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Sample records for sub-genomic transcript promoter

  1. Transcription of mouse Sp2 yields alternatively spliced and sub-genomic mRNAs in a tissue- and cell type-specific fashion

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    Yin, Haifeng; Nichols, Teresa D.; Horowitz, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    The Sp-family of transcription factors is comprised by nine members, Sp1-9, that share a highly-conserved DNA-binding domain. Sp2 is a poorly characterized member of this transcription factor family that is widely expressed in murine and human cell lines yet exhibits little DNA-binding or trans-activation activity in these settings. As a prelude to the generation of a “knock-out” mouse strain, we isolated a mouse Sp2 cDNA and performed a detailed analysis of Sp2 transcription in embryonic and adult mouse tissues. We report that (1) the 5′ untranslated region of Sp2 is subject to alternative splicing, (2) Sp2 transcription is regulated by at least two promoters that differ in their cell-type specificity, (3) one Sp2 promoter is highly active in nine mammalian cell lines and strains and is regulated by at least five discrete stimulatory and inhibitory elements, (4) a variety of sub-genomic messages are synthesized from the Sp2 locus in a tissue- and cell type-specific fashion and these transcripts have the capacity to encode a novel partial-Sp2 protein, and (5) RNA in situ hybridization assays indicate that Sp2 is widely expressed during mouse embryogenesis, particularly in the embryonic brain, and robust Sp2 expression occurs in neurogenic regions of the post-natal and adult brain. PMID:20353838

  2. Promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics.

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    Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-21

    Genes in eukaryotic cells are typically regulated by complex promoters containing multiple binding sites for a variety of transcription factors, but how promoter dynamics affect transcriptional dynamics has remained poorly understood. In this study, we analyze gene models at the transcriptional regulation level, which incorporate the complexity of promoter structure (PS) defined as transcriptional exits (i.e., ON states of the promoter) and the transition pattern (described by a matrix consisting of transition rates among promoter activity states). We show that multiple exits of transcription are the essential origin of generating multimodal distributions of mRNA, but promoters with the same transition pattern can lead to multimodality of different modes, depending on the regulation of transcriptional factors. In turn, for similar mRNA distributions in the models, the mean ON or OFF time distributions may exhibit different characteristics, thus providing the supplemental information on PS. In addition, we demonstrate that the transcriptional noise can be characterized by a nonlinear function of mean ON and OFF times. These results not only reveal essential characteristics of promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics but also provide signatures useful for inferring PS based on characteristics of transcriptional outputs. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic usage of transcription start sites within core promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaji, Hideya; Frith, Martin C; Katayama, Shintaro

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammalian promoters do not initiate transcription at single, well defined base pairs, but rather at multiple, alternative start sites spread across a region. We previously characterized the static structures of transcription start site usage within promoters at the base pair level......, based on large-scale sequencing of transcript 5' ends. RESULTS: In the present study we begin to explore the internal dynamics of mammalian promoters, and demonstrate that start site selection within many mouse core promoters varies among tissues. We also show that this dynamic usage of start sites...... is associated with CpG islands, broad and multimodal promoter structures, and imprinting. CONCLUSION: Our results reveal a new level of biologic complexity within promoters--fine-scale regulation of transcription starting events at the base pair level. These events are likely to be related to epigenetic...

  4. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site......, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites...... RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels....

  5. Two independent transcription initiation codes overlap on vertebrate core promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, Vanja; Li, Nan; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Plessy, Charles; Previti, Christopher; Nepal, Chirag; Gehrig, Jochen; Dong, Xianjun; Akalin, Altuna; Suzuki, Ana Maria; van Ijcken, Wilfred F. J.; Armant, Olivier; Ferg, Marco; Strähle, Uwe; Carninci, Piero; Müller, Ferenc; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A core promoter is a stretch of DNA surrounding the transcription start site (TSS) that integrates regulatory inputs and recruits general transcription factors to initiate transcription. The nature and causative relationship of the DNA sequence and chromatin signals that govern the selection of most TSSs by RNA polymerase II remain unresolved. Maternal to zygotic transition represents the most marked change of the transcriptome repertoire in the vertebrate life cycle. Early embryonic development in zebrafish is characterized by a series of transcriptionally silent cell cycles regulated by inherited maternal gene products: zygotic genome activation commences at the tenth cell cycle, marking the mid-blastula transition. This transition provides a unique opportunity to study the rules of TSS selection and the hierarchy of events linking transcription initiation with key chromatin modifications. We analysed TSS usage during zebrafish early embryonic development at high resolution using cap analysis of gene expression, and determined the positions of H3K4me3-marked promoter-associated nucleosomes. Here we show that the transition from the maternal to zygotic transcriptome is characterized by a switch between two fundamentally different modes of defining transcription initiation, which drive the dynamic change of TSS usage and promoter shape. A maternal-specific TSS selection, which requires an A/T-rich (W-box) motif, is replaced with a zygotic TSS selection grammar characterized by broader patterns of dinucleotide enrichments, precisely aligned with the first downstream (+1) nucleosome. The developmental dynamics of the H3K4me3-marked nucleosomes reveal their DNA-sequence-associated positioning at promoters before zygotic transcription and subsequent transcription-independent adjustment to the final position downstream of the zygotic TSS. The two TSS-defining grammars coexist, often physically overlapping, in core promoters of constitutively expressed genes to enable

  6. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

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    Milka Martinez

    Full Text Available RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX, is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  7. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

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    BASAK eKANDEMIR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pea3 subfamily of ETS transcription factors consist of three major proteins, Pea3, ERM and ER81. Although important for many different tissues that exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3.

  8. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

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    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  9. MarA-mediated transcriptional repression of the rob promoter.

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    Schneiders, Thamarai; Levy, Stuart B

    2006-04-14

    The Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator MarA affects functions that include antibiotic resistance, persistence, and survival. MarA functions as an activator or repressor of transcription utilizing similar degenerate DNA sequences (marboxes) with three different binding site configurations with respect to the RNA polymerase-binding sites. We demonstrate that MarA down-regulates rob transcripts both in vivo and in vitro via a MarA-binding site within the rob promoter that is positioned between the -10 and -35 hexamers. As for the hdeA and purA promoters, which are repressed by MarA, the rob marbox is also in the "backward" orientation. Protein-DNA interactions show that SoxS and Rob, like MarA, bind the same marbox in the rob promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses with a MarA-specific antibody demonstrate that MarA and RNA polymerase form a ternary complex with the rob promoter DNA. Transcription experiments in vitro and potassium permanganate footprinting analysis show that MarA affects the RNA polymerase-mediated closed to open complex formation at the rob promoter.

  10. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A; Herudek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transcriptomes are complex and formed by extensive promoter activity. In addition, gene promoters are largely divergent and initiate transcription of reverse-oriented promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). Although PROMPTs are commonly terminated early, influenced by polyadenylation s...

  11. An Ikaros Promoter Element with Dual Epigenetic and Transcriptional Activities.

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    Elizabeth A Perotti

    Full Text Available Ikaros DNA binding factor plays critical roles in lymphocyte development. Changes in Ikaros expression levels during lymphopoiesis are controlled by redundant but also unique regulatory elements of its locus that are critical for this developmental process. We have recently shown that Ikaros binds its own locus in thymocytes in vivo. Here, we evaluated the role of an Ikaros binding site within its major lympho-myeloid promoter. We identified an Ikaros/Ets binding site within a promoter sub-region that was highly conserved in mouse and human. Deletion of this binding site increased the percentage of the reporter-expressing mouse lines, indicating that its loss provided a more permissive chromatin environment. However, once transcription was established, the lack of this site decreased transcriptional activity. These findings implicate a dual role for Ikaros/Ets1 binding on Ikzf1 expression that is exerted at least through its promoter.

  12. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

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    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  13. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

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    Christopher A Lavender

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment.

  14. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

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    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment.

  15. Promoter polymorphisms regulating corticotrophin-releasing hormone transcription in vitro.

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    Wagner, U; Wahle, M; Moritz, F; Wagner, U; Häntzschel, H; Baerwald, C G O

    2006-02-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in the corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter are associated with altered CRH gene regulation, we studied the reactivity of three recently described promoter variants in vitro. The 3625 bp variants A1B1, A2B1 and A2B2 of the human CRH promoter were cloned in the 5' region to a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into both mouse anterior pituitary cells AtT-20D16vF2 and pheochromocytoma cells PC12. Incubation with 8-Br-cAMP alone or in combination with cytokines significantly enhanced the promoter activity in both cell lines studied by up to 22-fold. However, dexamethasone antagonised cAMP effects on CRH expression in AtT-20 cells while showing no effect on PC12 cells, indicating that tissue-specific factors play a crucial role. Among the haplotypes studied, A1B1 exhibited the greatest reactivity on various stimuli. Electric mobility shift assay (EMSA) was performed to study whether the described polymorphic nucleotide sequences in the 5' region of the hCRH gene interfere with binding of nuclear proteins. A specific DNA protein complex was detected at position -2353 bp for the wild type sequence only, possibly interfering with a binding site for the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Taken together, this is the first study to demonstrate that CRH promoter reactivity varies between the compound promoter alleles.

  16. Angelman syndrome imprinting center encodes a transcriptional promoter.

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    Lewis, Michael W; Brant, Jason O; Kramer, Joseph M; Moss, James I; Yang, Thomas P; Hansen, Peter J; Williams, R Stan; Resnick, James L

    2015-06-02

    Clusters of imprinted genes are often controlled by an imprinting center that is necessary for allele-specific gene expression and to reprogram parent-of-origin information between generations. An imprinted domain at 15q11-q13 is responsible for both Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), two clinically distinct neurodevelopmental disorders. Angelman syndrome arises from the lack of maternal contribution from the locus, whereas Prader-Willi syndrome results from the absence of paternally expressed genes. In some rare cases of PWS and AS, small deletions may lead to incorrect parent-of-origin allele identity. DNA sequences common to these deletions define a bipartite imprinting center for the AS-PWS locus. The PWS-smallest region of deletion overlap (SRO) element of the imprinting center activates expression of genes from the paternal allele. The AS-SRO element generates maternal allele identity by epigenetically inactivating the PWS-SRO in oocytes so that paternal genes are silenced on the future maternal allele. Here we have investigated functional activities of the AS-SRO, the element necessary for maternal allele identity. We find that, in humans, the AS-SRO is an oocyte-specific promoter that generates transcripts that transit the PWS-SRO. Similar upstream promoters were detected in bovine oocytes. This result is consistent with a model in which imprinting centers become DNA methylated and acquire maternal allele identity in oocytes in response to transiting transcription.

  17. Senataxin Mutation Reveals How R-Loops Promote Transcription by Blocking DNA Methylation at Gene Promoters.

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    Grunseich, Christopher; Wang, Isabel X; Watts, Jason A; Burdick, Joshua T; Guber, Robert D; Zhu, Zhengwei; Bruzel, Alan; Lanman, Tyler; Chen, Kelian; Schindler, Alice B; Edwards, Nancy; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Yao, Jianhua; Lehky, Tanya; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Crain, Barbara; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Cheung, Vivian G

    2018-02-01

    R-loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures found abundantly and yet often viewed as by-products of transcription. Studying cells from patients with a motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 4 [ALS4]) caused by a mutation in senataxin, we uncovered how R-loops promote transcription. In ALS4 patients, the senataxin mutation depletes R-loops with a consequent effect on gene expression. With fewer R-loops in ALS4 cells, the expression of BAMBI, a negative regulator of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), is reduced; that then leads to the activation of the TGF-β pathway. We uncovered that genome-wide R-loops influence promoter methylation of over 1,200 human genes. DNA methyl-transferase 1 favors binding to double-stranded DNA over R-loops. Thus, in forming R-loops, nascent RNA blocks DNA methylation and promotes further transcription. Hence, our results show that nucleic acid structures, in addition to sequences, influence the binding and activity of regulatory proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c...... with and phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), which is the master regulator of this process, on the promoter of PPARgamma target genes. PPARgamma-cdk9 interaction results in increased transcriptional activity of PPARgamma and therefore increased adipogenesis.......-Myc or MyoD. The P-TEFb complex is composed of a cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk9) subunit and a regulatory partner (cyclin T1, cyclin T2, or cyclin K). Because cdk9 has been shown to participate in differentiation processes, such as muscle cell differentiation, we studied a possible role of cdk9...

  19. The pine Pschi4 promoter directs wound-induced transcription

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    Haiguo Wu; Charles H. Michler; Liborio LaRussa; John M. Davis

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical wounding stimulates the accumulation of Pschi4 transcripts (encoding a putative extracellular chitinase) in pine trees. To gain insight into the transcriptional regulatory region(s) in this gymnosperm defense gene, the 5'-flanking region of Pschi4 was fused to the uidA reporter gene encoding -...

  20. Integration of transcriptional inputs at promoters of the arabinose catabolic pathway

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    Surette Michael G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most modelling efforts of transcriptional networks involve estimations of in vivo concentrations of components, binding affinities and reaction rates, derived from in vitro biochemical assays. These assays are difficult and in vitro measurements may not approximate actual in vivo conditions. Alternatively, changes in transcription factor activity can be estimated by using partially specified models which estimate the "hidden functions" of transcription factor concentration changes; however, non-unique solutions are a potential problem. We have applied a synthetic biology approach to develop reporters that are capable of measuring transcription factor activity in vivo in real time. These synthetic reporters are comprised of a constitutive promoter with an operator site for the specific transcription factor immediately downstream. Thus, increasing transcription factor activity is measured as repression of expression of the transcription factor reporter. Measuring repression instead of activation avoids the complications of non-linear interactions between the transcription factor and RNA polymerase which differs at each promoter. Results Using these reporters, we show that a simple model is capable of determining the rules of integration for multiple transcriptional inputs at the four promoters of the arabinose catabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that despite the complex and non-linear changes in cAMP-CRP activity in vivo during diauxic shift, the synthetic transcription factor reporters are capable of measuring real-time changes in transcription factor activity, and the simple model is capable of predicting the dynamic behaviour of the catabolic promoters. Conclusions Using a synthetic biology approach we show that the in vivo activity of transcription factors can be quantified without the need for measuring intracellular concentrations, binding affinities and reaction rates. Using measured transcription factor activity we

  1. Regulation of transcription from two ssrS promoters in 6S RNA biogenesis.

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    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hongmarn; Bak, Geunu; Kim, Kwang-sun; Lee, Younghoon

    2013-09-01

    ssrS-encoded 6S RNA is an abundant noncoding RNA that binds σ(70)-RNA polymerase and regulates expression at a subset of promoters in Escherichia coli. It is transcribed from two tandem promoters, ssrS P1 and ssrS P2. Regulation of transcription from two ssrS promoters in 6S RNA biogenesis was examined. Both P1 and P2 were growth phase-dependently regulated. Depletion of 6S RNA had no effect on growth-phase-dependent transcription from either promoter, whereas overexpression of 6S RNA increased P1 transcription and decreased P2 transcription, suggesting that transcription from P1 and P2 is subject to feedback activation and feedback inhibition, respectively. This feedback regulation disappeared in Δfis strains, supporting involvement of Fis in this process. The differential feedback regulation may provide a means for maintaining appropriate cellular concentrations of 6S RNA.

  2. Discriminative identification of transcriptional responses of promoters and enhancers after stimulus

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.

    2016-10-17

    Promoters and enhancers regulate the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of expression levels in spatial and temporal manner. Recent findings stemming from the Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) demonstrate that promoters and enhancers, based on their expression profiles after stimulus, belong to different transcription response subclasses. One of the most promising biological features that might explain the difference in transcriptional response between subclasses is the local chromatin environment. We introduce a novel computational framework, PEDAL, for distinguishing effectively transcriptional profiles of promoters and enhancers using solely histone modification marks, chromatin accessibility and binding sites of transcription factors and co-activators. A case study on data from MCF-7 cell-line reveals that PEDAL can identify successfully the transcription response subclasses of promoters and enhancers from two different stimulations. Moreover, we report subsets of input markers that discriminate with minimized classification error MCF-7 promoter and enhancer transcription response subclasses. Our work provides a general computational approach for identifying effectively cell-specific and stimulation-specific promoter and enhancer transcriptional profiles, and thus, contributes to improve our understanding of transcriptional activation in human.

  3. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down......-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation...

  4. Super elongation complex promotes early HIV transcription and its function is modulated by P-TEFb.

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    Kuzmina, Alona; Krasnopolsky, Simona; Taube, Ran

    2017-05-27

    Early work on the control of transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) laid the foundation for our current knowledge of how RNA Polymerase II is released from promoter-proximal pausing sites and transcription elongation is enhanced. The viral Tat activator recruits Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) and Super Elongation Complex (SEC) that jointly drive transcription elongation. While substantial progress in understanding the role of SEC in HIV gene transcription elongation has been obtained, defining of the mechanisms that govern SEC functions is still limited, and the role of SEC in controlling HIV transcription in the absence of Tat is less clear. Here we revisit the contribution of SEC in early steps of HIV gene transcription. In the absence of Tat, the AF4/FMR2 Family member 4 (AFF4) of SEC efficiently activates HIV transcription, while gene activation by its homolog AFF1 is substantially lower. Differential recruitment to the HIV promoter and association with Human Polymerase-Associated Factor complex (PAFc) play key role in this functional distinction between AFF4 and AFF1. Moreover, while depletion of cyclin T1 expression has subtle effects on HIV gene transcription in the absence of Tat, knockout (KO) of AFF1, AFF4, or both proteins slightly repress this early step of viral transcription. Upon Tat expression, HIV transcription reaches optimal levels despite KO of AFF1 or AFF4 expression. However, double AFF1/AFF4 KO completely diminishes Tat trans-activation. Significantly, our results show that P-TEFb phosphorylates AFF4 and modulates SEC assembly, AFF1/4 dimerization and recruitment to the viral promoter. We conclude that SEC promotes both early steps of HIV transcription in the absence of Tat, as well as elongation of transcription, when Tat is expressed. Significantly, SEC functions are modulated by P-TEFb.

  5. Nuclear factor ETF specifically stimulates transcription from promoters without a TATA box.

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    Kageyama, R; Merlino, G T; Pastan, I

    1989-09-15

    Transcription factor ETF stimulates the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene which does not have a TATA box in the promoter region. Here, we show that ETF recognizes various GC-rich sequences including stretches of deoxycytidine or deoxyguanosine residues and GC boxes with similar affinities. ETF also binds to TATA boxes but with a lower affinity. ETF stimulated in vitro transcription from several promoters without TATA boxes but had little or no effect on TATA box-containing promoters even though they had strong ETF-binding sites. These inactive ETF-binding sites became functional when placed upstream of the EGFR promoter whose own ETF-binding sites were removed. Furthermore, when a TATA box was introduced into the EGFR promoter, the responsiveness to ETF was abolished. These results indicate that ETF is a specific transcription factor for promoters which do not contain TATA elements.

  6. Transcriptional analysis of heterologous gene expression using the endogenous sD promoter from Bacillus halodurans

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Crampton, Michael C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This presentation focused on the transcriptional analysis of heterologous gene expression using the endogenous sD promoter from Bacillus halodurans. It concludes to a successful implementation of a high throughput mRNA sandwich hybridisation...

  7. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF THE JUNB PROMOTER - ANALYSIS OF STAT-MEDIATED SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COFFER, P; LUTTICKEN, C; VANPUIJENBROEK, A; KLOPDEJONGE, M; HORN, F; KRUIJER, W

    1995-01-01

    The product of the junB gene is a member of the AP-1 family of transcription factors that activate transcription by binding to TPA-responsive elements (TREs) within the promoters of target genes, Components of AP-1 are immediate-early genes whose expression is upregulated by a plethora of

  8. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn, E-mail: LoneB.Madsen@agrsci.dk

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  9. Bidirectional promoters as important drivers for the emergence of species-specific transcripts.

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    Valer Gotea

    Full Text Available The diversification of gene functions has been largely attributed to the process of gene duplication. Novel examples of genes originating from previously untranscribed regions have been recently described without regard to a unifying functional mechanism for their emergence. Here we propose a model mechanism that could generate a large number of lineage-specific novel transcripts in vertebrates through the activation of bidirectional transcription from unidirectional promoters. We examined this model in silico using human transcriptomic and genomic data and identified evidence consistent with the emergence of more than 1,000 primate-specific transcripts. These are transcripts with low coding potential and virtually no functional annotation. They initiate at less than 1 kb upstream of an oppositely transcribed conserved protein coding gene, in agreement with the generally accepted definition of bidirectional promoters. We found that the genomic regions upstream of ancestral promoters, where the novel transcripts in our dataset reside, are characterized by preferential accumulation of transposable elements. This enhances the sequence diversity of regions located upstream of ancestral promoters, further highlighting their evolutionary importance for the emergence of transcriptional novelties. By applying a newly developed test for positive selection to transposable element-derived fragments in our set of novel transcripts, we found evidence of adaptive evolution in the human lineage in nearly 3% of the novel transcripts in our dataset. These findings indicate that at least some novel transcripts could become functionally relevant, and thus highlight the evolutionary importance of promoters, through their capacity for bidirectional transcription, for the emergence of novel genes.

  10. RNA polymerase III promoter elements enhance transcription of RNA polymerase II genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliviero, S.; Monaci, P.

    1988-02-25

    Using transient expression assays in cultured human cells the authors have observed that RNA Polymerase III promoter sequences exert a positive cis-acting enhancer effect on RNA Polymerase II transcription. A DNA segment containing a copy of the Alu repeated element enhances transcription of the liver specific Haptoglobin related (Hpr) promoter in Hepatoma cell lines but not in HeLa cells. A tRNA/sup pro/ gene acts as enhancer of the SV40 promoter both in Hepatoma and in HeLa cell lines. Transcription from the SV40 promoter is also enhanced by DNA segments containing only the box A or the box B of the tRNA/sup pro/ promoter.

  11. The Transcription Factor THO Promotes Transcription Initiation and Elongation by RNA Polymerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinfeng; French, Sarah L; Beyer, Ann L; Schneider, David A

    2016-02-05

    Although ribosomal RNA represents the majority of cellular RNA, and ribosome synthesis is closely connected to cell growth and proliferation rates, a complete understanding of the factors that influence transcription of ribosomal DNA is lacking. Here, we show that the THO complex positively affects transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). We found that THO physically associates with the rDNA repeat and interacts genetically with Pol I transcription initiation factors. Pol I transcription in hpr1 or tho2 null mutants is dramatically reduced to less than 20% of the WT level. Pol I occupancy of the coding region of the rDNA in THO mutants is decreased to ~50% of WT level. Furthermore, although the percentage of active rDNA repeats remains unaffected in the mutant cells, the overall rDNA copy number increases ~2-fold compared with WT. Together, these data show that perturbation of THO function impairs transcription initiation and elongation by Pol I, identifying a new cellular target for the conserved THO complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (−42 to −57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (−63 to −74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (−59 to −66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism. PMID:22750226

  13. The DOF transcription factor Dof5.1 influences leaf axial patterning by promoting Revoluta transcription in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyungsae

    2010-10-05

    Dof proteins are transcription factors that have a conserved single zinc finger DNA-binding domain. In this study, we isolated an activation tagging mutant Dof5.1-D exhibiting an upward-curling leaf phenotype due to enhanced expression of the REV gene that is required for establishing adaxialabaxial polarity. Dof5.1-D plants also had reduced transcript levels for IAA6 and IAA19 genes, indicating an altered auxin biosynthesis in Dof5.1-D. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the Dof5.1 DNA-binding motif and the REV promoter region indicated that the DNA-binding domain of Dof5.1 binds to a TAAAGT motif located in the 5′-distal promoter region of the REV promoter. Further, transient and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays verified binding activity of the Dof5.1 DNA-binding motif with the REV promoter. Consistent with binding assays, constitutive over-expression of the Dof5.1 DNA-binding domain in wild-type plants caused a downward-curling phenotype, whereas crossing Dof5.1-D to a rev mutant reverted the upward-curling phenotype of the Dof5.1-D mutant leaf to the wild-type. These results suggest that the Dof5.1 protein directly binds to the REV promoter and thereby regulates adaxialabaxial polarity. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-12-12

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Long distance relationships: enhancer-promoter communication and dynamic gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Judith; Horsfield, Julia A

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional regulation of gene transcription involves loop formation between enhancer and promoter elements, controlling spatiotemporal gene expression in multicellular organisms. Enhancers are usually located in non-coding DNA and can activate gene transcription by recruiting transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors and RNA Polymerase II. Research over the last few years has revealed that enhancers have tell-tale characteristics that facilitate their detection by several approaches, although the hallmarks of enhancers are not always uniform. Enhancers likely play an important role in the activation of genes by functioning as a primary point of contact for transcriptional activators, and by making physical contact with gene promoters often by means of a chromatin loop. Although numerous transcriptional regulators participate in the formation of chromatin loops that bring enhancers into proximity with promoters, the mechanism(s) of enhancer-promoter connectivity remain enigmatic. Here we discuss enhancer function, review some of the many proteins shown to be involved in establishing enhancer-promoter loops, and describe the dynamics of enhancer-promoter contacts during development, differentiation and in specific cell types. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowski, M.C.; Richard-Foy, H.; Wolford, R.G.; Berard, D.S.; Hager, G.L.

    1983-11-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papiloma virus type 1 (BVP). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BVP molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat ''enhancer'' element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. Two approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. The authors have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extend of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation.

  17. A conserved RNA polymerase III promoter required for gammaherpesvirus TMER transcription and microRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Kevin W; Claypool, David J; van Dyk, Linda F

    2014-07-01

    Canonical RNA polymerase III (pol III) type 2 promoters contain a single A and B box and are well documented for their role in tRNA and SINE transcription in eukaryotic cells. The genome of Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) contains eight polycistronic tRNA-microRNA encoded RNA (TMER) genes that are transcribed from a RNA pol III type 2-like promoter containing triplicated A box elements. Here, we demonstrate that the triplicated A box sequences are required in their entirety to produce functional MuHV-4 miRNAs. We also identify that these RNA pol III type 2-like promoters are conserved in eukaryotic genomes. Human and mouse predicted tRNA genes containing these promoters also show enrichment of alternative RNA pol III transcription termination sequences and are predicted to give rise to longer tRNA primary transcripts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulatory Enhancer-Core-Promoter Communication via Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Stark, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by genomic enhancers that recruit transcription factors and cofactors to activate transcription from target core promoters. Over the past years, thousands of enhancers and core promoters in animal genomes have been annotated, and we have learned much about the domain structure in which regulatory genomes are organized in animals. Enhancer-core-promoter targeting occurs at several levels, including regulatory domains, DNA accessibility, and sequence-encoded core-promoter specificities that are likely mediated by different regulatory proteins. We review here current knowledge about enhancer-core-promoter targeting, regulatory communication between enhancers and core promoters, and the protein factors involved. We conclude with an outlook on open questions that we find particularly interesting and that will likely lead to additional insights in the upcoming years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pc promoter from class 2 integrons and the cassette transcription pattern it evokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Érica Lourenço; dos Santos Freitas, Fernanda; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2011-04-01

    Integrons are considered expression systems due to the presence of Pc promoters that drive gene cassette transcription. The role and configurations of Pc are well known in class 1 integrons; however, this region has not yet been identified in class 2 integrons. This study aimed to characterize the Pc promoter from class 2 integrons and to determine the effect of gene cassette position on transcription driven by this promoter. The class 2 cassette arrays from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae strains were determined by sequencing. Transcription analyses were performed by real-time RT-PCR and relative quantification was carried out by comparing the transcripts of each normalized gene inserted in the integron to each other. The resistance profile was determined by the disc diffusion method. The class 2 Pc promoter was characterized by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and promoter prediction programs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of the dfrA1-sat2-aadA1-ybeA and sat2-aadA1-ybeA arrangements in K. pneumoniae and V. cholerae strains, respectively. Real-time RT-PCR showed that the transcription of the first cassettes was higher than that of distal ones in wild-type and recombinant strains. All strains were resistant, indicating cassette expression. The Pc promoter of class 2 integrons (-35 TTTAAT |16 bp| -10 TAAAAT) was determined based on in silico analyses and on the transcription start site sequence of the class 2 integron cassette array. The Pc from class 2 integrons was characterized for the first time and the cassette position effect on transcription was demonstrated.

  20. Reconstruction of transcription control networks in Mollicutes by high-throughput identification of promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Y Fisunov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the class Mollicutes have significantly reduced genomes and gene expression control systems. They are also efficient pathogens that can colonize a broad range of hosts including plants and animals. Despite their simplicity, Mollicutes demonstrate complex transcriptional responses to various conditions, which contradicts their reduction in gene expression regulation mechanisms. We analyzed the conservation and distribution of transcription regulators across the 50 Mollicutes species. The majority of the transcription factors regulate transport and metabolism, and there are four transcription factors that demonstrate significant conservation across the analyzed bacteria. These factors include repressors of chaperone HrcA, cell cycle regulator MraZ and two regulators with unclear function from the WhiA and YebC/PmpR families. We then used three representative species of the major clades of Mollicutes (Acholeplasma laidlawii, Spiroplasma melliferum and Mycoplasma gallisepticum to perform promoters mapping and activity quantitation. We revealed that Mollicutes evolved towards a promoter architecture simplification that correlates with a diminishing role of transcription regulation and an increase in transcriptional noise. Using the identified operons structure and a comparative genomics approach, we reconstructed the transcription control networks for these three species. The organization of the networks reflects the adaptation of bacteria to specific conditions and hosts.

  1. RECQ5 helicase promotes resolution of conflicts between replication and transcription in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Vaclav; Dobrovolna, Jana; Hühn, Daniela; Fryzelkova, Jana; Bartek, Jiri; Janscak, Pavel

    2016-08-15

    Collisions between replication and transcription machineries represent a significant source of genomic instability. RECQ5 DNA helicase binds to RNA-polymerase (RNAP) II during transcription elongation and suppresses transcription-associated genomic instability. Here, we show that RECQ5 also associates with RNAPI and enforces the stability of ribosomal DNA arrays. We demonstrate that RECQ5 associates with transcription complexes in DNA replication foci and counteracts replication fork stalling in RNAPI- and RNAPII-transcribed genes, suggesting that RECQ5 exerts its genome-stabilizing effect by acting at sites of replication-transcription collisions. Moreover, RECQ5-deficient cells accumulate RAD18 foci and BRCA1-dependent RAD51 foci that are both formed at sites of interference between replication and transcription and likely represent unresolved replication intermediates. Finally, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of resolution of replication-transcription collisions wherein the interaction between RECQ5 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promotes RAD18-dependent PCNA ubiquitination and the helicase activity of RECQ5 promotes the processing of replication intermediates. © 2016 Urban et al.

  2. Transcriptional Activity of the FUT1 Gene Promoter Region in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide a theoretical basis on the regulatory mechanism of the α-l,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT1 gene in pigs by analyzing the transcriptional activity of its promoter region. On the basis of the previously obtained promoter sequence, primers upstream and downstream of the gene were designed using the restriction endonucleases KpnI and HindIII respectively, and the recombinant plasmids of the pGL3-promoter were constructed by inserting promoter sequences with partially missing regions. The resultant mutants were observed by transient transfection assay into HEK293 cells, and the transcriptional activity of the promoter region was determined by luciferase activity. The 5'-flanking region of the FUT1 gene (−1150 to +50 bp exhibited promoter activity. The −1150-bp to −849-bp region showed negative regulation of the gene. The recombinant plasmid pGL3-898 showed the strongest luciferase activity, and the activity showed a decreasing trend when the deleted region was increased. Recombinant plasmids were successfully constructed, verified, and the positive and negative regulation areas and core promoter region were detected, providing a deeper insight into the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the FUT1 gene.

  3. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuze, Michael Rex [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Beliaev, Alexander S [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  4. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  5. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meier

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS. In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs, and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  6. Transcription Factor Sp1 Promotes the Expression of Porcine ROCK1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruirui Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 gene plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability, tumorigenesis and myogenesis. However, little is known about the regulatory elements governing the transcription of porcine ROCK1 gene. In the current study, the transcription start site (TSS was identified by 5’-RACE, and was found to differ from the predicted one. The region in ROCK1 promoter which is critical for promoter activity was investigated via progressive deletions. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the region from −604 to −554 bp contains responsive elements for Sp1. Subsequent experiments showed that ROCK1 promoter activity is enhanced by Sp1 in a dose-dependent manner, whereas treatment with specific siRNA repressed ROCK1 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, DNA pull down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed Sp1 can bind to this region. qRT-PCR and Western blotting research followed by overexpression or inhibition of Sp1 indicate that Sp1 can affect endogenous ROCK1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of Sp1 can promote the expression of myogenic differentiation 1(MyoD, myogenin (MyoG, myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Taken together, we conclude that Sp1 positively regulates ROCK1 transcription by directly binding to the ROCK1 promoter region (from −604 to −532 bp and may affect the process of myogenesis.

  7. The human β-globin gene promoter; nuclear protein factors and erythroid specific induction of transcription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Boer (Ernie); M. Antoniou (Michael); V. Mignotte; L. Wall (Lee); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe have shown that the promoter of the human beta-globin gene contains three regions in addition to the known CAC, CAAT and TATA box regions that are important for the induction of transcription in erythroid cells. By using DNaseI footprinting and gel mobility shift assays we were able

  8. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Marinello

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc stabilized by camptothecin (CPT have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  9. The promoter of the cereal VERNALIZATION1 gene is sufficient for transcriptional induction by prolonged cold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M Alonso-Peral

    Full Text Available The VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1 gene of temperate cereals is transcriptionally activated by prolonged cold during winter (vernalization to promote flowering. To investigate the mechanisms controlling induction of VRN1 by prolonged cold, different regions of the VRN1 gene were fused to the GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP reporter and expression of the resulting gene constructs was assayed in transgenic barley (Hordeum vulgare. A 2 kb segment of the promoter of VRN1 was sufficient for GFP expression in the leaves and shoot apex of transgenic barley plants. Fluorescence increased at the shoot apex prior to inflorescence initiation and was subsequently maintained in the developing inflorescence. The promoter was also sufficient for low-temperature induction of GFP expression. A naturally occurring insertion in the proximal promoter, which is associated with elevated VRN1 expression and early flowering in some spring wheats, did not abolish induction of VRN1 transcription by prolonged cold, however. A translational fusion of the promoter and transcribed regions of VRN1 to GFP, VRN1::GFP, was localised to nuclei of cells at the shoot apex of transgenic barley plants. The distribution of VRN1::GFP at the shoot apex was similar to the expression pattern of the VRN1 promoter-GFP reporter gene. Fluorescence from the VRN1::GFP fusion protein increased in the developing leaves after prolonged cold treatment. These observations suggest that the promoter of VRN1 is targeted by mechanisms that trigger vernalization-induced flowering in economically important temperate cereal crops.

  10. Regulatory elements and transcriptional control of chickenvasahomologue (CVH) promoter in chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, So Dam; Lee, Bo Ram; Hwang, Young Sun; Lee, Hong Jo; Rim, Jong Seop; Han, Jae Yong

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors of functional gametes, have distinct characteristics and exhibit several unique molecular mechanisms to maintain pluripotency and germness in comparison to somatic cells. They express germ cell-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) by modulating tissue-specific cis - and trans -regulatory elements. Studies on gene structures of chicken vasa homologue ( CVH ), a chicken RNA binding protein, involved in temporal and spatial regulation are thus important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate germ cell fate, but also for practical applications of primordial germ cells. However, very limited studies are available on regulatory elements that control germ cell-specific expression in chicken. Therefore, we investigated the intricate regulatory mechanism(s) that governs transcriptional control of CVH . We constructed green fluorescence protein (GFP) or luciferase reporter vectors containing the various 5' flanking regions of CVH gene. From the 5' deletion and fragmented assays in chicken PGCs, we have identified a CVH promoter that locates at -316 to +275 base pair fragment with the highest luciferase activity. Additionally, we confirmed for the first time that the 5' untranslated region (UTR) containing intron 1 is required for promoter activity of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Furthermore, using a transcription factor binding prediction, transcriptome analysis and siRNA-mediated knockdown, we have identified that a set of transcription factors play a role in the PGC-specific CVH gene expression. These results demonstrate that cis -elements and transcription factors localizing in the 5' flanking region including the 5' UTR and an intron are important for transcriptional regulation of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Finally, this information will contribute to research studies in areas of reproductive biology, constructing of germ cell-specific synthetic promoter for tracing primordial germ cells as well

  11. Two distinct repressive mechanisms for histone 3 lysine 4 methylation through promoting 3'-end antisense transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritis, Thanasis; Oreal, Vincent; Brabers, Nathalie; Maestroni, Laetitia; Vitaliano-Prunier, Adeline; Benschop, Joris J; van Hooff, Sander; van Leenen, Dik; Dargemont, Catherine; Géli, Vincent; Holstege, Frank C P

    2012-09-01

    Histone H3 di- and trimethylation on lysine 4 are major chromatin marks that correlate with active transcription. The influence of these modifications on transcription itself is, however, poorly understood. We have investigated the roles of H3K4 methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining genome-wide expression-profiles of mutants in the Set1 complex, COMPASS, that lays down these marks. Loss of H3K4 trimethylation has virtually no effect on steady-state or dynamically-changing mRNA levels. Combined loss of H3K4 tri- and dimethylation results in steady-state mRNA upregulation and delays in the repression kinetics of specific groups of genes. COMPASS-repressed genes have distinct H3K4 methylation patterns, with enrichment of H3K4me3 at the 3'-end, indicating that repression is coupled to 3'-end antisense transcription. Further analyses reveal that repression is mediated by H3K4me3-dependent 3'-end antisense transcription in two ways. For a small group of genes including PHO84, repression is mediated by a previously reported trans-effect that requires the antisense transcript itself. For the majority of COMPASS-repressed genes, however, it is the process of 3'-end antisense transcription itself that is the important factor for repression. Strand-specific qPCR analyses of various mutants indicate that this more prevalent mechanism of COMPASS-mediated repression requires H3K4me3-dependent 3'-end antisense transcription to lay down H3K4me2, which seems to serve as the actual repressive mark. Removal of the 3'-end antisense promoter also results in derepression of sense transcription and renders sense transcription insensitive to the additional loss of SET1. The derepression observed in COMPASS mutants is mimicked by reduction of global histone H3 and H4 levels, suggesting that the H3K4me2 repressive effect is linked to establishment of a repressive chromatin structure. These results indicate that in S. cerevisiae, the non-redundant role of H3K4 methylation by

  12. Two distinct repressive mechanisms for histone 3 lysine 4 methylation through promoting 3'-end antisense transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanasis Margaritis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 di- and trimethylation on lysine 4 are major chromatin marks that correlate with active transcription. The influence of these modifications on transcription itself is, however, poorly understood. We have investigated the roles of H3K4 methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining genome-wide expression-profiles of mutants in the Set1 complex, COMPASS, that lays down these marks. Loss of H3K4 trimethylation has virtually no effect on steady-state or dynamically-changing mRNA levels. Combined loss of H3K4 tri- and dimethylation results in steady-state mRNA upregulation and delays in the repression kinetics of specific groups of genes. COMPASS-repressed genes have distinct H3K4 methylation patterns, with enrichment of H3K4me3 at the 3'-end, indicating that repression is coupled to 3'-end antisense transcription. Further analyses reveal that repression is mediated by H3K4me3-dependent 3'-end antisense transcription in two ways. For a small group of genes including PHO84, repression is mediated by a previously reported trans-effect that requires the antisense transcript itself. For the majority of COMPASS-repressed genes, however, it is the process of 3'-end antisense transcription itself that is the important factor for repression. Strand-specific qPCR analyses of various mutants indicate that this more prevalent mechanism of COMPASS-mediated repression requires H3K4me3-dependent 3'-end antisense transcription to lay down H3K4me2, which seems to serve as the actual repressive mark. Removal of the 3'-end antisense promoter also results in derepression of sense transcription and renders sense transcription insensitive to the additional loss of SET1. The derepression observed in COMPASS mutants is mimicked by reduction of global histone H3 and H4 levels, suggesting that the H3K4me2 repressive effect is linked to establishment of a repressive chromatin structure. These results indicate that in S. cerevisiae, the non-redundant role of

  13. Transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ binds to the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and promotes mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, G.G.; Townsend, K.; Martin, A.

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase that functions during mitosis. Here we identify the transcriptional regulator, transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ, TIF1γ, as an APC/C-interacting protein that regulates APC/C function. TIF1γ is not a substrate for APC....../C-dependent ubiquitylation but instead, associates specifically with the APC/C holoenzyme and Cdc20 to affect APC/C activity and progression through mitosis. RNA interference studies indicate that TIF1γ knockdown results in a specific reduction in APC/C ubiquitin ligase activity, the stabilization of APC/C substrates......, and an increase in the time taken for cells to progress through mitosis from nuclear envelope breakdown to anaphase. TIF1γ knockdown cells are also characterized by the inappropriate presence of cyclin A at metaphase, and an increase in the number of cells that fail to undergo metaphase-to-anaphase transition...

  14. Yap/Taz transcriptional activity in endothelial cells promotes intramembranous ossification via the BMP pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Mami; Nagasawa, Ayumi; Terai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis is categorized into two groups based on developmental histology, intramembranous and endochondral ossification. The role of blood vessels during endochondral ossification is well known, while their role in intramembranous ossification, especially the intertissue pathway, is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate endothelial Yap/Taz is a novel regulator of intramembranous ossification in zebrafish. Appropriate blood flow is required for Yap/Taz transcriptional activation in endothelial cells and intramembranous ossification. Additionally, Yap/Taz transcriptional activity in endothelial cells specifically promotes intramembranous ossification. BMP expression by Yap/Taz transactivation in endothelial cells is also identified as a bridging factor between blood vessels and intramembranous ossification. Furthermore, the expression of Runx2 in pre-osteoblast cells is a downstream target of Yap/Taz transcriptional activity in endothelial cells. Our results provide novel insight into the relationship between blood flow and ossification by demonstrating intertissue regulation. PMID:27273480

  15. Mitochondrial and nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor ATFS-1 promotes OXPHOS recovery during the UPRmt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargund, Amrita M.; Fiorese, Christopher J.; Pellegrino, Mark W.; Deng, Pan; Haynes, Cole M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial diseases and aging are associated with defects in the oxidative phosphorylation machinery (OXPHOS), which are the only complexes composed of proteins encoded by separate genomes. To better understand genome coordination and OXPHOS recovery during mitochondrial dysfunction, we examined ATFS-1, a transcription factor that regulates mitochondria-to-nuclear communication during the mitochondrial UPR, via ChIP-sequencing. Surprisingly, in addition to regulating mitochondrial chaperone, OXPHOS complex assembly factor, and glycolysis genes, ATFS-1 bound directly to OXPHOS gene promoters in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Interestingly, atfs-1 was required to limit the accumulation of OXPHOS transcripts during mitochondrial stress, which required accumulation of ATFS-1 in the nucleus and mitochondria. Because balanced ATFS-1 accumulation promoted OXPHOS complex assembly and function, our data suggest that ATFS-1 stimulates respiratory recovery by fine-tuning OXPHOS expression to match the capacity of the suboptimal protein-folding environment in stressed mitochondria, while simultaneously increasing proteostasis capacity. PMID:25773600

  16. PROMoter uPstream Transcripts share characteristics with mRNAs and are produced upstream of all three major types of mammalian promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preker, Pascal; Almvig, Kristina; Christensen, Marianne S

    2011-01-01

    or RNAPIII also produce PROMPTs that are targeted by the exosome. RNAPIII PROMPTs bear hallmarks of RNAPII promoter-associated RNAs, explaining the physical presence of RNAPII upstream of many RNAPIII-transcribed genes. We propose that RNAPII activity upstream gene promoters are wide-spread and integral......PROMoter uPstream Transcripts (PROMPTs) were identified as a new class of human RNAs, which are heterologous in length and produced only upstream of the promoters of active protein-coding genes. Here, we show that PROMPTs carry 3'-adenosine tails and 5'-cap structures. However, unlike m...... transcription cannot solely be assigned to poor CTD phosphorylation. Conditions that reduce gene transcription increase RNAPII occupancy of the upstream PROMPT region, suggesting that they reside in a common transcription compartment. Surprisingly, gene promoters that are actively transcribed by RNAPI...

  17. Synthetic Promoters and Transcription Factors for Heterologous Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Machens

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal systems for heterologous protein expression as well as for the engineering of synthetic gene regulatory circuits in hosts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae depend on synthetic transcription factors (synTFs and corresponding cis-regulatory binding sites. We have constructed and characterized a set of synTFs based on either transcription activator-like effectors or CRISPR/Cas9, and corresponding small synthetic promoters (synPs with minimal sequence identity to the host’s endogenous promoters. The resulting collection of functional synTF/synP pairs confers very low background expression under uninduced conditions, while expression output upon induction of the various synTFs covers a wide range and reaches induction factors of up to 400. The broad spectrum of expression strengths that is achieved will be useful for various experimental setups, e.g., the transcriptional balancing of expression levels within heterologous pathways or the construction of artificial regulatory networks. Furthermore, our analyses reveal simple rules that enable the tuning of synTF expression output, thereby allowing easy modification of a given synTF/synP pair. This will make it easier for researchers to construct tailored transcriptional control systems.

  18. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5‧ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors.

  19. Rat tenascin-R gene: structure, chromosome location and transcriptional activity of promoter and exon 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprini, A; Gherzi, R; Vecchi, E; Borsi, L; Zardi, L; Siri, A

    1998-01-01

    Tenascin-R is an extracellular matrix protein expressed exclusively in the central nervous system where it is thought to play a relevant role in regulating neurite outgrowth. We have i) cloned the cDNA of the rat tenascin-R 5' region; ii) defined its genomic organization, obtaining the sequence of two novel untranslated exons; iii) mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13q23 and suggested a previously unreported synteny between rat chromosome 13q23, human chromosome 1q24, and mouse chromosome 4E; and iv) sequenced and characterized the elements responsible for its neural cell-restricted transcription. We found that two discrete regions of the rat gene (the first in the proximal promoter, the second in the first exon) are independently able to activate to a high degree the transcription of a reporter gene in either human or rat neuroblastoma cell lines but not in other cell lines. Based on this observation, we re-evaluated the arrangement of transcriptionally active regions in the human tenascin-R gene we recently cloned and found that the human gene also contains an exon sequence able to initiate and sustain transcription independently of promoter sequences.

  20. The splicing machinery promotes RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Liu, Jun; Ma, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Su-Wei; Dou, Kun; Huang, Huan-Wei; Cai, Tao; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; He, Xin-Jian

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation in transposons and other DNA repeats is conserved in plants as well as in animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway directs de novo DNA methylation. We performed a forward genetic screen for suppressors of the DNA demethylase mutant ros1 and identified a novel Zinc-finger and OCRE domain-containing Protein 1 (ZOP1) that promotes Pol IV-dependent siRNA accumulation, DNA methylation, and transcriptional silencing. Whole-genome methods disclosed the genome-wide effects of zop1 on Pol IV-dependent siRNA accumulation and DNA methylation, suggesting that ZOP1 has both RdDM-dependent and -independent roles in transcriptional silencing. We demonstrated that ZOP1 is a pre-mRNA splicing factor that associates with several typical components of the splicing machinery as well as with Pol II. Immunofluorescence assay revealed that ZOP1 overlaps with Cajal body and is partially colocalized with NRPE1 and DRM2. Moreover, we found that the other development-defective splicing mutants tested including mac3a3b, mos4, mos12 and mos14 show defects in RdDM and transcriptional silencing. We propose that the splicing machinery rather than specific splicing factors is involved in promoting RdDM and transcriptional silencing. PMID:23524848

  1. Application of neural networks and information theory to the identification of E. coli transcriptional promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abremski, K. (Du Pont Merck Pharmaceutical Co., Wilmington, DE (USA). Experimental Station); Sirotkin, K. (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Lapedes, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The Humane Genome Project has as its eventual goal the determination of the entire DNA sequence of man, which comprises approximately 3 billion base pairs. An important aspect of this project will be the analysis of the sequence to locate regions of biological importance. New computer methods will be needed to automate and facilitate this task. In this paper, we have investigated use of neural networks for the recognition of functional patterns in biological sequences. The prediction of Escherichia coli transcriptional promoters was chosen as a model system for these studies. Two approaches were employed. In the fist method, a mutual information analysis of promoter and nonpromoter sequences was carried out to demonstrate the informative base positions that help to distinguish promoter sequences from non-promoter sequences. These base positions were than used to train a Perceptron to predict new promoter sequences. In the second method, the experimental knowledge of promoters was used to indicate the important base positions in the sequence. These base positions were used to train a back propagation network with hidden units which represented regions of sequence conservation found in promoters. With both types of networks, prediction of new promoter sequences was greater than 96.9%. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Overlapping CRE and E-box promoter elements can independently regulate COX-2 gene transcription in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, J R; Rivadeneira, D E; Mackrell, P J; Duff, M; Stapleton, P P; Mack-Strong, V; Maddali, S; Smyth, G P; Tanabe, T; Daly, J M

    2001-05-11

    Macrophage cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) transcription is mediated through the collaboration of different promoter elements. Here, the role of an overlapping cyclic AMP responsive element (CRE)/E-box was investigated. Nuclear proteins bound both the CRE and E-box, which synergized with other promoter elements to induce COX-2 transcription. Endotoxin induced binding of nuclear proteins to the CRE and E-box and each element independently induced higher COX-2 transcription levels than the overlapping CRE/E-box. Transcription factors associated with the CRE binding complex included c-Jun and CRE binding protein and with the E-box binding complex USF-1; their overexpression significantly induced COX-2 transcription. Therefore, both CRE and E-box promoter elements regulate COX-2 transcription in macrophages.

  3. Set2 Methyltransferase Facilitates DNA Replication and Promotes Genotoxic Stress Responses through MBF-Dependent Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chun Pai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modification through histone H3 lysine 36 methylation by the SETD2 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining genome stability. Here, we describe a role for Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation in facilitating DNA replication and the transcriptional responses to both replication stress and DNA damage through promoting MluI cell-cycle box (MCB binding factor (MBF-complex-dependent transcription in fission yeast. Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR expression, reduced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP synthesis, altered replication origin firing, and a checkpoint-dependent S-phase delay. Accordingly, prolonged S phase in the absence of Set2 is suppressed by increasing dNTP synthesis. Furthermore, H3K36 is di- and tri-methylated at these MBF gene promoters, and Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF binding and transcription in response to genotoxic stress. Together, these findings provide new insights into how H3K36 methylation facilitates DNA replication and promotes genotoxic stress responses in fission yeast.

  4. RNA sequencing on Solanum lycopersicum trichomes identifies transcription factors that activate terpene synthase promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulou, Eleni A; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2014-05-27

    Glandular trichomes are production and storage organs of specialized metabolites such as terpenes, which play a role in the plant's defense system. The present study aimed to shed light on the regulation of terpene biosynthesis in Solanum lycopersicum trichomes by identification of transcription factors (TFs) that control the expression of terpene synthases. A trichome transcriptome database was created with a total of 27,195 contigs that contained 743 annotated TFs. Furthermore a quantitative expression database was obtained of jasmonic acid-treated trichomes. Sixteen candidate TFs were selected for further analysis. One TF of the MYC bHLH class and one of the WRKY class were able to transiently transactivate S. lycopersicum terpene synthase promoters in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Strikingly, SlMYC1 was shown to act synergistically with a previously identified zinc finger-like TF, Expression of Terpenoids 1 (SlEOT1) in transactivating the SlTPS5 promoter. High-throughput sequencing of tomato stem trichomes led to the discovery of two transcription factors that activated several terpene synthase promoters. Our results identified new elements of the transcriptional regulation of tomato terpene biosynthesis in trichomes, a largely unexplored field.

  5. Distinguishing the Transcription Regulation Patterns in Promoters of Human Genes with Different Function or Evolutionary Age

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2012-07-01

    Distinguishing transcription regulatory patterns of different gene groups is a common problem in various bioinformatics studies. In this work we developed a methodology to deal with such a problem based on machine learning techniques. We applied our method to two biologically important problems related to detecting a difference in transcription regulation of: a/ protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human, as well as b/ a difference between primate-specific and non-primate-specific long non-coding RNAs. Our method is capable to classify RNAs using various regulatory features of genes that transcribe into these RNAs, such as nucleotide frequencies, transcription factor binding sites, de novo sequence motifs, CpG islands, repetitive elements, histone modification marks, and others. Ten-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish protein-coding and non-coding RNAs with accuracy above 80%. Twenty-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish primate-specific from non-primate-specific promoters of lncRNAs with accuracy above 80%. Consequently, we can hypothesize that transcription of the groups of genes mentioned above are regulated by different mechanisms. Feature selection techniques allowed us to reduce the number of features significantly while keeping the accuracy around 80%. Consequently, we can conclude that selected features play significant role in transcription regulation of coding and non-coding genes, as well as primate-specific and non-primate-specific lncRNA genes.

  6. Local regulation of gene expression by lncRNA promoters, transcription and splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Haines, Jenna E; Perez, Elizabeth M; Munson, Glen; Chen, Jenny; Kane, Michael; McDonel, Patrick E; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S

    2016-11-17

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed to produce thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). A few of these lncRNAs have been shown to recruit regulatory complexes through RNA-protein interactions to influence the expression of nearby genes, and it has been suggested that many other lncRNAs can also act as local regulators. Such local functions could explain the observation that lncRNA expression is often correlated with the expression of nearby genes. However, these correlations have been challenging to dissect and could alternatively result from processes that are not mediated by the lncRNA transcripts themselves. For example, some gene promoters have been proposed to have dual functions as enhancers, and the process of transcription itself may contribute to gene regulation by recruiting activating factors or remodelling nucleosomes. Here we use genetic manipulation in mouse cell lines to dissect 12 genomic loci that produce lncRNAs and find that 5 of these loci influence the expression of a neighbouring gene in cis. Notably, none of these effects requires the specific lncRNA transcripts themselves and instead involves general processes associated with their production, including enhancer-like activity of gene promoters, the process of transcription, and the splicing of the transcript. Furthermore, such effects are not limited to lncRNA loci: we find that four out of six protein-coding loci also influence the expression of a neighbour. These results demonstrate that cross-talk among neighbouring genes is a prevalent phenomenon that can involve multiple mechanisms and cis-regulatory signals, including a role for RNA splice sites. These mechanisms may explain the function and evolution of some genomic loci that produce lncRNAs and broadly contribute to the regulation of both coding and non-coding genes.

  7. Regulation of Human Cytomegalovirus Transcription in Latency: Beyond the Major Immediate-Early Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Matthew; Sinclair, John

    2013-01-01

    Lytic infection of differentiated cell types with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in the temporal expression of between 170–200 open reading frames (ORFs). A number of studies have demonstrated the temporal regulation of these ORFs and that this is orchestrated by both viral and cellular mechanisms associated with the co-ordinated recruitment of transcription complexes and, more recently, higher order chromatin structure. Importantly, HCMV, like all herpes viruses, establishes a lifelong latent infection of the host—one major site of latency being the undifferentiated haematopoietic progenitor cells resident in the bone marrow. Crucially, the establishment of latency is concomitant with the recruitment of cellular enzymes that promote extensive methylation of histones bound to the major immediate early promoter. As such, the repressive chromatin structure formed at the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) elicits inhibition of IE gene expression and is a major factor involved in maintenance of HCMV latency. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that a distinct subset of viral genes is also expressed during latency. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms that control the expression of these latency-associated transcripts and illustrate that regulation of these latency-associated promoters is also subject to chromatin mediated regulation and that the instructive observations previously reported regarding the negative regulation of the MIEP during latency are paralleled in the regulation of latent gene expression. PMID:23736881

  8. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic promoter databases as valuable tools in exploring the regulation of gene transcription: a comprehensive overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Małgorzata; Wysokińska, Halina; Kuźma, Łukasz; Szymczyk, Piotr

    2017-11-02

    The complete exploration of the regulation of gene expression remains one of the top-priority goals for researchers. As the regulation is mainly controlled at the level of transcription by promoters, study on promoters and findings are of great importance. This review summarizes forty selected databases that centralize experimental and theoretical knowledge regarding the organization of promoters, interacting transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. The presented databases offer researchers valuable support in elucidating the regulation of gene transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct and histone-specific modifications mediate positive versus negative transcriptional regulation of TSHalpha promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hormonally-regulated histone modifications that govern positive versus negative transcription of target genes are poorly characterized despite their importance for normal and pathological endocrine function. There have been only a few studies examining chromatin modifications on target gene promoters by nuclear hormone receptors. Moreover, these studies have focused on positively-regulated target genes. TSHalpha, a heterodimer partner for thyrotropin (TSH, is secreted by the pituitary gland. T(3 negatively regulates TSHalpha gene expression via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs which belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, whereas thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH positively regulates via the TRH receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor.We studied regulation of the TSHalpha gene by cAMP and T(3 using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays in stably-transfected rat pituitary cells containing the human TSHalpha promoter. Interestingly, cAMP selectively increased histone H4 acetylation whereas, as previously reported, T(3 induced histone H3 acetylation. In particular, cAMP increased H4K5 and H4K8 acetylation and decreased H4K20 trimethylation, modifications associated with transcriptional activation. T(3 increased H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation; however, it also decreased H3K27 acetylation and increased H3K27 trimethylation which are associated with transcriptional repression. Of note, cAMP recruited pCREB, CBP/p300, and PCAF to the promoter whereas T(3 caused dissociation of NCoR/SMRT and HDAC3. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant thyroid hormone receptor (TR from a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH led to less T(3-dependent negative regulation and partially blocked histone H3 modifications of the TSHalpha promoter.Our findings show that non-overlapping and specific histone modifications determine positive versus negative transcriptional regulation, and integrate opposing hormonal and

  10. A novel pea mitochondrial in vitro transcription system recognizes homologous and heterologous mRNA and tRNA promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, S; Hatzack, F; Brennicke, A

    1995-09-22

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the transcription initiation process in mitochondria of dicotyledonous plants, an in vitro transcription system was established for pea (Pisum sativum L.). The partially purified mitochondrial protein extract initiates transcription on homologous pea templates as well as on heterologous mitochondrial DNA from other dicot plant species. In vitro transcription begins within the nonanucleotide 5'-(-7)CRTAAGAGA(+2)-3' (transcription start site is underlined) conserved at most of the identified transcription initiation sites in dicot plant mitochondria. The in vitro initiation at promoters of protein as well as of tRNA coding genes indicates a common mode of transcription initiation for different types of RNA. The competent recognition of different heterologous templates supports a general functional role of the conserved nonanucleotide within mitochondrial promoters of dicotyledonous plants. Initial studies of the promoter structure by deletion analysis in the 5' region of the pea atp9 promoter show that in addition to the conserved nonanucleotide, which is essential for transcription initiation in vitro, sequences up to 25 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site are necessary for an efficient initiation event.

