WorldWideScience

Sample records for sub-femtosecond electron dynamics

  1. Exploring Sub-Femtosecond Correlated Dynamics with an Ultra-low Energy Electrostatic Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsch, C.P.; Grieser, M.; Dorn, A.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the three-body Coulomb problem for single excitation and ionization was claimed to be solved in a mathematically correct way during 1999 until 2004 for electron impact on hydrogen and helium, ion-impact ionization still represents a major challenge for theory. Troubling discrepancies have been observed recently in fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for helium single ionization by fast ion impact and even experimental total cross sections are in striking disagreement with the predictions of all state-of-the-art theories for low-energy antiproton collisions. Therefore, within the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR), it has been proposed to combine state-of-the-art many-particle imaging methods with a novel electrostatic storage ring for slow antiprotons in order to realize single and multiple ionization cross section measurements for antiprotons colliding with atoms, molecules and clusters. Total, as well as any differential cross sections up to FDCS including ionization-excitation reactions are envisaged to become available, serving as benchmark data for theory. Here, the present status of experiments in comparison with theory is presented and the layout of an Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) with its integrated reaction microscope at FLAIR is described

  2. Toward sub-femtosecond pump-probe experiments: a dispersionless autocorrelator with attosecond resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constant, E.; Mevel, E.; Zair, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Salin, F. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Talence (FR). Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA)

    2001-07-01

    We designed a dispersionless autocorrelator with a sub-femtosecond resolution suitable for the characterization of ultrashort X-UV pulses. We present a proof of feasibility experiment with 11 fs infrared pulses. (orig.)

  3. Progress in sub-femtosecond control of electron localization in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-04

    Jan 4, 2014 ... Recent advances in controlled generation of intense, ultrashort ... of the electric field for near infrared (IR) wavelength at 800 nm is about 2.7 fs. .... Furthermore, the oscillation contrast and phase, depends on the kinetic energy.

  4. Relation of high harmonic spectra to electronic structure in N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, J.P.; McFarland, B.K.; Guehr, M.; Bucksbaum, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    High harmonics of N 2 exhibit a number of features that are related to the electronic structure and sub-femtosecond dynamics of the molecule. Through measurements and simulations, we show how the harmonic spectral shape, spectral phase, alignment angle dependence, and intensity dependence can be related to the strong-field ionization and recombination dynamics of the HOMO and HOMO-1 electron orbitals. A field-free static model of the molecule is insufficient to explain the observations.

  5. Dynamic Flaps Electronic Scan Antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A dynamic FLAPS(TM) electronic scan antenna was the focus of this research. The novelty S of this SBIR resides in the use of plasma as the main component of this dynamic X-Band phased S array antenna...

  6. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-01-01

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code 'POSINST' was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ∼(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed

  7. Spin dynamics in electron synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Jan Felix

    2017-01-01

    Providing spin polarized particle beams with circular accelerators requires the consideration of depolarizing resonances which may significantly reduce the desired degree of polarization at specific beam energies. The corresponding spin dynamical effects are typically analyzed with numerical methods. In case of electron beams the influence of the emission of synchrotron radiation has to be taken into account. On short timescales, as in synchrotrons with a fast energy ramp or in damping rings, spin dynamics are investigated with spin tracking algorithms. This thesis presents the spin tracking code Polematrix as a versatile tool to study the impact of synchrotron radiation on spin dynamics. Spin tracking simulations have been performed based on the well established particle tracking code Elegant. The numerical studies demonstrate effects which are responsible for beam depolarization: Synchrotron side bands of depolarizing resonances and decoherence of spin precession. Polematrix can be utilized for any electron accelerator with minimal effort as it imports lattice files from the tracking programs MAD-X or Elegant. Polematrix has been published as open source software. Currently, the Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA at Bonn University is the only electron synchrotron worldwide providing a polarized beam. Integer and intrinsic depolarizing resonances are compensated with dedicated countermeasures during the fast energy ramp. Polarization measurements from ELSA demonstrate the particular spin dynamics of electrons and confirm the results of the spin tracking code Polematrix.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T c 4 superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the suppression of momentum

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-07-09

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T{sub c}4 superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the

  10. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky, E-mail: jianqiang.zhou@polytechnique.edu; Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Sponza, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, King’s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Guzzo, Matteo [Institut für Physik und IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gatti, Matteo [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  11. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case

  12. A theory of electron baths: One-electron system dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    The second-quantized, many-electron, atomic, and molecular Hamiltonian is partitioned both by the identity or labeling of the spin orbitals and by the dynamics of the spin orbitals into a system coupled to a bath. The electron bath is treated by a molecular time scale generalized Langevin equation approach designed to include one-electron dynamics in the system dynamics. The bath is formulated as an equivalent chain of spin orbitals through the introduction of equivalent-chain annihilation and creation operators. Both the dynamics and the quantum grand canonical statistical properties of the electron bath are examined. Two versions for the statistical properties of the bath are pursued. Using a weak bath assumption, a bath statistical average is defined which allows one to achieve a reduced dynamics description of the electron system which is coupled to the electron bath. In a strong bath assumption effective Hamiltonians are obtained which reproduce the dynamics of the bath and which lead to the same results as found in the weak bath assumption. The effective (but exact) Hamiltonian is found to be a one-electron Hamiltonian. A reduced dynamics equation of motion for the system population matrix is derived and found to agree with a previous version. This equation of motion is useful for studying electron transfer in the system when coupled to an electron bath

  13. Nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics behind molecular autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical method for real-time dynamics of nonadiabatic reorganization of electronic configurations in molecules is developed, with dual aim that the intramolecular electron dynamics can be probed by means of direct and/or indirect photoionizations and that the physical origins behind photoionization signals attained in the time domain can be identified in terms of the language of time-dependent quantum chemistry. In doing so, we first formulate and implement a new computational scheme for nonadiabatic electron dynamics associated with molecular ionization, which well fits in the general theory of nonadiabatic electron dynamics. In this method, the total nonadiabatic electron wavepackets are propagated in time directly with complex natural orbitals without referring to Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals, and the amount of electron flux from a molecular region leading to ionization is evaluated in terms of the relevant complex natural orbitals. In the second half of this paper, we apply the method to electron dynamics in the elementary processes consisting of the Auger decay to demonstrate the methodological significance. An illustrative example is taken from an Auger decay starting from the 2a1 orbital hole-state of H2O+. The roles of nuclear momentum (kinetic) couplings in electronic-state mixing during the decay process are analyzed in terms of complex natural orbitals, which are schematically represented in the conventional language of molecular symmetry of the Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  14. NLC electron injector beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-10-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) being designed at SLAC requires a train of 90 electron bunches 1.4 ns apart at 120 Hz. The intensity and emittance required at the interaction point, and the various machine systems between the injector and the IP determine the beam requirements from the injector. The style of injector chosen for the NLC is driven by the fact that the production of polarized electrons at the IP is a must. Based on the successful operation of the SLC polarized electron source a similar type of injector with a DC gun and subharmonic bunching system is chosen for the NLC

  15. Dynamism in Electronic Performance Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, James

    1995-01-01

    Describes a model for dynamic electronic performance support systems based on NNAble, a system developed by the training group at Apple Computer. Principles for designing dynamic performance support are discussed, including a systems approach, performer-centered design, awareness of situated cognition, organizational memory, and technology use.…

  16. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  17. Beam Dynamics With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, T; Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling experiments have been carried out at HIMAC in order to develop new technologies in heavy-ion therapy and related researches. The cool-stacking method, in particular, has been studied to increase the intensity of heavy-ions. The maximum stack intensity was 2 mA, above which a fast ion losses occurred simulatneously with the vertical coherent oscillations. The instability depends on the working point, the stacked ion-density and the electron-beam density. The instability was suppressed by reducing the peak ion-density with RF-knockout heating.

