02

    Hymenolepis nana is the most common cestode infection in the world. However, limited information is available regarding its impact on affected populations. We studied the epidemiology and symptoms associated with hymenolepiasis among children 3-16 years old in 16 rural communities of the highlands of the Cusco region in Peru. Information on demographics, socioeconomic status, symptoms as reported by parents, and parasitological testing was obtained from the database of an ongoing Fasciola hepatica epidemiologic study. A total of 1,230 children were included in the study. Forty-five percent were infected with at least one pathogenic intestinal parasite. Giardia spp. (22.9%) was the most common, followed by Hymenolepis (17.4%), Fasciola (14.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides (6.1%), and Strongyloides stercoralis (2%). The prevalence of Hymenolepis infection varied by community, by other parasitic infections, and by socioeconomic status. However, only years of education of the mother, use of well water, and age less than 10 years were associated with Hymenolepis infection in the multivariate analysis. Hymenolepis nana infection was associated with diarrhea, jaundice, headaches, fever, and fatigue. Children with > 500 eggs/g of stool were more likely to have symptoms of weight loss, jaundice, diarrhea, and fever. Hymenolepis nana infection and age were the only factors retained in the multivariate analysis modeling diarrhea. Hymenolepiasis is a common gastrointestinal helminth in the Cusco region and is associated with significant morbidity in children in rural communities. The impact caused by the emergence of Hymenolepis as a prevalent intestinal parasite deserves closer scrutiny. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Comparison of leaf anatomy on some Nepenthes spp. (Nepenthaceae) from highland and lowland habitat in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimy, N. Q.; Nisyawati, Metusala, D.

    2017-07-01

    Nepenthes (Nepenthaceae) is one of the unique plants with pitcher to absorb nutritional needs. This dicotyledonous plant is able to live in the lowland and highland. The difference of their habitat may influence its anatomical structures, such in leaves. This study aimed to compare the anatomy of lowland and highland Nepenthes leaves. We examined Nepenthes rafflesiana and N. mirabilis from the group of lowland Nepenthes. We also examined Nepenthes aristolochioides and N. singalana from the group of highland Nepenthes. Each species was represented by three adult leaves from 1-3 individual plants. Each leaf was made transverse section by using a hand mini microtome and the paradermal section was made by leaf screaping technique. Paradermal and the transverse section were dehydrated by using graded series of alcohol. Transverse section was stained with safranin 1 % and fastgreen 1 %, while the paradermal section with safranin 1 %. Microscopic observations were performed at Bioimaging Laboratory, Universitas Indonesia, Depok using a light microscope. The results showed there are differences in the anatomy structure between these two habitats. Highland Nepenthes has thicker and larger hypodermis than lowland Nepenthes. Cuticle layer in the highland Nepenthes was thicker than the lowland Nepenthes. Nectary gland on the highland Nepenthes was thicker and larger than the lowland Nepenthes. In addition, highland Nepenthes has bigger and fewer stomata density than the lowland Nepenthes.

  18. Control of epidemic malaria on the highlands of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albonico, M; De Giorgi, F; Razanakolona, J; Raveloson, A; Sabatinelli, G; Pietra, V; Modiano, D

    1999-09-01

    The Malagashy national malaria control programme ('Programme National de Lutte contre le Paludisme', PNLP) has been developing, since 1996, an epidemiological early warning system for malaria epidemics in the Central Highlands with the support of the Italian Development Cooperation. The system is based on the monitoring of malaria morbidity (clinical diagnosis) in 536 peripheral health centres (CSB) of the Highlands. The intervention area corresponds to 27 districts of the Antananarivo and Fianarantsoa provinces (4.7 million inhabitants) and spans around 100,000 square km. For each CSB a monthly warning threshold, defined as the 1993-1996 monthly mean number of malaria cases plus two standard deviations, was established. Three levels of epidemic alert have been defined according to the number of times the cases of presumptive malaria surpassed the threshold and according to the reported presence of severe malaria cases. The surveillance system relies also on the monitoring, in district hospitals of the Highlands, of the Plasmodium falciparum infection rate among clinically diagnosed malaria cases. A total of 185,589 presumptive malaria cases, corresponding to a 42/1000 malaria incidence, were recorded in 1997 by the surveillance system. During the same year 184 alerts of 2nd degree were reported. During 1998 173,632 presumptive malaria cases corresponding to a 38/1000 incidence were reported and 207 alerts of 2nd degree were detected; 75 of these alerts were investigated with ad hoc surveys and 3 initial malaria epidemics identified and controlled. Out of 6884 presumptive malaria cases diagnosed in the district hospitals during 1997-1998, only 835 (12.1%) have been confirmed by microscopy (P. falciparum 81.7%, P. vivax 15.0%, P. malariae 2.5%, P. ovale 0.2%, mixed infections 0.6%); 22.4% of these infections were imported cases from coastal endemic areas. The efficiency of the system in monitoring the trend of malaria morbidity and in the rapid detection and

  19. Evaluation of Coupled Model Forecasts of Ethiopian Highlands Summer Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Jury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates seasonal forecasts of rainfall and maximum temperature across the Ethiopian highlands from coupled ensemble models in the period 1981–2006, by comparison with gridded observational products (NMA + GPCC/CRU3. Early season forecasts from the coupled forecast system (CFS are steadier than European community medium range forecast (ECMWF. CFS and ECMWF April forecasts of June–August (JJA rainfall achieve significant fit (r2=0.27, 0.25, resp., but ECMWF forecasts tend to have a narrow range with drought underpredicted. Early season forecasts of JJA maximum temperature are weak in both models; hence ability to predict water resource gains may be better than losses. One aim of seasonal climate forecasting is to ensure that crop yields keep pace with Ethiopia’s growing population. Farmers using prediction technology are better informed to avoid risk in dry years and generate surplus in wet years.

  20. Freshwater fishes of Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park. A total of 1778 fish specimens from three species were collected during surveys carried out in the Little Caledon River during 2002. The chubbyhead barb Barbus anoplus was the only indigenous species recorded, and comprised 99.5 of the total catch. Two of the three recorded species were alien {Cypnnus carpio, Oncorhynchus mykiss}. A further nine indigenous species could potentially occur within the park, though are unlikely to be permanent residents. Barriers formed by instream impoundments may prevent temporary immigration of indigenous fishes, but also limit the further spread of alien species in the park's rivers.

  1. Mars: Stratigraphy of Western Highlands and Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Scott, D. H.; Tuesink, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies of Mars based on Viking images improved knowledge of the relative age and occurrence of geologic units on a global scale. Densities of geologic units or features during the Noarchian, Hesperian, and Amazonian periods are indicated for the North and South polar regions as well as the equatorial region of Mars. Cumulative counts of crater size frequencies for craters larger than 2 km in diameter on plateau units mapped in the western region of Mars counts indicate that the plateau terrain as a whole was thinly resurfaced during the Hesperian Period, and a large proportion of pre-existing craters less than 10 to 15 km in diameter was buried. The formation of northern plains, subpolar highlands, and both polar regions is also described.

  2. Geology of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Groenewald

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The Golden Gate Highlands National Park is underlain by stratigraphic units belonging to the upper part of the Karoo Sequence. These units include part of the Beaufort Group and the Molteno, Elliot, Clarens and Drakensberg Formations. Dolerite dykes and sills are intruded into the succession while recent alluvium and scree cover the valley floors and mountain slopes. The Beaufort Group is represented by red mudstone and light brown fine-grained feldspathic sandstone of the Tarkastad Subgroup. The Molteno Formation consists of medium- to coarse-grained trough cross-bedded sandstone, while the Elliot Formation comprises a thick succession of red mudstone, siltstone and interlayered fine- to medium-grained, light yellow-brown sandstone. The most characteristic feature of the park is the yellowish sandstone cliffs of the Clarens Formation. Cave formation is caused by exudation, differential weathering due to different degrees of carbonate cementation and undercutting of the sandstone. The highest peaks are capped by numerous layers of amygdaloidal and massive varieties of basaltic lava of the Drakensberg Formation. A possible volcanic pipe occurs in the eastern part of the park. The Elliot and Clarens Formations are rich in vertebrate fossil remains, especially Massospondylus sp. Remains of Notochampsa sp., Pachygenelus monus, Clarencea gracilis, Lanasaurus scalpridens and a cluster of unidentified dinosaur eggs have also been found. The formations underlying the Golden Gate Highlands National Park were formed during the Late Triassic Epoch and the Jurassic Period (roughly 150 to 230 million years ago. The strata in the park show very little structural deformation and the only obvious structures are faults which are intruded by dolerite.

  3. Determinants of child malnutrition in rural and urban Ecuadorian highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Johana; Van Camp, John; Wijaya, Sylviana; Donoso, Silvana; Huybregts, Lieven

    2014-09-01

    To identify and compare the sociodemographic determinants of stunting, wasting and overweight among infants of urban and rural areas in the Ecuadorian highlands. Cross-sectional study. Nabon (rural) and Cuenca (urban) cantons, Azuay Province, Ecuador. A total of 703 children aged 0-24 months and their caregivers (227 rural and 476 urban) recruited during the period from June to September 2008. Stunting prevalence was significantly higher in the rural area (37·4 % v. 17·7 %; P child's age (OR = 1·04; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·07; P = 0·011), maternal education (OR = 0·95; 95 % CI 0·92, 0·99; P = 0·025) and facility-based delivery (OR = 0·57; 95 % CI 0·45, 0·74; P child's age (OR = 1·07; 95 % CI 1·02, 1·11; P = 0·005). Urban determinants were: maternal BMI for stunting (OR = 0·91; 95 % CI 0·84, 0·99; P = 0·027), cough prevalence (OR = 0·57; 95 % CI 0·34, 0·96; P = 0·036) and facility-based delivery (OR = 0·25; 95 % CI 0·09, 0·73; P = 0·011) for overweight, and hygiene for wasting (OR = 0·57; 95 % CI 0·36, 0·89; P = 0·013). Infant malnutrition was associated with different sociodemographic determinants between urban and rural areas in the Ecuadorian highlands, a finding which contributes to prioritize the determinants to be assessed in nutritional interventions.

  4. Methane fluxes from waterlogged and drained Histosols of highland areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fernando Glück Rachwal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil can be either source or sink of methane (CH4, depending on the balance between methanogenesis and methanotrophy, which are determined by pedological, climatic and management factors. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of drainage of a highland Haplic Histosol on CH4 fluxes. Field research was carried out in Ponta Grossa (Paraná, Brazil based on the measurement of CH4 fluxes by the static chamber method in natural and drained Histosol, over one year (17 sampling events. The natural Histosol showed net CH4 eflux, with rates varying from 238 µg m-2 h-1 CH4, in cool/cold periods, to 2,850 µg m-2 h-1 CH4, in warm/hot periods, resulting a cumulative emission of 116 kg ha-1 yr-1 CH4. In the opposite, the drained Histosol showed net influx of CH4 (-39 to -146 µg m-2 h-1, which resulted in a net consumption of 9 kg ha-1 yr-1 CH4. The main driving factors of CH4 consumption in the drained soil were the lowering of the water-table (on average -57 cm, vs -7 cm in natural soil and the lower water content in the 0-10 cm layer (average of 5.5 kg kg-1, vs 9.9 kg kg-1 in natural soil. Although waterlogged Histosols of highland areas are regarded as CH4 sources, they fulfill fundamental functions in the ecosystem, such as the accumulation of organic carbon (581 Mg ha-1 C to a depth of 1 m and water (8.6 million L ha-1 = 860 mm to a depth of 1 m. For this reason, these soils must not be drained as an alternative to mitigate CH4 emission, but effectively preserved.

  5. Computing Tropical Varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speyer, D.; Jensen, Anders Nedergaard; Bogart, T.

    2005-01-01

    The tropical variety of a d-dimensional prime ideal in a polynomial ring with complex coefficients is a pure d-dimensional polyhedral fan. This fan is shown to be connected in codimension one. We present algorithmic tools for computing the tropical variety, and we discuss our implementation...... of these tools in the Gröbner fan software Gfan. Every ideal is shown to have a finite tropical basis, and a sharp lower bound is given for the size of a tropical basis for an ideal of linear forms....

  6. Integrated action planning for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of highland aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunting, Stuart W.; Luo, S.; Cai, K.

    2016-01-01

    The need for enhanced environmental planning and management for highland aquatic resources is described and rationale for integrated action planning presented. Past action planning initiatives for biodiversity conservation and wetland management are reviewed. A reflective account is given...

  7. Environmental degradation and intra-household welfare: the case of the Tanzanian rural South Pare Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimoso, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Key words: Environmental degradation, intrahousehold labour allocation, intrahousehold welfare. Rural south Pare highlands in Tanzania experience a deteriorating environmental situation. Of particular importance is the disappearance of forests and woodlands. The consequence are declining amounts

  8. No Evidence of Herpesvirus Infection in West Highland White Terriers With Canine Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roels, E; Dourcy, M; Holopainen, S; Rajamäki, M. M; Gillet, L; Ehlers, B; Clercx, C

    2016-01-01

    .... In dogs, canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (CIPF), a progressive fibrotic lung disease of unknown origin and poorly understood pathophysiology, has been reported to occur in West Highland white terriers (WHWTs...

  9. The Map of General Wade’s Clans (1731, or Map of the Highlands Loyalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALKIN S.G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is prepared with the support of London School of Economics and Political Sciences in the scope of implementation of research projects “Imperial Identity in Britain and Russia: Scotland and Ukraine, 1707–1914” (2010 and “Modernizing Empires: Regular State on the Margins of Europe – Britain and Russia in the Age of Reason” (2013. The article analyzes the attempts of the British Military responsible for the appeacement of the Scottish Highlands in the first half of the 18th century, to localize rebellion with the help of military topography and ethnic cartography. The material deals with the representation, interpretation and use of cartographic information about the Highlands. Rhetoric strategies of the military cartographers, their aims and role are also the objects of the analysis.In the light of the evidence provided by the most famous analysts on the state of Scottish Highlands and, respectively, on the “the Highland Problem” (support for the second restoration of the Stuart dynasty on the British throne from the disaffected clans which were armed and loyal only to their chiefs, with the help of the analysis of official and non-official documentary on the “Highland Problem” and keeping in mind sense of active corporative unity which was spread among the Military during the first half of the XVIII century, respecting colonial questions and policy on the other imperial margins, the author sought to concentrate research of military topography and ethnic cartography of the “Highland Problem”, represented in this article, on the data represented in “The Description of the Highlands of Scotland” (1731 by Clement Lemprière. In the end it is possible to conclude that the data collected and arranged by Clement Lemprière was not sufficient for the military aims during campaigns against the rebels in the Highlands and served as a frame for account of General Wade on his deeds as Commanderin-Chief in Scotland

  10. Maize production in the central Kenya highlands using cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    3Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), PO Box 6247, Kampala, Uganda. Abstract. Smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa have limited options for soil fertility replenishment due to low resource endowments, especially of cash to purchase mineral fertiliser and access to sufficient organic resources. In recent ...

  11. Snake bite in Gombe | Mustapha | Highland Medical Research Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: Snake bite is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria as in many parts of the tropics. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and the clinical pattern of snake bite in Gombe. Methods: Two hundred and seven (207) cases of snakebite admitted at the State Specialist Hospital Gombe over ...

  12. Characterizing meteorological and hydrologic conditions associated with shallow landslide initiation in the coastal bluffs of the Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashland, Francis; Fiore, Alex R.; Reilly, Pamela A.; De Graff, Jerome V.; Shakoor, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Meteorological and hydrologic conditions associated with shallow landslide initiation in the coastal bluffs of the Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey remain undocumented despite a history of damaging slope movement extending back to at least 1903. This study applies an empirical approach to quantify the rainfall conditions leading to shallow landsliding based on analysis of overlapping historical precipitation data and records of landslide occurrence, and uses continuous monitoring to quantify antecedent soil moisture and hydrologic response to rainfall events at two failure-prone hillslopes. Analysis of historical rainfall data reveals that both extended duration and cumulative rainfall amounts are critical characteristics of many landslide-inducing storms, and is consistent with current monitoring results that show notable increases in shallow soil moisture and pore-water pressure in continuous rainfall periods. Monitoring results show that shallow groundwater levels and soil moisture increase from annual lows in late summer-early fall to annual highs in late winter-early spring, and historical data indicate that shallow landslides occur most commonly from tropical cyclones in late summer through fall and nor’easters in spring. Based on this seasonality, we derived two provisional rainfall thresholds using a limited dataset of documented landslides and rainfall conditions for each season and storm type. A lower threshold for landslide initiation in spring corresponds with high antecedent moisture conditions, and higher rainfall amounts are required to induce shallow landslides during the drier soil moisture conditions in late summer-early fall.

  13. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any adult with DM in the tropics with hand cellulitis, infection and gangrene qualifies for TDHS.[1-4] It is a terminology used to describe a specific acute symptom complex found in diabetic patients in the tropics usually follows minor trauma to the hand and associated with progressive synergistic form of gangrene.

  14. Tropical Real Hurwitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Markwig, Hannah; Rau, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we define tropical analogues of real Hurwitz numbers, i.e. numbers of covers of surfaces with compatible involutions satisfying prescribed ramification properties. We prove a correspondence theorem stating the equality of the tropical numbers with their real counterparts. We apply this theorem to the case of double Hurwitz numbers (which generalizes our result from arXiv:1409.8095).

  15. Tropical Veterinarian: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. 2012 Author Guidelines: Instructions to Authors: TROPICAL VETERINARIAN welcomes original work on all aspects of veterinary science as practiced in the Tropics, including livestock production and management, animal disease (domestic and wild), various aspects of preventive medicine and public ...

  16. Utilization of tropical rabbits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The productive performance of rabbits was evaluated on diets of alfalfa meal and tropical forages. The results showed that rabbits can utilize high forage diets wlth little or no cereal grain. Several tropical legumes (Desmodium distortum, Macrop tilium lathyroides, Clitoria ternata and Cassra tora) have the same feeding ...

  17. Introduction to tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  18. Economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in highland Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Active surveillance of acute pesticide poisonings in a potato-growing region of highland Ecuador during 1991-1992 uncovered a rate of 171/100 000, due predominantly to occupational exposures to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Occupational exposure among agricultural workers was the most common reason for poisoning (32 male workers and 1 female worker, out of a total of 50 cases. Of these 33 cases, 28 of them reported pesticide application as the work task just prior to poisoning, with over 80% citing the use of World Health Organization Hazard Category I pesticides. The suicide rate of 17.1/100 000 and the overall mortality rate of 20.5/100 000 that we found are among the highest reported anywhere in the world. At the exchange rates prevailing at that time, median costs associated with these poisonings were estimated as follows: public and social security health care direct costs of US$ 9.85/case; private health costs of US$ 8.33/case; and lost-time indirect costs of US$ 8.33/ agricultural worker. Each one of those costs was over five times the daily agricultural wage, which was then about US$ 1.50. Further costing of pesticide poisonings should be carried out in other settings to provide appropriate information for decisions about pesticide use. In addition, integrated pest management should be further evaluated as an appropriate technology to reduce the economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in developing countries.

  19. Local biologies and HIV/AIDS in highlands Papua, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    The province of Papua, Indonesia has one of the fastest growing rates of HIV infection in Asia. Within volatile political conditions, HIV has reached generalized epidemic status for indigenous Papuans. This article explores the merits of using the concept of local biologies as an analytic tool to assess the range of factors which affect a local pattern of untreated HIV and rapid onset of AIDS. A research team conducted 32 in-depth interviews with HIV-positive indigenous persons and 15 interviews with health care workers in urban and peri-urban sites in the central highlands region. The results show fear of gossip and stigmatization, regional political conditions and gaps in care interweave to create local biological conditions of evasion of care and rapid onset of AIDS. The normative emphasis in contemporary scholarship on stigma as shaping subjective responses to HIV needs to be complemented by a full assessment of the physiological impact of health services, and the ways political conditions trickle down and mediate local biological patterns. The concept of local biologies is highly effective for explaining the full scope of possible factors affecting the intersection of social and physical realms for HIV-positive persons.

  20. Watershed morphology of highland and mountain ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

    2011-01-01

    The fluvial system represents a nested hierarchy that reflects the relationship among different spatial and temporal scales. Within the hierarchy, larger scale variables influence the characteristics of the next lower nested scale. Ecoregions represent one of the largest scales in the fluvial hierarchy and are defined by recurring patterns of geology, climate, land use, soils, and potential natural vegetation. Watersheds, the next largest scale, are often nested into a single ecoregion and therefore have properties that are indicative of a given ecoregion. Differences in watershed morphology (relief, drainage density, circularity ratio, relief ratio, and ruggedness number) were evaluated among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma: Ozark Highlands, Boston Mountains, and Ouachita Mountains. These ecoregions were selected because of their high-quality stream resources and diverse aquatic communities and are of special management interest to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. One hundred thirty-four watersheds in first-through fourth-order streams were compared. Using a nonparametric, two-factor analysis of variance (?? = 0.05) we concluded that the relief, drainage density, relief ratio, and ruggedness number all changed among ecoregion and stream order, whereas circularity ratio only changed with stream order. Our study shows that ecoregions can be used as a broad-scale framework for watershed management. ?? 2011 by Association of American Geographers.

  1. Nomadic ecology shaped the highland geography of Asia's Silk Roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frachetti, Michael D; Smith, C Evan; Traub, Cynthia M; Williams, Tim

    2017-03-08

    There are many unanswered questions about the evolution of the ancient 'Silk Roads' across Asia. This is especially the case in their mountainous stretches, where harsh terrain is seen as an impediment to travel. Considering the ecology and mobility of inner Asian mountain pastoralists, we use 'flow accumulation' modelling to calculate the annual routes of nomadic societies (from 750 m to 4,000 m elevation). Aggregating 500 iterations of the model reveals a high-resolution flow network that simulates how centuries of seasonal nomadic herding could shape discrete routes of connectivity across the mountains of Asia. We then compare the locations of known high-elevation Silk Road sites with the geography of these optimized herding flows, and find a significant correspondence in mountainous regions. Thus, we argue that highland Silk Road networks (from 750 m to 4,000 m) emerged slowly in relation to long-established mobility patterns of nomadic herders in the mountains of inner Asia.

  2. Seroepidemiology of human plague in the Madagascar highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsitorahina, M; Rabarijaona, L; Chanteau, S; Boisier, P

    2000-02-01

    We conducted a seroepidemiological survey of human plague in the general population using random sampling in the area of Ambositra, the main focus of plague in the central highlands of Madagascar (520 confirmed and presumptive cases notified during the past 10 years). Sera were tested using an ELISA IgG F1 assay. Considering the internal validity of the assay and the sampling method, the overall corrected prevalence of F1 antibodies was 0.6% (95% CI: 0.2%-1.8%). Being nearly 0 up to the age of 40, the corrected prevalence increased markedly after 45 years to 6.2%. Six of 20 individuals who declared to have been treated for clinical suspicion of bubonic plague in the past had F1 antibodies. The seroprevalence did not differ according to gender except in individuals > 60, where antibodies were significantly more frequent in males. This study suggests that the number of clinically suspected cases of plague provided by the surveillance network was plausible, despite some true cases being missed and a significant number of false positives. We also confirm that Yersinia pestis infections may occur without marked clinical manifestations and patients may recover without treatment, in accordance with old observations of pestis minor.

  3. Economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in highland Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Cole

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Active surveillance of acute pesticide poisonings in a potato-growing region of highland Ecuador during 1991-1992 uncovered a rate of 171/100 000, due predominantly to occupational exposures to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Occupational exposure among agricultural workers was the most common reason for poisoning (32 male workers and 1 female worker, out of a total of 50 cases. Of these 33 cases, 28 of them reported pesticide application as the work task just prior to poisoning, with over 80% citing the use of World Health Organization Hazard Category I pesticides. The suicide rate of 17.1/100 000 and the overall mortality rate of 20.5/100 000 that we found are among the highest reported anywhere in the world. At the exchange rates prevailing at that time, median costs associated with these poisonings were estimated as follows: public and social security health care direct costs of US$ 9.85/case; private health costs of US$ 8.33/case; and lost-time indirect costs of US$ 8.33/ agricultural worker. Each one of those costs was over five times the daily agricultural wage, which was then about US$ 1.50. Further costing of pesticide poisonings should be carried out in other settings to provide appropriate information for decisions about pesticide use. In addition, integrated pest management should be further evaluated as an appropriate technology to reduce the economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in developing countries.

  4. Sedimentary strata in the southern highlands of Noachis Terra, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, L. K.

    2005-12-01

    The sedimentary history of Mars is one of the fundamental problems that needs to be understood in order to determine the role of the atmosphere, climate, and water in sculpting the martian surface. To begin addressing this issue, a number of sedimentary strata, some up to several hundreds of meters thick, have been studied in the southern highlands of Mars using THEMIS VIS and IR (both day and night) images. A sequence of sedimentary units was found in a pit eroded into the floor of Rabe Crater (35° E, 44° S), some of which appear to be shedding dark sand that feeds into the Rabe Crater dune field. The visible and thermal characteristics of these units are similar to other units found across Noachis Terra (which extends from 0°-60° E, 30°-65° S, and includes Rabe Crater), leading to the hypothesis that a series of region-wide depositional events occurred at some point in the martian past, and that these deposits are currently exposed by erosion in pits on crater floors and possibly on the intercrater plains separating the craters. Some of these sedimentary units may consitute a source of sand for the many intracrater dune fields in Noachis Terra, eroding from a widespread source that outcrops locally. Sand-bearing layers that extend across all or part of Noachis Terra are not likely to be dominated by loess or lacustrine deposits; glacial and/or volcanic origins are more plausible.

  5. Rural Income and Forest Reliance in Highland Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado Córdova, José Pablo; Wunder, Sven; Smith-Hall, Carsten; Börner, Jan

    2013-05-01

    This paper estimates rural household-level forest reliance in the western highlands of Guatemala using quantitative methods. Data were generated by the way of an in-depth household income survey, repeated quarterly between November 2005 and November 2006, in 11 villages ( n = 149 randomly selected households). The main sources of income proved to be small-scale agriculture (53 % of total household income), wages (19 %) and environmental resources (14 %). The latter came primarily from forests (11 % on average). In the poorest quintile the forest income share was as high as 28 %. All households harvest and consume environmental products. In absolute terms, environmental income in the top quintile was 24 times higher than in the lowest. Timber and poles, seeds, firewood and leaf litter were the most important forest products. Households can be described as `regular subsistence users': the share of subsistence income is high, with correspondingly weak integration into regional markets. Agricultural systems furthermore use important inputs from surrounding forests, although forests and agricultural uses compete in household specialization strategies. We find the main household determinants of forest income to be household size, education and asset values, as well as closeness to markets and agricultural productivity. Understanding these common but spatially differentiated patterns of environmental reliance may inform policies aimed at improving livelihoods and conserving forests.

  6. EPAS1 variants in high altitude Tibetan wolves were selectively introgressed into highland dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgett vonHoldt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Admixture can facilitate adaptation. For example, black wolves have obtained the variant causing black coat color through past hybridization with domestic dogs and have higher fitness than gray colored wolves. Another recent example of the transfer of adaptive variation between the two species has been suggested by the similarity between high altitude Tibetan mastiffs and wolves at the EPAS1 gene, a transcription factor induced in low oxygen environments. Methods Here, we investigate the directionality of admixture in EPAS1 between 28 reference highland gray wolves, 15 reference domestic dogs, and 21 putatively admixed highland wolves. This experimental design represents an expanded sample of Asian dogs and wolves from previous studies. Admixture was inferred using 17,709 publicly available SNP genotypes on canine chromosome 10. We additionally conducted a scan for positive selection in the highland dog genome. Results We find an excess of highland gray wolf ancestry at the EPAS1 locus in highland domestic dogs, suggesting adaptive introgression from wolves to dogs. The signal of admixture is limited in genomic extent to a small region on chromosome 10, indicating that it is the focus of selection in an oxygen-limited environment. Discussion Our results suggest that an adaptive variant of EPAS1 in highland wolves was transferred to highland dogs, carrying linked variants that potentially function in hypoxia response at high elevation. The intertwined history of dogs and wolves ensures a unique evolutionary dynamic where variants that have appeared in the history of either species can be tested for their effects on fitness under natural and artificial selection. Such coupled evolutionary histories may be key to the persistence of wild canines and their domesticated kin given the increasing anthropogenic modifications that characterize the future of both species.

  7. Tropical Cyclone Report, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    picture) the comma shape of Tropical Storm Irma (15W). These two tropical cyclones were active with Tropical Storm Jeff (16W) and Typhoon Uleki (01C...DDGM (WF) ESCAP LIBRARY, BANGKOK JAPAN METEOROLOGY AGENCY FLENUMOCEANCEN MONTEREY MCAS IWAKUNI FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER, MIAMI...TY ULEKI ROGERS/SCOVIL 88 (03W) TD 03W PICKLE 40 (15W) TS IRMA CROSBY 93 (04W) TY THAD SCOVIL 44 (16W) TS JEFF PICKLE 94 (05W) TS VANESSA SCHULTZ 48

  8. Evaluation of TRMM multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA) against terrestrial measurement over a humid sub-tropical basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dheeraj; Gautam, Amar Kant; Palmate, Santosh S.; Pandey, Ashish; Suryavanshi, Shakti; Rathore, Neha; Sharma, Nayan

    2017-08-01

    To support the GPM mission which is homologous to its predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), this study has been undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA) daily-accumulated precipitation products for 5 years (2008-2012) using the statistical methods and contingency table method. The analysis was performed on daily, monthly, seasonal and yearly basis. The TMPA precipitation estimates were also evaluated for each grid point i.e. 0.25° × 0.25° and for 18 rain gauge stations of the Betwa River basin, India. Results indicated that TMPA precipitation overestimates the daily and monthly precipitation in general, particularly for the middle sub-basin in the non-monsoon season. Furthermore, precision of TMPA precipitation estimates declines with the decrease of altitude at both grid and sub-basin scale. The study also revealed that TMPA precipitation estimates provide better accuracy in the upstream of the basin compared to downstream basin. Nevertheless, the detection capability of daily TMPA precipitation improves with increase in altitude for drizzle rain events. However, the detection capability decreases during non-monsoon and monsoon seasons when capturing moderate and heavy rain events, respectively. The veracity of TMPA precipitation estimates was improved during the rainy season than during the dry season at all scenarios investigated. The analyses suggest that there is a need for better precipitation estimation algorithm and extensive accuracy verification against terrestrial precipitation measurement to capture the different types of rain events more reliably over the sub-humid tropical regions of India.

  9. GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) was the first major international experiment of the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP). It was conducted over...

  10. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants......The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European...... and American institutions and the dire conditions of funding and staffing in many tropical herbaria and botanical gardens. This happens at the same time as the collections become increasingly important for a series of modern approaches to evolutionary and biodiversity research and the needs of the biodiversity...

  11. AHP 28: The Cham's First Highland Sovereign: Po Romé (r. 1627-1651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Noseworthy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From 1627 to 1651, a member of the highland Austronesian Churu peoples, Po Romé, ruled over the lowland Austronesian Cham peoples' kingdom of Panduranga (now Khánh Hòa, Bình Thuận, and Ninh Thuận provinces in Việt Nam. Po Romé has been referred to as the 'Charlemagne' of Cham studies (Bruckmayr, 2013, indicative of his importance in larger understandings of the Cham and their role in Southeast Asian history. The Cham have generally been understood as a lowland people who brought highland peoples into their cultural sphere through conquest and trade. Scott (2009 has recently critiqued such simplistic presentations of the 'civilizing' of the highlands, and argued for a more nuanced understanding of highland identity. However, one conspicuous absence in Scott's portrayal is an examination of highland-lowland relations through the biographies of figures such as Po Romé. I argue that an examination of Po Romé's life and its ethnographic and historiographic contexts deepens our understanding of upland peoples and Cham history.

  12. Ranking malaria risk factors to guide malaria control efforts in African highlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Protopopoff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malaria is re-emerging in most of the African highlands exposing the non immune population to deadly epidemics. A better understanding of the factors impacting transmission in the highlands is crucial to improve well targeted malaria control strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A conceptual model of potential malaria risk factors in the highlands was built based on the available literature. Furthermore, the relative importance of these factors on malaria can be estimated through "classification and regression trees", an unexploited statistical method in the malaria field. This CART method was used to analyse the malaria risk factors in the Burundi highlands. The results showed that Anopheles density was the best predictor for high malaria prevalence. Then lower rainfall, no vector control, higher minimum temperature and houses near breeding sites were associated by order of importance to higher Anopheles density. CONCLUSIONS: In Burundi highlands monitoring Anopheles densities when rainfall is low may be able to predict epidemics. The conceptual model combined with the CART analysis is a decision support tool that could provide an important contribution toward the prevention and control of malaria by identifying major risk factors.

  13. Insights into Highland Patera Volcanism using Mars Express HRSC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.; Greeley, R.; Zuschneid, W.; Werner, S.; Neukum, G.; Gwinner, K.; Hauber, E.; Crown, D. A.; Gregg, T. K.; Raitala, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have used images obtained by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on the ESA Mars Express orbiter to assess geologic activity at two of Mars' highland volcanoes: Hadriaca Patera and Tyrrhena Patera. HRSC images cover wide swaths at consistent lighting conditions and resolutions, making them ideal resources for assessing surfaces ages using crater statistics. Additionally, multi-channel HRSC images are processed to produce Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) that are of greater spatial resolution than MOLA-derived DTMs, which are useful to assess regional and local topographic variations. Crater size-frequency analyses and cratering model age estimates show both Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae have complex surfaces shaped by volcanic, fluvial, and eolian processes. These ancient shields were formed early in martian history, 3.7-4.0 Ga. At Hadriaca Patera, the earliest detectable caldera activity occurred at 3.5 Ga, followed by explosive volcanic and fluvial activity on the flanks at 3.3-3.4 Ga. Later caldera activity occurred at 2.2-2.5 Ga and again at 1.1-1.6 Ga. At Tyrrhena Patera, explosive volcanic activity and emplacement of pyroclastic deposits occurred 3.5-3.6 Ga, with later fluvial erosional activity at 1.9-2.0 Ga and again at 1.2-1.5 Ga. Slopes on Tyrrhena Patera are generally shallower (0.09-0.4 degrees) than those on Hadriaca Patera (up to 0.7 degrees). Hadriaca's north flank trends uphill, suggesting that Hadriaca Patera settled due to removal of material during formation of Dao Vallis. Further study is underway to use HRSC topographic data and computer modeling to better understand pyroclastic volcanism at these two volcanoes.

  14. Pneumonia in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tow Keang; Siow, Wen Ting

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia in the tropics poses a heavy disease burden. The complex interplay of climate change, human migration influences and socio-economic factors lead to changing patterns of respiratory infections in tropical climate but also increasingly in temperate countries. Tropical and poorer countries, especially South East Asia, also bear the brunt of the global tuberculosis (TB) pandemic, accounting for almost one-third of the burden. But, as human migration patterns evolve, we expect to see more TB cases in higher income as well as temperate countries, and rise in infections like scrub typhus from ecotourism activities. Fuelled by the ease of air travel, novel zoonotic infections originating from the tropics have led to global respiratory pandemics. As such, clinicians worldwide should be aware of these new conditions as well as classical tropical bacterial pneumonias such as melioidosis. Rarer entities such as co-infections of leptospirosis and chikungunya or dengue will need careful consideration as well. In this review, we highlight aetiologies of pneumonia seen more commonly in the tropics compared with temperate regions, their disease burden, variable clinical presentations as well as impact on healthcare delivery. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Household-Level Determinants of Soil and Water Conservation Adoption Phases: Evidence from North-Western Ethiopian Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teshome, Akalu; Graaff, de J.; Kassie, M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil and water conservation (SWC) practices have been promoted in the highlands of Ethiopia during the last four decades. However, the level of adoption of SWC practices varies greatly. This paper examines the drivers of different stages of adoption of SWC technologies in the north-western highlands

  16. Phenological development of East African highland banana involves trade-offs between physiological age and chronological age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taulya, G.; Asten, van P.J.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Giller, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    The phenology of East African highland banana (Musa acuminata AAA-EA, hereafter referred to as ‘highland banana’) is poorly understood. We tested three hypotheses: (1) the physiological age at flowering is independent of site effects, (2) there is no difference in threshold size at flowering between

  17. Soil erosion, soil fertility and crop yield on slow-forming terraces in the highlands of Buberuka, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagabo, M.D.; Stroosnijder, L.; Visser, S.M.; Moore, D.