  11. Genome-wide determination of transcription start sites reveals new insights into promoter structures in the actinomycete Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersmeier, Andreas; Pfeifer-Sancar, Katharina; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2017-09-10

    The genome-wide identification of transcription start sites, enabled by high-throughput sequencing of a cDNA library enriched for native 5' transcript ends, is ideally suited for the analysis of promoters. Here, the transcriptome of Corynebacterium glutamicum, a non-pathogenic soil bacterium from the actinomycetes branch that is used in industry for the production of amino acids, was analysed by transcriptome sequencing of the 5'-ends of native transcripts. Total RNA samples were harvested from the exponential phase of growth, therefore the study mainly addressed promoters recognized by the main house-keeping sigma factor σ A . The identification of 2454 transcription start sites (TSS) allowed the detailed analysis of most promoters recognized by σ A and furthermore enabled us to form different promoter groups according to their location relative to protein-coding regions. These groups included leaderless transcripts (546 promoters), short-leadered (leadered (>500 bases) transcripts (173) as well as intragenic (557) and antisense transcripts (261). All promoters and the individual groups were searched for information, e.g. conserved residues and promoter motifs, and general design features as well as group-specific preferences were identified. A purine was found highly favored as TSS, whereas the -1 position was dominated by pyrimidines. The spacer between TSS and -10 region were consistently 6-7 bases and the -10 promoter motif was generally visible, whereas a recognizable -35 region was only occurring in a smaller fraction of promoters (7.5%) and enriched for leadered and antisense transcripts but depleted for leaderless transcripts. Promoters showing an extended -10 region were especially frequent in case of non-canonical -10 motifs (45.5%). Two bases downstream of the -10 core region, a G was conserved, exceeding 40% abundance in most groups. This fraction reached 74.6% for a group of putative σ B -dependent promoters, thus giving a hint to a specific

  12. The transcription factor ATF2 promotes melanoma metastasis by suppressing protein fucosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Eric; Feng, Yongmei; Claps, Giuseppina; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Perlina, Ally; Donn, Dylan; Jilaveanu, Lucia; Kluger, Harriet; Freeze, Hudson H.; Ronai, Ze’ev A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most lethal skin cancers worldwide, primarily because of its propensity to metastasize. Thus, the elucidation of mechanisms that govern metastatic propensity is urgently needed. We found that protein kinase Cε (PKCε)–mediated activation of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) controls the migratory and invasive behaviors of melanoma cells. PKCε-dependent phosphorylation of ATF2 promoted its transcriptional repression of the gene encoding fucokinase (FUK), which mediates the fucose salvage pathway and thus global cellular protein fucosylation. In primary melanocytes and cell lines representing early-stage melanoma, the abundance of PKCε-phosphorylated ATF2 was low, thereby enabling the expression of FUK and cellular protein fucosylation, which promoted cellular adhesion and reduced motility. In contrast, increased expression of the gene encoding PKCε and abundance of phosphorylated, transcriptionally active ATF2 were observed in advanced-stage melanomas and correlated with decreased FUK expression, decreased cellular protein fucosylation, attenuated cell adhesion, and increased cell motility. Restoring fucosylation in mice either by dietary fucose supplementation or by genetic manipulation of murine Fuk expression attenuated primary melanoma growth, increased the number of intratumoral natural killer cells, and decreased distal metastasis in murine isograft models. Tumor microarray analysis of human melanoma specimens confirmed reduced fucosylation in metastatic tumors and a better prognosis for primary melanomas that had high abundance of fucosylation. Thus, inhibiting PKCε or ATF2 or increasing protein fucosylation in tumor cells may improve clinical outcome in melanoma patients. PMID:26645581

  13. The transcription factor ATF2 promotes melanoma metastasis by suppressing protein fucosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Eric; Feng, Yongmei; Claps, Giuseppina; Fukuda, Michiko N; Perlina, Ally; Donn, Dylan; Jilaveanu, Lucia; Kluger, Harriet; Freeze, Hudson H; Ronai, Ze'ev A

    2015-12-08

    Melanoma is one of the most lethal skin cancers worldwide, primarily because of its propensity to metastasize. Thus, the elucidation of mechanisms that govern metastatic propensity is urgently needed. We found that protein kinase Cε (PKCε)-mediated activation of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) controls the migratory and invasive behaviors of melanoma cells. PKCε-dependent phosphorylation of ATF2 promoted its transcriptional repression of the gene encoding fucokinase (FUK), which mediates the fucose salvage pathway and thus global cellular protein fucosylation. In primary melanocytes and cell lines representing early-stage melanoma, the abundance of PKCε-phosphorylated ATF2 was low, thereby enabling the expression of FUK and cellular protein fucosylation, which promoted cellular adhesion and reduced motility. In contrast, increased expression of the gene encoding PKCε and abundance of phosphorylated, transcriptionally active ATF2 were observed in advanced-stage melanomas and correlated with decreased FUK expression, decreased cellular protein fucosylation, attenuated cell adhesion, and increased cell motility. Restoring fucosylation in mice either by dietary fucose supplementation or by genetic manipulation of murine Fuk expression attenuated primary melanoma growth, increased the number of intratumoral natural killer cells, and decreased distal metastasis in murine isograft models. Tumor microarray analysis of human melanoma specimens confirmed reduced fucosylation in metastatic tumors and a better prognosis for primary melanomas that had high abundance of fucosylation. Thus, inhibiting PKCε or ATF2 or increasing protein fucosylation in tumor cells may improve clinical outcome in melanoma patients. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. A promoter polymorphism of the alpha2-HS glycoprotein gene is associated with its transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Mari; Takata, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yukio; Suehiro, Tadashi; Inada, Shojiro; Osaki, Fumiaki; Arii, Kaoru; Kumon, Yoshitaka; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2008-01-01

    alpha2-Heremans Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG), also designated fetuin-A, is an abundant plasma protein that is expressed in hepatocytes. AHSG/fetuin-A has diverse biological functions including regulation of calcium homeostasis and inhibition of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The aim of this study was to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the AHSG gene that can be involved in regulation of AHSG/fetuin-A expression. By a cycle sequencing method, two common SNPs in the promoter region of AHSG gene, -799A/T (rs2248690, dbSNP ID) and -425G/T (rs2077119), were identified. A reporter gene assay using HepG2 cells showed that the -799A allele had significantly higher promoter activity compared with the -799T allele. The overexpression of c-Fos/c-Jun significantly repressed transcriptional activity and a gel shift assay showed that the -799T DNA fragment had a greater affinity for transcription factor AP-1 than the -799A. In 40 unrelated healthy subjects, serum AHSG/fetuin-A levels increased with the following order of genotypes: -799TTAHSG gene affects the AHSG gene transcription, possibly by producing different association with AP-1.

  15. Promoter Identification and Transcription Analysis of Penicillin-Binding Protein Genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae R6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Katharina; Pipo, Julia; Schweizer, Inga; Hakenbeck, Regine; Denapaite, Dalia

    2016-09-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are membrane-associated enzymes, which are involved in the last two steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, and some of them are key players in cell division. Furthermore, they are targets of β-lactams, the most widely used antibiotics. Nevertheless, very little is known about the expression and regulation of PBP genes. Using transcriptional mapping, we now determined the promoter regions of PBP genes from the laboratory strain Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 and examined the expression profile of these six promoters. The extended -10 region is highly conserved and complies with a σ(A)-type promoter consensus sequence. In contrast, the -35 region is poorly conserved, indicating the possibility for differential PBP regulation. All PBP promoters were constitutively expressed and highly active during the exponential and early stationary growth phase. However, the individual expression of PBP promoters varied approximately fourfold, with pbp1a being the highest and pbp3 the lowest. Furthermore, the deletion of one nucleotide in the spacer region of the PBP3 promoter reduced pbp3 expression ∼10-fold. The addition of cefotaxime above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) did not affect PBP expression in the penicillin-sensitive R6 strain. No evidence for regulation of S. pneumoniae PBP genes was obtained.

  16. Transcriptional downregulation of rice rpL32 gene under abiotic stress is associated with removal of transcription factors within the promoter region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipto Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulation of ribosomal proteins in plants under stress conditions has not been well studied. Although a few reports have shown stress-specific post-transcriptional and translational mechanisms involved in downregulation of ribosomal proteins yet stress-responsive transcriptional regulation of ribosomal proteins is largely unknown in plants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present work, transcriptional regulation of genes encoding rice 60S ribosomal protein L32 (rpL32 in response to salt stress has been studied. Northern and RT-PCR analyses showed a significant downregulation of rpL32 transcripts under abiotic stress conditions in rice. Of the four rpL32 genes in rice genome, the gene on chromosome 8 (rpL32_8.1 showed a higher degree of stress-responsive downregulation in salt sensitive rice variety than in tolerant one and its expression reverted to its original level upon withdrawal of stress. The nuclear run-on and promoter:reporter assays revealed that the downregulation of this gene is transcriptional and originates within the promoter region. Using in vivo footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, cis-elements in the promoter of rpL32_8.1 showing reduced binding to proteins in shoots of salt stressed rice seedlings were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The present work is one of the few reports on study of stress downregulated genes. The data revealed that rpL32 gene is transcriptionally downregulated under abiotic stress in rice and that this transcriptional downregulation is associated with the removal of transcription factors from specific promoter elements.

  17. Human Cockayne syndrome B protein reciprocally communicates with mitochondrial proteins and promotes transcriptional elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Sykora, Peter; Wilson, David M.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare human disorder characterized by pathologies of premature aging, neurological abnormalities, sensorineural hearing loss and cachectic dwarfism. With recent data identifying CS proteins as physical components of mitochondria, we sought to identify protein partners and roles for Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein in this organelle. CSB was found to physically interact with and modulate the DNA-binding activity of the major mitochondrial nucleoid, DNA replication and transcription protein TFAM. Components of the mitochondrial transcription apparatus (mitochondrial RNA polymerase, transcription factor 2B and TFAM) all functionally interacted with CSB and stimulated its double-stranded DNA-dependent adenosine triphosphatase activity. Moreover, we found that patient-derived CSB-deficient cells exhibited a defect in efficient mitochondrial transcript production and that CSB specifically promoted elongation by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase in vitro. These observations provide strong evidence for the importance of CSB in maintaining mitochondrial function and argue that the pathologies associated with CS are in part, a direct result of the roles that CSB plays in mitochondria. PMID:22743267

  18. The transcription factor TFII-I promotes DNA translesion synthesis and genomic stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farjana J Fattah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Translesion synthesis (TLS enables DNA replication through damaged bases, increases cellular DNA damage tolerance, and maintains genomic stability. The sliding clamp PCNA and the adaptor polymerase Rev1 coordinate polymerase switching during TLS. The polymerases Pol η, ι, and κ insert nucleotides opposite damaged bases. Pol ζ, consisting of the catalytic subunit Rev3 and the regulatory subunit Rev7, then extends DNA synthesis past the lesion. Here, we show that Rev7 binds to the transcription factor TFII-I in human cells. TFII-I is required for TLS and DNA damage tolerance. The TLS function of TFII-I appears to be independent of its role in transcription, but requires homodimerization and binding to PCNA. We propose that TFII-I bridges PCNA and Pol ζ to promote TLS. Our findings extend the general principle of component sharing among divergent nuclear processes and implicate TLS deficiency as a possible contributing factor in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  19. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  20. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  1. Engineering orthogonal dual transcription factors for multi-input synthetic promoters\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Brodel, Andreas K.; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Isalan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology has seen an explosive growth in the capability of engineering artificial gene circuits from transcription factors (TFs), particularly in bacteria. However, most artificial networks still employ the same core set of TFs (for example LacI, TetR and cI). The TFs mostly function via repression and it is difficult to integrate multiple inputs in promoter logic. Here we present to our knowledge the first set of dual activator-repressor switches for orthogonal logic gates, based on...

  2. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  3. Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor II Regulates Renin Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression. PMID:22645148

  4. Characterization of the human DYRK1A promoter and its regulation by the transcription factor E2F1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galceran Juan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of the human DYRK1A gene due to the presence of a third gene copy in trisomy 21 is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. The observation of gene dosage effects in transgenic mouse models implies that subtle changes in expression levels can affect the correct function of the DYRK1A gene product. We have therefore characterized the promoter of the human DYRK1A gene in order to study its transcriptional regulation. Results Transcription start sites of the human DYRK1A gene are distributed over 800 bp within a region previously identified as an unmethylated CpG island. We have identified a new alternative noncoding 5'-exon of the DYRK1A gene which is located 772 bp upstream of the previously described transcription start site. Transcription of the two splicing variants is controlled by non-overlapping promoter regions that can independently drive reporter gene expression. We found no evidence of cell- or tissue-specific promoter usage, but the two promoter regions differed in their activity and their regulation. The sequence upstream of exon 1A (promoter region A induced about 10-fold higher reporter gene activity than the sequence upstream of exon 1B (promoter region B. Overexpression of the transcription factor E2F1 increased DYRK1A mRNA levels in Saos2 and Phoenix cells and enhanced the activity of promoter region B three- to fourfold. Conclusion The identification of two alternatively spliced transcripts whose transcription is initiated from differentially regulated promoters regions indicates that the expression of the DYRK1A gene is subject to complex control mechanisms. The regulatory effect of E2F1 suggests that DYRK1A may play a role in cell cycle regulation or apoptosis.

  5. PlantPAN 2.0: an update of plant promoter analysis navigator for reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi-Nga; Zheng, Han-Qin; Wu, Nai-Yun; Chien, Chia-Hung; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chiang-Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Hou, Ping-Fu; Yang, Tien-Yi; Chang, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-04

    Transcription factors (TFs) are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins acting as critical regulators of gene expression. The Plant Promoter Analysis Navigator (PlantPAN; http://PlantPAN2.itps.ncku.edu.tw) provides an informative resource for detecting transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), corresponding TFs, and other important regulatory elements (CpG islands and tandem repeats) in a promoter or a set of plant promoters. Additionally, TFBSs, CpG islands, and tandem repeats in the conserve regions between similar gene promoters are also identified. The current PlantPAN release (version 2.0) contains 16 960 TFs and 1143 TF binding site matrices among 76 plant species. In addition to updating of the annotation information, adding experimentally verified TF matrices, and making improvements in the visualization of transcriptional regulatory networks, several new features and functions are incorporated. These features include: (i) comprehensive curation of TF information (response conditions, target genes, and sequence logos of binding motifs, etc.), (ii) co-expression profiles of TFs and their target genes under various conditions, (iii) protein-protein interactions among TFs and their co-factors, (iv) TF-target networks, and (v) downstream promoter elements. Furthermore, a dynamic transcriptional regulatory network under various conditions is provided in PlantPAN 2.0. The PlantPAN 2.0 is a systematic platform for plant promoter analysis and reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks.

  7. Identification of Cis-Acting Promoter Elements in Cold- and Dehydration-Induced Transcriptional Pathways in Arabidopsis, Rice, and Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Todaka, Daisuke; Mizoi, Junya; Yoshida, Takuya; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Matsukura, Satoko; Takasaki, Hironori; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.; Yoshiwara, Kyouko; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of three plants, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and soybean (Glycine max), have been sequenced, and their many genes and promoters have been predicted. In Arabidopsis, cis-acting promoter elements involved in cold- and dehydration-responsive gene expression have been extensively analysed; however, the characteristics of such cis-acting promoter sequences in cold- and dehydration-inducible genes of rice and soybean remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed microarray analyses using the three species, and compared characteristics of identified cold- and dehydration-inducible genes. Transcription profiles of the cold- and dehydration-responsive genes were similar among these three species, showing representative upregulated (dehydrin/LEA) and downregulated (photosynthesis-related) genes. All (46 = 4096) hexamer sequences in the promoters of the three species were investigated, revealing the frequency of conserved sequences in cold- and dehydration-inducible promoters. A core sequence of the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE) was the most conserved in dehydration-inducible promoters of all three species, suggesting that transcriptional regulation for dehydration-inducible genes is similar among these three species, with the ABRE-dependent transcriptional pathway. In contrast, for cold-inducible promoters, the conserved hexamer sequences were diversified among these three species, suggesting the existence of diverse transcriptional regulatory pathways for cold-inducible genes among the species. PMID:22184637

  8. Interplay between viral Tat protein and c-Jun transcription factor in controlling LTR promoter activity in different human immunodeficiency virus type I subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Renée M.; Derking, Ronald; Breidel, Seyguerney; Speijer, Dave; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription depends on cellular transcription factors that bind to sequences in the long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Each HIV-1 subtype has a specific LTR promoter configuration, and minor sequence changes in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or their arrangement can influence

  9. Zinc Finger and X-Linked Factor (ZFX Binds to Human SET Transcript 2 Promoter and Transactivates SET Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliang Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available SET (SE Translocation protein carries out multiple functions including those for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A inhibition, histone modification, DNA repair, and gene regulation. SET overexpression has been detected in brain neurons of patients suffering Alzheimer’s disease, follicle theca cells of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS patients, and ovarian cancer cells, indicating that SET may play a pathological role for these disorders. SET transcript 2, produced by a specific promoter, represents a major transcript variant in different cell types. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional activation of human SET transcript 2 promoter in HeLa cells. Promoter deletion experiments and co-transfection assays indicated that ZFX, the Zinc finger and X-linked transcription factor, was able to transactivate the SET promoter. A proximal promoter region containing four ZFX-binding sites was found to be critical for the ZFX-mediated transactivation. Mutagenesis study indicated that the ZFX-binding site located the closest to the transcription start site accounted for most of the ZFX-mediated transactivity. Manipulation of ZFX levels by overexpression or siRNA knockdown confirmed the significance and specificity of the ZFX-mediated SET promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results verified the binding of ZFX to its cognate sites in the SET promoter. These findings have led to identification of ZFX as an upstream factor regulating SET gene expression. More studies are required to define the in vivo significance of this mechanism, and specifically, its implication for several benign and malignant diseases related to SET dysregulation.

  10. Exercise promotes alpha7 integrin gene transcription and protection of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppart, Marni D; Volker, Sonja E; Alexander, Nicole; Burkin, Dean J; Kaufman, Stephen J

    2008-11-01

    The alpha7beta1 integrin is increased in skeletal muscle in response to injury-producing exercise, and transgenic overexpression of this integrin in mice protects against exercise-induced muscle damage. The present study investigates whether the increase in the alpha7beta1 integrin observed in wild-type mice in response to exercise is due to transcriptional regulation and examines whether mobilization of the integrin at the myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a key determinant in its protection against damage. A single bout of downhill running exercise selectively increased transcription of the alpha7 integrin gene in 5-wk-old wild-type mice 3 h postexercise, and an increased alpha7 chain was detected in muscle sarcolemma adjacent to tendinous tissue immediately following exercise. The alpha7B, but not alpha7A isoform, was found concentrated and colocalized with tenascin-C in muscle fibers lining the MTJ. To further validate the importance of the integrin in the protection against muscle damage following exercise, muscle injury was quantified in alpha7(-/-) mice. Muscle damage was extensive in alpha7(-/-) mice in response to both a single and repeated bouts of exercise and was largely restricted to areas of high MTJ concentration and high mechanical force near the Achilles tendon. These results suggest that exercise-induced muscle injury selectively increases transcription of the alpha7 integrin gene and promotes a rapid change in the alpha7beta integrin at the MTJ. These combined molecular and cellular alterations are likely responsible for integrin-mediated attenuation of exercise-induced muscle damage.

  11. An X11alpha/FSBP complex represses transcription of the GSK3beta gene promoter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2010-08-04

    X11alpha is a neuronal adaptor protein that interacts with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through a centrally located phosphotyrosine binding domain to inhibit the production of Abeta peptide that is deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. X11alpha also contains two C-terminal postsynaptic density-95, large discs, zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains, and we show here that through its PDZ domains, X11alpha interacts with a novel transcription factor, fibrinogen silencer binding protein. Moreover, we show that an X11alpha\\/fibrinogen silencer binding protein complex signals to the nucleus to repress glycogen synthase kinase-3beta promoter activity. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta is a favoured candidate kinase for phosphorylating tau in Alzheimer\\'s disease. Our findings show a new function for X11alpha that may impact on Alzheimer\\'s disease pathogenesis.

  12. Computational Approaches to Understand Transcriptional Regulation and Alternative Promoter Usage in Mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette

    The body consists of hundreds of di erent cell types as diverse as heart, blood, muscle and brain cells. All cells contain the same DNA which is the hereditary material that de nes who we are and how we look. In each cell parts of the DNA called genes are transcribed into RNA that is translated i...... study of the impact of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to mice lungs. Besides gaining new insight into the e ects of nanotubes the data is also used to explore the role of alternative promoter usage and enhancers in response to external stimuli....... erent aspects of transcriptional regulation. In the rst study we develop a machine learning framework to predict mRNA production, stalling and elongation of RNA polymerase II using publicly available histone modi cation data. The study reveals new pieces of information about the histone code. Besides...

  13. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino; Potter, Leah A.; Lin, Robert; Mullapudi, Nandita; Wandzioch, Ewa; Hines, Angela; Davis, Ashley; Bruun, Christine; Engberg, Nina; Petersen, Dorthe R.; Peterslund, Janny M. L.; MacDonald, Raymond J.; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Magnuson, Mark A.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent of different signals in different cellular contexts. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) to test the effect of successively deleting conserved genomic regions of the ubiquitously active Rosa26 promoter and substituting the deleted regions for regulatory sequences that respond to diverse extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can be adapted to any pathway that acts via DNA elements. PMID:22888097

  14. UTX promotes hormonally responsive breast carcinogenesis through feed-forward transcription regulation with estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, G; Liu, X; Zhang, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Chen, Z; Xu, B; Yang, J; He, L; Zhang, Z; Jin, T; Yi, X; Sun, L; Shang, Y; Liang, J

    2017-09-28

    UTX is implicated in embryonic development and lineage specification. However, how this X-linked histone demethylase contributes to the occurrence and progression of breast cancer remains to be clarified. Here we report that UTX is physically associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and functions in ER-regulated transcription. We showed that UTX coordinates with JHDM1D and CBP to direct H3K27 methylation-acetylation transition and to create a permissive chromatin state on ER targets. Genome-wide analysis of the transcriptional targets of UTX by ChIP-seq identified a set of genes such as chemokine receptor CXCR4 that are intimately involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis. We demonstrated that UTX promotes the proliferation and migration of ER(+) breast cancer cells. Interestingly, UTX itself is transactivated by ER, forming a feed-forward loop in the regulation of hormone response. Indeed, UTX is upregulated during ER(+) breast cancer progression, and the expression level of UTX is positively correlated with that of CXCR4 and negatively correlated with the overall survival of ER(+) breast cancer patients. Our study identified a feed-forward loop between UTX and ER in the regulation of hormonally responsive breast carcinogenesis, supporting the pursuit of UTX as an emerging therapeutic target for the intervention of certain ER(+) breast cancer with specific epigenetic vulnerability.

  15. Impaired PRC2 activity promotes transcriptional instability and favors breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, Michel; Rodilla, Veronica; Teissandier, Aurélie; Zeitouni, Bruno; Gruel, Nadege; Sadacca, Benjamin; Irondelle, Marie; Charruel, Margaux; Ducos, Bertrand; Michaud, Audrey; Caron, Matthieu; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Chavrier, Philippe; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Pasmant, Eric; Vidaud, Michel; Servant, Nicolas; Reyal, Fabien; Meseure, Dider; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Fre, Silvia; Margueron, Raphaël

    2015-12-15

    Alterations of chromatin modifiers are frequent in cancer, but their functional consequences often remain unclear. Focusing on the Polycomb protein EZH2 that deposits the H3K27me3 (trimethylation of Lys27 of histone H3) mark, we showed that its high expression in solid tumors is a consequence, not a cause, of tumorigenesis. In mouse and human models, EZH2 is dispensable for prostate cancer development and restrains breast tumorigenesis. High EZH2 expression in tumors results from a tight coupling to proliferation to ensure H3K27me3 homeostasis. However, this process malfunctions in breast cancer. Low EZH2 expression relative to proliferation and mutations in Polycomb genes actually indicate poor prognosis and occur in metastases. We show that while altered EZH2 activity consistently modulates a subset of its target genes, it promotes a wider transcriptional instability. Importantly, transcriptional changes that are consequences of EZH2 loss are predominantly irreversible. Our study provides an unexpected understanding of EZH2's contribution to solid tumors with important therapeutic implications. © 2015 Wassef et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Regulation of the Human Ghrelin Promoter Activity by Transcription Factors, NF-κB and Nkx2.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Shiimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To examine the gene expression of ghrelin, a growth hormone releasing and appetite stimulating hormone from stomach, we constructed human ghrelin promoter-reporter vectors and analyzed the promoter activity. The ghrelin promoter activity was high when cultured cells that express ghrelin mRNA endogenously like TT or ECC10 cells were used, indicating that these cells contain factors necessary for full expression of the human ghrelin gene. The human ghrelin promoter contains both positive and negative regulatory regions. A transient decrease of the promoter activity was found when the reporter vector with the −1600 fragment of the human ghrelin promoter was transfected into cultured cells. We then examined the effect of several transcription factors on the ghrelin promoter activity and found that NF-κB suppressed and that Nkx2.2, a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that is important for ghrelin cell development in pancreas, activates the promoter activity. These transcription factors may be possible targets for the control of ghrelin gene expression.

  17. RNA polymerase-promoter interactions determining different stability of the Escherichia coli and Thermus aquaticus transcription initiation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Mukhamedyarov, Damir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2012-12-01

    Transcription initiation complexes formed by bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) exhibit dramatic species-specific differences in stability, leading to different strategies of transcription regulation. The molecular basis for this diversity is unclear. Promoter complexes formed by RNAP from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) are considerably less stable than Escherichia coli RNAP promoter complexes, particularly at temperatures below 37°C. Here, we used a fluorometric RNAP molecular beacon assay to discern partial RNAP-promoter interactions. We quantitatively compared the strength of E. coli and Taq RNAPs partial interactions with the -10, -35 and UP promoter elements; the TG motif of the extended -10 element; the discriminator and the downstream duplex promoter segments. We found that compared with Taq RNAP, E. coli RNAP has much higher affinity only to the UP element and the downstream promoter duplex. This result indicates that the difference in stability between E. coli and Taq promoter complexes is mainly determined by the differential strength of core RNAP-DNA contacts. We suggest that the relative weakness of Taq RNAP interactions with DNA downstream of the transcription start point is the major reason of low stability and temperature sensitivity of promoter complexes formed by this enzyme.

  18. DNA methylation of specific CpG sites in the promoter region regulates the transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimrat Mamrut

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a peptide hormone, well known for its role in labor and suckling, and most recently for its involvement in mammalian social behavior. All central and peripheral actions of oxytocin are mediated through the oxytocin receptor, which is the product of a single gene. Transcription of the oxytocin receptor is subject to regulation by gonadal steroid hormones, and is profoundly elevated in the uterus and mammary glands during parturition. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene transcription, and has been linked to reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor in individuals with autism. Here, we hypothesized that transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor is regulated by DNA methylation of specific sites in its promoter, in a tissue-specific manner. Hypothalamus-derived GT1-7, and mammary-derived 4T1 murine cell lines displayed negative correlations between oxytocin receptor transcription and methylation of the gene promoter, and demethylation caused a significant enhancement of oxytocin receptor transcription in 4T1 cells. Using a reporter gene assay, we showed that methylation of specific sites in the gene promoter, including an estrogen response element, significantly inhibits transcription. Furthermore, methylation of the oxytocin receptor promoter was found to be differentially correlated with oxytocin receptor expression in mammary glands and the uterus of virgin and post-partum mice, suggesting that it plays a distinct role in oxytocin receptor transcription among tissues and under different physiological conditions. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the expression of the mouse oxytocin receptor gene is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation of its promoter.

  19. A conserved TATA-less proximal promoter drives basal transcription from the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soravia, E; Grebe, A; De Luca, P

    1995-01-01

    have cloned an uPAR DNA segment containing upstream regulatory sequences from both the human and murine genomes. We report that a proximal promoter, contained within 180 bp from the major transcription start sites of the human uPAR gene, drives basal transcription. This region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes......The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) focuses at the cell surface the activation of pro-uPA and, hence, the formation of plasmin, thus enhancing directional extracellular proteolysis. To characterize the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control receptor expression, we...

  20. Pokemon promotes the invasiveness of hepatocellular carcinoma by enhancing MEF2D transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Xiangqian; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Pokemon, a master oncogene crucial for the tumorigenicity and progression of a variety of cancers, has been demonstrated to enhance the proliferation and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the contribution of Pokemon to the invasiveness of HCC has not yet been studied. In this study, we employed HCC cells to investigate the role of Pokemon in the invasion of HCC with multidisciplinary approaches. Pokemon overexpression was found to be closely associated with invasion and intrahepatic metastasis of HCC in clinical specimens. Suppression of Pokemon attenuated the invasion of HCC cells by in vitro transwell and wound-healing assays. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), an oncogene that can promote the invasiveness of HCC, was found to be underexpressed during Pokemon silencing in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon downregulation on the migration of HCC cells. Further experiments verified that Pokemon binds two putative recognition sites located within the upstream region of the MEF2D promoter and enhances its transcription. The association between Pokemon and MEF2D was further confirmed in HCC specimens. Animal experiments further confirmed that Pokemon downregulation attenuated the metastasis of HCC cells in mice. Collectively, Pokemon was found to enhance the migration and invasion of HCC by increasing MEF2D expression. Thus, targeting Pokemon and MEF2D may be an effective strategy to suppress the metastasis of HCC.

  1. Activating transcription factor 3 promotes spinal cord regeneration of adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Fang; Huang, Shu-Bing; Zhao, Hou-De; Liu, Chun-Jie; Yao, Li; Shen, Yan-Qin

    2017-07-01

    Zebrafish is an excellent model to study the mechanisms underlying successful central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Previous study shows that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) promotes neurite outgrowth and is involved in optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish. Here, we used zebrafish model to investigate the role of ATF3 in regeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and in situ hybridization revealed that ATF3 mRNA levels increased at 12 h and 6 d following SCI. Double labeled immunofluorescence showed that ATF3 expressed in motoneurons. Treatment of anti-sense ATF3 morpholino (MO) inhibited locomotor recovery and decreased axon regeneration of spinal cord injured zebrafish. Further, inhibition of ATF3 up-regulated the expression of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). These data suggest that ATF3 could promote locomotor recovery and axon regrowth in zebrafish SCI model possibly by regulating inflammatory response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform...... to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally...... of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i.e. cerebellum versus heart for differential variation at the gene...

  3. Transcriptional coactivator NT-PGC-1α promotes gluconeogenic gene expression and enhances hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji Suk; Jun, Hee-Jin; Park, Minsung

    2016-10-01

    The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α plays a central role in hepatic gluconeogenesis. We previously reported that alternative splicing of the PGC-1α gene produces an additional transcript encoding the truncated protein NT-PGC-1α NT-PGC-1α is co-expressed with PGC-1α and highly induced by fasting in the liver. NT-PGC-1α regulates tissue-specific metabolism, but its role in the liver has not been investigated. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the role of hepatic NT-PGC-1α in the regulation of gluconeogenesis. Adenovirus-mediated expression of NT-PGC-1α in primary hepatocytes strongly stimulated the expression of key gluconeogenic enzyme genes (PEPCK and G6Pase), leading to increased glucose production. To further understand NT-PGC-1α function in hepatic gluconeogenesis in vivo, we took advantage of a previously reported FL-PGC-1α -/- mouse line that lacks full-length PGC-1α (FL-PGC-1α) but retains a slightly shorter and functionally equivalent form of NT-PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α 254 ). In FL-PGC-1α -/- mice, NT-PGC-1α 254 was induced by fasting in the liver and recruited to the promoters of PEPCK and G6Pase genes. The enrichment of NT-PGC-1α 254 at the promoters was closely associated with fasting-induced increase in PEPCK and G6Pase gene expression and efficient production of glucose from pyruvate during a pyruvate tolerance test in FL-PGC-1α -/- mice. Moreover, FL-PGC-1α -/- primary hepatocytes showed a significant increase in gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose production after treatment with dexamethasone and forskolin, suggesting that NT-PGC-1α 254 is sufficient to stimulate the gluconeogenic program in the absence of FL-PGC-1α Collectively, our findings highlight the role of hepatic NT-PGC-1α in stimulating gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose production. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  4. A sequence-specific core promoter-binding transcription factor recruits TRF2 to coordinately transcribe ribosomal protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Douglas G; Gilmour, David S

    2017-10-13

    Ribosomal protein (RP) genes must be coordinately expressed for proper assembly of the ribosome yet the mechanisms that control expression of RP genes in metazoans are poorly understood. Recently, TATA-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2) rather than the TATA-binding protein (TBP) was found to function in transcription of RP genes in Drosophila. Unlike TBP, TRF2 lacks sequence-specific DNA binding activity, so the mechanism by which TRF2 is recruited to promoters is unclear. We show that the transcription factor M1BP, which associates with the core promoter region, activates transcription of RP genes. Moreover, M1BP directly interacts with TRF2 to recruit it to the RP gene promoter. High resolution ChIP-exo was used to analyze in vivo the association of M1BP, TRF2 and TFIID subunit, TAF1. Despite recent work suggesting that TFIID does not associate with RP genes in Drosophila, we find that TAF1 is present at RP gene promoters and that its interaction might also be directed by M1BP. Although M1BP associates with thousands of genes, its colocalization with TRF2 is largely restricted to RP genes, suggesting that this combination is key to coordinately regulating transcription of the majority of RP genes in Drosophila. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of myostatin-2 promoter alleles from the marine fish Sparus aurata: evidence for strong muscle-specific promoter activity and post-transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadjar-Boger, Elisabeth; Hinits, Yaniv; Funkenstein, Bruria

    2012-09-25

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. In contrast to mammals, fish possess at least two paralogs of MSTN: MSTN-1 and MSTN-2. In this study, we analyzed the structural-functional features of the four variants of Sparus aurata MSTN-2 5'-flanking region: saMSTN-2a, saMSTN-2as, saMSTN-2b and saMSTN-2c. In silico analysis revealed numerous putative cis regulatory elements including several E-boxes known as binding sites to myogenic transcription factors. Transient transfection experiments using non-muscle and muscle cell lines showed surprisingly high transcriptional activity in muscle cells, suggesting the presence of regulatory elements unique to differentiated myotubes. These observations were confirmed by in situ intramuscular injections of promoter DNA followed by reporter gene assays. Moreover, high promoter activity was found in differentiated neural cell, in agreement with MSTN-2 expression in brain. Progressive 5'-deletion analysis, using reporter gene assays, showed that the core promoter is located within the first -127 bp upstream of the ATG, and suggested the presence of regulatory elements that either repress or induce transcriptional activity. Transient transgenic zebrafish provided evidence for saMSTN-2 promoter ability to direct GFP expression to myofibers. Finally, our data shows that although no mature saMSTN-2 mRNA is observed in muscle; unspliced forms accumulate, confirming high level of transcription. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time that MSTN-2 promoter is a very robust promoter, especially in muscle cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Viral DNA Replication Orientation and hnRNPs Regulate Transcription of the Human Papillomavirus 18 Late Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Haibin; Ge, Hui; Ajiro, Masahiko; Sharma, Nishi R; Meyers, Craig; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas; Klar, Amar; Court, Donald; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2017-05-30

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is tightly linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Although expression of viral early genes is initiated immediately upon virus infection of undifferentiated basal cells, viral DNA amplification and late gene expression occur only in the mid to upper strata of the keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In this report, we show that the relative activity of HPV18 TATA-less late promoter P811 depends on its orientation relative to that of the origin (Ori) of viral DNA replication and is sensitive to the eukaryotic DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. Additionally, transfected 70-nucleotide (nt)-long single-strand DNA oligonucleotides that are homologous to the region near Ori induce late promoter activity. We also found that promoter activation in raft cultures leads to production of the late promoter-associated, sense-strand transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) and splice-site small RNAs (spliRNAs). Finally, a cis-acting AAGTATGCA core element that functions as a repressor to the promoter was identified. This element interacts with hnRNP D0B and hnRNP A/B factors. Point mutations in the core prevented binding of hnRNPs and increased the promoter activity. Confirming this result, knocking down the expression of both hnRNPs in keratinocytes led to increased promoter activity. Taking the data together, our study revealed the mechanism of how the HPV18 late promoter is regulated by DNA replication and host factors.IMPORTANCE It has been known for decades that the activity of viral late promoters is associated with viral DNA replication among almost all DNA viruses. However, the mechanism of how DNA replication activates the viral late promoter and what components of the replication machinery are involved remain largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the P811 promoter region of HPV18 and demonstrated that its activation depends on the orientation of DNA replication. Using single

  7. The handedness-associated PCSK6 locus spans an intronic promoter regulating novel transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Robert; Covill, Laura; Pettigrew, Kerry A; Brandler, William M; Diaz, Rebeca; Xu, Yiwang; Tello, Javier A; Talcott, Joel B; Newbury, Dianne F; Stein, John; Monaco, Anthony P; Paracchini, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    We recently reported the association of the PCSK6 gene with handedness through a quantitative genome-wide association study (GWAS; P left-right body axis determination. Therefore, the GWAS data suggest that the biology underlying the patterning of structural asymmetries may also contribute to behavioural laterality, e.g. handedness. The association is further supported by an independent study reporting a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) within the same PCSK6 locus to be associated with degree of handedness in a general population cohort. Here, we have conducted a functional analysis of the PCSK6 locus combining further genetic analysis, in silico predictions and molecular assays. We have shown that the previous GWAS signal was not tagging a VNTR effect, suggesting that the two markers have independent effects. We demonstrated experimentally that one of the top GWAS-associated markers, rs11855145, directly alters the binding site for a nuclear factor. Furthermore, we have shown that the predicted regulatory region adjacent to rs11855415 acts as a bidirectional promoter controlling the expression of novel RNA transcripts. These include both an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and a short PCSK6 isoform predicted to be coding. This is the first molecular characterization of a handedness-associated locus that supports the role of common variants in non-coding sequences in influencing complex phenotypes through gene expression regulation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Cytokinins secreted by Agrobacterium promote transformation by repressing a plant myb transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Nagesh; Lee, Lan-Ying; Chen, Huabang; Yi, Hochul; Olbricht, Gayla R; Stirnberg, Alexandra; Jeffries, Jacob; Xiong, Kia; Doerge, R W; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2013-11-19

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the most widely used technique for generating transgenic plants. However, many crops remain recalcitrant. We found that an Arabidopsis myb family transcription factor (MTF1) inhibited plant transformation susceptibility. Mutating MTF1 increased attachment of several Agrobacterium strains to roots and increased both stable and transient transformation in both susceptible and transformation-resistant Arabidopsis ecotypes. Cytokinins from Agrobacterium tumefaciens decreased the expression of MTF1 through activation of the cytokinin response regulator ARR3. Mutating AHK3 and AHK4, genes that encode cytokinin-responsive kinases, increased the expression of MTF1 and impaired plant transformation. Mutant mtf1 plants also had increased expression of AT14A, which encodes a putative transmembrane receptor for cell adhesion molecules. Plants overexpressing AT14A exhibited increased susceptibility to transformation, whereas at14a mutant plants exhibited decreased attachment of bacteria to roots and decreased transformation, suggesting that AT14A may serve as an anchor point for Agrobacteria. Thus, by promoting bacterial attachment and transformation of resistant plants and increasing such processes in susceptible plants, treating roots with cytokinins may help engineer crops with improved features or yield.

  9. P-body proteins regulate transcriptional rewiring to promote DNA replication stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loll-Krippleber, Raphael; Brown, Grant W

    2017-09-15

    mRNA-processing (P-) bodies are cytoplasmic granules that form in eukaryotic cells in response to numerous stresses to serve as sites of degradation and storage of mRNAs. Functional P-bodies are critical for the DNA replication stress response in yeast, yet the repertoire of P-body targets and the mechanisms by which P-bodies promote replication stress resistance are unknown. In this study we identify the complete complement of mRNA targets of P-bodies during replication stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment. The key P-body protein Lsm1 controls the abundance of HHT1, ACF4, ARL3, TMA16, RRS1 and YOX1 mRNAs to prevent their toxic accumulation during replication stress. Accumulation of YOX1 mRNA causes aberrant downregulation of a network of genes critical for DNA replication stress resistance and leads to toxic acetaldehyde accumulation. Our data reveal the scope and the targets of regulation by P-body proteins during the DNA replication stress response.P-bodies form in response to stress and act as sites of mRNA storage and degradation. Here the authors identify the mRNA targets of P-bodies during DNA replication stress, and show that P-body proteins act to prevent toxic accumulation of these target transcripts.

  10. A G-quadruplex motif in an envelope gene promoter regulates transcription and virion secretion in HBV genotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Banhi; Kandpal, Manish; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2017-09-13

    HBV genotypes differ in pathogenicity. In addition, genotype-specific differences in the regulation of transcription and virus replication exist in HBV, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show the presence of a G-quadruplex motif in the promoter of the preS2/S gene; this G-quadruplex is highly conserved only in HBV genotype B but not in other HBV genotypes. We demonstrate that this G-quadruplex motif forms a hybrid intramolecular G-quadruplex structure. Interestingly, mutations disrupting the G-quadruplex in HBV genotype B reduced the preS2/S promoter activity, leading to reduced hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels. G-quadruplex ligands stabilized the G-quadruplex in genotype B and enhanced the preS2/S promoter activity. Furthermore, mutations disrupting the G-quadruplex in the full-length HBV genotype B constructs were associated with impaired virion secretion. In contrast to typical G-quadruplexes within promoters which are negative regulators of transcription the G-quadruplex in the preS2/S promoter of HBV represents an unconventional positive regulatory element. Our findings highlight (a) G-quadruplex mediated enhancement of transcription and virion secretion in HBV and (b) a yet unknown role for DNA secondary structures in complex genotype-specific regulatory mechanisms in virus genomes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Transcriptional activity of novel ALDH1L1 promoters in the rat brain following AAV vector-mediated gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janitha M Mudannayake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, member L1 (ALDH1L1 is a recently characterized pan-astrocytic marker that is more homogenously expressed throughout the brain than the classic astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. We generated putative promoter sequence variants of the rat ALDH1L1 gene for use in adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, with an aim to achieve selective regulation of transgene expression in astrocytes in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, ALDH1L1 promoter variants mediated transcriptional activity exclusively in neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta as assessed by luciferase reporter expression at 3 weeks postvector infusion. This selectivity for neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta also persisted in the context of adeno-associated viral serotype 5, 8 or 9 vector-mediated gene delivery. An in vivo promoter comparison showed the highest performing ALDH1L1 promoter variant mediated higher transgene expression than the neuronal-specific synapsin 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase promoters. The ALDH1L1 promoter was also transcriptionally active in dentate granule neurons following intrahippocampal adeno-associated viral vector infusion, whereas transgene expression was detected in both striatal neurons and astrocytes following vector infusion into the striatum. Our results demonstrate the potential suitability of the ALDH1L1 promoter as a new tool in the development of gene therapy and disease modelling applications.

  12. Transcriptional engineering of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter for improved heterologous protein production in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Özge; Prielhofer, Roland; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard; Çalık, Pınar

    2017-10-01

    The constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP ), which is one of the benchmark promoters of Pichia pastoris, was analyzed in terms of putative transcription factor binding sites. We constructed a synthetic library with distinct regulatory properties through deletion and duplication of these putative transcription factor binding sites and selected transcription factor (TF) genes were overexpressed or deleted to understand their roles on heterologous protein production. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein, an expression strength in a range between 0.35- and 3.10-fold of the wild-type PGAP was obtained. Another model protein, recombinant human growth hormone was produced under control of selected promoter variants and 1.6- to 2.4-fold higher product titers were reached compared to wild-type PGAP . In addition, a GAL4-like TF was found to be a crucial factor for the regulation of PGAP , and its overexpression enhanced the heterologous protein production considerably (up to 2.2-fold compared to the parental strain). The synthetic PGAP library generated enabled us to investigate the different putative transcription factors which are responsible for the regulation of PGAP under different growth conditions, ergo recombinant protein production under PGAP . Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2319-2327. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cockayne's Syndrome A and B Proteins Regulate Transcription Arrest after Genotoxic Stress by Promoting ATF3 Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epanchintsev, Alexey; Costanzo, Federico; Rauschendorf, Marc-Alexander; Caputo, Manuela; Ye, Tao; Donnio, Lise-Marie; Proietti-de-Santis, Luca; Coin, Frederic; Laugel, Vincent; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2017-12-21

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is caused by mutations in CSA and CSB. The CSA and CSB proteins have been linked to both promoting transcription-coupled repair and restoring transcription following DNA damage. We show that UV stress arrests transcription of approximately 70% of genes in CSA- or CSB-deficient cells due to the constitutive presence of ATF3 at CRE/ATF sites. We found that CSB, CSA/DDB1/CUL4A, and MDM2 were essential for ATF3 ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. ATF3 removal was concomitant with the recruitment of RNA polymerase II and the restart of transcription. Preventing ATF3 ubiquitination by mutating target lysines prevented recovery of transcription and increased cell death following UV treatment. Our data suggest that the coordinate action of CSA and CSB, as part of the ubiquitin/proteasome machinery, regulates the recruitment timing of DNA-binding factors and provide explanations about the mechanism of transcription arrest following genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen...

  15. Analysis of promoter elements involved in the transcriptional initiation of RpoS-dependent Borrelia burgdorferi genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Christian H; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2004-11-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, encodes an RpoS ortholog (RpoS(Bb)) that controls the temperature-inducible differential expression of at least some of the spirochete's lipoprotein genes, including ospC and dbpBA. To begin to dissect the determinants of RpoS(Bb) recognition of, and selectivity for, its dependent promoters, we linked a green fluorescent protein reporter to the promoter regions of several B. burgdorferi genes with well-characterized expression patterns. Consistent with the expression patterns of the native genes/proteins in B. burgdorferi strain 297, we found that expression of the ospC, dbpBA, and ospF reporters in the spirochete was RpoS(Bb) dependent, while the ospE and flaB reporters were RpoS(Bb) independent. To compare promoter recognition by RpoS(Bb) with that of the prototype RpoS (RpoS(Ec)), we also introduced our panel of constructs into Escherichia coli. In this surrogate, maximal expression from the ospC, dbpBA, and ospF promoters clearly required RpoS, although in the absence of RpoS(Ec) the ospF promoter was weakly recognized by another E. coli sigma factor. Furthermore, RpoS(Bb) under the control of an inducible promoter was able to complement an E. coli rpoS mutant, although RpoS(Ec) and RpoS(Bb) each initiated greater activity from their own dependent promoters than they did from those of the heterologous sigma factor. Genetic analysis of the ospC promoter demonstrated that (i) the T(-14) in the presumptive -10 region plays an important role in sigma factor recognition in both organisms but is not as critical for transcriptional initiation by RpoS(Bb) as it is for RpoS(Ec); (ii) the nucleotide at the -15 position determines RpoS or sigma(70) selectivity in E. coli but does not serve the same function in B. burgdorferi; and (iii) the 110-bp region upstream of the core promoter is not required for RpoS(Ec)- or RpoS(Bb)-dependent activity in E. coli but is required for maximal expression from this promoter in

  16. Generation of a synthetic mammalian promoter library by modification of sequences spacing transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Jens; Kusk, P.; Johansen, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    The development of a set of synthetic mammalian promoters with different specific activities is described. The library is based on a synthetic promoter, JeT, constructed as a 200 bp chimeric promoter built from fragments of the viral SV40 early promoter and the human beta-actin and ubiquitin C pr...

  17. PLCz functional haplotypes modulating promoter transcriptional activity are associated with semen quality traits in Chinese Holstein bulls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Pan

    Full Text Available The sperm-specific phospholipase C zeta (PLCz is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor that triggers a characteristic series of physiological stimuli via cytoplasmic Ca(2+ oscillations during fertilization. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PLCz gene expression remain largely unknown. To explore the genetic variations in the 5'-flanking region of the PLCz gene and their common haplotypes in Chinese Holstein bulls, as well as to determine whether these variations affect bovine semen quality traits and transcriptional activity, DNA samples were collected from Chinese Holstein bulls and sequenced for the identification of genetic variants in the 5'-flanking region of PLCz. Two genetic variants were identified, and their haplotypic profiles were constructed. The two novel genetic variations (g. -456 G>A and g. +65 T>C were genotyped in 424 normal Chinese Holstein bulls. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that both loci are in transcription factor binding sites of the core promoter region. The association studies revealed that the two genetic variations and their haplotype combinations significantly affected semen quality traits. Using serially truncated constructs of the bovine PLCz promoters and the luciferase reporter, we found that a 726 bp (-641 nt to +112 nt fragment constitutes the core promoter region. Furthermore, four haplotypes, H1H1 (GTGT, H2H2 (GCGC, H3H3 (ATAT, and H4H4 (ACAC, were significantly associated with semen quality traits and successfully transfected into MLTC-1 cell lines. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the different haplotypes exhibited distinct promoter activities. Maximal promoter activity was demonstrated by the H2H2 haplotypes, as compared with the other haplotypes. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report on genetic variants and their respective haplotypes in the 5'-flanking region of PLCz gene that can influence the semen quality of Chinese Holstein bulls as

  18. eRNAs promote transcription by establishing chromatin accessibility at defined genomic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell'orso, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors and DNA regulatory binding motifs are fundamental components of the gene regulatory network. Here, by using genome-wide binding profiling, we show extensive occupancy of transcription factors of myogenesis (MyoD and Myogenin) at extragenic enhancer regions coinciding with RNA......)RNA acted to activate the downstream myogenic genes. The deployment of transcriptional machinery to appropriate loci is contingent on chromatin accessibility, a rate-limiting step preceding Pol II assembly. By nuclease sensitivity assay, we found that eRNAs regulate genomic access of the transcriptional...... complex to defined regulatory regions. In conclusion, our data suggest that eRNAs contribute to establishing a cell-type-specific transcriptional circuitry by directing chromatin-remodeling events....

  19. Bidirectional activity of the NWC promoter is responsible for RAG-2 transcription in non-lymphoid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Laszkiewicz

    Full Text Available The recombination-activating genes (RAG-1 and RAG-2 encode a V(DJ recombinase responsible for rearrangements of antigen-receptor genes during T and B cell development, and RAG expression is known to correlate strictly with the process of rearrangement. In contrast to RAG-1, the expression of RAG-2 was not previously detected during any other stage of lymphopoiesis or in any other normal tissue. Here we report that the CpG island-associated promoter of the NWC gene (the third evolutionarily conserved gene in the RAG locus, which is located in the second intron of RAG-2, has bidirectional activity and is responsible for the detectable transcription of RAG-2 in some non-lymphoid tissues. We also identify evolutionarily conserved promoter fragments responsible for this bidirectional activity, and show that it is activated by transcription factor ZFP143. The possible implications of our findings are briefly discussed.

  20. Zinc Finger-Containing Cellular Transcription Corepressor ZBTB25 Promotes Influenza Virus RNA Transcription and Is a Target for Zinc Ejector Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Jeng, King-Song; Lai, Michael M C

    2017-10-15

    viral replication is its dual transcription functions, namely, promoting viral RNA transcription through binding to the U-rich region of vRNA and suppressing cellular interferon production. ZBTB25 contains a zinc finger domain that is required for RNA-inhibitory activity by chelating zinc ions. Disulfiram treatment disrupts the zinc finger functions, effectively repressing IAV replication. Based on our findings, we demonstrate that ZBTB25 regulates IAV RNA transcription and replication and serves as a promising antiviral target for IAV treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16 E2 protein transcriptionally activates the promoter of a key cellular splicing factor, SF2/ASF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Sarah; Milligan, Steven G; Graham, Sheila V

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) gene expression is regulated in concert with the epithelial differentiation program. In particular, expression of the virus capsid proteins L1 and L2 is tightly restricted to differentiated epithelial cells. For HPV16, the capsid proteins are encoded by 13 structurally different mRNAs that are produced by extensive alternative splicing. Previously, we demonstrated that upon epithelial differentiation, HPV16 infection upregulates hnRNP A1 and SF2/ASF, both key factors in alternative splicing regulation. Here we cloned a 1-kb region upstream of and including the transcriptional start site of the SF2ASF gene and used it in in vivo transcription assays to demonstrate that the HPV16 E2 transcription factor transactivates the SF2/ASF promoter. The transactivation domain but not the DNA binding domain of the protein is necessary for this. Active E2 association with the promoter was demonstrated using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that E2 interacted with a region 482 to 684 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site in vitro. This is the first time that HPV16 E2 has been shown to regulate cellular gene expression and the first report of viral regulation of expression of an RNA processing factor. Such E2-mediated control during differentiation of infected epithelial cells may facilitate late capsid protein expression and completion of the virus life cycle.

  2. Intron DNA Sequences Can Be More Important Than the Proximal Promoter in Determining the Site of Transcript Initiation.

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    Gallegos, Jenna E; Rose, Alan B

    2017-04-01

    To more precisely define the positions from which certain intronic regulatory sequences increase mRNA accumulation, the effect of a UBIQUITIN intron on gene expression was tested from six different positions surrounding the transcription start site (TSS) of a reporter gene fusion in Arabidopsis thaliana The intron increased expression from all transcribed positions but had no effect when upstream of the 5'-most TSS. While this implies that the intron must be transcribed to increase expression, the TSS changed when the intron was located in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR), suggesting that the intron affects transcription initiation. Remarkably, deleting 303 nucleotides of the promoter including all known TSSs and all but 18 nucleotides of the 5'-UTR had virtually no effect on the level of gene expression as long as an intron containing stimulatory sequences was included. Instead, transcription was initiated in normally untranscribed sequences the same distance upstream of the intron as when the promoter was intact. These results suggest that certain intronic DNA sequences play unexpectedly large roles in directing transcription initiation and constitute a previously unrecognized type of downstream regulatory element for genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of the ovine MT1 melatonin receptor promoter: interaction between multiple pituitary transcription factors at different phases of development.

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    Johnston, Jonathan D; Schuster, Carole; Barrett, Perry; Hazlerigg, David G

    2007-03-30

    Pineal secretion of melatonin provides a neuroendocrine representation of the light-dark cycle, which is used to synchronise daily and annual rhythms of physiology and behaviour. In mammals, melatonin primarily acts through MT(1) melatonin receptors that exhibit a highly restricted tissue distribution. Expression of MT(1) receptors is subject to developmental and circadian control, which likely modulates the physiological actions of melatonin. To investigate the mechanisms controlling MT(1) expression we cloned the proximal 1.5kb region of the ovine MT(1) promoter. Sequence analysis revealed putative cis-elements for transcription factors involved in pituitary development, namely Pitx-1 and Egr-1, and multiple putative E-boxes, which are involved in both circadian and developmental gene regulation. Nuclear protein from ovine pars tuberalis (PT) cells, a site of high endogenous MT(1) expression, stimulated gene expression from a MT(1) expression construct, indicating the presence of a functional promoter. Pitx-1 was strongly expressed in the ovine PT and stimulated MT(1) promoter activity in transfection assays. Co-transfection with Egr-1 induced promoter-specific effects: Pitx-1-stimulated MT(1) activity was inhibited, whereas betaLH promoter activity was enhanced. In addition to Pitx-1 the circadian clock genes Clock and Bmal1 were also expressed in the PT. However, despite multiple putative E-boxes in the MT(1) promoter, transfected Clock and Bmal1 were unable to regulate either basal or Pitx-1-stimulated MT(1) promoter activity. The current data, in conjunction with our previous study of the rat MT(1) promoter, suggests a general model in which melatonin receptor expression in the mammalian pituitary is determined by the developmentally changing balance between stimulatory and inhibitory transcription factors. Furthermore, our data suggest that circadian variation in MT(1) gene expression does not depend upon the direct action of circadian clock genes on E

  4. Nanos promotes epigenetic reprograming of the germline by down-regulation of the THAP transcription factor LIN-15B

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    Lee, Chih-Yung Sean; Lu, Tu

    2017-01-01

    Nanos RNA-binding proteins are required for germline development in metazoans, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have profiled the transcriptome of primordial germ cells (PGCs) lacking the nanos homologs nos-1 and nos-2 in C. elegans. nos-1nos-2 PGCs fail to silence hundreds of transcripts normally expressed in oocytes. We find that this misregulation is due to both delayed turnover of maternal transcripts and inappropriate transcriptional activation. The latter appears to be an indirect consequence of delayed turnover of the maternally-inherited transcription factor LIN-15B, a synMuvB class transcription factor known to antagonize PRC2 activity. PRC2 is required for chromatin reprogramming in the germline, and the transcriptome of PGCs lacking PRC2 resembles that of nos-1nos-2 PGCs. Loss of maternal LIN-15B restores fertility to nos-1nos-2 mutants. These findings suggest that Nanos promotes germ cell fate by downregulating maternal RNAs and proteins that would otherwise interfere with PRC2-dependent reprogramming of PGC chromatin. PMID:29111977

  5. FBXO3 Protein Promotes Ubiquitylation and Transcriptional Activity of AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator)*

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    Shao, Wei; Zumer, Kristina; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor which is expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells. It directs the expression of otherwise tissue-specific antigens, which leads to the elimination of autoreactive T cells during development. AIRE is modified post-translationally by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In this report we connected these modifications. AIRE, which is phosphorylated on two specific residues near its N terminus, then binds to the F-box protein 3 (FBXO3) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In turn, this SCFFBXO3 (SKP1-CUL1-F box) complex ubiquitylates AIRE, increases its binding to the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), and potentiates its transcriptional activity. Because P-TEFb is required for the transition from initiation to elongation of transcription, this interaction ensures proper expression of AIRE-responsive tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. PMID:27365398

  6. FBXO3 Protein Promotes Ubiquitylation and Transcriptional Activity of AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator).

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    Shao, Wei; Zumer, Kristina; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2016-08-19

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor which is expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells. It directs the expression of otherwise tissue-specific antigens, which leads to the elimination of autoreactive T cells during development. AIRE is modified post-translationally by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In this report we connected these modifications. AIRE, which is phosphorylated on two specific residues near its N terminus, then binds to the F-box protein 3 (FBXO3) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In turn, this SCF(FBXO3) (SKP1-CUL1-F box) complex ubiquitylates AIRE, increases its binding to the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), and potentiates its transcriptional activity. Because P-TEFb is required for the transition from initiation to elongation of transcription, this interaction ensures proper expression of AIRE-responsive tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Telomeric Retrotransposon HeT-A Contains a Bidirectional Promoter that Initiates Divergent Transcription of piRNA Precursors in Drosophila Germline.

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    Radion, Elizaveta; Ryazansky, Sergei; Akulenko, Natalia; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kwon, Dmitry; Morgunova, Valeriya; Olovnikov, Ivan; Kalmykova, Alla

    2017-10-27

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) provide the silencing of transposable elements in the germline. Drosophila telomeres are maintained by transpositions of specialized telomeric retroelements. piRNAs generated from sense and antisense transcripts of telomeric elements provide telomere length control in the germline. Previously, we have found that antisense transcription of the major telomeric retroelement HeT-A is initiated upstream of the HeT-A sense transcription start site. Here, we performed a deletion analysis of the HeT-A promoter and show that common regulatory elements are shared by sense and antisense promoters of HeT-A. Therefore, the HeT-A promoter is a bidirectional promoter capable of processive sense and antisense transcription. Ovarian small RNA data show that a solo HeT-A promoter within an euchromatic transgene initiates the divergent transcription of transgenic reporter genes and subsequent processing of these transcripts into piRNAs. These events lead to the formation of a divergent unistrand piRNA cluster at solo HeT-A promoters, in contrast to endogenous telomeres that represent strong dual-strand piRNA clusters. Solo HeT-A promoters are not immunoprecipitated with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) homolog Rhino, a marker of the dual-strand piRNA clusters, but are associated with HP1 itself, which provides piRNA-mediated transcriptional repression of the reporter genes. Unlike endogenous dual-strand piRNA clusters, the solo HeT-A promoter does not produce overlapping transcripts. In a telomeric context, however, bidirectional promoters of tandem HeT-A repeats provide a read-through transcription of both genomic strands, followed by Rhi binding. These data indicate that Drosophila telomeres share properties of unistrand and dual-strand piRNA clusters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of clusters of transcription factor binding sites in relationship to human promoter, CpG islands and gene expression

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    Sakaki Yoshiyuki

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs that interact with regulatory cis-elements on DNA sequences. To identify functional regulatory elements, computer searching can predict TF binding sites (TFBS using position weight matrices (PWMs that represent positional base frequencies of collected experimentally determined TFBS. A disadvantage of this approach is the large output of results for genomic DNA. One strategy to identify genuine TFBS is to utilize local concentrations of predicted TFBS. It is unclear whether there is a general tendency for TFBS to cluster at promoter regions, although this is the case for certain TFBS. Also unclear is the identification of TFs that have TFBS concentrated in promoters and to what level this occurs. This study hopes to answer some of these questions. Results We developed the cluster score measure to evaluate the correlation between predicted TFBS clusters and promoter sequences for each PWM. Non-promoter sequences were used as a control. Using the cluster score, we identified a PWM group called PWM-PCP, in which TFBS clusters positively correlate with promoters, and another PWM group called PWM-NCP, in which TFBS clusters negatively correlate with promoters. The PWM-PCP group comprises 47% of the 199 vertebrate PWMs, while the PWM-NCP group occupied 11 percent. After reducing the effect of CpG islands (CGI against the clusters using partial correlation coefficients among three properties (promoter, CGI and predicted TFBS cluster, we identified two PWM groups including those strongly correlated with CGI and those not correlated with CGI. Conclusion Not all PWMs predict TFBS correlated with human promoter sequences. Two main PWM groups were identified: (1 those that show TFBS clustered in promoters associated with CGI, and (2 those that show TFBS clustered in promoters independent of CGI. Assessment of PWM matches will allow more positive interpretation of TFBS in

  9. Reconstitution of glucotoxic HIT-T15 cells with somatostatin transcription factor-1 partially restores insulin promoter activity.