  18. Dynamic aspects of electronic predissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    We consider electronic excitation induced with a continuous wave laser to an excited bound state which can predissociate due to a radiationless transition to a dissociative state. The conditions for a separation of the process into the preparation of a vibrational eigenstate which subsequently...

  19. Time ordering in multi-electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J H; Godunov, A L; Shakov, Kh Kh; Shipakov, V A; Merabet, H; Bruch, R; Hanni, J

    2003-01-01

    Time ordering of interactions in dynamic quantum multi-electron systems provides a constraint that interconnects the time evolution of different electrons. In energy space, time ordering appears as the principal value contribution from the Green function, which corresponds to the asymptotic condition that specifies whether the system has outgoing (or possibly incoming) scattered waves. We report evidence of effects of time correlation found by comparing calculations to recent spectropolarimetric data

  20. Time ordering in multi-electron dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, J H [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States); Godunov, A L [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States); Shakov, Kh Kh [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States); Shipakov, V A [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Merabet, H [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Bruch, R [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Hanni, J [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV (United States)

    2003-01-28

    Time ordering of interactions in dynamic quantum multi-electron systems provides a constraint that interconnects the time evolution of different electrons. In energy space, time ordering appears as the principal value contribution from the Green function, which corresponds to the asymptotic condition that specifies whether the system has outgoing (or possibly incoming) scattered waves. We report evidence of effects of time correlation found by comparing calculations to recent spectropolarimetric data.

  1. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  2. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Vay, J.L.; Grote, D.P.; Ng, J.T.; Pivi, M.F.; Wang, L.F.

    2009-01-01

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l b c , (l b = bunch duration, ω c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ∼ 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed

  3. Electron-nuclear dynamics of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diz, A.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The content of an ab initio time-dependent theory of quantum molecular dynamics of electrons and atomic nuclei is presented. Employing the time-dependent variational principle and a family of approximate state vectors yields a set of dynamical equations approximating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. These equations govern the time evolution of the relevant state vector parameters as molecular orbital coefficients, nuclear positions, and momenta. This approach does not impose the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, does not use potential energy surfaces, and takes into account electron-nuclear coupling. Basic conservation laws are fully obeyed. The simplest model of the theory employs a single determinantal state for the electrons and classical nuclei and is implemented in the computer code ENDyne. Results from this ab-initio theory are reported for ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions

  4. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  5. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  6. Electron dynamics inside short-coherence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Giulio; Bordone, Paolo; Jacoboni, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    We present theoretical results on electron dynamics inside nanometric systems, where the coherence of the electron ensemble is maintained in a very short region. The contacts are supposed to spoil such a coherence, therefore the interference processes between the carrier wavefunction and the internal potential profile can be affected by the proximity of the contacts. The problem has been analysed by using the Wigner-function formalism. For very short devices, transport properties, such as tunnelling through potential barriers, are significantly influenced by the distance between the contacts

  7. Electron beam dynamics in Pasotron microwave sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmel, Y.; Shkvarunets, A.; Nusinovich, G.S.; Rodgers, J.; Bliokh, Yu.P.; Goebel, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Pasotron is a high efficiency (∼50%), plasma-assisted microwave generator in which the beam electrons exhibit two-dimensional motion in the slow wave structure. The electron beam propagates in the ion-focusing regime (Bennett pinch regime) because there is no applied magnetic field. Since initially only the neutral gas is present in the vacuum system and the ions in the neutralizing plasma channel are produced only due to the beam impact ionization, the beam dynamics in Pasotrons is inherently a nonstationary process, and important for efficient operation. The present paper contains results of experimental studies of stationary and nonstationary effects in the beam dynamics in Pasotrons and their theoretical interpretation

  8. Dynamics in electron transfer protein complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Qamar

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have provided experimental evidence for the existence of an encounter complex, a transient intermediate in the formation of protein complexes. We have used paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR spectroscopy in combination with Monte Carlo simulations to characterize and visualize the ensemble of encounter orientations in the short-lived electron transfer complex of yeast Cc and CcP. The complete conformational space sampled by the protein molecules during the dynamic part of ...

  9. Electron dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogaret, Alain, E-mail: A.R.Nogaret@bath.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-30

    This review explores the dynamics of two-dimensional electrons in magnetic potentials that vary on scales smaller than the mean free path. The physics of microscopically inhomogeneous magnetic fields relates to important fundamental problems in the fractional quantum Hall effect, superconductivity, spintronics and graphene physics and spins out promising applications which will be described here. After introducing the initial work done on electron localization in random magnetic fields, the experimental methods for fabricating magnetic potentials are presented. Drift-diffusion phenomena are then described, which include commensurability oscillations, magnetic channelling, resistance resonance effects and magnetic dots. We then review quantum phenomena in magnetic potentials including magnetic quantum wires, magnetic minibands in superlattices, rectification by snake states, quantum tunnelling and Klein tunnelling. The third part is devoted to spintronics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. This covers spin filtering by magnetic field gradients and circular magnetic fields, electrically induced spin resonance, spin resonance fluorescence and coherent spin manipulation. (topical review)

  10. Electronic structure and electron dynamics at Si(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Kutschera, M.; Schmidt, R.; Orth, C.; Fauster, T. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany); Rohlfing, M. [International University Bremen, School of Engineering and Science, P.O. Box 750 561, Bremen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The electronic structure and electron dynamics at a Si(100) surface is studied by two-photon photoemission (2PPE). At 90 K the occupied D{sub up} dangling-bond state is located 150{+-}50 meV below the valence-band maximum (VBM) at the center of the surface Brillouin zone anti {gamma} and exhibits an effective hole mass of (0.5{+-}0.15)m{sub e}. The unoccupied D{sub down} band has a local minimum at anti {gamma} at 650{+-}50 meV above the VBM and shows strong dispersion along the dimer rows of the c(4 x 2) reconstructed surface. At 300 K the D{sub down} position shifts comparable to the Si conduction-band minimum by 40 meV to lower energies but the dispersion of the dangling-bond states is independent of temperature. The surface band bending for p-doped silicon is less than 30 meV, while acceptor-type defects cause significant and preparation-dependent band bending on n-doped samples. 2PPE spectra of Si(100) are dominated by interband transitions between the occupied and unoccupied surface states and emission out of transiently and permanently charged surface defects. Including electron-hole interaction in many-body calculations of the quasi-particle band structure leads us to assign a dangling-bond split-off state to a quasi-one-dimensional surface exciton with a binding energy of 130 meV. Electrons resonantly excited to the unoccupied D{sub down} dangling-bond band with an excess energy of about 350 meV need 1.5{+-}0.2 ps to scatter via phonon emission to the band bottom at anti {gamma} and relax within 5 ps with an excited hole in the occupied surface band to form an exciton living for nanoseconds. (orig.)

  11. Nonadiabatic effects in electronic and nuclear dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. Bircher

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their very nature, ultrafast phenomena are often accompanied by the occurrence of nonadiabatic effects. From a theoretical perspective, the treatment of nonadiabatic processes makes it necessary to go beyond the (quasi static picture provided by the time-independent Schrödinger equation within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and to find ways to tackle instead the full time-dependent electronic and nuclear quantum problem. In this review, we give an overview of different nonadiabatic processes that manifest themselves in electronic and nuclear dynamics ranging from the nonadiabatic phenomena taking place during tunnel ionization of atoms in strong laser fields to the radiationless relaxation through conical intersections and the nonadiabatic coupling of vibrational modes and discuss the computational approaches that have been developed to describe such phenomena. These methods range from the full solution of the combined nuclear-electronic quantum problem to a hierarchy of semiclassical approaches and even purely classical frameworks. The power of these simulation tools is illustrated by representative applications and the direct confrontation with experimental measurements performed in the National Centre of Competence for Molecular Ultrafast Science and Technology.