    2013-01-01

    Crop productivity in Rwanda is declining as a result of intensive farming on steep slopes, which leads to soil loss and declining soil fertility particularly in the northern highlands. Slow-forming terraces have been widely adopted in the northern highlands of Rwanda to control soil erosion however

  18. Reconstructing hydroclimatic variations using compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of biomarkers from a maar lake in the Central Highlands, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Kelsey; Stevens, Lora; Sauer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Monsoonal variation in Southeast Asia affects a significant portion of the global population, but knowledge regarding response of the monsoon system to changing boundary conditions is limited. The paleoclimatic tool of compound-specific isotope analysis(CSIA) provides the ability to reconstruct past precipitation using a diverse set of biomarkers preserved in the sedimentary record. Limited proxies in tropical southeast Asia and difficult site access have led to a deficit in paleoclimate records. Ia M'He (14˚ 10'45" N, 107˚ 52' E) is a shallow volcanic crater (maar) lake, approximately 57 ha, located in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. Precipitation in the Central Highlands is sensitive to reorganizations of major climatic features, such as the migration of the ITCZ and the coupled Indo-Asian monsoon, ENSO and related shifts in the Pacific Walker Circulation and typhoon frequency. To examine this complex behavior, this pilot study aims to provide a 500-year record of effective moisture inferred from CSIA of hydrogen isotopes on biomarkers. Carbon/nitrogen ratios and carbon isotope ratios indicate that bulk organic matter is a combination of algae and C3 vegetation, offering the potential to use compound-specific hydrogen isotopes of aquatic and terrestrial organic matter in tandem. Preliminary analysis of the core shows dominant alkane chain lengths of C27 and C29, associated with terrestrial plant leaf waxes. The hydrogen isotope ratios of the plant wax components provide a proxy for paleo precipitation in a region where rainfall and droughts heavily influence population dynamics and create social discord. The CSIA record is expected to correlate with records from northern Vietnam, the South China Sea and Indonesia, with greater precipitation during the Little Ice Age. The degree to which evaporative modification of lake water (i.e., seasonal drying) occurs will be estimated by comparing the terrestrial CSIA values indicative of meteoric water with aquatic CSIA

  19. Performance testing of potato varieties: Performance of several potato varieties in the tropical highlands of West Java: executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunadi, N.; Wustman, R.; Burg, van der W.J.; Karjadi, A.K.; Been, T.H.; Haverkort, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the BOCI-project ‘Sustainable potato production in Indonesia’ (BO-10-001-230) trails were performed in West Java. The purpose was to evaluate the agricultural performance and processing quality of 10 varieties, half of which were introduced from the Netherlands by a Dutch seed

  20. A qualitative study exploring barriers related to use of footwear in rural highland ethiopia: implications for neglected tropical disease control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayode, Desta; McBride, Colleen M; de Heer, Hendrik D; Watanabe, Emi; Gebreyesus, Tsega; Tora, Abebayehu; Tadele, Getnet; Davey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    ...) is gaining increasing attention. Better understanding of the behaviors that influence use of footwear will lead to improved ability to measure shoe use and will be important for those implementing footwear programs...

  1. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ’ collections for modern drug discovery. Bakker gave an account of the tantalising possibilities for molecular systematics and other research in the use of herbarium collections, which have opened up for a plethora of additional data to be extracted from dried plant collections. The final talk was Blackmore......The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...

  2. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    is of importance to global change studies. Queenborough showed how herbarium collections can be used to study plant functional traits, and Antonelli documented the importance of herbarium voucher specimens for molecular phylogenetic studies and in comparative biogeography. Soberón gave a sobering account of ‘big......The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...

  3. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...... in the USA over the past two hundred years. Sebsebe Demissew taked about the situation in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly problems related to building and maintaining plant collections in new and poor nations. Onana outlined the history of botanical collections in Cameroon, covering a colonial period...

  4. Cyclone Driven Sediment Loads in a Tropical Mega-River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Stephen; Leyland, Julian; Hackney, Christopher; Heasley, Eleanore; Kummu, Matti; Lauri, Hannu; Parsons, Daniel; Nicholas, Andrew; Aalto, Rolf; Best, Jim

    2015-04-01

    floodplain reaches of Cambodia. Furthermore, it is shown that the proportion of flux generated from tropical cyclones increases downstream and dominates (~60%) the flux observed around the confluence of the 3S basin (the Se San, Sre Pok and Se Kong Rivers) which drains the Vietnamese highlands. This implies future changes in cyclone tracks may impact upon sediment delivery to the Mekong delta.

  5. “Medium-Scale” Forestland Grabbing in the Southwestern Highlands of Ethiopia: Impacts on Local Livelihoods and Forest Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tola Gemechu Ango

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forest provides a crucial portion of sustenance in many rural communities, although it is increasingly under pressure from appropriations of various scales. This study investigated the impacts of medium-scale forestland grabbing on local livelihoods and forest conservation in the southwestern highlands of Ethiopia. Data were generated through interviews, discussions and document review. The results indicate that state transfer of part of the forestland since the late 1990s to investors for coffee production created in situ displacement- a situation where farmers remained in place but had fully or partially lost access to forest- that disrupted farmers’ livelihoods and caused conflicts between them and the investors. Court cases about the appropriated land and related imprisonment, inflicted financial and opportunity costs on farmers. Farmers considered the livelihood opportunities created by the companies insufficient to compensate for loss of forest access. Companies’ technology transfers to farmers and contributions to foreign currency earnings from coffee exports have not yet materialized. Forest conservation efforts have been negatively affected by deforestation caused by conversion to coffee plantations and by farmers’ efforts to secure rights to forestland by more intensive use. The medium-scale forestland grabbing has been detrimental to farmers’ livelihoods and forest conservation in a way that recalls criticism of large- and mega-scale land grabbing since 2007–2008. The overall failure to achieve the objectives of transferring forestland to investors highlights a critical need to shift institutional supports to smallholders’ informal forest access and management practices for better development and conservation outcomes.

  6. Tropical Cyclone Report, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    1IW TS OFELIA 25 U0:. - 25 Jo., 12 45 (23) 99. 12W TY PERCY 27 Jl:. - 30 J(J. :2 6,5 (33) 9/6 13W TY ROBYN 0: AUG - ]C AUG 38 120 (6) 922 14W TY STEVE...westward very small tropical cyclones, Ofelia (llW) and track, and for its inability to intensify beyond 30 Percy (12W), formed in quick succession at...The monsoon gyre of July 1993 was associated with the formation of two and the motion of three very small tropical cyclones: Nathan, Ofelia (11W

  7. NOAA's Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Realtime El Nino and La Nina data from the tropical Pacific Ocean is provided by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean / Triangle Trans-Ocean buoy network (TAO/TRITON) of...

  8. Oak mortality associated with crown dieback and oak borer attack in the Ozark Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaofei Fan; John M. Kabrick; Martin A. Spetich; Stephen R. Shifley; Randy G. Jensen

    2008-01-01

    Oak decline and related mortality have periodically plagued upland oak–hickory forests, particularly oak species in the red oak group, across the Ozark Highlands of Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma since the late 1970s. Advanced tree age and periodic drought, as well as Armillaria root fungi and oak borer attack are believed to contribute to oak decline and mortality....

  9. Climate Change and Highland Malaria: Fresh Air for a Hot Debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaves, L.F.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, malaria has become established in zones at the margin of its previous distribution, especially in the highlands of East Africa. Studies in this region have sparked a heated debate over the importance of climate change in the territorial expansion of malaria, where positions range

  10. Stakeholders' perceptions of integrated rainwater management approaches in the Blue Nile Basin of the Ethiopian highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulema, Annet A.; Lema, Zelalem; Assefa, Elias; Adie, Aberra; Ogutu, Zadoc; Duncan, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Previous approaches to improve soil and water management in the Ethiopian highlands have achieved marginal success. An integrated approach to rainwater management (RWM) has been piloted to address interrelated problems of land degradation, livestock feed shortage, and soil erosion, in an effort

  11. Pesticides and health in highland Ecuadorian potato production: assessing impacts and developing responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, D.; Sherwood, S.G.; Crissman, C.; Barrera, V.H.; Espinosa, E.

    2002-01-01

    Pesticide use in highland Ecuador is concentrated in the high-risk, commercial production of potatoes. Small farm families experience considerable exposure and adverse health consequences. The authors describe a three-pronged strategy to reduce health impacts: 1) a community-based process of

  12. 78 FR 41891 - Proposed Establishment of the Upper Hiwassee Highlands Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ..., along a geological feature known as the Murphy Belt Sequence. Most of the vineyards within the proposed... Highlands viticultural area allow high amounts of solar radiation to reach the vineyards. By contrast, the... as ``mountain shadowing.'' The table below compares the total and per-acre amounts of solar radiation...

  13. Accounting for user expectations in the valuation of reliable irrigation water access in the Ethiopian highlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassahun, Habtamu Tilahun; Nicholson, Charles F.; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for reliable access to irrigation water for a sample of farmers in a watershed of the Ethiopian highlands who do not have prior experience with irrigation. To address the lack of previous irrigation experience, we account for underlying expectations of fut...

  14. Century scale climate change in the central highlands of Sri Lanka

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, an analysis of century scale climate trends in the central highlands of Sri Lanka is presented. Monthly rainfall and temperature records of the period 1869–2006 from five climatological stations were analyzed. The trend is calculated by the least square regression analysis and the significance of the observed ...

  15. Miners, peasants and entrepreneurs : Regional development in the Central Highlands of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, N.; Roberts, B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume traces the development of the central highlands, one of Peru's major mining regions. It draws on extensive fieldwork carried out in Peru between 1970 and 1982, spanning a reforming military government, reaction and a return to civilian politics under Belaunde. Through historical material

  16. Lithospheric deformation inferred from teleseismic shear wave splitting observations in the Scottish Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, I. D.; Owens, T. J.; Helffrich, G.; Knapp, J. H.

    2006-05-01

    The Scottish Highlands is an area that has experienced intense tectonic deformation over a recorded geological history that dates back to the Precambrian. Evidence for large scale deformation during the Caledonian orogeny is evident, for example, at the Great Glen and Highland Boundary faults, which have been investigated by field based studies of surface geology. The RUSH (Reflections Under the Scottish Highlands) broadband seismic network of 24 stations recorded continuously for 2 years in 2001-3 and traversed several of the major tectonic terrane boundaries in Scotland. Here we employ the method of Silver and Chan (1991) to estimate splitting parameters (dt, phi) using teleseismic shear waves recorded by these stations. The problem of large amounts of microseismic noise in our data is overcome by stacking individual results using the approach of Restivo and Helffrich (1999); high signal-to-noise ratio results are given more weight in the stack. We explore the relationship between splitting and structural fabric and find that fast polarisation directions are most commonly parallel to geological features such as the NE-SW trending Great Glen and Highland Boundary faults. In the north west part of the study area, towards the Moine thust zone, a change from NE- SW to E-W oriented polarisation direction is noted but dt is unchanged. dt increases markedly towards the NE-SW terrane boundaries. The results confirm that lithospheric scale deformation in Scotland has a preserved "fossil" anisotropic signature, up to hundreds of millions of years after the last tectonic episode.

  17. Highland High School Vocational Television; a Salt Lake Schools Exemplary Vocational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, LaMar C.

    The Highland High School (Salt Lake City, Utah) vocational television production program was designed to provide students with marketable skills in color television studio operation. Among the skills covered in the program were camera set-up and operation, video engineering, production switching, directing, television lighting, audio engineering,…

  18. Land management in the north-western highlands of Ethiopia: adoption and impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akalu Teshome Firew,; Firew, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Over the last four decades, the government of Ethiopia and various a consortium of donors have been promoting different land management (LM) practices in the highlands of Ethiopia to halt land degradation. However, the adoption rate of these practices has been low. This is

  19. Incorporating Scottish Highland Games and Activities into Your Physical Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Steven L.; Hannon, James C.; Brusseau, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a potentially new and exciting group of activities that can be taught in physical education. Activities based on Scottish Highland Games can be an interesting way to incorporate history and literature into the curriculum, as well as introduce students to a variety of unique physical activities. This…

  20. The Highland Park Environmental Health Plan: Evaluation and Recommendations for Improving the Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Dept. of Commerce, Lansing. Community Planning Div.

    The Highland Park environmental health plan includes the following components: Legal and administrative and programmatic relationships, planning studies, residential environment, disease vector control, water and sewage systems, sanitation, air pollution, food protection, industrial and radiological health, and solid waste facilities. (JR)

  1. Lifetime productivity of dairy cows in smallholder farming systems of the Central highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rufino, M.C.; Herrero, M.; Wijk, van M.T.; Hemerik, L.; Ridder, de N.; Giller, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of lifetime productivity is sensible to target interventions for improving productivity of smallholder dairy systems in the highlands of East Africa, because cows are normally not disposed of based on productive reasons. Feeding strategies and involuntary culling may have long-term

  2. Retinal vessel diameters in relation to hematocrit variation during acclimatization of highlanders to sea level altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Sander, Birgit; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine variations in retinal vessel diameters during acclimatization of native highlanders to normobaric normoxia at sea level. METHODS: Fifteen healthy residents of the greater La Paz region in Bolivia (3600 m above sea level) were examined thrice over a 72-day period, after having ...

  3. Land use/cover change patterns in highland ecosystems of Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Land use/cover change patterns in highland ecosystems of Lake Bunyonyi Catchment in western Uganda. C.L. Kizza, M.M. Tenywa, J.G.M. Majaliwa, F Kansiime, M Magunda, B Nakileza, B Barasa, G Gabiri, E Sebuliba, J Nampijja ...

  4. Building Climate Resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: A Role for Earth System Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Simane, Belay; Habib, Shahid; Anderson, Martha C.; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Foltz, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    The Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands of Ethiopia are characterized by significant interannual climate variability, complex topography and associated local climate contrasts, erosive rains and erodible soils, and intense land pressure due to an increasing population and an economy that is almost entirely dependent on smallholder, low-input agriculture. As a result, these highland zones are highly vulnerable to negative impacts of climate variability. As patterns of variability and precipitation intensity alter under anthropogenic climate change, there is concern that this vulnerability will increase, threatening economic development and food security in the region. In order to overcome these challenges and to enhance sustainable development in the context of climate change, it is necessary to establish climate resilient development strategies that are informed by best-available Earth System Science (ESS) information. This requirement is complicated by the fact that climate projections for the Abay Highlands contain significant and perhaps irreducible uncertainties. A critical challenge for ESS, then, is to generate and to communicate meaningful information for climate resilient development in the context of a highly uncertain climate forecast. Here we report on a framework for applying ESS to climate resilient development in the Abay Highlands, with a focus on the challenge of reducing land degradation. PMID:22470302

  5. The Nature and Role of Urban Places in the Southern Highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Robert E.; Lovingood, Paul E., Jr.

    The major towns and cities of the Southern Highlands are sometimes not categorized as "Appalachian," yet they have considerable impact on the character of the region. This study examines the distribution of selected human activities and quality of life variables in 156 counties in West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North…

  6. Farmers' indicators for soil erosion mapping and crop yield estimation in central highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoba, B.O.

    2005-01-01

    The central highlands of Kenya is characterised by abundant rainfall and fertile volcanic soils that support agricultural activities but problems of soil erosion are widespread in the region. Past efforts to control the soil erosion problems were through application of regulations that enforced

  7. Smallholder dairy systems in the Kenya highlands: cattle population dynamics under increasing intensification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bebe, B.O.; Udo, H.M.J.; Rowlands, G.J.; Thorpe, W.

    2003-01-01

    A cross-sectional stratified random sample survey of 1755 households in the Kenya highlands was conducted between June 1996 and April 1998 to quantify cattle population dynamics in smallholder herds. The free-, semi-zero- and zero-grazing systems practised represented increasing levels of

  8. A provisional check list of the reptiles and amphibians of Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Bates

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available A provisional check list of 26 reptile and amphibian species (8 frog, 8 lizard and 10 snake species occurring in Golden Gate Highlands National Park is presented. The list does not reflect the results of an intensive survey, but is a record of specimens collected in the park and preserved at the National Museum, Bloemfontein.

  9. The ecology of large carnivores in the highlands of northern Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yirga, Gidey; De Iongh, Hans H.; Leirs, Herwig

    2013-01-01

    The degradation and fragmentation of the northern Ethiopian highlands has resulted in frequent encounters of large carnivores with humans and their livestock. We interviewed 500 randomly selected households to estimate economic impact of livestock predation by spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta), le...

  10. Climate change as an amplifier of health risks: highland malaria in Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynen, Maud; Martens, Pim

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between climate and non-climate factors are of vital importance in shaping human vulnerability to global warming. In this chapter, this is illustrated for an important health risk induced by climate change, namely highland malaria in Africa. Despite the known causal links between

  11. Stability of diameter distributions in a managed uneven-aged oak forest in the Ozark Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiming Wang; Paul S. Johnson; H. E. Garrett; Stephen R. Shifley

    1997-01-01

    We studied a privately owned 156,000-acre oak-dominated forest in the Ozark Highlands of southern Missouri. The forest has been managed by the single-tree selection method since 1952. Using 40 years of continuous forest inventory records, we analyzed the stability of the shape of tree diameter distributions at the forest-wide scale. Results show that for trees ...

  12. Aulacoseira coroniformis sp. nov., a new diatom (Bacillariophyta) species from Highland Hammock State Park, Florida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, H.; Pearce, C.; Wagner-Cremer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aulacoseira coroniformis sp. nov. is described from a short peat core recovered in Highlands Hammock State Park, Florida, U.S.A. The morphology of the new diatom species is documented by light and scanning electron micrographs and discussed in detail, including a comparison with related species in

  13. Embodying Authentic Leadership through Popular Education at Highlander Research and Education Center: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki-Dudka, Michelle; Griswold, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 and 2014, workshops were held at Highlander Research and Education Center that explored the topics of authentic leadership and popular education. The participants shared their experiences through reflective writing upon completion of the workshops and approximately a year following. These reflections were developed into a case study. This…

  14. Using Eucalyptus for Soil & Water Conservation on the highland Vertisols of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kidanu, S.

    2004-01-01

    Resource degradation is a critical problem in the highlands of Ethiopia. With agricultural productivity lingering behind population growth the gap between the availability and the demand for agricultural land continues to grow. This results in severe land-use conflicts. Thus, high potential and more

  15. Differences in Optimal Growth Equations For White Oak in the Interior Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg; James M. Guldin

    2003-01-01

    Optimal growth equations are fundamental to many ecological simulators, but few have been critically examined. This paper reviews some of the behavior of the Potential Relative Increment (PRI) approach. Models for white oak were compared for Arkansas River Valley (ARV), Boston Mountains (BoM), Ouachita Mountains (OM), and Ozark Highlands (OH) ecological sections of the...

  16. PREDICTION OF FUNDAMENTAL ASSEMBLAGES OF MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLAND STREAM FISHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A statistical software tool, the Stream Fish Assemblage Predictor (SFAP), based on stream sampling data collected by the EPA in the mid-Atlantic Highlands, was developed to predict potential stream fish communities using characteristics of the stream and its watershed. Step o...

  17. Feeding Gods, Feeding Guests : Sacrifice and Hospitality among the Gadaba of Highland Orissa (India)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The study of food in Indian tribal societies merits more attention than it has received. The example given here concerns the Gadaba of Highland Orissa (India), and particularly two contexts are compared: sacrifice and hospitality. Sacrificial commensality during annual festivals stresses agnatic

  18. Towards integrated watershed management in highland Ethiopia: the Chemoga watershed case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bewket, W.

    2003-01-01

    Resource degradation is a critical problem in highland Ethiopia. Past soil and water conservation efforts did not bring about significant results. Hence, there is an urgent need to tackle the problem through new conservation approaches and technologies. This thesis discusses the need for and

  19. Competing for Coffee Space: Development-Induced Displacement in the Central Highlands of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutriaux, Sylvie; Geisler, Charles; Shively, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Vietnam has emerged as the world's second largest producer of coffee. The benefits of this expanding coffee economy are substantial but not universal; their distribution follows ethnic lines despite government commitment to equalize welfare. Focusing on Dak Lak Province in Vietnam's Central Highlands, we investigate this commercial transformation…

  20. Epidemic malaria and warmer temperatures in recent decades in an East African highland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, David; Bouma, Menno J.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Climate change impacts on malaria are typically assessed with scenarios for the long-term future. Here we focus instead on the recent past (1970-2003) to address whether warmer temperatures have already increased the incidence of malaria in a highland region of East Africa. Our analyses rely on a

  1. Malaria in the southern highlands of Tanzania: a review of hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outpatient attendance and inpatient admission records were examined to assess malaria situation in ten hospitals in Mbeya and Iringa Regions in southern highlands of Tanzania for a period of fifteen years from 1986-2000. Generally, records were deficient, some hospitals with entire annual records missing for one or ...

  2. DECISION TOOL FOR RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM MANAGMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Canaan Valley Highlands of the Mid-Atlantic, riparian zone restoration has been identified as a critical watershed management practice not only for the ecosystem services provided but also for the potential socioeconomic growth from environmental investment and job creatio...

  3. Effectiveness of sustainable land management measures in West Usambara highlands, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wickama, Juma; Okoba, Barrack; Sterk, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Soil erosion is a serious problem that affects food security and social livelihoods in the highlands of East Africa. Sustainable land management (SLM) measures have been widely promoted to reduce erosion and increase crop yield, but the adoption of SLM measures has remained low. In order to

  4. Climatic controls of ecohydrological responses in the highlands of northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesfaye, Samuale; Birhane, Emiru; Leijnse, Toon; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2017-01-01

    Climate variability and recurrent droughts have a strong negative impact on agricultural production and hydrology in the highlands northern Ethiopia. Since the 1980s, numerous mitigation and land rehabilitation measures have been implemented by local and national authorities to reduce these impacts,

  5. Does meat come from animals? A multispecies approach to classification and belonging in highland Guatemala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yates-Doerr, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the Guatemalan highlands, distinctions between human and animal are often irrelevant to the treatment of an object as meat. I draw from my ethnographic fieldwork on eating practices in that region to suggest that if the recent social science turn to species is to be a departure from the

  6. Species and structural diversity of church forests in a fragmented Ethiopian Highland landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassie Eshete, Alemayehu; Sterck, F.J.; Bongers, F.

    2010-01-01

    Question: Thousands of small isolated forest fragments remain around churches (“church forests”) in the almost completely deforested Ethiopian Highlands. We questioned how the forest structure and composition varied with altitude, forest area and human influence. Location: South Gondar, Amhara

  7. Tropical African Agaricales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pegler, D.N.

    1966-01-01

    The paper presents a study of fifty-one species of agarics which have been collected within the tropical regions of Africa, particularly Uganda. Typestudies are made of species described by Beeli, Bresadola, Hennings, and Patouillard. The following eleven species are described as new: Agaricus

  8. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 473. Introduction ... diabetes.[2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology ... 1Department of Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku‑Ozalla, 2Department of Medicine, Enugu State. University of ...

  9. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation...... in protected sites in humid tropical forests could be valued at USD 6,200-7,400 million depending on the land use after clearance. This is >1.5 times the estimated spending on protected area management in these regions. Improving management of protected areas to retain forest cover better may be an important...

  10. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramirez Correal, Beatriz; Teuling, Adriaan J.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hegger, Zita; Leemans, Rik

    2017-01-01

    Mountain areas are characterized by a large heterogeneity in hydrological and meteorological conditions. This heterogeneity is currently poorly represented by gauging networks and by the coarse scale of global and regional climate and hydrological models. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests (TMCFs)

  11. New highland distribution records of multiple Anopheles species in the Ecuadorian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Fiona F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent climate change reviews have stressed the possibility of some malaria vectors occupying regions of higher altitudes than previously recorded. Indeed, highland malaria has been observed in several African nations, possibly attributable to changes in land use, vector control and local climate. This study attempts to expand the current knowledge of the distribution of common Anopheles species in Ecuador, with particular attention to highland regions (> 500 m of the Andes. Methods Extensive field collections of larvae were undertaken in 2008, 2009 and 2010 throughout all regions of Ecuador (except the lower-altitude Amazonian plain and compared to historical distribution maps reproduced from the 1940s. Larvae were identified using both a morphological key and sequencing of the 800 bp region of the CO1 mitochondrial gene. In addition, spatial statistics (Getis-Ord Hotspot Analysis: Gi* were used to determine high and low-density clusters of each species in Ecuador. Results Distributions have been updated for five species of Anopheles in Ecuador: Anopheles albimanus, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, Anopheles punctimacula, Anopheles eiseni and Anopheles oswaldoi s.l.. Historical maps indicate that An. pseudopunctipennis used to be widespread in highland Andean valleys, while other species were completely restricted to lowland areas. By comparison, updated maps for the other four collected species show higher maximum elevations and/or more widespread distributions in highland regions than previously recorded. Gi* analysis determined some highland hot spots for An. albimanus, but only cold spots for all other species. Conclusions This study documents the establishment of multiple anopheline species in high altitude regions of Ecuador, often in areas where malaria eradication programs are not focused.

  12. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  13. Old tropical botanical collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2017-01-01

    The early history of botanical collections is reviewed, with particular emphasis on old collections from the tropics. The information available about older and newer botanical collections from the tropics was much improved after World War Two, including better lists of validly published names, more...... detailed description of literature and better information about collections and collectors. These improvements were initially made available as publications on paper, whereas now the information has become available on the Internet, at least in part. The changed procedures for handling botanical...... collections in connection with taxonomic research is sketched, from sending specimens on loan between institutions via publishing herbaria on microfiches to providing scanned images on the Internet. Examples from different institutions and organizations of how to make digitized images of specimens and other...

  14. Treating neglected tropical diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Director: Mectizan Donation Program, Georgia, USA. www.mectizan.org

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The name neglected tropical diseases (NTDs covers a range of diseases that cause disability, early death, and slowed physical and mental development. The first two in entries Table 1 are diseases that cause blindness. These diseases of neglected and impoverished peoples maintain a cycle of poverty and delayed development of the populations affected. The diseases themselves have been neglected in the push to control malaria, TB and AIDS.

  15. Malaria and Tropical Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-15

    Malaria is a serious mosquito-borne disease that can lead to death. This podcast discusses malaria risk when traveling to tropical areas, as well as how to protect yourself and your family from malaria infection.  Created: 5/15/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  16. Associations between trematode infections in cattle and freshwater snails in highland and lowland areas of Iringa Rural District, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzalawahe, Jahashi; Kassuku, Ayub A; Stothard, J Russell; Coles, Gerald C; Eisler, Mark C

    2015-09-01

    The epidemiology of trematode infections in cattle was investigated within highland and lowland areas of Iringa Rural District, in southern Tanzania. Fecal samples were collected from 450 cattle in 15 villages at altitudes ranging from 696 to 1800 m above the sea level. Freshwater snails were collected from selected water bodies and screened for emergence of cercariae. The infection rates in cattle were Fasciola gigantica 28·2%, paramphistomes 62·8% and Schistosoma bovis 4·8%. Notably, prevalence of trematode infections in cattle was much higher in highland (altitude > 1500 m) as compared with lowland (altitude snails collected included Lymnaea natalensis, Bulinus africanus, Bulinus tropicus, Bulinus forskali, Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Melanoides tuberculata and Bellamya constricta with a greater proportion of highland (75%) than lowland (36%) water bodies harbouring snails. Altitude is a major factor shaping the epidemiology of F. gigantica and paramphistomes infections in cattle in Iringa Rural District with greater emphasis upon control needed in highland areas.

  17. On compositional modeling of lunar highlands soils, including application to the orbiting gamma-ray experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, L. A.; Korotev, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The compositions of remotely sensed highlands soils are compared with those of acquired highlands soils through the use of a compositional model. This model previously demonstrated its ability to describe compositions of acquired highlands soils with an accuracy approximating the present knowledge of the compositions. The principal question addressed here is whether the compositional end-members used to describe the acquired highlands soils are adequate to describe the remotely sensed ones or whether in some remotely sensed regions volumetrically significant components of different composition are required. Owing to the large analytical uncertainties in the gamma-ray data, only the presence of substantial proportions of significantly different components would be detectable by this (or any other) analysis of those data.

  18. Biogeographic implications of small mammals from Northern Highlands in Tanzania with first data from the volcanic Mount Kitumbeine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sabuni, C.; Aghová, Tatiana; Bryjová, Anna; Šumbera, R.; Bryja, Josef

    (2018) ISSN 0025-1461 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : biogeography * Crocidura montis group * cytochrome b * Lophuromys * montane habitats * Northern Highlands of Tanzania Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.805, year: 2016

  19. TROPICAL COLLECTOR URCHIN, TRIPNEUSTES ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes a fertilization method to estimate the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to the gametes of the tropical sea urchin (Tripneustes gratilla). This toxicity test measures the fertilizing capacity of sperm following a static, non-renewal 60-minute exposure and a subsequent 20-minute exposure period following the addition of eggs. The purpose of the test is to determine the concentrations of a test substance diluted in sea water that reduce fertilization of exposed gametes relative to that of the control. This method was developed to provide an assessment of the toxicity of materials discharged into the marine environment, using biota indigenous to tropical Pacific regions, including Hawaii. This method provides an assessment of the toxicity to indigenous biota of materials discharged into the tropical Pacific marine environment. The use of this method contributes to risk based determinations, and the scientific foundation they provide for regulatory criteria at the state, regional or national levels. General impacts from this contribution include improved understanding by managers and scientists of links between human activities, natural dynamics, ecological stressors and ecosystem condition.

  20. Tropical arthritogenic alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Carla-Ruth; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2017-03-29

    Tropical alphaviruses have special tropism for bone and joint tissue. Patients can develop chronic rheumatic disorders similar to rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The prototype is Chikungunya virus, although other lesser known viruses in our environment such as Sindbis, Ross River, Mayaro, O'nyong nyong and Barmah Forest viruses have the potential to be sped through vectors and cause chronic rheumatic disease. International population movements have increased the numbers of patients diagnosed with these tropical viruses in areas in which they are not endemic. Since they can leave persistent symptoms and affect the quality of life of the patients, it is important that we be aware of them. Changes in ecosystems have favored the expansion of competent mosquitoes, making fears of local transmission in southern Europe a reality. The objective of this review is to provide a clinical approach to the different arthritogenic tropical alphaviruses, especially those in which chronic rheumatic disease is more frequent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of deforestation and land use changes on mosquito productivity and development in western Kenya highlands: Implication for malaria Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Eliningaya Kweka; Epiphania Edwin Kimaro; Stephen Munga

    2016-01-01

    Background: African highlands were known to be free of malaria for the past fifty years. However, the ever growing human population in the highlands of Africa have led to the deforestation and land coverage changes to create space for more land for cultivation, grazing and house construction materials needs. This has lead to creation of suitable breeding habitats which are in open places. Decrease of canopy and forest cover has led to increased temperature both in outdoors and indoors in defo...

  2. Effect of Deforestation and Land Use Changes on Mosquito Productivity and Development in Western Kenya Highlands: Implication for Malaria Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kweka, Eliningaya J; Kimaro, Epiphania E; Munga, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background African highlands were known to be free of malaria for the past 50 years. However, the ever growing human population in the highlands of Africa has led to the deforestation and land coverage changes to create space for more land for cultivation, grazing, and house construction materials needs. This has lead to the creation of suitable breeding habitats, which are in open places. Decrease of canopy and forest cover has led to increased temperature both in outdoors and indoors in ...

  3. Food preferences of oribi Ourebia ourebi in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Reilly

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available During a two-year study on the ecology of oribi Ourebia ourebi (Zimmermann, 1783 in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, plant species fed on by oribi were noted. The oribi fed on a total of 22 plant species. Feeding preference categories were assigned according to the degree of use of different plant species, based on direct observation and on a preference rating. The oribi in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park showed a seasonal variation in feeding preferences, utilising several species of forbs primarily during the summer and a marked dif-ference between per cent frequency utilisation of plant species and actual preference rating according to availability of species and for certain plant parts, e.g. for Sporobolus centrifugus.

  4. Tropical birds take small risks

    OpenAIRE

    Anders Pape Møller; Wei Liang

    2013-01-01

    The life history of tropical birds differs from that of their temperate counterparts by late start of reproduction, small clutch sizes, and high rates of adult survival. Thus, tropical species should have greater residual reproductive value than temperate species. Therefore, tropical birds can be predicted to take smaller risks than closely related temperate birds in order not to jeopardize their prospects of survival, which is the single most important component of fitness, and which is grea...

  5. Checklist of ferns and seed plants of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Daemane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A list of flowering plants and ferns has been compiled for the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, which occupies an area of 11 346 hectares but excludes the adjacent QwaQwa National Park. The checklist comprises 846 taxa (823 species and 23 infraspecific taxa representing 359 genera in 101 families. Eleven of the species are recorded in the Red Data List (Raimondo et al. 2010 and 64 species are naturalized exotics.

  6. A Fork in the Road: Molybdendum Concentrate Leaching at Tech Highland Valley Copper Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstin Johansson

    2011-01-01

    The molybdenum leach plant at Teck Highland Valley Copper Partnership leaches copper minerals out of the molybdenum concentrate in order to produce a saleable product. The plant is in need of capital investment to continue operating safely for the remainder of mine life. Management has initiated a technical investigation into the feasibility of installing additional flotation capacity in order to produce a saleable grade of molybdenum concentrate without leaching.This project will review the ...

  7. Maize Diversity, Market Access, and Poverty Reduction in the Western Highlands of Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Hellin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The western highlands of Guatemala lie within the area where maize was first domesticated, and maize remains central to farmers' livelihood security. Over 50% of the population in the region are in poverty, and over 48% suffer from chronic malnutrition. Development efforts have focused on improved land management, crop diversification, and improved access to markets, especially for high-value vegetable crops such as snow peas. As a result of successful initiatives worldwide, more attention is being directed at the extent to which farmers can benefit from market opportunities for indigenous crops by receiving a price premium for providing the environmental service of conserving agricultural biodiversity. Such an approach bridges the gap between poverty alleviation and in situ conservation. We explored this potential development pathway through both qualitative and quantitative research. Focus groups were conducted in 5 communities in the maize-growing highlands of Guatemala, followed by a survey of 989 farm households in 59 locations. Our results show that most farmers in the western highlands of Guatemala are severely maize deficient; on average, farm households produce enough maize for only 6.9 months of consumption a year and are forced to purchase maize to meet basic consumption needs. The results are in sharp contrast to research conducted in highland communities in neighboring Mexico, where many farmers are able to sell their maize in relatively lucrative specialty maize markets. In the context of renewed interest in reducing poverty in Central America, our research suggests that rather than focus on market development for local maize varieties, development efforts should target other types of interventions.

  8. Checklist of ferns and seed plants of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Daemane

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A list of flowering plants and ferns has been compiled for the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, which occupies an area of 11 346 hectares but excludes the adjacent QwaQwa National Park. The checklist comprises 846 taxa (823 species and 23 infraspecific taxa representing 359 genera in 101 families. Eleven of the species are recorded in the Red Data List (Raimondo et al. 2010 and 64 species are naturalized exotics.

  9. Using Eucalyptus for Soil & Water Conservation on the highland Vertisols of Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Kidanu, S.

    2004-01-01

    Resource degradation is a critical problem in the highlands of Ethiopia. With agricultural productivity lingering behind population growth the gap between the availability and the demand for agricultural land continues to grow. This results in severe land-use conflicts. Thus, high potential and more resilient soils need intensification to sustain human needs. This thesis discusses the opportunities of a short rotation (3 years) eucalyptus based agroforestry system to intensify annual sole cro...