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    Harmon, J S; Tanaka, Y; Olson, L K; Robertson, R P

    1998-06-01

    We have reported that chronic culture of HIT-T15 cells in medium containing supraphysiologic glucose concentrations (11.1 mmol/l) causes a decrease in insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin release. Furthermore, decreases in insulin gene transcription and binding activity of two essential beta-cell transcription factors, somatostatin transcription factor-1 (STF-1; also known as GSTF, IDX-1, IPF-1, PDX-1, and GSF) and RIPE-3b1 activator, are associated with this glucotoxic effect. In this study, we observed that the loss of RIPE-3b1 occurs much earlier (79% decrease at passage [p]81) than the loss of STF-1 (65% decrease at p104), with abolishment of both factors by p122. Since the STF-1, but not the RIPE-3b1 activator, gene has been cloned, we examined its restorative effects on insulin gene promoter activity after reconstitution with STF-1 cDNA. Basal insulin promoter activities normalized to early (p71-74) passage cells (1.000 +/- 0.069) were 0.4066 +/- 0.093 and 0.142 +/- 0.034 for intermediate (p102-106) and late (p118-122) passage cells, respectively. Early, intermediate, and late passage cells, all chronically cultured in medium containing 11.1 mmol/l glucose, were transfected with STF-1 alone or cotransfected with E2-5, an E-box factor known to be synergistically associated with STF-1. Compared with basal levels, we observed a trend toward an increase in insulin promoter activity in intermediate passage cells with STF-1 transfection (1.43-fold) that became a significant increase when E2-5 was cotransfected (1.78-fold). In late passage cells, transfection of STF-1 alone significantly stimulated a 2.2-fold increase in the insulin promoter activity. Cotransfection of STF-1 and E2-5 in late passage cells stimulated insulin promoter activity 2.8-fold, which was 40% of the activity observed in early passage cells. Control studies in glucotoxic betaTC-6 cells deficient in RIPE-3b1 activator but not STF-1 did not demonstrate an increase in insulin promoter

  10. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

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    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Kato, Kohsuke [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  11. Transcription and epigenetic profile of the promoter, first exon and first intron of the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

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    Romano, Gaetano; Macaluso, Marcella; Lucchetti, Chiara; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2007-05-01

    The transcriptional and chromatin profile of the promoter, first exon and first intron of the human TH gene were analyzed in human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C-16 and human renal carcinoma 293FT cell lines. The latter is a cell culture system that is not permissive for TH gene expression, whereas the former has a 50% cell fraction that tests positive for TH. The engineering of a 6.3 kb recombinant human TH promoter revealed the presence of repressors of transcription between positions (-6,244/-194). The addition of a 1.2 kb fragment of the first intron of the human TH gene (+730/+1,653) enhanced transcriptional activity of the recombinant promoter. However, both constructs were not specific for TH-positive BE(2)-C-16 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (Chip) analysis was carried out on BE(2)-C-16 and 293FT cells to probe sequences of promoter, first exon and first intron of the human TH gene from position (-448/+1,204). The presence of nucleosomes was observed approximately from position (-20/+473) in both cell lines. Chip analysis was then conducted to determine the acetylation of various lysine residues of H3 and H4 in both cell lines. All analyzed lysine residues of H3 and H4 were acetylated in BE(2)-C-16 cells, whereas 293FT cells tested positive for acetylation only in the external lysine residues of the histone tail. Our data are compatible with an active TH gene expression in a 50% cell fraction of BE(2)-C-16 cells. Further analysis of epigenetic programming might lead to the identification of the factors that determine TH gene expression specifically in dopaminergic neurons. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Mouse Dfa Is a Repressor of TATA-box Promoters and Interacts with the Abt1 Activator of Basal Transcription*

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    Brower, Christopher S.; Veiga, Lucia; Jones, Richard H.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Our study of the mouse Ate1 arginyltransferase, a component of the N-end rule pathway, has shown that Ate1 pre-mRNA is produced from a bidirectional promoter that also expresses, in the opposite direction, a previously uncharacterized gene (Hu, R. G., Brower, C. S., Wang, H., Davydov, I. V., Sheng, J., Zhou, J., Kwon, Y. T., and Varshavsky, A. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 32559–32573). In this work, we began analyzing this gene, termed Dfa (divergent from Ate1). Mouse Dfa was found to be transcribed from both the bidirectional PAte1/Dfa promoter and other nearby promoters. The resulting transcripts are alternatively spliced, yielding a complex set of Dfa mRNAs that are present largely, although not exclusively, in the testis. A specific Dfa mRNA encodes, via its 3′-terminal exon, a 217-residue protein termed DfaA. Other Dfa mRNAs also contain this exon. DfaA is sequelogous (similar in sequence) to a region of the human/mouse HTEX4 protein, whose physiological function is unknown. We produced an affinity-purified antibody to recombinant mouse DfaA that detected a 35-kDa protein in the mouse testis and in several cell lines. Experiments in which RNA interference was used to down-regulate Dfa indicated that the 35-kDa protein was indeed DfaA. Furthermore, DfaA was present in the interchromatin granule clusters and was also found to bind to the Ggnbp1 gametogenetin-binding protein-1 and to the Abt1 activator of basal transcription that interacts with the TATA-binding protein. Given these results, RNA interference was used to probe the influence of Dfa levels in luciferase reporter assays. We found that DfaA acts as a repressor of TATA-box transcriptional promoters. PMID:20356838

  13. Mouse Dfa is a repressor of TATA-box promoters and interacts with the Abt1 activator of basal transcription.

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    Brower, Christopher S; Veiga, Lucia; Jones, Richard H; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2010-05-28

    Our study of the mouse Ate1 arginyltransferase, a component of the N-end rule pathway, has shown that Ate1 pre-mRNA is produced from a bidirectional promoter that also expresses, in the opposite direction, a previously uncharacterized gene (Hu, R. G., Brower, C. S., Wang, H., Davydov, I. V., Sheng, J., Zhou, J., Kwon, Y. T., and Varshavsky, A. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 32559-32573). In this work, we began analyzing this gene, termed Dfa (divergent from Ate1). Mouse Dfa was found to be transcribed from both the bidirectional P(Ate1/Dfa) promoter and other nearby promoters. The resulting transcripts are alternatively spliced, yielding a complex set of Dfa mRNAs that are present largely, although not exclusively, in the testis. A specific Dfa mRNA encodes, via its 3'-terminal exon, a 217-residue protein termed Dfa(A). Other Dfa mRNAs also contain this exon. Dfa(A) is sequelogous (similar in sequence) to a region of the human/mouse HTEX4 protein, whose physiological function is unknown. We produced an affinity-purified antibody to recombinant mouse Dfa(A) that detected a 35-kDa protein in the mouse testis and in several cell lines. Experiments in which RNA interference was used to down-regulate Dfa indicated that the 35-kDa protein was indeed Dfa(A). Furthermore, Dfa(A) was present in the interchromatin granule clusters and was also found to bind to the Ggnbp1 gametogenetin-binding protein-1 and to the Abt1 activator of basal transcription that interacts with the TATA-binding protein. Given these results, RNA interference was used to probe the influence of Dfa levels in luciferase reporter assays. We found that Dfa(A) acts as a repressor of TATA-box transcriptional promoters.

  14. A promoter in the coding region of the calcium channel gene CACNA1C generates the transcription factor CCAT.

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    Natalia Gomez-Ospina

    Full Text Available The C-terminus of the voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.2 encodes a transcription factor, the calcium channel associated transcriptional regulator (CCAT, that regulates neurite extension and inhibits Cav1.2 expression. The mechanisms by which CCAT is generated in neurons and myocytes are poorly understood. Here we show that CCAT is produced by activation of a cryptic promoter in exon 46 of CACNA1C, the gene that encodes CaV1.2. Expression of CCAT is independent of Cav1.2 expression in neuroblastoma cells, in mice, and in human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, providing strong evidence that CCAT is not generated by cleavage of CaV1.2. Analysis of the transcriptional start sites in CACNA1C and immune-blotting for channel proteins indicate that multiple proteins are generated from the 3' end of the CACNA1C gene. This study provides new insights into the regulation of CACNA1C, and provides an example of how exonic promoters contribute to the complexity of mammalian genomes.

  15. Interplay between the transcription factors acting on the GATA- and GABA-responsive elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UGA promoters.

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    Cardillo, Sabrina B; Levi, Carolina E; Bermúdez Moretti, Mariana; Correa García, Susana

    2012-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport and catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are subject to a complex transcriptional control that depends on the nutritional status of the cells. The expression of the genes that form the UGA regulon is inducible by GABA and sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). GABA induction of these genes is mediated by Uga3 and Dal81 transcription factors, whereas GATA factors are responsible for NCR. Here, we show how members of the UGA regulon share the activation mechanism. Our results show that both Uga3 and Dal81 interact with UGA genes in a GABA-dependent manner, and that they depend on each other for the interaction with their target promoters and the transcriptional activation. The typical DNA-binding domain Zn(II)(2)-Cys(6) of Dal81 is unnecessary for its activity and Uga3 acts as a bridge between Dal81 and DNA. Both the trans-activation activity of the GATA factor Gln3 and the repressive activity of the GATA factor Dal80 are exerted by their interaction with UGA promoters in response to GABA, indicating that Uga3, Dal81, Gln3 and Dal80 all act in concert to induce the expression of UGA genes. So, an interplay between the factors responsible for GABA induction and those responsible for NCR in the regulation of the UGA genes is proposed here.

  16. Manœuver at the transcription start site: Mot1p and NC2 navigate TFIID/TBP to specific core promoter elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo; Lin, I-Ju; Darst, Russell P.

    2009-01-01

    The process of transcription initiation in eukaryotic cells is complex and our view of how the transcription apparatus is assembled at the promoter has changed over the last decade. For most genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) general transcription factors and Pol II assemble at the core promoter and initiate transcription at specific sites. The number of distinct core promoter elements is increasing and so is the number of specific proteins that act through these elements. Core promoter elements include the TATA box, TFIIB recognition element (BRE), the initiator (INR), and the downstream promoter element (DPE). Transcription factors that act through these elements are TATA binding protein (TBP) and its associated factors (TAFs), Negative Cofactor 2 (NC2), Mot1p, TFIIB, and TFIIA. Recent observations suggest that TBP, Mot1p, and NC2 exert positive and negative effects on transcription complex assembly depending on the presence or absence of specific core promoter elements. It is proposed here that Mot1p and NC2 together function as a remodeling complex that positions TFIID and perhaps other protein complexes at specific core promoter elements. PMID:19077548

  17. In vivo transcriptional targeting into the retinal vasculature using recombinant baculovirus carrying the human flt-1 promoter

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    Vaca Luis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells are a target for gene therapy because they are implicated in a number of vascular diseases. Recombinant baculovirus have emerged as novel gene delivery vectors. However, there is no information available concerning the use of endothelial-specific promoters in the context of the baculovirus genome. In the present study, we have generated a recombinant baculovirus containing the human flt-1 promoter (BacFLT-GFP driving the expression of the green fluorescent protein. Transcriptional gene targeting was analyzed in vitro in different mammalian cell lines and in vivo in adult rat retinal vasculature. Results BacFLT-GFP evoked the highest levels of expression in the endothelial cell line BUVEC-E6E7-1, similar to those reached by recombinant baculovirus carrying the CMV promoter (112% relative to BacCMV-GFP, n = 4. Interestingly, BacFLT-GFP directed high levels of expression in rat glioma C6 and in human glioblastoma CH235 cells (34.78% and 47.86% relative to BacCMV-GFP, respectively. Histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrate or trichostatin A enhanced the transcriptional activity of both BacCMV-GFP and BacFLT-GFP. Thus, in this study histone deacetylation appears to be a central mechanism for the silencing of baculovirus, independently of the promoter utilized. In vivo transcriptional targeting was demonstrated in adult rat retinal vasculature by intravitreal delivery of BacFLT-GFP and immunohistochemical staining with von Willebrand factor (vWF. Analysis by fluorescence microscopy and deconvolved three-dimensional confocal microscopy of retinal whole mounts obtained after 3 days of baculovirus injection showed that most GFP-expressing cells localized to the inner limiting membrane (ILM and ganglion cell layer (GCL and colocalize with vWF (70%, n = 10 in blood vessels, confirming the endothelial phenotype of the transduced cells. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that the restricted expression

  18. m^6A RNA methylation promotes XIST-mediated transcriptional repression

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Deepak P; Chen, Chun-Kan; Pickering, Brian F.; Chow, Amy; Jackson, Constanza; Guttman, Mitchell; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2016-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) mediates the transcriptional silencing of genes on the X chromosome. Here we show that, in human cells, XIST is highly methylated with at least 78 N^6-methyladenosine (m^6A) residues—a reversible base modification of unknown function in long non-coding RNAs. We show that m^6A formation in XIST, as well as in cellular mRNAs, is mediated by RNA-binding motif protein 15 (RBM15) and its paralogue RBM15B, which bind the m^6A-methylation...

  19. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

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    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin, E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  20. Mit1 Transcription Factor Mediates Methanol Signaling and Regulates the Alcohol Oxidase 1 (AOX1) Promoter in Pichia pastoris*

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    Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jinjia; Bai, Peng; Shi, Lei; Shen, Wei; Zhou, Mian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing; Cai, Menghao

    2016-01-01

    The alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter (PAOX1) of Pichia pastoris is the most powerful and commonly used promoter for driving protein expression. However, mechanisms regulating its transcriptional activity are unclear. Here, we identified a Zn(II)2Cys6-type methanol-induced transcription factor 1 (Mit1) and elucidated its roles in regulating PAOX1 activity in response to glycerol and methanol. Mit1 regulated the expression of many genes involved in methanol utilization pathway, including AOX1, but did not participate in peroxisome proliferation and transportation of peroxisomal proteins during methanol metabolism. Structural analysis of Mit1 by performing domain deletions confirmed its specific and critical role in the strict repression of PAOX1 in glycerol medium. Importantly, Mit1, Mxr1, and Prm1, which positively regulated PAOX1 in response to methanol, were bound to PAOX1 at different sites and did not interact with each other. However, these factors cooperatively activated PAOX1 through a cascade. Mxr1 mainly functioned during carbon derepression, whereas Mit1 and Prm1 functioned during methanol induction, with Prm1 transmitting methanol signal to Mit1 by binding to the MIT1 promoter (PMIT1), thus increasingly expressing Mit1 and subsequently activating PAOX1. PMID:26828066

  1. Activating transcription factor 3 promotes loss of the acinar cell phenotype in response to cerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Elena N; Young, Claire C; Toma, Jelena; Levy, Michael; Berger, Kurt R; Johnson, Charis L; Mehmood, Rashid; Swan, Patrick; Chu, Alphonse; Cregan, Sean P; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Howlett, Christopher J; Pin, Christopher L

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a debilitating disease of the exocrine pancreas that, under chronic conditions, is a major susceptibility factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Although down-regulation of genes that promote the mature acinar cell fate is required to reduce injury associated with pancreatitis, the factors that promote this repression are unknown. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a key mediator of the unfolded protein response, a pathway rapidly activated during pancreatic insult. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing, we show that ATF3 is bound to the transcriptional regulatory regions of >30% of differentially expressed genes during the initiation of pancreatitis. Of importance, ATF3-dependent regulation of these genes was observed only upon induction of pancreatitis, with pathways involved in inflammation, acinar cell differentiation, and cell junctions being specifically targeted. Characterizing expression of transcription factors that affect acinar cell differentiation suggested that acinar cells lacking ATF3 maintain a mature cell phenotype during pancreatitis, a finding supported by maintenance of junctional proteins and polarity markers. As a result, Atf3-/- pancreatic tissue displayed increased tissue damage and inflammatory cell infiltration at early time points during injury but, at later time points, showed reduced acinar-to-duct cell metaplasia. Thus our results reveal a critical role for ATF3 as a key regulator of the acinar cell transcriptional response during injury and may provide a link between chronic pancreatitis and PDAC. © 2017 Fazio et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Transcriptional responses to sucrose mimic the plant-associated life style of the plant growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638.

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    Safiyh Taghavi

    Full Text Available Growth in sucrose medium was previously found to trigger the expression of functions involved in the plant associated life style of the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638. Therefore, comparative transcriptome analysis between cultures grown in sucrose or lactate medium was used to gain insights in the expression levels of bacterial functions involved in the endophytic life style of strain 638. Growth on sucrose as a carbon source resulted in major changes in cell physiology, including a shift from a planktonic life style to the formation of bacterial aggregates. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in transcription of genes involved in motility (e.g., flagella biosynthesis and an increase in the transcription of genes involved in colonization, adhesion and biofilm formation. The transcription levels of functions previously suggested as being involved in endophytic behavior and functions responsible for plant growth promoting properties, including the synthesis of indole-acetic acid, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, also increased significantly for cultures grown in sucrose medium. Interestingly, despite an abundance of essential nutrients transcription levels of functions related to uptake and processing of nitrogen and iron became increased for cultures grown on sucrose as sole carbon source. Transcriptome data were also used to analyze putative regulatory relationships. In addition to the small RNA csrABCD regulon, which seems to play a role in the physiological adaptation and possibly the shift between free-living and plant-associated endophytic life style of Enterobacter sp. 638, our results also pointed to the involvement of rcsAB in controlling responses by Enterobacter sp. 638 to a plant-associated life style. Targeted mutagenesis was used to confirm this role and showed that compared to wild-type Enterobacter sp. 638 a ΔrcsB mutant was affected in its plant growth promoting ability.

  3. Heat shock factor 1 promotes TERRA transcription and telomere protection upon heat stress.

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    Koskas, Sivan; Decottignies, Anabelle; Dufour, Solenne; Pezet, Mylène; Verdel, André; Vourc'h, Claire; Faure, Virginie

    2017-06-20

    In response to metabolic or environmental stress, cells activate powerful defense mechanisms to prevent the formation and accumulation of toxic protein aggregates. The main orchestrator of this cellular response is HSF1 (heat shock factor 1), a transcription factor involved in the up-regulation of protein-coding genes with protective roles. It has become very clear that HSF1 has a broader function than initially expected. Indeed, our previous work demonstrated that, upon stress, HSF1 activates the transcription of a non-coding RNA, named Satellite III, at pericentromeric heterochromatin. Here, we observe that the function of HSF1 extends to telomeres and identify subtelomeric DNA as a new genomic target of HSF1. We show that the binding of HSF1 to subtelomeric regions plays an essential role in the upregulation of non-coding TElomeric Repeat containing RNA (TERRA) transcription upon heat shock. Importantly, our data show that telomere integrity is impacted by heat shock and that telomeric DNA damages are markedly enhanced in HSF1 deficient cells. Altogether, our findings reveal a new direct and essential function of HSF1 in the transcriptional activation of TERRA and in telomere protection upon stress. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. A promoter polymorphism rs2075824 within IMPA2 gene affecting the transcription activity: possible relationship with schizophrenia.

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    Li, Jia; Huang, Sheng; Dai, Hui-Rong; Wang, Juan; Lin, Li-Hui; Xiao, Hui; Peng, Xia; Li, Fei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Yuan, Jian-Min; Li, Li

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies with biological and genetic evidence indicate that the myo-inositol monophosphatase 2 (IMPA2) gene may influence schizophrenia. We performed a genetic association study in Han Chinese cohorts. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms within IMPA2 promoter region (rs971363, rs971362, rs2075824, rs111410794 and rs111610121), as well as one (rs45442994, in intron 1) that was positively associated in another study, were selected for genotyping in 1397 patients with schizophrenia and 1285 mentally healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies were assessed by gender stratification. Interestingly, rs2075824 showed a strong association with schizophrenia (P = 4.1 × 10 -4 ), and the T allele was more frequent in cases than controls [P = 5.6 × 10 -5 , OR (95% CI) = 1.26 (1.13-1.41)]. In vitro promoter assay showed that the transcription activity of the T allele promoter was higher than that of the C allele promoter and the T allele of rs2075824 contributed to risk for schizophrenia. By stratifying males and females, we found a gender-specific association for IMPA2 and schizophrenia: the T allele of rs2075824 was more frequent in male cases compared with male controls [P = 1.4 × 10 -4 , OR (95% CI) = 1.33 (1.15-1.55)]. Our data suggest that a promoter polymorphism of IMPA2 possibly contributed to risk for schizophrenia by elevating transcription activity in Han Chinese individuals. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. MicroRNA genes preferentially expressed in dendritic cells contain sites for conserved transcription factor binding motifs in their promoters

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    Huynen Martijn A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a fundamental role in the regulation of gene expression by translational repression or target mRNA degradation. Regulatory elements in miRNA promoters are less well studied, but may reveal a link between their expression and a specific cell type. Results To explore this link in myeloid cells, miRNA expression profiles were generated from monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs. Differences in miRNA expression among monocytes, DCs and their stimulated progeny were observed. Furthermore, putative promoter regions of miRNAs that are significantly up-regulated in DCs were screened for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs based on TFBS motif matching score, the degree to which those TFBSs are over-represented in the promoters of the up-regulated miRNAs, and the extent of conservation of the TFBSs in mammals. Conclusions Analysis of evolutionarily conserved TFBSs in DC promoters revealed preferential clustering of sites within 500 bp upstream of the precursor miRNAs and that many mRNAs of cognate TFs of the conserved TFBSs were indeed expressed in the DCs. Taken together, our data provide evidence that selected miRNAs expressed in DCs have evolutionarily conserved TFBSs relevant to DC biology in their promoters.

  6. Transcriptional Infidelity Promotes Heritable Phenotypic Change in a Bistable Gene Network

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    Gordon, Alasdair J. E; Halliday, Jennifer A; Blankschien, Matthew D; Burns, Philip A; Yatagai, Fumio; Herman, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Bistable epigenetic switches are fundamental for cell fate determination in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Regulatory proteins associated with bistable switches are often present in low numbers and subject to molecular noise. It is becoming clear that noise in gene expression can influence cell fate. Although the origins and consequences of noise have been studied, the stochastic and transient nature of RNA errors during transcription has not been considered in the origin or modeling of noise nor has the capacity for such transient errors in information transfer to generate heritable phenotypic change been discussed. We used a classic bistable memory module to monitor and capture transient RNA errors: the lac operon of Escherichia coli comprises an autocatalytic positive feedback loop producing a heritable all-or-none epigenetic switch that is sensitive to molecular noise. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the frequency of epigenetic switching from one expression state to the other is increased when the fidelity of RNA transcription is decreased due to error-prone RNA polymerases or to the absence of auxiliary RNA fidelity factors GreA and GreB (functional analogues of eukaryotic TFIIS). Therefore, transcription infidelity contributes to molecular noise and can effect heritable phenotypic change in genetically identical cells in the same environment. Whereas DNA errors allow genetic space to be explored, RNA errors may allow epigenetic or expression space to be sampled. Thus, RNA infidelity should also be considered in the heritable origin of altered or aberrant cell behaviour. PMID:19243224

  7. m6A RNA methylation promotes XIST-mediated transcriptional repression

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    Patil, Deepak P.; Chen, Chun-Kan; Pickering, Brian F.; Chow, Amy; Jackson, Constanza; Guttman, Mitchell; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2017-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) mediates the transcriptional silencing of genes on the X chromosome. Here we show that in human cells XIST is highly methylated with at least 78 N6-methyladenosine (m6A) residues—a reversible base modification of unknown function in long non-coding RNAs. We show that m6A formation in XIST, as well as in cellular mRNAs, is mediated by RNA binding motif protein 15 (RBM15) and its paralogue RBM15B, which bind the m6A-methylation complex and recruit it to specific sites in RNA. This results in the methylation of adenosine nucleotides in adjacent m6A consensus motifs. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of RBM15 and RBM15B, or knockdown of methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3), an m6A methyltransferase, impairs XIST-mediated gene silencing. A systematic comparison of m6A-binding proteins shows that YTH domain containing 1 (YTHDC1) preferentially recognizes m6A residues on XIST and is required for XIST function. Additionally, artificial tethering of YTHDC1 to XIST rescues XIST-mediated silencing upon loss of m6A. These data reveal a pathway of m6A formation and recognition required for XIST-mediated transcriptional repression. PMID:27602518

  8. Differential regulation of sense and antisense promoter activity at the Csf1R locus in B cells by the transcription factor PAX5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Richard M; Valeaux, Stephanie; Wilson, Nicola; Bouhlel, M Amine; Clarke, Deborah; Krüger, Imme; Kulu, Divine; Suske, Guntram; Philipsen, Sjaak; Tagoh, Hiromi; Bonifer, Constanze

    2011-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX5 is essential for the activation of B-cell-specific genes and for the silencing of myeloid-specific genes. We previously determined the molecular mechanism by which PAX5 silences the myeloid-specific colony-stimulating-factor-receptor (Csf1R) gene and showed that PAX5 directly binds to the Csf1r promoter as well as to an intronic enhancer that generates an antisense transcript in B cells. Here we examine the role of PAX5 in the regulation of sense and antisense transcription in B cells. We performed PAX5-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses across the Csfr1 locus. We investigated the role of PAX5 in regulating Csf1r sense and antisense promoter activity by transient transfections and by employing a Pax5(-/-) pro-B-cell line expressing an inducible PAX5 protein. PAX5 interacting factors were identified by pull-down experiments. The role of the transcription factor Sp3 in driving antisense promoter expression was examined in B cells from Sp3 knockout mice. PAX5 differentially regulates the Csf1r promoter and the promoter of the antisense transcript. PAX5 interferes with PU.1 transactivation at the sense promoter by binding to a PAX5 consensus sequence. At the antisense promoter, PAX5 does not specifically recognize DNA, but interacts with Sp3 to upregulate antisense promoter activity. Antisense promoter activation by PAX5 is dependent on the presence of its partial homeo-domain. We demonstrate that PAX5 regulates Csf1r in B cells by reducing the frequency of binding of the basal transcription machinery to the promoter and by activating antisense RNA expression. Copyright © 2011 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Viral vectors based on bidirectional cell-specific mammalian promoters and transcriptional amplification strategy for use in vitro and in vivo

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    Kasparov Sergey

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using cell-type-specific promoters to restrict gene expression to particular cells is an attractive approach for gene therapy, but often hampered by insufficient transcriptional activity of these promoters. Previous studies have shown that transcriptional amplification strategy (TAS can be used to enhance the activity of such promoters without loss of cell type specificity. Originally TAS involved the use of two copies of a cell-specific promoter leading to generation of large expression cassettes, which can be hard to use given the space limitations of the conventional viral gene expression vectors. Results We have now developed a new bidirectional lentiviral vector system, based on TAS that can enhance the transcriptional activity of human synapsin-1 (SYN promoter and the compact glial fibrillary acidic protein (GfaABC1D promoter. In the opposite orientation, a minimal core promoter (65 bp derived from the human cytomegalovirus (CMV was joined upstream of the SYN promoter or GfaABC1D promoter. This led to the formation of synthetic bidirectional promoters which were flanked with two gene expression cassettes. The 5' cassette transcribed the artificial transcriptional activator. The downstream cassette drove the synthesis of the gene of interest. Studies in both cell cultures and in vivo showed that the new bidirectional promoters greatly increased the expression level of the reporter gene. In vivo studies also showed that transgene expression was enhanced without loss of cell specificity of both SYN and GfaABC1D promoters. Conclusion This work establishes a novel approach for creating compact TAS-amplified cell-specific promoters, a feature important for their use in viral backbones. This improved approach should prove useful for the development of powerful gene expression systems based on weak cell-specific promoters.

  10. Deregulation of the Pit-1 transcription factor in human breast cancer cells promotes tumor growth and metastasis

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    Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Seoane, Samuel; Garcia-Caballero, Tomas; Gallego, Rosalia; Macia, Manuel; Gonzalez, Luis O.; Vizoso, Francisco; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The Pit-1 transcription factor (also know as POU1F1) plays a critical role in cell differentiation during organogenesis of the anterior pituitary in mammals and is a transcriptional activator for pituitary gene transcription. Increased expression of Pit-1 has been reported in human tumorigenic breast cells. Here, we found that Pit-1 overexpression or knockdown in human breast cancer cell lines induced profound phenotypic changes in the expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Some of these protumorigenic effects of Pit-1 were mediated by upregulation of Snai1, an inductor of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In immunodeficient mice, Pit-1 overexpression induced tumoral growth and promoted metastasis in lung. In patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and node-positive tumor, high expression of Pit-1 was significantly correlated with Snai1 positivity. Notably, in these patients elevated expression of Pit-1 was significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of distant metastasis. These findings suggest that Pit-1 could help to make a more accurate prognosis in patients with node-positive breast cancer and may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:21060149

  11. Hepatic Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs: High Promoter Conservation and Dynamic, Sex-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation by Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Tisha; Hao, Pengying; Yilmaz, Feyza; Waxman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key chromatin regulators, yet few studies have characterized lincRNAs in a single tissue under diverse conditions. Here, we analyzed 45 mouse liver RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data sets collected under diverse conditions to systematically characterize 4,961 liver lincRNAs, 59% of them novel, with regard to gene structures, species conservation, chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic states. To investigate the potential for functionality, we focused on the responses of the liver lincRNAs to growth hormone stimulation, which imparts clinically relevant sex differences to hepatic metabolism and liver disease susceptibility. Sex-biased expression characterized 247 liver lincRNAs, with many being nuclear RNA enriched and regulated by growth hormone. The sex-biased lincRNA genes are enriched for nearby and correspondingly sex-biased accessible chromatin regions, as well as sex-biased binding sites for growth hormone-regulated transcriptional activators (STAT5, hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 [HNF6], FOXA1, and FOXA2) and transcriptional repressors (CUX2 and BCL6). Repression of female-specific lincRNAs in male liver, but not that of male-specific lincRNAs in female liver, was associated with enrichment of H3K27me3-associated inactive states and poised (bivalent) enhancer states. Strikingly, we found that liver-specific lincRNA gene promoters are more highly species conserved and have a significantly higher frequency of proximal binding by liver transcription factors than liver-specific protein-coding gene promoters. Orthologs for many liver lincRNAs were identified in one or more supraprimates, including two rat lincRNAs showing the same growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased expression as their mouse counterparts. This integrative analysis of liver lincRNA chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and growth hormone regulation provides novel insights into the

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibition modulates histone acetylation at gene promoter regions and affects genome-wide gene transcription in Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Letícia Anderson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Treatment depends on a single drug, praziquantel, which kills the Schistosoma spp. parasite only at the adult stage. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi such as Trichostatin A (TSA induce parasite mortality in vitro (schistosomula and adult worms, however the downstream effects of histone hyperacetylation on the parasite are not known.TSA treatment of adult worms in vitro increased histone acetylation at H3K9ac and H3K14ac, which are transcription activation marks, not affecting the unrelated transcription repression mark H3K27me3. We investigated the effect of TSA HDACi on schistosomula gene expression at three different time points, finding a marked genome-wide change in the transcriptome profile. Gene transcription activity was correlated with changes on the chromatin acetylation mark at gene promoter regions. Moreover, combining expression data with ChIP-Seq public data for schistosomula, we found that differentially expressed genes having the H3K4me3 mark at their promoter region in general showed transcription activation upon HDACi treatment, compared with those without the mark, which showed transcription down-regulation. Affected genes are enriched for DNA replication processes, most of them being up-regulated. Twenty out of 22 genes encoding proteins involved in reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation were down-regulated. Dozens of genes encoding proteins with histone reader motifs were changed, including SmEED from the PRC2 complex. We targeted SmEZH2 methyltransferase PRC2 component with a new EZH2 inhibitor (GSK343 and showed a synergistic effect with TSA, significantly increasing schistosomula mortality.Genome-wide gene expression analyses have identified important pathways and cellular functions that were affected and may explain the schistosomicidal effect of TSA HDACi. The change in expression of dozens of histone reader genes involved in

  13. hypoxia-inducible factors activate CD133 promoter through ETS family transcription factors.

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    Shunsuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available CD133 is a cellular surface protein that has been reported to be a cancer stem cell marker, and thus it is considered to be a potential target for cancer treatment. However, the mechanism regulating CD133 expression is not yet understood. In this study, we analyzed the activity of five putative promoters (P1-P5 of CD133 in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells and colon cancer cell line WiDr, and found that the activity of promoters, particularly of P5, is elevated by overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Deletion and mutation analysis identified one of the two E-twenty six (ETS binding sites (EBSs in the P5 region as being essential for its promoter activity induced by HIF-1α and HIF-2α. In addition, a chromatin imunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α and HIF-2α bind to the proximal P5 promoter at the EBSs. The immunoprecipitation assay showed that HIF-1α physically interacts with Elk1; however, HIF-2α did not bind to Elk1 or ETS1. Furthermore, knockdown of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α resulted in a reduction of CD133 expression in WiDr. Taken together, our results revealed that HIF-1α and HIF-2α activate CD133 promoter through ETS proteins.

  14. A Vector with a Single Promoter for In Vitro Transcription and Mammalian Cell Expression of CRISPR gRNAs.

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    Peter J Romanienko

    Full Text Available The genomes of more than 50 organisms have now been manipulated due to rapid advancement of gene editing technology. One way to perform gene editing in the mouse using the CRISPR/CAS system, guide RNA (gRNA and CAS9 mRNA transcribed in vitro are microinjected into fertilized eggs that are then allowed to develop to term. As a rule, gRNAs are tested first in tissue culture cells and the one with the highest locus-specific cleavage activity is chosen for microinjection. For cell transfections, gRNAs are typically expressed using the human U6 promoter (hU6. However, gRNAs for microinjection into zygotes are obtained by in vitro transcription from a T7 bacteriophage promoter in a separate plasmid vector. Here, we describe the design and construction of a combined U6T7 hybrid promoter from which the same gRNA sequence can be expressed. An expression vector containing such a hybrid promoter can now be used to generate gRNA for testing in mammalian cells as well as for microinjection purposes. The gRNAs expressed and transcribed from this vector are found to be functional in cells as well as in mice.

  15. A Rice NAC Transcription Factor Promotes Leaf Senescence via ABA Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chanjuan; Lu, Songchong; Lv, Bo; Zhang, Bin; Shen, Jiabin; He, Jianmei; Luo, Liqiong; Xi, Dandan; Chen, Xu; Ming, Feng

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that abscisic acid (ABA)-induced leaf senescence and premature leaf senescence negatively affect the yield of rice (Oryza sativa). However, the molecular mechanism underlying this relationship, especially the upstream transcriptional network that modulates ABA level during leaf senescence, remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate a rice NAC transcription factor, OsNAC2, that participates in ABA-induced leaf senescence. Overexpression of OsNAC2 dramatically accelerated leaf senescence, whereas its knockdown lines showed a delay in leaf senescence. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR, dual-luciferase, and yeast one-hybrid assays demonstrated that OsNAC2 directly activates expression of chlorophyll degradation genes, OsSGR and OsNYC3 Moreover, ectopic expression of OsNAC2 leads to an increase in ABA levels via directly up-regulating expression of ABA biosynthetic genes (OsNCED3 and OsZEP1) as well as down-regulating the ABA catabolic gene (OsABA8ox1). Interestingly, OsNAC2 is upregulated by a lower level of ABA but downregulated by a higher level of ABA, indicating a feedback repression of OsNAC2 by ABA. Additionally, reduced OsNAC2 expression leads to about 10% increase in the grain yield of RNAi lines. The novel ABA-NAC-SAGs regulatory module might provide a new insight into the molecular action of ABA to enhance leaf senescence and elucidates the transcriptional network of ABA production during leaf senescence in rice. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Fnr, a global transcriptional regulator of Escherichia coli, activates the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) promoter and intracellular VHb expression increases cytochrome d promoter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, P S; Kallio, P T; Bailey, J E

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen-regulated promoter (Pvhb) of the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene has been applied to direct high-level expression of several cloned proteins, including Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb), which improves productivity of many aerobic processes. In an effort to gain a better understanding of the regulation of Pvhb, and to guide further optimization of this technology, we investigated whether the Escherichia coli global regulatory molecules Fnr and the Arc system (ArcA and ArcB), which control the expression of various genes under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, also regulate Pvhb activity in E. coli. The activity of Pvhb and the expression of VHb in E. coli were activated by Fnr, but were relatively unaffected by the Arc system under microaerobic conditions (DO less than 2% air saturation). We also examined the possibility of VHb affecting cytochrome d promoter activity during microaerobiosis. The presence of VHb increased the activity of beta-galactosidase from a cytochrome d promoter-lacZ fusion by 1.5-fold. This indicates that VHb affects oxygen-regulated transcription of E. coli genes and may contribute to the modified physiology observed in VHb-expressing E. coli.

  17. Promoter of CaZF, a chickpea gene that positively regulates growth and stress tolerance, is activated by an AP2-family transcription factor CAP2.

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    Deepti Jain

    Full Text Available Plants respond to different forms of stresses by inducing transcription of a common and distinct set of genes by concerted actions of a cascade of transcription regulators. We previously reported that a gene, CaZF encoding a C2H2-zinc finger family protein from chickpea (Cicer arietinum imparted high salinity tolerance when expressed in tobacco plants. We report here that in addition to promoting tolerance against dehydration, salinity and high temperature, the CaZF overexpressing plants exhibited similar phenotype of growth and development like the plants overexpressing CAP2, encoding an AP2-family transcription factor from chickpea. To investigate any relationship between these two genes, we performed gene expression analysis in the overexpressing plants, promoter-reporter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation. A number of transcripts that exhibited enhanced accumulation upon expression of CAP2 or CaZF in tobacco plants were found common. Transient expression of CAP2 in chickpea leaves resulted in increased accumulation of CaZF transcript. Gel mobility shift and transient promoter-reporter assays suggested that CAP2 activates CaZF promoter by interacting with C-repeat elements (CRTs in CaZF promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay demonstrated an in vivo interaction of CAP2 protein with CaZF promoter.

  18. Cross-species mapping of bidirectional promoters enables prediction of unannotated 5' UTRs and identification of species-specific transcripts

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    Lewin Harris A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bidirectional promoters are shared regulatory regions that influence the expression of two oppositely oriented genes. This type of regulatory architecture is found more frequently than expected by chance in the human genome, yet many specifics underlying the regulatory design are unknown. Given that the function of most orthologous genes is similar across species, we hypothesized that the architecture and regulation of bidirectional promoters might also be similar across species, representing a core regulatory structure and enabling annotation of these regions in additional mammalian genomes. Results By mapping the intergenic distances of genes in human, chimpanzee, bovine, murine, and rat, we show an enrichment for pairs of genes equal to or less than 1,000 bp between their adjacent 5' ends ("head-to-head" compared to pairs of genes that fall in the same orientation ("head-to-tail" or whose 3' ends are side-by-side ("tail-to-tail". A representative set of 1,369 human bidirectional promoters was mapped to orthologous sequences in other mammals. We confirmed predictions for 5' UTRs in nine of ten manual picks in bovine based on comparison to the orthologous human promoter set and in six of seven predictions in human based on comparison to the bovine dataset. The two predictions that did not have orthology as bidirectional promoters in the other species resulted from unique events that initiated transcription in the opposite direction in only those species. We found evidence supporting the independent emergence of bidirectional promoters from the family of five RecQ helicase genes, which gained their bidirectional promoters and partner genes independently rather than through a duplication process. Furthermore, by expanding our comparisons from pairwise to multispecies analyses we developed a map representing a core set of bidirectional promoters in mammals. Conclusion We show that the orthologous positions of bidirectional

  19. Transcriptional regulation of teleost aicda genes. Pt 1 suppressors of promiscuous promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to better understand antibody affinity maturation in fishes we sought to identify gene regulatory elements that could drive expression of activated B-cell specific fluorescent reporter transgenes in zebrafish. Specifically the promoter and several non-coding regions of the channel catfish (...

  20. Transcription factor IRF4 drives dendritic cells to promote Th2 differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jesse W.; Tjota, Melissa Y.; Clay, Bryan S.; Vander Lugt, Bryan; Bandukwala, Hozefa S.; Hrusch, Cara L.; Decker, Donna C.; Blaine, Kelly M.; Fixsen, Bethany R.; Singh, Harinder; Sciammas, Roger; Sperling, Anne I.

    2013-12-01

    Atopic asthma is an inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with Th2 adaptive immune responses triggered by innocuous antigens. While dendritic cells (DCs) are known to shape the adaptive immune response, the mechanisms by which DCs promote Th2 differentiation remain elusive. Herein we demonstrate that Th2-promoting stimuli induce DC expression of IRF4. Mice with conditional deletion of Irf4 in DCs show a dramatic defect in Th2-type lung inflammation, yet retain the ability to elicit pulmonary Th1 antiviral responses. Using loss- and gain-of-function analysis, we demonstrate that Th2 differentiation is dependent on IRF4 expression in DCs. Finally, IRF4 directly targets and activates the Il-10 and Il-33 genes in DCs. Reconstitution with exogenous IL-10 and IL-33 recovers the ability of Irf4-deficient DCs to promote Th2 differentiation. These findings reveal a regulatory module in DCs by which IRF4 modulates IL-10 and IL-33 cytokine production to specifically promote Th2 differentiation and inflammation.

  1. Functional and transcriptional induction of aquaporin-1 gene by hypoxia; analysis of promoter and role of Hif-1α.

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    Irene Abreu-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-1 (AQP1 is a water channel that is highly expressed in tissues with rapid O(2 transport. It has been reported that this protein contributes to gas permeation (CO(2, NO and O(2 through the plasma membrane. We show that hypoxia increases Aqp1 mRNA and protein levels in tissues, namely mouse brain and lung, and in cultured cells, the 9L glioma cell line. Stopped-flow light-scattering experiments confirmed an increase in the water permeability of 9L cells exposed to hypoxia, supporting the view that hypoxic Aqp1 up-regulation has a functional role. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulatory process, transcriptional regulation was studied by transient transfections of mouse endothelial cells with a 1297 bp 5' proximal Aqp1 promoter-luciferase construct. Incubation in hypoxia produced a dose- and time-dependent induction of luciferase activity that was also obtained after treatments with hypoxia mimetics (DMOG and CoCl(2 and by overexpressing stabilized mutated forms of HIF-1α. Single mutations or full deletions of the three putative HIF binding domains present in the Aqp1 promoter partially reduced its responsiveness to hypoxia, and transfection with Hif-1α siRNA decreased the in vitro hypoxia induction of Aqp1 mRNA and protein levels. Our results indicate that HIF-1α participates in the hypoxic induction of AQP1. However, we also demonstrate that the activation of Aqp1 promoter by hypoxia is complex and multifactorial and suggest that besides HIF-1α other transcription factors might contribute to this regulatory process. These data provide a conceptual framework to support future research on the involvement of AQP1 in a range of pathophysiological conditions, including edema, tumor growth, and respiratory diseases.

  2. Influence of promoter/enhancer region haplotypes on MGMT transcriptional regulation: a potential biomarker for human sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meixiang; Nekhayeva, Ilona; Cross, Courtney E; Rondelli, Catherine M; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2014-03-01

    The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) encodes the direct reversal DNA repair protein that removes alkyl adducts from the O6 position of guanine. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exist in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region. However, the haplotype structure encompassing these SNPs and their functional/biological significance are currently unknown. We hypothesized that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT transcription and can thus alter human sensitivity to alkylating agents. To identify the haplotype structure encompassing the MGMT P/E region SNPs, we sequenced 104 DNA samples from healthy individuals and inferred the haplotypes using the data generated. We identified eight SNPs in this region, namely T7C (rs180989103), T135G (rs1711646), G290A (rs61859810), C485A (rs1625649), C575A (rs113813075), G666A (rs34180180), C777A (rs34138162) and C1099T (rs16906252). Phylogenetics and Sequence Evolution analysis predicted 21 potential haplotypes that encompass these SNPs ranging in frequencies from 0.000048 to 0.39. Of these, 10 were identified in our study population as 20 paired haplotype combinations. To determine the functional significance of these haplotypes, luciferase reporter constructs representing these haplotypes were transfected into glioblastoma cells and their effect on MGMT promoter activity was determined. Compared with the most common (reference) haplotype 1, seven haplotypes significantly upregulated MGMT promoter activity (18-119% increase; P haplotype had no effect. Mechanistic studies conducted support the conclusion that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, differentially regulate MGMT transcription and could thus play a significant role in human sensitivity to environmental and therapeutic alkylating agents.

  3. Cross-talk between freezing response and signaling for regulatory transcriptions of MIR475b and its targets by miR475b promoter in Populus suaveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jun; Wang, Jia; Hu, Huiwen; Chen, Yinlei; An, Jiyong; Cai, Jian; Sun, Runze; Sheng, Zhongting; Liu, Xieping; Lin, Shanzhi

    2016-02-08

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of their target genes, yet the transcriptional regulation of plant miRNAs by promoter is poorly understood. Here, we firstly clone pri-miR475b cDNA and its native promoter from P. suaveolens, and characterize Psu-MIR475b as class-II gene transcribed by RNA polymerase II. By 5' deletion analysis of Psu-miR475b promoter in a series of promoter-GUS chimeric vectors, we functionally identify three positive regulatory regions and multiple cis-acting elements responsible for Psu-miR475b promoter activity in response to freezing stress and exogenous hormone treatment. Moreover, the Psu-miR475b promoter activity displays a tissue-specific manner, negatively regulated by freezing stress and positively by MeJA, SA or GA treatment. Importantly, we comparatively analyze the time-course transcriptional profiles of Psu-miR475b and its targets in Psu-miR475b over-expression transgenic plants controlled by Psu-miR475b-specific promoter or CaMV 35S constitutive promoter, and explore the regulatory mechanism of Psu-miR475b promoter controlling transcriptional expressions of Psu-MIR475b and its targets in response to freezing stress and exogenous hormone treatment. Our results reveal that Psu-miR475b promoter-mediated transcriptions of Psu-MIR475b and its targets in response to freezing stress may be involved in a cross-talk between freezing response and stress signaling process.

  4. Cytosine DNA methylation at promoter of non LTR retrotransposon and heat shock protein gene (HSP70) of Entamoeba histolytica and lack of correlation with transcription status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Mridula; Gaurav, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2017-03-01

    Non LTR retrotransposons (EhLINEs and EhSINEs) occupy 11% of the Entamoeba histolytica genome. Since promoter DNA methylation at cytosines has been correlated with transcriptional silencing of transposable elements in model organisms we checked whether this was the case in EhLINE1. We located promoter activity in a 841bp fragment at 5'-end of this element by luciferase reporter assay. From RNAseq and RT-PCR analyses we selected a transcriptionally active and silent copy to study cytosine DNA methylation of the promoter region by bisulfite sequencing. None of the cytosines were methylated in either copy. Further, we looked at methylation status of a few selected cytosines in all 5'-intact EhLINE1 copies by single nucleotide incorporation opposite cytosine in bisulfite-treated DNA, where dGTP would be incorporated if the cytosine was methylated. Again we did not find evidence of cytosine methylation, indicating that expression status of this element was not correlated with promoter DNA methylation. To test for any role of cytosine methylation in transcriptional regulation of the E. histolytica Hsp70 gene in which the promoter is fully methylated under normal growth conditions, we checked methylation status and found that the promoter remained fully methylated during heat-shock as well, although transcription was greatly enhanced by heat-shock, showing that cytosine methylation is not a repressive mark for EhHsp70. Our data present direct evidence that promoter methylation, a common mode of transposon silencing, is unlikely to be involved in transcriptional regulation of EhLINE1, and reinforce the conclusion that promoter DNA methylation may not be a major contributor to transcriptional regulation in E. histolytica. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Roles of Multiple Promoters in Transcription of Ribosomal DNA: Effects of Growth Conditions on Precursor rRNA Synthesis in Mycobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-y-Merchand, J. A.; Colston, M J; Cox, R A

    1998-01-01

    The roles of multiple promoters in the synthesis of rRNA under different conditions of growth were investigated, using two mycobacterial species as model organisms. When Mycobacterium smegmatis was grown under optimal conditions, its two rRNA operons contributed equally, with two promoters, one from each operon, being responsible for most transcripts. In stationary-phase growth or balanced growth under carbon starvation conditions, one operon (rrnAf) dominated and its three promoters contribu...

  6. Promoter-bound p300 complexes facilitate post-mitotic transmission of transcriptional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Madeline M; Byun, Jung S; Sacta, Maria; Jin, Qihuang; Baek, SongJoon; Gardner, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A central hallmark of epigenetic inheritance is the parental transmission of changes in patterns of gene expression to progeny without modification of DNA sequence. Although, the trans-generational conveyance of this molecular memory has been traditionally linked to covalent modification of histone and/or DNA, recent studies suggest a role for proteins that persist or remain bound within chromatin to "bookmark" specific loci for enhanced or potentiated responses in daughter cells immediately following cell division. In this report we describe a role for p300 in enabling gene bookmarking by pre-initiation complexes (PICs) containing RNA polymerase II (pol II), Mediator and TBP. Once formed these complexes require p300 to enable reacquisition of protein complex assemblies, chromatin modifications and long range chromatin interactions that facilitate post-mitotic transmission of transcriptional memory of prior environmental stimuli.

  7. Promoter-bound p300 complexes facilitate post-mitotic transmission of transcriptional memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline M Wong

    Full Text Available A central hallmark of epigenetic inheritance is the parental transmission of changes in patterns of gene expression to progeny without modification of DNA sequence. Although, the trans-generational conveyance of this molecular memory has been traditionally linked to covalent modification of histone and/or DNA, recent studies suggest a role for proteins that persist or remain bound within chromatin to "bookmark" specific loci for enhanced or potentiated responses in daughter cells immediately following cell division. In this report we describe a role for p300 in enabling gene bookmarking by pre-initiation complexes (PICs containing RNA polymerase II (pol II, Mediator and TBP. Once formed these complexes require p300 to enable reacquisition of protein complex assemblies, chromatin modifications and long range chromatin interactions that facilitate post-mitotic transmission of transcriptional memory of prior environmental stimuli.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell contact promotes CCN1 splicing and transcription in myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterweich, Julia; Ebert, Regina; Kraus, Sabrina; Tower, Robert J; Jakob, Franz; Schütze, Norbert

    2014-06-25

    CCN family member 1 (CCN1), also known as cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CYR61), belongs to the extracellular matrix-associated CCN protein family. The diverse functions of these proteins include regulation of cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and survival/apoptosis, induction of angiogenesis and cellular senescence. Their functions are partly overlapping, largely non-redundant, cell-type specific, and depend on the local microenvironment. To elucidate the role of CCN1 in the crosstalk between stromal cells and myeloma cells, we performed co-culture experiments with primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and the interleukin-6 (IL-6)-dependent myeloma cell line INA-6. Here we show that INA-6 cells display increased transcription and induction of splicing of intron-retaining CCN1 pre-mRNA when cultured in contact with MSC. Protein analyses confirmed that INA-6 cells co-cultured with MSC show increased levels of CCN1 protein consistent with the existence of a pre-mature stop codon in intron 1 that abolishes translation of unspliced mRNA. Addition of recombinant CCN1-Fc protein to INA-6 cells was also found to induce splicing of CCN1 pre-mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Only full length CCN1-Fc was able to induce mRNA splicing of all introns, whereas truncated recombinant isoforms lacking domain 4 failed to induce intron splicing. Blocking RGD-dependent integrins on INA-6 cells resulted in an inhibition of these splicing events. These findings expand knowledge on splicing of the proangiogenic, matricellular factor CCN1 in the tumor microenvironment. We propose that contact with MSC-derived CCN1 leads to splicing and enhanced transcription of CCN1 which further contributes to the translation of angiogenic factor CCN1 in myeloma cells, supporting tumor viability and myeloma bone disease.

  9. Foxn1 Transcription Factor Regulates Wound Healing of Skin through Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gawronska-Kozak

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are key molecules that finely tune gene expression in response to injury. We focused on the role of a transcription factor, Foxn1, whose expression is limited to the skin and thymus epithelium. Our previous studies showed that Foxn1 inactivity in nude mice creates a pro-regenerative environment during skin wound healing. To explore the mechanistic role of Foxn1 in the skin wound healing process, we analyzed post-injured skin tissues from Foxn1::Egfp transgenic and C57BL/6 mice with Western Blotting, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and flow cytometric assays. Foxn1 expression in non-injured skin localized to the epidermis and hair follicles. Post-injured skin tissues showed an intense Foxn1-eGFP signal at the wound margin and in leading epithelial tongue, where it co-localized with keratin 16, a marker of activated keratinocytes. This data support the concept that suprabasal keratinocytes, expressing Foxn1, are key cells in the process of re-epithelialization. The occurrence of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT was confirmed by high levels of Snail1 and Mmp-9 expression as well as through co-localization of vimentin/E-cadherin-positive cells in dermis tissue at four days post-wounding. Involvement of Foxn1 in the EMT process was verified by co-localization of Foxn1-eGFP cells with Snail1 in histological sections. Flow cytometric analysis showed the increase of double positive E-cadherin/N-cadherin cells within Foxn1-eGFP population of post-wounded skin cells isolates, which corroborated histological and gene expression analyses. Together, our findings indicate that Foxn1 acts as regulator of the skin wound healing process through engagement in re-epithelization and possible involvement in scar formation due to Foxn1 activity during the EMT process.

  10. Interplay between viral Tat protein and c-Jun transcription factor in controlling LTR promoter activity in different human immunodeficiency virus type I subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Renée M; Derking, Ronald; Breidel, Seyguerney; Speijer, Dave; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 transcription depends on cellular transcription factors that bind to sequences in the long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Each HIV-1 subtype has a specific LTR promoter configuration, and minor sequence changes in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or their arrangement can influence transcriptional activity, virus replication and latency properties. Previously, we investigated the proviral latency properties of different HIV-1 subtypes in the SupT1 T cell line. Here, subtype-specific latency and replication properties were studied in primary PHA-activated T lymphocytes. No major differences in latency and replication capacity were measured among the HIV-1 subtypes. Subtype B and AE LTRs were studied in more detail with regard to a putative AP-1 binding site using luciferase reporter constructs. c-Jun, a member of the AP-1 transcription factor family, can activate both subtype B and AE LTRs, but the latter showed a stronger response, reflecting a closer match with the consensus AP-1 binding site. c-Jun overexpression enhanced Tat-mediated transcription of the viral LTR, but in the absence of Tat inhibited basal promoter activity. Thus, c-Jun can exert a positive or negative effect via the AP-1 binding site in the HIV-1 LTR promoter, depending on the presence or absence of Tat.

  11. The Jasmonate-Activated Transcription Factor MdMYC2 Regulates ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR and Ethylene Biosynthetic Genes to Promote Ethylene Biosynthesis during Apple Fruit Ripening[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaxiu; Zhang, Lichao; Ji, Yinglin; Tan, Dongmei; Yuan, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is critical for ripening in climacteric fruits, including apple (Malus domestica). Jasmonate (JA) promotes ethylene biosynthesis in apple fruit, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Here, we found that JA-induced ethylene production in apple fruit is dependent on the expression of MdACS1, an ACC synthase gene involved in ethylene biosynthesis. The expression of MdMYC2, encoding a transcription factor involved in the JA signaling pathway, was enhanced by MeJA treatment in apple fruits, and MdMYC2 directly bound to the promoters of both MdACS1 and the ACC oxidase gene MdACO1 and enhanced their transcription. Furthermore, MdMYC2 bound to the promoter of MdERF3, encoding a transcription factor involved in the ethylene-signaling pathway, thereby activating MdACS1 transcription. We also found that MdMYC2 interacted with MdERF2, a suppressor of MdERF3 and MdACS1. This protein interaction prevented MdERF2 from interacting with MdERF3 and from binding to the MdACS1 promoter, leading to increased transcription of MdACS1. Collectively, these results indicate that JA promotes ethylene biosynthesis through the regulation of MdERFs and ethylene biosynthetic genes by MdMYC2. PMID:28550149

  12. The Jasmonate-Activated Transcription Factor MdMYC2 Regulates ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR and Ethylene Biosynthetic Genes to Promote Ethylene Biosynthesis during Apple Fruit Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Xu, Yaxiu; Zhang, Lichao; Ji, Yinglin; Tan, Dongmei; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Aide

    2017-06-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is critical for ripening in climacteric fruits, including apple (Malus domestica). Jasmonate (JA) promotes ethylene biosynthesis in apple fruit, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Here, we found that JA-induced ethylene production in apple fruit is dependent on the expression of MdACS1, an ACC synthase gene involved in ethylene biosynthesis. The expression of MdMYC2, encoding a transcription factor involved in the JA signaling pathway, was enhanced by MeJA treatment in apple fruits, and MdMYC2 directly bound to the promoters of both MdACS1 and the ACC oxidase gene MdACO1 and enhanced their transcription. Furthermore, MdMYC2 bound to the promoter of MdERF3, encoding a transcription factor involved in the ethylene-signaling pathway, thereby activating MdACS1 transcription. We also found that MdMYC2 interacted with MdERF2, a suppressor of MdERF3 and MdACS1 This protein interaction prevented MdERF2 from interacting with MdERF3 and from binding to the MdACS1 promoter, leading to increased transcription of MdACS1 Collectively, these results indicate that JA promotes ethylene biosynthesis through the regulation of MdERFs and ethylene biosynthetic genes by MdMYC2. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Telomerase promoter reprogramming and interaction with general transcription factors in the human mesenchymal stem cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Hoare, Stacey F.; Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    The human adult mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) does not express telomerase and has been shown to be the target for neoplastic transformation after transduction with hTERT. These findings lend support to the stem cell hypothesis of cancer development but by supplying hTERT, the molecular events...... and that modifications of the chromatin environment lead to reactivation of telomerase gene expression. It is shown that repression of hTERT expression in hMSCs is due to promoter-specific histone hypoacetylation coupled with low Pol II and TFIIB trafficking. This repression is overcome by treatment with Trichostatin...

  14. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  15. PLCE1 Promotes Esophageal Cancer Cell Progression by Maintaining the Transcriptional Activity of Snail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shicong Zhai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is among the most deadly malignant diseases. However, the genetic factors contributing to its occurrence are poorly understood. Multiple studies with large clinic-based cohorts revealed that variations of the phospholipase C epsilon (PLCE1 gene were associated with esophageal cancer susceptibility. However, the causative role of PLCE1 in esophageal cancer is not clear. We inactivated the functional alleles of PLCE1 by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. The resultant PLCE1 inactivated cells were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that loss of PLCE1 dramatically decreased the invasion and proliferation capacity of esophageal carcinoma cells in vitro. Moreover, such PLCE1 inactivated tumor grafts exhibited significantly decreased tumor size in mice. We found that PLCE1 was required to maintain protein level of snail a key transcription factor responsible for invasion. Our further transcriptomic data revealed that deficient cells were significantly decreased in expression of genes enriched as targets of Snail. Strikingly, recovery of Snail protein at least partially rescued the invasion and proliferation capacity in PLCE1 inactivated cells. In ESCC clinical specimens, PLCE1 was correlated with tumor stage (P < .0001. Interestingly, PLCE1 expression was positively correlated Snail by immunohistochemistry in such specimens (P < .0001. Therefore, our functional experiments showed the essential roles of PLCE1 in esophageal carcinoma cells and provided evidences that targeting PLCE1 and its downstream molecules could be effective therapies for esophageal cancer.