  12. Electron Beam Diagnosis and Dynamics using DIADYN Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toader, D.; Craciun, G.; Manaila, E.; Oproiu, C.; Marghitu, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is presenting results obtained with the DIADYN installation after replacing its vacuum electron source (VES L V) with a plasma electron source (PES L V). DIADYN is a low energy laboratory equipment operating with 10 to 50 keV electron beams and designed to help realize non-destructive diagnosis and dynamics for low energy electron beams but also to be used in future material irradiations. The results presented here regard the beam diagnosis and dynamics made with beams obtained from the newly replaced plasma source. We discuss both results obtained in experimental dynamics and dynamics calculation results for electron beams extracted from the SEP L V source.

  13. Incoherent imaging using dynamically scattered coherent electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellist, P.D.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We use a Bloch wave approach to show that, even for coherent dynamical scattering from a stationary lattice with no absorption, annular dark-field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope gives a direct incoherent structure image of the atomic-column positions of a zone-axis-aligned crystal. Although many Bloch waves may be excited by the probe, the detector provides a filtering effect so that the 1s-type bound states are found to dominate the image contrast for typical experimental conditions. We also find that the column intensity is related to the transverse kinetic energy of the 1s states, which gives atomic number, Z, contrast. The additional effects of phonon scattering are discussed, in particular the reasons why phonon scattering is not a prerequisite for transverse incoherence. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. Extreme localization of electrons in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommelhoff, Peter; Kealhofer, Catherine; Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush; Sortais, Yvan R P; Foreman, Seth M; Kasevich, Mark A

    2009-04-01

    Electron emission from sharp metal tips can take place on sub-femtosecond time scales if the emission is driven by few cycle femtosecond laser pulses. Here we outline the experimental prerequisites in detail, discuss emission regimes and relate them to recent experiments in the gas phase (attosecond physics). We present a process that leads to single atom tip emitters that are stable under laser illumination and conclude with a discussion of how to achieve short electron pulses at a target.

  15. XXIII International Conference on Nonlinear Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stoop, Ruedi; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2017-01-01

    This book collects contributions to the XXIII international conference “Nonlinear dynamics of electronic systems”. Topics range from non-linearity in electronic circuits to synchronisation effects in complex networks to biological systems, neural dynamics and the complex organisation of the brain. Resting on a solid mathematical basis, these investigations address highly interdisciplinary problems in physics, engineering, biology and biochemistry.

  16. Electron cloud dynamics in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Celata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The interference of stray electrons (also called “electron clouds” with accelerator beams is important in modern intense-beam accelerators, especially those with beams of positive charge. In magnetic wigglers, used, for instance, for transverse emittance damping, the intense synchrotron radiation produced by the beam can generate an electron cloud of relatively high density. In this paper the complicated dynamics of electron clouds in wigglers is examined using the example of a wiggler in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with the WARP-POSINST computer code show different density and dynamics for the electron cloud at locations near the maxima of the vertical wiggler field when compared to locations near the minima. Dynamics in these regions, the electron cloud distribution vs longitudinal position, and the beam coherent tune shift caused by the wiggler electron cloud will be discussed.

  17. Electron Beam Diagnosis and Dynamics using DIADYN Plasma Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toader, D; Craciun, G; Manaila, E; Oproiu, C [National Institute of Research for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Bucuresti (Romania); Marghitu, S [ICPE Electrostatica S.A - Bucuresti (Romania)

    2009-11-15

    This paper is presenting results obtained with the DIADYN installation after replacing its vacuum electron source (VES{sub L}V) with a plasma electron source (PES{sub L}V). DIADYN is a low energy laboratory equipment operating with 10 to 50 keV electron beams and designed to help realize non-destructive diagnosis and dynamics for low energy electron beams but also to be used in future material irradiations. The results presented here regard the beam diagnosis and dynamics made with beams obtained from the newly replaced plasma source. We discuss both results obtained in experimental dynamics and dynamics calculation results for electron beams extracted from the SEP{sub L}V source.

  18. Energetics and dynamics of excess electrons in simple fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space, B.

    1992-01-01

    Excess electronic dynamical and equilibrium properties are modeled in both polarizable and nonpolarizable noble gas fluids. Explicit dynamical calculations are carried out for excess electrons in fluid helium, where excess electronic eigenstates are localized. Energetics and dynamics are considered for fluids which span the entire range of polarizability present in the rare gases. Excess electronic eigenstates and eigenvalues are calculated for fluids of helium, argon and xenon. Both equilibrium and dynamical information is obtained from the calculation of these wavefunctions. A surface hopping trajectory method for studying nonadiabatic excess electronic relaxation in condensed systems is used to explore the nonadiabatic relaxation after photoexciting an equilibrated excess electron in dense fluid helium. The different types on nonadiabatic phenomena which are important in excess electronic relaxation are surveyed. The same surface hopping trajectory method is also used to study the rapid nonadiabatic relaxation after an excess electron is injected into unperturbed fluid helium. Several distinctively different relaxation processes, characterized by their relative importance at different times during the relaxation to a localized equilibrium state, are detailed. Though the dynamical properties of excess electrons under the conditions considered here have never been studied before, the behavior is remarkably similar to that observed in both experimental and theoretical studies of electron hydration dynamics, indicating that the processes described may be very general relaxation mechanisms for localization and trapping in fluids. Additionally, ground state energies of an excess electron, e 0 , are computed as a function of solvent density using model electron-atom pseudopotentials in fluid helium, argon, and xenon. The nonuniqueness of the pseudopotential description of electron-molecule interactions is demonstrated

  19. Dynamic screening and electron dynamics in low-dimensional metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkin, V.M.; Quijada, M.; Vergniory, M.G.; Alducin, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Chulkov, E.V.; Echenique, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical description of dynamic screening and electron dynamics in metallic media are reviewed. The time-dependent building-up of screening in different situations is addressed. Perturbative and non-perturbative theories are used to study electron dynamics in low-dimensional systems, such as metal clusters, image states, surface states and quantum wells. Modification of the electronic lifetimes due to confinement effects is analyzed as well

  20. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukhov, I.; Zelinsky, A. E-mail: zelinsky@kipt.kharkov.ua; Telegin, Yu

    2001-09-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  1. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, I; Telegin, Yu P

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  2. Probing electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in Momentum Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, M S; Hajgato, B; Morini, F; Knippenberg, S

    2010-01-01

    Orbital imaging experiments employing Electron Momentum Spectroscopy are subject to many complications, such as distorted wave effects, conformational mobility in the electronic ground state, ultra-fast nuclear dynamics in the final state, or a dispersion of the ionization intensity over electronically excited (shake-up) configurations of the cation. The purpose of the present contribution is to illustrate how a proper treatment of these complications enables us to probe in momentum space the consequences of electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in neutral and cationic states.

  3. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  4. Femtosecond and Subfemtosecond X-Ray Pulses from a SASE Based Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emma, P

    2004-03-10

    We propose a novel method to generate femtosecond and sub-femtosecond photon pulses in a free electron laser by selectively spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Its merits are simplicity and ease of implementation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, it can provide x-ray pulses the order of 1 femtosecond in duration containing about 1010 transversely coherent photons.