  10. Century scale climate change in the central highlands of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. De; J Sonnadara, D. U.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, an analysis of century scale climate trends in the central highlands of Sri Lanka is presented. Monthly rainfall and temperature records of the period 1869-2006 from five climatological stations were analyzed. The trend is calculated by the least square regression analysis and the significance of the observed trend is estimated using the Mann-Kendall statistic. The results clearly show that there is a statistically significant decrease in annual rainfall in the western slopes of the central highlands. Throughout the last century, the annual reduction of rainfall in Nuwara Eliya which is at an altitude of 1895 m was 5.2 mm/year. The decrease is largely due to the reduction in southwest monsoon rainfall which contributes to 75% of the total reduction. No significant change was observed on the eastern side of the central highlands which receives rainfall predominantly from the northeast monsoons. The mean annual temperature in the mountainous region shows a uniform increasing trend which is in line with the 100-year global temperature increase of 0.8 ± 0.2∘C. Kandy, which is at an altitude of 477 m and closely linked with the rainfall climatology of Nuwara Eliya, showed no significant change in the mean annual temperature. If the current trend continues, in another 100 years, western and eastern slopes of central highlands will receive the same amount of rainfall from the southwest monsoon and the northeast monsoon which will have far reaching consequences for Sri Lanka's economy and the ecology of the hill country.

  11. Population of Aedes sp in Highland of Wonosobo District and Its Competence as A Dengue Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Martini; Widjanarko, Bagoes; Hestiningsih, Retno; Purwantisari, Susiana; Yuliawati, Sri

    2017-02-01

    The increased cases of dengue fever have occurred in the highland of Wonosobo District, and the epidemic taken place in 2009 had 59.3 cases per 100,000 populations. This study aimed to describe of vector competence of the mosquitoes as a dengue vector in the highland of Wonosobo District, Central Java Province. The serial laboratory work was done to measure of vector competence complementary with vector bionomic study. The samples were 20 villages, which were located at Wonosobo sub district. Every village was observed about 15-20 houses. The observed variables were vector competition, bionomic and transovarial infection level, and titer of virus on the mosquitoes after injection. Immunohistochemistry or IHC methods were used to identify transovarial infection status. The number of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus were almost similar and both were found indoors or outdoors. Based on HI and OI index, the larvae density in the highland was enough high than standard of the program. Transovarial infection was found on Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Environment parameters such as temperature and relative humidity fulfilled the optimum requirement to support the vectors’ life cycle. Transovarial infection has been proven, thus, it indicates that the local transmission has been occurred in this area. Titer of virus was also increasing after day per day. This indicate that the mosquitoes has the ability being vector. As used to do in other area, it is important to conduct breeding places elimination (PSN) indoors as well as outdoors, through active participation of the community in highland area.

  12. Factors associated with high heterogeneity of malaria at fine spatial scale in the Western Kenyan highlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Baidjoe, A.Y.; Stevenson, J.; Knight, P; Stone, W.J.R.; Stresman, G.; Osoti, V; Makori, E; OWAGA, C.; Odongo, W; China, P; Shagari, S; Kariuki, S; Drakeley, C; Cox, J; Bousema, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The East African highlands are fringe regions between stable and unstable malaria transmission. What factors contribute to the heterogeneity of malaria exposure on different spatial scales within larger foci has not been extensively studied. In a comprehensive, community-based cross-sectional survey an attempt was made to identify factors that drive the macro- and micro epidemiology of malaria in a fringe region using parasitological and serological outcomes. Methods A large cross-...

  13. Strategies for conservation of highland ecosystem in Pulinguí San Pablo and Chorrera Mirador, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Patricio Lozano; Aracely Armas; Verónica Machado

    2016-01-01

    To drive conservation processes and sustainable use of an ecosystem implies, on the one hand, the understanding of the territory as a socio-ecosystem, and on the other hand, the application of the ecosystemic approach. For this reason, this is a tool that contributes to the highland ecosystem management of the communities Pulinguí San Pablo and Chorrera Mirador. This process was based on the socio-ecosystem characterization, determination of conservation elements and formulation of conservati...

  14. Building climate resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: a framework for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simane, Belay; Zaitchik, Benjamin F; Mesfin, Desalegn

    2012-02-01

    Ethiopia has become warmer over the past century and human induced climate change will bring further warming over the next century at unprecedented rates. On the average, climate models show a tendency for higher mean annual rainfall and for wetter conditions, in particular during October, November and December, but there is much uncertainty about the future amount, distribution, timing and intensity of rainfall. Ethiopia's low level of economic development, combined with its heavy dependence on agriculture and high population growth rate make the country particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of climate change. Nearly 90% of Ethiopia's population lives in the Highlands, which include the critical Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands--a region that holds special importance due to its role in domestic agricultural production and international water resources. A five year study of climate vulnerability and adaptation strategies in communities of Choke Mountain, located in the center of the Abay Highlands, has informed a proposed framework for enhancing climate resilience in communities across the region. The framework is motivated by the critical need to enhance capacity to cope with climate change and, subsequently, to advance a carbon neutral and climate resilient economy in Ethiopia. The implicit hypothesis in applying a research framework for this effort is that science-based information, generated through improved understanding of impacts and vulnerabilities of local communities, can contribute to enhanced resilience strategies. We view adaptation to climate change in a wider context of changes, including, among others, market conditions, the political-institutional framework, and population dynamics. From a livelihood perspective, culture, historical settings, the diversity of income generation strategies, knowledge, and education are important factors that contribute to adaptive capacities. This paper reviews key findings of the Choke Mountain study, describes

  15. Sediment yield in human-induced degraded catchments of the Northern Ethiopian Highlands: magnitude and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmaercke, M.; Zenebe, A.; Poesen, J.; Nyssen, J.; Verstraeten, G.; Deckers, J.; Govers, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Northern Ethiopian Highlands are a fragile environment, characterised by steep slopes, intense rainfall and a sparse vegetation cover. The extreme poverty, stagnating technology and high population and livestock densities induce serious soil erosion problems. This not only leads to lower crop yields but also reduces the life expectancy of many dams and reservoirs (used for power generation or water supply in the dry season) as a result of massive sedimentation. Although these problems demand for a thorough solution, little is known about the magnitude and dynamics of sediment transport in the Northern Ethiopian Highlands. Therefore an intensive measuring campaign was conducted during the rainy season of 2006 in 10 subcatchments of the Geba (drainage area: 5180 km2), a tributary of the Tekeze (Atbara) river. These subcatchments range in size from 120 km2 to 4330 km2 and represent contrasting environments typical for the Northern Ethiopian Highlands. In this paper, the results of this measuring campaign are discussed. The sediment yield for the 10 subcatchments range between 400 and 2500 t km-2 a-1, with an average value of 1400 t km-2 a-1. The uncertainties on these sediment yields were assessed by Monte Carlo simulations. Important spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment export were noted. A few flash floods were recorded in detail for which clear positive hysteresis effects in sediment concentration were found. The environmental factors, causing the large differences in sediment yield between the studied catchments were assessed by means of a semi-quantitative model.

  16. Agrobiodiversity of cactus pear (Opuntia, Cactaceae in the Meridional Highlands Plateau of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Reyes-Agüero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mexico is characterized by a remarkable richness of Opuntia, mostly at the Meridional Highlands Plateau; it is also here where the greatest richness of Opuntia variants occurs. Most of these variants have been maintained in homegardens; however, the gathering process which originated these homegardens has been disrupted over the past decades, as a result of social change and the destruction of large wild nopaleras. If the variants still surviving in homegardens are lost, these will be hard to recover, that is, the millenary cultural heritage from the human groups that populated the Mexican Meridional Highland Plateau will be lost forever. This situation motivated the preparation of a catalogue that records the diversity of wild and cultivated Opuntia variants living in the meridional Highlands Plateau. To this end, 379 samples were obtained in 29 localities, between 1998 and 2003. The information was processed through Twinspan. All specimens were identified and preserved in herbaria. Botanical keys and descriptions were elaborated. The catalogue includes information on 126 variants comprising 18 species. There were species with only one variant (Opuntia atropes, O. cochinera, O. jaliscana, O. leucotricha, O. rzedowskii and O. velutina, two (O. durangensis, O. lindheimeri, O. phaeacantha and O. robusta, five (O. joconostle and O. lasiacantha, seven (O. chavena, 12 (O. hyptiacantha and O. streptacantha, 15 (O. ficus-indica, 22 (O. albicarpa, and up to 34 (O. megacantha. Additionally, 267 common cactus pear names were related to those variants.

  17. Agricultural Commercialisation, Diversification, and Conservation of Renewable Resources in Northern Thailand Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Trébuil

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The process of commercialisation-diversification in the highlands of upper northern Thailand and the accompanying dismissal of self-subsistence are documented based on the findings from seven case studies carried out in different agricultural and social situations during the past decade. The characteristics of the key driving forces powering this agrarian transition such as rapid economic growth, decrease in the share of labour employed in the agriculture, urbanization and changes in food consumption patterns, and improved communication infrastructures, are presented in the Thai context. The environmental impact of these profound agrarian transformations on the degradation of key renewable resources, particularly soil erosion, is assessed. Their socio-economic consequences on an extensive differentiation among farming households and equity issues are also discussed. Finally the authors draw several lessons from this Thai experience that illustrate the very strong adaptive capacity of small highland farmers. They could be useful in similar agro-ecological zones of neighbouring countries that are presently experiencing the same kind of agricultural transition in the Montane Mainland Southeast Asia ecoregion. Particularly, the article underlines the need for more holistic and integrated approaches to agricultural development and the management of renewable resources in highland agro-ecosystems to alleviate poverty while conserving the resource base.

  18. Composition of soil microbiome along elevation gradients in southwestern highlands of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Azhar, Esam I; Khan, Imran; Bibi, Fehmida; Baabdullah, Rnda; Al-Zahrani, Ibrahim A; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed K

    2015-03-14

    Saudi Arabia is mostly barren except the southwestern highlands that are susceptible to environmental changes, a hotspot for biodiversity, but poorly studied for microbial diversity and composition. In this study, 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene hypervariable region V6 was used to analyze soil bacterial community along elevation gradients of the southwestern highlands. In general, lower percentage of total soil organic matter (SOM) and nitrogen were detected in the analyzed soil samples. Total 33 different phyla were identified across the samples, including dominant phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria. Representative OTUs were grouped into 329 and 508 different taxa at family and genus level taxonomic classification, respectively. The identified OTUs unique to each sample were very low irrespective of the altitude. Jackknifed principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) revealed, overall differences in the bacterial community were more related to the quantity of specific OTUs than to their diversity among the studied samples. Bacterial diversity and soil physicochemical properties did not show consistent changes along the elevation gradients. The large number of OTUs shared between the studied samples suggest the presence of a core soil bacterial community in the southwestern highlands of Saudi Arabia.

  19. Two new species of shrews (Soricidae) from the western highlands of Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Neal

    2010-01-01

    The broad-clawed shrews (Soricomorpha: Soricidae: Cryptotis) encompass a clade of 5 species—Cryptotis alticolus (Merriam), C. goldmani (Merriam), C. goodwini Jackson, C. griseoventris Jackson, and C. peregrinus (Merriam)—that is known collectively as the Cryptotis goldmani group and is characterized by broadened forefeet, elongated and broadened fore claws, and broadened humeri. These shrews are distributed in highland regions from central Mexico to Honduras. Two broad-clawed shrews, C. goodwini and C. griseoventris, occur in southern Mexico and Guatemala and are presumed sister species whose primary distinguishing feature is the larger size of C. goodwini. In an investigation of variation within and between these 2 species, I studied characteristics of the postcranial skeleton. Statistical analyses of a variety of character suites indicate that the forelimb morphology in this group exhibits less intraspecific variation and greater interspecific variation than cranio-mandibular morphology, although most skull characters support groupings based on forelimb characters. Together, these characters define 4 distinct groups among the specimens examined. C. griseoventris is restricted to the northern highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, and C. goodwini occurs in the southern highlands of Chiapas and Guatemala. Herein, I describe 2 new species of broad-clawed shrews from the Sierra de los Cuchumatanes, Guatemala.

  20. Characteristics of soils in selected maize growing sites along altitudinal gradients in East African highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Njuguna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maize is the main staple crop in the East African Mountains. Understanding how the edaphic characteristics change along altitudinal gradients is important for maximizing maize production in East African Highlands, which are the key maize production areas in the region. This study evaluated and compared the levels of some macro and micro-elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na and P and other soil parameters (pH, organic carbon content, soil texture [i.e. % Sand, % Clay and % Silt], cation exchange capacity [CEC], electric conductivity [EC], and water holding capacity [HC]. Soil samples were taken from maize plots along three altitudinal gradients in East African highlands (namely Machakos Hills, Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro characterized by graded changes in climatic conditions. For all transects, pH, Ca, K and Mg decreased with the increase in altitude. In contrast, % Silt, organic carbon content, Al and water holding capacity (HC increased with increasing altitude. The research provides information on the status of the physical–chemical characteristics of soils along three altitudinal ranges of East African Highlands and includes data available for further research.

  1. The interbelic Germans from the Banat Highland. Coal, steel, mines and forges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, C.; Micliuc, D. M.; Nedeloni, M. D.; Birtarescu, E.; Varga, A.

    2018-01-01

    The difficulties of the reconstruction era, following World War I had been increased by the cessation of some activities in the industrial centres of the Banat Highland. For instance, the copper mines were closed in 1921, the Romanian state forbidding the extraction of this ore. Only in Ocna de Fier a special dispensation had been given. The copper mines from Moldova Nouă, Sasca Montană, Ciclova, Dognecea had also been shut down. This fact caused the acid reaction of some writers. We recall that one of the main ways for improving the material condition, embraced by the ethnic Germans, was working abroad. Many German workers of the Banat Highland had emigrated, taking up an offer of well-paid work during the crisis years: 1929-1933. The miners of the Banat Highland, especially those of German origin, travelled to the areas rich in iron ore and coal of France, namely Alsace and Loraine. Considering that German was spoken there by a significant percentage of the population, the integration into the new working environment did not represent a problem.

  2. Death In The Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Burnard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914. J.R. Mcneill. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. xvi + 371 pp. (Paper US$ 24.99 Medicine in an Age of Commerce and Empire: Britain and its Tropical Colonies 1660-1830. Mark Harrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. x + 353 pp. (Cloth £65.00 Death in the New World: Cross-Cultural Encounters, 1492-1800. Erik R. Seeman. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. xii + 372 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00

  3. Tropical Cyclone Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    GUARD 160 (13-14W)TS KEN-LOLA BOUCHARD 86 (32W) TY GAY CRITTENDEN 166 (15W) TY MAC BOUCHARD 92 (33W) TY HUNT SHOEMAKER 172 (16W) TY OWEN CRITTENDEN 98...GURAL 188 TC 02A BOUCHARD 190 TC 32W ( GAY ) CRI’TTENDEN 166 4. SUMMARY OF SOUTH PACIFIC AND SOUTH INDIAN OCEAN TROPICAL CYCLONES ............. 193 4.1...Commander Naval ICAO International Civil Aviation AFB Air Force Base Oceanography Command Organization AFGWC Air Force Global Weather COSM or INIT Initial

  4. Tropical Cyclone Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P. Peggy; Knosp, Brian W.; Vu, Quoc A.; Yi, Chao; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Infor ma tion System (TCIS) is a Web portal (http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov) that provides researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane parameters together with large-scale and convection resolving model outputs. It provides a comprehensive set of high-resolution satellite (see figure), airborne, and in-situ observations in both image and data formats. Large-scale datasets depict the surrounding environmental parameters such as SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and aerosol loading. Model outputs and analysis tools are provided to evaluate model performance and compare observations from different platforms. The system pertains to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storm, the air-sea interaction processes, and the larger-scale environment as depicted by ocean heat content and the aerosol loading of the environment. Currently, the TCIS is populated with satellite observations of all tropical cyclones observed globally during 2005. There is a plan to extend the database both forward in time till present as well as backward to 1998. The portal is powered by a MySQL database and an Apache/Tomcat Web server on a Linux system. The interactive graphic user interface is provided by Google Map.

  5. Tannins in tropical woods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the chemistry of pyrogallol- and catecholtannins, their general properties and methods of extraction and determination. Three methods of estimation - Lowenthal, powdered hide and spectrophotometry - were compared using two control solutions, four samples of wood and one of bark. Using the empirical powdered hide method, tannins of both types were estimated in wood and bark of various tropical species (some separately and some as a mixture), Moroccan oaks (Quercus suber and Q. ilex), and European oak 9Q. petraea). Further tests were made on the wood and bark of the two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and R. racemosa, by subjecting them to successive extraction with a range of solvents. None of the woods tested had as much as the 10% of tannins considered necessary in economic sources. The bark of the two mangroves, of Eucalyptus urophylla and of Prosopis africana had tannin contents over 10% and the latter two species had very favorable tannin/non-tannin ratios. All the tropical species, with the probable exception of E. urophylla, had only catecholtannins. Only the oaks and E. urophylla bark gave positive results when tested for gallotannins.

  6. Mycorrhizas and tropical soil fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, I.M.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Major factors that constrain tropical soil fertility and sustainable agriculture are low nutrient capital, moisture stress, erosion, high P fixation, high acidity with aluminium toxicity, and low soil biodiversity. The fragility of many tropical soils limits food production in annual cropping

  7. Botany, Chemistry, and Tropical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role played by botany and chemistry in the development, exploitation, and later deterioration of tropical economies. Although near equals in 19th-century international trade, the development of synthetics by European scientists in the early 20th century crippled the tropical economies. Research, innovation, and investment protected…

  8. Three Dimensional Tropical Correspondence Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brett

    2017-07-01

    A tropical curve in R3 contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants in all genus. Nevertheless, we present a simple formula for how a given tropical curve contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants when we encode these invariants in a generating function with exponents of {λ} recording Euler characteristic. Our main modification from the known tropical correspondence formula for rational curves is as follows: a trivalent vertex, which before contributed a factor of n to the count of zero-genus holomorphic curves, contributes a factor of {2sin(nλ/2)}. We explain how to calculate relative Gromov-Witten invariants using this tropical correspondence formula, and how to obtain the absolute Gromov-Witten and Donaldson-Thomas invariants of some 3-dimensional toric manifolds including {CP3}. The tropical correspondence formula counting Donaldson-Thomas invariants replaces n by {i^{-(1+n)}q^{n/2}+i^{1+n}q^{-n/2}}.

  9. Budgeting suspended sediment fluxes in tropical monsoonal watersheds with limited data: the Lake Tana basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimale Fasikaw A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion decreases soil fertility of the uplands and causes siltation of lakes and reservoirs; the lakes and reservoirs in tropical monsoonal African highlands are especially affected by sedimentation. Efforts in reducing loads by designing management practices are hampered by lack of quantitative data on the relationship of erosion in the watersheds and sediment accumulation on flood plains, lakes and reservoirs. The objective of this study is to develop a prototype quantitative method for estimating sediment budget for tropical monsoon lakes with limited observational data. Four watersheds in the Lake Tana basin were selected for this study. The Parameter Efficient Distributed (PED model that has shown to perform well in the Ethiopian highlands is used to overcome the data limitations and recreate the missing sediment fluxes. PED model parameters are calibrated using daily discharge data and the occasionally collected sediment concentration when establishing the sediment rating curves for the major rivers. The calibrated model parameters are then used to predict the sediment budget for the 1994-2009 period. Sediment retained in the lake is determined from two bathymetric surveys taken 20 years apart whereas the sediment leaving the lake is calculated based on measured discharge and observed sediment concentrations. Results show that annually on average 34 t/ha/year of sediment is removed from the gauged part of the Lake Tana watersheds. Depending on the up-scaling method from the gauged to the ungauged part, 21 to 32 t/ha/year (equivalent to 24-38 Mt/year is transported from the upland watersheds of which 46% to 65% is retained in the flood plains and 93% to 96% is trapped on the flood plains and in the lake. Thus, only 4-7% of all sediment produced in the watersheds leaves the Lake Tana Basin.

  10. Multi year aerosol characterization in the tropical Andes and in adjacent Amazonia using AERONET measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Andrade-Flores, Marcos; Eck, Thomas F.; Stein, Ariel F.; O'Neill, Norman T.; Lyamani, Hassan; Gassó, Santiago; Whiteman, David N.; Veselovskii, Igor; Velarde, Fernando; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2017-10-01

    This work focuses on the analysis of columnar aerosol properties in the complex geophysical tropical region of South America within 10-20° South and 50-70° West. The region is quite varied and encompasses a significant part of Amazonia (lowlands) as well as high mountains in the Andes (highlands,∼4000 m a.s.l.). Several AERONET stations were included to study the aerosol optical characteristics of the lowlands (Rio Branco, Ji Parana and Cuiaba in Brazil and Santa Cruz in Bolivia) and the highlands (La Paz, Bolivia) during the 2000-2014 period. Biomass-burning is by far the most important source of aerosol in the lowlands, particularly during the dry season (August-October). Multi-annual variability was investigated and showed very strong burning activity in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. This resulted in smoke characterized by correspondingly strong, above-average AODs (aerosol optical depths) and homogeneous single scattering albedo (SSA) across all the stations (∼0.93). For other years, however, SSA differences arise between the northern stations (Rio Branco and Ji Parana) with SSAs of ∼0.95 and the southern stations (Cuiaba and Santa Cruz) with lower SSAs of ∼0.85. Such differences are explained by the different types of vegetation burned in the two different regions. In the highlands, however, the transport of biomass burning smoke is found to be sporadic in nature. This sporadicity results in highly variable indicators of aerosol load and type (Angstrom exponent and fine mode fraction) with moderately significant increases in both. Regional dust and local pollution are the background aerosol in this highland region, whose elevation places it close to the free troposphere. Transported smoke particles were generally found to be more optical absorbing than in the lowlands: the hypothesis to explain this is the significantly higher amount of water vapor in Amazonia relative to the high mountain areas. The air-mass transport to La Paz was investigated using

  11. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that involved Germany, Britain and France, until independence, which was brightened by exemplary collaboration. Muasya focussed on South Africa, which is the most developed country in sub-Saharan Africa with a well-functioning network of herbaria that covers widely different biota. Sanjappa outlined the history...... course which he helped initiating in Manaus Brazil in the 1970s, and which still train researchers in that country. In a section on tropical plant collections and ‘big data’ Feeley demonstrated how dated herbarium records made it possible to trace elevational changes of species distributions, which...... is of importance to global change studies. Queenborough showed how herbarium collections can be used to study plant functional traits, and Antonelli documented the importance of herbarium voucher specimens for molecular phylogenetic studies and in comparative biogeography. Soberón gave a sobering account of ‘big...

  12. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    course which he helped initiating in Manaus Brazil in the 1970s, and which still train researchers in that country. In a section on tropical plant collections and ‘big data’ Feeley demonstrated how dated herbarium records made it possible to trace elevational changes of species distributions, which...... in the USA over the past two hundred years. Sebsebe Demissew taked about the situation in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly problems related to building and maintaining plant collections in new and poor nations. Onana outlined the history of botanical collections in Cameroon, covering a colonial period...... and colleagues described how Norway has had programs to train botanists from a number of African countries. Balslev and colleagues present a successful capacity building project in Ecuador, which has resulted in a world-class herbarium and a cadre of well-trained taxonomists. Prance described a successful MSc...

  13. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    course which he helped initiating in Manaus Brazil in the 1970s, and which still train researchers in that country. In a section on tropical plant collections and ‘big data’ Feeley demonstrated how dated herbarium records made it possible to trace elevational changes of species distributions, which...... is of importance to global change studies. Queenborough showed how herbarium collections can be used to study plant functional traits, and Antonelli documented the importance of herbarium voucher specimens for molecular phylogenetic studies and in comparative biogeography. Soberón gave a sobering account of ‘big......’ collections for modern drug discovery. Bakker gave an account of the tantalising possibilities for molecular systematics and other research in the use of herbarium collections, which have opened up for a plethora of additional data to be extracted from dried plant collections. The final talk was Blackmore...

  14. Understanding the Chronology and Occupation Dynamics of Oversized Pit Houses in the Southern Brazilian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio de Souza, Jonas; Robinson, Mark; Corteletti, Rafael; Cárdenas, Macarena Lucia; Wolf, Sidnei; Iriarte, José; Mayle, Francis; DeBlasis, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A long held view about the occupation of southern proto-Jê pit house villages of the southern Brazilian highlands is that these sites represent cycles of long-term abandonment and reoccupation. However, this assumption is based on an insufficient number of radiocarbon dates for individual pit houses. To address this problem, we conducted a programme of comprehensive AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian modelling at the deeply stratified oversized pit House 1, Baggio I site (Cal. A.D. 1395–1650), Campo Belo do Sul, Santa Catarina state, Brazil. The stratigraphy of House 1 revealed an unparalleled sequence of twelve well preserved floors evidencing a major change in occupation dynamics including five completely burnt collapsed roofs. The results of the radiocarbon dating allowed us to understand for the first time the occupation dynamics of an oversized pit house in the southern Brazilian highlands. The Bayesian model demonstrates that House 1 was occupied for over two centuries with no evidence of major periods of abandonment, calling into question previous models of long-term abandonment. In addition, the House 1 sequence allowed us to tie transformations in ceramic style and lithic technology to an absolute chronology. Finally, we can provide new evidence that the emergence of oversized domestic structures is a relatively recent phenomenon among the southern proto-Jê. As monumental pit houses start to be built, small pit houses continue to be inhabited, evidencing emerging disparities in domestic architecture after AD 1000. Our research shows the importance of programmes of intensive dating of individual structures to understand occupation dynamics and site permanence, and challenges long held assumptions that the southern Brazilian highlands were home to marginal cultures in the context of lowland South America. PMID:27384341

  15. Understanding the Chronology and Occupation Dynamics of Oversized Pit Houses in the Southern Brazilian Highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio de Souza, Jonas; Robinson, Mark; Corteletti, Rafael; Cárdenas, Macarena Lucia; Wolf, Sidnei; Iriarte, José; Mayle, Francis; DeBlasis, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A long held view about the occupation of southern proto-Jê pit house villages of the southern Brazilian highlands is that these sites represent cycles of long-term abandonment and reoccupation. However, this assumption is based on an insufficient number of radiocarbon dates for individual pit houses. To address this problem, we conducted a programme of comprehensive AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian modelling at the deeply stratified oversized pit House 1, Baggio I site (Cal. A.D. 1395-1650), Campo Belo do Sul, Santa Catarina state, Brazil. The stratigraphy of House 1 revealed an unparalleled sequence of twelve well preserved floors evidencing a major change in occupation dynamics including five completely burnt collapsed roofs. The results of the radiocarbon dating allowed us to understand for the first time the occupation dynamics of an oversized pit house in the southern Brazilian highlands. The Bayesian model demonstrates that House 1 was occupied for over two centuries with no evidence of major periods of abandonment, calling into question previous models of long-term abandonment. In addition, the House 1 sequence allowed us to tie transformations in ceramic style and lithic technology to an absolute chronology. Finally, we can provide new evidence that the emergence of oversized domestic structures is a relatively recent phenomenon among the southern proto-Jê. As monumental pit houses start to be built, small pit houses continue to be inhabited, evidencing emerging disparities in domestic architecture after AD 1000. Our research shows the importance of programmes of intensive dating of individual structures to understand occupation dynamics and site permanence, and challenges long held assumptions that the southern Brazilian highlands were home to marginal cultures in the context of lowland South America.

  16. Building Climate Resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: A Framework for Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belay Simane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethiopia has become warmer over the past century and human induced climate change will bring further warming over the next century at unprecedented rates. On the average, climate models show a tendency for higher mean annual rainfall and for wetter conditions, in particular during October, November and December, but there is much uncertainty about the future amount, distribution, timing and intensity of rainfall. Ethiopia’s low level of economic development, combined with its heavy dependence on agriculture and high population growth rate make the country particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of climate change. Nearly 90% of Ethiopia’s population lives in the Highlands, which include the critical Blue Nile (Abay Highlands—a region that holds special importance due to its role in domestic agricultural production and international water resources. A five year study of climate vulnerability and adaptation strategies in communities of Choke Mountain, located in the center of the Abay Highlands, has informed a proposed framework for enhancing climate resilience in communities across the region. The framework is motivated by the critical need to enhance capacity to cope with climate change and, subsequently, to advance a carbon neutral and climate resilient economy in Ethiopia. The implicit hypothesis in applying a research framework for this effort is that science-based information, generated through improved understanding of impacts and vulnerabilities of local communities, can contribute to enhanced resilience strategies. We view adaptation to climate change in a wider context of changes, including, among others, market conditions, the political-institutional framework, and population dynamics. From a livelihood perspective, culture, historical settings, the diversity of income generation strategies, knowledge, and education are important factors that contribute to adaptive capacities. This paper reviews key findings of the Choke

  17. Genomic signature of highland adaptation in fish: a case study in Tibetan Schizothoracinae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chao; Tian, Fei; Zhao, Kai

    2017-12-06

    Genome-wide studies on highland adaptation mechanism in terrestrial animal have been widely reported with few available for aquatic animals. Tibetan Schizothoracinae species are ideal model systems to study speciation and adaptation of fish. The Schizothoracine fish, Gymnocypris przewalskii ganzihonensis had underwent the ecological niche shift from salt water to freshwater, and also experienced a recent split from Gymnocypris przewalskii przewalskii. In addition, G. p. ganzihonensis inhabited harsh aquatic environment including low temperature and hypoxia as well as other Schizothoracinae species, its genetic mechanism of highland adaptation have yet to be determined. Our study used comparative genomic analysis based on the transcriptomic data of G. p. ganzihonensis and other four fish genome datasets to investigate the genetic basis of highland adaptation in Schizothoracine fish. We found that Schizothoracine fish lineage on the terminal branch had an elevated dN/dS ratio than its ancestral branch. A total of 202 gene ontology (GO) categories involved into transport, energy metabolism and immune response had accelerated evolutionary rates than zebrafish. Interestingly, we also identified 162 genes showing signature of positive selection (PSG) involved into energy metabolism, transport and immune response in G. p. ganzihonesis. While, we failed to find any PSG related to hypoxia response as previous studies. Comparative genomic analysis based on G. p. ganzihonensis transcriptome data revealed significant genomic signature of accelerated evolution ongoing within Tibetan Schizothoracinae species lineage. Molecular evolution analysis suggested that genes involved in energy metabolism, transport and immune response functions in Schizothoracine fish underwent positive selection, especially in innate immunity including toll-like receptor signaling pathway genes. Taken together, our result as a case study in Schizothoracinae species provides novel insights in

  18. Tropical count of curves on abelian varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Lars Halvard; Rose, Simon Charles Florian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the problem of counting tropical genus g curves ing-dimensional tropical abelian varieties. We do this by studyingmaps from principally polarized tropical abelian varieties into afixed abelian variety. For g = 2, 3, we prove that the tropical countmatches the count provided in [Göt98...

  19. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-02-23

    To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900-4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40-87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900-3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000-3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300-4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500-4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs intolerance. Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose intolerance, with polycythaemia as a sign of poor hypoxic adaptation, accelerated by lifestyle change and ageing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  20. Black and minority ethnic young people: exploring the silences in the Scottish Highlands

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I analyse the dynamics of youth, race and rurality by considering the life experiences of young people in relation to race and racism through a small –scale study I have conducted over eight months. The study also investigates the aspirations of eight black and minority ethnic young people living in the Scottish Highlands. The study found that young people’s experiences of racism and racial microaggressions were exacerbated by a ‘conspiracy of silence’ in which i...

  1. A survey of the mammals occurring in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Rautenbach

    1976-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a survey of the mammals of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, Republic of South Africa. Fifty-seven species are mentioned, the majority recorded through material or sight records. Those species which may occur in the Park, as deducted from their overall distribution ranges, or from other indirect observations such as spoor or droppings, are considered as well. Habitat preferences are mentioned wherever possible, and the conservation status and relocation histories of the antelope species are quoted.

  2. Dancing in the Altiplano : K'iche' Maya culture in motion in contemporary highland Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, Rhonda Beth

    2009-01-01

    Nestled deep in the heart of the western highlands, Momostenango, Guatemala, is home to a variety of customary, ritual dance-dramas. These include the Baile de la conquista, the Dance of the Conquest or the Baile de los Mexicanos, the Dance of the Mexicans that are performed during the féria, the public festival dedicated to Santiago Apóstol, the patron saint of the community. Recently, however, new dances have gained considerably in popularity. Locals refer to these dances as convites, "invi...

  3. Habitat stability and occurrences of malaria vector larvae in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieli Harrysone

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the occurrence of malaria vector larvae in the valleys of western Kenya highlands is well documented, knowledge of larval habitats in the uphill sites is lacking. Given that most inhabitants of the highlands actually dwell in the uphill regions, it is important to develop understanding of mosquito breeding habitat stability in these sites in order to determine their potential for larval control. Methods A total of 128 potential larval habitats were identified in hilltops and along the seasonal streams in the Sigalagala area of Kakamega district, western Kenya. Water availability in the habitats was followed up daily from August 3, 2006 to February 23, 2007. A habitat is defined as stable when it remains aquatic continuously for at least 12 d. Mosquito larvae were observed weekly. Frequencies of aquatic, stable and larvae positive habitats were compared between the hilltop and seasonal stream area using χ2-test. Factors affecting the presence/absence of Anopheles gambiae larvae in the highlands were determined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Topography significantly affected habitat availability and stability. The occurrence of aquatic habitats in the hilltop was more sporadic than in the stream area. The percentage of habitat occurrences that were classified as stable during the rainy season is 48.76% and 80.79% respectively for the hilltop and stream area. Corresponding frequencies of larvae positive habitats were 0% in the hilltop and 5.91% in the stream area. After the rainy season, only 23.42% of habitat occurrences were stable and 0.01% larvae positive habitats were found in the hilltops, whereas 89.75% of occurrences remained stable in the stream area resulting in a frequency of 12.21% larvae positive habitats. The logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between habitat stability and larval occurrence and indicated that habitat surface area was negatively affecting the

  4. Geology of a Portion of the Martian Highlands: MTMs -20002, -20007, -25002 and -25007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortezzo, C. M.; Williams, K. K.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a continuing study to understand the relationship between valleys and highland resurfacing through geologic mapping, we are continuing to map seven MTM quads in portions of the Margaritifer, Arabia, and Noachis Terrae. Results from this mapping will also help constrain the role and extent of past water in the region. The MTMs are grouped in two different areas: a 4-quadrangle area (-20002, -20007, -25002, -25007) and an L-shaped area (-15017, -20017, -20022) within the region [1-5]. This abstract focuses on the geologic units and history from mapping in the 4-quadrangle area, but includes a brief update on the L-shaped map area.

  5. Diversity and abundance of amphibian species in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeje Kassie Teme

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the population status, abundance and diversity of amphibians found in Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Methods: The present study dealed with amphibian diversity at Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland during the period of August 2015 to September 2015. Transect line and visual encounter survey methods were used in careful visual estimation and amphibians were recorded in all possible habitats of the study area. Results: The total of 251 individuals of amphibians within 12 species grouped into 5 families were recorded in the Guguftu highland and Chefa wetland. Chefa wetland had the highest species abundance as well as richness with a total of 231 individuals falling in 11 species. Conclusions: This study reveals that the Chefa wetland is rich in amphibian diversity and supports many more species. Further studies are needed on molecular basis, population structure, habitat use by amphibians for better understanding and also imposing several conservation strategies in Chefa wetland.