  16. Let-7b promotes alpaca hair growth via transcriptional repression of TGFβR I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shen; Yu, Zhang; Ning, Liu; Hai-Dong, Wang; Jian-Shan, Xie; Shu-Yuan, Gao; Jia-Qi, Cheng; Xiu-Ju, Yu; Ting, Wang; Chang-Sheng, Dong; Xiao-Yan, He

    2016-02-10

    The young male alpaca ear and the back skins were used to investigate the effect of transforming growth factor receptor-β I (TGFβR I) on alpaca hair follicles and hair growth. The expression level and location of TGFβR I in alpaca ear and dorsal skin were detected through real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and paraffin section immunohistochemical technique (ICC-P). The results shown TGFβR I was lower expression in back skin compared to ear skin and the mean density of the positive reaction in ear skin was significantly higher than back skin. The targeted relationship with let-7b was detected using the dual-luciferase reporter vector of TGFβR I, which showed a significant target relationship between let-7b and TGFβR I. After transfection with let-7b eukaryotic expression vector, the relative mRNA expression of TGFβR I in alpaca skin fibroblasts did not differ, while the relative protein level was significantly decreased. In summary, a higher TGFβR I expression level in the ear skin suggests that TGFβR I may inhibit coat hair elongation. Further studies showed TGFβR I protein was downregulated by let-7b through transcriptional repression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. SUMOylation of the Forkhead transcription factor FOXL2 promotes its stabilization/activation through transient recruitment to PML bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Georges

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: FOXL2 is a transcription factor essential for ovarian development and maintenance. It is mutated in the genetic condition called Blepharophimosis Ptosis Epicantus inversus Syndrome (BPES and in cases of isolated premature ovarian failure. We and others have previously shown that FOXL2 undergoes several post-translational modifications. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using cells in culture, we show that interference with FOXL2 SUMOylation leads to a robust inhibition of its transactivation ability, which correlates with a decreased stability. Interestingly, FOXL2 SUMOylation promotes its transient recruitment to subnuclear structures that we demonstrate to be PML (Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies. Since PML bodies are known to be sites where post-translational modifications of nuclear factors take place, we used tandem mass spectrometry to identify new post-translational modifications of FOXL2. Specifically, we detected four phosphorylated, one sulfated and three acetylated sites. CONCLUSIONS: By analogy with other transcription factors, we propose that PML Nuclear Bodies might transiently recruit FOXL2 to the vicinity of locally concentrated enzymes that could be involved in the post-translational maturation of FOXL2. FOXL2 acetylation, sulfation, phosphorylation as well as other modifications yet to be discovered might alter the transactivation capacity of FOXL2 and/or its stability, thus modulating its global intracellular activity.

  18. The NAC Transcription Factor Gene OsY37 (ONAC011 Promotes Leaf Senescence and Accelerates Heading Time in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra El Mannai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an important physiological process involving the degradation of a number of metabolites and their remobilization to new reproductive and storage organs. NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC transcription factors are reported as important regulators of the senescence process. Here, we describe the identification and functional characterization of the NAC transcription factor gene, OsY37 (Oryza sativa Yellow37, ONAC011 obtained from Oryza sativa cv. indica, and japonica. We created transgenic plants expressing the OsY37 gene under the control of a strong and constitutive CaMV35S promoter. The resulting transgenic plants overexpressing OsY37 gene showed early heading and precocious senescence phenotype of flag leaves compared with wild-type plants. By contrast, blocking the function of this gene via RNAi (RNA interference and CRES-T (Chimeric Repressor Silencing Technology technology, delayed both heading time and leaf senescence. Furthermore, knockdown of OsY37 expression caused dwarfism and high accumulation of chlorophyll during the vegetative phase. Irrespective of early or delayed senescence, transgenic plants showed reduced grain yields. Our results indicate that OsY37 acts as a positive regulator of heading and senescence during the reproductive phase in rice. In addition, OsY37 may be involved in plant development and grain yield.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of the AP-2α Promoter by BTEB-1 and AP-2rep, a Novel wt-1/egr-Related Zinc Finger Repressor

    OpenAIRE

    Imhof, Axel; Schuierer, Marion; Werner, Oliver; Moser, Markus; Roth, Christina; Bauer, Reinhard; Buettner, Reinhard

    1999-01-01

    AP-2 transcription factors have been suggested to exert key regulatory functions in vertebrate embryonic development, in tumorigenicity of various cancer cell types, and in controlling cell cycle and apoptotic effector genes. In this study, we investigated transcriptional regulation of the AP-2α gene promoter mediated by an autoregulatory element (referred to as A32) with a core consensus AP-2 binding site at position −336 relative to the mRNA initiation site. AP-2 and multiple different nucl...

  20. Bypassing the Need for the Transcriptional Activator EarA through a Spontaneous Deletion in the BRE Portion of the fla Operon Promoter in Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Berezuk, Alison; Khursigara, Cezar M; Jarrell, Ken F

    2017-01-01

    In Methanococcus maripaludis, the euryarchaeal archaellum regulator A (EarA) is required for the transcription of the fla operon, which is comprised of a series of genes which encode most of the proteins needed for the formation of the archaeal swimming organelle, the archaellum. In mutants deleted for earA (ΔearA), there is almost undetectable transcription of the fla operon, Fla proteins are not synthesized and the cells are non-archaellated. In this study, we have isolated a spontaneous mutant of a ΔearA mutant in which the restoration of the transcription and translation of the fla operon (using flaB2, the second gene of the operon, as a reporter), archaella formation and swarming motility were all restored even in the absence of EarA. Analysis of the DNA sequence from the fla promoter of this spontaneous mutant revealed a deletion of three adenines within a string of seven adenines in the transcription factor B recognition element (BRE). When the three adenine deletion in the BRE was regenerated in a stock culture of the ΔearA mutant, very similar phenotypes to that of the spontaneous mutant were observed. Deletion of the three adenines in the fla promoter BRE resulted in the mutant BRE having high sequence identity to BREs from promoters that have strong basal transcription level in Mc. maripaludis and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. These data suggest that EarA may help recruit transcription factor B to a weak BRE in the fla promoter of wild-type cells but is not required for transcription from the fla promoter with a strong BRE, as in the three adenine deletion version in the spontaneous mutant.

  1. Bypassing the Need for the Transcriptional Activator EarA through a Spontaneous Deletion in the BRE Portion of the fla Operon Promoter in Methanococcus maripaludis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ding

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In Methanococcus maripaludis, the euryarchaeal archaellum regulator A (EarA is required for the transcription of the fla operon, which is comprised of a series of genes which encode most of the proteins needed for the formation of the archaeal swimming organelle, the archaellum. In mutants deleted for earA (ΔearA, there is almost undetectable transcription of the fla operon, Fla proteins are not synthesized and the cells are non-archaellated. In this study, we have isolated a spontaneous mutant of a ΔearA mutant in which the restoration of the transcription and translation of the fla operon (using flaB2, the second gene of the operon, as a reporter, archaella formation and swarming motility were all restored even in the absence of EarA. Analysis of the DNA sequence from the fla promoter of this spontaneous mutant revealed a deletion of three adenines within a string of seven adenines in the transcription factor B recognition element (BRE. When the three adenine deletion in the BRE was regenerated in a stock culture of the ΔearA mutant, very similar phenotypes to that of the spontaneous mutant were observed. Deletion of the three adenines in the fla promoter BRE resulted in the mutant BRE having high sequence identity to BREs from promoters that have strong basal transcription level in Mc. maripaludis and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. These data suggest that EarA may help recruit transcription factor B to a weak BRE in the fla promoter of wild-type cells but is not required for transcription from the fla promoter with a strong BRE, as in the three adenine deletion version in the spontaneous mutant.

  2. UNR/CSDE1 Drives a Post-transcriptional Program to Promote Melanoma Invasion and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurth, Laurence; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Olmeda, David; Bley, Nadine; Calvo, Guadalupe T; Guerrero, Santiago; Cerezo-Wallis, Daniela; Martinez-Useros, Javier; García-Fernández, María; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Soengas, Maria S; Gebauer, Fátima

    2016-11-14

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) modulate cancer progression through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we show that the RBP UNR/CSDE1 is overexpressed in melanoma tumors and promotes invasion and metastasis. iCLIP sequencing, RNA sequencing, and ribosome profiling combined with in silico studies unveiled sets of pro-metastatic factors coordinately regulated by UNR as part of RNA regulons. In addition to RNA steady-state levels, UNR was found to control many of its targets at the level of translation elongation/termination. Key pro-oncogenic targets of UNR included VIM and RAC1, as validated by loss- and gain-of-function studies. Our results identify UNR as an oncogenic modulator of melanoma progression, unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms, and identify potential targets for this therapeutically challenging malignancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional factor DLX3 promotes the gene expression of enamel matrix proteins during amelogenesis.

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    Zhichun Zhang

    Full Text Available Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3 is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease.

  4. Long and Short Isoforms of the Human Cytomegalovirus UL138 Protein Silence IE Transcription and Promote Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Hee; Caviness, Katie; Albright, Emily R; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Rak, Mike; Goodrum, Felicia; Kalejta, Robert F

    2016-10-15

    The UL133-138 locus present in clinical strains of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes proteins required for latency and reactivation in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells and virion maturation in endothelial cells. The encoded proteins form multiple homo- and hetero-interactions and localize within secretory membranes. One of these genes, UL136 gene, is expressed as at least five different protein isoforms with overlapping and unique functions. Here we show that another gene from this locus, the UL138 gene, also generates more than one protein isoform. A long form of UL138 (pUL138-L) initiates translation from codon 1, possesses an amino-terminal signal sequence, and is a type one integral membrane protein. Here we identify a short protein isoform (pUL138-S) initiating from codon 16 that displays a subcellular localization similar to that of pUL138-L. Reporter, short-term transcription, and long-term virus production assays revealed that both pUL138-L and pUL138-S are able to suppress major immediate early (IE) gene transcription and the generation of infectious virions in cells in which HCMV latency is studied. The long form appears to be more potent at silencing IE transcription shortly after infection, while the short form seems more potent at restricting progeny virion production at later times, indicating that both isoforms of UL138 likely cooperate to promote HCMV latency. Latency allows herpesviruses to persist for the lives of their hosts in the face of effective immune control measures for productively infected cells. Controlling latent reservoirs is an attractive antiviral approach complicated by knowledge deficits for how latently infected cells are established, maintained, and reactivated. This is especially true for betaherpesviruses. The functional consequences of HCMV UL138 protein expression during latency include repression of viral IE1 transcription and suppression of virus replication. Here we show that short and long isoforms of UL138

  5. The ABA receptor PYL8 promotes lateral root growth by enhancing MYB77-dependent transcription of auxin-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xing, Lu; Wang, Xingang; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Gao, Jinghui; Wang, Pengcheng; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-06-03

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development, and abiotic stress responses. ABA signaling is mediated by a group of receptors known as the PYR1/PYL/RCAR family, which includes the pyrabactin resistance 1-like protein PYL8. Under stress conditions, ABA signaling activates SnRK2 protein kinases to inhibit lateral root growth after emergence from the primary root. However, even in the case of persistent stress, lateral root growth eventually recovers from inhibition. We showed that PYL8 is required for the recovery of lateral root growth, following inhibition by ABA. PYL8 directly interacted with the transcription factors MYB77, MYB44, and MYB73. The interaction of PYL8 and MYB77 increased the binding of MYB77 to its target MBSI motif in the promoters of multiple auxin-responsive genes. Compared to wild-type seedlings, the lateral root growth of pyl8 mutant seedlings and myb77 mutant seedlings was more sensitive to inhibition by ABA. The recovery of lateral root growth was delayed in pyl8 mutant seedlings in the presence of ABA, and the defect was rescued by exposing pyl8 mutant seedlings to the auxin IAA (3-indoleacetic acid). Thus, PYL8 promotes lateral root growth independently of the core ABA-SnRK2 signaling pathway by enhancing the activities of MYB77 and its paralogs, MYB44 and MYB73, to augment auxin signaling. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Novel system uses probasin-based promoter, transcriptional silencers and amplification loop to induce high-level prostate expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hong

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite several effective treatment options available for prostate cancer, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Thus, there is a great need for new treatments to improve outcomes. One such strategy is to eliminate cancer through the expression of cytotoxic genes specifically in prostate cells by gene therapy vectored delivery. To prevent systemic toxicity, tissue- and/or cancer-specific gene expression is required. However, the use of tissue- or cancer-specific promoters to target transgene expression has been hampered by their weak activity. Results To address this issue, we have developed a regulation strategy that includes feedback amplification of gene expression along with a differentially suppressible tetracycline regulated expression system (DiSTRES. By differentially suppressing expression of the tetracycline-regulated transcriptional activator (tTA and silencer (tTS genes based on the cell origin, this leads to the activation and silencing of the TRE promoter, respectively. In vitro transduction of LNCaP cells with Ad/GFPDiSTRES lead to GFP expression levels that were over 30-fold higher than Ad/CMV-GFP. Furthermore, Ad/FasL-GFPDiSTRES demonstrated cytotoxic effects in prostate cancer cells known to be resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Conclusion Prostate-specific regulation from the DiSTRES system, therefore, serves as a promising new regulation strategy for future applications in the field of cancer gene therapy and gene therapy as a whole.

  7. Transcriptional activation by MarA, SoxS and Rob of two tolC promoters using one binding site: a complex promoter configuration for tolC in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aixia; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    The Escherichia coli tolC encodes a major outer membrane protein with multiple functions in export (e.g. diverse xenobiotics, haemolysin) and as an attachment site for phage and colicins. tolC is regulated in part by MarA, SoxS and Rob, three paralogous transcriptional activators which bind a sequence called the marbox and which activate multiple antibiotic and superoxide resistance functions. Two previously identified tolC promoters, p1 and p2, are not regulated by MarA, SoxS or Rob but p2 is activated by EvgAS and PhoPQ which also regulate other functions. Using transcriptional fusions and primer extension assays, we show here that tolC has two additional strong overlapping promoters, p3 and p4, which are downstream of p1, p2 and the marbox and are activated by MarA, SoxS and Rob. p3 and p4 are configured so that a single marbox suffices to activate transcription from both promoters. At the p3 promoter, the marbox is separated by 20 bp from the -10 hexamer for RNA polymerase but at the p4 promoter, the same marbox is separated by 30 bp from the -10 hexamer. The multiple tolC promoters may allow the cell to respond to diverse environments by co-ordinating tolC transcription with other appropriate functions.

  8. Human Dbf4/ASK promoter is activated through the Sp1 and MluI cell-cycle box (MCB) transcription elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing; Lee, Hoyun

    2002-11-07

    Dbf4 is the regulatory subunit of Cdc7 kinase, which is essential for entry into and traversing through S phase. The level of Dbf4, which is critical for the activation of Cdc7, is regulated by transcription and protein degradation. To gain a better understanding as to how the transcription of human Dbf4 (HuDbf4) is regulated, we have cloned and characterized its promoter. We found that HuDbf4 core promoter is localized within (-)211 to -285 of the translation start-codon. This 75 bp DNA segment contains, among others, a putative MluI Cell-cycle Box (MCB). A point mutation within the MCB dramatically reduced the promoter activity. This is the first example that an MCB element plays an essential role in the activation of a core promoter in mammalian cells. The auxiliary elements required for the full promoter activity are present within 162-bp upstream from the core promoter (i.e., -286/-447). A point mutation within the Sp1 element at -353/-361 resulted in a decrease of promoter activity to the basal level, while the deletion of the putative HES-1 at -326/-331 dramatically increased the promoter activity. Taken together, our data suggests that the MCB element is essential for the core promoter activation, while the Sp1 positive regulator and the HES-1 repressor coordinately determine the efficiency of the HuDbf4 promoter. We have also found: (i) that the major transcription initiations occur at -220, -235 and -245; (ii) that HuDbf4 gene consists of 12 exons, which spread over a 33-kb region.

  9. Elevated cJUN expression and an ATF/CRE site within the ATF3 promoter contribute to activation of ATF3 transcription by the amino acid response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lingchen; Kilberg, Michael S

    2013-02-15

    Mammalian cells respond to amino acid deprivation through multiple signaling pathways referred to as the amino acid response (AAR). Transcription factors mediate the AAR after their activation by several mechanisms; examples include translational control (activating transcription factor 4, ATF4), phosphorylation (p-cJUN), and transcriptional control (ATF3). ATF4 induces ATF3 transcription through a promoter-localized C/EBP-ATF response element (CARE). The present report characterizes an ATF/CRE site upstream of the CARE that also contributes to AAR-induced ATF3 transcription. ATF4 binds to the ATF/CRE and CARE sequences and both are required for a maximal response to ATF4 induction. ATF3, which antagonizes ATF4 and represses its own gene, also exhibited binding activity to the ATF/CRE and CARE sequences. The AAR resulted in elevated total cJUN and p-cJUN protein levels and both forms exhibited binding activity to the ATF/CRE and CARE ATF3 sequences. Knockdown of AAR-enhanced cJUN expression blocked induction of the ATF3 gene and mutation of either the ATF/CRE or the CARE site prevented the cJUN-dependent increase in ATF3-driven luciferase activity. The results indicate that both increased cJUN and the cis-acting ATF/CRE sequence within the ATF3 promoter contribute to the transcriptional activation of the gene during the AAR.

  10. The fiber specificity of the cotton FSltp4 gene promoter is regulated by an AT-rich promoter region and the AT-hook transcription factor GhAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Sven K; Orford, Sharon J; Martin-Harris, Michael; Timmis, Jeremy N

    2007-10-01

    Fiber-specific genes are expressed preferentially or exclusively in cotton (Gossypium spp.) fiber and are thought to have important functions in fiber development. The promoters of these genes are of interest because they control transcription in the fiber cell and may be used in the genetic manipulation of fiber quality. The promoter of a cotton lipid transfer protein gene, FSltp4, was isolated and shown to direct fiber-specific transcription of an abundant mRNA in cotton. In transgenic tobacco, this promoter was strongly active in leaf trichomes. Deletion analysis of the promoter identified an AT-rich 84 bp fiber specificity region (FSR) necessary for activity exclusively in the fiber cells. Cotton fiber proteins that bind the FSR were isolated using a yeast one-hybrid assay. One of these was a putative AT-hook transcription factor (GhAT1) containing two AT-hook motifs. GhAT1 was shown to be nuclear localized, and GhAT1 transcripts were found to be preferentially expressed in ovules and non-fiber tissues. Overexpression of GhAT1 strongly repressed the activity of the FSltp4 promoter in the trichomes of transgenic tobacco. These results suggest that GhAT1 assists in the specification of fiber cells by repressing FSltp4 in the non-fiber tissues of the cotton plant.

  11. The homeodomain transcription factor Hoxa2 interacts with and promotes the proteasomal degradation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase RCHY1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bergiers

    Full Text Available Hox proteins are conserved homeodomain transcription factors known to be crucial regulators of animal development. As transcription factors, the functions and modes of action (co-factors, target genes of Hox proteins have been very well studied in a multitude of animal models. However, a handful of reports established that Hox proteins may display molecular activities distinct from gene transcription regulation. Here, we reveal that Hoxa2 interacts with 20S proteasome subunits and RCHY1 (also known as PIRH2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. We further show that Hoxa2 promotes proteasome-dependent degradation of RCHY1 in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Correlatively, Hoxa2 alters the RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and promotes p53 stabilization. Together, our data establish that Hoxa2 can regulate the proteasomal degradation of RCHY1 and stabilization of p53.

  12. A PTIP-PA1 subcomplex promotes transcription for IgH class switching independently from the associated MLL3/MLL4 methyltransferase complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnes, Linda M; Su, Dan; Pikkupeura, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies for productive immune responses while maintaining stability of the B-cell genome. Transcription at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus targets CSR-associated DNA damage and is promoted by the BRCT domain-containing PTIP (Pax transacti...

  13. Promoter analysis reveals cis-regulatory motifs associated with the expression of the WRKY transcription factor CrWRKY1 in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhirong; Patra, Barunava; Li, Runzhi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2013-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are emerging as an important group of regulators of plant secondary metabolism. However, the cis-regulatory elements associated with their regulation have not been well characterized. We have previously demonstrated that CrWRKY1, a member of subgroup III of the WRKY TF family, regulates biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids in the ornamental and medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of the CrWRKY1 promoter. In silico analysis of the promoter sequence reveals the presence of several potential TF binding motifs, indicating the involvement of additional TFs in the regulation of the TIA pathway. The CrWRKY1 promoter can drive the expression of a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in native (C. roseus protoplasts and transgenic hairy roots) and heterologous (transgenic tobacco seedlings) systems. Analysis of 5'- or 3'-end deletions indicates that the sequence located between positions -140 to -93 bp and -3 to +113 bp, relative to the transcription start site, is critical for promoter activity. Mutation analysis shows that two overlapping as-1 elements and a CT-rich motif contribute significantly to promoter activity. The CrWRKY1 promoter is induced in response to methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment and the promoter region between -230 and -93 bp contains a putative MJ-responsive element. The CrWRKY1 promoter can potentially be used as a tool to isolate novel TFs involved in the regulation of the TIA pathway.

  14. UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkert, Melanie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Terecskei, Kata; De Veylder, Lieven; Nagy, Ferenc; Ulm, Roman

    2014-01-01

    In plants subjected to UV-B radiation, responses are activated that minimize damage caused by UV-B. The bZIP transcription factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) acts downstream of the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and promotes UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and acclimation. Expression of HY5 is induced by UV-B; however, the transcription factor(s) that regulate HY5 transcription in response to UV-B and the impact of UV-B on the association of HY5 with its target promoters are currently unclear. Here, we show that HY5 binding to the promoters of UV-B-responsive genes is enhanced by UV-B in a UVR8-dependent manner in Arabidopsis thaliana. In agreement, overexpression of REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS2, a negative regulator of UVR8 function, blocks UV-B-responsive HY5 enrichment at target promoters. Moreover, we have identified a T/G-box in the HY5 promoter that is required for its UV-B responsiveness. We show that HY5 and its homolog HYH bind to the T/GHY5-box cis-acting element and that they act redundantly in the induction of HY5 expression upon UV-B exposure. Therefore, HY5 is enriched at target promoters in response to UV-B in a UVR8 photoreceptor-dependent manner, and HY5 and HYH interact directly with a T/G-box cis-acting element of the HY5 promoter, mediating the transcriptional activation of HY5 in response to UV-B. PMID:25351492

  15. GBF1 differentially regulates CAT2 and PAD4 transcription to promote pathogen defense in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Mrunmay K; Singh, Nidhi; Banday, Zeeshan Z; Singh, Vijayata; Ram, Hathi; Singh, Deepjyoti; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Nandi, Ashis K

    2017-09-01

    G-BOX BINDING FACTOR 1 (GBF1) influences light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis, and inhibits CATALASE 2 (CAT2) expression during senescence. CAT2 functions as a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. The role of GBF1 in the defense response is not known. We report here that GBF1 positively influences the defense against virulent and avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae. The gbf1 mutants are susceptible, whereas GBF1 over-expresser transgenic plants are resistant to bacterial pathogens. GBF1 negatively regulates pathogen-induced CAT2 expression and thereby positively regulates the hypersensitive response. In addition to CAT2 promoter, GBF1 binds to the G-box-like element present in the intron of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4). This association of GBF1 with PAD4 intron is enhanced upon pathogenesis. GBF1 positively regulates PAD4 transcription in an intron-dependent manner. GBF1-mediated positive regulation of PAD4 expression is also evident in gbf1 mutant and GBF1 over-expression lines. Similar to pad4 mutants, pathogen-induced camalexin and salicylic acid (SA) accumulation, and expression of SA-inducible PATHOGENESIS RELATED1 (PR1) gene are compromised in the gbf1 mutant. Exogenous application of SA rescues the loss-of-defense phenotypes of gbf1 mutant. Thus, altogether, our results demonstrate that GBF1 is an important component of the plant defense response that functions upstream of SA accumulation and, by oppositely regulating CAT2 and PAD4, promotes disease resistance in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. MYB Promotes Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer through Direct Transcriptional Up-regulation and Cooperative Action of Sonic Hedgehog and Adrenomedullin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Seema; Tyagi, Nikhil; Arora, Sumit; Carter, James E; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-07-29

    Extensive desmoplasia is a prominent pathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC) that not only impacts tumor development, but therapeutic outcome as well. Recently, we demonstrated a novel role of MYB, an oncogenic transcription factor, in PC growth and metastasis. Here we studied its effect on pancreatic tumor histopathology and associated molecular and biological mechanisms. Tumor-xenografts derived from orthotopic-inoculation of MYB-overexpressing PC cells exhibited far-greater desmoplasia in histological analyses compared with those derived from MYB-silenced PC cells. These findings were further confirmed by immunostaining of tumor-xenograft sections with collagen-I, fibronectin (major extracellular-matrix proteins), and α-SMA (well-characterized marker of myofibroblasts or activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)). Likewise, MYB-overexpressing PC cells provided significantly greater growth benefit to PSCs in a co-culture system as compared with the MYB-silenced cells. Interrogation of deep-sequencing data from MYB-overexpressing versus -silenced PC cells identified Sonic-hedgehog (SHH) and Adrenomedullin (ADM) as two differentially-expressed genes among others, which encode for secretory ligands involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. In-silico analyses predicted putative MYB-binding sites in SHH and ADM promoters, which was later confirmed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. A cooperative role of SHH and ADM in growth promotion of PSCs was confirmed in co-culture by using their specific-inhibitors and exogenous recombinant-proteins. Importantly, while SHH acted exclusively in a paracrine fashion on PSCs and influenced the growth of PC cells only indirectly, ADM could directly impact the growth of both PC cells and PSCs. In summary, we identified MYB as novel regulator of pancreatic tumor desmoplasia, which is suggestive of its diverse roles in PC pathobiology. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Brd4 bridges the transcriptional regulators, Aire and P-TEFb, to promote elongation of peripheral-tissue antigen transcripts in thymic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hideyuki; Bansal, Kushagra; Schaefer, Uwe; Chapman, Trevor; Rioja, Inmaculada; Proekt, Irina; Anderson, Mark S; Prinjha, Rab K; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2015-08-11

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing a battery of thymic transcripts encoding proteins characteristic of peripheral tissues. Its unusually broad effect is achieved by releasing RNA polymerase II paused just downstream of transcriptional start sites. We explored Aire's collaboration with the bromodomain-containing protein, Brd4, uncovering an astonishing correspondence between those genes induced by Aire and those inhibited by a small-molecule bromodomain blocker. Aire:Brd4 binding depended on an orchestrated series of posttranslational modifications within Aire's caspase activation and recruitment domain. This interaction attracted P-TEFb, thereby mobilizing downstream transcriptional elongation and splicing machineries. Aire:Brd4 association was critical for tolerance induction, and its disruption could account for certain point mutations that provoke human autoimmune disease. Our findings evoke the possibility of unanticipated immunologic mechanisms subtending the potent antitumor effects of bromodomain blockers.

  18. Calcium transcriptionally regulates the biofilm machinery of Xylella fastidiosa to promote continued biofilm development in batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Chen, Hongyu; McCarty, Sara E; Liu, Lawrence Y; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The functions of calcium (Ca) in bacteria are less characterized than in eukaryotes, where its role has been studied extensively. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa has several virulence features that are enhanced by increased Ca concentrations, including biofilm formation. However, the specific mechanisms driving modulation of this feature are unclear. Characterization of biofilm formation over time showed that 4 mM Ca supplementation produced denser biofilms that were still developing at 96 h, while biofilm in non-supplemented media had reached the dispersal stage by 72 h. To identify changes in global gene expression in X. fastidiosa grown in supplemental Ca, RNA-Seq of batch culture biofilm cells was conducted at three 24-h time intervals. Results indicate that a variety of genes are differentially expressed in response to Ca, including genes related to attachment, motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, peptidoglycan synthesis, regulatory functions, iron homeostasis, and phages. Collectively, results demonstrate that Ca supplementation induces a transcriptional response that promotes continued biofilm development, while biofilm cells in nonsupplemented media are driven towards dispersion of cells from the biofilm structure. These results have important implications for disease progression in planta, where xylem sap is the source of Ca and other nutrients for X. fastidiosa. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ITGBL1 Is a Runx2 Transcriptional Target and Promotes Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis by Activating the TGFβ Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Qing; Du, Xin; Li, Dong-Mei; Kong, Peng-Zhou; Sun, Yan; Liu, Pei-Fang; Wang, Qing-Shan; Feng, Yu-Mei

    2015-08-15

    Bone metastasis affects more than 70% of advanced breast cancer patients, but the molecular mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Here, we present clinical and experimental evidence to clarify the role of the integrin β-like 1 (ITGBL1) as a key contributor to bone metastasis of breast cancer. In an in vivo model system and in vitro experiments, ITGBL1 expression promoted formation of osteomimetic breast cancers, facilitating recruitment, residence, and growth of cancer cells in bone microenvironment along with osteoclast maturation there to form osteolytic lesions. Mechanistic investigations identified the TGFβ signaling pathway as a downstream effector of ITGBL1 and the transcription factor Runx2 as an upstream activator of ITGBL1 expression. In support of these findings, we also found that ITGBL1 was an essential mediator of Runx2-induced bone metastasis of breast cancer. Overall, our results illuminate how bone metastasis occurs in breast cancer, and they provide functional evidence for new candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets to identify risk, to prevent, and to treat this dismal feature of advanced breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. In vivo identification of promoter elements and transcription factors mediating activation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase by T{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Lindsey R.; Niesen, Melissa I. [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Jaroszeski, Mark [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Ness, Gene C., E-mail: gness@hsc.usf.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The promoter elements and transcription factors necessary for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) induction of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) were investigated by transfecting rat livers with wild type and mutant HMGR promoter-luciferase constructs using in vivo electroporation. Mutations in the sterol response element (SRE), nuclear factor-y (NF-Y) site, and the newly identified upstream transcription factor-2 (USF-2) site essentially abolished the T{sub 3} response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that T{sub 3} treatment caused a 4-fold increase in in vivo binding of USF-2 to the HMGR promoter. Co-transfection of the wild type HMGR promoter with siRNAs to USF-2, SREBP-2, or NF-Y nearly abolished the T{sub 3} induction, as measured by promoter activity. These data provide in vivo evidence for functional roles for USF-2, SREBP-2, and NF-Y in mediating the T{sub 3}-induction of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  1. Promoter hypermethylation of the retinoic acid receptor beta2 gene is frequent in acute myeloid leukaemia and associated with the presence of CBFβ-MYH11 fusion transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rethmeier, Anita; Aggerholm, Anni; Olesen, Lene Hyldahl

    2006-01-01

    Silencing of the putative tumour suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) caused by aberrant promoter hypermethylation has been identified in several solid tumours. In order to evaluate the extent of RARbeta2 hypermethylation and transcription in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML...... was unmethylated in 10/10 bone marrow and 7/7 blood samples from healthy individuals, the gene was hypermethylated in 43% of the AML patients. The RARbeta2 degree of promoter methylation differed between and within individuals, and the mRNA transcription levels of the gene varied inter-individually by a factor...... of 4000. A significant inverse correlation between promoter hypermethylation and gene expression could be established (t-test, P = 0.019). Comparison of methylation data with a series of other molecular alterations in the same patient materials revealed a correlation between hypermethylation...

  2. [Transcriptional targeting gene therapy of double suicide gene driven by hTERT promoter in hepatic carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-zhe; Yang, Jian-yong; Chen, Wei; Huang, Yong-hui; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Ying-qiang; Li, Jia-ping

    2011-11-22

    To examine the selective killing effects of pEGFP-C1-mediated double suicide gene system driven by the hTERT promoter (hTERT-CDglyTK) on hepatic carcinoma cells. The hTERT promoter and gene fragments SV40, yCD and TKgly were amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and then inserted into pEGFP-C1. And the constructs of pEGFP-hTERT-CD, pEGFP-hTERT-TK and pEGFP-hTERT-CDglyTK were transfected to SMMC 7721 or HL7702 respectively. The transfection effects were observed and the cellular expressions of suicide genes detected by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), QPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) and Western blot. The transfected cells were treated with 5-fluorocytosine and ganciclovir at different concentrations and the cell-killing and bystander effects evaluated by the method of MTT (3-(4,5)-dimethyl thiadiazole (-z-y1)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide). The activity of cell telomerase was detected by the method of TRAP-argentation and the apoptotic rates analyzed by flow cytometry. All results of double and single gene systems were analyzed. The fragments of enzyme digestion corresponded to the expectations. RT-PCR, QPCR and Western blot demonstrated the expressions of CD, TK and CDglyTK. pEGFP-hTERT-CD, pEGFP-hTERT-TK and pEGFP-hTERT-CDglyTK showed the similar transfection efficiencies in SMMC7721 (74.5%, 76.3%, 76.9%). More sensitive to the prodrugs (P = 0.020, P = 0.015), higher apoptotic rates (P = 0.023, P = 0.017) and bystander effects (P = 0.012, P = 0.001)and lower telomerase activities (P = 0.045, P = 0.038) were observed in double gene system versus those in single gene system. However, the transfection and growth of HL7702 cell could not be infected by this double suicide gene. The plasmid of CDglyTK fusion gene system driven by hTERT promoter has been successfully constructed. It has demonstrated highly specific killing effects on hepatic carcinoma cells.

  3. Correct usage of multiple transcription initiation sites and C/EBP-dependent transcription activation of the rat XDH/XO TATA-less promoter requires downstream elements located in the coding region of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M P; Chow, C W; Rinaldo, J E; Chalkley, R

    1998-04-01

    In the present study, we have shown that a downstream element located in the coding region of the TATA-less rat xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase (XDH/XO) gene (-7 to +42) plays an important role in transcription initiation and C/EBP transcriptional activation. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that the promoter is organized with multiple initiator elements (Inr 1, 2, 3 and 4) which are important for transcription initiation. Additionally, we had identified two C/EBP binding sites upstream of this promoter. Deletional and mutational studies revealed that C/EBP binding was not essential for the basal level of transcriptional initation. However when XO-luciferase constructs include downstream sequence extending to +42 there is development of C/EBP sensitivity as well as a shift in the initiator usage. In the absence of the downstream element, primer extension analyses reveals Inr 3 and 4 to be the major start sites but in the presence of this additional sequence the usage is shifted to Inr 1 and 2. This shift in Inr usage more closely resembles that seen in intact macrophages or liver cells. Gel mobility shift assays indicate the presence of several binding factors located in this downstream region, one of which has been identified as YY-1. We postulate that YY-1 allows DNA bending which permits the upstream C/EBP elements to exhibit a transcriptional activation which is not seen when the downstream element is absent. This study presents a potential model for regulation of the XDH/XO promoter.

  4. Transcription activation by Escherichia coli Rob at class II promoters: protein-protein interactions between Rob's N-terminal domain and the σ(70) subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lanyn P; Keen, Edward F; Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Wolf, Richard E

    2012-06-08

    Bacterial transcription activators regulate transcription by making essential protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase, for example, with region 4 of the σ(70) subunit (σ(70) R4). Rob, SoxS, and MarA comprise a closely related subset of members of the AraC/XylS family of transcription factors that activate transcription of both class I and class II promoters. Recently, we showed that interactions between SoxS and σ(70) R4 occlude the binding of σ(70) R4 to the -35 promoter element of class II promoters. Although Rob shares many similarities with SoxS, it contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) that the other paralogs do not. Thus, a goal of this study was to determine whether Rob makes protein-protein interactions with σ(70) R4 at class II promoters and, if so, whether the interactions occlude the binding of σ(70) R4 to the -35 hexamer despite the presence of the CTD. We found that although Rob makes fewer interactions with σ(70) R4 than SoxS, the two proteins make the same, unusual, position-dependent interactions. Importantly, we found that Rob occludes σ(70) R4 from binding the -35 hexamer, just as does SoxS. Thus, the CTD does not substantially alter the way Rob interacts with σ(70) R4 at class II promoters. Moreover, in contrast to inferences drawn from the co-crystal structure of Rob bound to robbox DNA, which showed that only one of Rob's dual helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding motifs binds a recognition element of the promoter's robbox, we determined that the two HTH motifs each bind a recognition element in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A downstream CpG island controls transcript initiation and elongation and the methylation state of the imprinted Airn macro ncRNA promoter.

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    Martha V Koerner

    Full Text Available A CpG island (CGI lies at the 5' end of the Airn macro non-protein-coding (nc RNA that represses the flanking Igf2r promoter in cis on paternally inherited chromosomes. In addition to being modified on maternally inherited chromosomes by a DNA methylation imprint, the Airn CGI shows two unusual organization features: its position immediately downstream of the Airn promoter and transcription start site and a series of tandem direct repeats (TDRs occupying its second half. The physical separation of the Airn promoter from the CGI provides a model to investigate if the CGI plays distinct transcriptional and epigenetic roles. We used homologous recombination to generate embryonic stem cells carrying deletions at the endogenous locus of the entire CGI or just the TDRs. The deleted Airn alleles were analyzed by using an ES cell imprinting model that recapitulates the onset of Igf2r imprinted expression in embryonic development or by using knock-out mice. The results show that the CGI is required for efficient Airn initiation and to maintain the unmethylated state of the Airn promoter, which are both necessary for Igf2r repression on the paternal chromosome. The TDRs occupying the second half of the CGI play a minor role in Airn transcriptional elongation or processivity, but are essential for methylation on the maternal Airn promoter that is necessary for Igf2r to be expressed from this chromosome. Together the data indicate the existence of a class of regulatory CGIs in the mammalian genome that act downstream of the promoter and transcription start.

  6. Differential acetylation of histone H3 at the regulatory region of OsDREB1b promoter facilitates chromatin remodelling and transcription activation during cold stress.

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    Dipan Roy

    Full Text Available The rice ortholog of DREB1, OsDREB1b, is transcriptionally induced by cold stress and over-expression of OsDREB1b results in increase tolerance towards high salt and freezing stress. This spatio-temporal expression of OsDREB1b is preceded by the change in chromatin structure at the promoter and the upstream region for gene activation. The promoter and the upstream region of OsDREB1b genes appear to be arranged into a nucleosome array. Nucleosome mapping of ∼ 700 bp upstream region of OsDREB1b shows two positioned nucleosomes between -610 to -258 and a weakly positioned nucleosome at the core promoter and the TSS. Upon cold stress, there is a significant change in the nucleosome arrangement at the upstream region with increase in DNaseI hypersensitivity or MNase digestion in the vicinity of cis elements and TATA box at the core promoter. ChIP assays shows hyper-acetylation of histone H3K9 throughout the locus whereas region specific increase was observed in H3K14ac and H3K27ac. Moreover, there is an enrichment of RNA PolII occupancy at the promoter region during transcription activation. There is no significant change in the H3 occupancy in OsDREB1b locus negating the possibility of nucleosome loss during cold stress. Interestingly, cold induced enhanced transcript level of OsDREB1b as well as histone H3 acetylation at the upstream region was found to diminish when stressed plants were returned to normal temperature. The result indicates absolute necessity of changes in chromatin conformation for the transcription up-regulation of OsDREB1b gene in response to cold stress. The combined results show the existence of closed chromatin conformation at the upstream and promoter region of OsDREB1b in the transcription "off" state. During cold stress, changes in region specific histone modification marks promote the alteration of chromatin structure to facilitate the binding of transcription machinery for proper gene expression.

  7. A NF-κB-dependent dual promoter-enhancer initiates the lipopolysaccharide-mediated transcriptional activation of the chicken lysozyme in macrophages.

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    James Witham

    Full Text Available The transcriptional activation of the chicken lysozyme gene (cLys by lipopolysaccharide (LPS in macrophages is dependent on transcription of a LPS-Inducible Non-Coding RNA (LINoCR triggering eviction of the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF from a negative regulatory element upstream of the lysozyme transcription start site. LINoCR is transcribed from a promoter originally characterized as a hormone response enhancer in the oviduct. Herein, we report the characterization of this cis-regulatory element (CRE. In activated macrophages, a 60 bp region bound by NF-κB, AP1 and C/EBPβ controls this CRE, which is strictly dependent on NF-κB binding for its activity in luciferase assays. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase IKKα, known to be recruited by NF-κB to NF-κB-dependent genes is found at the CRE and within the transcribing regions of both cLys and LINoCR. Such repartition suggests a simultaneous promoter and enhancer activity of this CRE, initiating cLys transcriptional activation and driving CTCF eviction. This recruitment was transient despite persistence of both cLys transcription and NF-κB binding to the CRE. Finally, comparing cLys with other LPS-inducible genes indicates that IKKα detection within transcribing regions can be correlated with the presence of the elongating form of RNA polymerase II or concentrated in the 3' end of the gene.

  8. miR-2478 inhibits TGFβ1 expression by targeting the transcriptional activation region downstream of the TGFβ1 promoter in dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuanjian; Lan, Xianyong; Han, Ruili; Wang, Jing; Huang, Yongzhen; Sun, Jiajie; Guo, Wenjiao; Chen, Hong

    2017-02-15

    In a previous study, miR-2478 was demonstrated to be up-regulated in dairy goat mammary glands during peak lactation compared with the dry period. However, the detailed mechanisms by which miR-2478 regulates physiological lactation and mammary gland development in dairy goats remain unclear. In this study, we used bioinformatics analysis and homologous cloning to predict the target genes of miR-2478 and selected INSR, FBXO11, TGFβ1 and ING4 as candidate target genes of miR-2478. Subsequently, by targeting the 5'UTR of the TGFβ1 gene, we verified that miR-2478 significantly inhibited TGFβ1 transcription and the Pearson's correlation coefficient between miR-2478 expression and TGFβ1 expression was -0.98. Furthermore, we identified the potential promoter and transcription factor binding regions of TGFβ1 and analyzed the potential mechanisms of interaction between miR-2478 and TGFβ1. Dual-luciferase reporter assays revealed that two regions, spanning from -904 to -690 bp and from -79 to +197 bp, were transcription factor binding regions of TGFβ1. Interesting, the miR-2478 binding sequence was determined to span from +123 to +142 bp in the TGFβ1 gene promoter. Thus, our results have demonstrated that miR-2478 binds to the core region of the TGFβ1 promoter and that it affects goat mammary gland development by inhibiting TGFβ1 transcription.

  9. Multiple initiators and C/EBP binding sites are involved in transcription from the TATA-less rat XDH/XO basal promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, C W; Clark, M P; Rinaldo, J E; Chalkley, R

    1995-08-25

    In the present study, we have explored further the organization of the TATA-less rat xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase gene (XDH/XO). A DNase I hypersensitive site has been identified which it colocalizes with the basal promoter reported previously [Chow et al. (1994) Nucleic Acids Res., 22, 1846-1854]. Gel mobility shift assays indicate the presence of multiple binding factors located in the promoter. At least six footprints were detected of which two have been shown to be C/EBP binding sites. Members of the C/EBP-alpha and C/EBP-beta, but not C/EBP-delta, family are able to bind to these two sites. Deletional and mutational studies revealed that C/EBP binding is not essential for the basal level of transcription initiation of this promoter. Much of the transcriptional activity resides in the -102 to -7 DNA fragment, which contains all initiator activity which acts unidirectionally. Within this fragment, four putative initiator elements could be identified; interestingly, the linear integrity of these initiators is important for efficient transcription of the XDH/XO gene. Separation of the initiators leads to a complete loss of transcription activity; however, this loss could be partially restored by the introduction of an Sp1 binding site upstream of the separated initiators. Despite a difference in usage/frequency of initiation at the various initiators, primer extension analyses reveal similar positions for transcription initiations in both XDH/XO reporter constructs and in the endogenous XDH/XO gene. The differential usage of initiators may imply a possible post-transcriptional regulation for the XDH/XO gene.

  10. Functional characterization of the promoter region of the human EVI1 gene in acute myeloid leukemia: RUNX1 and ELK1 directly regulate its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maicas, M; Vázquez, I; Vicente, C; García-Sánchez, M A; Marcotegui, N; Urquiza, L; Calasanz, M J; Odero, M D

    2013-04-18

    The EVI1 gene (3q26) codes for a transcription factor with important roles in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. High expression of EVI1 is a negative prognostic indicator of survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) irrespective of the presence of 3q26 rearrangements. However, the only known mechanisms that lead to EVI1 overexpression are 3q aberrations, and the MLL-ENL oncoprotein, which activates the transcription of EVI1 in hematopoietic stem cells. Our aim was to characterize the functional promoter region of EVI1, and to identify transcription factors involved in the regulation of this gene. Generation of seven truncated constructs and luciferase reporter assays allowed us to determine a 318-bp region as the minimal promoter region of EVI1. Site-directed mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays identified RUNX1 and ELK1 as putative transcription factors of EVI1. Furthermore, knockdown of RUNX1 and ELK1 led to EVI1 downregulation, and their overexpression to upregulation of EVI1. Interestingly, in a series of patient samples with AML at diagnosis, we found a significant positive correlation between EVI1 and RUNX1 at protein level. Moreover, we identified one of the roles of RUNX1 in the activation of EVI1 during megakaryocytic differentiation. EVI1 knockdown significantly inhibited the expression of megakaryocytic markers after treating K562 cells with TPA, as happens when knocking down RUNX1. In conclusion, we define the minimal promoter region of EVI1 and demonstrate that RUNX1 and ELK1, two proteins with essential functions in hematopoiesis, regulate EVI1 in AML. Furthermore, our results show that one of the mechanisms by which RUNX1 regulates the transcription of EVI1 is by acetylation of the histone H3 on its promoter region. This study opens new directions to further understand the mechanisms of EVI1 overexpressing leukemias.

  11. The construction and characterization of the bi-directional promoter between pp38 gene and 1.8-kb mRNA transcripts of Marek's disease viruses

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    Ding Jiabo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease virus (MDV has a bi-directional promoter between pp38 gene and 1.8-kb mRNA transcripts. By sequencing for the promoters from 8 different strains (CVI988, 814, GA, JM, Md5, G2, RB1B and 648A, it is found, comparing with the other 7 MDV strains, CVI988 has a 5-bp (from -628 to -632 deletion in this region, which caused a Sp1 site destroyed. In order to analysis the activity of the promoter, the complete bi-directional promoters from GA and CVI988 were, respectively, cloned into pCAT-Basic vector in both directions for the recombinants pPGA(pp38-CAT, pPGA(1.8 kb-CAT, pPCVI(pp38-CAT and pPCVI(1.8 kb-CAT. The complete promoter of GA was divided into two single-direction promoters from the replication of MDV genomic DNA, and cloned into pCAT-Basic for pdPGA(pp38-CAT and pdPGA(1.8 kb-CAT as well. The above 6 recombinants were then transfected into chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs infected with MDV, and the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT was measured from the lysed CEFs 48 h post transfection. Results The results showed the activity of the divided promoters was decreased on both directions. In 1.8-kb mRNA direction, it is nearly down to 2.4% (19/781 of the whole promoter, while it keeps 65% (34/52 activity in pp38 direction. The deletion of Sp1 site in CVI988 causes the 20% activity decreased, and has little influence in pp38 direction. Conclusion The present study confirmed their result, and the promoter for the 1.8-kb mRNA transcripts is a much stronger promoter than that in the orientation for pp38.

  12. The global regulator Ncb2 escapes from the core promoter and impacts transcription in response to drug stress in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Shariq; Sanjiveeni Dhamgaye; Remya Nair; Neha Goyal; Vaibhav Jain; Arnab Mukhopadhyay; Mondal, Alok K.; Gauranga Mukhopadhyay; Rajendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Ncb2, the ? subunit of NC2 complex, a heterodimeric regulator of transcription was earlier shown to be involved in the activated transcription of CDR1 gene in azole resistant isolate (AR) of Candida albicans. This study examines its genome-wide role by profiling Ncb2 occupancy between genetically matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and AR clinical isolates. A comparison of Ncb2 recruitment between the two isolates displayed that 29 genes had higher promoter occupancy of Ncb2 in the AR isolat...

  13. Sp1 and Sp3 Are the Transcription Activators of Human ek1 Promoter in TSA-Treated Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; See Too, Wei Cun; Few, Ling Ling

    2016-01-01

    Ethanolamine kinase (EK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of ethanolamine, the first step in the CDP-ethanolamine pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Human EK exists as EK1, EK2α and EK2β isoforms, encoded by two separate genes, named ek1 and ek2. EK activity is stimulated by carcinogens and oncogenes, suggesting the involvement of EK in carcinogenesis. Currently, little is known about EK transcriptional regulation by endogenous or exogenous signals, and the ek gene promoter has never been studied. In this report, we mapped the important regulatory regions in the human ek1 promoter. 5' deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis identified a Sp site at position (-40/-31) that was essential for the basal transcription of this gene. Treatment of HCT116 cells with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, significantly upregulated the ek1 promoter activity through the Sp(-40/-31) site and increased the endogenous expression of ek1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that TSA increased the binding of Sp1, Sp3 and RNA polymerase II to the ek1 promoter in HCT116 cells. The effect of TSA on ek1 promoter activity was cell-line specific as TSA treatment did not affect ek1 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, we showed that Sp1 and Sp3 are not only essential for the basal transcription of the ek1 gene, their accessibility to the target site on the ek1 promoter is regulated by histone protein modification in a cell line dependent manner.

  14. Inhibition of Arginyltransferase 1 Induces Transcriptional Activity of Myocardin-related Transcription Factor A (MRTF-A) and Promotes Directional Migration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenach, Patricia A.; Schikora, Franziska; Posern, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A/MAL/MKL1/BSAC) regulates the expression of serum-response factor (SRF)-dependent target genes in response to the Rho-actin signaling pathway. Overexpression or activation of MRTF-A affects shape, migration, and invasion of cells and contributes to human malignancies, including cancer. In this study, we report that inhibition of arginyltransferase 1 (ATE1), an enzyme mediating post-transcriptional protein arginylation, is sufficient to increase MRTF-A activity in MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells independently of external growth factor stimuli. In addition, silencing or inhibiting ATE1 disrupted E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts, enhanced formation of actin-rich protrusions, and increased the number of focal adhesions, subsequently leading to elevated chemotactic migration. Although arginylated actin did not differentially affect MRTF-A, a rapid loss of E-cadherin and F-actin reorganization preceded MRTF-A activation upon ATE1 inhibition. Conversely, ectopic ATE1 expression was sufficient to render MRTF-A inactive, both in resting cells and in cells with exogenously activated RhoA-actin pathways. In this study, we provide a critical link between protein arginylation and MRTF-A activity and place ATE1 upstream of myocardin-related transcription factor. PMID:25381249

  15. Inhibition of arginyltransferase 1 induces transcriptional activity of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A) and promotes directional migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenach, Patricia A; Schikora, Franziska; Posern, Guido

    2014-12-19

    Myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A/MAL/MKL1/BSAC) regulates the expression of serum-response factor (SRF)-dependent target genes in response to the Rho-actin signaling pathway. Overexpression or activation of MRTF-A affects shape, migration, and invasion of cells and contributes to human malignancies, including cancer. In this study, we report that inhibition of arginyltransferase 1 (ATE1), an enzyme mediating post-transcriptional protein arginylation, is sufficient to increase MRTF-A activity in MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells independently of external growth factor stimuli. In addition, silencing or inhibiting ATE1 disrupted E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts, enhanced formation of actin-rich protrusions, and increased the number of focal adhesions, subsequently leading to elevated chemotactic migration. Although arginylated actin did not differentially affect MRTF-A, a rapid loss of E-cadherin and F-actin reorganization preceded MRTF-A activation upon ATE1 inhibition. Conversely, ectopic ATE1 expression was sufficient to render MRTF-A inactive, both in resting cells and in cells with exogenously activated RhoA-actin pathways. In this study, we provide a critical link between protein arginylation and MRTF-A activity and place ATE1 upstream of myocardin-related transcription factor. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Isolation, Expression, and Promoter Analysis of GbWRKY2: A Novel Transcription Factor Gene from Ginkgo biloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yong-Ling; Shen, Yong-Bao; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Cheng, Shui-Yuan; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    WRKY transcription factor is involved in multiple life activities including plant growth and development as well as biotic and abiotic responses. We identified 28 WRKY genes from transcriptome data of Ginkgo biloba according to conserved WRKY domains and zinc finger structure and selected three WRKY genes, which are GbWRKY2, GbWRKY16, and GbWRKY21, for expression pattern analysis. GbWRKY2 was preferentially expressed in flowers and strongly induced by methyl jasmonate. Here, we cloned the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA of GbWRKY2. The full-length cDNA of GbWRKY2 was 1,713 bp containing a 1,014 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 337 amino acids. The GbWRKY2 genomic DNA had one intron and two exons. The deduced GbWRKY2 contained one WRKY domain and one zinc finger motif. GbWRKY2 was classified into Group II WRKYs. Southern blot analysis revealed that GbWRKY2 was a single copy gene in G. biloba. Many cis-acting elements related to hormone and stress responses were identified in the 1,363 bp-length 5′-flanking sequence of GbWRKY2, including W-box, ABRE-motif, MYBCOREs, and PYRIMIDINE-boxes, revealing the molecular mechanism of upregulated expression of GbWRKY2 by hormone and stress treatments. Further functional characterizations in transiently transformed tobacco leaves allowed us to identify the region that can be considered as the minimal promoter. PMID:26351628

  17. Isolation, Expression, and Promoter Analysis of GbWRKY2: A Novel Transcription Factor Gene from Ginkgo biloba

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    Yong-Ling Liao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factor is involved in multiple life activities including plant growth and development as well as biotic and abiotic responses. We identified 28 WRKY genes from transcriptome data of Ginkgo biloba according to conserved WRKY domains and zinc finger structure and selected three WRKY genes, which are GbWRKY2, GbWRKY16, and GbWRKY21, for expression pattern analysis. GbWRKY2 was preferentially expressed in flowers and strongly induced by methyl jasmonate. Here, we cloned the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA of GbWRKY2. The full-length cDNA of GbWRKY2 was 1,713 bp containing a 1,014 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 337 amino acids. The GbWRKY2 genomic DNA had one intron and two exons. The deduced GbWRKY2 contained one WRKY domain and one zinc finger motif. GbWRKY2 was classified into Group II WRKYs. Southern blot analysis revealed that GbWRKY2 was a single copy gene in G. biloba. Many cis-acting elements related to hormone and stress responses were identified in the 1,363 bp-length 5′-flanking sequence of GbWRKY2, including W-box, ABRE-motif, MYBCOREs, and PYRIMIDINE-boxes, revealing the molecular mechanism of upregulated expression of GbWRKY2 by hormone and stress treatments. Further functional characterizations in transiently transformed tobacco leaves allowed us to identify the region that can be considered as the minimal promoter.

  18. Inflammatory cytokine TNF-α promotes corneal endothelium apoptosis via upregulating TIPE2 transcription during corneal graft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Wei, Chao; Ma, Li; Wang, Xin; Li, Lin; Zhou, Qingjun; Shi, Weiyun

    2018-02-26

    Endothelial dysfunction accounts for 50% of total corneal transplantation failures, suggesting that corneal endothelial damage is the leading cause of graft failure. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is known to contribute to the negative regulation of corneal transplantation, but how it does so remains unclear. Here, we report a regulatory loop involving TNF-α, TNF-α-induced protein 8 like 2 (TNFAIP8L2 or TIPE2), and apoptosis during corneal graft rejection. We established mice models of penetrating keratoplasty to verify whether the quantification of TNF-α in allogeneic corneas is enhanced through ELISA assay and immunofluorescence staining. In cornea tissues, we obtained corneal endothelium and measured apoptosis of the removed cells. Meanwhile, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of TIPE2. In human corneal endothelial cells, we verified the conclusions through some experiments. By specifically knocking down TIPE2, we detected the importance of TIPE2 in TNF-α-triggered apoptosis. In mice models, TNF-α was higher in the cornea and aqueous humor in allograft group and TNF-α elevation increased the apoptosis of the corneal endothelium. In addition, high levels of TIPE2 were found in allograft rejection models following TNF-α elevation. In human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), TNF-α clearly augments TIPE2 expression and promotes cell apoptosis through upregulating TIPE2 transcription. Knocking down markedly decreased cell apoptosis. Our study identifies the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of TNF-α, TIPE2, and apoptosis during allograft rejection, and it suggests that both TNF-α and TIPE2 might be potential targets for the successfully grafted corneal endothelium.

  19. An MSC2 Promoter-lacZ Fusion Gene Reveals Zinc-Responsive Changes in Sites of Transcription Initiation That Occur across the Yeast Genome.

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    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available The Msc2 and Zrg17 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a complex to transport zinc into the endoplasmic reticulum. ZRG17 is transcriptionally induced in zinc-limited cells by the Zap1 transcription factor. In this report, we show that MSC2 mRNA also increases (~1.5 fold in zinc-limited cells. The MSC2 gene has two in-frame ATG codons at its 5' end, ATG1 and ATG2; ATG2 is the predicted initiation codon. When the MSC2 promoter was fused at ATG2 to the lacZ gene, we found that unlike the chromosomal gene this reporter showed a 4-fold decrease in lacZ mRNA in zinc-limited cells. Surprisingly, β-galactosidase activity generated by this fusion gene increased ~7 fold during zinc deficiency suggesting the influence of post-transcriptional factors. Transcription of MSC2ATG2-lacZ was found to start upstream of ATG1 in zinc-replete cells. In zinc-limited cells, transcription initiation shifted to sites just upstream of ATG2. From the results of mutational and polysome profile analyses, we propose the following explanation for these effects. In zinc-replete cells, MSC2ATG2-lacZ mRNA with long 5' UTRs fold into secondary structures that inhibit translation. In zinc-limited cells, transcripts with shorter unstructured 5' UTRs are generated that are more efficiently translated. Surprisingly, chromosomal MSC2 did not show start site shifts in response to zinc status and only shorter 5' UTRs were observed. However, the shifts that occur in the MSC2ATG2-lacZ construct led us to identify significant transcription start site changes affecting the expression of ~3% of all genes. Therefore, zinc status can profoundly alter transcription initiation across the yeast genome.

  20. Expression of Terpenoids 1, a glandular trichome-specific transcription factor from tomato that activates the terpene synthase 5 promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyropoulou, E.A.; Haring, M.A.; Schuurink, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Terpene biosynthesis in tomato glandular trichomes has been well studied, with most if not all terpene synthases (TPSs) being identified. However, transcription factors (TFs) that regulate TPSs have not yet been discovered from tomato. In order to unravel the transcriptional regulation of the

  1. A point mutation affecting an SP1 binding site in the promoter of the ferrochelatase gene impairs gene transcription and causes erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Elena; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Mazzucchelli, Renata; Moriondo, Valeria; Mologni, Daniela; Zanone Poma, Barbara; Riva, Agostino

    2005-05-01

    Clinical manifestation of erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) results from coinheritance of a mutated allele and a wild-type low-expressed allele of the ferrochelatase (FECH) gene. Currently, up to 90 different mutations affecting the coding region or splicing junctions of the FECH gene have been identified. Despite the high molecular heterogeneity, no functional mutations have been previously reported in the promoter region. The weaker allele expression has been controversially associated to the presence of different intragenic polymorphisms. We applied a two-step screening strategy using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis followed by direct sequencing in order to rapidly identify FECH gene mutations in Italian EPP patients. We identified two unrelated subjects showing a normal FECH coding region but a single G>C base substitution at position -250 in the FECH promoter and the -251G, IVS1-23T, and IVS3-48C polymorphisms in trans to the substitution. To investigate the effect of the -250G>C mutation on protein binding to the FECH promoter, we conducted electro mobility shift assay (EMSA) and supershift analysis. To determine its effect on the transcriptional activity, K562 and Jurkat cell lines were transiently transfected. EMSA showed that the -250G>C mutation results in the loss of an SP1 binding site, and transient transfection assays demonstrated that such mutation strongly impairs promoter activity. Moreover, we showed that the -251A>G polymorphism, although unable to affect SP1 binding, displays a significant reduction in the transcriptional activity of the promoter. This is the first report of a mutation in the FECH promoter affecting binding of a transcription factor and causing EPP phenotype.