  5. Collision dynamics probed by convoy electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliger, M.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Toekesi, K.; Reinhold, C.O.; Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Komaki, K.; Azuma, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; RIKEN, Saitama

    2002-01-01

    The description of the collision mechanisms was examined by the emission of convoy electrons as a result of the transport of an Ar 17+ ion with an energy of 390 MeV/amu through self-supporting amorphous carbon foils of thickness varying from 25 to 9190 μg/cm 2 . A classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation of the random walk of the electron initially attached to the relativistic hydrogenic Argon ion was performed. Measurements were made of the final kinetic energy of the emitted convoy electrons at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). (R.P.)

  6. Electron Dynamics by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Schülke, Winfried

    2007-01-01

    The book offers the first comprehensive review of experimental methods, theory, and successful applications of synchrotron radiation based inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy, which enables the investigation of electron dynamics in condensed matter (correlated motion and excitation).

  7. Dynamic of non relativistic electrons and protons in the plasmasphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes Junior, O.; Pinto Junior, O.; Gonzalez, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the dynamics of electrons and protons inside the plasmasphere is presented. These particles are subjected to the geomagnetic field and to plasmaspheric electric fields, given by simple static models, during magnetically quiet and disturbed periods. (author) [pt

  8. Electron dynamics in solid state via time varying wavevectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaneja, Navin

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we study electron wavepacket dynamics in electric and magnetic fields. We rigorously derive the semiclassical equations of electron dynamics in electric and magnetic fields. We do it both for free electron and electron in a periodic potential. We do this by introducing time varying wavevectors k(t). In the presence of magnetic field, our wavepacket reproduces the classical cyclotron orbits once the origin of the Schröedinger equation is correctly chosen to be center of cyclotron orbit. In the presence of both electric and magnetic fields, our equations for wavepacket dynamics differ from classical Lorentz force equations. We show that in a periodic potential, on application of electric field, the electron wave function adiabatically follows the wavefunction of a time varying Bloch wavevector k(t), with its energies suitably shifted with time. We derive the effective mass equation and discuss conduction in conductors and insulators.

  9. Particle dynamics during electronic sputtering of solid krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled electronic sputtering of solid krypton by excimer production with molecular dynamics. Both excimer evolution in the solid and deexcitation processes have been incorporated in the simulation. The excimer dynamics in the lattice has been analyzed: the excimers formed near the surface...

  10. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  11. Simulation of long-term dynamic behavior of runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yulei; Liu Jian; Zhang Ruili; He Yang

    2015-01-01

    The secular dynamics of runaway electrons in Tokamak electromagnetic field is studied. The radiation effect is added into a relativistic volume-preserving algorithm to gain long-term stability of calculation. The results shows that the method we used is able to reveal the behavior of a runaway electron in configuration space. (author)

  12. Attosecond electron dynamics in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    WöRner, Hans Jakob

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss some of our recent experiments that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. Using high-harmonic spectroscopy, we resolve the migration of an electron hole across the molecule with a resolution of 100 as and simultaneously demonstrate extensive control over charge migration. In the second class of experiments, we use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from molecules in the gas phase and from a liquid-water microjet, resolving electron transport through liquid water on the attosecond time scale.

  13. Electron transfer dynamics: Zusman equation versus exact theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Qiang; Chen Liping; Nan Guangjun; Xu Ruixue; Yan Yijing

    2009-01-01

    The Zusman equation has been widely used to study the effect of solvent dynamics on electron transfer reactions. However, application of this equation is limited by the classical treatment of the nuclear degrees of freedom. In this paper, we revisit the Zusman equation in the framework of the exact hierarchical equations of motion formalism, and show that a high temperature approximation of the hierarchical theory is equivalent to the Zusman equation in describing electron transfer dynamics. Thus the exact hierarchical formalism naturally extends the Zusman equation to include quantum nuclear dynamics at low temperatures. This new finding has also inspired us to rescale the original hierarchical equations and incorporate a filtering algorithm to efficiently propagate the hierarchical equations. Numerical exact results are also presented for the electron transfer reaction dynamics and rate constant calculations.

  14. Dynamical coupling of electrons and ions in Xray-induced dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saalmann, Ulf; Camacho, Abraham; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Photo-absorption from short and intense Xray pulses by a molecule or a cluster triggers a complicated electron and ion dynamics. Whereas the excitation process concerns largely core-shell electrons, there are various subsequent relaxation channels like electronic decays and ionic Coulomb explosion. We will discuss the interplay of those processes for molecular clusters and fullerenes. (paper)

  15. Electron dynamics with radiation and nonlinear wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jowett, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    The physics of electron motion in storage rings is described by supplementing the Hamiltonian equations of motion with fluctuating radiation reaction forces to describe the effects of synchrotron radiation. This leads to a description of radiation damping and quantum diffusion in single-particle phase-space by means of Fokker-Planck equations. For practical purposes, most storage rings remain in the regime of linear damping and diffusion; this is discussed in some detail with examples, concentrating on longitudinal phase space. However special devices such as nonlinear wigglers may permit the new generation of very large rings to go beyond this into regimes of nonlinear damping. It is shown how a special combined-function wiggler can be used to modify the energy distribution and current profile of electron bunches

  16. Ultrafast dynamics of electrons at interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, Jason Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-03

    Electronic states of a thin layer of material on a surface possess unique physical and chemical properties. Some of these properties arise from the reduced dimensionality of the thin layer with respect to the bulk or the properties of the electric field where two materials of differing dielectric constants meet at an interface. Other properties are related to the nature of the surface chemical bond. Here, the properties of excess electrons in thin layers of Xenon, Krypton, and alkali metals are investigated, and the bound state energies and effective masses of the excess electrons are determined using two-photon photoemission. For Xenon, the dependence of bound state energy, effective mass, and lifetime on layer thickness from one to nine layers is examined. Not all quantities were measured at each coverage. The two photon photoemission spectra of thin layers of Xenon on a Ag(111) substrate exhibit a number of sharp, well-defined peaks. The binding energy of the excess electronic states of Xenon layers exhibited a pronounced dependence on coverage. A discrete energy shift was observed for each additional atomic layer. At low coverage, a series of states resembling a Rydberg series is observed. This series is similar to the image state series observed on clean metal surfaces. Deviations from image state energies can be described in terms of the dielectric constant of the overlayer material and its effect on the image potential. For thicker layers of Xe (beyond the first few atomic layers), the coverage dependence of the features begins to resemble that of quantum well states. Quantum well states are related to bulk band states. However, the finite thickness of the layer restricts the perpendicular wavevector to a discrete set of values. Therefore, the spectrum of quantum well states contains a series of peaks which correspond to the various allowed values of the perpendicular wavevector. Analysis of the quantum well spectrum yields electronic band structure

  17. Dynamic trapping of electrons in space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenning, N.; Bohm, M.; Faelthammar, C.G.