  6. Effect of deforestation and land use changes on mosquito productivity and development in western Kenya highlands: Implication for malaria Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliningaya Kweka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: African highlands were known to be free of malaria for the past fifty years. However, the ever growing human population in the highlands of Africa have led to the deforestation and land coverage changes to create space for more land for cultivation, grazing and house construction materials needs. This has lead to creation of suitable breeding habitats which are in open places. Decrease of canopy and forest cover has led to increased temperature both in outdoors and indoors in deforested areas. This increased temperature has resulted in shortening of developmental stages of aquatic stages of mosquitoes and sporogony development in adult mosquitoes. Method: Assessment of the effects of deforestation and land coverage changes (decrease which leads to temperature changes and subsequently increases survivorship of adults and sporogony development in adult mosquitoes body was gathered from previous data collected from 2003 to 2012 using different analysis techniques. Habitats productivity, species dynamics and abundance, mosquitoes feeding rates and sporogony development are presented in relation to temperature changes.Results: The effects of temperature rise due to land cover changes in highlands of western Kenya on larval developmental rates, adult sporogony developments and malaria risk in human population were derived. Vector species dynamics and abundance in relation to land use changes have been found to change with time.Conclusion: This study found that, land cover changes is a key driver for the temperature rise in African highlands and increases the rate of malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s , An. funestus and An. arabiensis colonising the highlands. It has also significantly enhanced sporogony development rate and adult vector survival and therefore the risk of malaria transmission in the highlands.

  7. Tropical Cyclone Ensemble Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    B.W. and R.S. Dunbar, 2010: A neural network technique for improving...in artifically higher winds. In high wind conditions (e.g., near the center of tropical cyclones), rain decreases the backscatter signal, because

  8. JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) brings together satellite and in situ data sets from various sources to help you find information for a particular...

  9. The Dynamics of Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    interpreted and compared. Lectures on this work have been given by the PI at James Cook University in Townsville, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Regional...continued to collaborate with Dr. Noel Davidson of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) to improve the Bureau’s Tropical Limited-Area Prediction...from the Tropical Cyclone Motion Experiment (TCM90), the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts, and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM

  10. Geology of the Terra Cimmeria-Utopia Planitia Highland Lowland Transitional Zone: Final Technical Approach and Scientific Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Tanaka, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    The southern Utopia highland-lowland transitional zone extends from northern Terra Cimmeria to southern Utopia Planitia and contains broad, bench-like platforms with depressions, pitted cones, tholi, and lobate flows. The locally occurring geologic units and landforms contrast other transitional regions and record a spatially partitioned geologic history. We systematically delineated and described the geologic units and landforms of the southern Utopia-Cimmeria highland-lowland transitional zone for the production of a 1:1,000,000-scale geologic map (MTMs 10237, 15237, 20237, 10242, 15242, 20242, 10247, 15247, and 20247). Herein, we present technical and scientific results of this mapping project.

  11. Mesoproterozoic graphite deposits, New Jersey Highlands: Geologic and stable isotopic evidence for possible algal origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Graphite deposits of Mesoproterozoic age are locally abundant in the eastern New Jersey Highlands, where they are hosted by sulphidic biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss, metaquartzite, and anatectic pegmatite. Gneiss and metaquartzite represent a shallow marine shelf sequence of locally organic-rich sand and mud. Graphite from massive deposits within metaquartzite yielded ??13C values of -26 ?? 2??? (1??), and graphite from massive deposits within biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss yielded ??13C values of -23 ??4???. Disseminated graphite from biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss country rock was -22 ??3???, indistinguishable from the massive deposits hosted by the same lithology. Anatectic pegmatite is graphitic only where generated from graphite-bearing host rocks; one sample gave a ??13C value of -15???. The ??34S values of trace pyrrhotite are uniform within individual deposits, but vary from 0 to 9??? from one deposit to another. Apart from pegmatitic occurrences, evidence is lacking for long-range mobilization of carbon during Grenvillian orogenesis or post-Grenvillian tectonism. The field, petrographic, and isotope data suggest that massive graphite was formed by granulite-facies metamorphism of Proterozoic accumulations of sedimentary organic matter, possibly algal mats. Preservation of these accumulations in the sedimentary environment requires anoxic basin waters or rapid burial. Anoxia would also favour the accumulation of dissolved ferrous iron in basin waters, which may explain some of the metasediment-hosted massive magnetite deposits in the New Jersey Highlands. ?? 2000 NRC.

  12. Grain and tortilla quality in landraces and improved maize grown in the highlands of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Carrillo, Gricelda; García-Lara, Silverio; Salinas-Moreno, Yolanda; Bergvinson, David J; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia

    2011-06-01

    The maize produced in the highlands of Mexico (>2,400 masl) is generally not accepted by the flour and masa and tortilla industry. The objective of this work was to evaluate the grain quality and tortilla properties of maize landraces commonly grown in the highlands of Mexico and compare them with improved germplasm (hybrids). Germplasm analysis included 11 landraces, 32 white hybrids, and six yellow hybrids. Grain quality was analyzed for a range of physical and chemical factors, as well as for alkaline cooking quality. Landrace grains tended to be heterogeneous in terms of size, hardness and color. All landraces had soft-intermediate grains with an average flotation index (FI) of 61%. In contrast, hybrid grains were homogenous in size and color, and harder than landrace grains, with a FI of 38%. Protein, free sugars, oil and phenolic content in landraces were higher than in the hybrids. Significant correlations were found between phenolic content and tortilla color (r= -0.60; p<0.001). Three landraces were identified as appropriate for the masa and tortilla industry, while all the hybrids evaluated fulfilled the requirements of this industry.

  13. Comparative assessment of lowland and highland Smallholder farmers' vulnerability to climate variability in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayal, D. Y., Sr.; Abshare, M. W. M.; Desta, S. D.; Filho, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Desalegn Yayeh Ayal P.O.BOX 150129 Addis Ababa University Ethiopia Mobil +251910824784 Abstract Smallholder farmers' near term scenario (2010-2039) vulnerability nature and magnitude was examined using twenty-two exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity vulnerability indicators. Assessment of smallholder farmers' vulnerability to climate variability revealed the importance of comprehending exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity induces. Due to differences in level of change in rainfall, temperature, drought frequency, their environmental interaction and variations on adaptive capacity the nature and magnitude of smallholder farmers vulnerability to physical, biological and epidemiological challenges of crop and livestock production varied within and across agro-ecologies. Highlanders' sensitive relates with high population density, erosion and crop disease and pest damage occurrence. Whereas lowlanders will be more sensitive to high crop disease and pest damage, provenance of livestock disease, absence of alternative water sources, less diversified agricultural practices. However, with little variations in the magnitude and nature of vulnerability, both highlanders and lowlanders are victims of climate variability and change. Given the ever increasing population, temperature and unpredictable nature of rainfall variability, the study concluded that future adaptation strategies should capitalize on preparing smallholder farmers for both extremes- excess rainfall and flooding on the one hand and severe drought on the other.

  14. Photogeology: Part D: Descartes highlands: possible analogs around the Orientale Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Carroll Ann

    1972-01-01

    The Descartes highlands are adjacent to the terra plain on which the Apollo 16 lunar module landed (fig. 29-13). A variety of volcanic origins was proposed for the highlands before the mission (refs. 29-4, 29-21, and 29-35 to 29-37), but the returned samples of the area consist almost exclusively of nonvolcanic breccias. The breccias obtained from Stone Mountain have not been identified conclusively as sample materials of the Descartes Mountains (ref. 29-35). A volcanic origin is thus not yet precluded (sec. 6 of this report), but a review of possible impact-related origins seems to be appropriate. The orbital photography acquired during the Apollo 16 mission provides excellent imagery on which geomorphic interpretations may be based. No obvious local crater is a plausible source of the material, but there may be a relation to either the Nectaris or Imbrium Basin. The less degraded Orientale Basin (fig. 29-24) provides a model by which these comparisons can be made (part F of this section).

  15. Practices related to postpartum uterine involution in the Western Highlands of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoff, K A; Thompson, Lisa M; Bly, K C; Romero, Carolina

    2013-03-01

    Guatemala has the third highest level of maternal mortality in Latin America. Postpartum haemorrhage is the main cause of maternal mortality. In rural Guatemala, most women rely on Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) during labour, delivery, and the postpartum period. Little is known about current postpartum practices that may contribute to uterine involution provided by Mam- and Spanish-speaking TBAs in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. a qualitative study was conducted with 39 women who participated in five focus groups in the San Marcos Department of Guatemala. Questions regarding postpartum practices were discussed during four focus groups of TBAs and one group of auxiliary nurses. three postpartum practices believed to aid postpartum uterine involution were identified: use of the chuj (Mam) (Spanish, temazcal), a traditional wood-fired sauna-bath used by Mam-speaking women; herbal baths and teas; and administration of biomedicines. TBAs provide the majority of care to women during childbirth and the postpartum period and have developed a set of practices to prevent and treat postpartum haemorrhage. Integration of these practices may prove an effective method to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Forest Transition in Madagascar’s Highlands: Initial Evidence and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. McConnell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Madagascar is renowned for the loss of the forested habitat of lemurs and other species endemic to the island. Less well known is that in the highlands, a region often described as an environmental “basket-case” of fire-degraded, eroded grasslands, woody cover has been increasing for decades. Using information derived from publically available high- and medium-resolution satellites, this study characterizes tree cover dynamics in the highlands of Madagascar over the past two decades. Our results reveal heterogeneous patterns of increased tree cover on smallholder farms and village lands, spurred by a mix of endogenous and exogenous forces. The new trees play important roles in rural livelihoods, providing renewable supplies of firewood, charcoal, timber and other products and services, as well as defensible claims to land tenure in the context of a decline in the use of hillside commons for grazing. This study documents this nascent forest transition through Land Change Science techniques, and provides a prologue to political ecological analysis by setting these changes in their social and environmental context and interrogating the costs and benefits of the shift in rural livelihood strategies.

  17. Preliminary findings on identification of mycorrhizal fungi from diverse orchids in the Central Highlands of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoya, Kazutomo; Zettler, Lawrence W; Kendon, Jonathan P; Bidartondo, Martin I; Stice, Andrew L; Skarha, Shannon; Corey, Laura L; Knight, Audrey C; Sarasan, Viswambharan

    2015-11-01

    The Orchid flora of Madagascar is one of the most diverse with nearly 1000 orchid taxa, of which about 90% are endemic to this biodiversity hotspot. The Itremo Massif in the Central Highlands of Madagascar with a Highland Subtropical climate range encompasses montane grassland, igneous and metamorphic rock outcrops, and gallery and tapia forests. Our study focused on identifying culturable mycorrhizae from epiphytic, lithophytic, and terrestrial orchid taxa to understand their diversity and density in a spatial matrix that is within the protected areas. We have collected both juvenile and mature roots from 41 orchid taxa for isolating their orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF), and to culture, identify, and store in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Twelve operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of three known orchid mycorrhizal genera, were recognized by analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 85 isolates, and, by comparing with GenBank database entries, each OTU was shown to have closely related fungi that were also found as orchid associates. Orchid and fungal diversity were greater in gallery forests and open grasslands, which is very significant for future studies and orchid conservation. As far as we know, this is the first ever report of detailed identification of mycorrhizal fungi from Madagascar. This study will help start to develop a programme for identifying fungal symbionts from this unique biodiversity hotspot, which is undergoing rapid ecosystem damage and species loss. The diversity of culturable fungal associates, their density, and distribution within the Itremo orchid hotspot areas will be discussed.

  18. The impact of regional climate change on malaria risk due to greenhouse forcing and land-use changes in tropical Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Volker; Fink, Andreas H; Morse, Andrew P; Paeth, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    Climate change will probably alter the spread and transmission intensity of malaria in Africa. In this study, we assessed potential changes in the malaria transmission via an integrated weather-disease model. We simulated mosquito biting rates using the Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM). The input data for the LMM were bias-corrected temperature and precipitation data from the regional model (REMO) on a 0.5° latitude-longitude grid. A Plasmodium falciparum infection model expands the LMM simulations to incorporate information on the infection rate among children. Malaria projections were carried out with this integrated weather-disease model for 2001 to 2050 according to two climate scenarios that include the effect of anthropogenic land-use and land-cover changes on climate. Model-based estimates for the present climate (1960 to 2000) are consistent with observed data for the spread of malaria in Africa. In the model domain, the regions where malaria is epidemic are located in the Sahel as well as in various highland territories. A decreased spread of malaria over most parts of tropical Africa is projected because of simulated increased surface temperatures and a significant reduction in annual rainfall. However, the likelihood of malaria epidemics is projected to increase in the southern part of the Sahel. In most of East Africa, the intensity of malaria transmission is expected to increase. Projections indicate that highland areas that were formerly unsuitable for malaria will become epidemic, whereas in the lower-altitude regions of the East African highlands, epidemic risk will decrease. We project that climate changes driven by greenhouse-gas and land-use changes will significantly affect the spread of malaria in tropical Africa well before 2050. The geographic distribution of areas where malaria is epidemic might have to be significantly altered in the coming decades.

  19. Crop coefficients for winter wheat in a sub-humid climate regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Jeppe Hvelplund; Plauborg, Finn; Mollerup, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    Estimations of evapotranspiration (ET) from natural surfaces are used in a large number of applications such as agricultural water management and water resources planning. Lack of reliable, cheap and easy-to-use instruments, associated with the chaotic and varying nature of the meteorological...

  20. Modelling soil moisture under different land covers in a sub-humid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study demonstrates that a simple, robust and parametrically parsimonious model is capable of simulating the temporal dynamics of soil moisture content under distinctly different land covers. Also, results of sensitivity analysis revealed that exotic plant species such as Acacia have adapted themselves effectively to the ...

  1. Changes in Fire-Derived Soil Black Carbon Storage in a Sub-humid Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. D.; Yao, J.; Murray, D. B.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Fire-derived black carbon (BC) in soil, including charcoal, represents a potentially important fraction of terrestrial carbon cycling due to its presumed long persistence in soil. Interpretation of site BC retention is important for assessing feedbacks to ecosystem processes including nutrient and water cycling. However, interaction between vegetation disturbance, BC formation, and off site transport may exist that complicate interpretation of BC addition to soils from wildfire or prescribed burns directly. To investigate the relationship between disturbance and site retention on soil BC, we determined BC concentrations for a woodland in central Texas, USA, from study plots in hilly terrain with a fire scar dendrochronology spanning 100 years. BC values were determined from 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Estimated values showed mean BC concentration of 2.73 ± 3.06 g BC kg-1 (0.91 ± 0.51 kg BC m-2) for sites with fire occurrence within the last 40 years compared with BC values of1.21 ± 1.70 g BC kg-1 soil (0.18 ± 0.14 kg BC m-2) for sites with fire 40 - 100 years ago. Sites with no tree ring evidence of fire during the last 100 years had the lowest mean soil BC concentration of 0.05 ± 0.11 g BC kg-1 (0.02 ± 0.03 kg BC m-2). Molecular proxies of stability (lignin/N) and decomposition (Alkyl C/O-Alky C) showed no differences across the sites, indicating that low potential for BC mineralization. Modeled soil erosion and time since fire from fire scar data showed that soil BC concentrations were inversely correlated. A modified the ecosystem process model, Biome-BGC, was also used simulate the effects of fire disturbance with different severities and seasonality on C cycling related to the BC production, effect on soil water availability, and off-site transport. Results showed that BC impacts on ecosystem processes, including net ecosystem exchange and leaf area development, were predominantly related to fire frequency. Site BC loss rates were affected by initial slope-affected erosion, fire severity, vegetation type, and rate of vegetation recovery. The simulation results showed that fire types, such as high severity, was generally associated with low site BC retention related to low vertical transfer of BC into soils, buoyancy of BC particles, and surface runoff from unvegetated soils.

  2. Partial Root-Zone Drying (PRD) Feasibility on Potato in a Sub-Humid Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battilani, A; Jensen, C R; Liu, F

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out in Northern Italy, within the frame of the EU project SAFIR, to test the feasibility of partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation management in potatoes and to compare the PRD irrigation strategy with regulated deficit irrigation (RDI). PRD increased total and f...... not steadily and not sufficiently to overcome the higher irrigation system and management costs.......A field experiment was carried out in Northern Italy, within the frame of the EU project SAFIR, to test the feasibility of partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation management in potatoes and to compare the PRD irrigation strategy with regulated deficit irrigation (RDI). PRD increased total...... Efficiency (WUE, NUE) were similar between irrigation treatments. The income for each cubic meter of water or kg of nitrogen was highly variable and not statistically different between PRD and RDI. Crop gross margin per hectare shows a tendency to increase with PRD (average +256 euro ha-1), although...

  3. Restoration and Carbon Sequestration Potential of Sub-Humid Shrublands in a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, A.; White, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past century, various anthropogenic activities have resulted into loss of more than 95% shrub cover from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), TX, USA. Restoration of these shrublands has been a priority for two endangered felids, ocelots and jaguarondis, that require contiguous shrub cover. While woody shrub restoration may be considered the antithesis of shrub encroachment, this type of habitat restoration also provides a substantial opportunity of increasing carbon sequestration. Restoration of these shrublands by U.S. federal refuge managers during the past three decades have resulted some successful reestablishment of native shrub communities. We assessed restoration efficacy, carbon storage capacity, and future climate change impacts using combined remote sensing and modeling techniques. We first developed a canopy identification algorithm using a spectral vegetation index from the Digital Ortho Quarter Quadrangle data to estimate individual shrub canopy area. The area was used as input into allometric equations to estimate aboveground biomass for dominant shrub species across this region. The accuracy of the automated canopy identification by the algorithm was 79% when compared to the number of visually-determined, hand-digitized shrub canopies. From this analysis, we found that naturally regenerated sites had higher average shrub densities of 174/ha when compared with 156 individuals/ha for replanted sites. However, average biomass for naturally regenerated sites (3.28 Mg C/ha) stored less biomass compared to that of replanted sites (3.71 Mg C/ha). We found that average biomass per shrub in naturally regenerated sites was lower compared to that of replanted sites (p < 0.05). Shrub density and biomass estimated from the remote sensing data was used as input for the Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth model to predict future shrub biomass for three GCM scenarios projected by IPCC (2007). Modeling showed that the LRGV may produce lower biomass per ha for the projected higher emission scenarios compared to lower emission scenarios. We conclude that restoration efforts within LRGV have contributed to increasing shrub density and sequestering carbon in tissue biomass, but future climate change is likely to reduce its carbon sequestration potential.

  4. Norms for multivariate diagnosis of nutrient imbalance in the East African highland bananas (musa spp.aaa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wairegi, L.; Asten, van P.

    2011-01-01

    Despite low yields and soil fertility problems, fertilizer use in the East African Highland banana (AAA-EA) production is absent. High fertilizer costs increase the need for site-specific fertilizer recommendations that address deficiencies. This study aimed to derive and compare norms for AAA-EA

  5. Developing Blended Learning in Higher Education--A Case Study of the University of the Highlands and Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simco, Neil; Campbell, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides some editorial context for a suite of three papers, each of which focuses on pedagogical considerations at the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI). The paper first identifies the distinctive characteristics of the University, its history, context and purpose. It moves on to explore a major initiative in blended…

  6. Landscape-scale fire restoration on the big piney ranger district in the Ozark highlands of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Andre; McRee Anderson; Douglas Zollner; Marie Melnechuk; Theo Witsell

    2009-01-01

    The Ozark-St. Francis National Forest, The Nature Conservancy (TNC), the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Arkansas Forestry Commission, private landowners, and others are currently engaged in a collaborative project to restore the oak-hickory and pine-oak ecosystems of the Ozark Highlands on 60,000 acres of the Big Piney Ranger District. Frequent historical fires...

  7. Tillage and vegetative barrier effects on soil conservation and short-term economic benefits in the Central Kenya highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guto, S.N.; Pypers, P.; Vanlauwe, B.; Ridder, de N.; Giller, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    Minimum tillage and vegetative barriers can conserve soil and water resources in the steep-sloping highlands of East Africa but there has been little adoption by smallholder farmers. Soil conservation efficiency and short-term economic benefits provided by tillage and vegetative barriers were

  8. Soil carbon and nitrogen sequestration over an age sequence of Pinus patula plantations in Zimbabwean Eastern Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujuru, L.; Gotora, T.; Velthorst, E.J.; Nyamangara, J.; Hoosbeek, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Forests play a major role in regulating the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations creating a need to investigate the ability of exotic plantations to sequester atmospheric CO2. This study examined pine plantations located in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe

  9. A remote sensing-assisted risk rating study to predict oak decline and recovery in the Missouri Ozark Highlands, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuizhen Wang; Hong S. He; John M. Kabrick

    2008-01-01

    Forests in the Ozark Highlands underwent widespread oak decline affected by severe droughts in 1999-2000. In this study, the differential normalized difference water index was calculated to detect crown dieback. A multi-factor risk rating system was built to map risk levels of stands. As a quick response to drought, decline in 2000 mostly occurred in stands at low to...

  10. Mortality, scarring, and growth in an oak woodland following prescribed fire and commercial thinning in the Ozark Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.S. Kinkead; M.C. Stambaugh; J.M. Kabrick

    2017-01-01

    Oak-dominated (Quercus Spp.) woodlands are commonly thinned and burned in the Ozark Highlands to prevent canopy closure and regenerate desired species, despite a lack of information regarding tree mortality, scarring, and growth in residual stands. Our study compared stand- and tree-level responses after two prescribed burns across four treatments...

  11. Investments in land management in the north-western highlands of Ethiopia: the role of social capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firew, A.T.; Graaff, de J.; Kessler, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    In the north-western highlands of Ethiopia investments in land management (LM) have not always been successful. The objectives of this study were to assess farmers⿿ perceptions about implementation approaches of soil and water conservation (SWC) practices and to explore the relationship between the

  12. Caring for the land : best practice in soil and water conservation in Beressa watershed, highlands of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsalu Taye, A.

    2006-01-01

    Land degradation in the form of soil erosion and nutrient loss is a major constraint to farming activities and agricultural development in the highlands of Ethiopia. Though large-scale conservation projects have been initiated and carried out by the government during the past few decades, the

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces from the East African highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asfaw, A.; Blair, M.W.; Almekinders, C.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The East African highlands are a region of important common bean production and high varietal diversity for the crop. The objective of this study was to uncover the diversity and population structure of 192 landraces from Ethiopia and Kenya together with four genepool control genotypes using

  14. 76 FR 60935 - Notice of Application from ExxonMobil Corporation, Highland Uranium Mine and Millsite, To Amend...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Boundary to include the Highland Pit Lake and the Southeast Drainage. An NRC administrative review... proceeding; and (3) the possible effect of any order that may be entered in the proceeding on the petitioner... Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, Attention: Rulemaking and Adjudications Staff; or (2...

  15. Median nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the New Jersey Highlands Region estimated using regression models and land-surface characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ronald J.; Chepiga, Mary M.; Cauller, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate-concentration data are used in conjunction with land-use and land-cover data to estimate median nitrate concentrations in groundwater underlying the New Jersey (NJ) Highlands Region. Sources of data on nitrate in 19,670 groundwater samples are from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) and the NJ Private Well Testing Act (PWTA).

  16. What do we know about the amphibians from the Kenyan central and western highlands? A faunistic and taxonomic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lötters, S.; Rotich, D.; Koester, T.E.; Kosuch, J.; Muchai, V.; Scheelke, K.; Schick, S.; Teege, P.; Wasonga, D.V.; Veith, M.K.H.

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the pertinent faunistic and taxonomic knowledge available from literature and scientific collections on the amphibians from the central and western highlands of Kenya. Fifty-four anuran species in 19 genera and 12 families were recognized. Higher taxa are those also found in adjacent

  17. Smallholders' soil fertility management in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: implications for nutrient stocks, balances and sustainability of agroecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haileslassie, A.; Priess, J.A.; Veldkamp, E.; Lesschen, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Low agricultural productivity caused by soil degradation is a serious problem in the Ethiopian Highlands. Here, we report how differences in soil fertility management between farming systems, based either on enset (Ensete ventricosum) or on teff (Eragrostis tef) as the major crops, affect the extent

  18. A matrix transition model for an uneven-aged, oak-hickory forest in the Missouri ozark highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    James R. Lootens; David R. Larsen; Edward F. Loewenstein

    1999-01-01

    We presented a matrix growth model for an uneven-aged, oak-hickory forest in the Ozark Highlands of Missouri. The model was developed to predict ingrowth, growth of surviving trees, and mortality by diameter class for a five-year period. Tree removal from management activities is accounted for in the model. We evaluated a progression of models from a static, fixed...

  19. Mixed cropping of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) landraces in the central highlands of Eritrea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldeamlak, A.

    2001-01-01

    A common cropping system in the central highlands of Eritrea is mixed cropping of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum); it is called hanfetz (Tigrigna word). Mixtures may give higher yield, better yield stability, better food quality and more animal feed. Factors affecting

  20. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an Andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Calderón-Espinosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.

  1. Constituting Antebellum African American Identity: Resistance, Violence, and Masculinity in Henry Highland Garnet's (1843) "Address to the Slaves"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, James

    2007-01-01

    In August 1843 Presbyterian minister Henry Highland Garnet delivered his "Address to the Slaves of the United States of America" to the National Convention of Colored Citizens in Buffalo, NY. While often read (and almost as often dismissed) as either an unqualified call for a violent slave rebellion or, at the least, a celebration of…

  2. East African highland bananas (Musa spp. AAA-EA) 'worry' more about potassium deficiency than drought stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taulya, G.

    2013-01-01

    Drought stress, potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) deficiencies are major constraints to rain-fed East African highland banana (EAHB) production in Uganda. It was hypothesised that the reduction in fresh bunch mass and increase in dry matter (DM) allocation to corms with drought stress, K and N

  3. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Espinosa, Martha L; Ortega-León, Angela M; Zamora-Abrego, Joan G

    2013-03-01

    Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.

  4. Evaluation of soil and water conservation practices in the north-western Ethiopian highlands using multi-criteria analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teshome Firew, A.; Graaff, de J.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2014-01-01

    Investments by farmers in soil and water conservation (SWC) practices are influenced by the physical effectiveness, financial efficiency, and social acceptability of these practices. The objective of this study is to evaluate different SWC practices in the north-western highlands of Ethiopia using

  5. Mineral fertilizer response and nutrient use efficiencies of East African highland banana (Musa spp., AAA-EAHB, cv. Kisansa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyombi, K.; Asten, van P.J.A.; Corbeels, M.; Taulya, G.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Giller, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    Poor yields of East African highland bananas (Musa spp., AAA-EAHB) on smallholder farms have often been attributed to problems of poor soil fertility. We measured the effects of mineral fertilizers on crop performance at two sites over two to three crop cycles; Kawanda in central Uganda and Ntungamo

  6. Catastrophic floods and tropical storms over the last 120 years on the Dak Bla River, Central Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trang; Stevens, Lora; Vu, Tich; Le, Thuyen

    2017-04-01

    Catastrophic floods are a common natural disaster in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. Given the region's rapid economic development, including an expanding agricultural base and hydroelectric dams, it is important to understand past flood frequency and magnitude. Although mountainous, the highly weathered landscape is not conducive to significant preservation of slack water deposits. Thus, grain size, magnetic susceptibility and carbon/nitrogen ratios of sediment cores from two abandoned channels of the Dak Bla River were used to identify major flood events during the last 120 years. There is a notable increase in magnitude during the late 20th century, with the most pronounced flood occurring in 1972 during the Second Indochina (American-Vietnam) War. The dramatic increase in sediment deposition during the late 20th century is believed to result from anthropogenic alteration of the catchment, including deforestation by bombing during the Second Indochina War and conversion of forest to cropland. Meteorological and river gauge data are rare in Vietnam and span only the last 40 years on the Dak Bla River. For the duration of these records, all major modern floods are triggered by tropical storms bringing excessive rain late in the wet season. Although non-conformable and young radiocarbon dates limit our ability to correlate earlier floods with known tropical storms, the number of direct typhoon strikes and floods during the last 120 years are similar suggesting a possible link beyond the instrumental record. From these data we propose that neither wet years (e.g strong monsoon years) or typhoons are individually responsible for major floods. Catastrophic flooding is a result of a direct tropical storm strike after a normal to wet monsoon season saturates the landscape. If this model is correct, it may be possible to create short-term predictions of flooding help mitigate large-scale disasters. The caveat is that the occurrence and tracks of tropical storms are

  7. Maize, tropical (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Shireen K

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the third most important food crop globally after wheat and rice. In sub-Saharan Africa, tropical maize has traditionally been the main staple of the diet; 95 % of the maize grown is consumed directly as human food and as an important source of income for the resource-poor rural population. The biotechnological approach to engineer biotic and abiotic traits implies the availability of an efficient plant transformation method. The production of genetically transformed plants depends both on the ability to integrate foreign genes into target cells and the efficiency with which plants are regenerated. Maize transformation and regeneration through immature embryo culture is the most efficient system to regenerate normal transgenic plants. However, this system is highly genotype dependent. Genotypes adapted to tropic areas are difficult to regenerate. Therefore, transformation methods used with model genotypes adapted to temperate areas are not necessarily efficient with tropical lines. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the method of choice since it has been first achieved in 1996. In this report, we describe a transformation method used successfully with several tropical maize lines. All the steps of transformation and regeneration are described in details. This protocol can be used with a wide variety of tropical lines. However, some modifications may be needed with recalcitrant lines.

  8. Ferroelectric Material on Venus' Highlands, and Possibly on Other Planets & Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.; Harrington, E. M.; Sharpton, V. L.

    2016-12-01

    Ferroelectric materials yield a distinctive radar signature. Ferroelectrics have a spontaneous electrical polarization (dipole moment) that can be reversed by an applied electrical field. With increasing temperature T, the polarization can decay and disappear (i.e., the ferroelectric material becomes paraelectric) at a Curie T. As T increases toward the transition, the relative permittivity (dielectric constant) of the material increases to very high values (e.g., >1000), and then drops to `normal' values (e.g., 8 for basalt) at T above the transition. This pattern is apparent in Magellan SAR backscatter coefficients in near-equatorial highlands and some mid-latitude volcanoes. In the equatorial highlands, apparent SAR brightness increases with altitude (and decreasing T) and then declines precipitously at 4.4 km elevation, i.e. 700K. The transition is consistent with the ferroelectric material being the mineral chlorapatite, Ca5(PO4)3Cl. Chlorapatite can have a spontaneous electrical dipole, or contain domains with dipoles, because (at `low' T) the Cl ions are displaced from symmetric positions in the crystal's structure. Apatite is a common minor mineral in igneous rocks, but usually occurs as fluorapatite (which is not ferroelectric); on Venus, however, primary fluorapatite may react with HCl in the atmosphere to become chlorapatite. Oddly, Venus' near-polar highlands (Ishtar Terra) do not show this characteristic radar response of a ferroelectric substance, which implies a significantly different chemical or physical environment. The geological and temperature regime of Venus is unique in the solar system, but a ferroelectric radar signature could be observed on other bodies. The surface of Mercury is likely hot enough to cross the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition for chlorapatite; its effect on radar properties would be diurnal (rather than altitudinal). Other ferroelectric materials could be present elsewhere in the solar system. Some polymorphs of H2O

  9. Origins and biogeography of the Anolis crassulus subgroup (Squamata: Dactyloidae) in the highlands of Nuclear Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Erich P; Townsend, Josiah H

    2017-12-21

    Recent studies have begun to reveal the complex evolutionary and biogeographic histories of mainland anoles in Central America, but the origins and relationships of many taxa remain poorly understood. One such group is the Anolis (Norops) crassulus species subgroup, which contains ten morphologically similar highland taxa, the majority of which have restricted distributions. The nominal taxon A. crassulus has a disjunct distribution from Chiapas, Mexico, through Guatemala, in the highlands of El Salvador, and in the Chortís Highlands of Honduras. We test the relationships of these species using multiple mitochondrial and nuclear loci in concatenated and multispecies coalescent frameworks, in an effort to both resolve long-standing taxonomic confusion and present new insights into the evolution and biogeography of these taxa. Sequences of multiple mitochondrial and nuclear loci were generated for eight of the ten species of the Anolis crassulus species subgroup. We analyzed phylogenetic relationships and estimated divergence times and ancestral ranges of the subgroup, recovering a monophyletic subgroup within Anolis. Within the nominal taxon Anolis crassulus, we recovered multiple genetically distinct lineages corresponding to allopatric populations, and show that the Chortís Highland lineage split from the others over 13 MYA. Additionally, distinct mitochondrial lineages are present within the taxa A. heteropholidotus and A. morazani, and importantly, samples of A. crassulus and A. sminthus previously used in major anole phylogenetic analyses are not recovered as conspecific with those taxa. We infer a Chortís Highland origin for the ancestor of this subgroup, and estimate cladogenesis of this subgroup began approximately 22 MYA. Our results provide new insights into the evolution, biogeography, and timing of diversification of the Anolis crassulus species subgroup. The disjunctly distributed Anolis crassulus sensu lato represents several morphologically

  10. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of talar morphology in extant gorilla taxa from highland and lowland habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Ryan P; Tocheri, Matthew W; Orr, Caley M; Mcnulty, Kieran P

    2015-01-01

    Western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) are known to climb significantly more often than eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei), a behavioral distinction attributable to major differences in their respective habitats (i.e., highland vs. lowland). Genetic evidence suggests that the lineages leading to these taxa began diverging from one another between approximately 1 and 3 million years ago. Thus, gorillas offer a special opportunity to examine the degree to which morphology of recently diverged taxa may be "fine-tuned" to differing ecological requirements. Using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics, we compared talar morphology in a sample of 87 specimens including western (lowland), mountain (highland), and grauer gorillas (lowland and highland populations). Talar shape was captured with a series of landmarks and semilandmarks superimposed by generalized Procrustes analysis. A between-group principal components analysis of overall talar shape separates gorillas by ecological habitat and by taxon. An analysis of only the trochlea and lateral malleolar facet identifies subtle variations in trochlear shape between western lowland and lowland grauer gorillas, potentially indicative of convergent evolution of arboreal adaptations in the talus. Lastly, talar shape scales differently with centroid size for highland and lowland gorillas, suggesting that ankle morphology may track body-size mediated variation in arboreal behaviors differently depending on ecological setting. Several of the observed shape differences are linked biomechanically to the facilitation of climbing in lowland gorillas and to stability and load-bearing on terrestrial substrates in the highland taxa, providing an important comparative model for studying morphological variation in groups known only from fossils (e.g., early hominins). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The lethal fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is present in lowland tropical forests of far eastern Panamá.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eria A Rebollar

    Full Text Available The fungal disease chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is one of the main causes of amphibian population declines and extinctions all over the world. In the Neotropics, this fungal disease has caused catastrophic declines in the highlands as it has spread throughout Central America down to Panamá. In this study, we determined the prevalence and intensity of Bd infection in three species of frogs in one highland and four lowland tropical forests, including two lowland regions in eastern Panamá in which the pathogen had not been detected previously. Bd was present in all the sites sampled with a prevalence ranging from 15-34%, similar to other Neotropical lowland sites. The intensity of Bd infection on individual frogs was low, ranging from average values of 0.11-24 zoospore equivalents per site. Our work indicates that Bd is present in anuran communities in lowland Panamá, including the Darién province, and that the intensity of the infection may vary among species from different habitats and with different life histories. The population-level consequences of Bd infection in amphibian communities from the lowlands remain to be determined. Detailed studies of amphibian species from the lowlands will be essential to determine the reason why these species are persisting despite the presence of the pathogen.

  12. Temperate and Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2015-01-01

    increased that trend, requiring more specimens to allow the study of variation both within and between species. During the 19th and the 20th centuries larger botanical gardens and large public herbaria with tropical plants developed in European countries, particularly in countries with tropical colonies......The first botanical gardens and collections of preserved plants in the 16th century served didactic purposes and should ensure correct identification of medicinal, ornamental and other useful plants. Collections of preserved plants were nearly all book-herbaria, emulating illustrated books...... by easier travelling and growing interest in exploring the World’s biodiversity. New trends in the 21st century included a wider focus than the study of taxonomy and plant geography: for example conservation and climate change. Many factors may influence the future of tropical plant collections...