  2. Expression of metastasis suppressor gene AES driven by a Yin Yang (YY) element in a CpG island promoter and transcription factor YY2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Yoshiro; Ito, Shinji; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M Mark

    2016-11-01

    We recently found that the product of the AES gene functions as a metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) in both humans and mice. Expression of amino-terminal enhancer of split (AES) protein is significantly decreased in liver metastatic lesions compared with primary colon tumors. To investigate its downregulation mechanism in metastases, we searched for transcriptional regulators of AES in human CRC and found that its expression is reduced mainly by transcriptional dysregulation and, in some cases, by additional haploidization of its coding gene. The AES promoter-enhancer is in a typical CpG island, and contains a Yin-Yang transcription factor recognition sequence (YY element). In human epithelial cells of normal colon and primary tumors, transcription factor YY2, a member of the YY family, binds directly to the YY element, and stimulates expression of AES. In a transplantation mouse model of liver metastases, however, expression of Yy2 (and therefore of Aes) is downregulated. In human CRC metastases to the liver, the levels of AES protein are correlated with those of YY2. In addition, we noticed copy-number reduction for the AES coding gene in chromosome 19p13.3 in 12% (5/42) of human CRC cell lines. We excluded other mechanisms such as point or indel mutations in the coding or regulatory regions of the AES gene, CpG methylation in the AES promoter enhancer, expression of microRNAs, and chromatin histone modifications. These results indicate that Aes may belong to a novel family of metastasis suppressors with a CpG-island promoter enhancer, and it is regulated transcriptionally. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. The PLZF-like protein TRA-4 cooperates with the Gli-like transcription factor TRA-1 to promote female development in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Phillip; Conradt, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    The Gli-like transcription factor TRA-1 of C. elegans promotes female development by repressing the transcription of male-specific genes. We have found that tra-1 interacts with tra-4, a previously uncharacterized gene that encodes a protein similar to the human proto-oncoprotein and transcriptional repressor PLZF. In this context, the TRA-4 protein functions with NASP-1, a C. elegans homolog of the mammalian histone chaperone NASP, and the histone deacetylase HDA-1. We also found that tra-4 is a member of the synMuv B group of genes, many of which encode homologs of components of the Drosophila Myb-Muv B transcriptional repressor complex, and that several synMuv B genes also promote female development. Based on these results, we propose that male-specific genes are repressed in C. elegans hermaphrodites by the combined action of TRA-1/Gli, a complex composed of TRA-4/PLZF-like, NASP, and HDA-1/HDAC, and synMuv B proteins. Similar interactions may function in sex determination and developmental regulation in other species.

  4. Transcription Factor IRF4 Promotes CD8+T Cell Exhaustion and Limits the Development of Memory-like T Cells during Chronic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Kevin; Gabriel, Sarah S; Liao, Yang; Gloury, Renee; Preston, Simon; Henstridge, Darren C; Pellegrini, Marc; Zehn, Dietmar; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike; Febbraio, Mark A; Shi, Wei; Kallies, Axel

    2017-12-19

    During chronic stimulation, CD8 + T cells acquire an exhausted phenotype characterized by expression of inhibitory receptors, down-modulation of effector function, and metabolic impairments. T cell exhaustion protects from excessive immunopathology but limits clearance of virus-infected or tumor cells. We transcriptionally profiled antigen-specific T cells from mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus strains that cause acute or chronic disease. T cell exhaustion during chronic infection was driven by high amounts of T cell receptor (TCR)-induced transcription factors IRF4, BATF, and NFATc1. These regulators promoted expression of inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, and mediated impaired cellular metabolism. Furthermore, they repressed the expression of TCF1, a transcription factor required for memory T cell differentiation. Reducing IRF4 expression restored the functional and metabolic properties of antigen-specific T cells and promoted memory-like T cell development. These findings indicate that IRF4 functions as a central node in a TCR-responsive transcriptional circuit that establishes and sustains T cell exhaustion during chronic infection. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human RNA polymerase II associated factor 1 complex promotes tumorigenesis by activating c-MYC transcription in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Xiuyi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100053 (China); Giroux-Leprieur, Etienne [ER2 GRC UPMC04 Theranoscan, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Tenon Hospital, 4 Rue de La Chine, 75020, Paris (France); Respiratory Diseases and Thoracic Oncology Department, Ambroise Pare Hospital – APHP, Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines University, 9 Avenue Charles de Gaulle, 92100, Boulogne-Billancourt (France); Wislez, Marie [ER2 GRC UPMC04 Theranoscan, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Tenon Hospital, 4 Rue de La Chine, 75020, Paris (France); Hu, Mu; Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100053 (China); Shi, Huaiyin [Department of Pathology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Fu-xing Road #28, Beijing, 100853 (China); Du, Kaiqi, E-mail: kaiqidu_zhejiang@163.com [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Zhejiang Corps Hospital, Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: leiwang_hebei@163.com [Department of Human Anatomy, Hebei Medical University, Hebei Province (China)

    2015-10-02

    Human RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-associated factor 1 complex (hPAF1C) plays a crucial role in protein-coding gene transcription. Overexpression of hPAF1C has been implicated in the initiation and progression of various human cancers. However, the molecular pathways involved in tumorigenesis through hPAF1C remain to be elucidated. The current study suggested hPAF1C expression as a prognostic biomarker for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and patients with low hPAF1C expression levels had significantly better overall survival. Furthermore, the expression of hPAF1C was found to be positively correlated with c-MYC expression in patient tumor samples and in cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies indicated that hPAF1C could promote lung cancer cell proliferation through regulating c-MYC transcription. These results demonstrated the prognostic value of hPAF1C in early-stage NSCLC and the role of hPAF1C in the transcriptional regulation of c-MYC oncogene during NSCLC tumorigenesis. - Highlights: • hPAF1C expression is a prognostic biomarker for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. • The expression of hPAF1C was positively correlated with c-MYC in tumor samples of patients and in several NSCLC cell lines. • hPAF1C could promote lung cancer cell proliferation through regulating c-MYC transcription.

  6. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein induces a transcriptional repressor complex on the Toll-like receptor 9 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Uzma A; Zannetti, Claudia; Parroche, Peggy; Goutagny, Nadège; Malfroy, Marine; Roblot, Guillaume; Carreira, Christine; Hussain, Ishraq; Müller, Martin; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Picard, Didier; Sylla, Bakary S; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Tommasino, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and other oncogenic viruses have been reported to deregulate immunity by suppressing the function of the double-stranded DNA innate sensor TLR9. However, the mechanisms leading to these events remain to be elucidated. We show that infection of human epithelial cells with HPV16 promotes the formation of an inhibitory transcriptional complex containing NF-κBp50-p65 and ERα induced by the E7 oncoprotein. The E7-mediated transcriptional complex also recruited the histone demethylase JARID1B and histone deacetylase HDAC1. The entire complex bound to a specific region on the TLR9 promoter, which resulted in decreased methylation and acetylation of histones upstream of the TLR9 transcriptional start site. The involvement of NF-κB and ERα in the TLR9 down-regulation by HPV16 E7 was fully confirmed in cervical tissues from human patients. Importantly, we present evidence that the HPV16-induced TLR9 down-regulation affects the interferon response which negatively regulates viral infection. Our studies highlight a novel HPV16-mediated mechanism that combines epigenetic and transcriptional events to suppress a key innate immune sensor.

  7. IL-15 prolongs CD154 expression on human CD4 T cells via STAT5 binding to the CD154 transcriptional promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Lowe, RM; Genin, A; Orgun, N; Cron, RQ

    2014-01-01

    Activation induced CD154 expression on CD4 T cells is prolonged in systemic lupus erythematosus but the mechanism(s) for its dysregulation are unknown. The studies reported herein demonstrate that IL-15 is capable of prolonging CD154 expression on PHA activated CD4 T cells. Since IL-15 signals through STAT5, predicted STAT5 binding sites in the human CD154 transcriptional promoter were identified, and STAT5 binding to the proximal CD154 promoter in vitro and in vivo following primary CD4 T ce...

  8. ZmMYB14 is an important transcription factor involved in the regulation of the activity of the ZmBT1 promoter in starch biosynthesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qianlin; Wang, Yayun; Du, Jia; Li, Hui; Wei, Bin; Wang, Yongbin; Li, Yangping; Yu, Guowu; Liu, Hanmei; Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Yinghong; Hu, Yufeng; Huang, Yubi

    2017-09-01

    The biosynthesis of starch is a complex process that depends on the regulatory mechanisms of different functional enzymes, and transcriptional regulation plays an important role in this process. Brittle 1, encoded by BT1, is a transporter of adenosine diphosphate-glucose, which plays an important role in the biosynthesis of starch in the endosperm of cereals. Here, we report that the promoter (pZmBT1) of the maize BT1 homolog, ZmBT1, contains an MBSI site (TAACTG), which is important for its activity. Moreover, high expression level of the gene for ZmMYB14 transcription factor was observed in the maize endosperm; its expression pattern was similar to those of the starch synthesis-related genes in maize seeds. ZmMYB14 is a typical 2R-MYB transcription factor localized in the nucleus and possessed transcriptional activation activity. ZmMYB14 could bind to the region of pZmBT1 from -280 to -151 bp and promote its activity through the TAACTG site. It was also observed to promote the activity of pZmSh2, pZmBt2, pZmGBSSI, pZmSSI, and pZmSBE1 in the maize endosperm in transient gene overexpression assays. Furthermore, ZmMYB14 was also shown to bind directly to the promoters of six starch-synthesizing genes, ZmGBSSI, ZmSSI, ZmSSIIa, ZmSBE1, ZmISA1, and ZmISA2 in yeast. These findings indicate that ZmMYB14 functions as a key regulator of ZmBT1 and is closely related to the biosynthesis of starch. Our results provide crucial information related to the regulation of starch biosynthesis in maize and would be helpful in devising strategies for modulating starch production in maize endosperm. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Role of core promoter sequences in the mechanism of swarmer cell-specific silencing of gyrB transcription in Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gober James W

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each Caulobacter crescentus cell division yields two distinct cell types: a flagellated swarmer cell and a non-motile stalked cell. The swarmer cell is further distinguished from the stalked cell by an inability to reinitiate DNA replication, by the physical properties of its nucleoid, and its discrete program of gene expression. Specifically, with regard to the latter feature, many of the genes involved in DNA replication are not transcribed in swarmer cells. Results We show that for one of these genes involved in DNA replication, gyrB, its pattern of temporal expression depends upon an 80 base pair promoter region with strong resemblance to the Caulobacter crescentus σ73 consensus promoter sequence; regulation does not appear to be affected by the general strength of the promoter activity, as mutations that increased its conformity with the consensus did not affect its cell-cycle expression pattern. Transcription from the gyrB promoter in vitro required only the presence of the σ73 RNA polymerase (from E. coli and the requisite nucleoside triphosphates, although a distinct binding activity, present in crude whole-cell extracts, formed a complex gyrB promoter DNA. We also assayed the effect on gyrB expression in strains containing mutations in either smc or dps, two genes encoding proteins that condense DNA. However we found there was no change in the temporal pattern of gyrB transcription in strains containing deletions in either of these genes. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that gyrB transcription does not require any auxiliary factors, suggesting that temporal regulation is not dependent upon an activator protein. Swarmer-specific silencing may not be attributable to the observed physical difference in the swarmer cell nucleoid, since mutations in either smc or dps, two genes encoding proteins that condense DNA, did not alter the temporal pattern of gyrB transcription in strains containing deletions in either

  10. An NF-κB Transcription-Factor-Dependent Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Program Promotes Regulatory T Cell Identity and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunju; Grinberg-Bleyer, Yenkel; Liao, Will; Maloney, Dillon; Wang, Pingzhang; Wu, Zikai; Wang, Jiguang; Bhatt, Dev M; Heise, Nicole; Schmid, Roland M; Hayden, Matthew S; Klein, Ulf; Rabadan, Raul; Ghosh, Sankar

    2017-09-19

    Both conventional T (Tconv) cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are activated through ligation of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex, leading to the induction of the transcription factor NF-κB. In Tconv cells, NF-κB regulates expression of genes essential for T cell activation, proliferation, and function. However the role of NF-κB in Treg function remains unclear. We conditionally deleted canonical NF-κB members p65 and c-Rel in developing and mature Treg cells and found they have unique but partially redundant roles. c-Rel was critical for thymic Treg development while p65 was essential for mature Treg identity and maintenance of immune tolerance. Transcriptome and NF-κB p65 binding analyses demonstrated a lineage specific, NF-κB-dependent transcriptional program, enabled by enhanced chromatin accessibility. These dual roles of canonical NF-κB in Tconv and Treg cells highlight the functional plasticity of the NF-κB signaling pathway and underscores the need for more selective strategies to therapeutically target NF-κB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  12. Temporal transcription of the lactococcal temperate phage TP901-1 and DNA sequence of the early promoter region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Hans Peter Lynge; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    , of which at least two (the integrase gene and putative repressor) are needed for lysogeny, and the divergent and longer transcriptional unit from PL, presumably encoding functions required for the lytic life cycle. ORFs with homology to proteins involved in DNA replication were identified on the latter......Transcriptional analysis by Northern blotting identified clusters of early, middle and late transcribed regions of the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 during one-step growth experiments. The latent period was found to be 65 min and the burst size 40 +/- 10. The eight early transcripts...

  13. Cellular Transcription Factor Oct-1 Interacts with the Epstein-Barr Virus BRLF1 Protein To Promote Disruption of Viral Latency▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Amanda R.; Kwek, Swee Sen; Hagemeier, Stacy R.; Wille, Coral K.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-to-lytic switch is an essential part of the viral life cycle, but the cellular factors that promote viral reactivation are not well defined. In this report, we demonstrate that the cellular transcription factor Oct-1 cooperates with the EBV immediate-early protein BRLF1 (R, Rta) to induce lytic viral reactivation. We show that cotransfected Oct-1 enhances the ability of BRLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in 293 cells stably infected with a BRLF1-defective EBV mutant (BRLF1-stop) and that Oct-1 increases BRLF1-mediated activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays. We find that Oct-1 interacts directly with BRLF1 in vitro and that a mutant BRLF1 protein (the M140A mutant) attenuated for the ability to interact with Oct-1 in vitro is also resistant to Oct-1-mediated transcriptional enhancement in 293 BRLF1-stop cells. Furthermore, we show that cotransfected Oct-1 augments BRLF1 binding to a variety of lytic EBV promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays (including the BZLF1, BMRF1, and SM promoters) and that BRLF1 tethers Oct-1 to lytic EBV promoters. In addition, we demonstrate that an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding (the S335D mutant) still retains the ability to enhance BRLF1 transcriptional effects. Finally, we show that knockdown of endogenous Oct-1 expression reduces the level of constitutive lytic EBV gene expression in both EBV-positive B-cell and EBV-positive epithelial cell lines. These results suggest that Oct-1 acts as a positive regulator of EBV lytic gene expression and that this effect is at least partially mediated through its interaction with the viral protein BRLF1. PMID:21697476

  14. Data in support of FSH induction of IRS-2 in human granulosa cells: Mapping the transcription factor binding sites in human IRS-2 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surleen Kaur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2 plays critical role in the regulation of various metabolic processes by insulin and IGF-1. The defects in its expression and/or function are linked to diseases like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, insulin resistance and cancer. To predict the transcription factors (TFs responsible for the regulation of human IRS-2 gene expression, the transcription factor binding sites (TFBS and the corresponding TFs were investigated by analysis of IRS-2 promoter sequence using MatInspector Genomatix software (Cartharius et al., 2005 [1]. The ibid data is part of author׳s publication (Anjali et al., 2015 [2] that explains Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH mediated IRS-2 promoter activation in human granulosa cells and its importance in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Further analysis was carried out for binary interactions of TF regulatory genes in IRS-2 network using Cytoscape software tool and R-code. In this manuscript, we describe the methodology used for the identification of TFBSs in human IRS-2 promoter region and provide details on experimental procedures, analysis method, validation of data and also the raw files. The purpose of this article is to provide the data on all TFBSs in the promoter region of human IRS-2 gene as it has the potential for prediction of the regulation of IRS-2 gene in normal or diseased cells from patients with metabolic disorders and cancer.

  15. Heme controls ferroportin1 (FPN1) transcription involving Bach1, Nrf2 and a MARE/ARE sequence motif at position -7007 of the FPN1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Samuele; Chiabrando, Deborah; Messana, Erika; Stolte, Jens; Turco, Emilia; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2010-08-01

    Macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system play a key role in recycling iron from hemoglobin of senescent or damaged erythrocytes. Heme oxygenase 1 degrades the heme moiety and releases inorganic iron that is stored in ferritin or exported to the plasma via the iron export protein ferroportin. In the plasma, iron binds to transferrin and is made available for de novo red cell synthesis. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that control the transcriptional response of iron export protein ferroportin to hemoglobin in macrophages. Iron export protein ferroportin mRNA expression was analyzed in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages in response to hemoglobin, heme, ferric ammonium citrate or protoporphyrin treatment or to siRNA mediated knockdown or overexpression of Btb And Cnc Homology 1 or nuclear accumulation of Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-like. Iron export protein ferroportin promoter activity was analyzed using reporter constructs that contain specific truncations of the iron export protein ferroportin promoter or mutations in a newly identified MARE/ARE element. We show that iron export protein ferroportin is transcriptionally co-regulated with heme oxygenase 1 by heme, a degradation product of hemoglobin. The protoporphyrin ring of heme is sufficient to increase iron export protein ferroportin transcriptional activity while the iron released from the heme moiety controls iron export protein ferroportin translation involving the IRE in the 5'untranslated region. Transcription of iron export protein ferroportin is inhibited by Btb and Cnc Homology 1 and activated by Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-like involving a MARE/ARE element located at position -7007/-7016 of the iron export protein ferroportin promoter. This finding suggests that heme controls a macrophage iron recycling regulon involving Btb and Cnc Homology 1 and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-like to assure the coordinated degradation of heme by heme oxygenase 1, iron storage and

  16. Mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation: RNA polymerase - promoter binding, isomerization to initiation-competent open complexes, and initiation of RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saecker, Ruth M; Record, M Thomas; Dehaseth, Pieter L

    2011-10-07

    Initiation of RNA synthesis from DNA templates by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process, in which initial recognition of promoter DNA by RNAP triggers a series of conformational changes in both RNAP and promoter DNA. The bacterial RNAP functions as a molecular isomerization machine, using binding free energy to remodel the initial recognition complex, placing downstream duplex DNA in the active site cleft and then separating the nontemplate and template strands in the region surrounding the start site of RNA synthesis. In this initial unstable "open" complex the template strand appears correctly positioned in the active site. Subsequently, the nontemplate strand is repositioned and a clamp is assembled on duplex DNA downstream of the open region to form the highly stable open complex, RP(o). The transcription initiation factor, σ(70), plays critical roles in promoter recognition and RP(o) formation as well as in early steps of RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. © The Author(s).

  18. The Drosophila Transcription Factors Tinman and Pannier Activate and Collaborate with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 to Promote Heart Cell Fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TyAnna L Lovato

    Full Text Available Expression of the MADS domain transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2 is regulated by numerous and overlapping enhancers which tightly control its transcription in the mesoderm. To understand how Mef2 expression is controlled in the heart, we identified a late stage Mef2 cardiac enhancer that is active in all heart cells beginning at stage 14 of embryonic development. This enhancer is regulated by the NK-homeodomain transcription factor Tinman, and the GATA transcription factor Pannier through both direct and indirect interactions with the enhancer. Since Tinman, Pannier and MEF2 are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, and since their vertebrate homologs can convert mouse fibroblast cells to cardiomyocytes in different activator cocktails, we tested whether over-expression of these three factors in vivo could ectopically activate known cardiac marker genes. We found that mesodermal over-expression of Tinman and Pannier resulted in approximately 20% of embryos with ectopic Hand and Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur expression. By adding MEF2 alongside Tinman and Pannier, a dramatic expansion in the expression of Hand and Sur was observed in almost all embryos analyzed. Two additional cardiac markers were also expanded in their expression. Our results demonstrate the ability to initiate ectopic cardiac fate in vivo by the combination of only three members of the conserved Drosophila cardiac transcription network, and provide an opportunity for this genetic model system to be used to dissect the mechanisms of cardiac specification.

  19. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Elevates Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4 in Neurons and Promotes ATF4-Dependent Induction of Sesn2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 plays important physiologic roles in the brain including regulation of learning and memory as well as neuronal survival and death. Yet, outside of translational regulation by the eIF2α-dependent stress response pathway, there is little information about how its levels are controlled in neurons. Here, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promotes a rapid and sustained increase in neuronal ATF4 transcripts and protein levels. This increase is dependent on tropomyosin receptor kinase (TrkB signaling, but independent of levels of phosphorylated eIF2α. The elevation in ATF4 protein occurs both in nuclei and processes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that ATF4 mediates BDNF-promoted induction of Sesn2 which encodes Sestrin2, a protector against oxidative and genotoxic stresses and a mTor complex 1 inhibitor. In contrast, BDNF-elevated ATF4 did not affect expression of a number of other known ATF4 targets including several with pro-apoptotic activity. The capacity of BDNF to elevate neuronal ATF4 may thus represent a means to maintain this transcription factor at levels that provide neuroprotection and optimal brain function without risk of triggering neurodegeneration.

  20. The tomato MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR interacts with promoters involved in numerous ripening processes in a COLORLESS NONRIPENING-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Vrebalov, Julia; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Giovannoni, James J

    2011-11-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex developmental process responsible for the transformation of the seed-containing organ into a tissue attractive to seed dispersers and agricultural consumers. The coordinated regulation of the different biochemical pathways necessary to achieve this change receives considerable research attention. The MADS-box transcription factor RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN) is an essential regulator of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening but the exact mechanism by which it influences the expression of ripening-related genes remains unclear. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation approach, we provide evidence that RIN interacts with the promoters of genes involved in the major pathways associated with observed and well-studied ripening phenotypes and phenomena, including the transcriptional control network involved in overall ripening regulation, ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, downstream ethylene response, cell wall metabolism, and carotenoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the cases of ethylene and carotenoid biosynthesis, RIN interacts with the promoters of genes encoding rate-limiting activities. We also show that RIN recruitment to target loci is dependent on a normally functioning allele at the ripening-specific transcription factor COLORLESS NONRIPENING gene locus, further clarifying the relationship between these two ripening regulators.

  1. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA......-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the Tind promoter...

  2. Rapamycin enhances lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinoma cells by increasing the transcriptional activities of immediate-early lytic promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yinfeng; Yao, Guoliang; Gu, Bianli

    2017-11-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human herpesvirus, is linked to both epithelial and lymphoid malignancies. Induction of EBV reactivation is a potential therapeutic strategy for EBV-associated tumors. In this study, we assessed the effects of rapamycin on EBV reactivation in gastric carcinoma cells. We found that rapamycin upregulated expression of EBV lytic proteins and increased the viral proliferation triggered by the EBV lytic inducer sodium butyrate. Reverse transcription-qPCR, luciferase activity assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and western blotting were employed to explore the mechanism by which rapamycin promotes EBV reactivation. Our results showed that rapamycin treatment resulted in increased mRNA levels of EBV immediate-early genes. Rapamycin also enhanced the transcriptional activities of the EBV immediate-early lytic promoters Zp and Rp by strengthening Sp1 binding. Repression of the cellular ataxia telangiectasia-mutated/p53 pathway by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene significantly abrogated virus reactivation by rapamycin/sodium butyrate treatment, indicating that the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated/p53 pathway is involved in rapamycin-promoted EBV reactivation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that rapamycin might have the potential to enhance the effectiveness of oncolytic viral therapies developed for EBV-associated malignancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of the human class II alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4) gene affect both transcriptional activity and ethanol metabolism in Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yukiko; Nishimura, Fusae T; Abe, Shuntaro; Fukunaga, Tatsushige; Tanii, Hideji; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2009-02-01

    Class II alcohol dehydrogenase (pi-ADH), encoded by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4), is considered to contribute to ethanol (EtOH) oxidation in the liver at high concentration. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in the promoter region of this gene. Analysis of genotype distribution in 102 unrelated Japanese subjects revealed that four loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium and could be classified into three haplotypes. The effects of these polymorphisms on transcriptional activity were investigated in HepG2 cells. Transcriptional activity was significantly higher in cells with the -136A allele than in those with the -136C allele. To investigate whether this difference in transcriptional activity caused a difference in EtOH elimination, previous data on blood EtOH changes after 0.4 g/kg body weight alcohol ingestion were analyzed. When analyzed based on aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 gene (ALDH2) (487)Glu/Lys genotype, the significantly lower level of EtOH at peak in subjects with -136C/A and -136A/A genotype compared with subjects with -136C/C genotype indicated that -136 bp was a suggestive locus for differences in EtOH oxidation. This effect was observed only in subjects with ALDH2 (487)Glu/Glu. These results suggested that the SNP at -136bp in the ADH4 promoter had an effect on transcriptional regulation, and that the higher activity of the -136A allele compared with the -136C allele caused a lower level of blood EtOH after alcohol ingestion; that is, individuals with the -136A allele may consume more EtOH and might have a higher risk for development of alcohol dependence than those without the -136A allele.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus transcription activator R upregulates BARF1 expression by direct binding to its promoter, independent of methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, E. K.; Wille, C.; Hopmans, E. S.; Robinson, A. R.; Middeldorp, J. M.; Kenney, S. C.; Greijer, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is considered a major viral oncogene in epithelial cells and has immune-modulating properties. However, in B cells and lymphomas, BARF1 expression is restricted to the viral lytic replication cycle. In this report, the transcriptional

  5. Transcriptional reprogramming underpins enhanced plant growth promotion by the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma hamatum GD12 during antagonistic interactions with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sophie; Le Cocq, Kate; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Moore, Karen; Winsbury, Rebecca; de Torres Zabala, Marta; Studholme, David J; Salmon, Deborah; Thornton, Christopher R; Grant, Murray R

    2016-12-01

    The free-living soil fungus Trichoderma hamatum strain GD12 is notable amongst Trichoderma strains in both controlling plant diseases and stimulating plant growth, a property enhanced during its antagonistic interactions with pathogens in soil. These attributes, alongside its markedly expanded genome and proteome compared with other biocontrol and plant growth-promoting Trichoderma strains, imply a rich potential for sustainable alternatives to synthetic pesticides and fertilizers for the control of plant disease and for increasing yields. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transcriptional responses of GD12 underpinning its biocontrol and plant growth promotion capabilities during antagonistic interactions with the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in soil. Using an extensive mRNA-seq study capturing different time points during the pathogen-antagonist interaction in soil, we show that dynamic and biphasic signatures in the GD12 transcriptome underpin its biocontrol and plant (lettuce) growth-promoting activities. Functional predictions of differentially expressed genes demonstrate the enrichment of transcripts encoding proteins involved in transportation and oxidation-reduction reactions during both processes and an over-representation of siderophores. We identify a biphasic response during biocontrol characterized by a significant induction of transcripts encoding small-secreted cysteine-rich proteins, secondary metabolite-producing gene clusters and genes unique to GD12. These data support the hypothesis that Sclerotinia biocontrol is mediated by the synthesis and secretion of antifungal compounds and that GD12's unique reservoir of uncharacterized genes is actively recruited during the effective biological control of a plurivorous plant pathogen. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The B-Cell Specific Transcription Factor, Oct-2, Promotes Epstein-Barr Virus Latency by Inhibiting the Viral Immediate-Early Protein, BZLF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Amanda R.; Kwek, Swee Sen; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-lytic switch is mediated by the BZLF1 immediate-early protein. EBV is normally latent in memory B cells, but cellular factors which promote viral latency specifically in B cells have not been identified. In this report, we demonstrate that the B-cell specific transcription factor, Oct-2, inhibits the function of the viral immediate-early protein, BZLF1, and prevents lytic viral reactivation. Co-transfected Oct-2 reduces the ability of BZLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in two different latently infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, Oct-2 inhibits BZLF1 activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays, and attenuates BZLF1 binding to lytic viral promoters in vivo. Oct-2 interacts directly with BZLF1, and this interaction requires the DNA-binding/dimerization domain of BZLF1 and the POU domain of Oct-2. An Oct-2 mutant (Δ262–302) deficient for interaction with BZLF1 is unable to inhibit BZLF1-mediated lytic reactivation. However, an Oct-2 mutant defective for DNA-binding (Q221A) retains the ability to inhibit BZLF1 transcriptional effects and DNA-binding. Importantly, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Oct-2 expression in several EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines increases the level of lytic EBV gene expression, while decreasing EBNA1 expression. Moreover, treatments which induce EBV lytic reactivation, such as anti-IgG cross-linking and chemical inducers, also decrease the level of Oct-2 protein expression at the transcriptional level. We conclude that Oct-2 potentiates establishment of EBV latency in B cells. PMID:22346751

  7. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  8. High-resolution three-dimensional NMR structure of theKRASproto-oncogene promoter reveals key features of a G-quadruplex involved in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkour, Abdelaziz; Marquevielle, Julien; Ivashchenko, Stefaniia; Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Salgado, Gilmar F

    2017-05-12

    Non-canonical base pairing within guanine-rich DNA and RNA sequences can produce G-quartets, whose stacking leads to the formation of a G-quadruplex (G4). G4s can coexist with canonical duplex DNA in the human genome and have been suggested to suppress gene transcription, and much attention has therefore focused on studying G4s in promotor regions of disease-related genes. For example, the human KRAS proto-oncogene contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element located upstream of the major transcription start site. The KRAS nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) region contains a G-rich element (22RT; 5'-AGGGCGGTGTGGGAATAGGGAA-3') and encompasses a Myc-associated zinc finger-binding site that regulates KRAS transcription. The NEH region therefore has been proposed as a target for new drugs that control KRAS transcription, which requires detailed knowledge of the NHE structure. In this study, we report a high-resolution NMR structure of the G-rich element within the KRAS NHE. We found that the G-rich element forms a parallel structure with three G-quartets connected by a four-nucleotide loop and two short one-nucleotide double-chain reversal loops. In addition, a thymine bulge is found between G8 and G9. The loops of different lengths and the presence of a bulge between the G-quartets are structural elements that potentially can be targeted by small chemical ligands that would further stabilize the structure and interfere or block transcriptional regulators such as Myc-associated zinc finger from accessing their binding sites on the KRAS promoter. In conclusion, our work suggests a possible new route for the development of anticancer agents that could suppress KRAS expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna Miles

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF, which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state.

  10. Counter regulation of ECRG4 gene expression by hypermethylation-dependent inhibition and the Sp1 transcription factor-dependent stimulation of the c2orf40 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xitong; Zeng, Xiaorong; Coimbra, Raul; Eliceiri, Brian P; Baird, Andrew

    2017-12-15

    The human cytokine precursor ECRG4 has been associated with multiple physiological, developmental and pathophysiological processes involving cell proliferation, cell migration, innate immunity, inflammation, cancer progression and metastases. Although down-regulation of ECRG4 gene expression has been largely attributed to hypermethylation of CpG islands in the 5'untranslated region of the ECRG4 promoter, the mechanisms that underlie the dynamics of its regulation have never been systematically described. Here we show that the ECRG4 gene is widely expressed in human tissues and report that its core promoter lies between the -780 to +420 base pairs relative to the ATG start codon of the ECRG4 open reading frame. This sequence, which contains several CpG islands, also includes multiple overlapping Sp1 consensus binding sequences and a putative binding site for NF-kB activation. 5'RACE of mRNA derived from human leukocytes shows that ECRG4 transcription initiates from the guanidine at -11 from the initiation ATG of the ECRG4 open reading frame. While there is no canonical TATA- or CAAT-boxes proximal to this translational initiation site, there is a distal TATA-sequence in the 5'UTR. This region was identified as the sequence targeted by hypermethylation because in vitro methylation of plasmids encoding the ECRG4 promoter abolish promoter activity and the treatment of Jurkat cells (which naturally express ECRG4) with the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC, increases endogenous ECRG4 expression. Because ChIP assays show that Sp1 binds the ECRG4 promoter, that forced Sp1 expression trans-activates the ECRG4 promoter and Sp1 inhibition with mithramycin inhibits ECRG4 expression, we conclude that the dynamic positive and negative regulatory elements controlling ECRG4 expression include a counter regulation between promoter methylation and Sp1 activation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. CCAR1 promotes chromatin loading of androgen receptor (AR) transcription complex by stabilizing the association between AR and GATA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seo, Woo-Young; Jeong, Byong Chang; Yu, Eun Ji; Kim, Hwa Jin; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lim, Joung Eun; Kwon, Ghee Young; Lee, Hyun Moo; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    .... We further showed that CCAR1 is required for recruitment of AR, MED1 and RNA polymerase II to the enhancers of AR target genes and for androgen-induced long-range prostate specific antigen enhancer-promoter interaction...

  12. CD5 Binds to Interleukin-6 and Induces a Feed-Forward Loop with the Transcription Factor STAT3 in B Cells to Promote Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunyan; Xin, Hong; Zhang, Wang; Yazaki, Paul J; Zhang, Zhifang; Le, Keith; Li, Wenzhao; Lee, Heehyoung; Kwak, Larry; Forman, Stephen; Jove, Richard; Yu, Hua

    2016-04-19

    The participation of a specific subset of B cells and how they are regulated in cancer is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the proportion of CD5(+) relative to interleukin-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα)-expressing B cells was greatly increased in tumors. CD5(+) B cells responded to IL-6 in the absence of IL-6Rα. IL-6 directly bound to CD5, leading to activation of the transcription factor STAT3 via gp130 and its downstream kinase JAK2. STAT3 upregulated CD5 expression, thereby forming a feed-forward loop in the B cells. In mouse tumor models, CD5(+) but not CD5(-) B cells promoted tumor growth. CD5(+) B cells also showed activation of STAT3 in multiple types of human tumor tissues. Thus, our findings demonstrate a critical role of CD5(+) B cells in promoting cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression of a maize Myb transcription factor driven by a putative silk-specific promoter significantly enhances resistance to Helicoverpa zea in transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric T; Berhow, Mark A; Dowd, Patrick F

    2007-04-18

    Hi II maize (Zea mays) plants were engineered to express maize p1 cDNA, a Myb transcription factor, controlled by a putative silk specific promoter, for secondary metabolite production and corn earworm resistance. Transgene expression did not enhance silk color, but about half of the transformed plant silks displayed browning when cut, which indicated the presence of p1-produced secondary metabolites. Levels of maysin, a secondary metabolite with insect toxicity, were highest in newly emerged browning silks. The insect resistance of transgenic silks was also highest at emergence, regardless of maysin levels, which suggests that other unidentified p1-induced molecules likely contributed to larval mortality. Mean survivor weights of corn earworm larvae fed mature browning transgenic silks were significantly lower than weights of those fed mature nonbrowning transgenic silks. Some transgenic pericarps browned with drying and contained similar molecules found in pericarps expressing a dominant p1 allele, suggesting that the promoter may not be silk-specific.

  14. The WRKY transcription factors PtrWRKY18 and PtrWRKY35 promote Melampsora resistance in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanzhong; Guo, Li; Ma, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xin; Jiao, Bo; Li, Chaofeng; Luo, Keming

    2017-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors play important roles in response to diverse environmental stresses, but exact functions of these proteins in poplar defense are still largely unknown. In a previous study, we have shown that poplar WRKY89 is induced by salicylic acid (SA) treatment and plays an important role in resistance against fungi in transgenic poplars. Here, we determined an increase in transcript levels of Group IIa WRKY members in transgenic poplars overexpressing WRKY89 using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that PtrWRKY18 and PtrWRKY35 were potential target genes of WRKY89. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PtrWRKY18 and PtrWRKY35 were localized in the nucleus, and exhibited no transcription activation activity. Constitutive overexpression of PtrWRKY18 and PtrWRKY35 in poplars activated pathogenesis-related genes, and increased resistance to the biotrophic pathogen Melampsora. The results also provided support for the involvement of SA-mediated signaling in Melampsora resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The execution of the transcriptional axis mutant p53, E2F1 and ID4 promotes tumor neo-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontemaggi, Giulia; Dell'Orso, Stefania; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Shay, Tal; Melucci, Elisa; Fazi, Francesco; Terrenato, Irene; Mottolese, Marcella; Muti, Paola; Domany, Eytan; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    ID4 (inhibitor of DNA binding 4) is a member of a family of proteins that function as dominant-negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Growing evidence links ID proteins to cell proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Here we identify ID4 as a transcriptional target of gain-of-function p53 mutants R175H, R273H and R280K. Depletion of mutant p53 protein severely impairs ID4 expression in proliferating tumor cells. The protein complex mutant p53-E2F1 assembles on specific regions of the ID4 promoter and positively controls ID4 expression. The ID4 protein binds to and stabilizes mRNAs encoding pro-angiogenic factors IL8 and GRO-alpha. This results in the increase of the angiogenic potential of cancer cells expressing mutant p53. These findings highlight the transcriptional axis mutant p53, E2F1 and ID4 as a still undefined molecular mechanism contributing to tumor neo-angiogenesis.

  16. R-ChIP Using Inactive RNase H Reveals Dynamic Coupling of R-loops with Transcriptional Pausing at Gene Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Jia-Yu; Zhang, Xuan; Gu, Ying; Xiao, Rui; Shao, Changwei; Tang, Peng; Qian, Hao; Luo, Daji; Li, Hairi; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Dong-Er; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2017-11-16

    R-loop, a three-stranded RNA/DNA structure, has been linked to induced genome instability and regulated gene expression. To enable precision analysis of R-loops in vivo, we develop an RNase-H-based approach; this reveals predominant R-loop formation near gene promoters with strong G/C skew and propensity to form G-quadruplex in non-template DNA, corroborating with all biochemically established properties of R-loops. Transcription perturbation experiments further indicate that R-loop induction correlates to transcriptional pausing. Interestingly, we note that most mapped R-loops are each linked to a nearby free RNA end; by using a ribozyme to co-transcriptionally cleave nascent RNA, we demonstrate that such a free RNA end coupled with a G/C-skewed sequence is necessary and sufficient to induce R-loop. These findings provide a topological solution for RNA invasion into duplex DNA and suggest an order for R-loop initiation and elongation in an opposite direction to that previously proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The promoter structure differentiation of a MYB transcription factor RLC1 causes red leaf coloration in Empire Red Leaf Cotton under light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenrui; Liu, Chuanliang; Zhang, Yanzhao; Li, Ying; Yi, Keke; Zhao, Xinhua; Cui, Min-Long

    2013-01-01

    The red leaf coloration of Empire Red Leaf Cotton (ERLC) (Gossypium hirsutum L.), resulted from anthocyanin accumulation in light, is a well known dominant agricultural trait. However, the underpin molecular mechanism remains elusive. To explore this, we compared the molecular biological basis of anthocyanin accumulation in both ERLC and the green leaf cotton variety CCRI 24 (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Introduction of R2R3-MYB transcription factor Rosea1, the master regulator anthocyanin biosynthesis in Antirrhinum majus, into CCRI 24 induced anthocyanin accumulation, indicating structural genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis are not defected and the leaf coloration might be caused by variation of regulatory genes expression. Expression analysis found that a transcription factor RLC1 (Red Leaf Cotton 1) which encodes the ortholog of PAP1/Rosea1 was highly expressed in leaves of ERLC but barely expressed in CCRI 24 in light. Ectopic expression of RLC1 from ERLC and CCRI 24 in hairy roots of Antirrhinum majus and CCRI 24 significantly enhanced anthocyanin accumulation. Comparison of RLC1 promoter sequences between ERLC and CCRI 24 revealed two 228-bp tandem repeats presented in ERLC with only one repeat in CCRI 24. Transient assays in cotton leave tissue evidenced that the tandem repeats in ERLC is responsible for light-induced RLC1 expression and therefore anthocyanin accumulation. Taken together, our results in this article strongly support an important step toward understanding the role of R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulatory menchanisms of anthocyanin accumulation in red leaf cotton under light.

  18. Osteogenic differentiation of mouse mesenchymal progenitor cell, Kusa-A1 is promoted by mammalian transcriptional repressor Rbpj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shengchao [Department of Preventive Dentistry, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, 145 West Changle Road, 710032 Xi' an (China); Kawashima, Nobuyuki, E-mail: kawashima.n.endo@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Pulp Biology and Endodontics, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Sakamoto, Kei; Katsube, Ken-ichi [Department of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Umezawa, Akihiro [Department of Reproductive Biology and Pathology, National Institute for Child Health and Development, 2-10-4 Ohkura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535 (Japan); Suda, Hideaki [Department of Pulp Biology and Endodontics, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); GCOE Program, International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} High Rbpj mRNA expression was observed in mesenchymal cells surrounding the bone of mouse embryos. {yields} Overexpression of Rbpj depressed Notch-Hes1/Hey1 signaling. {yields} Rbpj upregulated promoter activities of Runx2 and Ose2. {yields} Rbpj promoted osteoblastic differentiation/maturation in Kusa-A1 cells. -- Abstract: Pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells possess the ability to differentiate into many cell types, but the precise mechanisms of differentiation are still unclear. Here, we provide evidence that Rbpj (recombination signal-binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa j region) protein, the primary nuclear mediator of Notch, is involved in osteogenesis. Overexpression of Rbpj promoted osteogenic differentiation of mouse Kusa-A1 cells in vitro and in vivo. Transient transfection of an Rbpj expression vector into Kusa-A1 cells upregulated promoter activities of Runx2 and Ose2. Enhanced osteogenic potentials including high alkaline phosphatase activity, rapid calcium deposition, and increased calcified nodule formation, were observed in established stable Rbpj-overexpressing Kusa-A1 (Kusa-A1/Rbpj) cell line. In vivo mineralization by Kusa-A1/Rbpj was promoted compared to that by Kusa-A1 host cells. Histological findings revealed that expression of Rbpj was primarily observed in osteoblasts. These results suggest that Rbpj may play essential roles in osteoblast differentiation.

  19. Understanding the transcriptional regulation of cervix cancer using microarray gene expression data and promoter sequence analysis of a curated gene set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant; Mangal, Manu; Agarwal, Subhash Mohan

    2014-02-10

    Cervical cancer, the malignant neoplasm of the cervix uteri is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the top-most cancer in India. Several factors are responsible for causing cervical cancer, which alter the expression of oncogenic genes resulting in up or down-regulation of gene expression and inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes/gene products. Gene expression is regulated by interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and specific regulatory elements in the promoter regions of target genes. Thus, it is important to decipher and analyze TFs that bind to regulatory regions of diseased genes and regulate their expression. In the present study, computational methods involving the combination of gene expression data from microarray experiments and promoter sequence analysis of a curated gene set involved in the cervical cancer causation have been utilized for identifying potential regulatory elements. Consensus predictions of two approaches led to the identification of twelve TFs that might be crucial to the regulation of cervical cancer progression. Subsequently, TF enrichment and oncomine expression analysis suggested that the transcription factor family E2F played an important role for the regulation of genes involve in cervical carcinogenesis. Our results suggest that E2F possesses diagnostic/prognostic value and can act as a potential drug target in cervical cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Escherichia coli strains with promoter libraries constructed by Red/ET recombination pave the way for transcriptional fine tuning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braatsch, Stephan; Helmark, Søren; Kranz, Harald

    2008-01-01

    System-oriented applications of genetic engineering, such as metabolic engineering, often require the serial optimization of enzymatic reaction steps, which can be achieved by transcriptional, fine-tuning. However, approaches to changing gene expression are usually limited to deletion and/or strong...... expression. Red/ET recombination perfectly complements SPL technology, since it enables easy modification of the Escherichia Coli genome and can be accomplished with linear DNA (i.e., the SPL). To demonstrate the synergistic use of Red/ET and SPL for metabolic engineering applications, we replaced the native...

  1. Zinc-finger domains of the transcriptional repressor KLF15 bind multiple sites in rhodopsin and IRBP promoters including the CRS-1 and G-rich repressor elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Hong

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the retina, many of the genes that encode components of the visual transduction cascade and retinoid recycling are exclusively expressed in photoreceptor cells and show highly stereotyped temporal and spatial expression patterns. Multiple transcriptional activators of photoreceptor-specific genes have been identified, but little is known about negative regulation of gene expression in the retina. We recently identified KLF15, a member of the Sp/Krüppel-like Factor family of zinc-finger containing transcription factors, as an in vitro repressor of the promoters of the photoreceptor-specific genes rhodopsin and IRBP/Rbp3. To gain further insight into the mechanism of KLF15-mediated regulation of gene expression, we have characterized the binding characteristics and specificity of KLF15's DNA binding domains and defined the KLF15 binding sites in the rhodopsin and IRBP promoters. Results In EMSA and DNAseI footprinting assays, a KLF15-GST fusion protein containing the C-terminal zinc-finger domains (123 amino acids showed zinc-dependent and sequence-specific binding to a 9 bp consensus sequence containing a core CG/TCCCC. Both the bovine rhodopsin and IRBP promoters contained multiple KLF15 binding sites that included the previously identified CRS-1 and G-rich repressor elements. KLF15 binding sites were highly conserved between the bovine, human, chimp and dog rhodopsin promoters, but less conserved in rodents. KLF15 reduced luciferase expression by bRho130-luc (containing 4 KLF15 sites and repressed promoter activation by CRX (cone rod homeobox and/or NRL (neural retina leucine zipper, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported for a longer bRho225-luc (containing 6 KFL15 sites. Conclusion KLF15 binds to multiple 9 bp consensus sites in the Rhodospin and IRBP promoters including the CRS-1 and G-rich repressor elements. Based on the known expression pattern of KLF15 in non

  2. Ablation of Transcription Factor IRF4 Promotes Transplant Acceptance by Driving Allogenic CD4+T Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Zhang, Hedong; Shi, Xiaomin; Xiao, Xiang; Fan, Yihui; Minze, Laurie J; Wang, Jin; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Xia, Jiahong; Sciammas, Roger; Li, Xian C; Chen, Wenhao

    2017-12-19

    CD4 + T cells orchestrate immune responses and destruction of allogeneic organ transplants, but how this process is regulated on a transcriptional level remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) was a key transcriptional determinant controlling T cell responses during transplantation. IRF4 deletion in mice resulted in progressive establishment of CD4 + T cell dysfunction and long-term allograft survival. Mechanistically, IRF4 repressed PD-1, Helios, and other molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. In the absence of IRF4, chromatin accessibility and binding of Helios at PD-1 cis-regulatory elements were increased, resulting in enhanced PD-1 expression and CD4 + T cell dysfunction. The dysfunctional state of Irf4-deficient T cells was initially reversible by PD-1 ligand blockade, but it progressively developed into an irreversible state. Hence, IRF4 controls a core regulatory circuit of CD4 + T cell dysfunction, and targeting IRF4 represents a potential therapeutic strategy for achieving transplant acceptance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigations of Escherichia coli promoter sequences with artificial neural networks: new signals discovered upstream of the transcriptional startpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Engelbrecht, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    We present a novel method for using the learning ability of a neural network as a measure of information in local regions of input data. Using the method to analyze Escherichia coli promoters, we discover all previously described signals, and furthermore find new signals that are regularly spaced...

  4. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elongation. Residual Promoter Complex. Elongation complex. Figure 2. Assembly of Transcription initiation complex on a TATA containing promoter: The single line with boxes represent promoter DNA and the +1 indicates the transcription start ...

  5. The Fos-Related Antigen 1–JUNB/Activator Protein 1 Transcription Complex, a Downstream Target of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3, Induces T Helper 17 Differentiation and Promotes Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Mee Moon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of T helper 17 (Th17 cells leads to chronic inflammatory disorders. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 orchestrates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and pathogenic cell differentiation from interleukin (IL-17-producing Th17 cells. However, the pathways mediated by STAT3 signaling are not fully understood. Here, we observed that Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1 and JUNB are directly involved in STAT3 binding to sites in the promoters of Fosl1 and Junb. Promoter binding increased expression of IL-17 and the development of Th17 cells. Overexpression of Fra1 and Junb in mice resulted in susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis and an increase in Th17 cell numbers and inflammatory cytokine production. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, FRA1 and JUNB were colocalized with STAT3 in the inflamed synovium. These observations suggest that FRA1 and JUNB are associated closely with STAT3 activation, and that this activation leads to Th17 cell differentiation in autoimmune diseases and inflammation.

  6. A base substitution in the promoter associated with the human haptoglobin 2-1 modified phenotype decreases transcriptional activity and responsiveness to interleukin-6 in human hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, D.J.; Maeda, N. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An A-to-C base substitution at nucleotide position -61 in the promoter region of the human haptoglobin gene (Hp) has been shown to be strongly associated with the haptoglobin 2-1 modified (Hp2-1mod) phenotype. In order to investigate whether this base substitution is the cause of reduced expression of the Hp[sup 2] allele relative to the Hp[sup 1] allele in individuals with the Hp2-1mod phenotype, the authors used the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) expression system to evaluate promoter function. In HepG2 cells, which normally express their endogenous haptoglobin genes, CAT plasmid constructs with the -61C base change in the promoter had about 10-fold-lower transcriptional activity after transfection than did the Hp control construct. The -61C substitution also rendered the construct unresponsive to treatment by interleukin-6 after transfection into Hep3B2 cells, which normally do not express haptoglobin but do so in response to stimulation by acute-phase reactants. In addition, two base substitutions, T to A and A to G, at positions -104 and -55G, respectively, in the promoter region of the Hp[sup 1] allele, are also associated with the Hp2-1mod phenotype. CAT constructs with both substitutions (-104A-55G) and with one substitution (-55G) showed activity similar to that in the Hp control when transfected into both HepG2 and Hep3B2 cells, although interleukin-6 induction was less than with the Hp control construct. These results further support the hypothesis that the Hp2-1mod phenotype results, in part, from the -61C mutation in the promoter region of the Hp[sup 2] gene.

  7. An evaluation of a SVA retrotransposon in the FUS promoter as a transcriptional regulator and its association to ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Savage

    Full Text Available Genetic mutations of FUS have been linked to many diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration. A primate specific and polymorphic retrotransposon of the SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA family is present upstream of the FUS gene. Here we have demonstrated that this retrotransposon can act as a classical transcriptional regulatory domain in the context of a reporter gene construct both in vitro in the human SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cell line and in vivo in a chick embryo model. We have also demonstrated that the SVA is composed of multiple distinct regulatory domains, one of which is a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR. The ability of the SVA and its component parts to direct reporter gene expression supported a hypothesis that this region could direct differential FUS expression in vivo. The SVA may therefore contribute to the modulation of FUS expression exhibited in and associated with neurological disorders including ALS where FUS regulation may be an important parameter in progression of the disease. As VNTRs are often clinical associates for disease progression we determined the extent of polymorphism within the SVA. In total 2 variants of the SVA were identified based within a central VNTR. Preliminary analysis addressed the association of these SVA variants within a small sporadic ALS cohort but did not reach statistical significance, although we did not include other parameters such as SNPs within the SVA or an environmental factor in this analysis. The latter may be particularly important as the transcriptional and epigenetic properties of the SVA are likely to be directed by the environment of the cell.

  8. The transcriptional co-repressor Grg3/Tle3 promotes pancreatic endocrine progenitor delamination and β-cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, David E.; Gasperowicz, Malgorzata; Otto, Florian; Cross, James C.; Gradwohl, Gerard; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells arise from Ngn3+ endocrine progenitors within the trunk epithelium of the embryonic pancreas. The emergence of endocrine cells requires E-cadherin downregulation, but the crucial steps that elicit such are not clear, yet probably important for ultimately being able to efficiently generate β-cells de novo from stem cells. Grg3 (groucho-related gene 3, also known as Tle3), encodes a member of the Groucho/TLE family of co-repressors and its function in various cell contexts is mediated by recruitment to target genes by different transcription factors. Grg proteins broadly regulate the progression of progenitor cells to differentiated cell types, but specific developmental mechanisms have not been clear. We find that Grg3 is expressed in most β-cells and a subset of other endocrine cell types in the pancreas. Grg3 is highly expressed in Ngn3+ endocrine progenitor descendants just after transient Ngn3 expression. Grg3-null embryos die at E14.5, which is associated with placental defects, so we explanted E12.5 pancreata to allow endocrine differentiation to occur in culture. Grg3 knockout explants displayed a drastic decrease in the differentiation of all endocrine cell types owing to defects in the delamination of early endocrine progenitors from the trunk epithelium. We find that Grg3 normally suppresses E-cadherin gene expression, thereby allowing delamination of endocrine cells from the trunk epithelium and revealing how this transcriptional co-repressor modulates this crucial step of β-cell development. PMID:22434868

  9. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  10. An evaluation of a SVA retrotransposon in the FUS promoter as a transcriptional regulator and its association to ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Abigail L; Wilm, Thomas P; Khursheed, Kejhal; Shatunov, Aleksey; Morrison, Karen E; Shaw, Pamela J; Shaw, Christopher E; Smith, Bradley; Breen, Gerome; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Moss, Diana; Bubb, Vivien J; Quinn, John P

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations of FUS have been linked to many diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration. A primate specific and polymorphic retrotransposon of the SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) family is present upstream of the FUS gene. Here we have demonstrated that this retrotransposon can act as a classical transcriptional regulatory domain in the context of a reporter gene construct both in vitro in the human SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cell line and in vivo in a chick embryo model. We have also demonstrated that the SVA is composed of multiple distinct regulatory domains, one of which is a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). The ability of the SVA and its component parts to direct reporter gene expression supported a hypothesis that this region could direct differential FUS expression in vivo. The SVA may therefore contribute to the modulation of FUS expression exhibited in and associated with neurological disorders including ALS where FUS regulation may be an important parameter in progression of the disease. As VNTRs are often clinical associates for disease progression we determined the extent of polymorphism within the SVA. In total 2 variants of the SVA were identified based within a central VNTR. Preliminary analysis addressed the association of these SVA variants within a small sporadic ALS cohort but did not reach statistical significance, although we did not include other parameters such as SNPs within the SVA or an environmental factor in this analysis. The latter may be particularly important as the transcriptional and epigenetic properties of the SVA are likely to be directed by the environment of the cell.

  11. Alpha/Beta Interferon Promotes Transcription and Inhibits Replication of Borna Disease Virus in Persistently Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staeheli, Peter; Sentandreu, Maria; Pagenstecher, Axel; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic RNA virus that can replicate in the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. This study shows that BDV multiplication was efficiently blocked in transgenic mice that express mouse alpha-1 interferon (IFN-α1) in astrocytes. To investigate whether endogenous virus-induced IFN might similarly restrict BDV, we used IFNAR0/0 mice, which lack a functional alpha/beta IFN (IFN-α/β) receptor. As would be expected if virus-induced IFN were important to control BDV infection, we found that cultured embryo cells of IFNAR0/0 mice supported viral multiplication, whereas cells from wild-type mice did not. Unexpectedly, however, BDV spread through the CNSs of IFNAR0/0 and wild-type mice with similar kinetics, suggesting that activation of endogenous IFN-α/β genes in BDV-infected brains was too weak or occurred too late to be effective. Surprisingly, Northern blot analysis showed that the levels of the most abundant viral mRNAs in the brains of persistently infected IFNAR0/0 mice were about 20-fold lower than those in wild-type mice. In contrast, genomic viral RNA was produced in about a 10-fold excess in the brains of IFNAR0/0 mice. Human IFN-α2 similarly enhanced transcription and simultaneously repressed replication of the BDV genome in persistently infected Vero cells. Thus, in persistently infected neurons and cultured cells, IFN-α/β appears to freeze the BDV polymerase in the transcriptional mode, resulting in enhanced viral mRNA synthesis and suppressing viral genome replication. PMID:11483767

  12. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Rama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  13. Monoamine oxidase A gene promoter methylation and transcriptional downregulation in an offender population with antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checknita, D; Maussion, G; Labonté, B; Comai, S; Tremblay, R E; Vitaro, F; Turecki, N; Bertazzo, A; Gobbi, G; Côté, G; Turecki, G

    2015-03-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterised by elevated impulsive aggression and increased risk for criminal behaviour and incarceration. Deficient activity of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene is suggested to contribute to serotonergic system dysregulation strongly associated with impulsive aggression and antisocial criminality. To elucidate the role of epigenetic processes in altered MAOA expression and serotonin regulation in a population of incarcerated offenders with ASPD compared with a healthy non-incarcerated control population. Participants were 86 incarcerated participants with ASPD and 73 healthy controls. MAOA promoter methylation was compared between case and control groups. We explored the functional impact of MAOA promoter methylation on gene expression in vitro and blood 5-HT levels in a subset of the case group. Results suggest that MAOA promoter hypermethylation is associated with ASPD and may contribute to downregulation of MAOA gene expression, as indicated by functional assays in vitro, and regression analysis with whole-blood serotonin levels in offenders with ASPD. These results are consistent with prior literature suggesting MAOA and serotonergic dysregulation in antisocial populations. Our results offer the first evidence suggesting epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to MAOA dysregulation in antisocial offenders. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  14. Increased dosage of AOX1 promoter-regulated expression cassettes leads to transcription attenuation of the methanol metabolism in Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Elena; Landes, Nils; Albiol, Joan; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard; Ferrer, Pau

    2017-01-01

    The methanol-regulated alcohol oxidase promoter (PAOX1) of Pichia pastoris is one of the strongest promoters for heterologous gene expression in this methylotrophic yeast. Although increasing gene dosage is one of the most common strategies to increase recombinant protein productivities, the increase of gene dosage of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) in P. pastoris has been previously shown to reduce cell growth, lipase production and substrate consumption in high-copy strains. To better assess that physiological response, transcriptomics analysis was performed of a subset of strains with 1 to 15 ROL copies. The macroscopic physiological parameters confirm that growth yield and carbon uptake rate are gene dosage dependent, and were supported by the transcriptomic data, showing the impact of increased dosage of AOX1 promoter-regulated expression cassettes on P. pastoris physiology under steady methanolic growth conditions. Remarkably, increased number of cassettes led to transcription attenuation of the methanol metabolism and peroxisome biogenesis in P. pastoris, concomitant with reduced secretion levels of the heterologous product. Moreover, our data also point to a block in ROL mRNA translation in the higher ROL-copies constructs, while the low productivities of multi-copy strains under steady growth conditions do not appear to be directly related to UPR and ERAD induction. PMID:28295011

  15. Interaction between transactivation domain of p53 and middle part of TBP-like protein (TLP is involved in TLP-stimulated and p53-activated transcription from the p21 upstream promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Maeda

    Full Text Available TBP-like protein (TLP is involved in transcriptional activation of an upstream promoter of the human p21 gene. TLP binds to p53 and facilitates p53-activated transcription from the upstream promoter. In this study, we clarified that in vitro affinity between TLP and p53 is about one-third of that between TBP and p53. Extensive mutation analyses revealed that the TLP-stimulated function resides in transcription activating domain 1 (TAD1 in the N-terminus of p53. Among the mutants, #22.23, which has two amino acid substitutions in TAD1, exhibited a typical mutant phenotype. Moreover, #22.23 exhibited the strongest mutant phenotype for TLP-binding ability. It is thus thought that TLP-stimulated and p53-dependent transcriptional activation is involved in TAD1 binding of TLP. #22.23 had a decreased transcriptional activation function, especially for the upstream promoter of the endogenous p21 gene, compared with wild-type p53. This mutant did not facilitate p53-dependent growth repression and etoposide-mediated cell-death as wild-type p53 does. Moreover, mutation analysis revealed that middle part of TLP, which is requited for p53 binding, is involved in TLP-stimulated and p53-dependent promoter activation and cell growth repression. These results suggest that activation of the p21 upstream promoter is mediated by interaction between specific regions of TLP and p53.