    1989-12-01

    The neutralization of positive space charge is studied in a case where heavy positive ions are added to a limited region of length L in a collisionfree magnetized plasma. It is found that electrons which become accelerated towards the positive space charge can only achieve a partial neutralization: they overshoot, and the positive region becomes surrounded by negative space charges which screen the electric field from the surroundings. The process is studied both analytically and by computer simulations with consistent results: large positive potentials (U>>kT e /e) can be built up with respect to the surrounding plasma. In the process of growth, the potential maximum traps electrons in transit so that quasineutrality is maintained. The potential U is proportional to the ambient electron temperature and the square of the plasma density increase, but independent of both the ion injection rate and the length L. The process explains several features of the Porcupinge xenon beam injection experiment. It could also have importance for the electrodynamic coupling between plasmas of different densities, e.g. the injection of neutral clouds in the ionosphere of species that becomes rapidly photoionized, or penetration of dense plasma clouds from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. (31 refs.) (authors)

  18. Electron-nuclear corellations for photoinduced dynamics in molecular dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Dmitri S.; Pereversev, Yuryi V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2003-03-01

    Ultrafast photoinduced dynamics of electronic excitation in molecular dimers is drastically affected by dynamic reorganization of of inter- and intra- molecular nuclear configuration modelled by quantized nuclear degree of freedom [1]. The dynamics of the electronic population and nuclear coherence is analyzed with help of both numerical solution of the chain of coupled differential equations for mean coordinate, population inversion, electronic-vibrational correlation etc.[2] and by propagating the Gaussian wavepackets in relevant adiabatic potentials. Intriguing results were obtained in the approximation of small energy difference and small change of nuclear equilibrium configuration for excited electronic states. In the limiting case of resonance between electronic states energy difference and frequency of the nuclear mode these results have been justified by comparison to exactly solvable Jaynes-Cummings model. It has been found that the photoinduced processes in dimer are arranged according to their time scales:(i) fast scale of nuclear motion,(ii) intermediate scale of dynamical redistribution of electronic population between excited states as well as growth and dynamics of electronic -nuclear correlation,(iii) slow scale of electronic population approaching to the quasiequilibrium distribution, decay of electronic-nuclear correlation, and diminishing the amplitude of mean coordinate oscillations, accompanied by essential growth of the nuclear coordinate dispersion associated with the overall nuclear wavepacket width. Demonstrated quantum-relaxational features of photoinduced vibronic dinamical processess in molecular dimers are obtained by simple method, applicable to large biological systems with many degrees of freedom. [1] J. A. Cina, D. S. Kilin, T. S. Humble, J. Chem. Phys. (2003) in press. [2] O. V. Prezhdo, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2995 (2002).

  19. Dynamics of photoexcited quasiparticles in heavy electron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demsar, Jure; Sarrao, John L; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond real-time spectroscopy is an emerging new tool for studying low energy electronic structure in correlated electron systems. Motivated by recent advances in understanding the nature of relaxation phenomena in various correlated electron systems (superconductors, density wave systems) the technique has been applied to heavy electron compounds in comparison with their non-magnetic counterparts. While the dynamics in their non-magnetic analogues are similar to the dynamics observed in noble metals (only weak temperature dependences are observed) and can be treated with a simple two-temperature model, the photoexcited carrier dynamics in heavy electron systems show dramatic changes as a function of temperature and excitation level. In particular, below some characteristic temperature the relaxation rate starts to decrease, dropping by more than two orders of magnitude upon cooling down to liquid He temperatures. This behaviour has been consistently observed in various heavy fermion metals as well as Kondo insulators, and is believed to be quite general. In order to account for the experimental observations, two theoretical models have been proposed. The first treats the heavy electron systems as simple metals with very flat electron dispersion near the Fermi level. An electron-phonon thermalization scenario can account for the observed slowing down of the relaxation provided that there exists a mechanism for suppression of electron-phonon scattering when both the initial and final electronic states lie in the region of flat dispersion. An alternative scenario argues that the relaxation dynamics in heavy electron systems are governed by the Rothwarf-Taylor bottleneck, where the dynamics are governed by the presence of a narrow gap in the density of states near the Fermi level. The so-called hybridization gap results from hybridization between localized moments and the conduction electron background. Remarkable agreement with the model suggests that carrier

  20. Electron dynamics in intentionally disordered semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, E.; Sanchez, A.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Berman, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    We study the dynamical behavior of disordered quantum well-based semiconductor superlattices where the disorder is intentional and short-range correlated. We show that, whereas the transmission time of a particle grows exponentially with the number of wells in an usual disordered superlattice for any value of the incident particle energy, for specific values of the incident energy this time increases linearly when correlated disorder is included. As expected, those values of the energy coincide with a narrow subband of extended states predicted by the static calculations of Domacute inguez-Adame et al.[Phys. Rev. B 51, 14359 (1994)]; such states are seen in our dynamical results to exhibit a ballistic regime, very close to the WKB approximation of a perfect superlattice. Fourier transform of the output signal for an incident Gaussian wave packet reveals a dramatic filtering of the original signal, which makes us confident that devices based on this property may be designed and used for nanotechnological applications. This is more so in view of the possibility of controlling the output band using a dc-electric field, which we also discuss. In the conclusion we summarize our results and present an outlook for future developments arising from this work. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Imaging Electron Dynamics with Ultrashort Light Pulses: A Theory Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Popova-Gorelova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of ultrafast phenomena in various atomic, molecular and condense matter systems is governed by electron dynamics. Therefore, the ability to image electronic motion in real space and real time would provide a deeper understanding of such processes and guide developments of tools to control them. Ultrashort light pulses, which can provide unprecedented time resolution approaching subfemtosecond time scale, are perspective to achieve real-time imaging of electron dynamics. This task is challenging not only from an experimental view, but also from a theory perspective, since standard theories describing light-matter interaction in a stationary regime can provide erroneous results in an ultrafast case as demonstrated by several theoretical studies. We review the theoretical framework based on quantum electrodynamics, which has been shown to be necessary for an accurate description of time-resolved imaging of electron dynamics with ultrashort light pulses. We compare the results of theoretical studies of time-resolved nonresonant and resonant X-ray scattering, and time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and show that the corresponding time-resolved signals encode analogous information about electron dynamics. Thereby, the information about an electronic system provided by these time-resolved techniques is different from the information provided by their time-independent analogues.

  2. Dynamics of electrons and holes at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulkov, E.V.; Leonardo, A.; Sklyadneva, I.Yu.; Silkin, V.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present ab initio calculation results for electron-phonon (e-ph) contribution to hole lifetime broadening of the X-bar surface state on Al(0 0 1). We show that e-ph coupling in this state is significantly stronger than in bulk Al at the Fermi level. It makes the e-ph decay channel very important in the formation of the hole decay in the surface state at X-bar. We also present the results for e-e lifetime broadening in a quantum-well state in 1 ML K/Cu(1 1 1). We show that this contribution is not negligible and is much larger than that in a surface state on Ag(1 1 1)

  3. Electron momentum spectroscopy of aniline taking account of nuclear dynamics in the initial electronic ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farasat, M; Golzan, M M; Shojaei, S H R; Morini, F; Deleuze, M S

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure, electron binding energy spectrum and (e, 2e) momentum distributions of aniline have been theoretically predicted at an electron impact energy of 1.500 keV on the basis of Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamical simulations, in order to account for thermally induced nuclear motions in the initial electronic ground state. Most computed momentum profiles are rather insensitive to thermally induced alterations of the molecular structure, with the exception of the profiles corresponding to two ionization bands at electron binding energies comprised between ∼10.0 and ∼12.0 eV (band C) and between ∼16.5 and ∼20.0 eV (band G). These profiles are found to be strongly influenced by nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state, especially in the low momentum region. The obtained results show that thermal averaging smears out most generally the spectral fingerprints that are induced by nitrogen inversion. (paper)

  4. Spin dynamics in electron synchrotrons; Spindynamik in Elektronensynchrotronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Jan Felix

    2017-07-14

    Providing spin polarized particle beams with circular accelerators requires the consideration of depolarizing resonances which may significantly reduce the desired degree of polarization at specific beam energies. The corresponding spin dynamical effects are typically analyzed with numerical methods. In case of electron beams the influence of the emission of synchrotron radiation has to be taken into account. On short timescales, as in synchrotrons with a fast energy ramp or in damping rings, spin dynamics are investigated with spin tracking algorithms. This thesis presents the spin tracking code Polematrix as a versatile tool to study the impact of synchrotron radiation on spin dynamics. Spin tracking simulations have been performed based on the well established particle tracking code Elegant. The numerical studies demonstrate effects which are responsible for beam depolarization: Synchrotron side bands of depolarizing resonances and decoherence of spin precession. Polematrix can be utilized for any electron accelerator with minimal effort as it imports lattice files from the tracking programs MAD-X or Elegant. Polematrix has been published as open source software. Currently, the Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA at Bonn University is the only electron synchrotron worldwide providing a polarized beam. Integer and intrinsic depolarizing resonances are compensated with dedicated countermeasures during the fast energy ramp. Polarization measurements from ELSA demonstrate the particular spin dynamics of electrons and confirm the results of the spin tracking code Polematrix.