  13. Adrenaline and tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, R K; Singh, H K; Sinha, R K; Saran, R

    1976-01-01

    Injections of adrenaline produced an immediate rise in peripheral absolute eosinophil count in cases of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, but a fall or no change in other conditions with similar clinical manifestations. A similar early eosinophilic effect was noted in control guinea pigs as well as in Ascaris larvae-fed guinea pigs. The effect of adrenaline on eosinophil counts in cases of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia was not paralled by effects on total erythrocyte or leucocyte counts or on packed cell volumes. The early eosinophilic effects of adrenaline in guinea pigs was blocked by pehntolamine but no be propranalol. Adrenaline-induced changes on eosinophil counts may be used as a disgnostic test of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

  14. APR-2 Tropical Cyclone Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, S. L.; Tanelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Second Generation Airborne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) participated in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in August and September of 2010, collecting a large volume of data in several tropical systems, including Hurricanes Earl and Karl. Additional measurements of tropical cyclone have been made by APR-2 in experiments prior to GRIP (namely, CAMEX-4, NAMMA, TC4); Table 1 lists all the APR-2 tropical cyclone observations. The APR-2 observations consist of the vertical structure of rain reflectivity at 13.4 and 35.6 GHz, and at both co-polarization and crosspolarization, as well as vertical Doppler measurements and crosswind measurements. APR-2 normally flies on the NASA DC-8 aircraft, as in GRIP, collecting data with a downward looking, cross-track scanning geometry. The scan limits are 25 degrees on either side of the aircraft, resulting in a roughly 10-km swath, depending on the aircraft altitude. Details of the APR-2 observation geometry and performance can be found in Sadowy et al. (2003).The multiparameter nature of the APR-2 measurements makes the collection of tropical cyclone measurements valuable for detailed studies of the processes, microphysics and dynamics of tropical cyclones, as well as weaker systems that are associated with tropical cyclone formation. In this paper, we give a brief overview of how the APR-2 data are processed. We also discuss use of the APR-2 cross-track winds to estimate various quantities of interest in in studies of storm intensification. Finally, we show examples of the standard products and derived information.

  15. Timing and Distribution of Single-Layered Ejecta Craters Imply Sporadic Preservation of Tropical Subsurface Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchoff, Michelle R.; Grimm, Robert E.

    2018-01-01

    Determining the evolution of tropical subsurface ice is a key component to understanding Mars's climate and geologic history. Study of an intriguing crater type on Mars—layered ejecta craters, which likely form by tapping subsurface ice—may provide constraints on this evolution. Layered ejecta craters have a continuous ejecta deposit with a fluidized-flow appearance. Single-layered ejecta (SLE) craters are the most common and dominate at tropical latitudes and therefore offer the best opportunity to derive new constraints on the temporal evolution of low-latitude subsurface ice. We estimate model formation ages of 54 SLE craters with diameter (D) ≥ 5 km using the density of small, superposed craters with D D 1 km indicates that ice could be preserved as shallow as 100 m or less at those locations. Finally, there is a striking spatial mixing in an area of highlands near the equator of layered and radial (lunar-like ballistic) ejecta craters; the latter form where there are insufficient concentrations of subsurface ice. This implies strong spatial heterogeneity in the concentration of tropical subsurface ice.

  16. Tropical rain forest: a wider perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldsmith, F. B

    1998-01-01

    .... Barbier -- Can non-market values save the tropical forests? / D. Pearce -- The role of policy and institutions / James Mayers and Stephen Bass -- Modelling tropical land use change and deforestation...

  17. Archives: Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 95 ... Archives: Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. Journal Home > Archives: Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Archives: Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 33 of 33 ... Archives: Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Journal Home > Archives: Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Year 2001 Tropical Cyclones of the World

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Year 2001 Tropical Cyclones of the World poster. During calendar year 2001, fifty tropical cyclones with sustained surface winds of at least 64 knots were observed...

  20. 2003 Tropical Cyclones of the World

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Year 2003 Tropical Cyclones of the World poster. During calendar year 2003, fifty-one tropical cyclones with sustained surface winds of at least 64 knots were...

  1. Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Instructions for Authors (Last Updated December 2012). STATEMENT OF SCOPE. The Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology (formerly Journal of Tropical Microbiology) publishes papers and critical reviews in Medical Microbiology, Plant pathology, Public Health, Industrial Microbiology, ...

  2. Year 2000 Tropical Cyclones of the World

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Year 2000 Tropical Cyclones of the World poster. During calendar year 2000, forty-five tropical cyclones with sustained surface winds of at least 64 knots were...

  3. Proximal base stress fracture of the second metatarsal in a Highland dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hannah Isabella; O'Donnell, Barry; Hopper, Graeme Philip; Chang, Winston

    2013-06-26

    A 15-year-old female Highland dancer presented to the accident and emergency department with an ankle inversion injury on a background of several weeks of pain in the right foot. A radiograph of the right foot demonstrated a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. She was treated conservatively with a below knee removable supportive walking boot with a rocker bottom sole. She re-presented to the accident and emergency department 3 weeks later with pins and needles in the right foot; she was given crutches to use along side the supportive walking boot. Radiographs 12 weeks after the first presentation showed healing of the stress fracture. The patient was now asymptomatic of the injury. She was unable to fully train for 12 weeks due to the injury. Conservative management was successful in this patient.

  4. Economic and institutional incentives for managing the Ethiopean highlands of the Upper Blue Nile Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassahun, Habtamu Tilahun; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl

    2015-01-01

    water infrastructure across the Blue Nile River System. A choice experiment was set up requiring farmers to contribute with labour and to implement specific watershed management (WM) activities in exchange for subsidised credit facilities, better opportunities for livestock production in the form...... two classes. One class, which is probably dominated by literate farmers and farmers who have easy credit access, is willing to contribute more labour and requires fewer subsidies than the other class. Furthermore, the two groups have opposite viewpoints on management (semi-privatisation of common land......This article identifies incentives that motivate land users to participate in the management of private and communal lands in the Ethiopian highlands of the Upper Blue Nile Basin, where on-farm and offfarm impacts of soil erosion are threatening the livelihoods of millions of farmers and damaging...

  5. Genetic differences in hemoglobin function between highland and lowland deer mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Runck, Amy M.; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    In high-altitude vertebrates, adaptive changes in blood–O2 affinity may be mediated by modifications of hemoglobin (Hb) structure that affect intrinsic O2 affinity and/or responsiveness to allosteric effectors that modulate Hb–O2 affinity. This mode of genotypic specialization is considered typical...... of mammalian species that are high-altitude natives. Here we investigated genetically based differences in Hb–O2 affinity between highland and lowland populations of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), a generalist species that has the broadest altitudinal distribution of any North American mammal....... The results of a combined genetic and proteomic analysis revealed that deer mice harbor a high level of Hb isoform diversity that is attributable to allelic polymorphism at two tandemly duplicated -globin genes and two tandemly duplicated β-globin genes. This high level of isoHb diversity translates...

  6. Engima of a thermal anomaly - A TM/AVHRR study of the volcanic Arabian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodget, H. W.; Andre, C. G.; Masuoka, P. M.

    1987-01-01

    Discovery of a large thermal anomaly in the western Arabian highlands on Landsat TM imagery is reported. The anomaly, 15 C warmer than surroundings, forms a 2-km-wide arc around the southern flank of Jebel Chada, a volcano active in 1256 AD. It is recorded by AVHRR imagery as well, despite the 1.1-km spatial resolution of this sensor. Air photos and geologic maps show no bedrock unit that corresponds to the anomaly. Digital techniques were applied to the TM and AVHRR data, including contrast enhancement, density slicing, principal components analysis, and construction of multiband composite images. It is concluded that the anomaly results from a thin cover of volcanic ash or cinder that is optically indistinguishable from underlying basalt, rather than from internal (volcanic or hydrologic) heat sources.

  7. Arboreal Coleoptera Associated with Leucosidea sericea (Rosaceae at the Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalk Louw

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available An analysis was made of arboreal Coleoptera on Leucosidea sericea from the Golden Gate Highlands National Park in the north-eastern Orange Free State, Republic of South Africa. Five sites were selected from which samples were taken, using a beating technique, at equal intensity, during 13 consecutive months. A total of 117 species representing 35 families were recorded and allocated to four guilds, namely phytophages (47 species, predators (44 species, scavengers (16 species and tourists (10 species. This diversity is attributed to the structural complexity and range of the host plant. The scarcity of a large number of these species is primarily ascribed to a high seasonal turnover rate. Species diversity and numbers of individuals were found to vary between the different study sites and are attributed to the growth stage and condition of the host plant, as well as the effect of sun and shade on activity cycles and the choice of feeding levels.

  8. Red cocks and black hens : Gendered symbolism, kinship and social practice in the Ngada highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schröter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ngada is not only the name of a regency (kabupaten in Central Flores, one of the Lesser Sunda Islands in eastern Indonesia (Nusa Tenggara Timur, but also refers to a people numbering about 60,000 who live in the southern and central part of the regency, extending from a small coastal section along the Savu Sea up to a highland plateau more than 1,000 metres in altitude. With the exception of the plateau, the region is extremely rugged, cross-cut by rough gorges. Many villages are still isolated and can only be reached by footpaths. Other villages are now connected by unpaved roads and a few even by paved ones.

  9. Intestinal parasitic infections and anaemia among pregnant women in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Michael, Audrey; Kirarock, Wendy S; Pomat, William S; van den Biggelaar, Anita H J

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associations with risk factors among pregnant women in their second or third trimester in Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. Among the 201 pregnant women enrolled in this study, 163 (81%) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. Infections with protozoan parasites (65%) were more prevalent than infections with nematodes (31%); protozoan infections included Entamoeba histolytica (43%), Giardia lamblia (39%) and Pentatrichomonas hominis (14%), and nematode infections included hookworm (18%), Ascaris lumbricoides (14%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3%) and Trichuris trichiura (2%). Factors associated with higher risk of intestinal parasitic infections in pregnancy included being a primigravida for protozoan-only infections and education limited to primary school for nematode infections. Altitude-adjusted haemoglobin levels were assessed at the beginning of labour for 110 women, with 69 (63%) found to be anaemic (haemoglobin pregnancy and anaemia.

  10. The relationship between the Guinea Highlands and the West African offshore rainfall maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. L.; Young, G. S.; Evans, J. L.; Fuentes, J. D.; Núñez Ocasio, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Satellite rainfall estimates reveal a consistent rainfall maximum off the West African coast during the monsoon season. An analysis of 16 years of rainfall in the monsoon season is conducted to explore the drivers of such copious amounts of rainfall. Composites of daily rainfall and midlevel meridional winds centered on the days with maximum rainfall show that the day with the heaviest rainfall follows the strongest midlevel northerlies but coincides with peak low-level moisture convergence. Rain type composites show that convective rain dominates the study region. The dominant contribution to the offshore rainfall maximum is convective development driven by the enhancement of upslope winds near the Guinea Highlands. The enhancement in the upslope flow is closely related to African easterly waves propagating off the continent that generate low-level cyclonic vorticity and convergence. Numerical simulations reproduce the observed rainfall maximum and indicate that it weakens if the African topography is reduced.

  11. Recovery of nitrogen fertilizer by traditional and improved rice cultivars in the Bhutan Highlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaley, Bhim Bahadur; Jensen, Henning Høgh; Christiansen, Jørgen Lindskrog

    2010-01-01

    The recovery of soil derived nitrogen (NDFS) and fertilizer N (NDFF) was investigated in highland rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields in Bhutan, characterized by high inputs of farmyard manure (FYM). The effect of 60 kg N ha-1 (60 N) applied in two splits to a traditional and an improved cultivar...... greater harvest index (HI). The mean percentage recovery of fertilizer N (REN) applied at 45 days after transplanting (DAT) was 34% compared to 22% at 7 DAT, resulting in 56% greater uptake of NDFF at 45 DAT. The overall REN for both the improved and the traditional cultivars were 25.7% and 30......% respectively, with no difference between cultivars, but REN decreased with increasing FYM inputs. Fertilizer N recommendations that allow for previous FYM inputs combined with applications timed to coincide with maximum crop demand (45 DAT), and the use of improved cultivars, could enhance N fertilizer...

  12. Land Management Strategies and their Implications for Mazahua Farmers’ Livelihoods in the Highlands of Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Fajardo Belina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study from a Mazahua indigenous community in the rural Highlands of Central Mexico. It analyses Mazahua farming livelihoods characterised by subsistence agriculture, marginality, poverty and severe land degradation. Mazahua farmers face constrained environmental, socioeconomic and cultural conditions, which influence their local decisions on natural resource management. The results describe the capital assets base used, where land, livestock and crop production are imperative assets to support farmers’ livelihood strategies. It analyses local management practices to achieve livelihood outcomes in the short/long term, and to improve or undermine land characteristics and other related assets. It also presents a farmer typology constructed by local perceptions, a controversial element to drive sustainable development strategies at the local level. Finally, it discusses how local land management practices are adopted and their importance in developing alternatives to encourage positive trade-offs between conservation and production in order to improve rural livelihoods.

  13. No Evidence of Herpesvirus Infection in West Highland White Terriers With Canine Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, E; Dourcy, M; Holopainen, S; Rajamäki, M M; Gillet, L; Ehlers, B; Clercx, C

    2016-11-01

    In humans, horses, and rodents, an association between pulmonary fibrotic disorders and gammaherpesvirus infection has been suggested. In dogs, canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (CIPF), a progressive fibrotic lung disease of unknown origin and poorly understood pathophysiology, has been reported to occur in West Highland white terriers (WHWTs). The present study investigated the potential association between CIPF and herpesvirus infection. A PCR assay, using a mixture of degenerate and deoxyinosine-substituted primers targeting highly conserved regions of the DNA polymerase gene (DPOL) of herpesviruses, was applied on both lung and blood samples from WHWTs affected with CIPF and controls. Herpesvirus DPOL sequence could not be amplified from any of 46 lung samples (28 affected WHWTs and 18 control dogs of various breeds) and 38 blood samples (19 CIPF WHWTs and 19 control age-matched WHWTs) included. An association between CIPF and herpesvirus infection is therefore unlikely. Investigation of other causes of the disease is warranted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Linkages between Snow Cover Seasonality, Terrain, and Land Surface Phenology in the Highland Pastures of Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henebry, Geoffrey; Tomaszewska, Monika; Kelgenbaeva, Kamilya

    2017-04-01

    In the highlands of Kyrgyzstan, vertical transhumance is the foundation of montane agropastoralism. Terrain attributes, such as elevation, slope, and aspect, affect snow cover seasonality, which is a key influence on the timing of plant growth and forage availability. Our study areas include the highland pastures in Central Tien Shan mountains, specifically in the rayons of Naryn and At-Bashy in Naryn oblast, and Alay and Chong-Alay rayons in Osh oblast. To explore the linkages between snow cover seasonality and land surface phenology as modulated by terrain and variations in thermal time, we use 16 years (2001-2016) of Landsat surface reflectance data at 30 m resolution with MODIS land surface temperature and snow cover products at 1 km and 500 m resolution, respectively, and two digital elevation models, SRTM and ASTER GDEM. We model snow cover seasonality using frost degree-days and land surface phenology using growing degree-days as quadratic functions of thermal time: a convex quadratic (CxQ) model for land surface phenology and a concave quadratic (CvQ) model for snow cover seasonality. From the fitted parameter coefficients, we calculated phenometrics, including "peak height" and "thermal time to peak" for the CxQ models and "trough depth" and "thermal time to trough" for the CvQ models. We explore how these phenometrics change as a function of elevation and slope-aspect interactions and due to interannual variability. Further, we examine how snow cover duration and timing affects the subsequent peak height and thermal time to peak in wetter, drier, and normal years.

  15. Tracking paraglacial sediment with cosmogenic 10Be using an example from the northwest Scottish Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fame, Michelle L.; Owen, Lewis A.; Spotila, James A.; Dortch, Jason M.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2018-02-01

    Beryllium-10 concentrations in samples of sediment and bedrock from five study sites across the Scottish Highlands trace paraglacial sediment sources and define the nature of glacial erosion for the late Quaternary. Exposure ages derived from 10Be concentrations in ridge and lower elevation bedrock range from 10 to 33 ka, which suggest that polythermal ice and warm based ice were primarily responsible for producing glacial sediment. Comparisons of 10Be concentrations between catchment-wide sediment (2.06 ± 0.34 × 104 to 11.24 ± 1.54 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 33), near surface deposits (2.71 ± 0.33 × 104 to 3.48 ± 0.49 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 6), 4-m-thick deep till (0.68 × 10410Be atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 1), ridge bedrock (8.93 ± 0.47 × 104 to 34.05 ± 1.66 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 20), and lower elevation polished bedrock (6.74 ± 0.67 × 104 to 12.65 ± 0.7 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2, n = 5) indicate that most sand fluxing through catchments in the Scottish Highlands is sourced from the remobilization and vertical mixing of near surface deposits. These findings indicate that glaciogenic material continues to dominate paraglacial sediment budgets more than 11 ka after deglaciation.

  16. Costs of early detection systems for epidemic malaria in highland areas of Kenya and Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapuoda Beth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria epidemics cause substantial morbidity and mortality in highland areas of Africa. The costs of detecting and controlling these epidemics have not been explored adequately in the past. This study presents the costs of establishing and running an early detection system (EDS for epidemic malaria in four districts in the highlands of Kenya and Uganda. Methods An economic costing was carried out from the health service provider's perspective in both countries. Staff time for data entry and processing, as well as supervising and coordinating EDS activities at district and national levels was recorded and associated opportunity costs estimated. A threshold analysis was carried out to determine the number of DALYs or deaths that would need to be averted in order for the EDS to be considered cost-effective. Results The total costs of the EDS per district per year ranged between US$ 14,439 and 15,512. Salaries were identified as major cost-drivers, although their relative contribution to overall costs varied by country. Costs of relaying surveillance data between facilities and district offices (typically by hand were also substantial. Data from Uganda indicated that 4% or more of overall costs could potentially be saved by switching to data transfer via mobile phones. Based on commonly used thresholds, 96 DALYs in Uganda and 103 DALYs in Kenya would need to be averted annually in each district for the EDS to be considered cost-effective. Conclusion Results from this analysis suggest that EDS are likely to be cost-effective. Further studies that include the costs and effects of the health systems' reaction prompted by EDS will need to be undertaken in order to obtain comprehensive cost-effectiveness estimates.

  17. A decade of rapid change: Biocultural influences on child growth in highland Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oths, Kathryn S; Smith, Hannah N; Stein, Max J; Lazo Landivar, Rodrigo J

    2017-10-30

    In the past decade many areas of Peru have been undergoing extreme environmental, economic, and cultural change. In the highland hamlet of Chugurpampa, La Libertad, climate change has ruined harvests and led to frequent periods of migration to the coast in search of livelihood. This biocultural research examines how the changes could be affecting the growth of children who maintain residence in the highlands. Clinical records from the early 2000s were compared to those from the early 2010s. Charts were randomly selected to record anthropometric data, netting a sample of 75 children ages 0-60 months of age. Analysis of covariance was run to compare mean stature, weight, and BMI between cohorts. Percentage of children who fall below the -2 threshold for z-scores for height and weight were compared by age and cohort. A significant secular trend in growth was found, with children born more recently larger than those born a decade before. The effect is most notable in the first year of life, with the growth advantage attenuated by the age of 3 for height and age 4 for weight. While children were unlikely to be stunted from 0 to 3 years of age, 44% of the later cohort were stunted and 11% were underweight from 4 to 5 years of age. Three possible explanations for the rapid shift are entertained: more time spent on the coast during gestation and early childhood, which may attenuate the effect of hypoxia on child growth; dietary change; and increased use of biomedicine. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The earliest evidence for Upper Paleolithic occupation in the Armenian Highlands at Aghitu-3 Cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Andrew W; Gasparyan, Boris; Allué, Ethel; Bigga, Gerlinde; Bruch, Angela A; Cullen, Victoria L; Frahm, Ellery; Ghukasyan, Robert; Gruwier, Ben; Jabbour, Firas; Miller, Christopher E; Taller, Andreas; Vardazaryan, Varduhi; Vasilyan, Davit; Weissbrod, Lior

    2017-09-01

    With its well-preserved archaeological and environmental records, Aghitu-3 Cave permits us to examine the settlement patterns of the Upper Paleolithic (UP) people who inhabited the Armenian Highlands. We also test whether settlement of the region between ∼39-24,000 cal BP relates to environmental variability. The earliest evidence occurs in archaeological horizon (AH) VII from ∼39-36,000 cal BP during a mild, moist climatic phase. AH VI shows periodic occupation as warm, humid conditions prevailed from ∼36-32,000 cal BP. As the climate becomes cooler and drier at ∼32-29,000 cal BP (AH V-IV), evidence for occupation is minimal. However, as cooling continues, the deposits of AH III demonstrate that people used the site more intensively from ∼29-24,000 cal BP, leaving behind numerous stone artifacts, faunal remains, and complex combustion features. Despite the climatic fluctuations seen across this 15,000-year sequence, lithic technology remains attuned to one pattern: unidirectional reduction of small cores geared towards the production of bladelets for tool manufacture. Subsistence patterns also remain stable, focused on medium-sized prey such as ovids and caprids, as well as equids. AH III demonstrates an expansion of social networks to the northwest and southwest, as the transport distance of obsidian used to make stone artifacts increases. We also observe the addition of bone tools, including an eyed needle, and shell beads brought from the east, suggesting that these people manufactured complex clothing and wore ornaments. Remains of micromammals, birds, charcoal, pollen, and tephra relate the story of environmental variability. We hypothesize that UP behavior was linked to shifts in demographic pressures and climatic changes. Thus, by combining archaeological and environmental data, we gain a clearer picture about the first UP inhabitants of the Armenian Highlands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors associated with high heterogeneity of malaria at fine spatial scale in the Western Kenyan highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidjoe, Amrish Y; Stevenson, Jennifer; Knight, Philip; Stone, William; Stresman, Gillian; Osoti, Victor; Makori, Euniah; Owaga, Chrispin; Odongo, Wycliffe; China, Pauline; Shagari, Shehu; Kariuki, Simon; Drakeley, Chris; Cox, Jonathan; Bousema, Teun

    2016-06-04

    The East African highlands are fringe regions between stable and unstable malaria transmission. What factors contribute to the heterogeneity of malaria exposure on different spatial scales within larger foci has not been extensively studied. In a comprehensive, community-based cross-sectional survey an attempt was made to identify factors that drive the macro- and micro epidemiology of malaria in a fringe region using parasitological and serological outcomes. A large cross-sectional survey including 17,503 individuals was conducted across all age groups in a 100 km(2) area in the Western Kenyan highlands of Rachuonyo South district. Households were geo-located and prevalence of malaria parasites and malaria-specific antibodies were determined by PCR and ELISA. Household and individual risk-factors were recorded. Geographical characteristics of the study area were digitally derived using high-resolution satellite images. Malaria antibody prevalence strongly related to altitude (1350-1600 m, p malaria infections were apparently asymptomatic. Malaria parasite prevalence was associated with age, bed net use, house construction features, altitude and topographical wetness index. Antibody prevalence was associated with all these factors and distance to the nearest water body. Altitude was a major driver of malaria transmission in this study area, even across narrow altitude bands. The large proportion of asymptomatic parasite carriers at all altitudes and the age-dependent acquisition of malaria antibodies indicate stable malaria transmission; the strong correlation between current parasite carriage and serological markers of malaria exposure indicate temporal stability of spatially heterogeneous transmission.

  20. Climatic controls of ecohydrological responses in the highlands of northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Samuale; Birhane, Emiru; Leijnse, Toon; van der Zee, S E A T M

    2017-12-31

    Climate variability and recurrent droughts have a strong negative impact on agricultural production and hydrology in the highlands northern Ethiopia. Since the 1980s, numerous mitigation and land rehabilitation measures have been implemented by local and national authorities to reduce these impacts, are often poorly effective. As underlying reason may be that controlling relationships between climate and ecohydrology at medium-sized catchments (10-10,000km(2)) of semi-arid highlands are not well known. We investigated trends and relationships in precipitation, temperature, streamflow, and net primary productivity (NPP). The results were mixed, with both significant increasing and decreasing trends for temperature and streamflow. Precipitation time series did not show a significant trend for the majority of stations, both over the years and over each season, except for a few stations. A time series indicated a significant abrupt increase of NPP in annual, seasonal and monthly timescale. Cross-correlation and regression analysis indicate precipitation and maximum temperature were the dominant climatic variables in the Geba catchment for streamflow and NPP. In view of these results, also land use and land cover change over the past three decades was analysed as a possible factor of importance, as human intervention, may affect streamflow and NPP. Factors that mainly correlate with streamflow and NPP are precipitation and maximum temperature. Important interventions that appear beneficial for these responses are construction of micro-dams, soil and water conservation and ecological restoration measures. The awareness that interactions can be quite different in semi-arid and semi-humid regions, as well as in upstream and downstream areas, should be reflected in management aimed at sustainable water and land resources use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Madagascar Highland erosion: What can we learn from the archive precipitation data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imola Szabó, Amanda; Raveloson, Andrea; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    In Madagascar, soil erosion is significant even when it is compared to world averages, resulting in special geomorphic forms known as lavakas appearing in the Highland regions of the island. The development of these features is due to rather unique multifactorial environmental conditions. Among many factors (geology, soil composition, human influence, etc.) the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation is a key factor. The presence of the dry and wet season seems to be responsible for the enhanced generation of small cracks that might eventually lead to the development of a gully. However, the way of the development of such gully erosions are unknown. To what extent of the actual precipitation pattern to what extent the weather contributes to the aforementioned phenomenon has not yet been studied in great detail. The aim of our research is to study the climatic and weather conditions of lavaka-prone areas for the last decades. The typical cyclonal pattern affects the Madagascar Highlands in various ways. The precipitation and the soil moisture data show that the spatial distribution can be correlated with the appearance of lavakas to a given extent, however the local distribution cannot be explained only based on the precipitation pattern. The severity of the wet season varies strongly in the various decades leading to different precipitation maxima in January-March period. In general the effectiveness of the gully erosion is thought to be highly enhanced if the run-off of the area show large temporal variations. According to our studies this variability is quite high in certain seasons, and, despite of the low spatial resolution, related to the lavaka-prone areas. However, neither the amount of the precipitation, nor the variability alone cannot explain the high variation found in the spatial density and length distribution. Further multidisciplinary studies are necessary to draw conclusions about lavaka formation and describe the process of lavaka

  2. Tree height and tropical forest biomass estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.O. Hunter; M. Keller; D. Vitoria; D.C. Morton

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forests account for approximately half of above-ground carbon stored in global vegetation. However, uncertainties in tropical forest carbon stocks remain high because it is costly and laborious to quantify standing carbon stocks. Carbon stocks of tropical forests are determined using allometric relations between tree stem diameter and height and biomass....

  3. Natural and near natural tropical forest values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel H. Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper identifies and describes some of the values associated with tropical rain forests in their natural and near-natural conditions. Tropical rain forests are moist forests in the humid tropics where temperature and rainfall are high and the dry season is short. These closed (non-logged) and broad-leaved forests are a global resource. Located almost entirely in...

  4. Black Swan Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, K.; Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Virtually all assessments of tropical cyclone risk are based on historical records, which are limited to a few hundred years at most. Yet stronger TCs may occur in the future and at places that have not been affected historically. Such events lie outside the realm of historically based expectations and may have extreme impacts. Their occurrences are also often made explainable after the fact (e.g., Hurricane Katrina). We nickname such potential future TCs, characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective predictability, "black swans" (Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007). As, by definition, black swan TCs have yet to happen, statistical methods that solely rely on historical track data cannot predict their occurrence. Global climate models lack the capability to predict intense storms, even with a resolution as high as 14 km (Emanuel et al. 2010). Also, most dynamic downscaling methods (e.g., Bender et al. 2010) are still limited in horizontal resolution and are too expensive to implement to generate enough events to include rare ones. In this study, we apply a simpler statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to simulate large numbers of synthetic storms under a given (observed or projected) climate condition. The method has been shown to generate realistic extremes in various basins (Emanuel et al. 2008 and 2010). We also apply a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC; Luettich et al. 1992) to simulate the storm surges generated by these storms. We then search for black swan TCs, in terms of the joint wind and surge damage potential, in the generated large databases. Heavy rainfall is another important TC hazard and will be considered in a future study. We focus on three areas: Tampa Bay in the U.S., the Persian Gulf, and Darwin in Australia. Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge as it is surrounded by shallow water and low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. High surges are generated by storms with a broad

  5. The future of tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Five anthropogenic drivers--land use change, wood extraction, hunting, atmospheric change, climate change--will largely determine the future of tropical forests. The geographic scope and intensity of these five drivers are in flux. Contemporary land use change includes deforestation (approximately 64,000 km(2) yr(-1) for the entire tropical forest biome) and natural forests regenerating on abandoned land (approximately 21,500 km(2) yr(-1) with just 29% of the biome evaluated). Commercial logging is shifting rapidly from Southeast Asia to Africa and South America, but local fuelwood consumption continues to constitute 71% of all wood production. Pantropical rates of net deforestation are declining even as secondary and logged forests increasingly replace old-growth forests. Hunters reduce frugivore, granivore and browser abundances in most forests. This alters seed dispersal, seed and seedling survival, and hence the species composition and spatial template of plant regeneration. Tropical governments have responded to these local threats by protecting 7% of all land for the strict conservation of nature--a commitment that is only matched poleward of 40 degrees S and 70 degrees N. Protected status often fails to stop hunters and is impotent against atmospheric and climate change. There are increasing reports of stark changes in the structure and dynamics of protected tropical forests. Four broad classes of mechanisms might contribute to these changes. Predictions are developed to distinguish among these mechanisms.

  6. of epilepsy in tropical countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OF EPILEPSY IN TROPICAL COUNTRIES. Institut d'Epidémiologie ... country or in different countries (up to 9999 subjects), and .... tal retardation when IQ is between 50 and 70 and severe men- tal retardation when IQ is below 50. The IQ system is not however indispensable and the doctor should do a global eva- luation of ...

  7. Equational theories of tropical sernirings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Esik, Zoltan; Ingolfsdottir, Anna

    2003-01-01

    examples of such structures are the (max,+) semiring and the tropical semiring. It is shown that none of the exotic semirings commonly considered in the literature has a finite basis for its equations, and that similar results hold for the commutative idempotent weak semirings that underlie them. For each...

  8. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tropical Journal of Health Sciences (TJHS) is an international journal which provides a forum for exchange of ideas to those engaged in work in the Health Sciences and related fields. The journal intends to publish high quality papers on original research, case reports, short communications, commentary, review ...

  9. Ozone in the Tropical Troposphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Wouter

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here is to acquire knowledge of the past, present, and future composition, stability, sensitivity, and variability of the troposphere. We focus mostly on the tropical regions because it has received little attention so far, measurements here are scarce, and large

  10. Tropical Journal of Medical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Medical Research publishes original research work, review articles, important case report, short communications, and innovations in medicine and related fields. Vol 16, No 2 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles ...

  11. Colonial adventures in tropical agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buelens, Frans; Frankema, Ewout

    2016-01-01

    How profitable were foreign investments in plantation agriculture in the Netherlands Indies during the late colonial era? We use a new dataset of monthly quoted stock prices and dividends of international companies at the Brussels stock exchange to estimate the returns to investment in tropical

  12. Hydrology of inland tropical lowlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidayat, Hidayat; Teuling, Ryan; Vermeulen, Bart; Muh, Taufik; Kastner, Karl; Geertsema, Tjitske J.; Bol, Dinja C.C.; Hoekman, Dirk H.; Sri Haryani, Gadis; Lanen, van Henny A.J.; Delinom, Robert M.; Dijksma, Roel; Anshari, Gusti Z.; Ningsih, Nining S.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Hoitink, Ton

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands are important reservoirs of water, carbon and biodiversity. They are typical landscapes of lowland regions that have high potential for water retention. However, the hydrology of these wetlands in tropical regions is often studied in isolation from the processes taking place at the

  13. Earthworm invasions in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizelle Gonzalez; Ching Yu Huang; Xiaoming Zou; Carlos Rodriguez

    2006-01-01

    The effects and implications of invasive species in belowground terrestrial ecosystems are not well known in comparison with aboveground terrestrial and marine environments. The study of earthworm invasions in the tropics is limited by a lack of taxonomic knowledge and the potential for loss of species in native habitats due to anthropogenic land use change. Alteration...

  14. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Dunkerton

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i a region of

  15. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2008-06-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, resembles the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development within the critical layer is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally this "marsupial paradigm" one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. This translation requires an appropriate "gauge" that renders translating streamlines and isopleths of translating stream function approximately equivalent to flow trajectories. In the translating frame, the closed circulation is stationary, and a dividing streamline effectively separates air within the critical layer from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because it provides (i) a region of

  16. Pollen and non-pollen palynomorph indicators of vegetation and highland grazing activities obtained from modern surface and dung datasets in the eastern Pyrenees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ejarque, Ana; Miras, Yannick; Riera Mora, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    .... in the south-eastern Pyrenees. This research aimed to analyse highland pollen and NPP in relation to vegetation and grazing, and to evaluate the local and regional significance of modern pollen deposition...

  17. In-vessel co-composting of yard waste and food waste: an approach for sustainable waste management in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amirhossein Malakahmad; Natasha Binti Idrus; Motasem S Abualqumboz; Sara Yavari; Shamsul Rahman M Kutty

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Huge amount of yard waste is produced in cities with excessive agricultural activities like Cameron Highlands, Malaysia where most of the time the yard waste is being managed poorly and big...

  18. Additions To The Lichen Biota Of SE Siberia: Records From The Stanovoye Nagor’e Highlands (Trans-Baikal Region, Russia)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey Chesnokov; Lydmila Konoreva

    2015-01-01

    ... Nagor’e Highlands in southeastern Siberia, including 64 species new for the area. Some of the newly recorded species are extremely rare in Russia [e.g., (Mudd) Poelt, Noble & Vězda and Nyl. Cromb...

  19. Tropical sprue after travel to Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetermans, W E; Vonck, A

    2000-01-01

    Tropical sprue (TS) is a diagnosis to consider in travelers with prolonged diarrhea and a malabsorption syndrome after return from tropical countries, particularly India and Southeast Asia. TS is an unusual condition in tropical Africa. Textbooks of tropical medicine indicate a low endemicity in Nigeria and a limited number of cases in South Africa and Zimbabwe. A Medline search from 1979 to mid 1998 using "Tanzania and tropical sprue" as key words disclosed no hits. We report herein a case of TS in a European traveler, who lived in Tanzania for 8 months.

  20. Tropical cyclone statistics in the Northeastern Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Vadillo, E; Zaitsev, Oleg; Morales Pérez., R

    2007-01-01

    The principal area of tropical cyclogenesis in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean is offshore in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, between 8 and 15° N, and most of these cyclones move towards the west and northwest during their initial phase. Historical analysis of tropical cyclone data in the Northeastern (NE) Pacific over the last 38 years (from 1966 to 2004) shows a mean of 16.3 tropical cyclones per year, consisting of 8.8 hurricanes and 7.4 tropical storms. The analysis shows great geographical v...

  1. Molt patterns, age, and sex criteria for selected highland Costa Rican resident landbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared D. Wolfe; Richard B. Chandler; David I. King

    2009-01-01

    Demographic studies within temperate latitudes often use molt and plumage-based criteria to differentiate age and sex classes (Bayne & Hobson 2002, Brown et al. 2002, Jones et al. 2004). Despite their critical nature (Pyle et al. 2004, DuVal 2005, Doucet et al. 2007), molt and plumage data derived from resident tropical species remain scarce (Dickey & van...