  16. The Bacterial Effector HopX1 Targets JAZ Transcriptional Repressors to Activate Jasmonate Signaling and Promote Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Boter, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chini, Andrea; Rathjen, John P.; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR), which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile). Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA)-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome. PMID:24558350

  17. The bacterial effector HopX1 targets JAZ transcriptional repressors to activate jasmonate signaling and promote infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Gimenez-Ibanez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR, which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile. Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome.

  18. NanR, a Transcriptional Regulator That Binds to the Promoters of Genes Involved in Sialic Acid Metabolism in the Anaerobic Pathogen Clostridium perfringens.

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    Blair Therit

    Full Text Available Among many other virulence factors, Clostridium perfringens produces three sialidases NanH, NanI and NanJ. NanH lacks a secretion signal peptide and is predicted to be an intracellular enzyme, while NanI and NanJ are secreted. Previously, we had identified part of an operon encoding NanE (epimerase and NanA (sialic acid lyase enzymes. Further analysis of the entire operon suggests that it encodes a complete pathway for the transport and metabolism of sialic acid along with a putative transcriptional regulator, NanR. The addition of 30 mM N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac to a semi-defined medium significantly enhanced the growth yield of strain 13, suggesting that Neu5Ac can be used as a nutrient. C. perfringens strain 13 lacks a nanH gene, but has NanI- and NanJ-encoding genes. Analysis of nanI, nanJ, and nanInanJ mutants constructed by homologous recombination revealed that the expression of the major sialidase, NanI, was induced by the addition of Neu5Ac to the medium, and that in separate experiments, the same was true of a nanI-gusA transcriptional fusion. For the nanI and nanJ genes, primer extension identified three and two putative transcription start sites, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays using purified NanR and DNA from the promoter regions of the nanI and nanE genes showed high affinity, specific binding by NanR. We propose that NanR is a global regulator of sialic acid-associated genes and that it responds, in a positive feedback loop, to the concentration of sialic acid in the cell.

  19. NanR, a Transcriptional Regulator That Binds to the Promoters of Genes Involved in Sialic Acid Metabolism in the Anaerobic Pathogen Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therit, Blair; Cheung, Jackie K; Rood, Julian I; Melville, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    Among many other virulence factors, Clostridium perfringens produces three sialidases NanH, NanI and NanJ. NanH lacks a secretion signal peptide and is predicted to be an intracellular enzyme, while NanI and NanJ are secreted. Previously, we had identified part of an operon encoding NanE (epimerase) and NanA (sialic acid lyase) enzymes. Further analysis of the entire operon suggests that it encodes a complete pathway for the transport and metabolism of sialic acid along with a putative transcriptional regulator, NanR. The addition of 30 mM N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to a semi-defined medium significantly enhanced the growth yield of strain 13, suggesting that Neu5Ac can be used as a nutrient. C. perfringens strain 13 lacks a nanH gene, but has NanI- and NanJ-encoding genes. Analysis of nanI, nanJ, and nanInanJ mutants constructed by homologous recombination revealed that the expression of the major sialidase, NanI, was induced by the addition of Neu5Ac to the medium, and that in separate experiments, the same was true of a nanI-gusA transcriptional fusion. For the nanI and nanJ genes, primer extension identified three and two putative transcription start sites, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays using purified NanR and DNA from the promoter regions of the nanI and nanE genes showed high affinity, specific binding by NanR. We propose that NanR is a global regulator of sialic acid-associated genes and that it responds, in a positive feedback loop, to the concentration of sialic acid in the cell.

  20. Contribution of transcription factor, SP1, to the promotion of HB-EGF expression in defense mechanism against the treatment of irinotecan in ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kohei; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Nam, Sung Ouk; Odawara, Takashi; Manabe, Sadao; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Takada, Shuji; Asahara, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2014-10-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is a worst histological subtype than other ovarian malignant tumor. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. The aims of this study were to validate the efficacy of HB-EGF-targeted therapy for OCCC and to identify the transcription factor that contributed to the induction of HB-EGF by SN38 treatment in OCCC cells. HB-EGF was highly expressed in OCCC cells, and an increase of HB-EGF was induced by SN38 which had only antitumor effect among conventional anticancer agents on OCCC. A specific inhibitor of HB-EGF, a cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), led to a synergistic increase in the number of apoptotic OCCC cells with the treatment of SN38. The luciferase assay with 5'-deletion promoter constructs identified a GC-rich element between -125 and -178 (the distal transcription start site was denoted +1) as a cis-regulatory region, and the treatment of SN38 induced luciferase activity in this region. An in silico and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis estimated that SP1 bound to the cis-regulatory region of HB-EGF in OCCC cells. Real-time PCR and cell viability assays showed that the transfection of a small interfering RNA targeting SP1 suppressed the expression of HB-EGF induced by SN38, resulting in the enhanced sensitivity of SN38. Taken together, these results indicate that induction of HB-EGF expression contributed to defense mechanism against treatment of SN38 through the transcriptional activity of SP1 in OCCC cells. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The promoter structure differentiation of a MYB transcription factor RLC1 causes red leaf coloration in Empire Red Leaf Cotton under light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenrui Gao

    Full Text Available The red leaf coloration of Empire Red Leaf Cotton (ERLC (Gossypium hirsutum L., resulted from anthocyanin accumulation in light, is a well known dominant agricultural trait. However, the underpin molecular mechanism remains elusive. To explore this, we compared the molecular biological basis of anthocyanin accumulation in both ERLC and the green leaf cotton variety CCRI 24 (Gossypium hirsutum L.. Introduction of R2R3-MYB transcription factor Rosea1, the master regulator anthocyanin biosynthesis in Antirrhinum majus, into CCRI 24 induced anthocyanin accumulation, indicating structural genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis are not defected and the leaf coloration might be caused by variation of regulatory genes expression. Expression analysis found that a transcription factor RLC1 (Red Leaf Cotton 1 which encodes the ortholog of PAP1/Rosea1 was highly expressed in leaves of ERLC but barely expressed in CCRI 24 in light. Ectopic expression of RLC1 from ERLC and CCRI 24 in hairy roots of Antirrhinum majus and CCRI 24 significantly enhanced anthocyanin accumulation. Comparison of RLC1 promoter sequences between ERLC and CCRI 24 revealed two 228-bp tandem repeats presented in ERLC with only one repeat in CCRI 24. Transient assays in cotton leave tissue evidenced that the tandem repeats in ERLC is responsible for light-induced RLC1 expression and therefore anthocyanin accumulation. Taken together, our results in this article strongly support an important step toward understanding the role of R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulatory menchanisms of anthocyanin accumulation in red leaf cotton under light.

  2. Overexpression of transcription factor AP-2 stimulates the PA promoter of the human uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) gene through a mechanism involving derepression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aas, Per Arne; Pena Diaz, Javier; Liabakk, Nina Beate

    2009-01-01

    RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with AP-2 antibody demonstrated that endogenous AP-2 binds to the PA promoter in vivo. Overexpression of AP-2alpha, -beta or -gamma all stimulated expression from a PA-luciferase reporter gene construct approximately 3- to 4-fold. Interestingly, an N-terminally truncated AP-2...... within the region of DNA marked by PA. Footprinting analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of PA and putative AP-2 binding regions with HeLa cell nuclear extract and recombinant AP-2alpha protein indicate that AP-2 transcription factors are central in the regulated expression of UNG2 m......alpha, lacking the activation domain but retaining the DNA binding and dimerization domains, stimulated PA to a level approaching that of full-length AP-2, suggesting that AP-2 overexpression stimulates PA activity by a mechanism involving derepression rather than activation, possibly by neutralizing...

  3. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández de la Cruz, Olga; Marchat, Laurence A; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; López Rosas, Itzel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-21

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica.

  4. DNA topoisomerase 1α promotes transcriptional silencing of transposable elements through DNA methylation and histone lysine 9 dimethylation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Theresa Dinh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2 are related transcriptional silencing mechanisms that target transposable elements (TEs and repeats to maintain genome stability in plants. RdDM is mediated by small and long noncoding RNAs produced by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, respectively. Through a chemical genetics screen with a luciferase-based DNA methylation reporter, LUCL, we found that camptothecin, a compound with anti-cancer properties that targets DNA topoisomerase 1α (TOP1α was able to de-repress LUCL by reducing its DNA methylation and H3K9me2 levels. Further studies with Arabidopsis top1α mutants showed that TOP1α silences endogenous RdDM loci by facilitating the production of Pol V-dependent long non-coding RNAs, AGONAUTE4 recruitment and H3K9me2 deposition at TEs and repeats. This study assigned a new role in epigenetic silencing to an enzyme that affects DNA topology.

  5. PML promotes metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer through transcriptional regulation of HIF1A target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponente, Manfredi; Campanini, Letizia; Cuttano, Roberto; Piunti, Andrea; Delledonne, Giacomo A; Coltella, Nadia; Valsecchi, Roberta; Villa, Alessandra; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pattini, Linda; Doglioni, Claudio; Bernardi, Rosa

    2017-02-23

    Elucidating the molecular basis of tumor metastasis is pivotal for eradicating cancer-related mortality. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) encompasses a class of aggressive tumors characterized by high rates of recurrence and metastasis, as well as poor overall survival. Here, we find that the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML exerts a prometastatic function in TNBC that can be targeted by arsenic trioxide. We found that, in TNBC patients, constitutive HIF1A activity induces high expression of PML, along with a number of HIF1A target genes that promote metastasis at multiple levels. Intriguingly, PML controls the expression of these genes by binding to their regulatory regions along with HIF1A. This mechanism is specific to TNBC cells and does not occur in other subtypes of breast cancer where PML and prometastatic HIF1A target genes are underexpressed. As a consequence, PML promotes cell migration, invasion, and metastasis in TNBC cell and mouse models. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PML with arsenic trioxide, a PML-degrading agent used to treat promyelocytic leukemia patients, delays tumor growth, impairs TNBC metastasis, and cooperates with chemotherapy by preventing metastatic dissemination. In conclusion, we report identification of a prometastatic pathway in TNBC and suggest clinical development toward the use of arsenic trioxide for TNBC patients.

  6. The ABA effect on the accumulation of an invertase inhibitor transcript that is driven by the CAMV35S promoter in ARABIDOPSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun-Ji; Lee, Sung June; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hoi Seon; Lee, Hojoung

    2008-09-30

    Invertase (beta-D-fructofuranosidase; EC 3.2.1.26) catalyzes the conversion of sucrose into glucose and fructose and is involved in an array of important processes, including phloem unloading, carbon partitioning, the response to pathogens, and the control of cell differentiation and development. Its importance may have caused the invertases to evolve into a multigene family whose members are regulated by a variety of different mechanisms, such as pH, sucrose levels, and inhibitor proteins. Although putative invertase inhibitors in the Arabidopsis genome are easy to locate, few studies have been conducted to elucidate their individual functions in vivo in plant growth and development because of their high redundancy. In this study we assessed the functional role of the putative invertase inhibitors in Arabidopsis by generating transgenic plants harboring a putative invertase inhibitor gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter. A transgenic plant that expressed high levels of the putative invertase inhibitor transcript when grown under normal conditions was chosen for the current study. To our surprise, the stability of the invertase inhibitor transcripts was shown to be down-regulated by the phytohormone ABA (abscisic acid). It is well established that ABA enhances invertase activity in vivo but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Our results thus suggest that one way ABA regulates invertase activity is by down-regulating its inhibitor.

  7. Upstream Stimulating Factors 1 and 2 Enhance Transcription from the Placenta-Specific Promoter 1.1 of the Bovine Cyp19 Gene

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    Vanselow Jens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Placenta-derived oestrogens have an impact on the growth and differentiation of the trophoblast, and are involved in processes initiating and facilitating birth. The enzyme that converts androgens into oestrogens, aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom, is encoded by the Cyp19 gene. In the placenta of the cow, expression of Cyp19 relies on promoter 1.1 (P1.1. Our recent studies of P1.1 in vitro and in a human trophoblast cell line (Jeg3 revealed that interactions of placental nuclear protein(s with the E-box element at position -340 are required for full promoter activity. The aim of this work was to identify and characterise the placental E-box (-340-binding protein(s (E-BP as a step towards understanding how the expression of Cyp19 is regulated in the bovine placenta. Results The significance of the E-box was confirmed in cultured primary bovine trophoblasts. We enriched the E-BP from placental nuclear extracts using DNA-affinity Dynabeads and showed by Western blot analysis and supershift EMSA experiments that the E-BP is composed of the transcription factors upstream stimulating factor (USF 1 and USF2. Depletion of the USFs by RNAi and expression of a dominant-negative USF mutant, were both associated with a significant decrease in P1.1-dependent reporter gene expression. Furthermore, scatter plot analysis of P1.1 activity vs. USF binding to the E-box revealed a strong positive correlation between the two parameters. Conclusion From these results we conclude that USF1 and USF2 are activators of the bovine placenta-specific promoter P1.1 and thus act in the opposite mode as in the case of the non-orthologous human placenta-specific promoter.

  8. An ABRE promoter sequence is involved in osmotic stress-responsive expression of the DREB2A gene, which encodes a transcription factor regulating drought-inducible genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June-Sik; Mizoi, Junya; Yoshida, Takuya; Fujita, Yasunari; Nakajima, Jun; Ohori, Teppei; Todaka, Daisuke; Nakashima, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-12-01

    In plants, osmotic stress-responsive transcriptional regulation depends mainly on two major classes of cis-acting elements found in the promoter regions of stress-inducible genes: ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) and dehydration-responsive elements (DREs). ABRE has been shown to perceive ABA-mediated osmotic stress signals, whereas DRE is known to be involved in an ABA-independent pathway. Previously, we reported that the transcription factor DRE-BINDING PROTEIN 2A (DREB2A) regulates DRE-mediated transcription of target genes under osmotic stress conditions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the transcriptional regulation of DREB2A itself remains largely uncharacterized. To elucidate the transcriptional mechanism associated with the DREB2A gene under osmotic stress conditions, we generated a series of truncated and base-substituted variants of the DREB2A promoter and evaluated their transcriptional activities individually. We found that both ABRE and coupling element 3 (CE3)-like sequences located approximately -100 bp from the transcriptional initiation site are necessary for the dehydration-responsive expression of DREB2A. Coupling our transient expression analyses with yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays indicated that the ABRE-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (AREB1), AREB2 and ABRE-BINDING FACTOR 3 (ABF3) bZIP transcription factors can bind to and activate the DREB2A promoter in an ABRE-dependent manner. Exogenous ABA application induced only a modest accumulation of the DREB2A transcript when compared with the osmotic stress treatment. However, the osmotic stress-induced DREB2A expression was found to be markedly impaired in several ABA-deficient and ABA-insensitive mutants. These results suggest that in addition to an ABA-independent pathway, the ABA-dependent pathway plays a positive role in the osmotic stress-responsive expression of DREB2A.

  9. JNK Promotes Epithelial Cell Anoikis by Transcriptional and Post-translational Regulation of BH3-Only Proteins

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    Nomeda Girnius

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Developmental morphogenesis, tissue injury, and oncogenic transformation can cause the detachment of epithelial cells. These cells are eliminated by a specialized form of apoptosis (anoikis. While the processes that contribute to this form of cell death have been studied, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we tested the role of the cJUN NH2-terminal kinase (JNK signaling pathway using murine models with compound JNK deficiency in mammary and kidney epithelial cells. These studies demonstrated that JNK is required for efficient anoikis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, JNK-promoted anoikis required pro-apoptotic members of the BCL2 family of proteins. We show that JNK acts through a BAK/BAX-dependent apoptotic pathway by increasing BIM expression and phosphorylating BMF, leading to death of detached epithelial cells.

  10. The forkhead box transcription factor FOXC1 promotes breast cancer invasion by inducing matrix metalloprotease 7 (MMP7) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Steven T; Keri, Ruth A

    2012-07-13

    Therapeutic options for treatment of basal-like breast cancers are limited and identification of molecular targets for novel therapies to treat this aggressive cancer is urgently needed. Recently, FOXC1, a forkhead box transcription factor, was identified as a functionally important biomarker of breast cancer aggressiveness and the basal-like breast cancer subtype. However, the mechanism through which FOXC1 controls aggressiveness of basal-like breast cancer remains to be elucidated. Here, we identify matrix metalloprotease 7 (MMP7) as a key downstream effector of FOXC1-mediated invasiveness. Expression of FOXC1 and MMP7 is significantly correlated in breast cancer samples and cell lines at both the mRNA and protein levels. Transient expression of FOXC1 in nontransformed mammary epithelial cell lines resulted in significantly increased expression of MMP7 and an MMP7-dependent increase in invasiveness. In reciprocal experiments, silencing endogenous FOXC1 in basal-like breast cancer cell lines resulted in decreased expression of MMP7 without decreased expression of other matrix metalloproteinases. We also demonstrate that elevated co-expression of FOXC1 and MMP7 is an independent predictor of patient outcome in multivariate analyses of two breast cancer patient cohorts. Together, our findings identify MMP7 as a novel mechanism through which FOXC1 may regulate the basal-like breast cancer invasive phenotype and the propensity of these cancers to metastasize. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate for the first time a correlation between MMP7 expression and basal-like breast cancers, suggesting that MMP7 may be a useful therapeutic target for treatment of this disease.

  11. TGF-β inhibits alveolar protein transport by promoting shedding, regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and transcriptional downregulation of megalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocchi, Luciana C; Vohwinkel, Christine U; Mayer, Konstantin; Herold, Susanne; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Vadász, István

    2017-11-01

    Disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that leads to the accumulation of protein-rich edema in the alveolar space, often resulting in comparable protein concentrations in alveolar edema and plasma and causing deleterious remodeling. Patients who survive ARDS have approximately three times lower protein concentrations in the alveolar edema than nonsurvivors; thus the ability to remove excess protein from the alveolar space may be critical for a positive outcome. We have recently shown that clearance of albumin from the alveolar space is mediated by megalin, a 600-kDa transmembrane endocytic receptor and member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor superfamily. In the currents study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms by which transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a key molecule of ARDS pathogenesis, drives downregulation of megalin expression and function. TGF-β treatment led to shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis of megalin at the cell surface and to a subsequent increase in intracellular megalin COOH-terminal fragment abundance resulting in transcriptional downregulation of megalin. Activity of classical protein kinase C enzymes and γ-secretase was required for the TGF-β-induced megalin downregulation. Furthermore, TGF-β-induced shedding of megalin was mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2, -9, and -14. Silencing of either of these MMPs stabilized megalin at the cell surface after TGF-β treatment and restored normal albumin transport. Moreover, a direct interaction of megalin with MMP-2 and -14 was demonstrated, suggesting that these MMPs may function as novel sheddases of megalin. Further understanding of these mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ARDS. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of human mucin MUC4 by bile acids in oesophageal cancer cells is promoter-dependent and involves activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariette, Christophe; Perrais, Michaël; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Hémon, Brigitte; Pigny, Pascal; Batra, Surinder; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Triboulet, Jean-Pierre; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2004-02-01

    Abnormal gastro-oesophageal reflux and bile acids have been linked to the presence of Barrett's oesophageal premalignant lesion associated with an increase in mucin-producing goblet cells and MUC4 mucin gene overexpression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of MUC4 by bile acids are unknown. Since total bile is a complex mixture, we undertook to identify which bile acids are responsible for MUC4 up-regulation by using a wide panel of bile acids and their conjugates. MUC4 apomucin expression was studied by immunohistochemistry both in patient biopsies and OE33 oesophageal cancer cell line. MUC4 mRNA levels and promoter regulation were studied by reverse transcriptase-PCR and transient transfection assays respectively. We show that among the bile acids tested, taurocholic, taurodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic and glycocholic acids and sodium glycocholate are strong activators of MUC4 expression and that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. By using specific pharmacological inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase A and protein kinase C, we demonstrate that bile acid-mediated up-regulation of MUC4 is promoter-specific and mainly involves activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. This new mechanism of regulation of MUC4 mucin gene points out an important role for bile acids as key molecules in targeting MUC4 overexpression in early stages of oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  13. Transcriptionally Less Active Prodynorphin Promoter Alleles are Associated with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

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    Marcelo A. Kauffman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed an association study in a population of patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE with Hippocampal Sclerosis (MTEHS together with a systematic revision of the literature to investigate the role of transcriptionally less active polymorphic alleles of Prodynorphin (PDYN gene in this pathology. We included 102 patients with a diagnosis of MTEHS and 86 healthy controls. The positive antecedent of family history for epileptic events defined a TLE subgroup with familial predisposition for epileptic disorders. The PDYN promoter polymorphism was genotyped by means of a PCR assay. For meta-analysis, we identified case-control association studies between TLE and PDYN by searching PUBMED. The pooled OR was estimated using a fixed effects model under dominant and co-dominant heredity models. No differences in genotypic and allelic frequencies were found between cases and controls (p = 0.61 in our population, neither in the whole cohort nor in the analysis limited to TLE with familial predisposition (p = 0.71. The Meta-Analysis included 591 TLE patients and 1117 healthy controls. We found an association between L allele (p = 0.003; OR = 1.40; IC 95 = 1.12–1.74 and a modestly higher risk to develop TLE in the group of patients with familial predisposition. Therefore, functional allelic variants in the PDYN promoter might modify the risk to develop TLE in subjects with familial predisposition.

  14. LLM-Domain B-GATA Transcription Factors Promote Stomatal Development Downstream of Light Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana Hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranftl, Quirin L.; Diener, Julia; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Richter, René

    2016-01-01

    Stomata are pores that regulate the gas and water exchange between the environment and aboveground plant tissues, including hypocotyls, leaves, and stems. Here, we show that mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana LLM-domain B-GATA genes are defective in stomata formation in hypocotyls. Conversely, stomata formation is strongly promoted by overexpression of various LLM-domain B-class GATA genes, most strikingly in hypocotyls but also in cotyledons. Genetic analyses indicate that these B-GATAs act upstream of the stomata formation regulators SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and SCREAM/SCREAM2 and downstream or independent of the patterning regulators TOO MANY MOUTHS and STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1. The effects of the GATAs on stomata formation are light dependent but can be induced in dark-grown seedlings by red, far-red, or blue light treatments. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) mutants form stomata in the dark, and in this genetic background, GATA expression is sufficient to induce stomata formation in the dark. Since the expression of the LLM-domain B-GATAs GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED) and GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 as well as that of SPCH is red light induced but the induction of SPCH is compromised in a GATA gene mutant background, we hypothesize that PIF- and light-regulated stomata formation in hypocotyls is critically dependent on LLM-domain B-GATA genes. PMID:26917680

  15. Heme and nitric oxide binding by the transcriptional regulator DnrF from the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae increases napD promoter affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Matthias; Schweyen, Peter; Bröring, Martin; Laass, Sebastian; Härtig, Elisabeth; Jahn, Dieter

    2017-09-15

    Under oxygen-limiting conditions, the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) generates energy via denitrification, a respiratory process in which nitric oxide (NO) is an intermediate. Accumulation of NO may cause cytotoxic effects. The response to this nitrosative (NO-triggered) stress is controlled by the Crp/Fnr-type transcriptional regulator DnrF. We analyzed the response to NO and the mechanism of NO sensing by the DnrF regulator. Using reporter gene fusions and transcriptomics, here we report that DnrF selectively repressed nitrate reductase (nap) genes, preventing further NO formation. In addition, DnrF induced the expression of the NO reductase genes (norCB), which promote NO consumption. We used UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy to characterize heme binding to DnrF and subsequent NO coordination. DnrF detects NO via its bound heme cofactor. We found that the dimeric DnrF bound one molecule of heme per subunit. Purified recombinant apo-DnrF bound its target promoter sequences (napD, nosR2, norC, hemA, and dnrE) in electromobility shift assays, and we identified a specific palindromic DNA-binding site 5'-TTGATN4ATCAA-3' in these target sequences via mutagenesis studies. Most importantly, successive addition of heme as well as heme and NO to purified recombinant apo-DnrF protein increased affinity of the holo-DnrF for its specific binding motif in the napD promoter. On the basis of these results, we propose a model for the DnrF-mediated NO stress response of this marine bacterium. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The potency of STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) 3 protein as growth promoter for chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'ruf, Anwar; Iswati, Sri; Hidajati, Nove; Damayanti, Ratna

    2017-09-01

    The long-term objective of this study was to produce STAT synthetic protein in chicken during growth period resulting from the increase of growth hormone (GH) as growth promoter. This study used ten male chicken Lohman from PT. Multibreeder Indonesia. The chicken were kept within batteried cage, with a capacity of one chicken in each cage. The chickens were fed twice a day, at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. with the amount of feed 10% less than standard. On day 21 the chicken were slaughtered to obtain the samples, i.e., adipose, liver and muscles for the following examinations (1) isolation of STAT-3 signaling protein from adipose, liver and muscles of the chicken, (2) analysis of STAT-3 signaling protein using SDS-PAGE method, and (3) identification of STAT-3 signaling protein using Western blot method by means of protein detection using electrophoresis with polyacrylamide gels. Results of examination on protein in hepatic, muscle and adipose of chickens in growth period revealed that STAT protein was positively present in those tissues. This finding was followed-up with SDS-PAGE examination, from which we found the presence of protein band between the markers of 116 kDa and 14.4 kDa. The protein band was supposedly the STAT-3 protein. To prove that protein band formed was the STAT-3, Western blot examination was conducted using rabbit polyclonal antibody STAT-3. The result showed the formation of the protein band, indicating the presence of reaction between antigen (STAT-3 protein) and STAT-3 protein antibody. In conclusion, STAT-3 protein is present in hepatic, muscular, and adipose tissues, with molecular weight of 59.4 kDa.

  17. Anthrax lethal toxin rapidly reduces c-Jun levels by inhibiting c-Jun gene transcription and promoting c-Jun protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Weiming; Guo, Pengfei; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M

    2017-10-27

    Anthrax is a life-threatening disease caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis , which expresses lethal factor and the receptor-binding protective antigen. These two proteins combine to form anthrax lethal toxin (LT), whose proximal targets are mitogen-activated kinase kinases (MKKs). However, the downstream mediators of LT toxicity remain elusive. Here we report that LT exposure rapidly reduces the levels of c-Jun, a key regulator of cell proliferation and survival. Blockade of proteasome-dependent protein degradation with the 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132 largely restored c-Jun protein levels, suggesting that LT promotes degradation of c-Jun protein. Using the MKK1/2 inhibitor U0126, we further show that MKK1/2-Erk1/2 pathway inactivation similarly reduces c-Jun protein, which was also restored by MG132 pre-exposure. Interestingly, c-Jun protein rebounded to normal levels 4 h following U0126 exposure but not after LT exposure. The restoration of c-Jun in U0126-exposed cells was associated with increased c-Jun mRNA levels and was blocked by inactivation of the JNK1/2 signaling pathway. These results indicate that LT reduces c-Jun both by promoting c-Jun protein degradation via inactivation of MKK1/2-Erk1/2 signaling and by blocking c-Jun gene transcription via inactivation of MKK4-JNK1/2 signaling. In line with the known functions of c-Jun, LT also inhibited cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of LT-resistant MKK2 and MKK4 variants partially restored Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 signaling in LT-exposed cells, enabling the cells to maintain relatively normal c-Jun protein levels and cell proliferation. Taken together, these findings indicate that LT reduces c-Jun protein levels via two distinct mechanisms, thereby inhibiting critical cell functions, including cellular proliferation.

  18. Interaction of Arabidopsis TGA3 and WRKY53 transcription factors on Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) promoter mediates salicylic acid-dependent gene expression in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Shayan; Das, Abhimanyu; Khandagale, Prashant; Maiti, Indu B; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Dey, Nrisingha

    2017-09-14

    This paper highlighted a salicylic acid-inducible Caulimoviral promoter fragment from Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV). Interaction of Arabidopsis transcription factors TGA3 and WRKY53 on CmYLCV promoter resulted in the enhancement of the promoter activity via NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling. Several transcriptional promoters isolated from plant-infecting Caulimoviruses are being presently used worldwide as efficient tools for plant gene expression. The CmYLCV promoter has been isolated from the Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (Caulimoviruses) and characterized more than 12 years ago; also we have earlier reported a near-constitutive, pathogen-inducible CmYLCV promoter fragment (-329 to +137 from transcription start site; TSS) that enhances stronger (3×) expression than the previously reported fragments; all these fragments are highly efficient in monocot and dicot plants (Sahoo et al. Planta 240: 855-875, 2014). Here, we have shown that the full-length CmYLCV promoter fragment (-729 to +137 from TSS) is salicylic acid (SA) inducible. In this context, we have performed an in-depth study to elucidate the factors responsible for SA-inducibility of the CmYLCV promoter. We found that the as-1 1 and W-box1 elements (located at -649 and -640 from the TSS) of the CmYLCV promoter are required for SA-induced activation by recruiting Arabidopsis TGA3 and WRKY53 transcription factors. Consequently, as a nascent observation, we established the physical interaction between TGA3 and WYKY53; also demonstrated that the N-terminal domain of TGA3 is sufficient for the interaction with the full-length WRKY53. Such interaction synergistically activates the CmYLCV promoter activity in planta. Further, we found that activation of the CmYLCV promoter by SA through TGA3 and WRKY53 interaction depends on NPR1. Finally, the findings presented here provide strong support for the direct regulatory roles of TGA3 and WRKY53 in the SA and NPR1-dependent activation of a

  19. Activation of GPR54 promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human tumor cells through a specific transcriptional program not shared by other Gq-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jérôme A J; Mirjolet, Jean-François; Bernard, Jérôme; Burgeon, Emmanuel; Simons, Marie-Jeanne; Vassart, Gilbert; Parmentier, Marc; Libert, Frédérick

    2005-01-21

    GPR54 is a receptor for peptides derived from the metastasis suppressor gene KiSS-1. To investigate the intracellular mechanisms involved in the reduction of the metastatic potential of MDA-MB-435S cells expressing GPR54, a time course stimulation by kisspeptin-10 over a period of 25 h was performed using cDNA microarrays. Comparison with the bradykinin B(2) receptor revealed a distinct pattern of gene regulation despite a common coupling to the G(q/11) class of G-proteins. Inhibitors of PLC and PK-C abolished the transcriptional regulation of all tested genes, while an inhibitor of p42/44 affected a subset of genes controlled both by GPR54 and B(2). Among the genes specifically up-regulated by GPR54, we found several proapoptotic genes. Stimulation of GPR54 promoted apoptosis while no significant change was observed after B(2) receptor activation. Our results suggest that the metastasis suppressor properties of GPR54 are mediated in part by cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in malignant cells.

  20. SDHB deficiency promotes TGFβ-mediated invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer through transcriptional repression complex SNAIL1-SMAD3/4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyu Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH is a heterotetrameric complex, among which the catalytic core SDHB loss-of-function mutations lead to mitochondrial enzyme SDH dysfunction and are associated with cancer formation. However, the impact of SDHB loss on colorectal carcinoma and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we found a coherent decreased SDHB expression both in human colorectal cancer (CRC samples and CRC cell lines. Combined clinical analysis in a cohort of 43 CRC patients demonstrated a correlation between reduced SDHB activity and a more advanced clinical phenotype regarding lymphatic and distant metastasis. Applying genetic interference and cellular function approaches, we found that knocking down SDHB promoted cell migration and invasion through enabling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and inverse results of SDHB overexpression further confirmed our theory. Mechanical exploration revealed that SDHB knockdown could activate TGFβ signaling pathway, more precisely through up-regulation of a tight-junction transcriptional repression complex SNAIL1-SMAD3/SMAD4, thus contributed to the increase in metastasis. In conclusion by identifying SNAIL1-SMAD3/SMAD4 as essential for the TGFβ-mediated tumorigenic capacity in SDHB-deficient CRC cells, this study revealed a critical mechanical vulnerability for potential future therapeutic target of SDHB-associated CRC.

  1. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.

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    Wei Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr., GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD. Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  2. Sorghum bmr6 mutant analysis demonstrates that a shared MYB1 transcription factor binding site in the promoter links the expression of genes in related pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieqin; Wang, Lihua; Zhan, Qiuwen; Liu, Yanlong; Fu, Bisheng; Wang, Chunming

    2013-11-01

    Sorghum is not only an important cereal crop but also a biofuel crop. The sorghum brown midrib mutant 6 (bmr6) has a reduced lignin content in the cell walls and vascular tissues, which could potentially be advantageous for cellulosic biofuel production. Meanwhile, both dry matter yield and plant height were decreased in the bmr6 mutant. To identify genes affected in the mutant, differential gene expression analysis was performed for bmr6 and the wild type. As a result, a total of 1,052 differentially expressed genes were detected between the two samples, of which 166 genes were downregulated and 886 genes were upregulated. Five hundred seventy-nine of the 1,052 differentially expressed genes could be assigned to 154 documented pathways. These pathways mainly included primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore, mutation of the bmr6 gene, which impaired the biosynthesis of lignin, ultimately affected the expression of these genes associated with the growth and development of sorghum. Except for the bmr6 gene, 11 key enzyme genes of monolignols biosynthesis were upregulated. Promoter analysis identified that these genes have common MYB sites. It revealed that a feedback mechanism existed in the pathway and a MYB1 transcription factor (Sb02g031190) could associate with the upregulation of these genes in sorghum. In this study, we investigated gene expressions at a global level in sorghum bmr6 mutant and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of lignin biosynthesis.

  3. Oligogalacturonic acids promote tomato fruit ripening through the regulation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthesis at the transcriptional and post-translational levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxuan; Zhou, Leilei; Wang, Zhichao; Chen, Jianting; Qu, Guiqin

    2016-01-09

    Oligogalacturonic acids (OGs) are oligomers of alpha-1,4-linked galacturonosyl residues that are released from cell walls by the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acids upon fruit ripening and under abiotic/biotic stress. OGs may induce ethylene production and fruit ripening, however, the mechanism(s) behind these processes is unknown. Tomato cultivar 'Ailsa Craig' (AC) and mutant Neverripe, ripening inhibitor, non-ripening, and colorless non-ripening fruits were treated with OGs at different stages. Only AC fruits at mature green stage 1 showed an advanced ripening phenomenon, although transient ethylene production was detected in all of the tomato fruits. Ethylene synthesis genes LeACS2 and LeACO1 were rapidly up-regulated, and the phosphorylated LeACS2 protein was detected after OGs treatment. Protein kinase/phosphatase inhibitors significantly affected the ripening process induced by the OGs. As a potential receptor of OGs, LeWAKL2 was also up-regulated in their presence. We demonstrated that OGs promoted tomato fruit ripening by inducing ethylene synthesis through the regulation of LeACS2 at transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  4. A chromatin-based mechanism for limiting divergent noncoding transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Sebastian; Escalante-Chong, Renan; Pho, Nam

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their annotated transcript, many eukaryotic mRNA promoters produce divergent noncoding transcripts. To define determinants of divergent promoter directionality, we used genomic replacement experiments. Sequences within noncoding transcripts specified their degradation pathways, and...

  5. Germline transcription and switch recombination of a transgene containing the entire H chain constant region locus: effect of a mutation in a STAT6 binding site in the gamma 1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Shi, Jian; Graves, Kevin A; Collins, John T

    2004-11-01

    The switch (S) in H chain class is preceded by germline transcription and then mediated by a DNA recombination event. One of the impediments toward understanding the mechanism is the lack of a system in which a recombinant DNA molecule undergoes cytokine-regulated class S recombination. To study class S recombination, we used transgenic mice with a 230-kb bacterial artificial chromosome that included a rearranged VDJ gene and the entire murine H chain constant region locus. We found that both germline transcription and S recombination to the transgenic gamma1 H chain gene were regulated by IL-4 like that of the endogenous genes. In mice with two or more copies of the H chain locus transgene, both germline transcripts and S recombination took place at levels comparable to those from the endogenous loci. We also prepared a version of the transgene with a 4-bp mutation in a STAT6 binding site in the gamma1 promoter region. On the average, this mutation reduced germline transcription by 80%, but did not change the amount of S recombination in vitro. Among both the wild-type and mutant transgenes, we found no significant correlation between the amount of germline transcripts and the amount of S recombination. We infer that the physiologic level of germline transcription of the gamma1 gene is in excess over the amount required for efficient S recombination.

  6. Transcription Activation by Escherichia coli Rob at Class II Promoters: Protein–Protein Interactions between Rob’s N-Terminal Domain and the σ70 Subunit of RNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lanyn P.; Keen, Edward F.; Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Wolf, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription activators regulate transcription by making essential protein–protein interactions with RNA polymerase, for example, with region 4 of the σ70 subunit (σ70 R4). Rob, SoxS, and MarA comprise a closely related subset of members of the AraC/XylS family of transcription factors that activate transcription of both class I and class II promoters. Recently, we showed that interactions between SoxS and σ70 R4 occlude the binding of σ70 R4 to the −35 promoter element of class II promoters. Although Rob shares many similarities with SoxS, it contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) that the other paralogs do not. Thus, a goal of this study was to determine whether Rob makes protein–protein interactions with σ70 R4 at class II promoters and, if so, whether the interactions occlude the binding of σ70 R4 to the −35 hexamer despite the presence of the CTD. We found that although Rob makes fewer interactions with σ70 R4 than SoxS, the two proteins make the same, unusual, position-dependent interactions. Importantly, we found that Rob occludes σ70 R4 from binding the −35 hexamer, just as does SoxS. Thus, the CTD does not substantially alter the way Rob interacts with σ70 R4 at class II promoters. Moreover, in contrast to inferences drawn from the co-crystal structure of Rob bound to robbox DNA, which showed that only one of Rob’s dual helix–turn–helix (HTH) DNA binding motifs binds a recognition element of the promoter’s robbox, we determined that the two HTH motifs each bind a recognition element in vivo. PMID:22465792

  7. E2F/Rb Family Proteins Mediate Interferon Induced Repression of Adenovirus Immediate Early Transcription to Promote Persistent Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueting Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are cytokines that have pleiotropic effects and play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. IFNs have broad antiviral properties and function by different mechanisms. IFNs fail to inhibit wild-type Adenovirus (Ad replication in established cancer cell lines. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IFNs on Ad replication in normal human cells. Our data demonstrate that both IFNα and IFNγ blocked wild-type Ad5 replication in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC and TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDF-TERT. IFNs inhibited the replication of divergent adenoviruses. The inhibition of Ad5 replication by IFNα and IFNγ is the consequence of repression of transcription of the E1A immediate early gene product. Both IFNα and IFNγ impede the association of the transactivator GABP with the E1A enhancer region during the early phase of infection. The repression of E1A expression by IFNs requires a conserved E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer, and IFNs increased the enrichment of the E2F-associated pocket proteins, Rb and p107, at the E1A enhancer in vivo. PD0332991 (Pabociclib, a specific CDK4/6 inhibitor, dephosphoryles pocket proteins to promote their interaction with E2Fs and inhibited wild-type Ad5 replication dependent on the conserved E2F binding site. Consistent with this result, expression of the small E1A oncoprotein, which abrogates E2F/pocket protein interactions, rescued Ad replication in the presence of IFNα or IFNγ. Finally, we established a persistent Ad infection model in vitro and demonstrated that IFNγ suppresses productive Ad replication in a manner dependent on the E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer. This is the first study that probes the molecular basis of persistent adenovirus infection and reveals a novel mechanism by which adenoviruses utilize IFN signaling to suppress lytic virus replication and to promote persistent infection.

  8. The role of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II in the regulation of hepatic fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis in newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchais, Julien; Boutant, Marie; Fauveau, Véronique; Qing, Lou Dan; Sabra-Makke, Lina; Bossard, Pascale; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; Pégorier, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-15

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) is an orphan nuclear receptor involved in the control of numerous functions in various organs (organogenesis, differentiation, metabolic homeostasis, etc.). The aim of the present work was to characterize the regulation and contribution of COUP-TFII in the control of hepatic fatty acid and glucose metabolisms in newborn mice. Our data show that postnatal increase in COUP-TFII mRNA levels is enhanced by glucagon (via cAMP) and PPARα. To characterize COUP-TFII function in the liver of suckling mice, we used a functional (dominant negative form; COUP-TFII-DN) and a genetic (shRNA) approach. Adenoviral COUP-TFII-DN injection induces a profound hypoglycemia due to the inhibition of gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation secondarily to reduced PEPCK, Gl-6-Pase, CPT I, and mHMG-CoA synthase gene expression. Using the crossover plot technique, we show that gluconeogenesis is inhibited at two different levels: 1) pyruvate carboxylation and 2) trioses phosphate synthesis. This could result from a decreased availability in fatty acid oxidation arising cofactors such as acetyl-CoA and reduced equivalents. Similar results are observed using the shRNA approach. Indeed, when fatty acid oxidation is rescued in response to Wy-14643-induced PPARα target genes (CPT I and mHMG-CoA synthase), blood glucose is normalized in COUP-TFII-DN mice. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that postnatal increase in hepatic COUP-TFII gene expression is involved in the regulation of liver fatty acid oxidation, which in turn sustains an active hepatic gluconeogenesis that is essential to maintain an appropriate blood glucose level required for newborn mice survival. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Genetic analysis of the Staphylococcus epidermidis macromolecular synthesis operon: Serp1129 is an ATP binding protein and sigA transcription is regulated by both sigma(A)- and sigma(B)-dependent promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Kendall A; Kinkead, Lauren C; Larson, Marilynn A; Hinrichs, Steven H; Fey, Paul D

    2010-01-12

    The highly conserved macromolecular synthesis operon (MMSO) contains both dnaG (primase) and sigA (primary sigma factor). However, in previously evaluated gram-positive species, the MMSO is divergent upstream of dnaG. The MMSO of Bacillus subtilis contains three open reading frames (ORFs) that are differentially regulated by multiple promoters. In conjunction with studies to determine the expression profile of dnaG, the MMSO of Staphylococus epidermidis was characterized. The ORFs of S. epidermidis were compared to the previously described MMSO of B. subtilis and two additional ORFs in S. epidermidis, serp1129 and serp1130, were identified. The largest transcript, 4.8 kb in length, was expressed only in exponential growth and encompassed all four ORFs (serp1130, serp1129, dnaG, and sigA). A separate transcript (1.5 kb) comprising serp1130 and serp1129 was expressed in early exponential growth. Two smaller transcripts 1.3 and 1.2 kb in size were detected with a sigA probe in both exponential and post-exponential phases of growth. Western blot analysis correlated with the transcriptional profile and demonstrated that Serp1129 was detected only in the exponential phase of growth. Computational analysis identified that Serp1130 contained a CBS motif whereas Serp1129 contained an ATP/GTP binding motif. Functional studies of Serp1129 demonstrated that it was capable of binding both ATP and GTP. Comparisons with a sigB:dhfr mutant revealed that the 1.3 kb sigA transcript was regulated by a sigma(B)-dependent promoter. These studies demonstrated that the S. epidermidis 1457 MMSO contains two ORFs (serp1129 and serp1130) not described within the B. subtilis MMSO and at least three promoters, one of which is sigma(beta)-dependent. The transcriptional regulation of sigA by sigma(B) provides evidence that the staphylococcal sigma(B)-dependent response is controlled at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The conservation of serp1129 across multiple gram

  10. Genetic analysis of the Staphylococcus epidermidis Macromolecular Synthesis Operon: Serp1129 is an ATP binding protein and sigA transcription is regulated by both σA- and σB-dependent promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrichs Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly conserved macromolecular synthesis operon (MMSO contains both dnaG (primase and sigA (primary sigma factor. However, in previously evaluated gram-positive species, the MMSO is divergent upstream of dnaG. The MMSO of Bacillus subtilis contains three open reading frames (ORFs that are differentially regulated by multiple promoters. In conjunction with studies to determine the expression profile of dnaG, the MMSO of Staphylococus epidermidis was characterized. Results The ORFs of S. epidermidis were compared to the previously described MMSO of B. subtilis and two additional ORFs in S. epidermidis, serp1129 and serp1130, were identified. The largest transcript, 4.8 kb in length, was expressed only in exponential growth and encompassed all four ORFs (serp1130, serp1129, dnaG, and sigA. A separate transcript (1.5 kb comprising serp1130 and serp1129 was expressed in early exponential growth. Two smaller transcripts 1.3 and 1.2 kb in size were detected with a sigA probe in both exponential and post-exponential phases of growth. Western blot analysis correlated with the transcriptional profile and demonstrated that Serp1129 was detected only in the exponential phase of growth. Computational analysis identified that Serp1130 contained a CBS motif whereas Serp1129 contained an ATP/GTP binding motif. Functional studies of Serp1129 demonstrated that it was capable of binding both ATP and GTP. Comparisons with a sigB:dhfr mutant revealed that the 1.3 kb sigA transcript was regulated by a σB-dependent promoter. Conclusions These studies demonstrated that the S. epidermidis 1457 MMSO contains two ORFs (serp1129 and serp1130 not described within the B. subtilis MMSO and at least three promoters, one of which is σβ-dependent. The transcriptional regulation of sigA by σB provides evidence that the staphylococcal σB-dependent response is controlled at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The conservation of

  11. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); El-Hage, Nazira [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah [George Mason University, Manassas, VA (United States); Ochem, Alex [ICGEB, Wernher and Beit Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa); Simon, Gary L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Karn, Jonathan [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hauser, Kurt F. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Tyagi, Mudit, E-mail: tmudit@email.gwu.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  12. Metazoan promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Carninci, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Promoters are crucial for gene regulation. They vary greatly in terms of associated regulatory elements, sequence motifs, the choice of transcription start sites and other features. Several technologies that harness next-generation sequencing have enabled recent advances in identifying promoters ...

  13. Oct-2 forms a complex with Oct-1 on the iNOS promoter and represses transcription by interfering with recruitment of RNA PolII by Oct-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentrari, Fatima; Chantôme, Aurelie; Knights, Andrew; Jeannin, Jean-François; Pance, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Oct-1 (POU2f1) and Oct-2 (POU2f2) are members of the POU family of transcription factors. They recognize the same DNA sequence but fulfil distinct functions: Oct-1 is ubiquitous and regulates a variety of genes while Oct-2 is restricted to B-cells and neurones. Here we examine the interplay and regulatory mechanisms of these factors to control the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, NOS2). Using two breast cancer cell lines as a comparative model, we found that MCF-7 express iNOS upon cytokine stimulation while MDA-MB-231 do not. Oct-1 is present in both cell lines but MDA-MB-231also express high levels of Oct-2. Manipulation of Oct-2 expression in these cell lines demonstrates that it is directly responsible for the repression of iNOS in MDA-MB-231. In MCF-7 cells Oct-1 binds the iNOS promoter, recruits RNA PolII and triggers initiation of transcription. In MDA-MB-231 cells, both Oct-1 and Oct-2 bind the iNOS promoter, forming a higher-order complex which fails to recruit RNA PolII, and as a consequence iNOS transcription does not proceed. Unravelling the mechanisms of transcription factor activity is paramount to the understanding of gene expression patterns that determine cell behaviour. PMID:26271992

  14. Cloning and Functional Analysis of the Promoter of an Ascorbate Oxidase Gene from Gossypium hirsutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Shan; Tao, Chengcheng; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Apoplastic ascorbate oxidase (AO) plays significant roles in plant cell growth. However, the mechanism of underlying the transcriptional regulation of AO in Gossypium hirsutum remains unclear. Here, we obtained a 1,920-bp promoter sequence from the Gossypium hirsutum ascorbate oxidase (GhAO1) gene, and this GhAO1 promoter included a number of known cis-elements. Promoter activity analysis in overexpressing pGhAO1::GFP-GUS tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) showed that the GhAO1 promoter exhibited high activity, driving strong reporter gene expression in tobacco trichomes, leaves and roots. Promoter 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated that truncated GhAO1 promoters with serial 5'-end deletions had different GUS activities. A 360-bp fragment was sufficient to activate GUS expression. The P-1040 region had less GUS activity than the P-720 region, suggesting that the 320-bp region from nucleotide -720 to -1040 might include a cis-element acting as a silencer. Interestingly, an auxin-responsive cis-acting element (TGA-element) was uncovered in the promoter. To analyze the function of the TGA-element, tobacco leaves transformed with promoters with different 5' truncations were treated with indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Tobacco leaves transformed with the promoter regions containing the TGA-element showed significantly increased GUS activity after IAA treatment, implying that the fragment spanning nucleotides -1760 to -1600 (which includes the TGA-element) might be a key component for IAA responsiveness. Analyses of the AO promoter region and AO expression pattern in Gossypium arboreum (Ga, diploid cotton with an AA genome), Gossypium raimondii (Gr, diploid cotton with a DD genome) and Gossypium hirsutum (Gh, tetraploid cotton with an AADD genome) indicated that AO promoter activation and AO transcription were detected together only in D genome/sub-genome (Gr and Gh) cotton. Taken together, these results suggest that the 1,920-bp GhAO1 promoter is a functional sequence with a

  15. [Marek's disease virus can infect chicken brain microglia and promote the transcription of toll-like receptor 15 and 1LB genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing-li; Chen, Hao; Wei, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Microglial cells were purified from a mixed neuroglia culture prepared from the neonatal chicken brain in vitro, and were infected with the vvMDV YL040920 isolate and an attenuated MDV vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens, respectively. The presence of cytopathic effect (CPE) was examined daily, and the MEQ expression in MDV-infected microglia was detected by immunohistochemistry assay. DNA replication of the MDV meq gene and transcription of the gB gene were determined by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and qRT-PCR, respectively. The transcripts of Toll-like receptor (TLR) mRNA in microglia post MDV infection were quantified by qRT-PCR. The results of this study showed that both vvMDV YL040920 and attenuated vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens could infect microglia and produce characteristic CPE with plaque formation. The plaques were formed due to cells shedding at multi-sites, then quickly expanded and integrated. Furthermore, the MEQ protein was detected in nuclei of YL040920 and CVI988/ Rispens-infected microglia, and MDV meq DNA replication and gB gene transcription in MDV-infected microglia were also confirmed. Although both MDV DNA copies and gB transcripts were increased in the virus-infected microglia, the higher viral DNA load and gB transcript were observed for CVI988/Rispens than for YL040920 in vitro (P < or = 0.05/0.001). The transcriptions of TLR15 and TLR1LB gene were found to be up-regulated in microglia following MDV infection in vitro. Purified microglia infected with YL040920 was observed increased TLR15 and TLR1LB transcripts as early as 1 day post infection (dpi), and reached its peak level at 3 dpi, then decreased mildly at 5 dpi. For CVI988/Rispens, it induced an increase of TLR15 transcript as early as 1 dpi, and rose rapidly at 3 dpi, and then decreased slightly at 5 dpi. At the same time, CVI988/Rispens induced the increase of chTLR1LB transcript at 3 dpi and decreased at 5 dpi. By comparing the TLRs transcription between YL040920 and CVI988

  16. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α promotes hypoxia-induced A549 apoptosis via a mechanism that involves the glycolysis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao GuiQun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α, which plays an important role in controlling the hypoxia-induced glycolysis pathway, is a "master" gene in the tissue hypoxia response during tumor development. However, its role in the apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer remains unknown. Here, we have studied the effects of HIF-1α on apoptosis by modulating HIF-1α gene expression in A549 cells through both siRNA knock-down and over-expression. Methods A549 cells were transfected with a HIF-1α siRNA plasmid or a HIF-1α expression vector. Transfected cells were exposed to a normoxic or hypoxic environment in the presence or absence of 25 mM HEPES and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG (5 mM. The expression of three key genes of the glycolysis pathway, glucose transporter type 1(GLUT1, phosphoglycerate kinase 1(PGK1, and hexokinase 1(HK1, were measured using real-time RT-PCR. Glycolysis was monitored by measuring changes of pH and lactate concentration in the culture medium. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay and flow cytometry. Results Knocking down expression of HIF-1α inhibited the glycolysis pathway, increased the pH of the culture medium, and protected the cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. In contrast, over-expression of HIF-1α accelerated glycolysis in A549 cells, decreased the pH of the culture medium, and enhanced hypoxia-induced apoptosis. These effects of HIF-1α on glycolysis, pH of the medium, and apoptosis were reversed by treatment with the glycolytic inhibitor, 2-DG. Apoptosis induced by HIF-1α over-expression was partially inhibited by increasing the buffering capacity of the culture medium by adding HEPES. Conclusion During hypoxia in A549 cells, HIF-1α promotes activity of the glycolysis pathway and decreases the pH of the culture medium, resulting in increased cellular apoptosis.

  17. Swimming-induced exercise promotes hypertrophy and vascularization of fast skeletal muscle fibres and activation of myogenic and angiogenic transcriptional programs in adult zebrafish

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palstra, A.P; Rovira, M; Rizo-Roca, D; Torrella, J.R; Spaink, H.P; Planas, J.V

    2014-01-01

    ... contractile activity potentiated somatic growth. Given that the underlying exercise-induced transcriptional mechanisms regulating muscle mass in vertebrates are not fully understood, here we investigated the cellular and molecular adaptive...

  18. Transcriptional repression of Aurora-A gene by wild-type p53 through directly binding to its promoter with histone deacetylase 1 and mSin3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Ying; Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Lin, Tsung-Chieh Chester; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Wu, Chun-Chi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we firstly showed that p53 transcriptionally represses Aurora-A gene expression through directly binding to its promoter. DNA affinity precipitation assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that p53 physically bound to the Aurora-A promoter. Moreover, the in vitro and in vivo assays showed that p53 directly bound to the Aurora-A promoter together with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and mSin3a as corepressors. Furthermore, we identified that the nucleotides -360 to -354 (CCTGCCC), upstream of the Aurora-A transcriptional start site, was responsible for the p53-mediated repression. Mutation within this site disrupted its interaction with p53, mSin3a and HDAC1, as well as attenuated the repressive effect of p53 on Aurora-A promoter activity. Treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a HDAC1 inhibitor, disrupted the interaction of p53-HDAC1-mSin3a complex with the nucleotides -365∼-345 region, and enhanced the Aurora-A promoter activity and gene expression. Additionally, knockdown of p53 or mSin3a also drastically blocked the formation of p53-HDAC1-mSin3a repressive complex onto this promoter region and elevated the Aurora-A promoter activity and gene expression. Moreover, the p53-HDAC1-mSin3a repressive complex also involved in the inhibition of Aurora-A gene expression upon cisplatin treatment. Finally, the clinical investigation showed that Aurora-A and p53 exhibited an inverse correlation in both the expression level and prognostic status, and the low p53/high Aurora-A showed the poorest prognosis of NSCLC patients. Our findings showed novel regulatory mechanisms of p53 in regulating Aurora-A gene expression in NSCLC cells. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Novel basic-region helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AnBH1) of Aspergillus nidulans counteracts the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF in the promoter of a penicillin biosynthesis gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Maria Louise; Litzka, Olivier; Martic, Goran; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Brakhage, Axel A

    2002-10-25

    Cis-acting CCAAT elements are found frequently in eukaryotic promoter regions. Many of the genes containing such elements in their promoters are regulated by a conserved multimeric CCAAT-binding complex. In the fungus Emericella (Aspergillus) nidulans, this complex was designated AnCF (A.nidulans CCAAT-binding factor). AnCF regulates several genes, including the penicillin biosynthesis genes ipnA and aatA. Since it is estimated that the CCAAT-binding complex regulates more than 200 genes, an important question concerns the regulation mechanism that allows so many genes to be regulated by a single complex in a gene-specific manner. One of the answers to this question appears to lie in the interaction of AnCF with other transcription factors. Here, a novel transcription factor designated AnBH1 was isolated. The corresponding anbH1 gene was cloned and found to be located on chromosome IV. The deduced AnBH1 protein belongs to the family of basic-region helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. AnBH1 binds in vitro as a homodimer to an, not previously described, asymmetric E-box within the aatA promoter that overlaps with the AnCF-binding site. This is the first report demonstrating that the CCAAT-binding complex and a bHLH transcription factor bind to overlapping sites. Since deletion of anbH1 appears to be lethal, the anbH1 gene was replaced by a regulatable alcAp-anbH1 gene fusion. The analysis of aatAp-lacZ expression in such a strain indicated that AnBH1 acts as a repressor of aatA gene expression and therefore counteracts the positive action of AnCF.

  20. Keratinocyte transcriptional regulation of the human c-Myc promoter occurs via a novel Lef/Tcf binding element distinct from neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolly, Carine; Zakher, Antony; Strauss, Christian; Suter, Maja M; Müller, Eliane J

    2007-05-15

    The proto-oncogene c-Myc is involved in early neoplastic transformations. Two consensus Lef/Tcf binding elements (TBE) were found to be prerequisite for transcriptional transactivation by the armadillo proteins beta-catenin and plakoglobin (PG) together with Tcf4 in human neoplastic cells. In epidermal keratinocytes, c-Myc was reported to be repressed by Lef-1 and PG. Using reporter gene assays, here we demonstrate that deletion of the two consensus TBE fails to abrogate transcriptional regulation by Lef-1/PG in wildtype and beta-catenin-/- keratinocytes, while it reduces transcription in pre-neoplastic PG-/- keratinocytes. We identified a TBE sequence variant downstream of the major transcriptional initiation site that binds Lef-1 in vitro and in vivo, and its mutation compromised transcriptional regulation by Lef-1/PG. Collectively, this study demonstrates that the two consensus TBE's reported in neoplastic cells are dispensable for c-Myc regulation in normal keratinocytes, which instead use a novel TBE sequence variant. This unprecedented finding may have important implications for armadillo target genes involved in carcinogenesis.

  1. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo; El-Hage, Nazira; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan; Kashanchi, Fatah; Ochem, Alex; Simon, Gary L.; Karn, Jonathan; Hauser, Kurt F.; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-κB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-κB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. PMID:25980739

  2. A single amino acid change within the R2 domain of the VvMYB5b transcription factor modulates affinity for protein partners and target promoters selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavonoid pathway is spatially and temporally controlled during plant development and the transcriptional regulation of the structural genes is mostly orchestrated by a ternary protein complex that involves three classes of transcription factors (R2-R3-MYB, bHLH and WDR. In grapevine (Vitis vinifera L., several MYB transcription factors have been identified but the interactions with their putative bHLH partners to regulate specific branches of the flavonoid pathway are still poorly understood. Results In this work, we describe the effects of a single amino acid substitution (R69L located in the R2 domain of VvMYB5b and predicted to affect the formation of a salt bridge within the protein. The activity of the mutated protein (name VvMYB5bL, the native protein being referred as VvMYB5bR was assessed in different in vivo systems: yeast, grape cell suspensions, and tobacco. In the first two systems, VvMYB5bL exhibited a modified trans-activation capability. Moreover, using yeast two-hybrid assay, we demonstrated that modification of VvMYB5b transcriptional properties impaired its ability to correctly interact with VvMYC1, a grape bHLH protein. These results were further substantiated by overexpression of VvMYB5bR and VvMYB5bL genes in tobacco. Flowers from 35S::VvMYB5bL transgenic plants showed a distinct phenotype in comparison with 35S::VvMYB5bR and the control plants. Finally, significant differences in transcript abundance of flavonoid metabolism genes were observed along with variations in pigments accumulation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that VvMYB5bL is still able to bind DNA but the structural consequences linked to the mutation affect the capacity of the protein to activate the transcription of some flavonoid genes by modifying the interaction with its co-partner(s. In addition, this study underlines the importance of an internal salt bridge for protein conformation and thus for the establishment

  3. A cotton fiber-preferential promoter, PGbEXPA2, is regulated by GA and ABA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Tu, Lili; Ye, Zhengxiu; Wang, Maojun; Gao, Wenhui; Zhang, Xianlong

    2015-09-01

    PGbEXPA2 (Promoter of GbEXPA2 ) was preferentially and strongly expressed during cotton fiber development, and the 461-bp PGbEXPA2 fragment was essential for responding to exogenous GA and ABA in Arabidopsis. Cotton fibers are highly elongated single-cell, unbranched and non-glandular seed trichomes. Previous studies have reported that the transcript level of GbEXPA2 is significantly up-regulated during fiber cell elongation, suggesting that GbEXPA2 has an important function in fiber development. In this study, the promoter of GbEXPA2 (839 bp) from the D(T) sub-genome was isolated from Gossypium barbadense 3-79. Consistent with the expression pattern of GbEXPA2, the promoter PGbEXPA2 was able to express GUS to high levels in elongating fibers, but not in the root, stem, or leaf. In Arabidopsis, GUS activity was only found in the rosette leaf trichomes and rosette leaf vascular tissue, indicating that the transcription factors which bind to PGbEXPA2 in the leaf trichomes of transgenic Arabidopsis were similar to those found in cotton fiber. A deletion analysis of PGbEXPA2 revealed that a 461-bp fragment was sufficient to drive GUS expression in cotton fibers and Arabidopsis rosette leaf trichomes. Exogenous phytohormonal treatments on transgenic Arabidopsis with different promoter lengths (P-839, P-705, P-588 and P-461) showed that GUS activity in Arabidopsis trichomes could be strongly up-regulated by GA and, in contrast, down-regulated by ABA.