  5. Space-charge dynamics of polymethylmethacrylate under electron beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, H; Ong, C K

    1997-01-01

    Space-charge dynamics of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) under electron beam irradiation has been investigated employing a scanning electron microscope. Assuming a Gaussian space-charge distribution, the distribution range (sigma) has been determined using a time-resolved current method in conjunction with a mirror image method. sigma is found to increase with irradiation time and eventually attain a stationary value. These observations have been discussed by taking into account radiation-induced conductivity and charge mobility. (author)

  6. Isolated sub-100-attosecond pulse generation via controlling electron dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang; Cao, Wei; Li, Yuhua; Wang, Xinlin

    2007-01-01

    A new method to coherently control the electron dynamics is proposed using a few-cycle laser pulse in combination with a controlling field. It is shown that this method not only broadens the attosecond pulse bandwidth, but also reduces the chirp, then an isolated 80-as pulse is straightforwardly obtained and even shorter pulse is achievable by increasing the intensity of the controlling field. Such ultrashort pulses allow one to investigate ultrafast electronic processes which have never be a...

  7. Jacob's ladder of approximations to paraxial dynamic electron scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Lubk, A.; Rusz, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical scattering theory describes the dominant scattering process of beam electrons at targets in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Hence, practically every quantitative TEM study has to consider its ramifications, typically by some approximate modeling. Here, we elaborate on a hierarchy within the various approximations focusing on the two principal approaches used in practice, Bloch wave and multislice. We reveal characteristic differences in the capability of these methods to...

  8. FEL small signal dynamics and electron beam prebunching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.

    1993-01-01

    A seed signal and/or a pre-bunched electron beam may provide the start up of a free electron laser (FEL). Recently, interest has grown around FEL's operating with pre-bunched electron beams; this paper is, therefore, devoted to the analysis of the dynamic features of FEL's operating in such a configuration. It exploits a slightly modified form of the FEL high gain equation to derive quantities of practical interest like the dependence of the system growth rate on the bunching coefficients

  9. Towards a formal definition of static and dynamic electronic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Riveros, Carlos L; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N; Marques, Miguel A L

    2017-05-24

    Some of the most spectacular failures of density-functional and Hartree-Fock theories are related to an incorrect description of the so-called static electron correlation. Motivated by recent progress in the N-representability problem of the one-body density matrix for pure states, we propose a method to quantify the static contribution to the electronic correlation. By studying several molecular systems we show that our proposal correlates well with our intuition of static and dynamic electron correlation. Our results bring out the paramount importance of the occupancy of the highest occupied natural spin-orbital in such quantification.

  10. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  11. Comparison of solvation dynamics of electrons in four polyols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampre, I.; Pernot, P.; Bonin, J. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique/ELYSE, Universite Paris-Sud 11, UMR 8000, Bat. 349, Orsay F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay F-91405 (France); Mostafavi, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique/ELYSE, Universite Paris-Sud 11, UMR 8000, Bat. 349, Orsay F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay F-91405 (France)], E-mail: mehran.mostafavi@lcp.u-psud.fr

    2008-10-15

    Using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, we studied the solvation dynamics of the electron in liquid polyalcohols: ethane-1,2-diol, propane-1,2-diol, propane-1,3-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol. Time-resolved absorption spectra ranging from 440 to 720 nm were measured. Our study shows that the excess electron in the diols presents an intense and wide absorption band in the visible and near-IR spectral domain at early time after two-photon ionization of the neat solvent. Then, for the first tens of picoseconds, the electron spectrum shifts toward the blue domain and its bandwidth decreases as the red part of the initial spectrum rapidly drops, while the blue part hardly evolves. In contrast, in the triol, the absorption spectrum of the electron is early situated in the visible range after the pump pulse and then solely evolves in the red part. The Bayesian data analysis of the observed picosecond solvation dynamics with different models is in favor of a heterogeneous continuous relaxation. That is corroborated by the analogy between the change in the absorption band with increasing time or decreasing temperature. That tends to indicate a similar organization disorder of the solvent. Moreover, the electron solvation dynamics is very fast in propane-1,2,3-triol despite its high viscosity and highlight the role of the OH-group in that process.

  12. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Sören Lühmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  13. Born-Oppenheimer Dynamics, Electronic Friction, and the Inclusion of Electron-Electron Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wenjie; Miao, Gaohan; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2017-07-01

    We present a universal expression for the electronic friction as felt by a set of classical nuclear degrees of freedom (DOFs) coupled to a manifold of quantum electronic DOFs; no assumptions are made regarding the nature of the electronic Hamiltonian and electron-electron repulsions are allowed. Our derivation is based on a quantum-classical Liouville equation for the coupled electronic-nuclear motion, followed by an adiabatic approximation whereby electronic transitions are assumed to equilibrate faster than nuclear movement. The resulting form of friction is completely general, but does reduce to previously published expressions for the quadratic Hamiltonian (i.e., Hamiltonians without electronic correlation). At equilibrium, the second fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied and the frictional matrix is symmetric. To demonstrate the importance of electron-electron correlation, we study electronic friction within the Anderson-Holstein model, where a proper treatment of electron-electron interactions shows signatures of a Kondo resonance and a mean-field treatment is completely inadequate.

  14. Dynamics of coupled electron-nuclei-systems in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falge, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    This work aimed at the theoretical analysis of high harmonic generation in molecules and the influence of coupled electron and nuclear dynamics on ultra-short pulse ionization processes. In the first part of this thesis, the isotope effect and influence of vibrational excitation on high harmonic generation were investigated for the isotope pairs H 2 O/D 2 O and H 2 /D 2 . It was shown that on the one hand high harmonic intensities strongly depend on the vibrational quantum number of the initial state of the water molecule and on the other hand the spectra of H 2 O and D 2 O exhibit a clear isotope effect for certain vibrationally excited states. Also it was shown that high harmonics of vibrationally excited states show an even more pronounced isotope effect than the ground state. The second and third part of this work treats the influence of coupled electron and nuclear dynamics on photoelectron spectra. In order to facilitate a numerically exact description of this dynamics, a simple one-dimensional model system (Shin-Metiu model) was used. It consists of only a single electronic and nuclear degree-of-freedom and allows for a switching between adiabatic and strongly non-adiabatic dynamics by its parameterization. This model served for the analysis of the dynamics of three different cases ranging from weak over intermediate to strong electron-nuclear coupling. To investigate the influence of non-adiabatic effects on photoelectron spectra, time-resolved photoelectron spectra were calculated applying two methods: a numerically exact treatment and an adiabatic approach neglecting the electron-nuclear coupling. Subsequently, the dependence of the efficiency of a non-adiabatic transition on the nuclear mass was analysed. To this end, the population dynamics and photoelectron spectra were calculated numerically exactly for a strong electron and nuclear coupling. Thereafter the asymmetry in forward and backward direction of time-resolved photoelectron spectra and the

  15. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  16. Spatiotemporal Observation of Electron-Impact Dynamics in Photovoltaic Materials Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat

    2017-05-17

    Understanding light-triggered charge carrier dynamics near photovoltaic-material surfaces and at interfaces has been a key element and one of the major challenges for the development of real-world energy devices. Visualization of such dynamics information can be obtained using the one-of-a-kind methodology of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM). Here, we address the fundamental issue of how the thickness of the absorber layer may significantly affect the charge carrier dynamics on material surfaces. Time-resolved snapshots indicate that the dynamics of charge carriers generated by electron impact in the electron-photon dynamical probing regime is highly sensitive to the thickness of the absorber layer, as demonstrated using CdSe films of different thicknesses as a model system. This finding not only provides the foundation for potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of devices in the fields of chemical and materials research, but also has impact on the use and interpretation of electron beam-induced current for optimization of photoactive materials in these devices.