  2. Organic Carbon Stocks, Dynamics and Restoration in Relation to Soils of Agroecosystems in Ethiopia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getaneh Gebeyehu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Soils represent the largest carbon pool and play important roles for carbon storage for prolonged periods in agroecosystems. A number of studies were conducted to quantify soil organic carbon (SOC worldwide. The objective of this review was to evaluate organic carbon stocks, dynamics and restoration in soils of agroecosystems in Ethiopia. Soil data from 32 different observations, representing four different agroecosystems, were analysed. The mean SOC stocks in the four agroecosystems varied and ranged from 25.66 (sub-humid agroecosystem to 113.17 (humid mid-highland agroecosystems Mg C ha-1 up to one meter depth. The trend of mean SOC followed (in descending order: humid mid-highland (113.17 Mg C ha-1 > per-humid highland (57.14 Mg C ha-1 > semi-arid (25.77 Mg C ha-1 > sub-humid (25.66 Mg C ha-1. Compared with soils of tropical countries, those in Ethiopian agroecosystems contained low SOC storage potential. This might be associated with differences in measurement and analysis methods as 53.1% of the studies employed the Walkley-Black Method, which is known to underestimate carbon stocks in addition to ecological and management effects. However, shifts of land management from rain-fed to irrigation farming systems exhibited progress in the improvement of mean SOC storage potential. The analyses showed that farming systems involving irrigation sequestered more carbon than rain-fed farm systems. The mean SOC in the various agricultural land uses followed the following trend (in descending order: agroforestry (153.57 Mg C ha-1 > grazing land (34.61 Mg C ha-1 > cereal cultivation (24.18 Mg C ha-1. Therefore, the possible solutions for improvement of organic carbon stocks would be implementation of appropriate restoration strategies based on agroecosystems.INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENT Volume-6, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2016/17, page: 1-22 

  3. Physical and chemical properties of young soils of the Icelandic highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Mankasingh, Utra

    2015-04-01

    Most of the Icelandic soils are of volcanic origin, classified as andisols (carbon content 1-12%), many of which are strongly affected by erosion and so, formation of new soils is of great interest. The effect of land cover type on the weathering patterns and the formation of new soils are of interest. The southern Icelandic highlands are characterised by harsh climate, shallow soils and limited vegetation cover. We hypothesise that in the highland regions of Iceland the progression of land cover from unvegetated to vegetated sites will impact soil development. This study describes the physical and chemical properties of highland soils in Iceland. Soil samples were collected from 12 sites in September 2013, nine sites were fully vegetated and three unvegetated: grassland (G1-G8), with moss, Carex Bigelowii and dwarf shrubs, sandy fluvial wetland (S) and unvegetated gravels (M1-M3). All soils with vegetative cover were characterized by weak or structureless soil ranging in texture from loamy sand to silty clay loam, while at unvegetated sites soil texture was structureless and sandy. On average, the bulk density of soils (range 0.53 - 1.16 g cm-3) were lower at vegetated sites than unvegetated sites. The soil depth is greater in the vegetated sites, indicating greater soil development. The average % carbon (%C), % nitrogen (%N), overall % soil organic matter (%SOM), of vegetated sites were higher than for unvegetated sites, indicating the difference in soil development: vegetated sites (mean), 1.60%C, 0.10%N, 4.9%SOM; unvegetated sites (mean), 0.27%C, 0.02%N, 1.81%SOM. All soils had significant amounts of amorphous clay minerals such as allophone, imogolite, ferrihydrite or aluminium-humus complexes and also high aluminium and iron percentages, and high phosphate retention. All of which are characteristic for andisols. There were strong associations between Fe and Al and the soil C, which are indicative of Al and Fe complexed with humus or allophane and ferrihydrite

  4. Distribution and translocation of selenium from soil to highland barley in the Tibetan Plateau Kashin-Beck disease area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Hairong; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Yonghua; Wei, Binggan; Yu, Jiangping; Feng, Fujian

    2017-02-01

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD), which is still active and severe in the Tibetan Plateau, is considered to be a kind of selenium (Se)-deficient disease. Highland barley as the most popular staple food in the Tibetan Plateau is one of the dominant Se sources for local people. To improve Se levels in crops in the Tibetan Plateau KBD area, the distribution and translocation of Se from soil to highland barley in both non-KBD and KBD endemic areas were investigated. The results showed that Se levels in highland barley were too low to meet the minimum requirements of human for daily intake of Se. The total Se concentrations of highland barley fractions in KBD areas were lower than that in non-KBD areas (grain P = 0.238; straw P = 0.087; root P = 0.008). However, no significant difference was observed in corresponding cultivated soil Se between the two areas (P = 0.993). The calculation of Se transfer factors indicated that the restricting step for Se translocation was from soil to root. Water-soluble, exchangeable and fulvic acid-bound Se fractions in the soil are key species dominating in this transfer process, according to their significant correlations with root Se. Se transfer from soil to root significantly increases as the pH value of soil increases (P = 0.007), and soil organic matter content decreases (P = 0.019). The information obtained may have considerable significance for proposing effective agricultural measures to increase grain Se in KBD endemic areas.

  5. Unthinkable Rebellion and the Praxis of the Possible: Ch'orti' Campesin@ Struggles in Guatemala's Eastern Highlands

    OpenAIRE

    Casolo, Jennifer Jean

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examines the production of rural struggle in Guatemala' indigenous eastern highlands, a place where after decades of silence, 36 years of civil war and two centuries of marginalization, the seemingly unthinkable--organized resistance and alternative proposals--became palpable. In the face of crisis, attempts to turn rural producers, into neoliberal subjects of credit resurrected the historical specter of dispossession and catalyzed an unlikely alliance to oppose unjust agrar...

  6. [Demographic pressure and extension of new cultures: difficult adaptation. The case of the wheat-growing culture of highland Byumba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutaganda, T

    1993-04-01

    Results of a 1990 survey are the basis for a discussion of the spread of wheat cultivation in the Byumba highlands of Rwanda. The highlands are among the most densely populated areas of Rwanda, with an estimated 370 persons per sq km compared to the national average of 272. The region offers ideal temperature and rainfall conditions for wheat cultivation. 76% of the cultivable lands of the region are considered suitable for wheat. Wheat is among crops that Rwanda would like to produce internally in greater quantity to reduce import requirements. Population pressure has led to division of plots, so that at present, 57.3% of households have less than 1 hectare of land. Dispersion of plots has also become a problem. A wide variety of crops in addition to wheat are cultivated in the Byumba highlands. The number of hectares devoted to wheat has increased from 140 in 1983 to 2902 in 1990. The increase is due to the growing number of cultivators growing a small amount of wheat rather than to increased size of production units. 68% of wheat cultivators harvested less than 200 kg in 1990. The subsistence nature of most agriculture in the Byumba highlands has limited the spread of wheat cultivation, as households seek to produce an adequate and varied food supply for their own consumption. The small size of holdings has limited the feasibility of technical advances in wheat cultivation for local growers. Many households devote space to crops such as sweet potatoes that do not produce well at their relatively high altitudes. Encouraging greater cultivation of wheat will require an improved marketing system and a sufficiently high price to allow growers to purchase the foodstuffs they forego planting. Steps should be taken to limit the division of land holdings and to improve cultivation techniques. It will be necessary as well to limit population growth through family planning in order to lessen demographic pressure on the limited cultivable lands.

  7. Impacts of hydrometeorological extremes in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in 1706–1889 as derived from taxation records

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolák, Lukáš; Brázdil, Rudolf; Valášek, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2015), s. 465-488 ISSN 1212-0014 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-19831S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : historical climatology * ice-age * documentary * vulnerability * temperatures * europe * winter * hydrometeorological extremes * taxation records * damage * impacts * Bohemian-Moravian Highlands Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.415, year: 2015

  8. Asymmetries and Approaches to the Education Problems of the Indigenous Youth from the Central Highlands of Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Llanos Erazo, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the changes and transformations that have occurred in the socio-educational practices of indigenous youth from the Central Highlandsof Ecuador.Methodology: this research includes quantitative and qualitative approachesand methods. The qualitative approach predominates because of thecontinuous application of ethnographic approaches, which were followed with104 communities in three provinces of the Central Highlands (Cotopaxi, Tungurahua and Chimborazo). Thematic interview...

  9. The siting and environmental change of a high medieval monastery in central German highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büdel, Christian; Tintrup, Angela; Baumhauer, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The geology of central German highlands is dominated by Triassic sandstones of the Bunter sandstone unit (German: Buntsandstein). These rocks commonly lack of minerals and they are unsuitable for beneficial agriculture. Early settlers in the Spessart highlands in central Germany therefore preferred patches of Pleistocene loess accumulation for the siting of their residences. The occurrence and distribution of this preferred loess-sites at high medieval times is of high interest and still under discussion. The investigated monastery site of Elisabethenzell was founded, developed and abandoned during a short medieval period and in an exposed and delimited area. The investigation of its environmental history and landscape offers insights to the careful decision of the former settlers. Both, historical maps and the data from laser altimetry were assessed in order to compile a comprehensive overview of the monasteries situation. In addition, pedologic, sedimentologic and geomorphologic prospections were conducted and all data was assessed using a geographic information system (GIS). At selected sites ramming core probes, and sections helped to determine specific soil and sediment characteristics. The results show subsoils of mineral-poor sandstones and Pleistocene periglacial layers with a thickness of up to 4-6 meters. The constructional elements of the monastery take advantage of the shape of the Pleistocene landforms, which was observed together with a local melioration of the mostly acidic Cambisols. This is provided by the delimited occurrence of loamy loesses in relictic Luvisols. The meliorated soils coincide with a better availability of water, which is due to the local geomorphology and higher clay contents in underlying Miocene and Pliocene sediments. As a consequence, medieval agriculture and gardening is likely and the landforms reveal preferable areas offering a confined gradation as well as evidence for the prevention of soil erosion. A prospection of soil

  10. Topography and malaria transmission heterogeneity in western Kenya highlands: prospects for focal vector control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndenga Bryson A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent resurgence of malaria in the highlands of Western Kenya has called for a more comprehensive understanding of the previously neglected complex highland vector ecology. Besides other drivers of malaria epidemiology, topography is likely to have a major effect on spatial vector and parasite distribution. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of topography on malaria spatial vector distribution and parasite prevalence. Methodology Indoor resting adult malaria vectors and blood parasites were collected in three villages along a 4 km transect originating from the valley bottom and ending at the hilltop for 13 months. Members of the Anopheles gambiae complex were identified by PCR. Blood parasites were collected from children 6–13 years old and densities categorized by site of home location and age of the children. Results Ninety eight percent (98% of An. gambiae s.s. and (99% Anopheles funestus were collected in houses located at the edge of the valley bottom, whereas 1% of An. gambiae s.s. were collected at mid hill and at the hilltop respectively. No An. funestus were collected at the hilltop. Malaria prevalence was 68% at the valley bottom, 40.2% at mid hill and 26.7% at the hilltop. Children aged six years and living at the edge of the valley bottom had an annual geometric mean number of 66.1 trophozoites for every 200 white blood cells, while those living at mid-hill had a mean of 84.8, and those living at hilltop had 199.5 trophozoites. Conclusion Malaria transmission in this area is mainly confined to the valley bottom. Effective vector control could be targeted at the foci. However, the few vectors observed at mid-hill maintained a relatively high prevalence rate. The higher variability in blood parasite densities and their low correlation with age in children living at the hilltop suggests a lower stability of transmission than at the mid-hill and valley bottom.

  11. Soil organic matter stabilization in grazing highland soils from the Andean Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M. A.; Faz, A.; Zornoza, R.

    2012-04-01

    Grasslands comprise approximately 40% of the earth's land area and play a critical role in the global carbon cycle. Apolobamba is a grazing highland located in the Andean Plateau where sustainable vicuna (Vicugna vicugna) management programme is carried out. Understanding the soil properties and the organic matter dynamics is fundamental to determine the grazing impacts in the carbon reservoirs. However, the labile and recalcitrant fractions of C have not been widely studied under field conditions, especially in high grasslands. The objectives of this survey were to: (i) achieve a soil characterization through general physico-chemical properties and (ii) study soil organic matter stabilization through recalcitrant and labile carbon budgets in Apolobamba. Regarding the lastly vicuna censuses carried out in the studied area, eight representative zones with different vicuna densities were selected and soil samples were collected. Other characteristics were also considered to select the study zones: (1) alpaca densities, (2) vegetation communities (3) plant cover and (4) landscape and geo-morphological description. Recalcitrant and water soluble organic carbon were determined as well as recalcitrant index. General soil characterization showed strongly acid and no saline soils with high cation exchange capacity and sandy-loam and loam textures. Total nitrogen contents indicated no limitation for the native vegetation growth. In general, no relationships were found among general soil properties, vicuna and alpaca densities; however, zones with highest alpaca density could be prone to soil erosion based on the available P distribution and the texture results. Additionally, a negative alpaca grazing influence in the soil organic carbon stocks was observed. On the other hand, high soil recalcitrant carbon contents (3.7 ± 0.3 kg m-2) and recalcitrance index (0.8 ± 0.1) were found. Likewise, labile C exhibited similar values to those obtained from researchers conducted in

  12. Evaluation of two methods of estimating larval habitat productivity in western Kenya highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweka, Eliningaya J; Zhou, Guofa; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Gilbreath, Thomas M; Mosha, Franklin; Munga, Stephen; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2011-06-17

    Malaria vector intervention and control programs require reliable and accurate information about vector abundance and their seasonal distribution. The availability of reliable information on the spatial and temporal productivity of larval vector habitats can improve targeting of larval control interventions and our understanding of local malaria transmission and epidemics. The main objective of this study was to evaluate two methods of estimating larval habitat productivity in the western Kenyan highlands, the aerial sampler and the emergence trap. The study was conducted during the dry and rainy seasons in 2008, 2009 and 2010. Aerial samplers and emergence traps were set up for sixty days in each season in three habitat types: drainage ditches, natural swamps, and abandoned goldmines. Aerial samplers and emergence traps were set up in eleven places in each habitat type. The success of each in estimating habitat productivity was assessed according to method, habitat type, and season. The effect of other factors including algae cover, grass cover, habitat depth and width, and habitat water volume on species productivity was analysed using stepwise logistic regression Habitat productivity estimates obtained by the two sampling methods differed significantly for all species except for An. implexus. For for An. gambiae s.l. and An. funestus, aerial samplers performed better, 21.5 and 14.6 folds, than emergence trap respectively, while the emergence trap was shown to be more efficient for culicine species. Seasonality had a significant influence on the productivity of all species monitored. Dry season was most productive season. Overall, drainage ditches had significantly higher productivity in all seasons compared to other habitat types. Algae cover, debris, chlorophyll-a, and habitat depth and size had significant influence with respect to species. These findings suggest that the aerial sampler is the better of the two methods for estimating the productivity of An

  13. Evaluation of two methods of estimating larval habitat productivity in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munga Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria vector intervention and control programs require reliable and accurate information about vector abundance and their seasonal distribution. The availability of reliable information on the spatial and temporal productivity of larval vector habitats can improve targeting of larval control interventions and our understanding of local malaria transmission and epidemics. The main objective of this study was to evaluate two methods of estimating larval habitat productivity in the western Kenyan highlands, the aerial sampler and the emergence trap. Methods The study was conducted during the dry and rainy seasons in 2008, 2009 and 2010. Aerial samplers and emergence traps were set up for sixty days in each season in three habitat types: drainage ditches, natural swamps, and abandoned goldmines. Aerial samplers and emergence traps were set up in eleven places in each habitat type. The success of each in estimating habitat productivity was assessed according to method, habitat type, and season. The effect of other factors including algae cover, grass cover, habitat depth and width, and habitat water volume on species productivity was analysed using stepwise logistic regression Results Habitat productivity estimates obtained by the two sampling methods differed significantly for all species except for An. implexus. For for An. gambiae s.l. and An. funestus, aerial samplers performed better, 21.5 and 14.6 folds, than emergence trap respectively, while the emergence trap was shown to be more efficient for culicine species. Seasonality had a significant influence on the productivity of all species monitored. Dry season was most productive season. Overall, drainage ditches had significantly higher productivity in all seasons compared to other habitat types. Algae cover, debris, chlorophyll-a, and habitat depth and size had significant influence with respect to species. Conclusion These findings suggest that the aerial sampler is the

  14. Venus' radar-bright highlands: Different signatures and materials on Ovda Regio and on Maxwell Montes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan; Harrington, Elise; Sharpton, Virgil

    2016-12-01

    Venus' highlands appear much brighter than its lowland plains in reflected radar, which has been explained by several conflicting hypotheses. We study this transition at higher spatial and elevation resolution than previously possible by combining Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with Magellan SAR stereo elevations. We confirm that SAR backscatter over Ovda Regio (5°N to 15°S) grades from low to high as elevation increases (2-4.5 km above the datum), and then drops precipitously above ∼4.5 km (T= ∼702 K). This pattern is consistent with presence of a substance that undergoes a phase transition from ferroelectric to normal dielectric at ∼700 K; the mineral chlorapatite is a likely candidate. This pattern is seen across Ovda, on other near-equatorial highlands, and on some shield volcanoes like the Tepev Montes. We also confirm that Maxwell Montes (60-68°N) shows a different pattern; its surface transitions abruptly from low backscatter to high backscatter at ∼4.5 km above the datum, and remains so to nearly its highest elevations (∼10 km). This pattern is consistent with the presence of a semiconductor material either precipitated from the atmosphere (e.g., a frost) or produced by atmosphere-surface interaction. If a ferroelectric substance were in the rock at Maxwell (as at Ovda), it could be invisible beneath the coating of semiconductor material. However, the absence of a semiconductor material on Ovda requires either that [1] the atmosphere compositions at Maxwell and Ovda are substantially different, or [2] that the semiconductor at Maxwell forms by atmosphere-surface reaction (not as an atmospheric precipitate) and that the surface materials at Ovda and Maxwell are substantially different. Obviously, artifacts in both the altimetry and SAR datasets are propagated into this stereo DEM, which therefore must be evaluated for self-consistency and consistency with inferences from the images. All elevations here are referenced to a

  15. Diurnal changes of arterial oxygen saturation and erythropoietin concentration in male and female highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Edgar; Riveros, Alain; Sánchez, Armando; Peñuela, Oscar; Böning, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    In Caucasians and Native Americans living at altitude, hemoglobin mass is increased in spite of erythropoietin concentrations ([Epo]) not markedly differing from sea level values. We hypothesized that a nocturnal decrease of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) causes a temporary rise of [Epo] not detected by morning measurements. SaO2 (continuous, finger oximeter) and [Epo] (ELISA, every 4 h) were determined in young highlanders (altitude 2600 m) during 24 h of usual daily activity. In Series I (six male, nine female students), SaO2 fell during the night with the nadir occurring between 01:00 and 03:00; daily means (range 92.4-95.2%) were higher in females (+1.7%, P < 0.01). [Epo] showed opposite changes with zenith occurring at 04:00 without a sex difference. Mean daily values (22.9 ± 10.7SD U/L) were higher than values obtained at 08:00 (17.2 ± 9.5 U/L, P < 0.05). In Series II (seven females), only SaO2 was measured. During follicular and luteal phases, SaO2 variation was similar to Series I, but the rhythm was disturbed during menstruation. While daily [Epo] variations at sea level are not homogeneous, there is a diurnal variation at altitude following changes in SaO2 Larger hypoventilation-dependent decreases of alveolar PO2 decreases during the night probably cause a stronger reduction of SaO2 in highlanders compared to lowlanders. This variation might be enlarged by a diurnal fluctuation of Hb concentration. In spite of a lower [Hb], the higher SaO2 in women compared to men led to a similar arterial oxygen content, likely explaining the absence of differences in [Epo] between sexes. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. Cycad diversification and tropical biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rull, V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent unexpected discovery that living Cycadales are not Jurassic-Cretaceous (200– 65 Mya relicts, as all their extant genera began to diversify during the Late Miocene (12 Mya, has challenged a classical evolutionary myth. This brief note shows how this finding may also provide new clues on the shaping of the high tropical biodiversity

    El reciente e inesperado descubrimiento de que las Cycadales actuales no son relictos Jurásico-Cretácicos (200-65 Mya, ya que todos sus géneros iniciaron su diversificación durante el Mioceno Tardío (12 Mya, ha puesto en entredicho un mito evolutivo clásico. En esta nota se expone como este hallazgo puede, además, proporcionar nuevas pistas sobre el origen de la elevada biodiversidad tropical.

  17. Description of a new Lithoxus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae from the Guayana Highlands with a discussion of Guiana Shield biogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan K. Lujan

    Full Text Available Lithoxus jantjae, new species, is described from above Tencua Falls in headwaters of the Ventuari River, a white- to clearwater river flowing west from the Maigualida and Parima mountains in the Guayana Highlands of southern Venezuela. Lithoxus jantjae represents a nearly 600 km westward range expansion for a genus historically known only from Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Brazil. Lithoxus jantjae shares with other species of Lithoxus a dorsoventrally depressed body and a large, papilose oral disk with small toothcups and few teeth. It can be distinguished from congeners by a unique combination of characters including 12 branched caudal-fin rays, medial premaxillary tooth cusps enlarged, and a convex posterior margin of the adipose-fin membrane. With the discovery of L. jantjae, Lithoxus becomes the most recent example of a growing list of rheophilic loricariid genera with disjunct distributions on east and west sides of the Guayana Highlands. A biogeographic hypothesis relying on the existence of a proto-Berbice River uniting the southern Guayana Highlands with rivers of the central Guiana Shield is advanced to partially explain the modern distribution of these species.

  18. Impact of glaciers retreat on highland Andean wetlands and communities: lessons from the upper Cachi catchment (Ayacucho, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Oscar; Biévre Bert, De

    2017-04-01

    The vulnerability of water resources under climate change scenarios in Peru is generally regarded to be connected to a diminished availability of water due to retreating glaciers. However, the impact of glacier retreat goes much beyond a decline of glacial water reserves. This article argues that another important impact is the extreme erosion in areas where glaciers have recently melted, as well as the accumulation of erosion material in highland wetlands located downslope. As a direct consequence of these changes highland Andean communities which depend on these ecosystems are affected in socio-economic terms as they find themselves forced to alter ancestral dynamics and traditional practices of land and water use. This quickly leads to a vicious cycle of risks and threats. In such a context a possibility to adapt to glacial retreat should be to protect areas affected by glacial melt in order to enable a rapid development of protective vegetation cover. In the upper catchment of the Cachi River interesting experiences of protection and water harvesting exist that could be extended to other high vulnerability areas for the benefit of highland populations as well as downstream water users, such as the irrigation system of Cachi and the city of Ayacucho.

  19. Variation of the lunar highland surface roughness at baseline 0.15-100 km and the relationship to relative age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Y.; Gwinner, K.; Oberst, J.; Haruyama, J.; Matsunaga, T.; Morota, T.; Noda, H.; Araki, H.; Ohtake, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Gläser, P.; Ishihara, Y.; Honda, C.; Hirata, N.; Demura, H.

    2014-03-01

    We report the surface roughness analysis of the lunar highlands for the baseline range 0.15-100 km. We use the Median Differential Slope αm to investigate the scale dependency of the roughness and derive the global αm distribution from SELENE Laser Altimeter and Terrain Camera data. While αm(l) versus baseline l (km) plots vary among different highland types, all highlands commonly show a peak at 3-30 km. The Pre-Nectarian surface shows a relatively large αm(20-30 km). Our analysis is supported by the simulation of synthetic surface cratering models and crater statistics. In our simulation, a peak of αm(30 km) is successfully reproduced. The actual crater density shows good correlation with an empirical roughness indicator. However, a large part of the Nectarian surface shows a peak at 6-9 km baseline. This peak may be caused by secondary craters and ejecta deposit textures from the Nectarian system basins.

  20. The Challenges of Bottom-up Approach of Natural-Social Integration in China Highland Pasture Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Likun

    2017-04-01

    The pasture land covers two fifth of total Chinese land area, which is mainly distributed in western highland of Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, Tibet, Qinghai, Gansu and Sichuan Provinces. China pasture land is not only in charge of providing food resource to regional people, but also plays important role in highland ecosystem services and biodiversity. Along with global warming and enhanced grazing activity, 90% of China pasture land is facing the threat of land degradation. From middle 1990's, Chinese government has released a series of pasture land conservation policies to prevent further environmental degradation. In the same time, lots of pasture ecosystem and environment change researches are supported by national and regional funding agencies. In this study, by monitoring and investigating this top-down approach of pasture land research and policy making processes, we would like to find out the gaps and problems of current research and policy making on China pasture land conservation, especially focusing on the possibility of establishing the bottom-up approach of natural-social sciences integration to support the pasture land conservation and sustainable pasture land management in highland China.

  1. The distribution and hydrogeological controls of fluoride in the groundwater of central Ethiopian rift and adjacent highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayenew, Tenalem

    2008-05-01

    Occurrence of fluoride (F) in groundwater has drawn worldwide attention, since it has considerable impact on human health. In Ethiopia high concentrations of F in groundwaters used for community water supply have resulted in extensive dental and skeletal fluorosis. As a part of a broader study, the distribution of F in groundwater has been investigated, and compared with bedrock geology and pertinent hydrochemical variables. The result indicates extreme spatial variations. High F concentration is often associated with active and sub-active regional thermal fields and acidic volcanics within high temperature rift floor. Variations in F can also be related to changes in calcium concentration resulting from dissolution of calcium minerals and mixing with waters of different chemical composition originated from variable hydrogeological environment across the rift valley. The concentration of F dramatically declines from the rift towards the highlands with the exception of scattered points associated with thermal springs confined in local volcanic centers. There are also interactions of F-rich alkaline lakes and the surrounding groundwater. Meteoric waters recharging volcanic aquifers become enriched with respect to F along the groundwater flow path from highland recharge areas to rift discharge areas. Locally wells drilled along large rift faults acting as conduits of fresh highland waters show relatively lower F. These areas are likely to be possible sources of better quality waters within the rift. The result of this study has important implications on site selection for water well drilling.

  2. Colonial adventures in tropical agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Buelens, Frans; Frankema, Ewout

    2016-01-01

    How profitable were foreign investments in plantation agriculture in the Netherlands Indies during the late colonial era? We use a new dataset of monthly quoted stock prices and dividends of international companies at the Brussels stock exchange to estimate the returns to investment in tropical agriculture (1919–1938). We adopt the Dimson–March–Staunton method to compute real geometric annual average rates of return and assess our estimates in an international comparative perspective. We find...

  3. Viral exanthems in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli Coelho da Silva; Cestari, Tania; Allen, Samuel H; Ramos e-Silva, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    Viral exanthems are a common problem in tropical regions, particularly affecting children. Most exanthems are transient and harmless, but some are potentially very dangerous. Pregnant women and malnourished or immunocompromised infants carry the greatest risk of adverse outcome. In this article, parvovirus B19; dengue and yellow fever; West Nile, Barmah Forest, Marburg, and Ebola viruses, and human herpesviruses; asymmetric periflexural exanthema of childhood; measles; rubella; enteroviruses; Lassa fever; and South American hemorrhagic fevers will be discussed.

  4. NPP Tropical Forest: Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a lower montane secondary rain forest at Marafunga in the highlands of Papua...

  5. Malaria prevalence pattern observed in the highland fringe of Butajira, Southern Ethiopia: a longitudinal study from parasitological and entomological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Belyhun, Yeshambel; Teklu, Takele; Mengesha, Tesfaye; Petros, Beyene

    2011-06-07

    In Ethiopia, information regarding highland malaria transmission is scarce, and no report has been presented from Butajira highland so far whether the appearance of malaria in the area was due to endemicity or due to highland malaria transmission. Thus this study aimed to determine the presence and magnitude of malaria transmission in Butajira. For parasitological survey, longitudinal study was conducted from October to December 2006. The entomological surveys were done from October to December 2006 and continued from April to May 2007. Both parasitological and entomological surveys were done using standard procedures. The parasitological result in all the survey months (October-December) showed an overall detection rate of 4.4% (48/1082) (CI 95%; 3.2-5.7%) malaria parasite. Among infected individuals, 32 (3.0%) of the infection was due to Plasmodium vivax and the rest 16 (1.5%) were due to Plasmodium falciparum. The highest prevalence 39(3.6%) of the parasite was observed in age groups of above 15 years old. Among the total tested, 25(2.3%) of males and 23(2.1%) of females had malaria infection. Among tested individuals, 38(5.3%) and 10 (2.7%) of infection was occurred in Misrak-Meskan (2100 m a.s.l) and Mirab-Meskan (2280 m a.s.l), respectively which was statistically significant (X2=3.72, P0.05). The entomological survey showed a collection of 602 larvae and 80 adult Anopheles. Anopheles christyi was the dominant species both in the first (45.3%) and in the second (35.4%) surveys; where as, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato comprised 4.7% and 14.6%, in the first and second surveys, respectively. Anopheles gambiae s.l comprises 55% of the adult collection, and both species were collected more from outdoors (57.5%). The number of An. christyi was higher in Mirab-Meskan (58. 3%) than Misrak-Meskan (41.7%) (Prisk of malaria and its control programme in the area must be given adequate attention to minimize potential epidemics. In addition, the current study should be

  6. Reducing future non-point source sediment and phosphorus loading under intensifying agricultural production in the Ethiopian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogus, Mamaru; Schmitter, Petra; Tilahun, Seifu; Steenhuise, Tammo

    2016-04-01

    Intensification of agriculture will bring along non-point source pollution in the Ethiopian highlands resulting in eutrophication of lakes. The first signs of eutrophication have been observed already in Lake Tana. The lake it supports the lives of millions in the surrounding through fishing, tourism, transportation and hydropower.Presently, information on non-point source pollution is lacking in the Ethiopian highlands. There are few studies carried out in the highlands on the extent and the source areas of pollution, and models are not available for predicting sediment and phosphorus loading other than those developed for temperate climates. The objective of this chapter is to review existing non-point source studies, report on our findings of sediment and phosphorus sources that are related the non-point source pollution of Lake Tana and to present a non-point source model for the Ethiopian highland based on the Parameter Efficient Semi-distributed Watershed Hydrology Model (PED-WHM).In our research we have found that the saturation excess runoff from valley bottoms and from degraded lands are prevalent in the Ethiopia highlands. The periodically runoff source areas are also the sources for the non-point source pollution and by concentrating best management practices in these source areas we expect that we can reduce pollution without affecting the profitability of the existing farms. The water balance component of the non-point source model has been performing well in predicting both the discharge and the location of the runoff source areas. Sediment and phosphorus prediction models have been developed and are currently being tested for the 7km2Awramba watershed and the 1350 km2Gumara basin. Initial results indicate that 11.2 ton/ha/year sediment load and an accumulation rate of 17.3 mg/kg/year of dissolved phosphorus from Gumara watershed joining the lake. By developing best management practices at this time before non-point source pollution is rampant and

  7. Nomadic ecology shaped the highland geography of Asia’s Silk Roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frachetti, Michael D.; Smith, C. Evan; Traub, Cynthia M.; Williams, Tim

    2017-03-01

    There are many unanswered questions about the evolution of the ancient ‘Silk Roads’ across Asia. This is especially the case in their mountainous stretches, where harsh terrain is seen as an impediment to travel. Considering the ecology and mobility of inner Asian mountain pastoralists, we use ‘flow accumulation’ modelling to calculate the annual routes of nomadic societies (from 750 m to 4,000 m elevation). Aggregating 500 iterations of the model reveals a high-resolution flow network that simulates how centuries of seasonal nomadic herding could shape discrete routes of connectivity across the mountains of Asia. We then compare the locations of known high-elevation Silk Road sites with the geography of these optimized herding flows, and find a significant correspondence in mountainous regions. Thus, we argue that highland Silk Road networks (from 750 m to 4,000 m) emerged slowly in relation to long-established mobility patterns of nomadic herders in the mountains of inner Asia.

  8. HIGHLAND SPECIES AND TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENT FOR GERMINATION: A CASE FROM TWO ENDEMIC PAPUAN Pittosporum (PITTOSPORACEAE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Satyanti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change, including warming and drying, is currently the biggest challenge for plant regeneration. We conducted two experiments on how temperature affected the germination of Pittosporum pullifolium and P. spicessens, both endemic to Central Papua highlands. P. pullifolium habitat temperature at night could reach 8°C whereas P. spicessens habitat temperature ranged from 19°C early in the morning up to 26°C at midday. The first experiment was to understand the effect of chilling on P. pullifolium germination initiation. Our study showed that P. pullifolium was dependent on cold stratification for its germination. Without cold stratification the germination was absent even though the temperature range of sowing environment is at ca. 13–26°C (Cibodas Botanic Gardens. With a cold stratification at 6–8°C (constant for more than a month, germination of P. pullifolium occurred, with better germination rate under a light. Subsequently we carried out extended cold stratification for a month and interestingly, the germination still occurred but now it is better under dark condition. For P. spicessens, the germination at its habitat temperature range (Wamena and in the warmer environment (Bogor Botanic Gardens, both occurred at more than two weeks after sowing.

  9. The Sustainability of Community-Based Adaptation Projects in the Blue Nile Highlands of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belay Simane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate resilience in subsistence agricultural communities depends strongly on the robustness and effective management of the agricultural natural resource base. For this reason, adaptation planning efforts frequently focus on natural resource conservation as the primary motivation for and primary outcome of adaptation activities. Here, we present an analysis of the sustainability of community based adaptation (CBA activities in 20 community based organizations (CBO that were established in the Blue Nile Highlands of Ethiopia in order to promote resilience to climate change. CBA sustainability was assessed through multi-criteria analysis using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Sustainability was considered for social, institutional, technical, financial, and environmental dimensions, with second-order indicators or factors defined for each dimension. According to this analysis, CBA efforts of two thirds of the COBs studied were found to be unsustainable in all dimensions and CBA efforts of the remaining CBOs were found to be at risk of unsustainability. A number of barriers to CBA sustainability were identified, including inadequacies in community participation, training of local community members, local government commitment, farmer capacity, and bureaucratic efficiency. Participatory evaluation of CBA, however, revealed that many of these barriers can be attributed to the decision to use conservation of natural resources as the primary framework for CBA activities. Based on this evaluation, new efforts have been developed that use markets as the entry and exit points for sustainability activities. Lessons learned in this project are relevant for CBA efforts in other agricultural regions of the developing world.

  10. Livestock Predation by Puma ( Puma concolor) in the Highlands of a Southeastern Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira, Francesca Belem Lopes; Trinca, Cristiano Trapé; Haddad, Claudio Maluf

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated local opinion about reducing livestock losses to puma ( Puma concolor) and the potential for conflict among livestock breeders inside a protected area in the highlands of a southeastern Brazilian Atlantic forest. We also quantified the number and type of livestock losses, and determined if predation by puma was correlated with property profile and landscape characteristics. We conducted semistructured interviews with 42 livestock breeders sampled in 36 rural properties. When asked how to reduce predation, 33 % of livestock breeders refused to answer, 26 % suggested improving livestock husbandry practices, 19 % stated that there was no appropriate action, 17 % favored removing the "problem" individual, and 5 % suggested killing the puma. Opinion on how to solve predation was independent of herd size and history of losses, and was correlated with respondent age class. Older respondents tended to suggest removing or killing pumas. Attitudes toward predation represented high potential for conflict among livestock breeders who demonstrated high discordance among responses. Horses were the most common prey (51 %), followed by cattle (28 %), sheep (17 %), and goats (4 %); totaling 47 animals attacked between 2004 and 2007. Annual predation was approximately 12 ± 5 animals, equivalent to 0.4 % of the total livestock. Property elevation and distance from the urban center were the main predictors of predation probability. This survey used a novel approach that has not been addressed directly in other studies on livestock predation and demonstrated that the high potential for conflict among livestock breeders should be considered before implementing management actions.

  11. The Artisanal Production of Pulque, a Traditional Beverage of the Mexican Highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadez-Blanco, Rogelio; Bravo-Villa, Griselda; Santos-Sánchez, Norma F; Velasco-Almendarez, Sandra I; Montville, Thomas J

    2012-06-01

    Pulque is a traditional fermented alcoholic, acidic, viscous drink of the Mexican central highlands. Its production from the "aguamiel" (sap) of agave plants dates back ~1,500 years and continues to be made by artisanal methods. However, the variability of pulque's quality and its instability hamper its widespread distribution and consumption. Microbiological surveys of pulque from three ranches revealed tremendous variability in the types and quantity of the indigenous microbiota. The population of lactic acid bacteria ranged from 6 × 10(7) to 2 × 10(11) CFU/mL. This variability might be attributed to the conditions on the ranches where the pulque was made. In an attempt to identify these sources of variability, the microbial populations of aguamiel and pulque from a single agave plant were determined. Surprisingly, the population size of the "unfermented" aguamiel and the pulque converged by the end of 3 weeks. The potential use of bacteriocinogenic LAB and known starter cultures to improve pulque properties are discussed.