  4. Classical Mus musculus Igκ enhancers support transcription but not high level somatic hypermutation from a V-lambda promoter in chicken DT40 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga Rama Kothapalli

    Full Text Available Somatic hypermutation (SHM of immunoglobulin genes is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID in activated B cells. This process is strictly dependent on transcription. Hence, cis-acting transcriptional control elements have been proposed to target SHM to immunoglobulin loci. The Mus musculus Igκ locus is regulated by the intronic enhancer (iE/MAR and the 3' enhancer (3'E, and multiple studies using transgenic and knock-out approaches in mice and cell lines have reported somewhat contradictory results about the function of these enhancers in AID-mediated sequence diversification. Here we show that the M. musculus iE/MAR and 3'E elements are active solely as transcriptional enhancer when placed in the context of the IGL locus in Gallus gallus DT40 cells, but they are very inefficient in targeting AID-mediated mutation events to this locus. This suggests that either key components of the cis-regulatory targeting elements reside outside the murine Igκ transcriptional enhancer sequences, or that the targeting of AID activity to Ig loci occurs by largely species-specific mechanisms.

  5. The transcription factor EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS II activates the MYB ODORANT1 promoter at a MYB binding site specific for fragrant petunias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Moerkercke, A.; Haring, M.A.; Schuurink, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Fragrance production in petunia flowers is highly regulated. Two transcription factors, ODORANT1 (ODO1) and EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS II (EOBII) have recently been identified as regulators of the volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid pathway in petals. Unlike the non-fragrant Petunia hybrida cultivar R27,

  6. A protein binding AT-rich sequence in the soybean leghemoglobin c3 promoter is a general cis element that requires proximal DNA elements to stimulate transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, N B; Larsen, K; Knudsen, J Y

    1994-01-01

    A nodule nuclear factor, NAT2, interacts with two AT-rich binding sites (NAT2 BS1 and NAT2 BS2) in the soybean leghemoglobin (lb) c3 promoter. In transgenic Lotus corniculatus nodules, an oligonucleotide containing NAT2 BS1 activated an inactive -159 lbc3 promoter when placed immediately upstream...

  7. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Maternal low-protein diet affects epigenetic regulation of hepatic mitochondrial DNA transcription in a sex-specific manner in newborn piglets associated with GR binding to its promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Jia

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS plays an important role in energy homeostasis by controlling electron transfer and ATP generation. Maternal malnutrition during pregnancy affects mitochondrial (mt DNA-encoded OXPHOS activity in offspring, yet it is unknown whether epigenetic mechanism is involved in the transcriptional regulation of mtDNA-encoded OXPHOS genes. In this study, 14 primiparous purebred Meishan sows were fed either standard- (SP, 12% crude protein or low-protein (LP; 6% crude protein diets throughout gestation, and the hepatic expression and transcriptional regulation of mtDNA-encoded OXPHOS genes were analyzed in newborn piglets. Maternal low protein diet decreased hepatic mtDNA copy number in males, but not in females. LP male piglets had significantly higher hepatic AMP concentration and low energy charge, which was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression of NADH dehydrogenase subunits 6, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, 2, 3 and cytochrome b, as well as increased cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity. In contrast, LP female piglets showed significantly lower hepatic AMP concentrations and higher energy charge with no alterations in OXPHOS gene expression. Moreover, LP males demonstrated higher glucocorticoid receptor (GR binding to the mtDNA promoter compared with SP males, which was accompanied by lower cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation on mtDNA promoter. Interestingly, opposite changes were seen in females, which showed diminished GR binding and enriched cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation on mtDNA promoter. These results suggest that maternal low protein diet during pregnancy causes sex-dependent epigenetic alterations in mtDNA-encoded OXPHOS gene expression, possibly GR is involved in mtDNA transcription regulation.

  9. transcriptional regulatory element

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARL

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... Further test of the effect of WPRE on plasmid-mediated gene expression with two therapeutic proteins showed substantial ... promoter-independent, and provide valuable information to improve vectors for efficient and stable gene expression in ... transcriptional events concerning the recombinant. mRNA.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 and pRb promotes their dissociation to mediate release of the SAP30·mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Sadowski, Martin; Steel, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2011-02-18

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is mediated by phosphorylation of protein substrates by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). A critical substrate of CDKs is the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, pRb, which inhibits G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression by binding and repressing E2F transcription factors. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb alleviates this inhibitory effect to promote G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression. pRb represses transcription by binding to the E2F transactivation domain and recruiting the mSin3·histone deacetylase (HDAC) transcriptional repressor complex via the retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBP1). RBP1 binds to the pocket region of pRb via an LXCXE motif and to the SAP30 subunit of the mSin3·HDAC complex and, thus, acts as a bridging protein in this multisubunit complex. In the present study we identified RBP1 as a novel CDK substrate. RBP1 is phosphorylated by CDK2 on serines 864 and 1007, which are N- and C-terminal to the LXCXE motif, respectively. CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 or pRb destabilizes their interaction in vitro, with concurrent phosphorylation of both proteins leading to their dissociation. Consistent with these findings, RBP1 phosphorylation is increased during progression from G(1) into S-phase, with a concurrent decrease in its association with pRb in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into CDK-mediated regulation of the pRb tumor suppressor during cell cycle progression, demonstrating that CDK-mediated phosphorylation of both RBP1 and pRb induces their dissociation to mediate release of the mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex from pRb to alleviate transcriptional repression of E2F.

  11. The mutant phenotype associated with P-element alleles of the vestigial locus in Drosophila melanogaster may be caused by a readthrough transcript initiated at the P-element promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, R B; O'Keefe, S L

    2001-04-01

    We report here the isolation of a new P-element-induced allele of the vestigial locus vg(2a33), the molecular characterization of which allows us to propose a unifying explanation of the phenotypes of the large number of vestigial P-element alleles that now exists. The first P-element allele of vestigial to be isolated was vg(21), which results in a very weak mutant wing phenotype that is suppressed in the P cytotype. By destabilizing vg(2a33) in a dysgenic cross, we isolated the vg(2a33) allele, which exhibits a moderate mutant wing phenotype and is not suppressed by the P cytotype. The new allele is characterized by a 46-bp deletion that removes the 3'-proximal copy of the 11-bp internal repeat from the P element of vg(21). To understand how this subtle difference between the two alleles leads to a rather pronounced difference in their phenotypes, we mapped both the vg and P-element transcription units present in wild type and mutants. Using both 5'-RACE and S1 protection, we found that P-element transcription is initiated 19 bp farther upstream than previously thought. Using primer extension, the start of vg transcription was determined to lie 435 bp upstream of the longest cDNA recovered to date and upstream of the P-element insertion site. Our discovery that the P element is situated within the first vg exon has prompted a reassessment of the large body of genetic data on a series of alleles derived from vg(21). Our current hypothesis to explain the degree of variation in the mutant phenotypes and their response to the P repressor invokes a critical RNA secondary structure in the vg transcript, the formation of which is hindered by a readthrough transcript initiated at the P-element promoter.

  12. The interferon-induced antiviral protein PML (TRIM19) promotes the restriction and transcriptional silencing of lentiviruses in a context-specific, isoform-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroori, Nasser; Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2016-03-22

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, a type I interferon (IFN-I)-induced gene product and a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, modulates the transcriptional activity of viruses belonging to various families. Whether PML has an impact on the replication of HIV-1 has not been fully addressed, but recent studies point to its possible involvement in the restriction of HIV-1 in human cells and in the maintenance of transcriptional latency in human cell lines in which HIV-1 is constitutively repressed. We investigated further the restriction of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac, by PML in murine cells and in a lymphocytic human cell line. In particular, we studied the relevance of PML to IFN-I-mediated inhibition and the role of individual human isoforms. We demonstrate that both human PML (hPML) and murine PML (mPML) inhibit the early post-entry stages of the replication of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac. In addition, HIV-1 was transcriptionally silenced by mPML and by hPML isoforms I, II, IV and VI in MEFs. This PML-mediated transcriptional repression was attenuated in presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. In contrast, depletion of PML had no effect on HIV-1 gene expression in a human T cell line. PML was found to contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 by IFN-I. Specifically, IFN-α and IFN-β treatments of MEFs enhanced the PML-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 early replication stages. We show that PML can inhibit HIV-1 and other lentiviruses as part of the IFN-I-mediated response. The restriction takes place at two distinct steps, i.e. reverse transcription and transcription, and in an isoform-specific, cellular context-specific fashion. Our results support a model in which PML activates innate immune antilentiviral effectors. These data are relevant to the development of latency reversal-inducing pharmacological agents, since PML was previously proposed as a pharmacological target for such inhibitors. This study also has

  13. E2F7 and E2F8 promote angiogenesis through transcriptional activation of VEGFA in cooperation with HIF1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijts, B.G.; Bakker, W.J.; Cornelissen, P.W.; Liang, K.H.; Schaftenaar, F.H.; Westendorp, B.; de Wolf, C.A.; Paciejewska, M.; Scheele, C.L.; Kent, L.; Leone, G.; Schulte-Merker, S.; de Bruin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors plays an important role in controlling cell-cycle progression. While this is their best-known function, we report here novel functions for the newest members of the E2F family, E2F7 and E2F8 (E2F7/8). We show that simultaneous deletion of E2F7/8 in zebrafish

  14. CMX-8933, a peptide fragment of the glycoprotein ependymin, promotes activation of AP-1 transcription factor in mouse neuroblastoma and rat cortical cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, V E; Adams, D; Boyer-Boiteau, A

    2001-10-19

    An 8-amino acid peptide fragment (CMX-8933) of Ependymin, a glycoprotein component of the extracellular fluid and cerebrospinal fluid of goldfish brain, was synthesized and tested for its capacity to activate AP-1 transcription factor in cell cultures. Dose-response and time-course studies of AP-1's binding to DNA were carried out in neuroblastoma (NB2a/dl) and primary rat brain cortical cultures using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). A 13-14-fold increase in AP-1's DNA binding was obtained when NB2a cells were incubated for 4 h with 6-10 microg/ml CMX-8933. Primary rat brain cortical cultures were much more sensitive to the effects of CMX-8933 than transformed (NB2a) cultures; here a 26.7+/-5.2-fold increase in binding was observed following a 3-h treatment with as little as 10 ng/ml peptide. These findings are consistent with an activation of this transcription factor, a characteristic that has been previously correlated with functional aspects of full-sized neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor and brain-derived nerve growth factor) in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. Such data suggest a role for Ependymin in transcriptional control.

  15. Characterization of the Promoter Region of an Arabidopsis Gene for 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase Involved in Dehydration-Inducible Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Babak; Iuchi, Satoshi; Fujita, Miki; Fujita, Yasunari; Takasaki, Hironori; Osakabe, Yuriko; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Plants respond to dehydration stress and tolerate water-deficit status through complex physiological and cellular processes. Many genes are induced by water deficit. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in tolerance to dehydration stress by inducing many stress genes. ABA is synthesized de novo in response to dehydration. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis have been identified, and they are expressed mainly in leaf vascular tissues. Of the products of such genes, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. One of the five NCED genes in Arabidopsis, AtNCED3, is significantly induced by dehydration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of the early stages of the dehydration stress response, it is important to analyse the transcriptional regulatory systems of AtNCED3. In the present study, we found that an overlapping G-box recognition sequence (5′-CACGTG-3′) at −2248 bp from the transcriptional start site of AtNCED3 is an important cis-acting element in the induction of the dehydration response. We discuss the possible transcriptional regulatory system of dehydration-responsive AtNCED3 expression, and how this may control the level of ABA under water-deficit conditions. PMID:23604098

  16. The ets-related transcription factor GABP directs bidirectional transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Collins

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of genes in the human genome are distributed such that their transcription start sites are located less than 1 kb apart on opposite strands. These divergent gene pairs have a single intergenic segment of DNA, which in some cases appears to share regulatory elements, but it is unclear whether these regions represent functional bidirectional promoters or two overlapping promoters. A recent study showed that divergent promoters are enriched for consensus binding sequences of a small group of transcription factors, including the ubiquitous ets-family transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP. Here we show that GABP binds to more than 80% of divergent promoters in at least one cell type. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GABP binding is correlated and associated with bidirectional transcriptional activity in a luciferase transfection assay. In addition, we find that the addition of a strict consensus GABP site into a set of promoters that normally function in only one direction significantly increases activity in the opposite direction in 67% of cases. Our findings demonstrate that GABP regulates the majority of divergent promoters and suggest that bidirectional transcriptional activity is mediated through GABP binding and transactivation at both divergent and nondivergent promoters.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the desferrioxamine gene cluster of Streptomyces coelicolor is mediated by binding of DmdR1 to an iron box in the promoter of the desA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Sedef; Barreiro, Carlos; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Coque, Juan José R; Martín, Juan F

    2007-02-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces pilosus produce desferrioxamine siderophores which are encoded by the desABCD gene cluster. S. pilosus is used for the production of desferrioxamine B which is utilized in human medicine. We report the deletion of the desA gene encoding a lysine decarboxylase in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The DeltadesA mutant was able to grow on lysine as the only carbon and nitrogen source but its desferrioxamine production was blocked, confirming that the L-lysine decarboxylase encoded by desA is a dedicated enzyme committing L-lysine to desferrioxamine biosynthesis. Production of desferrioxamine was restored by complementation with the whole wild-type desABCD cluster, but not by desA alone, because of a polar effect of the desA gene replacement on expression of the downstream des genes. The transcription pattern of the desABCD cluster in S. coelicolor showed that all four genes were coordinately induced under conditions of iron deprivation. The transcription start point of the desA gene was identified by primer extension analysis at a thymine located 62 nucleotides upstream of the translation start codon. The -10 region of the desA promoter overlaps the 19-nucleotide palindromic iron box sequence known to be involved in iron regulation in Streptomyces. Binding of DmdR1 divalent metal-dependent regulatory protein to the desA promoter region of both S. coelicolor and S. pilosus was shown using electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, validating the conclusion that iron regulation of the desABCD cluster is mediated by the regulatory protein DmdR1. We conclude that the genes involved in desferrioxamine production are under transcriptional control exerted by the DmdR1 regulator in the presence of iron and are expressed under conditions of iron limitation.

  18. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-11-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells.

  19. Ca2+, CREB and Krüppel: A novel KLF7-binding element conserved in mouse and human TRKB promoters is required for CREB-dependent transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2007-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its receptor, trkB, is essential for the proper development and function of the nervous system. Here we identify a novel regulatory element designated TCaRE3 (TRKB Ca2+ Response Element 3) required for CREB-dependent TRKB transcription in neurons. TCaRE3-inactivating mutations abolished both Ca2+- and cAMP-stimulated TRKB expression, despite the presence of upstream CREs. TCaRE3 mutations also reduced basal expression by at least 80%....

  20. The barley HvNAC6 transcription factor affects ABA accumulation and promotes basal resistance against powdery mildew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yan-Jun; Perera, Venura; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    susceptible to Bgh than wild-type plants. Application of exogenous ABA increased basal resistance against Bgh in wild-type plants, but not in HvNAC6 RNAi plants, suggesting that ABA is a positive regulator of basal resistance which depends on HvNAC6. Silencing of HvNAC6 expression altered the light......Barley HvNAC6 is a member of the plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC2) transcription factor family and we have shown previously that it acts as a positive regulator of basal resistance in barley against the biotrophic pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). In this study, we use...... a transgenic approach to constitutively silence HvNAC6 expression, using RNA interference (RNAi), to investigate the in vivo functions of HvNAC6 in basal resistance responses in barley in relation to the phytohormone ABA. The HvNAC6 RNAi plants displayed reduced HvNAC6 transcript levels and were more...

  1. Dual role for SUMO E2 conjugase Ubc9 in modulating the transforming and growth-promoting properties of the HMGA1b architectural transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youjun; Lu, Jie; Prochownik, Edward V

    2007-05-04

    Members of the HMGA1 (high mobility group A1) family of architectural transcription factors, HMGA1a and HMGA1b, play important roles in many normal cellular processes and in tumorigenesis. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for HMGA1-interacting proteins and identified the SUMO E2 conjugase Ubc9 as one such partner. The Ubc9-interacting domain of HMGA1 is bipartite, consisting of a proline-rich region near the N terminus and an acidic domain at the extreme C terminus, whereas the HMGA1-interacting domain of Ubc9 comprises a single region previously shown to associate with and SUMOylate other transcription factors. Consistent with these findings, endogenous HMGA1 proteins and Ubc9 could be co-immunoprecipitated from several human cell lines. Studies with HMGA1b proteins containing mutations of either or both Ubc9-interacting domains and with Ubc9-depleted cell lines indicated that the proline-rich domain of HMGA1b positively influences transformation and growth, whereas the acidic domain negatively influences these properties. None of the changes in HMGA1 protein functions mediated by Ubc9 appears to require SUMOylation. These findings are consistent with the idea that Ubc9 can act as both a positive and negative regulator of proliferation and transformation via its non-SUMO-dependent interaction with HMGA1 proteins.

  2. The Delta Np63 alpha phosphoprotein binds the p21 and 14-3-3 sigma promoters in vivo and has transcriptional repressor activity that is reduced by Hay-Wells syndrome-derived mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Matthew D; Mays, Deborah J; Sniezek, Joseph C; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2003-04-01

    p63 is a recently identified homolog of p53 that is found in the basal layer of several stratified epithelial tissues such as the epidermis, oral mucosa, prostate, and urogenital tract. Studies with p63(-/-) mice and analysis of several human autosomal-dominant disorders with germ line p63 mutations suggest p63 involvement in maintaining epidermal stem cell populations. The p63 gene encodes six splice variants with reported transactivating or dominant-negative activities. The goals of the current study were to determine the splice variants that are expressed in primary human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) and the biochemical activity p63 has in these epithelial cell populations. We found that the predominant splice variant expressed in HEKs was Delta Np63 alpha, and it was present as a phosphorylated protein. During HEK differentiation, Delta Np63 alpha and p53 levels decreased, while expression of p53 target genes p21 and 14-3-3 sigma increased. Delta Np63 alpha had transcriptional repressor activity in vitro, and this activity was reduced in Delta Np63 alpha proteins containing point mutations, corresponding to those found in patients with Hay-Wells syndrome. Further, we show that Delta Np63 alpha and p53 can bind the p21 and 14-3-3 sigma promoters in vitro and in vivo, with decreased binding of p63 to these promoters during HEK differentiation. These data suggest that Delta Np63 alpha acts as a transcriptional repressor at select growth regulatory gene promoters in HEKs, and this repression likely plays an important role in the proliferative capacity of basal keratinocytes.

  3. Genomic characterization and dynamic methylation of promoter facilitates transcriptional regulation of H2A variants, H2A.1 and H2A.2 in various pathophysiological states of hepatocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Monica; Reddy, Divya; Gupta, Sanjay

    2017-04-01

    Differential expression of homomorphous variants of H2A family of histone H2A.1 and H2A.2 have been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and maintenance of undifferentiated state of hepatocyte. However, not much is known about the transcriptional regulation of these H2A variants. The current study revealed the presence of 43bp 5'-regulatory region upstream of translation start site and a 26bp 3' stem loop conserved region for both the H2A.1 and H2A.2 variants. However, alignment of both H2A.1 and H2A.2 5'-untranslated region (UTR) sequences revealed no significant degree of homology between them despite the coding exon being very similar amongst the variants. Further, transient transfection coupled with dual luciferase assay of cloned 5' upstream sequences of H2A.1 and H2A.2 of length 1.2 (-1056 to +144) and 1.379kb (-1160 to +219) from experimentally identified 5'UTR in rat liver cell line (CL38) confirmed their promoter activity. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed a presence of multiple CpG sites interspersed in the cloned promoter of H2A.1 and a CpG island near TSS for H2A.2, suggesting that histone variants transcription might be regulated epigenetically. Indeed, treatment with DNMT and HDAC inhibitors increased the expression of H2A.2 with no significant change in H2A.1 levels. Further, methyl DNA immunoprecipitation coupled with quantitative analysis of DNA methylation using real-time PCR revealed hypo-methylation and hyper-methylation of H2A.1 and H2A.2 respectively in embryonic and HCC compared to control adult liver tissue. Collectively, the data suggests that differential DNA methylation on histone promoters is a dynamic player regulating their expression status in different pathophysiological stages of liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Proposed Method for Estimating Health-Promoting Glucosinolates and Hydrolysis Products in Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) Using Relative Transcript Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Talon M; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2017-01-18

    Due to the importance of glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products in human nutrition and plant defense, optimizing the content of these compounds is a frequent breeding objective for Brassica crops. Toward this goal, we investigated the feasibility of using models built from relative transcript abundance data for the prediction of glucosinolate and hydrolysis product concentrations in broccoli. We report that predictive models explaining at least 50% of the variation for a number of glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products can be built for prediction within the same season, but prediction accuracy decreased when using models built from one season's data for prediction of an opposing season. This method of phytochemical profile prediction could potentially allow for lower phytochemical phenotyping costs and larger breeding populations. This, in turn, could improve selection efficiency for phase II induction potential, a type of chemopreventive bioactivity, by allowing for the quick and relatively cheap content estimation of phytochemicals known to influence the trait.

  5. E2F site in the essential promoter region does not confer S phase-specific transcription of the ABCC10 gene in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Magdalena; Sirotnak, Francis M

    2017-01-01

    ABCC10 (MRP7) plays a role in cellular detoxification and resistance to anticancer drugs. Since ABCC10 gene transcription in human prostate cancer CWR22Rv1 cells was found dependent on E2F binding sequence motif, ABCC10 expression in G1 and S phases of the cell cycle of CWR22Rv1 cells, was analyzed. The cells were synchronized in G1 phase by double thymidine block and in S phase by thymidine/mimosine double block. ABCC10 mRNA level was found to be similar in S phase-synchronized and asynchronous cell populations. In G1 phase it decreased by 2.4- to 3-fold. It is thus inferred, that ABCC10 expression in CWR22Rv1 cells is not S phase-specific but is primarily associated with cell proliferation.

  6. Pyropia yezoensis glycoprotein promotes the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotypic switch via the STAT3 and STAT6 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kwon, Mi-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Min-Kyeong; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage polarization has been well documented. Macrophages can aquire two phenotypes, the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, and the anti-inflammatory and wound healing M2 phenotype. The M1 macrophage phenotype has been linked to metabolic disease and is also associated with cancer-related inflammation. Of note, macrophage polarization can be influenced by the extracellular environment. In the current study, we examined the effects of Pyropia yezoensis glycoprotein (PYGP) on M1 to M2 macrophage polarization in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with LPS exhibited an upregulated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, namely of the M1 markers, nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and nitric oxide synthase‑2 (NOS-2). Treatment with PYGP inhibited the production of M1 markers and increased arginase 1 (ARG1), chitinase-like 3 (Chil3; also known as Ym1), resistin like beta (RETNLB; also known as FIZZ1), IL-10, CD163, CD206, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) M2 marker gene expression. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and STAT6 transcription factors were phosphorylated following treatment with PYGP. However, the silencing of STAT3 and STAT6 using siRNA in the macrophages decreased ARG1, Ym1 and FIZZ1 M2 marker gene expression in spite of treatment of PYGP. These findings suggest that PYGP exerts anti-inflammatory effects by regulating the M1 to M2 phenotypic switch through STAT3 and STAT6. Thus, PYGP may have potential for use as a natural remedy for inflammatory diseases.

  7. Functional interactions between an atypical NF-κB site from the rat CYP2B1 promoter and the transcriptional repressor RBP-Jκ/CBF1

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Wang, Xiao-Li; DeJong, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    The phenobarbital-inducible rat cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B1 and 2B2 proteins are encoded by homologous genes whose promoters contain a mammalian-apparent long terminal repeat retrotransposon (MaLR). An NF-κB-like site within the MaLR forms multiple protein–DNA complexes with rat liver and HeLa cell nuclear extracts. Using antibody supershift assays, we have identified these complexes as NF-κB and RPB-Jκ/CBF1. Competition assays using a series of single site mutant oligonucleotides reveal that t...

  8. Polymorphism in the regulatory region located more than 1.1 kilobases 5' to the start site of transcription, the promoter region, and exon 1 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Sørensen, Steen; Morling, N

    1999-01-01

    in certain disorders of pregnancy. We have studied the DNA sequences of the putative regulatory region located more than 1.1 kilobases 5' from the start site of transcription (a 244 bp HindIII/EcoRI fragment) of the HLA-G gene and of the promoter region to detect any possible polymorphism. We detected one...... into two groups based on the detected polymorphism. The nucleotide substitutions may have implications for the binding of nuclear factors to the regulatory regions. To our knowledge this is the first study of any polymorphism in the 5'-flanking sequences to the HLA-G gene. Further studies are needed......The non-classic Human Leucocyte Antigen class Ib molecule, HLA-G, is expressed on the invasive, extra-villous cytotrophoblast in human placenta. HLA-G protects against natural killer (NK)-cell-mediated lysis and may modulate the secretion of cytokines. Aberrant expression of HLA-G has been reported...

  9. Thalidomide can promote erythropoiesis by induction of STAT5 and repression of external pathway of apoptosis resulting in increased expression of GATA-1 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzasko, Norbert; Chocholska, Sylwia; Goracy, Aneta; Hus, Marek; Dmoszynska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Thalidomide was shown to stimulate erythropoiesis and increase hemoglobin level in multiple myeloma patients, but way of such activity remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the mechanisms of thalidomide stimulating effect on erythroid differentiation. Hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirates taken from myeloma patients and cultured with or without thalidomide. Then the generation of erythroid cells and the expression of STAT5, GATA-1, GATA-2, selected caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins in erythroid cells were assessed using flow cytometry and real-time PCR. The generation of erythroblasts was higher in thalidomide than in control cultures (63.9% vs. 55.8%, p thalidomide than in control cultures. The expression of STAT5 (cytometry 331.5 vs. 276.1, p = 0.015; PCR 24.3 vs. 21.1, p = 0.003) and GATA-1 (cytometry 259.7 vs. 232.0, p = 0.027; PCR 18.9 vs. 16.5, p = 0.003) was higher in thalidomide than in control cultures. Our results suggest that thalidomide enhances expression of STAT5 in response of erythroid cells to erythropoietin and as a result of caspase 3 suppression. Moreover it may exert inhibitory effect on an external pathway of caspases activation with consequent decreased degradation of GATA-1 transcription factor by downstream caspases. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Oroxylin A inhibits glycolysis-dependent proliferation of human breast cancer via promoting SIRT3-mediated SOD2 transcription and HIF1α destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L; Zhou, Y; Qiao, C; Ni, T; Li, Z; You, Q; Guo, Q; Lu, N

    2015-04-09

    Alterations of cellular metabolism play a central role in the development and progression of cancer. Oroxylin A, an active flavonoid of a Chinese traditional medicinal plant, was previously shown to modulate glycolysis in cancer cells. However, the mechanism by which oroxylin A regulates glycolysis is still not well defined. Here, we show that oroxylin A inhibits glycolysis in breast cancer cells via the Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3)-mediated destabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), which controls glycolytic gene expression. Oroxylin A promotes superoxide dismutase (SOD2) gene expression through SIRT3-regulated DNA-binding activity of FOXO3a and increases the activity of SOD2 by promoting SIRT3-mediated deacetylation. In vivo, oroxylin A inhibits the growth of transplanted human breast tumors associated with glycolytic suppression. These data indicate that oroxylin A inhibits glycolysis-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells, through the suppression of HIF1α stabilization via SIRT3 activation, providing preclinical information for the cancer therapies of SIRT3 stimulation.

  11. Vaccination inhibits TLR2 transcription via suppression of GR nuclear translocation and binding to TLR2 promoter in porcine lung infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Liu, Maojun; Zou, Huafeng; Li, Xian; Shao, Guoqing; Zhao, Ruqian

    2013-12-27

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) act respectively as effectors of innate immune and stress responses. The crosstalk between them is critical for the maintenance of homeostasis during the immune response. Vaccination is known to boost adaptive immunity, yet it remains elusive whether vaccination may affect GR/TLR interactions following infection. Duroc×Meishan crossbred piglets were allocated to three groups. The control group (CC) received neither vaccination nor infection; the non-vaccinated infection group (NI) was artificially infected intratracheally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae); while the vaccinated, infected group (VI) was vaccinated intramuscularly with inactivated M. hyopneumoniae one month before infection. The clinical signs and macroscopic lung lesions were significantly reduced by vaccination. However, vaccination did not affect the concentration of M. hyopneumoniae DNA in the lung. Serum cortisol was significantly decreased in both NI and VI pigs (Ppigs demonstrated significantly diminished nuclear GR content. TLRs 1-10 were all expressed in lung, among which TLR2 was the most abundant and was significantly up-regulated (Ppigs, but not in VI pigs. Accordingly, GR binding to the GR response element on TLR2 promoter was significantly increased (Ppigs, but not in VI pigs. These results suggest that the inhibition of GR nuclear translocation and binding to the TLR2 promoter, which results in diminished TLR2 expression, is associated with the protective effect of vaccination on M. hyopneumoniae-induced lung lesions in the pig. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of a Bipartite Jasmonate-Responsive Promoter Element in the Catharanthus roseus ORCA3 Transcription Factor Gene That Interacts Specifically with AT-Hook DNA-Binding Proteins1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vom Endt, Débora; Soares e Silva, Marina; Kijne, Jan W.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Memelink, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant signaling molecules that play key roles in defense against certain pathogens and insects, among others, by controlling the biosynthesis of protective secondary metabolites. In Catharanthus roseus, the APETALA2-domain transcription factor ORCA3 is involved in the jasmonate-responsive activation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. ORCA3 gene expression is itself induced by jasmonate. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we located a 74-bp region within the ORCA3 promoter, which contains an autonomous jasmonate-responsive element (JRE). The ORCA3 JRE is composed of two important sequences: a quantitative sequence responsible for a high level of expression and a qualitative sequence that appears to act as an on/off switch in response to methyl jasmonate. We isolated 12 different DNA-binding proteins having one of four different types of DNA-binding domains, using the ORCA3 JRE as bait in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) one-hybrid transcription factor screening. The binding of one class of proteins bearing a single AT-hook DNA-binding motif was affected by mutations in the quantitative sequence within the JRE. Two of the AT-hook proteins tested had a weak activating effect on JRE-mediated reporter gene expression, suggesting that AT-hook family members may be involved in determining the level of expression of ORCA3 in response to jasmonate. PMID:17496112

  13. Transforming Growth Factor β2 Promotes Transcription of COX2 and EP4, Leading to a Prostaglandin E2-Driven Autostimulatory Loop That Enhances Virulence of Theileria annulata-Transformed Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echebli, Nadia; Ding, Ying; Kamau, Everlyn

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine known to regulate cell growth, differentiation, and motility and is a potent modulator of immune function. TGF-β consequently plays a central role in carcinogenesis, and a dampened TGF-β2 response by Theileria annulata-infected monocytes/macrophages underpins disease resistance to tropical theileriosis. Here, we show that concomitant with the loss of TGF-β2 production, there is ablated expression of COX2 and EP4, which leads to a drop in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and, consequently, reduced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and EPAC. This ablated phenotype can be rescued in attenuated macrophages by the addition of exogenous TGF-β2, which reactivates the expression of COX2 and EP4 while repressing that of protein kinase inhibitor gamma (PKIG) to the levels in virulent macrophages. TGF-β2 therefore promotes the adhesion and invasiveness of virulent macrophages by modulating COX2, EP4, and PKIG transcription to initiate a prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-driven autostimulatory loop that augments PKA and EPAC activities. A virulence phenotype stemming from the double activation of PKA and EPAC is the induction of a CREB-mediated transcriptional program and the upregulation of JAM-L- and integrin 4αβ1-mediated adhesion of Theileria-infected macrophages. PMID:25690101

  14. Timing of transcription during the cell cycle: Protein complexes binding to E2F, E2F/CLE, CDE/CHR, or CHR promoter elements define early and late cell cycle gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A; Stangner, Konstanze; Schmitt, Thomas; Wintsche, Axel; Engeland, Kurt

    2017-11-17

    A central question in cell cycle control is how differential gene expression is regulated. Timing of expression is important for correct progression through the cell cycle. E2F, CDE, and CHR promoter sites have been linked to transcriptional repression in resting cells and activation during the cell cycle. Further, the DREAM complex binds CHR or CDE/CHR elements of G2/M genes resulting in repression during G0/G1. Here, we show that DREAM also binds to E2F sites of S phase genes in quiescence and upon p53 activation. Furthermore, we describe a novel class of promoter sites, the CHR-like elements (CLE), which can support binding of DREAM to E2F elements. Activation of such S phase genes is achieved through binding of E2F1-3/DP complexes to E2F sites. In contrast, the activating MuvB complexes MMB and FOXM1-MuvB bind to CHR elements and mediate peak expression in G2/M. In conclusion, data presented here in combination with earlier results leads us to propose a model that explains how DREAM can repress early cell cycle genes through E2F or E2F/CLE sites and late genes through CHR or CDE/CHR elements. Also p53-dependent indirect transcriptional repression through the p53-p21-Cyclin/CDK-DREAM-E2F/CLE/CDE/CHR pathway requires DREAM binding to E2F or E2F/CLE sites in early cell cycle genes and binding of DREAM to CHR or CDE/CHR elements of late cell cycle genes. Specific timing of activation is achieved through binding of E2F1-3/DP to E2F sites and MMB or FOXM1-MuvB complexes to CHR elements.

  15. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-05

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  17. [Na]i -induced c-Fos expression is not mediated by activation of the 5' -promoter containing known transcriptional elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloui, Mounsif; Taurin, Sebastien; Akimova, Olga A; Guo, Deng-Fu; Tremblay, Johanne; Dulin, Nickolai O; Hamet, Pavel; Orlov, Sergei N

    2007-07-01

    In vascular smooth muscle cells and several other cell types, inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase leads to the expression of early response genes, including c-Fos. We designed this study to examine whether or not a putative Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive element is located within the c-Fos 5'-UTR from - 650 to + 103 containing all known response elements activated by 'classic' stimuli, such as growth factors and Ca(2+) (i)-raising compounds. In HeLa cells, the highest increment of c-Fos mRNA content was noted after 6 h of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition with ouabain that was abolished by actinomycin D, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis. c-Fos protein accumulation in ouabain-treated cells correlated with a gain of Na(+) (i) and loss of K(+) (i). Augmented c-Fos expression was also observed under inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in K(+)-free medium and in the presence of the Na(+) ionophore monensin. The effect of ouabain on c-Fos expression was sharply attenuated under dissipation of the transmembrane Na(+) gradient, but was preserved in the presence of Ca(2+) chelators and the extracellular regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059, thus indicating an Na(+) (i)-mediated, Ca(2+) (i)- and extracellular regulated kinase-independent mechanism of gene expression. In contrast to massive c-Fos expression, we failed to detect any effect of ouabain on accumulation of luciferase driven by the c-Fos 5'-UTR. Negative results were also obtained in ouabain-treated vascular smooth muscle cells and C11 Madin-Darby canine kidney cells possessing augmented c-Fos expression. Our results reveal that Na(+) (i)-induced c-Fos expression is not mediated by the 5'-UTR containing transcriptional elements activated by growth factors and other 'classic stimuli'.

  18. Genetic variants of Wnt transcription factor TCF-4 (TCF7L2 putative promoter region are associated with small intestinal Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen J Koslowski

    Full Text Available Reduced expression of Paneth cell antimicrobial alpha-defensins, human defensin (HD-5 and -6, characterizes Crohn's disease (CD of the ileum. TCF-4 (also named TCF7L2, a Wnt signalling pathway transcription factor, orchestrates Paneth cell differentiation, directly regulates the expression of HD-5 and -6, and was previously associated with the decrease of these antimicrobial peptides in a subset of ileal CD. To investigate a potential genetic association of TCF-4 with ileal CD, we sequenced 2.1 kb of the 5' flanking region of TCF-4 in a small group of ileal CD patients and controls (n = 10 each. We identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, of which three (rs3814570, rs10885394, rs10885395 were in linkage disequilibrium and found more frequently in patients; one (rs3814570 was thereby located in a predicted regulatory region. We carried out high-throughput analysis of this SNP in three cohorts of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients and controls. Overall 1399 healthy individuals, 785 ulcerative colitis (UC patients, 225 CD patients with colonic disease only and 784 CD patients with ileal involvement were used to determine frequency distributions. We found an association of rs3814570 with ileal CD but neither with colonic CD or UC, in a combined analysis (allele positivity: OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.52, p = 0.00737, which was the strongest in ileal CD patients with stricturing behaviour (allele frequency: OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08 to1.62, p = 0.00686 or an additional involvement of the upper GIT (allele frequency: OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.03 to1.84, p = 0.02882. The newly identified genetic association of TCF-4 with ileal CD provides evidence that the decrease in Paneth cell alpha-defensins is a primary factor in disease pathogenesis.

  19. Genetic Variants of Wnt Transcription Factor TCF-4 (TCF7L2) Putative Promoter Region Are Associated with Small Intestinal Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslowski, Maureen J.; Kübler, Irmgard; Chamaillard, Mathias; Schaeffeler, Elke; Reinisch, Walter; Wang, Guoxing; Beisner, Julia; Teml, Alexander; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Winter, Stefan; Herrlinger, Klaus R.; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Séverine; Cooney, Rachel; Fellermann, Klaus; Jewell, Derek; Bevins, Charles L.; Schwab, Matthias; Stange, Eduard F.; Wehkamp, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Reduced expression of Paneth cell antimicrobial α-defensins, human defensin (HD)-5 and -6, characterizes Crohn's disease (CD) of the ileum. TCF-4 (also named TCF7L2), a Wnt signalling pathway transcription factor, orchestrates Paneth cell differentiation, directly regulates the expression of HD-5 and -6, and was previously associated with the decrease of these antimicrobial peptides in a subset of ileal CD. To investigate a potential genetic association of TCF-4 with ileal CD, we sequenced 2.1 kb of the 5′ flanking region of TCF-4 in a small group of ileal CD patients and controls (n = 10 each). We identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which three (rs3814570, rs10885394, rs10885395) were in linkage disequilibrium and found more frequently in patients; one (rs3814570) was thereby located in a predicted regulatory region. We carried out high-throughput analysis of this SNP in three cohorts of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and controls. Overall 1399 healthy individuals, 785 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, 225 CD patients with colonic disease only and 784 CD patients with ileal involvement were used to determine frequency distributions. We found an association of rs3814570 with ileal CD but neither with colonic CD or UC, in a combined analysis (allele positivity: OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.52, p = 0.00737), which was the strongest in ileal CD patients with stricturing behaviour (allele frequency: OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08 to1.62, p = 0.00686) or an additional involvement of the upper GIT (allele frequency: OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.03 to1.84, p = 0.02882). The newly identified genetic association of TCF-4 with ileal CD provides evidence that the decrease in Paneth cell α-defensins is a primary factor in disease pathogenesis. PMID:19221600

  20. Estrogen Promotes Hepatic Synthesis of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids by Regulating ELOVL5 at Post-Transcriptional Level in Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Li, Cui-Cui; Li, Fang; Li, Hong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Loor, Juan J; Kang, Xiang-Tao; Sun, Gui-Rong

    2017-06-30

    The very long chain fatty acid elongase (ELOVL) plays an important role in the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA). Previous studies suggest that chicken could be an alternate source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we detected that ELOVL5, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis of omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), was highly expressed in the liver of laying hens and increased rapidly after sexual maturity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed ELOVL fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) gene as a putative target of miR-218-5p, miR-19a-3p, miR-19b-3p, miR-30a-5p, miR-30b-5p, and miR-30e-5p. We demonstrated estrogen downregulated microRNA (miRNA), and that ELOVL5 is a direct target of miR-218-5p, which was located in intron 14 of the Slit guidance ligand 2 (SLIT2) gene and co-expressed with the host gene. Overall, estrogen enhanced hepatic synthesis of LCPUFA by functioning as a negative regulator of miRNA thereby augmenting the expression of these miRNA target genes, especially ELOVL5, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis of n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA. This study provides a novel model for the use of estrogen in the poultry industry as an inducer of ELOVL5 expression to enhance hepatic n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA synthesis at the post-transcriptional level.

  1. Alendronate promotes osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis through interferon-β/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoqing; Xu, Zhongyang; Ding, Shaofeng; Yi, Guangkun; Wang, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Alendronate is commonly used for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis; however, the underlying pathological molecular mechanisms of its action remain unclear. In the present study, the alendronate-treated signaling pathway in bone metabolism in rats with ovariectomy induced by osteoporosis was investigated. Rats with osteoporosis were orally administered alendronate or phosphate-buffered saline (control). In addition, the interferon-β (IFN-β)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling pathway was investigated in osteoblasts following treatment with alendronate in vitro and in vivo. During the differentiation period, IFN-β (100 ng/ml) was used to treat the osteoblast cells, and the activity, viability and bone metabolism-associated gene expression levels (STAT1, p-STAT1, Fra1, TRAF6 and SOCS1) were analyzed in osteoblast cells. Histopathological changes were used to evaluate osteoblasts, osteoclasts, inflammatory phase of bone healing and osteonecrotic areas. The results demonstrated that alendronate significantly inhibited the activity of osteoporotic osteoclasts by stimulating expression of IFN-β, as well as markedly improved the viability and activity of osteoblasts compared with the control group. In addition, alendronate increased the expression and phosphorylation levels of STAT1 in osteoclasts, enhanced osteoblast differentiation, upregulated the expression levels of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, and increased the expression of osteoblast differentiation-associated genes (osteocalcin, osterix and Runx2). Inhibition of IFN-β expression canceled the benefits of alendronate-mediated osteoblast differentiation. Notably, alendronate enhanced bone formation in rats with osteoporosis induced by ovariectomy. In conclusion, these findings suggest that alendronate can regulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in rats with osteoporosis induced by ovariectomy through upregulation of IFN-β/STAT1 signaling

  2. TGF-β regulates the expression of transcription factor KLF6 and its splice variants and promotes co-operative transactivation of common target genes through a Smad3–Sp1–KLF6 interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOTELLA, Luisa M.; SANZ-RODRIGUEZ, Francisco; KOMI, Yusuke; FERNANDEZ-L, Africa; VARELA, Elisa; GARRIDO-MARTIN, Eva M.; NARLA, Goutham; FRIEDMAN, Scott L.; KOJIMA, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    KLF6 (Krüppel-like factor 6) is a transcription factor and tumour suppressor with a growing range of biological activities and transcriptional targets. Among these, KLF6 suppresses growth through transactivation of TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor-β1). KLF6 can be alternatively spliced, generating lower-molecular-mass isoforms that antagonize the full-length WT (wild-type) protein and promote growth. A key target gene of full-length KLF6 is endoglin, which is induced in vascular injury. Endoglin, a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and TGF-β auxiliary receptor, has a pro-angiogenic role in endothelial cells and is also involved in malignant progression. The aim of the present work was to explore the effect of TGF-β on KLF6 expression and splicing, and to define the contribution of TGF-β on promoters regulated by co-operation between KLF6 and Sp1 (specificity protein 1). Using co-transfection, co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, our data demonstrate that KLF6 co-operates with Sp1 in transcriptionally regulating KLF6-responsive genes and that this co-operation is further enhanced by TGF-β1 through at least two mechanisms. First, in specific cell types, TGF-β1 may decrease KLF6 alternative splicing, resulting in a net increase in full-length, growth-suppressive KLF6 activity. Secondly, KLF6–Sp1 co-operation is further enhanced by the TGF-β–Smad (similar to mothers against decapentaplegic) pathway via the likely formation of a tripartite KLF6–Sp1–Smad3 complex in which KLF6 interacts indirectly with Smad3 through Sp1, which may serve as a bridging molecule to co-ordinate this interaction. These findings unveil a finely tuned network of interactions between KLF6, Sp1 and TGF-β to regulate target genes. PMID:19076057

  3. Simultaneous live imaging of the transcription and nuclear position of specific genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between genome organization and gene expression has recently been established. However, the relationships between spatial organization, dynamics, and transcriptional regulation of the genome remain unknown. In this study, we developed a live-imaging method for simultaneous measurements of the transcriptional activity and nuclear position of endogenous genes, which we termed the ‘Real-time Observation of Localization and EXpression (ROLEX)’ system. We demonstrated that ROLEX is highly specific and does not affect the expression level of the target gene. ROLEX enabled detection of sub-genome-wide mobility changes that depended on the state of Nanog transactivation in embryonic stem cells. We believe that the ROLEX system will become a powerful tool for exploring the relationship between transcription and nuclear dynamics in living cells. PMID:26092696

  4. Selenium Biofortification in Radish Enhances Nutritional Quality via Accumulation of Methyl-Selenocysteine and Promotion of Transcripts and Metabolites Related to Glucosinolates, Phenolics, and Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Berto, Chiara; Malagoli, Mario; Trentin, Annarita; Sambo, Paolo; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Two selenium (Se) fertilization methods were tested for their effects on levels of anticarcinogenic selenocompounds in radish (Raphanus sativus), as well as other nutraceuticals. First, radish was grown on soil and foliar selenate applied 7 days before harvest at 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg Se per plant. Selenium levels were up to 1200 mg Se/kg DW in leaves and 120 mg Se/kg DW in roots. The thiols cysteine and glutathione were present at 2–3-fold higher levels in roots of Se treated plants, and total glucosinolate levels were 35% higher, due to increases in glucoraphanin. The only seleno-aminoacid detected in Se treated plants was Se-methyl-SeCys (100 mg/kg FW in leaves, 33 mg/kg FW in roots). The levels of phenolic aminoacids increased with selenate treatment, as did root total nitrogen and protein content, while the level of several polyphenols decreased. Second, radish was grown in hydroponics and supplied with 0, 5, 10, 20, or 40 μM selenate for 1 week. Selenate treatment led to a 20–30% increase in biomass. Selenium concentration was 242 mg Se/kg DW in leaves and 85 mg Se/kg DW in roots. Cysteine levels decreased with Se in leaves but increased in roots; glutatione levels decreased in both. Total glucosinolate levels in leaves decreased with Se treatment due to repression of genes involved in glucosinolates metabolism. Se-methyl-SeCys concentration ranged from 7–15 mg/kg FW. Aminoacid concentration increased with Se treatment in leaves but decreased in roots. Roots of Se treated plants contained elevated transcript levels of sulfate transporters (Sultr) and ATP sulfurylase, a key enzyme of S/Se assimilation. No effects on polyphenols were observed. In conclusion, Se biofortification of radish roots may be achieved via foliar spray or hydroponic supply. One to ten radishes could fulfill the daily human requirement (70 μg) after a single foliar spray of 5 mg selenate per plant or 1 week of 5–10 μM selenate supply in hydroponics. The radishes metabolized

  5. Selenium biofortification in radish enhances nutritional quality via accumulation of methyl-selenocysteine and promotion of transcripts and metabolites related to glucosinolates, phenolics and amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Schiavon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two selenium (Se fertilization methods were tested for their effects on levels of anticarcinogenic selenocompounds in radish (Raphanus sativus, as well as other nutraceuticals. First, radish was grown on soil and foliar selenate applied 7d before harvest at 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg Se per plant. Selenium levels were up to 1,200 mg Se/kg DW in leaves and 120 mg Se/kg DW in roots. The thiols cysteine and glutathione were present at 2-3 fold higher levels in roots of Se treated plants, and total glucosinolate levels were 35% higher, due to increases in glucoraphanin. The only seleno-aminoacid detected in Se treated plants was Se-methyl-SeCys (100 mg/kg FW in leaves, 33 mg/kg FW in roots. The levels of phenolic aminoacids increased with selenate treatment, as did root total nitrogen and protein content, while the level of several polyphenols decreased. Second, radish was grown in hydroponics and supplied with 0, 5, 10, 20, or 40 microM selenate for one week. Selenate treatment led to a 20-30% increase in biomass. Selenium concentration was 242 mg Se/kg DW in leaves and 85 mg Se/kg DW in roots. Cysteine levels decreased with Se in leaves but increased in roots; glutatione levels decreased in both. Total glucosinolate levels in leaves decreased with Se treatment due to repression of genes involved in glucosinolates metabolism. Se-methyl-SeCys concentration ranged from 7-15 mg/kg FW. Aminoacid concentration increased with Se treatment in leaves but decreased in roots. Roots of Se treated plants contained elevated transcript levels of sulfate transporters (Sultr and ATP sulfurylase, a key enzyme of S/Se assimilation. No effects on polyphenols were observed. In conclusion, Se biofortification of radish roots may be achieved via foliar spray or hydroponic supply. One to ten radishes could fulfill the daily human requirement (70 microg after a single foliar spray of 5 mg selenate per plant or one week of 5-10 microM selenate supply in hydroponics. The radishes

  6. Selenium Biofortification in Radish Enhances Nutritional Quality via Accumulation of Methyl-Selenocysteine and Promotion of Transcripts and Metabolites Related to Glucosinolates, Phenolics, and Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Berto, Chiara; Malagoli, Mario; Trentin, Annarita; Sambo, Paolo; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2016-01-01

    Two selenium (Se) fertilization methods were tested for their effects on levels of anticarcinogenic selenocompounds in radish (Raphanus sativus), as well as other nutraceuticals. First, radish was grown on soil and foliar selenate applied 7 days before harvest at 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg Se per plant. Selenium levels were up to 1200 mg Se/kg DW in leaves and 120 mg Se/kg DW in roots. The thiols cysteine and glutathione were present at 2-3-fold higher levels in roots of Se treated plants, and total glucosinolate levels were 35% higher, due to increases in glucoraphanin. The only seleno-aminoacid detected in Se treated plants was Se-methyl-SeCys (100 mg/kg FW in leaves, 33 mg/kg FW in roots). The levels of phenolic aminoacids increased with selenate treatment, as did root total nitrogen and protein content, while the level of several polyphenols decreased. Second, radish was grown in hydroponics and supplied with 0, 5, 10, 20, or 40 μM selenate for 1 week. Selenate treatment led to a 20-30% increase in biomass. Selenium concentration was 242 mg Se/kg DW in leaves and 85 mg Se/kg DW in roots. Cysteine levels decreased with Se in leaves but increased in roots; glutatione levels decreased in both. Total glucosinolate levels in leaves decreased with Se treatment due to repression of genes involved in glucosinolates metabolism. Se-methyl-SeCys concentration ranged from 7-15 mg/kg FW. Aminoacid concentration increased with Se treatment in leaves but decreased in roots. Roots of Se treated plants contained elevated transcript levels of sulfate transporters (Sultr) and ATP sulfurylase, a key enzyme of S/Se assimilation. No effects on polyphenols were observed. In conclusion, Se biofortification of radish roots may be achieved via foliar spray or hydroponic supply. One to ten radishes could fulfill the daily human requirement (70 μg) after a single foliar spray of 5 mg selenate per plant or 1 week of 5-10 μM selenate supply in hydroponics. The radishes metabolized selenate to

  7. A small molecule drug promoting miRNA processing induces alternative splicing of MdmX transcript and rescues p53 activity in human cancer cells overexpressing MdmX protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Valianatos

    Full Text Available MdmX overexpression contributes to the development of cancer by inhibiting tumor suppressor p53. A switch in the alternative splicing of MdmX transcript, leading to the inclusion of exon 6, has been identified as the primary mechanism responsible for increased MdmX protein levels in human cancers, including melanoma. However, there are no approved drugs, which could translate these new findings into clinical applications. We analyzed the anti-melanoma activity of enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic inhibiting the growth of some human cancers in vitro and in vivo by promoting miRNA maturation. We found that enoxacin inhibited the growth and viability of human melanoma cell lines much stronger than a structurally related fluoroquinolone ofloxacin, which only weakly modulates miRNA processing. A microarray analysis identified a set of miRNAs significantly dysregulated in enoxacin-treated A375 melanoma cells. They had the potential to target multiple signaling pathways required for cancer cell growth, among them the RNA splicing. Recent studies showed that interfering with cellular splicing machinery can result in MdmX downregulation in cancer cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that enoxacin could, by modulating miRNAs targeting splicing machinery, activate p53 in melanoma cells overexpressing MdmX. We found that enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, a related fluoroquinolone capable of promoting microRNA processing, but not ofloxacin, strongly activated wild type p53-dependent transcription in A375 melanoma without causing significant DNA damage. On the molecular level, the drugs promoted MdmX exon 6 skipping, leading to a dose-dependent downregulation of MdmX. Not only in melanoma, but also in MCF7 breast carcinoma and A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells overexpressing MdmX. Together, our results suggest that some clinically approved fluoroquinolones could potentially be repurposed as activators of p53 tumor suppressor in cancers overexpressing Mdm

  8. Self protection from anti-viral responses--Ro52 promotes degradation of the transcription factor IRF7 downstream of the viral Toll-Like receptors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgs, Rowan

    2010-01-01

    Ro52 is a member of the TRIM family of single-protein E3 ligases and is also a target for autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren\\'s syndrome. We previously demonstrated a novel function of Ro52 in the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of IRF3 following TLR3\\/4 stimulation. We now present evidence that Ro52 has a similar role in regulating the stability and activity of IRF7. Endogenous immunoprecipitation of Ro52-bound proteins revealed that IRF7 associates with Ro52, an effect which increases following TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation, suggesting that Ro52 interacts with IRF7 post-pathogen recognition. Furthermore, we show that Ro52 ubiquitinates IRF7 in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a decrease in total IRF7 expression and a subsequent decrease in IFN-alpha production. IRF7 stability was increased in bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ro52-deficient mice stimulated with imiquimod or CpG-B, consistent with a role for Ro52 in the negative regulation of IRF7 signalling. Taken together, these results suggest that Ro52-mediated ubiquitination promotes the degradation of IRF7 following TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation. As Ro52 is known to be IFN-inducible, this system constitutes a negative-feedback loop that acts to protect the host from the prolonged activation of the immune response.

  9. A unified architecture of transcriptional regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Danko, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is precisely controlled in time and space through the integration of signals that act at gene promoters and gene-distal enhancers. Classically, promoters and enhancers are considered separate classes of regulatory elements, often distinguished by histone modifications. However...... and enhancers are considered a single class of functional element, with a unified architecture for transcription initiation. The context of interacting regulatory elements and the surrounding sequences determine local transcriptional output as well as the enhancer and promoter activities of individual elements....

  10. RNA N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase METTL3 promotes liver cancer progression through YTHDF2 dependent post-transcriptional silencing of SOCS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengnuo; Wei, Lai; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Tsang, Felice Ho-Ching; Shen, Jialing; Cheng, Carol Lai-Hung; Tsang, Long-Hin; Ho, Daniel Wai-Hung; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Lee, Joyce Man-Fong; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Chun-Ming

    2017-11-24

    Epigenetic alterations immensely contributed to human carcinogenesis. Conventional epigenetic studies predominantly focused on DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. Recently, diverse and reversible chemical modifications on RNAs emerge as a new layer of epigenetic regulation. N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant chemical modification on eukaryotic mRNA and is important to the regulation of mRNA stability, splicing, and translation. Using transcriptome sequencing, we discovered that METTL3 (methyltransferase like 3), a major RNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase, was significantly up-regulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and multiple solid tumors. Clinically, overexpression of METTL3 was associated with poor prognosis of HCC patients. Functionally, we proved that knockdown of METTL3 drastically reduced HCC cell proliferation, migration and colony formation in vitro. Knockout of METTL3 remarkably suppressed HCC tumorigenicity and lung metastasis in vivo. On the other hand, using CRISPR/dCas9-VP64 activation system, we demonstrated that overexpression of METTL3 significantly promoted HCC growth both in vitro and in vivo. Through transcriptome sequencing, m6A-Seq and m6A MeRIP qRT-PCR, we identified SOCS2 (suppressor of cytokine signaling 2) as a target of METTL3-mediated m6A modification. Knockdown of METTL3 substantially abolished SOCS2 mRNA m6A modification and augmented SOCS2 mRNA expression. We also showed that m6A-mediated SOCS2 mRNA degradation relied on m6A "reader" protein YTHDF2 dependent pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrated that METTL3 was frequently up-regulated in human HCC and contributed to HCC progression. METTL3 repressed SOCS2 expression in HCC via the m6A-YTHDF2 dependent mechanism. Thus, our findings suggested a new dimension of epigenetic alteration in liver carcinogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. The promoter of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4a-5 gene of Chrysanthemum morifolium (CmCCD4a-5) drives petal-specific transcription of a conjugated gene in the developing flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ayano; Takahashi, Shigekazu; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-15

    Carotenoids comprise one of the major groups of pigments in flowers. Because carotenoids are physiologically indispensable pigments for all photosynthetic plants, their catabolism must be discretely regulated in photosynthetic organs and non-photosynthetic organs such as petals or fruits. In the chrysanthemum, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4a (CmCCD4a), which is dominantly expressed in petals, cleaves carotenoid, leading to a white flower. CmCCD4a-5 was recently identified as a new member of the CmCCD4a family, but its detailed expression profile in plant tissues has not yet been established. In this study, we sequenced a 1094-bp region upstream of CmCCD4a-5 and assessed its petal-specific promoter activity. To evaluate the activity of this gene, we constructed two types of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana that possessed, respectively, a fusion gene of a 1090-bp or 505-bp segment of the upstream region plus the β-d-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (1090bUR::GUS and 505bUR::GUS). GUS activity in the 505bUR::GUS strain was observed mainly in the anthers/pollen in flower buds, whereas GUS activity of the 1090bUR::GUS strain was observed in immature petals of the flower buds. Among the cis-acting elements located between positions -505 and -1090, no elements that have previously been reported to enhance the expression in petals or to suppress it in anthers/pollen were detected by PLACE analysis, indicating the existence of unknown cis-element(s). A semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that CmCCD4a-5 transcription was prominent in petals but was undetectable in roots, stems and leaves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. A brain-specific transcription activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner, M; Rattner, A; Mauxion, F; Sen, R; Citri, Y

    1989-11-01

    We have identified a DNA binding protein, named BETA, that interacts with the same (B) transcriptional regulatory sequence as the known transcription factor NF-kappa B. BETA is found only in gray matter throughout the brain, and not in a variety of other rat tissues. Two binding sites for BETA are present adjacent to the promoter of the rat proenkephalin gene. Transfection of primary brain cultures that express BETA, with a reporter gene driven by the SV40 promoter linked to BETA DNA binding sites, results in transcriptional activation. We infer that BETA is a brain-specific transcription activator.