  17. Electron-impact-ionization dynamics of S F6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James N.; Lee, Jason W. L.; Vallance, Claire

    2017-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the dissociative electron ionization dynamics of S F6 is important in the modeling and tuning of dry-etching plasmas used in the semiconductor manufacture industry. This paper reports a crossed-beam electron ionization velocity-map imaging study on the dissociative ionization of cold S F6 molecules, providing complete, unbiased kinetic energy distributions for all significant product ions. Analysis of these distributions suggests that fragmentation following single ionization proceeds via formation of S F5 + or S F3 + ions that then dissociate in a statistical manner through loss of F atoms or F2, until most internal energy has been liberated. Similarly, formation of stable dications is consistent with initial formation of S F4 2 + ions, which then dissociate on a longer time scale. These data allow a comparison between electron ionization and photoionization dynamics, revealing similar dynamical behavior. In parallel with the ion kinetic energy distributions, the velocity-map imaging approach provides a set of partial ionization cross sections for all detected ionic fragments over an electron energy range of 50-100 eV, providing partial cross sections for S2 +, and enables the cross sections for S F4 2 + from S F+ to be resolved.

  18. Dissipation and energy balance in electronic dynamics of Na clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, Marc; Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the impact of dissipation on the energy balance in the electron dynamics of metal clusters excited by strong electro-magnetic pulses. The dynamics is described theoretically by Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) at the level of Local Density Approximation (LDA) augmented by a self interaction correction term and a quantum collision term in Relaxation-Time Approximation (RTA). We evaluate the separate contributions to the total excitation energy, namely energy exported by electron emission, potential energy due to changing charge state, intrinsic kinetic and potential energy, and collective flow energy. The balance of these energies is studied as function of the laser parameters (frequency, intensity, pulse length) and as function of system size and charge. We also look at collisions with a highly charged ion and here at the dependence on the impact parameter (close versus distant collisions). Dissipation turns out to be small where direct electron emission prevails namely for laser frequencies above any ionization threshold and for slow electron extraction in distant collisions. Dissipation is large for fast collisions and at low laser frequencies, particularly at resonances. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  19. Comparison of dynamical aspects of nonadiabatic electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in solution are analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations. The rate for nonadiabatic PCET is expressed in terms of a time-dependent probability flux correlation function. The impact of the proton donor-acceptor and solvent dynamics on the probability flux is examined. The dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function is dominated by a solvent damping term that depends on the energy gap correlation function. The proton donor-acceptor motion does not impact the dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function but does influence the magnitude of the rate. The approximations previously invoked for the calculation of PCET rates are tested. The effects of solvent damping on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion are found to be negligible, and the short-time solvent approximation, in which only equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent are considered, is determined to be valid for these types of reactions. The analysis of PCET reactions is compared to previous analyses of single electron and proton transfer reactions. The dynamical behavior is qualitatively similar for all three types of reactions, but the time scale of the decay of the probability flux correlation function is significantly longer for single proton transfer than for PCET and single electron transfer due to a smaller solvent reorganization energy for proton transfer

  20. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  1. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  2. Isolated sub-100-as pulse generation via controlling electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Pengfei; Lu Peixiang; Cao Wei; Li Yuhua; Wang Xinlin

    2007-01-01

    A method to coherently control electron dynamics is proposed using a few-cycle laser pulse in combination with a controlling field. It is shown that this method not only broadens the attosecond pulse bandwidth, but also reduces the chirp; thus an isolated 80-as pulse is straightforwardly obtained, and even shorter pulses are achievable by increasing the intensity of the controlling field. Such ultrashort pulses allow one to investigate ultrafast electronic processes. In addition, the few-cycle synthesized pulse is expected to be useful for manipulating a wide range of laser-atom interactions

  3. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  4. Spatiotemporal Observation of Electron-Impact Dynamics in Photovoltaic Materials Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat; Sun, Jingya; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2017-01-01

    information can be obtained using the one-of-a-kind methodology of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM). Here, we address the fundamental issue of how the thickness of the absorber layer may significantly affect the charge carrier dynamics

  5. Dynamic analysis of electron density in the course of the internal motion of molecular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, A.; Hori, K.; Asai, Y.; Yamabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general dynamic aspect of electron density of a molecular system is studied on the basis of the general equation of the electron orbital which is formulated for the dynamic study of electronic motion. The newly defined electron orbital incorporates the dynamics of molecular vibration into the electronic structures. In this scheme, the change of electron distribution caused by excitation of vibrational state is defined as the ''dynamic electron transfer.'' The dynamic electron density is found to have the remarkable ''additive'' property. The time-dependent aspect of the dynamic electron redistribution is also analyzed on the basis of the ''coherent state.'' The new method relates the classical vibrational amplitude to the quantum number of the vibrational state. As a preliminary application of the present treatment, the dynamic electron densities of H 2 , HD, HT, HF, and HCl molecules are calculated by use of ab initio molecular orbital method

  6. How can attosecond pulse train interferometry interrogate electron dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. L.; Isinger, M.; Busto, D.; Guénot, D.; Nandi, S.; Zhong, S.; Dahlström, J. M.; Gisselbrecht, M.; l'Huillier, A.

    2018-04-01

    Light pulses of sub-100 as (1 as=10-18 s) duration, with photon energies in the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) spectral domain, represent the shortest event in time ever made and controlled by human beings. Their first experimental observation in 2001 has opened the door to investigating the fundamental dynamics of the quantum world on the natural time scale for electrons in atoms, molecules and solids and marks the beginning of the scientific field now called attosecond science.

  7. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  8. Consideration of Relativistic Dynamics in High-Energy Electron Coolers

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhwiler, David L

    2005-01-01

    A proposed electron cooler for RHIC would use ~55 MeV electrons to cool fully-ionized 100 GeV/nucleon gold ions.* At two locations in the collider ring, the electrons and ions will co-propagate for ~13 m, with velocities close to c and gamma>100. To lowest-order, one can Lorentz transform all physical quantities into the beam frame and calculate the dynamical friction forces assuming a nonrelativisitc, electrostatic plasma. However, we show that nonlinear space charge forces of the bunched electron beam on the ions must be calculated relativistically, because an electrostatic beam-frame calculation is not valid for such short interaction times. The validity of nonrelativistic friction force calculations must also be considered. Further, the transverse thermal velocities of the high-charge (~20 nC) electron bunch are large enough that some electrons have marginally relativistic velocities, even in the beam frame. Hence, we consider relativistic binary collisions – treating the model problem of ...