  12. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haron, S. H., E-mail: ismail@ukm.edu.my; Ismail, B. S., E-mail: sthumaira@yahoo.com [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  13. Multisensor monitoring of deforestation in the Guinea Highlands of West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilruth, Peter T.; Hutchinson, Charles F.

    1990-01-01

    Multiple remote sensing systems were used to assess deforestation in the Guinea Highlands (Fouta Djallon) of West Africa. Sensor systems included: (1) historical (1953) and current (1989) aerial mapping photography; (2) current large-scale, small format (35mm) aerial photography; (3) current aerial video imagery; and (4) historical (1973) and recent (1985) LANDSAT MSS. Photographic and video data were manually interpreted and incorporated in a vector-based geographic information system (GIS). LANDSAT data were digitally classified. General results showed an increase in permanent and shifting agriculture over the past 35 years. This finding is consistent with hypothesized strategies to increase agricultural production through a shortening of the fallow period in areas of shifting cultivation. However, results also show that the total area of both permanent and shifting agriculture had expanded at the expense of natural vegetation and an increase in erosion. Although sequential LANDSAT MSS cannot be used in this region to accurately map land over, the location, direction and magnitude of changes can be detected in relative terms. Historical and current aerial photography can be used to map agricultural land use changes with some accuracy. Video imagery is useful as ancillary data for mapping vegetation. The most prudent approach to mapping deforestation would incorporate a multistage approach based on these sensors.

  14. Changes in farmers' knowledge of maize diversity in highland Guatemala, 1927/37-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Etten Jacob

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small-scale studies on long-term change in agricultural knowledge might uncover insights with broader, regional implications. This article evaluates change in farmer knowledge about crop genetic resources in highland Guatemala between 1927/37 and 2004. It concentrates on maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L. in one Guatemalan township, Jacaltenango, an area with much ecological and maize diversity. It relies on a particular type of baseline information: lists of farmer-defined cultivars drawn up by ethnographers in the first half of the twentieth century. A questionnaire format based on two independent lists of local farmer cultivars dating from 1927 and 1937 was used to assess changes in maize diversity. Comparisons between attributes given to each cultivar in the past and in 2004 were used as a partial test of the stability of cultivar identity. In farmers' perceptions, cultivar loss was low and limited to certain cultivars adapted to the warmer environments. Crop production problems were mentioned as the main motives for change. No evidence for a loss of cultivars due to the political violence of the 1980s was found. In the lower areas many newly introduced cultivars were found, which reportedly provide solutions for the production problems the older cultivars have. The article contrasts these findings with those of an earlier study which suggested much cultivar loss due to political violence, and draws conclusions about the methodological implications.

  15. Crop and non-crop productivity in a traditional maize agroecosystem of the highland of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background In Mexico, the traditional maize cultivation system has resisted intensification attempts for many decades in some areas, even in some well-connected regions of the temperate highlands. We suggest that this is due to economics. Methods The total useful biomass of several fields in Nanacamilpa, Tlaxcala, are evaluated for productivity and costs. Results Maize grain production is low (1.5 t ha-1) and does not cover costs. However, maize stover demands a relatively high price. If it included, a profit is possible (about 110 US $ ha-1). We show that non-crop production (weeds for food and forage) potentially has a higher value than the crop. It is only partially used, as there are constraints on animal husbandry, but it diversifies production and plays a role as a back-up system in case of crop failure. Conclusion The diversified system described is economically rational under current conditions and labor costs. It is also stable, low-input and ecologically benign, and should be recognized as an important example of integrated agriculture, though some improvements could be investigated. PMID:19943939

  16. Field Plot Techniques for Black Sigatoka Evaluation in East African Highland Bananas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro, JU.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Number of plants per experimental unit and number of replications for the efficient and precise assessment of black sigatoka leaf spot disease caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis in East African Highland bananas were determined. Two representative cultivars were used. Host response to black sigatoka infection was measured by recording the youngest leaf with necrotic spots. The number of plants per experimental unit was determined, using the methods of maximum curvature and comparison of variances, while the number of replications was estimated by Hatheway's method. The optimum experimental plot size was 3 plants (18 m2 for the beer banana cultivar 'Igitsiri', and 30 plants (180 m2 for the cooking banana cultivar 'Igisahira Gisanzwe', using the comparison of variances method. However, the optimum plot size was 15 plants (90 m2 for both cultivars using the method of maximum curvature. The latter statistical method was preferred because of the low precision of the estimates in the former method. Unreplicated trials with plots of 15 plants could be adequate to assess black sigatoka response in East African bananas if uniform disease pressure exists.

  17. Crop and non-crop productivity in a traditional maize agroecosystem of the highland of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Amaro, Rosa M; Martínez-Bernal, Angélica; Basurto-Peña, Francisco; Vibrans, Heike

    2009-11-27

    In Mexico, the traditional maize cultivation system has resisted intensification attempts for many decades in some areas, even in some well-connected regions of the temperate highlands. We suggest that this is due to economics. The total useful biomass of several fields in Nanacamilpa, Tlaxcala, are evaluated for productivity and costs. Maize grain production is low (1.5 t ha(-1)) and does not cover costs. However, maize stover demands a relatively high price. If it included, a profit is possible (about 110 US $ ha(-1)). We show that non-crop production (weeds for food and forage) potentially has a higher value than the crop. It is only partially used, as there are constraints on animal husbandry, but it diversifies production and plays a role as a back-up system in case of crop failure. The diversified system described is economically rational under current conditions and labor costs. It is also stable, low-input and ecologically benign, and should be recognized as an important example of integrated agriculture, though some improvements could be investigated.

  18. Bee pollen as non-wood forest product in the eastern Andean highlands of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín José Chamorro García

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Andean forests of the Eastern Andean high-lands of Colombia have a high conservation priority given the vulnerable condition of species such as Quercus humboldtii (Fagaceae that inhabit these ecosystems. Beekeeping is regarded as an alternative activity that could play a role in the conservation of Andean forests, but little is known about how the floras of these ecosystems contribute to honey and bee pollen production. We analyzed the contribution of Andean forests to bee pollen production, given the productive potential and commercial importance of this product. Pollen analyses were performed on 25 samples from apiaries near Andean forests located in the states of Cundinamarca, Boyacá and Santander. We found that Q. humboldtii is an important source of pollen with high potential for monofloral bee pollen production. In addition, bees collect pollen from other Andean forests species such as Weinmannia tomentosa, Viburnum spp. and Morella spp. Utilization of bee pollen could lead to incentives to carry out forest conservation practices through beekeeping management.

  19. Isolation of Mycobacterium species from raw milk of pastoral cattle of the Southern Highlands of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazwala, R R; Daborn, C J; Kusiluka, L J; Jiwa, S F; Sharp, J M; Kambarage, D M

    1998-08-01

    A study to determine the secretion of Mycobacterium spp. in milk from indigenous cattle was carried out in pastoral cattle reared in the Southern Highlands to Tanzania. The study was aimed at elucidating the dangers associated with milk-borne zoonoses in a society where milk is normally consumed raw. Out of 805 milk samples, 31 (3.9%) were positive for mycobacteria. There was a preponderance of atypical mycobacteria (87%) whereas only two isolates (6.5%) were confirmed as M. bovis. Atypical mycobacteria included: M. terrae (n = 7), M. fortuitum (n = 2), M. flavescens (n = 13), M. gordonae (n = 1) and M. smegmatis (n = 4). Although the number of M. bovis positive samples was low, the habit of pooling milk may still pose great public health dangers to milk consumers in this part of the world. Moreover, isolation of atypical mycobacteria should also be considered to be a danger to human health in countries such as Tanzania, where the number of people with lowered immunity due to HIV infection is on the increase.

  20. Assessment of Satellite Surface Radiation Products in Highland Regions with Tibet Instrumental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Koike, Toshio; Stackhouse, Paul; Mikovitz, Colleen

    2006-01-01

    This study presents results of comparisons between instrumental radiation data in the elevated Tibetan Plateau and two global satellite products: the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment - Surface Radiation Budget (GEWEX-SRB) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project - Flux Data (ISCCP-FD). In general, shortwave radiation (SW) is estimated better by ISCCP-FD while longwave radiation (LW) is estimated better by GEWEX-SRB, but all the radiation components in both products are under-estimated. Severe and systematic errors were found in monthly-mean SRB SW (on plateau-average, -48 W/sq m for downward SW and -18 W/sq m for upward SW) and FD LW (on plateau-average, -37 W/sq m for downward LW and -62 W/sq m for upward LW) for radiation. Errors in monthly-mean diurnal variations are even larger than the monthly mean errors. Though the LW errors can be reduced about 10 W/sq m after a correction for altitude difference between the site and SRB and FD grids, these errors are still higher than that for other regions. The large errors in SRB SW was mainly due to a processing mistake for elevation effect, but the errors in SRB LW was mainly due to significant errors in input data. We suggest reprocessing satellite surface radiation budget data, at least for highland areas like Tibet.

  1. Natural flow regimes of the Ozark-Ouachita Interior Highlands region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, D. R.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Longing, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    Natural flow regimes represent the hydrologic conditions to which native aquatic organisms are best adapted. We completed a regional river classification and quantitative descriptions of each natural flow regime for the Ozark–Ouachita Interior Highlands region of Arkansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. On the basis of daily flow records from 64 reference streams, seven natural flow regimes were identified with mixture model cluster analysis: Groundwater Stable, Groundwater, Groundwater Flashy, Perennial Runoff, Runoff Flashy, Intermittent Runoff and Intermittent Flashy. Sets of flow metrics were selected that best quantified nine ecologically important components of these natural flow regimes. An uncertainty analysis was performed to avoid selecting metrics strongly affected by measurement uncertainty that can result from short periods of record. Measurement uncertainties (bias, precision and accuracy) were assessed for 170 commonly used flow metrics. The ranges of variability expected for select flow metrics under natural conditions were quantified for each flow regime to provide a reference for future assessments of hydrologic alteration. A random forest model was used to predict the natural flow regimes of all stream segments in the study area based on climate and catchment characteristics, and a map was produced. The geographic distribution of flow regimes suggested distinct ecohydrological regions that may be useful for conservation planning. This project provides a hydrologic foundation for future examination of flow–ecology relationships in the region. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Parasitic infections among Orang Asli (aborigine) in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, S Lokman; Gan, C C; Malkit, K; Azian, My Noor; Chong, C K; Shaari, N; Zainuddin, W; Chin, C N; Sara, Y; Lye, M S

    2007-05-01

    In April 2004, an outbreak of acute diarrheal illness occurred among the Orang Asli (aborigine) in the Cameron Highlands, Pahang State, Peninsular Malaysia, where rotavirus was later implicated as the cause. In the course of the epidemic investigation, stool samples were collected and examined for infectious agents including parasites. Soil transmitted helminthes (STH), namely Ascaris lumbricoides (25.7%), Trichuris trichiura (31.1%) and hookworm (8.1%), and intestinal protozoa, which included Giardia lamblia (17.6%), Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (9.4%), Blastocystis hominis (8.1%) and Cryptosporidium parvum (2.7%), were detected. Forty-four (59.5%) were infected with at least one parasite, 24 (32.4%), 12 (16.2%) and 8 (10.8%) had single, double and triple parasitic infections, respectively. STH were prevalent with infections occurring as early as in infancy. Giardia lamblia, though the most commonly found parasite in samples from symptomatic subjects, was within the normally reported rate of giardiasis among the various communities in Malaysia, and was an unlikely cause of the outbreak. However, heavy pre-existing parasitic infections could have contributed to the severity of the rotavirus diarrheal outbreak.

  3. [Tropical pyomyositis. A report of 188 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Flores, Jesús Daniel; Hernández-Jácome, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    Tropical pyomyositis, a bacterial muscular infection, has been reported frequently from tropical and subtropical zones. However, there are only a few reports from Mexico. We present a prospective study of tropical pyomyositis cases in three secondary- and tertiary-care hospitals in Veracruz, Mexico between August 1985 and December 2000. Tropical pyomyositis was more common in young adults, male-to-female ratio being 2.2:1. Principal features were muscle pains, fluctuanct muscular mass, and fever. Tropical pyomyositis was associated with recent muscular trauma and/or pyodermitis in 67% of cases. 60% of admissions presented invasive clinical stage of the disease, and fewer of 20% of cases presented multiple muscular involvement. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common etiologic agent. Most frequent complications were pleuropulmonaries. Only one patient, who had septicemia and multiple organ failure, died. Tropical pyomyositis is rare in healthy individuals and requires high clinical suspicion. Prognosis is generally favorable after surgical drainage and adequate antimicrobial therapy.

  4. Holocene environmental changes in the highlands of the southern Peruvian Andes (14° S) and their impact on pre-Columbian cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittek, K.; Forbriger, M.; Mächtle, B.; Schäbitz, F.; Wennrich, V.; Reindel, M.; Eitel, B.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude peatlands of the Andes still remain relatively unexploited although they offer an excellent opportunity for well-dated palaeoenvironmental records. To improve knowledge about climatic and environmental changes in the western Andes of southern Peru, we present a high-resolution record of the Cerro Llamoca peatland for the last 8600 years. The 10.5 m long core consists of peat and intercalated sediment layers and was examined for all kinds of microfossils. We chose homogeneous peat sections for pollen analysis at decadal to centennial resolution. The inorganic geochemistry was analysed in 2 mm resolution (corresponding >2 years) using an ITRAX X-ray fluorescence core scanner. We interpret phases of relatively high abundances of Poaceae pollen in our record as an expansion of Andean grasslands during humid phases. Drier conditions are indicated by a significant decrease of Poaceae pollen and higher abundances of Asteraceae pollen. The results are substantiated by changes in arsenic contents and manganese/iron ratios, which turned out to be applicable proxies for in situ palaeoredox conditions. The mid-Holocene period of 8.6-5.6 ka is characterised by a series of episodic dry spells alternating with spells that are more humid. After a pronounced dry period at 4.6-4.2 ka, conditions generally shifted towards a more humid climate. We stress a humid/relatively stable interval between 1.8 and 1.2 ka, which coincides with the florescence of the Nasca culture in the Andean foothills. An abrupt turn to a sustained dry period occurs at 1.2 ka, which is contemporaneous with the demise of the Nasca/Wari society in the Palpa lowlands. Markedly drier conditions prevail until 0.75 ka, providing evidence of the presence of a Medieval Climate Anomaly. Moister but hydrologically highly variable conditions prevailed again after 0.75 ka, which allowed re-expansion of tussock grasses in the highlands, increased discharge into the Andean foreland and resettling of the

  5. Abiotic factors influencing tropical dry forests regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccon Eliane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical dry forests represent nearly half the tropical forests in the world and are the ecosystems registering the greatest deterioration from the anthropogenic exploitation of the land. This paper presents a review on the dynamics of tropical dry forests regeneration and the main abiotic factors influencing this regeneration, such as seasonal nature, soil fertility and humidity, and natural and anthropic disturbances. The main purpose is to clearly understand an important part of TDF succession dynamics.

  6. Global Hydroclimatological Teleconnections Resulting from Tropical Deforestation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roni Avissar; David Werth

    2005-01-01

    ... temperature or precipitation and had only local implications. Here it is shown that deforestation of tropical regions significantly affects precipitation at mid- and high latitudes through hydrometeorological teleconnections...

  7. Disaggregating tropical disease prevalence by climatic and vegetative zones within tropical west Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl S. Beckley; Salisu Shaban; Guy H. Palmer; Andrew T. Hudak; Susan M. Noh; James E. Futse

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly...

  8. Nuclear medicine in tropical diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Francisco Jose Hossri Nogueira [Centro Oncologico da Regiao de Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear]. E-mail: fjbraga@dfm.ffclrp.usp.br

    2002-09-01

    Tropical diseases affect more people in the world than any other kind of disease, but scintigraphic data on that matter are not so frequent in the literature. Since the geographic regions where such diseases occur are normally very poor, scintillation cameras may not be available. We present a resumed summary of part of what has been done on this subject to-date. Leprosy affects circa 12 million people worldwide and has already been studied by means of the following scintigraphic exams: gallium-67, 99mTc-MDP or HMDP, 99mTc-colloid or Dextran, 99mTc-DTPA and 99mTc-WBC. Paracoccidioidomycosis is a deep mycosis and such cases may be evaluated by means of gallium-67, bone scintigraphy, lymphoscintigraphy, hepato-biliary, bone marrow and liver/spleen scintigraphies. Mycetoma is bone and soft tissue mycosis and gallium-67 and bone studies are very useful in the evaluation of such cases. Tuberculosis is the most well studied tropical disease and dozens of radiopharmaceuticals and techniques were described to evaluate such patients. Jorge Lobo disease is a rare mycosis that affects mainly indians from the Amazon region and gallium-67 was shown to accumulate in active disease. Neurocysticercosis is spread worldwide and brain SPECT (99mTc-ECD or 99mTc-HMPAO) is a very good tool for the functional evaluation of the disease. Patients suffering from cutaneous and mucous leishmaniasis may benefit from gallium-67 scintigraphy. Chagas disease may affect the heart and or the digestive tract and several scintigraphic exams may be helpful in the evaluation of such cases (gated blood pool, heart perfusions tests, pharyngeal transit tests, gastric emptying tests, intestinal transit tests, hepato-biliary scintigraphy, among others). Scintigraphy should be more largely used in the functional evaluation of organs and systems of patients affected y tropical diseases. It is a powerful tool to evaluate both the extent of disease and the efficacy of therapy. (author)

  9. Huracanes y biodiversidad costera tropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio I Salazar-Vallejo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available La biodiversidad costera tropical ha sido modulada por las tormentas y huracanes durante mucho tiempo y en nuestros días también está sujeta a severas presiones por actividades antropogénicas. El objetivo de esta revisión fue el compilar la información disponible para mejorar nuestra comprensión sobre el impacto de los huracanes y tratar de incentivar el establecimiento de monitoreos de los cambios del paisaje costero, ya que es la mejor forma de evaluar los impactos de estas tormentas. Aunque el impacto de los ciclones resiste generalizaciones amplias, se incluyen aspectos sobre dinámica histórica y asociación con eventos temporales y se detallan los efectos por resuspensión y traslado de sedimentos, impacto del oleaje y fragmentación de organismos del arrecife coralino. También se presentan brevemente algunos efectos sobre tortugas marinas y bosques costerosTropical coastal biodiversity has been modulated by tropical storms during a long time and it is currently facing a heavy human impact. The purpose of this review is to compile the available information to improve our understanding of hurricane impacts and to promote the establishment of coastal landscape monitoring, because that is the best way to assess these impacts. Although generalizations on hurricane effects are elusive, some historical dynamics and temporal relationships are included and some details are presented on the impacts by resuspension and movement of sediments, storm waves, and breaking off of coral reef organisms. Some effects on marine turtles and coastal forests are also briefly pointed out

  10. Marine resources in the tropics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Qasim, S.Z.; Wafar, M.V.M.

    in the grazing pres sure of anchoveta led to an increase in plankton biomass. a much greater detrital carbon production and the transfer of organic carbon to the sediments. leading to increased meio- and microbenthic production (Table II). Abundance of phyto...- and zooplankton after the decline of the anchovy stocks resulted in an increase in sardine stocks, and the increased carbon flux to the benthos caused an increase in the demersal hake stock (Table II). 3.4 Other TropicalCo~stalWaters Marten and Poiovina (1982...

  11. Tropical cyclone boundary layer shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Slocum, Christopher J.; Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; Wayne H. Schubert

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents numerical solutions and idealized analytical solutions of axisymmetric, $f$-plane models of the tropical cyclone boundary layer. In the numerical model, the boundary layer radial and tangential flow is forced by a specified pressure field, which can also be interpreted as a specified gradient balanced tangential wind field $v_{\\rm gr}(r)$ or vorticity field $\\zeta_{\\rm gr}(r)$. When the specified $\\zeta_{\\rm gr}(r)$ field is changed from one that is radially concentrated i...

  12. Annual Tropical Cyclone Report 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    m - mm - 330 t00 12 00 00 00 ~ 0 21 22 23 24 JULY FIGURE 3-11-1. Time o.ws-seci o, KiOY’a mirimrn aca-tevet c- esate va~sus 700 =b equiivetetA pcten...ca Yj org~ujima W sation. 479121 ;:; 95 . 4 ~~The numerical forecast series during this (176 kn cthat o4 Taipei real . peak irter-sity oi (2period...phenomenon that is not evident to the fore- caster in real -time but which explains the motion or character of a tropical cyclone. In- culation pattern

  13. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  14. Soil organic matter dynamics at the paramo and puna highlands in the Andean mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles Muñoz, M.; Faz, Ángel; Mermut, Ahmet R.; Zornoza, Raúl

    2014-05-01

    Mountains and uplands represent the most diverse and fragile ecosystems in the world, cover about 20% of the terrestrial surface and are distributed across all continents and major ecoregions. The Andean Plateau is the main mountain range of the American continent and one of the largest in the world with more than 7,500 km. The soil organic matter is a corner stone in the fertility management of the Andean agriculture as well as in the erosion control. However, its role is still much unknown in these ecosystems. Moreover, the influence of current global climatic change on soil organic C reservoirs and dynamics is still not clearly understood. The aim of this work was to review the soil C dynamics and the implication of the soil organic matter in the fertility management, erosion control, conservation of biodiversity and global climate change to improve the knowledge on the mountain Andean highlands. Climate, landscape, soil C pools, biomass and management were studied. In general, the Andean climate is affected by three main factors: ocean currents, winds and orography characterized by an abrupt topography. The entire Andean belt is segmented into the Northern, Central and Southern Andes. Northern Andes are called paramo and are characterized by humid climate while Central and Southern Andes dryer zones are called puna. Most of the region is tectonically and volcanically active. Sedimentary rocks predominated in the paramo while sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic ones prevailed in the puna. The most common soils were Andosols, Regosols, Umbrisols and Histosols. The cold and wet climate and the low atmospheric pressure favored organic matter accumulation in the soil. The accumulation of organic matter is further enhanced by the formation of organomineral complexes strongly resistant to the microbial breakdown mainly in the paramo. High organic C contents were observed in the paramo (10%) oppositely to the low contents found in the dryer puna (1%). The C/N ratio

  15. Nitrous oxide emission from highland winter wheat field after long-term fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X. R.; Hao, M. D.; Xue, X. H.; Shi, P.; Horton, R.; Wang, A.; Zang, Y. F.

    2010-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas. N2O emissions from soils vary with fertilization and cropping practices. The response of N2O emission to fertilization of agricultural soils plays an important role in global N2O emission. The objective of this study was to assess the seasonal pattern of N2O fluxes and the annual N2O emissions from a rain-fed winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) field in the Loess Plateau of China. A static flux chamber method was used to measure soil N2O fluxes from 2006 to 2008. The study included 5 treatments with 3 replications in a randomized complete block design. Prior to initiating N2O measurements the treatments had received the same fertilization for 22 years. The fertilizer treatments were unfertilized control (CK), manure (M), nitrogen (N), nitrogen + phosphorus (NP), and nitrogen + phosphorus + manure (NPM). Soil N2O fluxes in the highland winter wheat field were highly variable temporally and thus were fertilization dependent. The highest fluxes occurred in the warmer and wetter seasons. Relative to CK, m slightly increased N2O flux while N, NP and NPM treatments significantly increased N2O fluxes. The fertilizer induced increase in N2O flux occurred mainly in the first 30 days after fertilization. The increases were smaller in the relatively warm and dry year than in the cold and wet year. Combining phosphorous and/or manure with mineral N fertilizer partly offset the nitrogen fertilizer induced increase in N2O flux. N2O fluxes at the seedling stage were mainly controlled by nitrogen fertilization, while fluxes at other plant growth stages were influenced by plant and environmental conditions. The cumulative N2O emissions were always higher in the fertilized treatments than in the non-fertilized treatment (CK). Mineral and manure nitrogen fertilizer enhanced N2O emissions in wetter years compared to dryer years. Phosphorous fertilizer offset 0.50 and 1.26 kg N2O-N ha-1 increases, while manure + phosphorous offset 0

  16. Leaching potential of phosphorus from cattle excreta patches in the central highlands of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kenneth R; Liu, Kesi; White-Leech, U Renee; Sollenberger, Lynn E

    2013-01-01

    Research is limited for cow-calf operations as a potential nonpoint source of P within Florida's central highlands region (CHR). The study was conducted in a bahiagrass ( Flügge) pasture. The soil is an excessively drained 'Candler' sand. In dung-designated plots, 2 kg of fresh cattle dung was deposited across the surface of a 15-cm-radius circular zone (Zone 1 [Z1]) centered within 3 × 3 m plots. In urine plots, 1 L of urine was deposited on Z1 and 1 L on Zone 2 (Z2), an area extending outward from Z1 to 30 cm from plot center. In dung and urine plots, Zone 3 (Z3) extended from Z2 to 45 cm from plot center and Zone 4 (Z4) from Z3 to 60 cm. Excreta deposition frequencies (DFs) were 0, 1, 2, and 3 times per year during 2006 and 2007. Total apparent remaining P (ARP = [fertilizer P + excreta P] - forage P removal) for Z1 of dung plots was 21, 447, 905, and 1249 kg ha for DF0, DF1, DF2, and DF3, respectively. In 2008, soil was incrementally sampled to a depth of 120 cm in all zones. Urine deposition did not increase soil P. Soil P levels and the degree of P saturation percentages increased with DF but only in the upper 10 cm of topsoil beneath Z1 of dung plots. Our results suggest that the risk of dung P reaching groundwater is low due to a considerable P retention capacity within the rooting zone of the Candler soil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Hospital admission following induced abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea--a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallely, Lisa M; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D L; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion.

  18. Hospital Admission following Induced Abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea – A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallely, Lisa M.; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D. L.; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Methods Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Findings Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. Conclusion In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion. PMID:25329982

  19. Heavy rainfall intensity triggering the landslide at Sungai Ruil Cameron Highland Malaysia - A Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, K. B.

    2012-04-01

    Landslide in the village of Sungai Ruil, Brinchang, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia occurred on August 7, 2011 at 5:50 pm. This incident has caused six houses buried by debris or mud which engaged seven fatalities and two injuries This landslide has been classified as landslide debris flow. Total area of the village involved is around 40 hectares whilst the catchment area of the village is around 80 hectares. The landslide forensic investigation was carried out to identify the caused of the failure. There are three methods in conducting the study that involved geological mapping and interpretation for assessment of geological hazards. The second method is the debris flow hazard assessment in all the drainage including rainfall analysis. The rainfall analysis was carried out to produce the snake line and critical line. The third method is an analysis of slope stability in locations with high potential of slope failure in the area. There are three factors identified that resulted from this incident. The first factor is the presence of geological factors weakness (covered by colluviums), weathered material, orientation and location of adversely discontinuities and relict slope failure. While the second factor is the appearance of the morphology of hilly terrain, presence of channel order 0 or 'ephemeral drainage' and river bed gradient more than 35 degrees. The third factor is human activity that build water barrier. While the high intensity of rainfall in a short period of time is believed to be a triggering factor. This paper will discuss in detail on how intensity and duration of rainfall induce the landslide and predict the threshold value at the area.

  20. Land Cover Classification in Complex and Fragmented Agricultural Landscapes of the Ethiopian Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eggen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethiopia is a largely agrarian country with nearly 85% of its employment coming from agriculture. Nevertheless, it is not known how much land is under cultivation. Mapping land cover at finer resolution and global scales has been particularly difficult in Ethiopia. The study area falls in a region of high mapping complexity with environmental challenges which require higher quality maps. Here, remote sensing is used to classify a large area of the central and northwestern highlands into eight broad land cover classes that comprise agriculture, grassland, woodland/shrub, forest, bare ground, urban/impervious surfaces, water, and seasonal water/marsh areas. We use data from Landsat spectral bands from 2000 to 2011, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and its temporal mean and variance, together with a digital elevation model, all at 30-m spatial resolution, as inputs to a supervised classifier. A Support Vector Machines algorithm (SVM was chosen to deal with the size, variability and non-parametric nature of these data stacks. In post-processing, an image segmentation algorithm with a minimum mapping unit of about 0.5 hectares was used to convert per pixel classification results into an object based final map. Although the reliability of the map is modest, its overall accuracy is 55%—encouraging results for the accuracy of agricultural uses at 85% suggest that these methods do offer great utility. Confusion among grassland, woodland and barren categories reflects the difficulty of classifying savannah landscapes, especially in east central Africa with monsoonal-driven rainfall patterns where the ground is obstructed by clouds for significant periods of time. Our analysis also points out the need for high quality reference data. Further, topographic analysis of the agriculture class suggests there is a significant amount of sloping land under cultivation. These results are important for future research and environmental monitoring in

  1. Total polyphenols contents in different grapevine varieties in highlands of southern brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brighenti Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are one of the main parameters of wine quality and contribute to the organoleptic characteristics, particularly color, astringency and body. In the highlands of southern Brazil, low temperatures and high accumulation of global solar radiation favor the synthesis of total polyphenols in grapes. The objective of this work was to evaluate the concentration of total polyphenols of 10 white varieties and 13 red varieties produced in high altitude regions of southern Brazil. The vineyard is located in the Experimental Station of Santa Catarina State Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Agency (EPAGRI, in the city of São Joaquim (28° 16′30″S, 49° 56′09″W, Altitude 1,400 m, the evaluations occurred in 2015/2016 growing season. The content of total polyphenols was determined as proposed by Singleton & Rossi (1965, using the Folin-Ciocalteu method, with spectrophotometer readings. Polyphenol content ranged from 283.56 to 1,387.31 mg/L for white varieties, the varieties with the highest concentrations were Greco di Tufo (1,378.31 mg/L, Trebbiano Toscano (995.59 mg/L and Ribola Gialla (737.48 mg/L. For the red varieties, the total polyphenol content ranged from 523.87 to 4,929.57 mg/L, Ancellotta (4,929.57 mg/L, Uva di Troia (2,722.27 mg/L and Croatina (2,410 mg/L stood out for presenting the highest levels.

  2. Predation efficiency of Anopheles gambiae larvae by aquatic predators in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyindo Mramba

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current status of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and the effects of insecticides on non-target insect species have raised the need for alternative control methods for malaria vectors. Predation has been suggested as one of the important regulation mechanisms for malaria vectors in long-lasting aquatic habitats, but the predation efficiency of the potential predators is largely unknown in the highlands of western Kenya. In the current study, we examined the predation efficiency of five predators on Anopheles gambiae s.s larvae in 24 hour and semi- field evaluations. Methods Predators were collected from natural habitats and starved for 12 hours prior to starting experiments. Preliminary experiments were conducted to ascertain the larval stage most predated by each predator species. When each larval instar was subjected to predation, third instar larvae were predated at the highest rate. Third instar larvae of An. gambiae were introduced into artificial habitats with and without refugia at various larval densities. The numbers of surviving larvae were counted after 24 hours in 24. In semi-field experiments, the larvae were counted daily until they were all either consumed or had developed to the pupal stage. Polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the presence of An. gambiae DNA in predator guts. Results Experiments found that habitat type (P P P P An. gambiae DNA was found in at least three out of ten midguts for all predator species. Gambusia affins was the most efficient, being three times more efficient than tadpoles. Conclusion These experiments provide insight into the efficiency of specific natural predators against mosquito larvae. These naturally occurring predators may be useful in biocontrol strategies for aquatic stage An. gambiae mosquitoes. Further investigations should be done in complex natural habitats for these predators.

  3. Farmers' Assessment of the Social and Ecological Values of Land Uses in Central Highland Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguma, Lalisa Alemayehu; Hager, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    Often in land use evaluations, especially those in developing countries, only the financial aspect receives serious attention, while the social and ecological values are overlooked. This study compared the social and ecological values of four land use types (small-scale woodlot [SSW], boundary tree and shrub planting [BTP], homestead tree and shrub growing [HTG] and cereal farming [CF]) by a criteria-based scoring approach using a bao game. The impacts of local wealth status and proximity to a forest on the value the community renders to the land use types were also assessed. The value comparison, assessed by relative scoring, was accompanied by farmer's explanations to reveal the existing local knowledge about land use values. It was found that HTG ≥ SSW > BTP > CF for both social and ecological values. Though this trend applies for the medium and rich households, the poor ones chose SSW as the most valuable. With increasing distance from a forest, the social and ecological values of land uses increased. The accompanying scoring justifications indicated the existence of in-depth ecological knowledge, which conform to contemporary scientific reports. Generally, this study showed that social and ecological values, besides financial values, strongly influence farmer's decision in implementing various practices related to the land use types. Thus, such values are worth considering for a holistic understanding of the diverse benefits of land uses. Finally, the strong preference for tree and shrub-based land use types is a good opportunity for enhancing tree and shrub growing to minimize the major environmental problems (e.g., soil degradation, wood shortage and deforestation) in the central highlands of Ethiopia.

  4. Hospital admission following induced abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea--a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Vallely

    Full Text Available In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion.Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information.Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119 of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119 of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported.In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion.

  5. Sandstone geomorphology of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, South Africa, in a global context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Grab

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Golden Gate Highlands National Park (GGHNP is well known for its impressive sandstone formations. While previous geoscience research in the park has focused on geology, palaeontology, slope forms and the prominent lichen weathering, remarkably little has been written on the diversity and possible origins of sandstone phenomena in the region. The objectives of this study were (1 to present a geomorphological map of prominent and interesting landforms for particular portions of the park and (2 to document the variety of macro- and microscale sandstone formations observed. During field work, we undertook global positioning system measurements to map landforms and, in addition, measured the dimensions of several landform types. A Schmidt hammer was used to conduct rock hardness tests at a variety of localities and lithologies for comparative purposes. We indentified and mapped 27 macro- and microscale sandstone landforms, of which 17 are described in detail. It is demonstrated that for the most part, the landforms are a likely product of surface lithological reactions to a regional climate characterised by pronounced multitemporal temperature and moisture shifts, recently and in the past. However, many of the geomorphological processes producing landforms are controlled by microclimates set up by factors such as macro- and microtopography. Conservation implications: The GGHNP is best known for its geological, geomorphological and palaeontological heritage. This paper highlights the diversity of sandstone geomorphological phenomena, many of them rare and ‘unique’ to the region. Not only are these landforms of aesthetic interest to tourists, but they also provide microhabitats for biota. Thus, conservation of biota requires associated conservation of geo-environments where they are established.

  6. Physiography and tectonic setting of the subglacial lake district between Vostok and Belgica subglacial highlands (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, I. E.; Cianfarra, P.; Forieri, A.; Salvini, F.; Zirizotti, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the interpretation of 11 radio echo-sounding (RES) missions carried out over the Vostok-Dome Concordia region during the Italian Antarctic expeditions in the period 1995-2001. The extension and the density of the radar data in the surveyed area allowed to reconstruct a reliable subglacial morphology and to identify four relevant morphological structures namely: the Aurora trench, the Concordia trench, the Concordia ridge and the South Hills. These structures show evidence compatible with the presence of tectonic features. Morphological considerations indicate their development in Cenozoic time. Hybrid cellular automata (HCA)-based numerical modelling allowed to justify a possible role played by the tectonics of the Aurora and Concordia trench evolution. This was accomplished by matching the bed profiles along opportunely projected sections with the modelled surfaces as derived by the activity of normal faults with variable surfaces within the continental crust. The Vostok-Dome C region is characterized by a large number of subglacial lakes. From the analysis of basal reflected power echo, we identified 14 new lakes and obtained information about their physiography as well as their possible relations with tectonics. We propose a grouping of subglacial lakes on the base of their physiography and geological setting, namely relief lakes, basin lakes and trench lakes. Relief lakes located in the Belgica subglacial highlands and are characterized by sharp and steep symmetric edges, suggesting a maximum water depth of the order of 100 m. Their origin may well relate to localized, positive geothermal flux anomalies. Basin lakes located in the Vincennes subglacial basin and are characterized by wider dimension that allow the development of well-defined, flat ice surface anomalies. Trench lakes characterize the Aurora and Concordia trenches as the possible effect of normal fault activity.