  13. Firemaster® 550 and its components isopropylated triphenyl phosphate and triphenyl phosphate enhance adipogenesis and transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Pparγ) on the adipocyte protein 2 (aP2) promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshdary, Vian

    2017-01-01

    Firemaster® 550 (FM550) is a chemical mixture currently used as an additive flame retardant in commercial products, and is comprised of 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tertrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), and isopropylated triphenyl phosphate (IPTP). Animal and in vitro studies suggest that FM550, TPP and IPTP may have adipogenic effects and may exert these effects through PPARγ activation. Using murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, we investigated the detailed expression of transcription factors and adipogenic markers in response to FM550 and its components. Further we investigated the mechanism of action of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) on downstream targets of the receptor by focussing on the mature adipocyte marker, adipocyte protein 2 (aP2). In addition, we set to elucidate the components responsible for the adipogenic effects seen in the FM550 mixture. We show that FM550 and its components TPP, IPTP, and TBPH, but not TBB induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, despite displaying enhanced lipid accumulation, TBPH did not alter the mRNA or protein expression of terminal differentiation markers. In contrast, FM550, TPP, and IPTP treatment enhanced lipid accumulation, and mRNA and protein expression of terminal differentiation markers. To further delineate the mechanisms of action of FM550 and its components we focussed on aP2 promoter activity. For this purpose we used the enhancer region of the mouse aP2 promoter using a 584-bp reporter construct containing an active PPRE located 5.4 kb away from the transcription start site of aP2. Exposure to FM550, IPTP, and TPP significantly increased PPARγ mediated aP2 enhancer activity. Furthermore, we show that TPP- and IPTP-dependent upregulation of aP2 was significantly inhibited by the selective PPARγ antagonist GW9662. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that IPTP and TPP treatment

  14. Firemaster® 550 and its components isopropylated triphenyl phosphate and triphenyl phosphate enhance adipogenesis and transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Pparγ) on the adipocyte protein 2 (aP2) promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Emily W Y; Ahmed, Shaimaa; Peshdary, Vian; Atlas, Ella

    2017-01-01

    Firemaster® 550 (FM550) is a chemical mixture currently used as an additive flame retardant in commercial products, and is comprised of 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tertrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), and isopropylated triphenyl phosphate (IPTP). Animal and in vitro studies suggest that FM550, TPP and IPTP may have adipogenic effects and may exert these effects through PPARγ activation. Using murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, we investigated the detailed expression of transcription factors and adipogenic markers in response to FM550 and its components. Further we investigated the mechanism of action of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) on downstream targets of the receptor by focussing on the mature adipocyte marker, adipocyte protein 2 (aP2). In addition, we set to elucidate the components responsible for the adipogenic effects seen in the FM550 mixture. We show that FM550 and its components TPP, IPTP, and TBPH, but not TBB induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, despite displaying enhanced lipid accumulation, TBPH did not alter the mRNA or protein expression of terminal differentiation markers. In contrast, FM550, TPP, and IPTP treatment enhanced lipid accumulation, and mRNA and protein expression of terminal differentiation markers. To further delineate the mechanisms of action of FM550 and its components we focussed on aP2 promoter activity. For this purpose we used the enhancer region of the mouse aP2 promoter using a 584-bp reporter construct containing an active PPRE located 5.4 kb away from the transcription start site of aP2. Exposure to FM550, IPTP, and TPP significantly increased PPARγ mediated aP2 enhancer activity. Furthermore, we show that TPP- and IPTP-dependent upregulation of aP2 was significantly inhibited by the selective PPARγ antagonist GW9662. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that IPTP and TPP treatment

  15. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  16. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    binding protein (NBP); promoter; transcription factor (TF); transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Abbreviations used: CNG, conserved non-genic sequence; EST, expressed sequence tag; NBP nucleic acid-binding protein; PF, phylogenetic.

  17. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nex-1/Math-2 promotes neuronal survival of PC12 cells by modulating the dynamic expression of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2005-02-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nex1/Math-2 belongs to the NeuroD subfamily, which plays a critical role during neuronal differentiation and maintenance of the differentiated state. Previously, we demonstrated that Nex1 is a key regulatory component of the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway. Further supporting this hypothesis, this study shows that Nex1 has survival-inducing properties similar to NGF, as Nex1-overexpressing PC12 cells survive in the absence of trophic factors. We dissected the molecular mechanism by which Nex1 confers neuroprotection upon serum removal and found that constitutive expression of Nex1 maintained the expression of specific G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and concomitantly induced a dynamic expression profile of key anti-apoptotic regulators. This study provides the first evidence of the underlying mechanism by which a member of the NeuroD-subfamily promotes an active anti-apoptotic program essential to the survival of neurons. Our results suggest that the survival program may be viewed as an integral component of the intrinsic programming of the differentiated state.

  18. A WRKY transcription factor participates in dehydration tolerance in Boea hygrometrica by binding to the W-box elements of the galactinol synthase (BhGolS1) promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Lili; Liu, Xia; Liu, Yongxiu; Phillips, Jonathan; Deng, Xin

    2009-11-01

    Accumulation of compatible osmolytes, such as soluble sugars, in plants is an important osmoprotective mechanism. Sugars play a role in osmotic adjustment and are associated with stabilization of proteins and cell structures, reactive oxygen species scavenging, signaling functions or induction of adaptive pathways. Galactinol is the galactosyl donor for the synthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) and its synthesis by galactinol synthase (GolS) is the first committed step of the RFOs biosynthetic pathway. GolS genes are induced by a variety of stresses in both stress-sensitive and tolerant-plant species; however, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation is not fully established. In this paper, we characterized a GolS gene (BhGolS1) that was dehydration and ABA-inducible in the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica and conferred dehydration tolerance in a transgenic tobacco system. Four W-box cis-elements were identified in the BhGolS1 promoter and shown to be bound by an early dehydration and ABA-inducible WRKY gene (BhWRKY1). These data suggest a mechanism where BhWRKY1 is likely to function in an ABA-dependent signal pathway to regulate BhGolS1 expression, which leads to the accumulation of RFOs in desiccation-tolerant B. hygrometrica leaves.

  19. Wine polyphenols exert antineoplasic effect on androgen resistant PC-3 cell line through the inhibition of the transcriptional activity of COX-2 promoter mediated by NF-kβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruelo, A; de Las Heras, M M; Redondo, C; Ramón de Fata, F; Romero, I; Angulo, J C

    2014-09-01

    Mediterranean diet may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is associated with increased cellular proliferation, prevents apoptosis and favors tumor invasion. We intend to clarify whether resveratrol and other polyphenols effectively inhibit COX-2 activity and induce apoptosis in hormone-resistant PC-3 cell line. PC-3 cells were cultured and treated with different concentrations of gallic acid, tannic acid, quercetin, and resveratrol in presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA; 50 μg/ml) that induces COX-2 expression. Total RNA was extracted and COX-2 expression was analyzed by relative quantification real-time PCR (ΔΔCt method). COX-2 activity was determined by PGE-2 detection using ELISA. Caspase 3/7 luminescence assay was used to disclose apoptosis. Transitory transfection with short human COX-2 (phPES2 -327/+59) and p5xNF-kβ-Luc plasmids determined COX-2 promoter activity and specifically that dependant of NF-kβ. COX-2 expression was not modified in media devoid of PMA. However, under PMA induction tannic acid (2.08 ±.21), gallic acid (2.46 ±.16), quercetin (1.78 ±.14) and resveratrol (1.15 ±.16) significantly inhibited COX-2 mRNA with respect to control (3.14 ±.07), what means a 34%, 23%, 46% and 61% reduction, respectively. The inhibition in the levels of PGE-2 followed a similar pattern. All compounds studied induced apoptosis at 48 h, although at a different rate. PMA caused a rise in activity 7.4 ±.23 times phPES2 -327/+59 and 2.0 ±.1 times p5xNF-kβ-Luc at 6h compared to basal. Resveratrol suppressed these effects 17.1 ±.21 and 32.4 ±.18 times, respectively. Similarly, but to a lesser extent, the rest of evaluated polyphenols diminished PMA inductor effect on the activity of both promoters. Polyphenols inhibit transcriptional activity of COX-2 promoter mediated by NF-kβ. This effect could explain, at least in part, the induction of apoptosis in vitro by

  20. Comparative integromics on FZD7 orthologs: conserved binding sites for PU.1, SP1, CCAAT-box and TCF/LEF/SOX transcription factors within 5'-promoter region of mammalian FZD7 orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    that the binding sites for PU.1, SP1/Krüppel-like, CCAAT-box, and TCF/LEF/SOX transcription factors were conserved among 5'-promoter regions of mammalian FZD7 orthologs.

  1. TRF2: TRansForming the view of general transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kedmi, Adi; Ideses, Diana; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is pivotal for development and differentiation of organisms. Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) initiates at the core promoter. Core promoters, which encompass the transcription start site, may contain functional core promoter elements, such as the TATA box, initiator, TCT and downstream core promoter element. TRF2 (TATA-box-binding protein-related factor 2) does not bind TATA box-containing promoters. Rather, it is recruited to core promoters via sequences other than the TATA box. We review the recent findings implicating TRF2 as a basal transcription factor in the regulation of diverse biological processes and specialized transcriptional programs.

  2. MicroRNA promoter analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megraw, Molly; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a brief overview of current knowledge about the promoters of plant microRNAs (miRNAs), and provide a step-by-step guide for predicting plant miRNA promoter elements using known transcription factor binding motifs. The approach to promoter element prediction is based on a carefully constructed collection of Positional Weight Matrices (PWMs) for known transcription factors (TFs) in Arabidopsis. A key concept of the method is to use scoring thresholds for potential binding sites that are appropriate to each individual transcription factor. While the procedure can be applied to search for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs) in any pol-II promoter region, it is particularly practical for the case of plant miRNA promoters where upstream sequence regions and binding sites are not readily available in existing databases. The majority of the material described in this chapter is available for download at http://microrna.gr.

  3. Systematic clustering of transcription start site landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Parker, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, high-throughput methods for transcription start site (TSS) detection have shown that most promoters have an array of neighboring TSSs where some are used more than others, forming a distribution of initiation propensities. TSS distributions (TSSDs) vary widely between promoters...

  4. JAZF1 promotes proliferation of C2C12 cells, but retards their myogenic differentiation through transcriptional repression of MEF2C and MRF4—Implications for the role of Jazf1 variants in oncogenesis and type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Aoki, Natsumi; Hijikata, Takao, E-mail: hijikata@musashino-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-15

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified in Jazf1, which is also involved in the oncogenesis of endometrial stromal tumors. To understand how Jazf1 variants confer a risk of tumorigenesis and T2D, we explored the functional roles of JAZF1 and searched for JAZF1 target genes in myogenic C2C12 cells. Consistent with an increase of Jazf1 transcripts during myoblast proliferation and their decrease during myogenic differentiation in regenerating skeletal muscle, JAZF1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, whereas it retarded myogenic differentiation. Examination of myogenic genes revealed that JAZF1 overexpression transcriptionally repressed MEF2C and MRF4 and their downstream genes. AMP deaminase1 (AMPD1) was identified as a candidate for JAZF1 target by gene array analysis. However, promoter assays of Ampd1 demonstrated that mutation of the putative binding site for the TR4/JAZF1 complex did not alleviate the repressive effects of JAZF1 on promoter activity. Instead, JAZF1-mediated repression of Ampd1 occurred through the MEF2-binding site and E-box within the Ampd1 proximal regulatory elements. Consistently, MEF2C and MRF4 expression enhanced Ampd1 promoter activity. AMPD1 overexpression and JAZF1 downregulation impaired AMPK phosphorylation, while JAZF1 overexpression also reduced it. Collectively, these results suggest that aberrant JAZF1 expression contributes to the oncogenesis and T2D pathogenesis. - Highlights: • JAZF1 promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation of myoblasts. • JAZF1 retards myogenic differentiation and hypertrophy of myotubes. • JAZF1 transcriptionally represses Mef2C and Mrf4 expression. • JAZF1 has an impact on the phosphorylation of AMPK.

  5. Promoter shape varies across populations and affects promoter evolution and expression noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Ignacio E; Degner, Jacob F; Harnett, Dermot; Cannavò, Enrico; Casale, Francesco P; Shim, Heejung; Garfield, David A; Birney, Ewan; Stephens, Matthew; Stegle, Oliver; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2017-04-01

    Animal promoters initiate transcription either at precise positions (narrow promoters) or dispersed regions (broad promoters), a distinction referred to as promoter shape. Although highly conserved, the functional properties of promoters with different shapes and the genetic basis of their evolution remain unclear. Here we used natural genetic variation across a panel of 81 Drosophila lines to measure changes in transcriptional start site (TSS) usage, identifying thousands of genetic variants affecting transcript levels (strength) or the distribution of TSSs within a promoter (shape). Our results identify promoter shape as a molecular trait that can evolve independently of promoter strength. Broad promoters typically harbor shape-associated variants, with signatures of adaptive selection. Single-cell measurements demonstrate that variants modulating promoter shape often increase expression noise, whereas heteroallelic interactions with other promoter variants alleviate these effects. These results uncover new functional properties of natural promoters and suggest the minimization of expression noise as an important factor in promoter evolution.

  6. From DNA binding to transcriptional activation: Is the TALE complete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobola, Nicoletta

    2017-09-04

    How transcription factors (TFs) control enhancer and promoter functions to effect changes in gene expression is an important question. In this issue, Hau et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201701154) show that the TALE TF MEIS recruits the histone modifier PARP1/ARTD1 at promoters to decompact chromatin and activate transcription. © 2017 Bobola.

  7. DNA dynamically directs its own transcription initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, K. O. (Kim O.); Kalosakas, G. (George); Bishop, A. R. (Alan R.); Choi, C. H. (Chu H.); Usheva, A. (Anny)

    2004-01-01

    Initiation of DNA gene transcription requires a transient opening in the double helix at the transcriptional start site. It is generally assumed that the location of this 'transcriptional bubble' is determined by sequence-specific protein binding, and that the energy required for unwinding the double helix comes from torsional strain. Physical twisting should cause DNA to open consistently in weakly bonded A/T rich stretches, however, simple base-pairing energetics alone can not account for the variety of observed transcriptional start sites. Applying the Peyrard-Bishop nonlinear cooperativity model to DNA, we are able to predict that thermally-induced DNA bubbles, similar in size to transcription bubbles, form at specific locations on DNA promoters. These predicted openings agree remarkably well with experiment, and that they correlate exactly with known transcription start sites and important regulatory sites on three different promoters. We propose that the sequence-specific location of the transcriptional start site is predetermined by the inherent opening patterns of specific DNA sequences. As DNA bubble formation is independent of protein binding, it appears that DNA is not only a passive carrier of information, but its dynamics plays an important role in directing the transcription and regulation of the genes it contains.

  8. Study of activity transcription factors C/EBPalpha in region - 53 to - 33 of promoter apolipoprotein B gene Estudo da atividade do fator de transcrição C/EBPalfa na região -53 a -33 do promoter do gene da apolipoproteina B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Cristina Dantas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein B (ApoB plays a major role in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This protein acts as a ligand for the cellular recognition and catabolism of low density lipoprotein (LDL by the LDL receptor. Previous studies have shown that the expression of apoB in hepatic cells is regulated by the interaction of factors binding to enhancer elements in intron 2 and three elements designated III, IV and V. These elements lie within regions respectively -86 to -62, -72 to -53 and -53 to -33 from the ApoB promoter. In this study, we have suggested that transcription factor C/EBPalpha, which binds to the -53 to -33 region of the apoB, interacts with the HNF-4 synergistic complex and C/EBPalpha factors within -86 to -53 and may contribute to increase transcription of the ApoB gene.A apolipoproteina B (apoB tem um importante papel na regulação na homeostasia celular, do colesterol e na patogênese da aterosclerose. Esta proteína age como ligante para o reconhecimento e catabolismo lipoproteínas de baixa densidade (LBD através do receptor de LDL. Estudos anteriores mostraram que a expressão do gene da apolipoproteína B (APOB em células hepáticas é regulada pela interação de fatores ligados ao elemento enhancer no intron 2, e em 3 elementos denominados de III, IV e V localizados nas regiões -86 a -62, -72 a -53 e -53 a -33 , respectivamente, do promotor do gene da APOB. Neste trabalho, nós sugerimos que o fator de transcrição C/EBPalfa ligado a região -53 a -33 da APOB interage com o complexo HNF-4 e C/EBPalfa localizado dentro da região -86 a -53 do APO B e contribui para aumentar a transcrição do gene APOB.

  9. Genetic analysis of Kruppel-like zinc finger 11 variants in 5864 Danish individuals: potential effect on insulin resistance and modified signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 binding by promoter variant -1659G>C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Froguel, Philippe; Hamid, Yasmin H

    2008-01-01

    interfering RNA transfection. RESULTS: We could not confirm T2D association of the KLF11 LD block, however, in glucose-tolerant subjects; it was significantly associated with higher fasting serum insulin and C-peptide levels and increased homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance indexes (P = 0.00004, P...... = 0.006, and P = 0.00002, respectively). In addition, binding of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 to the wild-type (-1659G>C) allele stimulated gene transcription, whereas STAT3 did not bind onto the mutant allele. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that KLF11 may interfere with glucose...

  10. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  11. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  12. Chromosomal organization of transcription: in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sam; Reverchon, Sylvie; Nasser, William; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2017-11-28

    Early studies of transcriptional regulation focused on individual gene promoters defined specific transcription factors as central agents of genetic control. However, recent genome-wide data propelled a different view by linking spatially organized gene expression patterns to chromosomal dynamics. Therefore, the major problem in contemporary molecular genetics concerned with transcriptional gene regulation is to establish a unifying model that reconciles these two views. This problem, situated at the interface of polymer physics and network theory, requires development of an integrative methodology. In this review, we discuss recent achievements in classical model organism E. coli and provide some novel insights gained from studies of a bacterial plant pathogen, D. dadantii. We consider DNA topology and the basal transcription machinery as key actors of regulation, in which activation of functionally relevant genes is coupled to and coordinated with the establishment of extended chromosomal domains of coherent transcription. We argue that the spatial organization of genome plays a fundamental role in its own regulation.

  13. Negative modulation of the chicken infectious anemia virus promoter by COUP-TF1 and an E box-like element at the transcription start site binding dEF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the promoter-enhancer of chicken infectious anemia virus (CAV) is increased in an estrogen receptor-enhanced cell line when treated with estrogen. This promoter-enhancer also binds unidentified proteins that recognize a consens...

  14. Myocardial deletion of transcription factor CHF1/Hey2 results in altered myocyte action potential and mild conduction system expansion but does not alter conduction system function or promote spontaneous arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew E Hartman; Liu, Yonggang; Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chad S. Weldy; Fishman, Glenn I.; Laflamme, Michael A.; Chin, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    CHF1/Hey2 is a Notch-responsive basic helix–loop-helix transcription factor involved in cardiac development. Common variants in Hey2 are associated with Brugada syndrome. We hypothesized that absence of CHF1/Hey2 would result in abnormal cellular electrical activity, altered cardiac conduction system (CCS) development, and increased arrhythmogenesis. We isolated neonatal CHF/Hey2-knockout (KO) cardiac myocytes and measured action potentials and ion channel subunit gene expression. We also cro...

  15. The LIM Homeodomain Transcription Factor LHX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichao; Gutierrez, Diana; Li, Xiao; Bidlack, Felicitas; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Andrade, Kelsey; Margolis, Henry C.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    LHX6 is a LIM-homeobox transcription factor expressed during embryogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating LHX6 transcriptional activities are unknown. LHX6 and the PITX2 homeodomain transcription factor have overlapping expression patterns during tooth and craniofacial development, and in this report, we demonstrate new transcriptional mechanisms for these factors. PITX2 and LHX6 are co-expressed in the oral and dental epithelium and epithelial cell lines. Lhx6 expression is increased in Pitx2c transgenic mice and decreased in Pitx2 null mice. PITX2 activates endogenous Lhx6 expression and the Lhx6 promoter, whereas LHX6 represses its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal endogenous PITX2 binding to the Lhx6 promoter. LHX6 directly interacts with PITX2 to inhibit PITX2 transcriptional activities and activation of multiple promoters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal an LHX6·PITX2 nuclear interaction in living cells. LHX6 has a dominant repressive effect on the PITX2 synergistic activation with LEF-1 and β-catenin co-factors. Thus, LHX6 acts as a transcriptional repressor and represses the expression of several genes involved in odontogenesis. We have identified specific defects in incisor, molar, mandible, bone, and root development and late stage enamel formation in Lhx6 null mice. Amelogenin and ameloblastin expression is reduced and/or delayed in the Lhx6 null mice, potentially resulting from defects in dentin deposition and ameloblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that LHX6 regulates cell proliferation in the cervical loop and promotes cell differentiation in the anterior region of the incisor. We demonstrate new molecular mechanisms for LHX6 and an interaction with PITX2 for normal craniofacial and tooth development. PMID:23229549

  16. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vichi; F. Coin (Frédéric); J-P. Renaud (Jean-Paul); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Moras; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA boxbinding protein

  17. WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A model for genesis of transcription systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Zachary F; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guowei; Geiger, James H

    2016-01-01

    Repeating sequences generated from RNA gene fusions/ligations dominate ancient life, indicating central importance of building structural complexity in evolving biological systems. A simple and coherent story of life on earth is told from tracking repeating motifs that generate α/β proteins, 2-double-Ψ-β-barrel (DPBB) type RNA polymerases (RNAPs), general transcription factors (GTFs), and promoters. A general rule that emerges is that biological complexity that arises through generation of repeats is often bounded by solubility and closure (i.e., to form a pseudo-dimer or a barrel). Because the first DNA genomes were replicated by DNA template-dependent RNA synthesis followed by RNA template-dependent DNA synthesis via reverse transcriptase, the first DNA replication origins were initially 2-DPBB type RNAP promoters. A simplifying model for evolution of promoters/replication origins via repetition of core promoter elements is proposed. The model can explain why Pribnow boxes in bacterial transcription (i.e., (-12)TATAATG(-6)) so closely resemble TATA boxes (i.e., (-31)TATAAAAG(-24)) in archaeal/eukaryotic transcription. The evolution of anchor DNA sequences in bacterial (i.e., (-35)TTGACA(-30)) and archaeal (BRE(up); BRE for TFB recognition element) promoters is potentially explained. The evolution of BRE(down) elements of archaeal promoters is potentially explained.

  19. The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD)

    OpenAIRE

    Perier, R. C.; Praz, V; Junier, T; Bonnard, C.; Bucher, P

    2000-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) is an annotated non-redundant collection of eukaryotic POL II promoters for which the transcription start site has been determined experimentally. Access to promoter sequences is provided by pointers to positions in nucleotide sequence entries. The annotation part of an entry includes a description of the initiation site mapping data, exhaustive cross-references to the EMBL nucleotide sequence database, SWISS-PROT, TRANSFAC and other databases, as well a...

  20. Enhancement of CIITA transcriptional function by ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Susanna F; Zika, Eleni; Conti, Brian; Zhu, Xin-Sheng; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2003-11-01

    Although increasing evidence indicates that there is a direct link between ubiquitination and mono-ubiquitination and transcription in yeast, this link has not been demonstrated in higher eukaryotes. Here we show that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA), which is required for expression of genes encoding MHC class II molecules, is ubiquitinated. This ubiquitination enhanced the association of CIITA with both MHC class II transcription factors and the MHC class II promoter, resulting in an increase in transactivation function and in the expression of MHC class II mRNA. The degree of CIITA ubiquitination was controlled by histone acetylases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs), indicating that the crucial cellular processes mediated by these enzymes are linked to regulate transcription. Thus, ubiquitin positively regulates a mammalian coactivator by enhancing its assembly at the promoter.

  1. Exposure to double-stranded RNA mediated by tobacco rattle virus leads to transcription up-regulation of effector gene Mi-vap-2 from Meloidogyne incognita and promotion of pathogenicity in progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yuankai; Wang, Xuan; Le, Xiuhu; Ju, Yuliang; Guan, Tinglong; Li, Hongmei

    2016-02-01

    Meloidogyne spp. are economically important plant parasites and cause enormous damage to agriculture world-wide. These nematodes use secreted effectors which modify host cells, allowing them to obtain the nutrients required for growth and development. A better understanding of the roles of effectors in nematode parasitism is critical for understanding the mechanisms of nematode-host interactions. In this study, Mi-vap-2 of Meloidogyne incognita, a gene encoding a venom allergen-like protein, was targeted by RNA interference mediated by the tobacco rattle virus. Unexpectedly, compared with a wild type line, a substantial up-regulation of Mi-vap-2 transcript was observed in juveniles collected at 7 days p.i. from Nicotiana benthamiana agroinfiltrated with TRV::vap-2. This up-regulation of the targeted transcript did not impact development of females or the production of galls, nor the number of females on the TRV::vap-2 line. In a positive control line, the transcript of Mi16D10 was knocked down in juveniles from the TRV::16D10 line at 7 days p.i., resulting in a significant inhibition of nematode development. The up-regulation of Mi-vap-2 triggered by TRV-RNAi was inherited by the progeny of the nematodes exposed to double-stranded RNA. Meanwhile, a substantial increase in Mi-VAP-2 expression in those juvenile progeny was revealed by ELISA. This caused an increase in the number of galls (71.2%) and females (84.6%) produced on seedlings of N. benthamiana compared with the numbers produced by control nematodes. Up-regulation of Mi-vap-2 and its encoded protein therefore enhanced pathogenicity of the nematodes, suggesting that Mi-vap-2 may be required for successful parasitism during the early parasitic stage of M. incognita. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Defining transcriptional networks through integrative modeling of mRNA expression and transcription factor binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussemaker Harmen J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomics studies are yielding information about regulatory processes in the cell at an unprecedented scale. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, DNA microarrays have not only been used to measure the mRNA abundance for all genes under a variety of conditions but also to determine the occupancy of all promoter regions by a large number of transcription factors. The challenge is to extract useful information about the global regulatory network from these data. Results We present MA-Networker, an algorithm that combines microarray data for mRNA expression and transcription factor occupancy to define the regulatory network of the cell. Multivariate regression analysis is used to infer the activity of each transcription factor, and the correlation across different conditions between this activity and the mRNA expression of a gene is interpreted as regulatory coupling strength. Applying our method to S. cerevisiae, we find that, on average, 58% of the genes whose promoter region is bound by a transcription factor are true regulatory targets. These results are validated by an analysis of enrichment for functional annotation, response for transcription factor deletion, and over-representation of cis-regulatory motifs. We are able to assign directionality to transcription factors that control divergently transcribed genes sharing the same promoter region. Finally, we identify an intrinsic limitation of transcription factor deletion experiments related to the combinatorial nature of transcriptional control, to which our approach provides an alternative. Conclusion Our reliable classification of ChIP positives into functional and non-functional TF targets based on their expression pattern across a wide range of conditions provides a starting point for identifying the unknown sequence features in non-coding DNA that directly or indirectly determine the context dependence of transcription factor action. Complete analysis results are

  3. Cellular Transcription Factor YY1 Mediates the Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) IE62 Transcriptional Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Sommer, Marvin; Arvin, Ann; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Several cellular transcription factors have been shown to be involved in IE62-mediated activation. The YY1 cellular transcription factor has activating and repressive effects on gene transcription. Analysis of the VZV genome revealed 19 postulated YY1 binding sites located within putative promoters of 16 VZV genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) confirmed the binding of YY1 to ORF10, ORF28/29 and gI promoters and the mutation of these binding sites inhibited YY1 binding and the promoter activation by IE62 alone or following VZV infection. Mutation of the ORF28/29 YY1 site in the VZV genome displayed insignificant influence on virus growth in melanoma cells; but it inhibited the virus replication significantly at day 5 and 6 post infection in HELF cells. This work suggests a novel role for the cellular factor YY1 in VZV replication through the mediation of IE62 activation of viral gene expression. PMID:24418559

  4. Nuclear gadgets in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D A

    1991-03-01

    In mammalian mitochondrial DNA, activation of the light-strand promoter mediates both priming of leading-strand replication and initiation of light-strand transcription. Accurate and efficient transcription requires at least two proteins: mitochondrial RNA polymerase and a separable transcription factor that can function across species boundaries. Subsequently, primer RNAs are cleaved by a site-specific ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease that recognizes short, highly conserved sequence elements in the RNA substrate.

  5. Molecular characterization of a transcriptionally active Ty1/copia-like retrotransposon in Gossypium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuefen; Jiang, Yurong; Ding, Mingquan; He, Shae; Zhang, Hua; Lin, Lifeng; Rong, Junkang

    2015-06-01

    A transcriptionally active Ty1/copia -like retrotransposon was identified in the genome of Gossypium barbadense. The different heat activation of this element was observed in two tetraploid cotton species. Most retrotransposons from plants are transcriptionally silent, or activated under certain conditions. Only a small portion of elements are transcriptionally active under regular condition. A long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon was isolated from the cultivated Sea Island cotton (H7124) genome during the investigation of the function of a homeodomain leucine zipper gene (HD1) in trichome growth. Insertion of this element in HD1 gene of At sub-genome was related to the trichomeless stem in Gossypium barbadense. The element, named as GBRE-1, had all features of a typical Ty1/copia retrotransposon and possessed high similarity to the members of ONSEN retrotransposon family. It was 4997 bp long, comprising a single 4110 bp open reading frame, which encoded 1369 amino acids including the conserved domains of gag and pol. The expression of GBRE-1 was detected under regular condition in G. barbadense and G. hirsutum, and its expression level was increased under heat-stress condition in G. hirsutum. Besides, its expression pattern was similar to that of the ONSEN retrotransposon. Abundant cis-regulatory motifs related to stress-response and transcriptional regulation were found in the LTR sequence. These results suggested that GBRE-1 was a transcriptionally active retrotransposon in Gossypium. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of a complete Ty1/copia-type retrotransposon with present-day transcriptional activity in cotton.

  6. Filovirus replication and transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Mühlberger, Elke

    2007-01-01

    The highly pathogenic filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola virus, belong to the nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales. The mode of replication and transcription is similar for these viruses. On one hand, the negative-sense RNA genome serves as a template for replication, to generate progeny genomes, and, on the other hand, for transcription, to produce mRNAs. Despite the similarities in the replication/transcription strategy, filoviruses have evolved structural and fu...

  7. Transcription regulation by the human Ccr4-Not proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwartjes, Catharina Geertruida Maria

    2004-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is a highly regulated process. Multiple protein complexes are involved in the regulation of mRNA synthesis. The Ccr4-Not complex regulates transcription at a global level and, most likely, requires other proteins to associate with promoters. The complex is

  8. WRKY transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  9. Functional Screening of Core Promoter Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Dan Y; Kedmi, Adi; Ideses, Diana; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    The core promoter is the DNA sequence that recruits the basal transcription machinery and directs accurate initiation of transcription. It is an active contributor to gene expression that can be rationally designed to manipulate the levels of expression. Core promoter function can be analyzed using different experimental approaches. Here, we describe the qualitative and quantitative analysis of engineered core promoter functions using the EGFP reporter gene that is driven by distinct core promoters. Expression plasmids are transfected into different mammalian cell lines, and the resulting fluorescence is monitored by live cell imaging , as well as by flow cytometry. In order to verify that the transcriptional activity of the examined core promoters is indeed a function of their activity, as opposed to differences in DNA uptake, real-time quantitative PCR analysis is performed. Importantly, the described methodology for functional screening of core promoter activity has enabled the analysis of engineered potent core promoters for extended time periods.

  10. Polycomb Responds to Low Levels of Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Berrozpe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available How is Polycomb (Pc, a eukaryotic negative regulator of transcription, targeted to specific mammalian genes? Our genome-wide analysis of the Pc mark H3K27me3 in murine cells revealed that Pc is preferentially associated with CpG island promoters of genes that are transcribed at a low level and less so with promoters of genes that are either silent or more highly expressed. Studies of the CpG island promoter of the Kit gene demonstrate that Pc is largely absent when the gene is silent in myeloid cells, as well as when the gene is highly expressed in mast cells. Manipulations that increase transcription in the former case, and reduce it in the latter, increase Pc occupancy. The average negative effect of Pc, we infer, is about 2-fold. We suggest possible biological roles for such negative effects and propose a mechanism by which Pc might be recruited to weakly transcribed genes.

  11. Dynamic analysis of stochastic transcription cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire V Harper

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In individual mammalian cells the expression of some genes such as prolactin is highly variable over time and has been suggested to occur in stochastic pulses. To investigate the origins of this behavior and to understand its functional relevance, we quantitatively analyzed this variability using new mathematical tools that allowed us to reconstruct dynamic transcription rates of different reporter genes controlled by identical promoters in the same living cell. Quantitative microscopic analysis of two reporter genes, firefly luciferase and destabilized EGFP, was used to analyze the dynamics of prolactin promoter-directed gene expression in living individual clonal and primary pituitary cells over periods of up to 25 h. We quantified the time-dependence and cyclicity of the transcription pulses and estimated the length and variation of active and inactive transcription phases. We showed an average cycle period of approximately 11 h and demonstrated that while the measured time distribution of active phases agreed with commonly accepted models of transcription, the inactive phases were differently distributed and showed strong memory, with a refractory period of transcriptional inactivation close to 3 h. Cycles in transcription occurred at two distinct prolactin-promoter controlled reporter genes in the same individual clonal or primary cells. However, the timing of the cycles was independent and out-of-phase. For the first time, we have analyzed transcription dynamics from two equivalent loci in real-time in single cells. In unstimulated conditions, cells showed independent transcription dynamics at each locus. A key result from these analyses was the evidence for a minimum refractory period in the inactive-phase of transcription. The response to acute signals and the result of manipulation of histone acetylation was consistent with the hypothesis that this refractory period corresponded to a phase of chromatin remodeling which significantly

  12. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  13. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  14. Transcriptional features of genomic regulatory blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akalin, Altuna; Fredman, David; Arner, Erik; Dong, Xianjun; Bryne, Jan Christian; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Lenhard, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) are chromosomal regions spanned by highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNEs), most of which serve as regulatory inputs of one target gene in the region. The target genes are most often transcription factors involved in embryonic development and differentiation. GRBs often contain extensive gene deserts, as well as additional 'bystander' genes intertwined with HCNEs but whose expression and function are unrelated to those of the target gene. The tight regulation of target genes, complex arrangement of regulatory inputs, and the differential responsiveness of genes in the region call for the examination of fundamental rules governing transcriptional activity in GRBs. Here we use extensive CAGE tag mapping of transcription start sites across different human tissues and differentiation stages combined with expression data and a number of sequence and epigenetic features to discover these rules and patterns. We show evidence that GRB target genes have properties that set them apart from their bystanders as well as other genes in the genome: longer CpG islands, a higher number and wider spacing of alternative transcription start sites, and a distinct composition of transcription factor binding sites in their core/proximal promoters. Target gene expression correlates with the acetylation state of HCNEs in the region. Additionally, target gene promoters have a distinct combination of activating and repressing histone modifications in mouse embryonic stem cell lines. GRB targets are genes with a number of unique features that are the likely cause of their ability to respond to regulatory inputs from very long distances.

  15. Chromatin Kinases Act on Transcription Factors and Histone Tails in Regulation of Inducible Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefowicz, Steven Z; Shimada, Miho; Armache, Anja; Li, Charles H; Miller, Rand M; Lin, Shu; Yang, Aerin; Dill, Brian D; Molina, Henrik; Park, Hee-Sung; Garcia, Benjamin A; Taunton, Jack; Roeder, Robert G; Allis, C David

    2016-10-20

    The inflammatory response requires coordinated activation of both transcription factors and chromatin to induce transcription for defense against pathogens and environmental insults. We sought to elucidate the connections between inflammatory signaling pathways and chromatin through genomic footprinting of kinase activity and unbiased identification of prominent histone phosphorylation events. We identified H3 serine 28 phosphorylation (H3S28ph) as the principal stimulation-dependent histone modification and observed its enrichment at induced genes in mouse macrophages stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we identified mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MSKs) as primary mediators of H3S28ph in macrophages. Cell-free transcription assays demonstrated that H3S28ph directly promotes p300/CBP-dependent transcription. Further, MSKs can activate both signal-responsive transcription factors and the chromatin template with additive effects on transcription. Specific inhibition of MSKs in macrophages selectively reduced transcription of stimulation-induced genes. Our results suggest that MSKs incorporate upstream signaling inputs and control multiple downstream regulators of inducible transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Drosophila TRF2 is a preferential core promoter regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedmi, Adi; Zehavi, Yonathan; Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Ideses, Diana; Wachtel, Chaim; Doniger, Tirza; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Muster, Nemone; Thompson, James; Anderson, Scott; Avrahami, Dorit; Yates, John R; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-10-01

    Transcription of protein-coding genes is highly dependent on the RNA polymerase II core promoter. Core promoters, generally defined as the regions that direct transcription initiation, consist of functional core promoter motifs (such as the TATA-box, initiator [Inr], and downstream core promoter element [DPE]) that confer specific properties to the core promoter. The known basal transcription factors that support TATA-dependent transcription are insufficient for in vitro transcription of DPE-dependent promoters. In search of a transcription factor that supports DPE-dependent transcription, we used a biochemical complementation approach and identified the Drosophila TBP (TATA-box-binding protein)-related factor 2 (TRF2) as an enriched factor in the fractions that support DPE-dependent transcription. We demonstrate that the short TRF2 isoform preferentially activates DPE-dependent promoters. DNA microarray analysis reveals the enrichment of DPE promoters among short TRF2 up-regulated genes. Using primer extension analysis and reporter assays, we show the importance of the DPE in transcriptional regulation of TRF2 target genes. It was previously shown that, unlike TBP, TRF2 fails to bind DNA containing TATA-boxes. Using microfluidic affinity analysis, we discovered that short TRF2-bound DNA oligos are enriched for Inr and DPE motifs. Taken together, our findings highlight the role of short TRF2 as a preferential core promoter regulator. © 2014 Kedmi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart A; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-30

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  18. Accumulation of genome-specific transcripts, transcription factors and phytohormonal regulators during early stages of fiber cell development in allotetraploid cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Yang, S; Cheung, Foo; Lee, Jinsuk J; Ha, Misook; Wei, Ning E; Sze, Sing-Hoi; Stelly, David M; Thaxton, Peggy; Triplett, Barbara; Town, Christopher D; Jeffrey Chen, Z

    2006-09-01

    Gene expression during the early stages of fiber cell development and in allopolyploid crops is poorly understood. Here we report computational and expression analyses of 32 789 high-quality ESTs derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. Texas Marker-1 (TM-1) immature ovules (GH_TMO). The ESTs were assembled into 8540 unique sequences including 4036 tentative consensus sequences (TCs) and 4504 singletons, representing approximately 15% of the unique sequences in the cotton EST collection. Compared with approximately 178 000 existing ESTs derived from elongating fibers and non-fiber tissues, GH_TMO ESTs showed a significant increase in the percentage of genes encoding putative transcription factors such as MYB and WRKY and genes encoding predicted proteins involved in auxin, brassinosteroid (BR), gibberellic acid (GA), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene signaling pathways. Cotton homologs related to MIXTA, MYB5, GL2 and eight genes in the auxin, BR, GA and ethylene pathways were induced during fiber cell initiation but repressed in the naked seed mutant (N1N1) that is impaired in fiber formation. The data agree with the known roles of MYB and WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis leaf trichome development and the well-documented phytohormonal effects on fiber cell development in immature cotton ovules cultured in vitro. Moreover, the phytohormonal pathway-related genes were induced prior to the activation of MYB-like genes, suggesting an important role of phytohormones in cell fate determination. Significantly, AA sub-genome ESTs of all functional classifications including cell-cycle control and transcription factor activity were selectively enriched in G. hirsutum L., an allotetraploid derived from polyploidization between AA and DD genome species, a result consistent with the production of long lint fibers in AA genome species. These results suggest general roles for genome-specific, phytohormonal and transcriptional gene regulation during the early stages of fiber

  19. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  20. Genome organization and transcriptional regulation of respiratory syncytial virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this work was to analyze the RS virus order of transcription, gene organization and transcriptional regulation to determine other unique RS virus features and better compare RS virus to other paramyxoviruses. The number of viral promoters and the order of transcription was determined using UV inactivation experiments. RNA transcribed from UV damaged genomes was analyzed by gel electrophoresis and dot blot hybridization. These experiments revealed that RS virus has a single transcriptional promoter, as has been shown for other paramyxoviruses. Also like other paramyxoviruses, the gene encoding the major nucleocapsid protein (N) lies close to the promoter site at the 3' end of the genome while the gene presumed to encode the viral polymerase is found at the 5' end of the genome. However, unlike other paramyxoviruses, two genes coding for small, unique nonstructural proteins lie before the N gene at the 3' end of the genome.

  1. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    promoters, our analysis suggests a possible alternative mechanism of regulation and/or biogenesis of sense-intronic lncRNAs. [Ghosh S., Sati S., Sengupta S. and Scaria V. 2015 Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs. J. Genet.

  2. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...

  3. Functional consequences of splicing of the antisense transcript COOLAIR on FLC transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Sebastian; Raitskin, Oleg; Wu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    perturbs a cotranscriptional feedback mechanism linking COOLAIR processing to FLC gene body histone demethylation and reduced FLC transcription. The importance of COOLAIR splicing in this repression mechanism was confirmed by disrupting COOLAIR production and mutating the COOLAIR proximal splice acceptor......Antisense transcription is widespread in many genomes; however, how much is functional is hotly debated. We are investigating functionality of a set of long noncoding antisense transcripts, collectively called COOLAIR, produced at Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). COOLAIR initiates just...... downstream of the major sense transcript poly(A) site and terminates either early or extends into the FLC promoter region. We now show that splicing of COOLAIR is functionally important. This was revealed through analysis of a hypomorphic mutation in the core spliceosome component PRP8. The prp8 mutation...

  4. HDAC Activity Is Required for Efficient Core Promoter Function at the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang C. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have been shown to be required for basal or inducible transcription at a variety of genes by poorly understood mechanisms. We demonstrated previously that HDAC inhibition rapidly repressed transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter by a mechanism that does not require the binding of upstream transcription factors. In the current study, we find that HDACs work through the core promoter sequences of MMTV as well as those of several cellular genes to facilitate transcriptional initiation through deacetylation of nonhistone proteins.

  5. Hey bHLH transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David; Wiese, Cornelia; Gessler, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are direct targets of canonical Notch signaling. The three mammalian Hey proteins are closely related to Hes proteins and they primarily repress target genes by either directly binding to core promoters or by inhibiting other transcriptional activators. Individual candidate gene approaches and systematic screens identified a number of Hey target genes, which often encode other transcription factors involved in various developmental processes. Here, we review data on interaction partners and target genes and conclude with a model for Hey target gene regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how expression of Hey proteins affects processes like cell fate decisions and differentiation, e.g., in cardiovascular, skeletal, and neural development or oncogenesis and how this relates to the observed developmental defects and phenotypes observed in various knockout mice. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvergne, Béatrice; Michalik, Liliane; Wahli, Walter

    2006-04-01

    Our understanding of metabolism is undergoing a dramatic shift. Indeed, the efforts made towards elucidating the mechanisms controlling the major regulatory pathways are now being rewarded. At the molecular level, the crucial role of transcription factors is particularly well-illustrated by the link between alterations of their functions and the occurrence of major metabolic diseases. In addition, the possibility of manipulating the ligand-dependent activity of some of these transcription factors makes them attractive as therapeutic targets. The aim of this review is to summarize recent knowledge on the transcriptional control of metabolic homeostasis. We first review data on the transcriptional regulation of the intermediary metabolism, i.e., glucose, amino acid, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. Then, we analyze how transcription factors integrate signals from various pathways to ensure homeostasis. One example of this coordination is the daily adaptation to the circadian fasting and feeding rhythm. This section also discusses the dysregulations causing the metabolic syndrome, which reveals the intricate nature of glucose and lipid metabolism and the role of the transcription factor PPARgamma in orchestrating this association. Finally, we discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic regulations, which provide new opportunities for treating complex metabolic disorders.

  8. Adaptive inducibility of CREM as transcriptional memory of circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, N S; Duval, G; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1996-05-02

    The CREM gene encodes the transcriptional repressor ICER, which has been implicated in the molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms in mammals. ICER is rhythmically expressed in the pineal gland, with peak levels occurring at night. ICER levels are regulated by light by means of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN); transcription is induced during darkness by adrenergic input to the pineal gland from the SCN, which activates the ICER promoter using cyclic AMP and the transcriptional activator CREB. This induction is transient because ICER represses its own transcription. Here we show that the response of the CREM gene to adrenergic stimulation is determined by night length. Depending on the photoperiod of the prior entraining cycles, the CREM gene is either subsensitive or supersensitive to induction. This differential responsiveness is controlled by the changing balance between positive (CREB) and negative (ICER) transcriptional regulators. Thus, the transcriptional response of the CREM gene is determined by the memory of past photoperiods.

  9. 21 CFR 12.98 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a verbatim stenographic transcript of oral testimony and for necessary copies of the transcript. (b... the transcript of oral testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The...

  10. Transcription factor decoy technology: A therapeutic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Markus; Wagner, Andreas H

    2017-11-15

    Targeting transcription factors represents one possibility to interfere with a known activated regulatory pathway that promotes disease. Double-stranded transcription factor decoy (TFD) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) are therapeutic drug candidates, which are able to specifically target and neutralize key transcription factors involved in the pathogenesis of a given disease. These short double-stranded TFD molecules mimic the consensus DNA binding site of a specific transcription factor in the promoter region of its target genes. Therefore, it is possible to exploit this nucleic acid-based drug class for the treatment of diseases caused by aberrant expression of such target genes the products of which are involved in disease initiation and progression. This research update focuses firstly on the mechanism of action of TFD molecules. Long-term effects of such ODNs depend on their stability and the efficiency by which they are delivered to the target tissue and taken up by their target cells. Hence structural modifications like e.g., single-stranded TFD molecules hybridising to itself to form an intramolecular hairpin molecule or circular ODNs assuming a dumbbell configuration, intended to enhance both stability and efficacy, are addressed. Also specific drug delivery methods like ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction with TFD ODN-coated microbubbles or adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for tissue-specific transduction and long-term TFD molecule expression in non-dividing cells will be discussed. Finally, current therapeutic applications of TFD ODN will be summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Copia is transcriptionally responsive to environmental stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, D J; McDonald, J F

    1985-01-01

    Adult Drosophila subjected to a variety of environmental stresses that induce classic Drosophila heat shock response simultaneously exhibit a rapid and significant rise in copia homologous transcripts. Levels of Drosophila Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase gene) and 18s ribosomal RNA were unaffected by environmental stress. Copia's ability to be induced by stress is correlated with the presence of sequences homologous to the heat shock promoter consensus sequence which appear to be appropriately pos...

  12. Conserved POU-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within FZD5 promoter: Transcriptional mechanisms of FZD5 in undifferentiated human ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    Canonical WNT signals are transduced through Frizzled (FZD) family receptor and LRP5/LRP6 co-receptor to upregulate FGF20, JAG1, DKK1, WISP1, CCND1 and MYC genes for cell-fate determination, while non-canonical WNT signals are transduced through FZD family receptor and ROR2/PTK7/RYK co-receptor to activate RHOA/RHOU/RAC/CDC42, JNK, PKC, NLK and NFAT signaling cascades for the regulation of tissue polarity, cell movement, and adhesion. We previously reported molecular cloning and characterization of human FZD5, which showed six amino-acid substitutions with human Hfz5. FZD5, functioning as WNT5A receptor, is the key molecule in the fields of oncology, regenerative medicine, cardiology, rheumatology, diabetology, and gastroenterology. Here, comparative integromics analyses on FZD5 orthologs were performed by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee FZD5 and cow Fzd5 genes were identified within NW_104292.1 and AC166656.2 genome sequences, respectively. FZD5 orthologs were seven-transmembrane proteins with extracellular Frizzled domain, leucine zipper motif around the 5th transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic DVL- and PDZ-binding motifs. Ser523 and Ser529 around the DVL-binding motif of FZD5 orthologs were putative aPKC phosphorylation sites. POU5F1 (OCT4)-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within the 5'-promoter region of human FZD5 gene was evolutionarily conserved among mammalian FZD5 orthologs. POU5F1 was more related to POU2F and POU3F subfamily members. POU5F1 was preferentially expressed in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer. POU2F1 (OCT1) was expressed in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, POU2F2 in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, and POU2F3 in diffuse-type gastric cancer. Multiple SP1/KLF family members, other than KLF2 or KLF4, were expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Together, these facts indicate that POU5F1 and POU2F subfamily members

  13. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  14. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  15. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    control spanning the range from completely muted to cranked up to maximum. The volume, in this case, is the production rate of proteins. This production is the result of a two step procedure: i) transcription, in which a small part of DNA from the genome (a gene) is transcribed into an RNA molecule (an mRNA...... prediction and provide tools that help investigators use these. In addition, a de novo motif discovery tool was developed that locates these patterns in DNA sequences. This compared favorably to many contemporary methods. A novel experimental method, cap-analysis of gene expression (CAGE), was recently......); and ii) translation, in which the mRNA is translated into a protein. This thesis focus on the ¿rst of these steps, transcription, and speci¿cally the initiation of this. Simpli¿ed, initiation is preceded by the binding of several proteins, known as transcription factors (TFs), to DNA. This takes place...

  16. Processivity and coupling in messenger RNA transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of messenger RNA processing is now being uncovered by experimental techniques that are capable of detecting individual copies of mRNA in cells, and by quantitative real-time observations that reveal the kinetics. This processing is commonly modelled by permitting mRNA to be transcribed only when the promoter is in the on state. In this simple on/off model, the many processes involved in active transcription are represented by a single reaction. These processes include elongation, which has a minimum time for completion and processing that is not captured in the model.In this paper, we explore the impact on the mRNA distribution of representing the elongation process in more detail. Consideration of the mechanisms of elongation leads to two alternative models of the coupling between the elongating polymerase and the state of the promoter: Processivity allows polymerases to complete elongation irrespective of the promoter state, whereas coupling requires the promoter to be active to produce a full-length transcript. We demonstrate that these alternatives have a significant impact on the predicted distributions. Models are simulated by the Gillespie algorithm, and the third and fourth moments of the resulting distribution are computed in order to characterise the length of the tail, and sharpness of the peak. By this methodology, we show that the moments provide a concise summary of the distribution, showing statistically-significant differences across much of the feasible parameter range.We conclude that processivity is not fully consistent with the on/off model unless the probability of successfully completing elongation is low--as has been observed. The results also suggest that some form of coupling between the promoter and a rate-limiting step in transcription may explain the cell's inability to maintain high mRNA levels at low noise--a prediction of the on/off model that has no supporting evidence.

  17. [Studies on selectivity of recognizing factor for rmf promoter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Q; Akira, I

    1997-02-01

    The truncted DNA template carrying rmf gene promoter was transcripted by E. coli RNA polymorase holoenzyme (E sigma) reconstituted with core enzyme (alpha 2 beta beta') and sigma 70 or sigma 38 in vitro. The initional site of the transcription of rmf was confirmed with different restriction endonuclease. rmf promoter can be recognized by E sigma 70 but not E sigma 38. The suitable temperature for in vitro transcription was 37 degrees C, NaCl concentration was 50 mmol/L.

  18. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  19. A code for transcription initiation in mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Martin C.; Valen, Eivind Dale; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide detection of transcription start sites (TSSs) has revealed that RNA Polymerase II transcription initiates at millions of positions in mammalian genomes. Most core promoters do not have a single TSS, but an array of closely located TSSs with different rates of initiation. As a rule...... that initiation events are clustered on the chromosomes at multiple scales - clusters within clusters - indicating multiple regulatory processes. Within the smallest of such clusters, which can be interpreted as core promoters, the local DNA sequence predicts the relative transcription start usage of each...... nucleotide with a remarkable 91% accuracy, implying the existence of a DNA code that determines TSS selection. Conversely, the total expression strength of such clusters is only partially determined by the local DNA sequence. Thus, the overall control of transcription can be understood as a combination...

  20. Rhythm quantization for transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.; Desain, P.W.M.; Kappen, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Music Transcription is the extraction of an acceptable notation from performed music. One important task in this problem is rhythm quantization which refers to categorization of note durations. Although quantization of a pure mechanical performance is rather straightforward, the task

  1. Actinomycin and DNA transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Sobell, H M

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding how actinomycin binds to DNA have suggested its mechanism of action. Actinomycin binds to a premelted DNA conformation present within the transcriptional complex. This immobilizes the complex, interfering with the elongation of growing RNA chains. The model has a number of implications for understanding RNA synthesis.

  2. Actinomycin and DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, H M

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding how actinomycin binds to DNA have suggested its mechanism of action. Actinomycin binds to a premelted DNA conformation present within the transcriptional complex. This immobilizes the complex, interfering with the elongation of growing RNA chains. The model has a number of implications for understanding RNA synthesis. Images PMID:2410919

  3. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  4. Actinomycin and DNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobell, H.M.

    1985-08-01

    Recent advances in understanding how actinomycin binds to DNA have suggested its mechanism of action. Actinomycin binds to a premelted DNA conformation present within the transcriptional complex. This immobilizes the complex, interfering with the elongation of growing RNA chains. The model has a number of implications for understanding RNA synthesis.

  5. Transcriptional analysis of the Streptococcus pyogenes salivaricin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namprachan-Frantz, Phanramphoei; Rowe, Hannah M; Runft, Donna L; Neely, Melody N

    2014-02-01

    The sal lantibiotic locus plays an important role in the virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our transcriptional analysis of the sal locus provides new information on the complex regulation of this operon. Transcription of the operon is regulated by a promoter upstream of the operon and by a second internal promoter upstream of the salKRZ genes. Here we identify the location of the internal promoter and provide information on how this promoter is autoregulated by proteins within the locus. We determined by primer extension that the salKR promoter is located within the salY gene and identified several regulatory regions important for expression. The higher activity of the promoter in a salKR deletion strain indicates a role in repression by the SalR response regulator. Further, this promoter had higher activity in a salA deletion strain, implicating corepression or a signaling role for the SalA peptide. Finally, we demonstrate that this promoter can be controlled by host factors. Analysis of transcriptional regulation of this locus provides a better understanding of the function of the sal locus in S. pyogenes pathogenesis.

  6. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  7. Regulation of transcription initiation by Gfh factors from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Aleksei; Esyunina, Daria; Pupov, Danil; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Transcription factors of the Gre family bind within the secondary channel of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) directly modulating its catalytic activities. Universally conserved Gre factors activate RNA cleavage by RNAP, by chelating catalytic metal ions in the RNAP active site, and facilitate both promoter escape and transcription elongation. Gfh factors are Deinococcus/Thermus-specific homologues of Gre factors whose transcription functions remain poorly understood. Recently, we found that Gfh1 and Gfh2 proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans dramatically stimulate RNAP pausing during transcription elongation in the presence of Mn(2+), but not Mg(2+), ions. In contrast, we show that Gfh1 and Gfh2 moderately inhibit transcription initiation in the presence of either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. By using a molecular beacon assay, we demonstrate that Gfh1 and Gfh2 do not significantly change promoter complex stability or the rate of promoter escape by D. radiodurans RNAP. At the same time, Gfh factors significantly increase the apparent KM value for the 5'-initiating nucleotide, without having major effects on the affinity of metal ions for the RNAP active site. Similar inhibitory effects of Gfh factors are observed for transcription initiation on promoters recognized by the principal and an alternative σ factor. In summary, our data suggest that D. radiodurans Gfh factors impair the binding of initiating substrates independently of the metal ions bound in the RNAP active site, but have only mild overall effects on transcription initiation. Thus the mechanisms of modulation of RNAP activity by these factors are different for various steps of transcription. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Transcription and processing of mitochondrial RNA in the human pathogen Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accari, Jessica; Barth, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The size, structure, gene content and organisation of mitochondrial genomes can be highly diverse especially amongst the protists. We investigated the transcription and processing of the mitochondrial genome of the opportunistic pathogen Acanthamoeba castellanii and here we present a detailed transcription map of the 41.6 kb genome that encodes 33 proteins, 16 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs. Northern hybridisation studies identified six major polycistronic transcripts, most of which are co-transcriptionally processed into smaller mono-, di- and tricistronic RNAs. The maturation of the polycistronic transcripts is likely to involve endonucleolytic cleavage where tRNAs serve as processing signals. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions across the intervening regions between the six major polycistronic transcripts suggest that these transcripts were once part of an even larger transcript. Our findings indicate that the mitochondrial genome of A. castellanii is transcribed from only one or two promoters, very similar to the mode of transcription in the mitochondria of its close relative Dictyostelium discoideum, where transcription is known to occur from only a single transcription initiation site. Transcription initiation from a minimal number of promoters despite a large genome size may be an emerging trend in the mitochondria of protists. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Transcription regulatory elements are punctuation marks for DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkin, Ekaterina V.; Castro Roa, Daniel; Nudler, Evgeny; Mirkin, Sergei M.

    2006-01-01

    Collisions between DNA replication and transcription significantly affect genome organization, regulation, and stability. Previous studies have described collisions between replication forks and elongating RNA polymerases. Although replication collisions with the transcription-initiation or -termination complexes are potentially even more important because most genes are not actively transcribed during DNA replication, their existence and mechanisms remained unproven. To address this matter, we have designed a bacterial promoter that binds RNA polymerase and maintains it in the initiating mode by precluding the transition into the elongation mode. By using electrophoretic analysis of replication intermediates, we have found that this steadfast transcription-initiation complex inhibits replication fork progression in an orientation-dependent manner during head-on collisions. Transcription terminators also appeared to attenuate DNA replication, but in the opposite, codirectional orientation. Thus, transcription regulatory signals may serve as “punctuation marks” for DNA replication in vivo. PMID:16670199

  11. Emerging roles for MEF2 transcription factors in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, A J; Cole, C J; Josselyn, S A

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, transcription factors are critical for linking external stimuli to protein production, enabling neurons and neuronal networks to adapt to the ever-changing landscape. Gene transcription and protein synthesis are also vital for the formation of long-term memory. Members of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors have a well-characterized role in the development of a variety of tissues, but their role in the adult brain is only beginning to be understood. Recent evidence indicates that MEF2 regulates the structural and synaptic plasticity underlying memory formation. However, in stark contrast to most other transcription factors implicated in memory, MEF2-mediated transcription constrains (rather than promotes) memory formation. Here, we review recent data examining the role of MEF2 in adult memory formation in rodents. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  12. Rice tungro bacilliform virus: transcription and translation in protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G; Müller, M; Potrykus, I; Hohn, T; Fütterer, J

    1994-10-01

    Protoplasts from cell suspension cultures of Oryza sativa (monocot) and Orychophragmus violaceus (dicot) support transcription from the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter and translation of the resulting mRNA despite the presence of a long leader sequence with strong secondary structure and 12 short open reading frames. Transcriptional elements located both upstream and downstream of the transcription initiation site are defined by deletion analysis and the functional TATA motif is determined. Expression of an open reading frame downstream of the entire leader is more efficient than that downstream of truncated derivatives. For optimal expression sequences in the 5' and 3' parts of the leader are required.

  13. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    . In this report, we review the recent literature to deduce mechanisms underlying Polycomb and H3K9 methylation mediated repression, and describe the functional interplay with activating H3K4 methylation. We summarize recent data that indicate a close relationship between GC density of promoter sequences......, transcription factor binding and the antagonizing activities of distinct epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs). Subsequently, we compare chromatin signatures associated with different types of transcriptional</