  7. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  8. Flash flood in 1714 in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands - Reconstructing a Catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleder, Libor; Krejčí, Jakub; Šírová, Jolana

    2015-04-01

    Read against the backdrop of the past twenty years with their exceptional frequency of summer floods, records of historical flood events have become highly topical. Aside from the May flood of 1872, the flash flood that occurred at the turn of July and August 1714 in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands is probably the most important case of its kind in the Czech lands, and may likely be ranked among the most notable occurrences of extreme weather even within the larger Central European context. Within the catchment basin of the Sázava River, the headwater level rose about three meters above the highest floods on the hydrological record and 1.5m above the highest historical flood-mark. Taking into account the time period - i.e., the beginning of the 18th century - some of the concurrent accounts of the flood are uncommonly detailed, containing not only a specification of the damage caused, but also high water mark figures and, at least in broad strokes, a record of the changing water levels over time. The flood caused tremendous material damage at the time, breaching e.g. about 70 fish ponds and destroying essentially all bridges; over 230 people were killed. It was revealed that the area of Žďárské vrchy (Žďár Hills) at the divide of the rivers Loučná, Chrudimka, Sázava, and Svratka which was impacted by the causative extreme precipitation may have measured 800 to 1000 square kilometers. Rough estimates of the headwater flow rate equal about four times current Q100 values. We therefore used the hydrological model Aqualog in order to determine whether an event of this scope was at all realistic. The goal was to assess whether it was realistically possible that precipitation may have been of such scope as to trigger a hydrological response of this intensity.

  9. Spatial characterization of glacial and periglacial landforms in the highlands of Sierra Nevada (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, P; Oliva, M; García-Hernández, C; Gómez Ortiz, A; Ruiz-Fernández, J; Salvador-Franch, F; Catarineu, M

    2017-04-15

    Sierra Nevada constitutes the southernmost and highest massif in the Iberian Peninsula, with elevations exceeding 3000m. Two large glacial advances were recorded during the Last Glaciation and several minor advances occurred until the Early Holocene. Since then, periglacial activity has prevailed above 2500m. Here, we present a new and more accurate geomorphological map of the highlands of Sierra Nevada, integrating in a GIS environment i) high resolution satellite imagery, ii) topographic data, and iii) field observations. This approach has allowed a better characterization of the spatial extent of cold-climate morphogenic processes and associated landforms formed during the Last Glaciation and subsequent deglaciation. Despite its extension and high altitude, the steep relief of Sierra Nevada and its southern location conditioned a significantly lower glaciated surface (104.6km2) with respect to other Iberian massifs. We have also inferred the paleoclimatic conditions of the study area through the calculation of Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs). The distribution of the lowest moraines suggests an ELA for the maximum glacial extent at 2525m in the northern slope and 2650m in the southern side, increasing towards the east. Local ELA differences are related to: (i) the influence of the warmer Mediterranean Sea in contrast to the cooler Atlantic Ocean, (ii) the climate with more continental characteristics on the northern slope, and (iii) the microscale control of the local topography. Mean annual air temperatures in the ice-free summit plateaus were between -4/-6°C during the maximum local glacial extent, determining permafrost conditions with intense periglacial dynamics. Rock glaciers and protalus lobes developed until 2500m, the lowest boundary for permafrost regime. The distribution of other glacial and periglacial landforms within the limits of the maximum ice extent provides evidence to better understand the extent of subsequent glacial stages and post

  10. Effect of land use change on water discharge in Srepok watershed, Central Highland, Viet Nam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Ngoc Quyen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Srepok watershed plays an important role in Central Highland in Viet Nam. It impacts to developing social-economic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to research elements which impact to natural resources in this watershed. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model and Geography Information System (GIS were used to simulate water discharge in the Srepok watershed. The objectives of the research were to apply GIS and SWAT model for simulation water discharge and then, we assessed land use change which impacted on water discharge in the watershed. The observed stream flow data from Ban Don Stream gauge station was used to calibrate for the period from 1981 to 2000 and then validate for the period from 2001 to 2009. After using SWAT-CUP software to calibration, NSI reached 0.63 and R square value achieved 0.64 from 2004 to 2008 in calibration and NSI gained good level at 0.74 and R square got 0.75 from 2009 to 2012 in validation step at Ban Don Station. After that, land cover in 2010 was processed like land cover in 2000 and set up SWAT model again. The simulated water discharge in scenario 1 (land use 2000 was compared with scenario 2 (land use 2010, the simulation result was not significant difference between two scenarios because the change of area of land use was not much enough to affect the fluctuation of water discharge. However, the effect of land cover on water resource could be seen clearly via total water yield. The percentage of surface flow in 2000 was twice times more than in 2010; retard and base flow in 2000 was slightly more than in 2010. Therefore, decreased surface flow, increased infiltration capacity of water and enriched base flow resulted in the growth of land cover.

  11. Using OSL to decipher past soil history in archaeological terraces, Judea Highlands, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Naomi; Gadot, Yuval; Davidovich, Uri; Avni, Yoav; Avni, Gideon; Golan, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Archaeological terraces are the most prominent feature of the agricultural sphere in the hilly landscape throughout the Mediterranean. Using terrace walls for the artificial creation of arable plots of land was a major technological innovation that has completely altered the natural terrain. As such, the dating of these simply built features is of upmost importance. Archaeological excavations and OSL dating of the soil infill of terraces were carried out in three excavation areas at Mt. Eitan in the Judea Highlands, Israel. Previous survey showed that Mt. Eitan was settled continuously at least from the Middle Bronze Age (ca 3800 years ago) and until modern times. The OSL ages shows that all extant terraces were constructed in the past 550-200 years, in the Ottoman period. Older ages are limited only to the base of a few terraces, and they range from the Roman Period (ca 1800 years ago) to Mamluk times (ca 700 years ago). Many of the soil samples contain quartz grains with older ages, indicating incomplete bleaching of the sediment at the time of terrace construction. We used the finite mixture model to find out if there are distinct age clusters to these poorly bleached grains. Analyses were carried out on a compilation of all measured De values (small aliquots) from the entire study area, and for each area separately. Results show that the unbleached grains cluster into only a few periods and highlight four synchronous episodes of terrace building in the past 800 years. The Roman and Early Islamic periods are also represented, even in area where soils with such ages were not found. The unbleached grains preserve older episodes of terrace building no longer represented in the landscape.

  12. Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai B Mullerpattan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE is a syndrome of wheezing, fever and eosiniphilia seen predominantly in the Indian subcontinent and other tropical areas. Its etiological link with Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi has been well established. The pathogenesis is due to an exaggerated immune response to the filarial antigens which includes type I, type III and type IV reactions with eosinophils playing a pivotal role. Peripheral blood eosinophilia is usually striking with levels over 3000/΅l being common. High serum levels of IgE and filarial-specific IgE and IgG are also found. The pathology may vary from an acute eosinophilic alveolitis to histiocytic infiltration depending on the stage of the disease. While earlier studies had suggested that the disease runs a benign course, more recent work has shown that untreated TPE could result in a fair degree of respiratory morbidity. Pulmonary function tests may show a mixed restrictive and obstructive abnormality with a reduction in diffusion capacity. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL eosinophil count has a negative correlation with the diffusion capacity. Treatment consists of diethylcarbamazine (DEC for at least three weeks. Despite treatment with DEC, about 20 per cent of patients may relapse. Steroids have shown to have a beneficial effect but the exact dose and duration is yet to be confirmed by randomized controlled trials. A specific and easily available marker is required for TPE in order to distinguish it from other parasitic and non-parasitic causes of pulmonary eosinophilia.

  13. Functional ecology of tropical forest recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohbeck, M.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic abstract of the thesis for the library for the acquisitions department of Wageningen UR library (published as a html file so hyperlinks may be included) In English, one or 2 pages. Functional ecology of tropical forest recovery Currently in the tropics, the area of

  14. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome: prevention through education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome describes an acute symptom complex found in patients with diabetes in the tropics, usually following minor trauma to the hand. Two different patients, both previously diagnosed with diabetes, suddenly developed an abscess of the hand that progressively worsened, and became an ulcer ...

  15. Characterizing tropical forests with multispectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eileen Helmer; Nicholas R. Goodwin; Valery Gond; Carlos M. Souza, Jr.; Gregory P. Asner

    2015-01-01

    Multispectral satellite imagery, that is, remotely sensed imagery with discrete bands ranging from visible to shortwave infrared (SWIR) wavelengths, is the timeliest and most accessible remotely sensed data for monitoring tropical forests. Given this relevance, we summarize here how multispectral imagery can help characterize tropical forest attributes of widespread...

  16. Carbon exchange among tropical coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouillon, S.; Connolly, R.; Nagelkerken, I.

    2009-01-01

    Tropical rivers provide about 60% of the global transport of organic and inorganic carbon from continents to the coastal zone. These inputs combine with organic material from productive mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and coral reefs to make tropical coastal ecosystems important components in the

  17. Case series on tropical diabetic hand syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-24

    Oct 24, 2013 ... Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a term used to describe diabetes complication of the hand affecting people in the tropics. It consists of localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands, progressive, fulminant hand sepsis and gangrene in extreme cases. This syndrome is not ...

  18. Structural dynamics of tropical moist forest gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria O. Hunter; Michael Keller; Douglas Morton; Bruce Cook; Michael Lefsky; Mark Ducey; Scott Saleska; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira; Juliana Schietti

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest...

  19. Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology (JTMB) formerly Journal of Tropical Microbiology gives preeminence to the central role of modern biotechnology and microorganisms as tools and targets in current research, which is largely multidisciplinary. JTMB covers a broad range of topics, such as disease ...

  20. Malaria prevalence pattern observed in the highland fringe of Butajira, Southern Ethiopia: A longitudinal study from parasitological and entomological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengesha Tesfaye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ethiopia, information regarding highland malaria transmission is scarce, and no report has been presented from Butajira highland so far whether the appearance of malaria in the area was due to endemicity or due to highland malaria transmission. Thus this study aimed to determine the presence and magnitude of malaria transmission in Butajira. Methods For parasitological survey, longitudinal study was conducted from October to December 2006. The entomological surveys were done from October to December 2006 and continued from April to May 2007. Both parasitological and entomological surveys were done using standard procedures. Results The parasitological result in all the survey months (October-December showed an overall detection rate of 4.4% (48/1082 (CI 95%; 3.2-5.7% malaria parasite. Among infected individuals, 32 (3.0% of the infection was due to Plasmodium vivax and the rest 16 (1.5% were due to Plasmodium falciparum. The highest prevalence 39(3.6% of the parasite was observed in age groups of above 15 years old. Among the total tested, 25(2.3% of males and 23(2.1% of females had malaria infection. Among tested individuals, 38(5.3% and 10 (2.7% of infection was occurred in Misrak-Meskan (2100 m a.s.l and Mirab-Meskan (2280 m a.s.l, respectively which was statistically significant (X2 = 3.72, P Plasmodium species declined from October to December, the trend was non-significant (X2 for trend = 0.49, P > 0.05. The entomological survey showed a collection of 602 larvae and 80 adult Anopheles. Anopheles christyi was the dominant species both in the first (45.3% and in the second (35.4% surveys; where as, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato comprised 4.7% and 14.6%, in the first and second surveys, respectively. Anopheles gambiae s.l comprises 55% of the adult collection, and both species were collected more from outdoors (57.5%. The number of An. christyi was higher in Mirab-Meskan (58. 3% than Misrak-Meskan (41.7% (P Conclusion

  1. Use of ancient sedimentary DNA as a novel conservation tool for high-altitude tropical biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessenkool, Sanne; McGlynn, Gayle; Epp, Laura S; Taylor, David; Pimentel, Manuel; Gizaw, Abel; Nemomissa, Sileshi; Brochmann, Christian; Popp, Magnus

    2014-04-01

    Conservation of biodiversity may in the future increasingly depend upon the availability of scientific information to set suitable restoration targets. In traditional paleoecology, sediment-based pollen provides a means to define preanthropogenic impact conditions, but problems in establishing the exact provenance and ecologically meaningful levels of taxonomic resolution of the evidence are limiting. We explored the extent to which the use of sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) may complement pollen data in reconstructing past alpine environments in the tropics. We constructed a record of afro-alpine plants retrieved from DNA preserved in sediment cores from 2 volcanic crater sites in the Albertine Rift, eastern Africa. The record extended well beyond the onset of substantial anthropogenic effects on tropical mountains. To ensure high-quality taxonomic inference from the sedaDNA sequences, we built an extensive DNA reference library covering the majority of the afro-alpine flora, by sequencing DNA from taxonomically verified specimens. Comparisons with pollen records from the same sediment cores showed that plant diversity recovered with sedaDNA improved vegetation reconstructions based on pollen records by revealing both additional taxa and providing increased taxonomic resolution. Furthermore, combining the 2 measures assisted in distinguishing vegetation change at different geographic scales; sedaDNA almost exclusively reflects local vegetation, whereas pollen can potentially originate from a wide area that in highlands in particular can span several ecozones. Our results suggest that sedaDNA may provide information on restoration targets and the nature and magnitude of human-induced environmental changes, including in high conservation priority, biodiversity hotspots, where understanding of preanthropogenic impact (or reference) conditions is highly limited. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. MAPPING TROPICAL FOREST FOR SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT USING SPOT 5 SATELLITE IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. T. T. Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the combination of multi-data in stratifying the natural evergreen broadleaved tropical forest of the Central Highlands of Vietnam. The forests were stratified using both unsupervised and supervised classification methods based on SPOT5 and field data. The forests were classified into 3 and 4 strata separably. Correlation between stratified forest classes and forest variables was analyzed in order to find out 1 how many classes is suitable to stratify for the forest in this area and 2 how closely the forest variables are related with forest classes. The correlation coefficient shows although all forest variables did have a significant correlation with the forest classes, stand volume appeared to have the strongest correlation with forest classes. These are 0.64 and 0.59 for four and three strata respectively. The results of supervised classification also show the four strata of heavily degraded forest, moderate disturbance, insignificant disturbance, and dense forest were discriminated more clearly comparing to the forest stratified into three classes. The proof is that overall accuracy of supervised classification was 86% with Kappa of 0.8 for four classes, meanwhile, these are 77% and 0.62 respectively for forest area classified into 3 classes.

  3. Persistent Soil Seed Banks for Natural Rehabilitation of Dry Tropical Forests in Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebrehiwot, K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry tropical forests are threatened world-wide by conversion to grazing land, secondary forest, savannah or arable land. In Ethiopia, natural dry forest cover has been decreasing at an alarming rate over the last decennia and has reached a critical level. Efforts like the rehabilitation of dry forests to curb this ecological degradation, need a stronger scientific basis than currently available. The aim of the present research was to test the hypothesis whether soil seed banks can contribute to natural forest regeneration in the dry forest of Ethiopia. Therefore, the composition of the seed bank in relation to vegetation and abiotic environment was analysed in four forest relics and four exclosures, i.e. demarcated land areas under strict conservation management, in the highlands of Tigray, northern Ethiopia. Results show strong relationships between natural vegetation, seed bank composition, soil chemical characteristics and environmental degradation, as evidenced through characteristics such as land use impact and soil depth. Most striking is the presence of only very few woody species in the seed bank of degraded areas. This suggests that seed banks only play a minimal role in natural forest recovery in the study area. If this is true, natural recovery will primarily depend on presence of seed trees in the vicinity and successful seed dispersal mechanisms. This result underlines the importance of sustainable management of the few remaining forest relics and trees outside these relics.

  4. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J; de Santana, Charles N; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-05-06

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics.

  5. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F.; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J.; de Santana, Charles N.; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics. PMID:27151103

  6. Global trends in tropical cyclone risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduzzi, P.; Chatenoux, B.; Dao, H.; de Bono, A.; Herold, C.; Kossin, J.; Mouton, F.; Nordbeck, O.

    2012-04-01

    The impact of tropical cyclones on humans depends on the number of people exposed and their vulnerability, as well as the frequency and intensity of storms. How will the cumulative effects of climate change, demography and vulnerability affect risk? Conventionally, reports assessing tropical cyclone risk trends are based on reported losses, but these figures are biased by improvements to information access. Here we present a new methodology based on thousands of physically observed events and related contextual parameters. We show that mortality risk depends on tropical cyclone intensity, exposure, levels of poverty and governance. Despite the projected reduction in the frequency of tropical cyclones, projected increases in both demographic pressure and tropical cyclone intensity over the next 20 years can be expected to greatly increase the number of people exposed per year and exacerbate disaster risk, despite potential progression in development and governance.

  7. Ecological Assessment of Two Species of Potamonautid Freshwater Crabs from the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe, with Implications for Their Conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatenda Dalu

    Full Text Available The spatial ecology of freshwater crabs and their conservation status is largely understudied in Africa. An ecological assessment was conducted at 104 localities in 51 rivers and/or streams in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe whereby the distribution and abundances of freshwater crab species were mapped and the possible drivers of the observed trends in population structure explored. In addition, information on crab utilisation as a food resource by local communities was assessed via face to face interviews across the region. Finally, the conservation status of each species was assessed using the IUCN Red List criteria. Only two crab species Potamonautes mutareensis and Potamonautes unispinus were recorded within the region of study. Potamonautes mutareensis was largely restricted to less impacted environments in the high mountainous river system, whereas P. unispinus was found in low laying areas. In stretches of river where both species were found to co-occur, the species were never sampled from the same site, with P. mutareensis occurring in shallower, faster flowing environments and P. unispinus in deeper, slow flowing sites. Interview results revealed that the local communities, particularly in the southern part of the Eastern Highlands around the Chipinge area, had a considerable level of utilisation (55% of households on the harvesting of crabs for household consumption during the non-agricultural season (May to September. Results from the IUCN Red List assessment indicate that both species should be considered as "Least Concern". Threats to freshwater crabs in the Eastern Highlands, however, include widespread anthropogenic impacts such as habitat destruction associated with gold and diamond mining, inorganic and organic pollution and possibly exploitation for human consumption. The current study provides important information and insight towards the possible development of a freshwater crab conservation action plan within the region.

  8. Beyond the drip-line: a high-resolution open-air Holocene hunter-gatherer sequence from highland Lesotho

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mitchell, P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available the drip-line: a high-resolution open-air Holocene hunter-gatherer sequence from highland Lesotho Peter Mitchell1, Ina Plug2, Geoff Bailey3, Ruth Charles4, Amanda Esterhuysen5, Julia Lee Thorp6, Adrian Parker7 & Stephan Woodborne8 The activities....g. Jerardino & Yates 1997), few open-air sites of Holocene age have attracted serious excavation. In areas like the Karoo, the semi-arid interior of western South Africa, they are often deflated, with bone and macroplants poorly preserved, while elsewhere...

  9. Geology of the Southern Utopia Planitia Highland-Lowland Boundary Plain: First Year Results and Second Year Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Tanaka, K. L.; Hare, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    The southern Utopia highland-lowland boundary (HLB) extends >1500 km westward from northern Nepenthes Mensae to the topographic saddle that separates Isidis and Utopia Planitiae. It contains bench-like platforms that contain depressions, pitted cones (some organized into arcuate chains and thumbprint terrain), isolated domes, lineated depressions, buried circular depressions, ring fractures, polygonal fractures, and other locally- to regionally-dispersed landforms [1]. The objective of our mapping project is to clarify the geologic evolution of the southern Utopia Planitia HLB by identifying the geologic, structural, and stratigraphic relationships of surface materials in MTMs 10237, 15237, 20237, 10242, 15242, 20242, 10247, 15247, and 20247.

  10. Dao, Harmakhis, and Reull Valles - The role of outflow channels in the degradation of the circum-Hellas highlands of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, David A.; Mest, Scott C.

    1997-03-01

    Geologic deposits and landforms representative of much of the planet's history are preserved in the southern cratered highlands of Mars. The circum-Hellas highlands to the east of the basin record the effects of volcanism, tectonism, fluvial erosion and deposition, aeolian activity, and masswasting. Mapping studies and geomorphic analyses have provided a general understanding of the evolution of the Hellas region, placed constraints on the styles and timing of volcanic activity associated with Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae, and investigated Dao and Harmakhis Valles and the terminus of Reull Vallis. The present study provides a detailed comparison of Dao, Harmakhis, and Reull Valles, and examines the role of highland outflow channels in the degradation of the region.

  11. Adats and Their Influence on the Social Structure and Legal Relations in the Community of Highland Peoples in Late XIX Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Shavlоkhova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article raises the question of entering the Caucasus into the composition of the Russian Empire and multiple problems and tasks, requiring the solution in the late 19th century. Of interest were the data of how the self-administration of the different population categories in the second half of the 19th century was realized, when the question came up of the highland nobility rights equialization with the rights of the Russian noblemen, for what the considerable part of the highland aristocracy stroke vigorously. The description of class gradation of the highland societies, such as Kabardinian, Adygei, Ossetian is given. Caucasian noblemen were nothing more than the petty liegemen of the princes. By the end of the 19th century the class division preserved its value only in everyday life: each family name bore the stamp of its origin.

  12. An annotated checklist of trees and relatives in tropical montane forests from southeast Peru: the importance of continue collecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Farfan-Rios

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The tropical Andes and adjacent Amazon are Earth’s highest biodiversity hotspot. Manu National Park in southeastern Peru encompasses an entire watershed, ranging from Andean highlands to Amazonian lowlands, and is a megadiverse landscape on the Andes to Amazon transition. Here we present an annotated checklist of trees and related species is along an elevation gradient in the Manu Biosphere Reserve that runs from sub-montane forests at 800 m elevation up to the tree line at 3625 m. Based on a network of 21 1-hectare permanent tree plots and botanical explorations, the floristic information is systematized by elevation ranges, geographical distribution and endemism. These preliminary results show 1108 species. Of these, 43% are new records for the region of Cusco, 15 species are new records for the Peruvian flora, 40 species are endemics for Peru, and 30 are potential new species for science. Another 39.7% are identified to genus or family level and remain morphospecies. Additionally, we show altitudinal range expansion for 45.2% of identified species (302 species. These results were found in a transect of plots spanning only 20 km of geographic distance, and are a sample of the high tree diversity in these mountainous ecosystems. The data show how poorly collected and understudied these ecosystems are. Basic floristic studies and collections are imperative for a better understanding of species distribution and function of ecosystems, and the basic biodiversity of the tropical Andes. They will also help to answer a major, unresolved question in modern global ecology of how tropical forests will respond to global climate change.

  13. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Khamarrul Azahari; Santangelo, Michele; Van Westen, Cees J.; Straatsma, Menno W.; de Jong, Steven M.

    2013-05-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been used to construct the digital terrain model (DTM) under dense vegetation, but its reliability for landslide recognition in the tropics remains surprisingly unknown. This study evaluates the suitability of ALS for generating an optimal DTM for mapping landslides in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. For the bare-earth extraction, we used hierarchical robust filtering algorithm and a parameterization with three sequential filtering steps. After each filtering step, four interpolations techniques were applied, namely: (i) the linear prediction derived from the SCOP++ (SCP), (ii) the inverse distance weighting (IDW), (iii) the natural neighbor (NEN) and (iv) the topo-to-raster (T2R). We assessed the quality of 12 DTMs in two ways: (1) with respect to 448 field-measured terrain heights and (2) based on the interpretability of landslides. The lowest root-mean-square error (RMSE) was 0.89 m across the landscape using three filtering steps and linear prediction as interpolation method. However, we found that a less stringent DTM filtering unveiled more diagnostic micro-morphological features, but also retained some of vegetation. Hence, a combination of filtering steps is required for optimal landslide interpretation, especially in forested mountainous areas. IDW was favored as the interpolation technique because it combined computational times more reasonably without adding artifacts to the DTM than T2R and NEN, which performed relatively well in the first and second filtering steps, respectively. The laser point density and the resulting ground point density after filtering are key parameters for producing a DTM applicable to landslide identification. The results showed that the

  14. Southeast Asian tropical medicine and parasitology network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikagul, Jitra

    2006-01-01

    The SEAMEO TROPMED Network is a regional cooperative network established in 1967 for education, training and research in tropical medicine and public health under the Southeast Asia Ministers of Education Organization. The Network operates through four Regional Centers with respective areas of specialization and host institutions: Community Nutrition/Tropmed Indonesia; Microbiology, Parasitology and Entomology/Tropmed Malaysia; Public Health/Tropmed Philippines; and Tropical Medicine/Tropmed Thailand. To train health workers, to support research on endemic and newly emerging diseases, and to advocate relevant health policies are the main functions of these centers. SEAMEO TROPMED Network in collaboration with the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University and other institutions has regularly organized the Seminar on Food-borne Parasitic Zoonoses every 3-5 years over the past 15 years. The Faculty of Tropical Medicine has organized the annual Joint International Tropical Medicine Meeting since 1996. Full papers of the presentations at these two meetings have been published as supplementary issues to the Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, an in-house journal of SEAMEO TROPMED Network. Recently, the Parasitology Association of ASEAN Countries has rotated the hosting of the ASEAN Congress of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine. These institutional and conference networks will enable closer links, to promote the health of people in the Southeast Asian region.

  15. Active Stream Length Dynamics in Headwater Catchments Spanning Physiographic Provinces in the Appalachian Highlands

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    Jensen, C.; McGuire, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most basic descriptions of streams is the presence of channelized flow. However, this seemingly simple query goes unanswered for the majority of headwater networks, as stream length expands and contracts with the wetness of catchments seasonally, interannually, and in response to storm events. Although streams are known to grow and shrink, a lack of information on longitudinal dynamics across different geographic regions precludes effective management. Understanding the temporal variation in temporary network length over a broad range of settings is critical for policy decisions that impact aquatic ecosystem health. This project characterizes changes in active stream length for forested headwater catchments spanning four physiographic provinces of the Appalachian Highlands: the New England at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire; Valley and Ridge at Poverty Creek and the North Fork of Big Stony Creek in Jefferson National Forest, Virginia; Blue Ridge at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina; and Appalachian Plateau at Fernow Experimental Forest, West Virginia. Multivariate statistical analysis confirms these provinces exhibit characteristic topographies reflecting differences in climate, geology, and environmental history and, thus, merit separate consideration. The active streams of three watersheds (<45 ha) in each study area were mapped six times to capture a variety of moderate flow conditions that can be expected most of the time (i.e., exceedance probabilities between 25 to 75%). The geomorphic channel and channel heads were additionally mapped to determine how active stream length variability relates to the development of the geomorphic network. We found that drainage density can vary up to four-fold with discharge. Stream contraction primarily proceeds by increasing disconnection and disintegration into pools, while the number of flow origins remains constant except at high and low extremes of discharge. This work demonstrates

  16. Highlands of the upper Jequitinhonha valley, Brazil: I - characterization and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique Alves Bispo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the upper Jequitinhonha valley, state of Minas Gerais, Brazi, there are large plane areas known as "chapadas", which are separated by areas dissected by tributaries of the Jequitinhonha and Araçuaí rivers. These dissected areas have a surface drainage system with tree, shrub, and grass vegetation, more commonly known as "veredas", i.e., palm swamps. The main purpose of this study was to characterize soil physical, chemical and morphological properties of a representative toposequence in the watershed of the Vereda Lagoa do Leandro, a swamp near Minas Novas, MG, on "chapadas", the highlands of the Alto Jequitinhonha region Different soil types are observed in the landscape: at the top - Typic Haplustox (LVA, in the middle slope - Xanthic Haplustox (LA, at the footslope - Xanthic Haplustox, gray color, here called "Gray Haplustox" ("LAC" and, at the bottom of the palm swamp - Typic Albaquult (GXbd. These soils were first morphologically described; samples of disturbed and undisturbed soils were collected from all horizons and subhorizons, to evaluate their essential physical and chemical properties, by means of standard determination of Fe, Al, Mn, Ti and Si oxides after sulfuric extraction. The contents of Fe, Al and Mn, extracted with dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate and oxalate treatments, were also determined. In the well-drained soils of the slope positions, the typical morphological, physical and chemical properties of Oxisols were found. The GXbd sample, from the bottom of the palm swamp, is grayish and has high texture gradient (B/A and massive structure. The reduction of the proportion of crystalline iron compounds and the low crystallinity along the slope confirmed the loss of iron during pedogenesis, which is reflected in the current soil color. The Si and Al contents were lowest in the "LAC" soil. There was a decrease of the Fe2O3/TiO2 ratio downhill, indicating progressive drainage restriction along the toposequence. The genesis

  17. Diversity and abundance of littoral cladocerans and copepods in nine Ecuadorian highland lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia E Torres

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and abundance of littoral cladocerans and copepods were studied in nine lakes at Reserva Ecológica Cayambe-Coca (Páramo de Guamaní, Ecuador. Six samples were taken in the littoral zone of each lake using a 500 µm mesh plankton conic net. One species of cladocerans (Ephemeroporus acanthoides is reported for the first time in Ecuador. The diversity (H’ and evenness (E of the lakes were determined and correlated with PCA axes based on their environmental variables. The principal parameters that distinguished these lakes were altitude and pH, an unexpected finding considering that the altitudinal range was very small. Lake size is of secondary importance for this group of lakes. None of the environmental axes correlated with H’ or E; nevertheless, a larger than expected species richness was found in a small oligotrophic lake with a high level of DO. Based on our results, we hypothesize that altitude and pH are important factors determining the zooplankton diversity (directly or indirectly in highland lakes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (1: 131-137. Epub 2006 Mar 31.La diversidad y abundancia de cladóceros y copépodos de la zona litoral de nueve lagos fue estudiada en la Reserva Ecológica Cayambe-Coca (Páramo de Guamaní, Ecuador. Seis muestras fueron tomadas en la zona litoral de cada lago utilizando una red conica para plancton de 500 µm de apertura. Una especie de cladócero (Ephemeroporus acanthoides es informada por primera vez en Ecuador. La diversidad (H’ y equitatividad (E fueron determinadas y correlacionadas con los ejes del PCA basado en variables ambientales de los lagos. Los principales parámetros que distinguen estos lagos fueron la altitud y el pH, hallazgo inesperado dado el estrecho ámbito altitudinal. El tamaño parece ser secundario en importancia para este grupo de lagos. No se encontró una correlación significativa entre ninguno de los ejes ambientales y los indices H’ o E; sin embargo, la riqueza de

  18. Geologic controls on cave development in Burnsville Cove, Bath and Highland Counties, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher; Haynes, John T.; Lucas, Philip C.; Lambert, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Burnsville Cove in Bath and Highland Counties (Virginia, USA) is a karst region in the Valley and Ridge Province of the Appalachian Mountains. The region contains many caves in Silurian to Devonian limestone, and is well suited for examining geologic controls on cave location and cave passage morphology. In Burnsville Cove, many caves are located preferentially near the axes of synclines and anticlines. For example, Butler Cave is an elongate cave where the trunk channel follows the axis of Sinking Creek syncline and most of the side passages follow joints at right angles to the syncline axis. In contrast, the Water Sinks Subway Cave, Owl Cave, and Helictite Cave have abundant maze patterns, and are located near the axis of Chestnut Ridge anticline. The maze patterns may be related to fact that the anticline axis is the site of the greatest amount of flexure, leading to more joints and (or) greater enlargement of joints. Many of the larger caves of Burnsville Cove (e.g., Breathing Cave, Butler Cave–Sinking Creek Cave System, lower parts of the Water Sinks Cave System) are developed in the Silurian Tonoloway Limestone, the stratigraphic unit with the greatest surface exposure in the area. Other caves are developed in the Silurian to Devonian Keyser Limestone of the Helderberg Group (e.g., Owl Cave, upper parts of the Water Sinks Cave System) and in the Devonian Shriver Chert and (or) Licking Creek Limestone of the Helderberg Group (e.g., Helictite Cave). Within the Tonoloway Limestone, the larger caves are developed in the lower member of the Tonoloway Limestone immediately below a bed of silica-cemented sandstone. In contrast, the larger caves in the Keyser Limestone are located preferentially in limestone beds containing stromatoporoid reefs, and some of the larger caves in the Licking Creek Limestone are located in beds of cherty limestone below the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone. Geologic controls on cave passage morphology include joints, bedding planes, and

  19. Detection of antibodies against Bluetongue virus among domestic ruminants in the highlands of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Doj Raj; Prajapati, Meera; Shrestha, Prazila; Acharya, Madhav Prasad; Paudyal, Narayan; Bowen, Richard; Singh, Upendra Man; Joshi, Bhoj Raj

    2016-09-30

    Bluetongue (BT) is one of the most economically important transboundary animal diseases. In recent years, it has been considered a disease related to climate change. A study was undertaken in 2013 in Nepal to measure the prevalence of Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection among domestic ruminants inhabiting the 3 agro-climatic zones with altitudes ranging from 150 to 2,400 metres above sea level. Twelve clusters representing the 3 altitudes were selected. The presence of antibodies against BTV was demonstrated in serum samples of sheep, goats, cattle, buffaloes, yaks/chauries, and chyangra goats (Himalayan goat) of Nepal. For this purpose, a total of 2,084 sera were collected from a population of 202 sheep, 739 goats, 590 cattle, 379 buffaloes, 105 yaks/chauries, and 69 chyangra goats between February 2013 and January 2014. The presence of antibodies against BTV was investigated using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). Of the 2,084 collected sera, 45.20% were positive for BTV antibodies. Species-wise prevalence was 17.82%, 47.50%, 53.05%, 58.05%, 7.62%, and 20.29% in sheep, goats, cattle, buffaloes, yak, and chyangra goats, respectively. Contrary to the general belief, maximum numbers of seropositive cases were recorded in buffaloes followed by cattle, goats, chyangra goats, sheep, and yak/chauries. The samples collected in the post-monsoon period (July-August is the monsoon period) show a seroprevalence higher than the pre-monsoon samples. This study shows the seroprevalence of BT in domestic ruminant population of Nepal at all altitudes. The highest prevalence has been reported in the plains of Terai followed by gradual decline in the mid-hills, and in the high mountains. Furthermore, detection of antibodies against BTV in both small and large ruminants (chyangra goats and yak/chauries) dwelling in high altitudes in the absence of BT vaccination is suggesting vector movement to the highlands as a consequence of warmer climate. These findings

  20. Geological mapping of lunar highland crater Lalande: Topographic configuration, morphology and cratering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Liu, ChangQing; Bi, Xiangyu

    2018-02-01

    Highland crater Lalande (4.45°S, 8.63°W; D = 23.4 km) is located on the PKT area of the lunar near side, southeast of the Mare Insularum. It is a complex crater in Copernican era and has three distinguishing features: high silicic anomaly, the highest Th abundance and special landforms on its floor. There are some low-relief bulges on the left of Lalande's floor with regular circle or ellipse shapes. They are ∼250-680 m wide and ∼30-91 m high with maximum flank slopes >20°. There are two possible scenarios for the formation of these low-relief bulges which are impact melt products or young silicic volcanic eruptions. We estimated the absolute model ages of the ejecta deposits, several melt ponds and the hummocky floor and determined the ratio of diameter and depth of the crater Lalande. In addition, we found some similar bugle features within other Copernican-aged craters and there were no volcanic source vents on Lalande's floor. Thus, we hypothesized that these low-relief bulges were most consistent with an origin of impact melts during the crater formation instead of small and young volcanic activities occurring on the floor. Based on Kaguya Terrain Camera (TC) ortho-mosaic and Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data produced by TC imagery in stereo, geological units and some linear features on the floor and wall of Lalande have been mapped. Eight geological units are organized by crater floor units: hummocky floor, central peak and low-relief bulges; and crater wall units: terraced walls, channeled and veneered walls, interior walls, mass wasting areas, blocky areas, and melt ponds. These geological units and linear features provided us a chance to understand some details of the cratering process and elevation differences on the floor. We proposed that subsidence due to melt cooling, late-stage wall collapse and rocks uplifted from beneath the surface could be the possible causes of the observed elevation differences on Lalande's floor.