  9. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron injection into organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Li-Ping; Qiu Yu; Tong Guo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    We numerically investigate the injection process of electrons from metal electrodes to one-dimensional organic molecules by combining the extended Su—Schrieffer—Heeger (SSH) model with a nonadiabatic dynamics method. It is found that a match between the Fermi level of electrodes and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) or the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of organic molecules can be greatly affected by the length of the organic chains, which has a great impact on electron injection. The correlation between oligomers and electrodes is found to open more efficient channels for electron injection as compared with that in polymer/electrode structures. For oligomer/electrode structures, we show that the Schottky barrier essentially does not affect the electron injection as the electrode work function is smaller than a critical value. This means that the Schottky barrier is pinned for a small work-function electrode. For polymer/electrode structures, we find that it is possible for the Fermi level of electrodes to be pinned to the polaronic level. The condition under which the Fermi level of electrodes exceeds the polaronic level of polymers is shown to not always lead to spontaneous electron transfer from electrodes to polymers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  10. Quantum dynamics and electronic spectroscopy within the framework of wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    This paper serves as a first-time report on formulating important aspects of electronic spectroscopy and quantum dynamics in condensed harmonic systems using the framework of wavelets, and a stepping stone to our future work on developing anharmonic wavelets. The Morlet wavelet is taken to be the mother wavelet for the initial state of the system of interest. This work reports daughter wavelets that may be used to study spectroscopy and dynamics of harmonic systems. These wavelets are shown to arise naturally upon optical electronic transition of the system of interest. Natural birth of basis (daughter) wavelets emerging on exciting an electronic two-level system coupled, both linearly and quadratically, to harmonic phonons is discussed. It is shown that this takes place through using the unitary dilation and translation operators, which happen to be part of the time evolution operator of the final electronic state. The corresponding optical autocorrelation function and linear absorption spectra are calculated to test the applicability and correctness of the herein results. The link between basis wavelets and the Liouville space generating function is established. An anharmonic mother wavelet is also proposed in the case of anharmonic electron–phonon coupling. A brief description of deriving anharmonic wavelets and the corresponding anharmonic Liouville space generating function is explored. In conclusion, a mother wavelet (be it harmonic or anharmonic) which accounts for Duschinsky mixing is suggested. (paper)

  11. Electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen: dynamical variational treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defrance, P.; Lecointre, J. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Kereselidze, T.; Machavariani, Z.S. [Department of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilissi State University, Tbilissi (Georgia)

    2011-10-15

    A simple and straightforward calculating scheme is proposed for electron-impact single and multiple ionization of atoms. The method is based on the application of the Hulthen-Kohn dynamical variational principle. An effective charge seen by the scattered electron is determined for a certain type of trial wave functions mathematically in a rigorous way excluding any empirical assumptions. Validity of the elaborated approach is assessed by calculating triply differential cross section (TDCS) for electron-impact ionization of hydrogen. It is shown that, inclusion of the effective charge into the calculation reduces height of a 'binary peak' in comparison with the first Born approximation result. The height of a 'recoil peak' depends on the sign of the effective charge. The calculated TDCS are compared with the available experimental data and with the results of sophisticated theories and agreement is found. (authors)

  12. Diagnosis and dynamics of low energy electron beams using DIADYN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marghitu, S.; Oproiu, C.; Toader, D.; Ruset, C.; Grigore, E.; Marghitu, O.; Vasiliu, M.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents original results concerning electron beam diagnosis and dynamics using DIADYN, a low energy (10 - 50 kV), medium intensity (0.1 - 1 A) laboratory equipment. A key stage in the operation of DIADYN is the beam diagnosis, performed by the non-destructive, modified three-gradient method (MTGM). We concentrate on the better use of experimental and computational techniques, in order to improve the consistency of the results. At present, DIADYN is equipped with a hot filament vacuum electron source (VES), consisting of a convergent Pierce diode, working in a pulse mode. Since the plasma electron sources (PES) have a longer lifetime and produce higher beam currents, we discuss the possibility to replace the VES with a PES. Special attention is given to VES results in a functioning regime typical for a low energy glow discharge PES. (authors)

  13. Diagnosis and dynamics of low energy electron beams using DIADYN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marghitu, S [Electrostatica, ICPE-CA S.A., Spaiul Unirii 313, Sector 3, RO-74204 Bucharest (Romania); Oproiu, C; Toader, D; Ruset, C; Grigore, E [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Marghitu, O [Institute for Space Sciences, INCDLPFR, PO Box MG-23, RO-76911 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Vasiliu, M [Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independentei, RO-060032, Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents original results concerning electron beam diagnosis and dynamics using DIADYN, a low energy (10 - 50 kV), medium intensity (0.1 - 1 A) laboratory equipment. A key stage in the operation of DIADYN is the beam diagnosis, performed by the non-destructive, modified three-gradient method (MTGM). We concentrate on the better use of experimental and computational techniques, in order to improve the consistency of the results. At present, DIADYN is equipped with a hot filament vacuum electron source (VES), consisting of a convergent Pierce diode, working in a pulse mode. Since the plasma electron sources (PES) have a longer lifetime and produce higher beam currents, we discuss the possibility to replace the VES with a PES. Special attention is given to VES results in a functioning regime typical for a low energy glow discharge PES. (authors)

  14. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  15. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.

  16. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  18. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHope, W.J.; Browning, N.; Campbell, G.; Cook, E.; King, W.; Lagrange, T.; Reed, B.; Stuart, B.; Shuttlesworth, R.; Pyke, B.

    2009-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM

  19. Dynamical and electronic properties of rare-earth aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Sharma, Yamini

    2018-04-01

    Rare-earth dialuminides belong to a large family of compounds that stabilize in cubic MgCu2 structure. A large number of these compounds are superconducting, amongst these YAl2, LaAl2 and LuAl2 have been chosen as reference materials for studying 4f-electron systems. In order to understand the role of the RE atoms, we have applied the FPLAPW and PAW methods within the density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that the contribution of RE atoms is dominant in both electronic structure and phonon dispersion. The anomalous behavior of superconducting LaAl2 is well explained from an analysis of the electron localization function (ELF), Bader charge analysis, density of electronic states as well as the dynamical phonon vibrational modes. The interaction of phonon modes contributed by low frequency vibrations of La atoms with the high density La 5d-states at EF in LaAl2 lead to strong electron-phonon coupling.

  20. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices

  1. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm 2  and 3×10 cm 2  for a 15×15 cm 2  applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min −1 ). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors. (paper)

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of electron trapping in the sapphire lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaut, C.; Oh, K.H.; Fayeulle, S.; Kohanoff, J.

    1995-10-01

    Energy storage and release in dielectric materials can be described on the basis of the charge trapping mechanism. Most phenomenological aspects have been recently rationalized in terms of the space charge mode. Dynamical aspects are studied here by performing Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that an excess electron introduced into the sapphire lattice (α -Al 2 O 3 ) can be trapped only at a limited number of sites. The energy gained by allowing the electron to localize in these sites is of the order of 4-5 eV, in good agreement with the results of the space charge model. Displacements of the neighboring ions due to the implanted charge are shown to be localized in a small region of about 5 A. Detrapping is observed at 250 K. The ionic displacements turn out to play an important role in modifying the potential landscape by lowering, in a dynamical way, the barriers that cause localization at low temperature. (author). 18 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. - Highlights: • A detailed characterization of electron

  4. How Does the Electron Dynamics Affect the Global Reconnection Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether the microscale controls the macroscale or vice-versa remains one of the most challenging problems in plasmas. A particular topic of interest within this context is collisionless magnetic reconnection, where both points of views are espoused by different groups of researchers. This presentation will focus on this topic. We will begin by analyzing the properties of electron diffusion region dynamics both for guide field and anti-parallel reconnection, and how they can be scaled to different inflow conditions. As a next step, we will study typical temporal variations of the microscopic dynamics with the objective of understanding the potential for secular changes to the macroscopic system. The research will be based on a combination of analytical theory and numerical modeling.

  5. Charged beam dynamics, particle accelerators and free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Sabia, Elio; Artioli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Charged Beam Dynamics, Particle Accelerators and Free Electron Lasers summarises different topics in the field of accelerators and of Free Electron Laser (FEL) devices. It is intended as a reference manual for the different aspects of FEL devices, explaining how to design both a FEL device and the accelerator providing the driving beam. It covers both theoretical and experimental aspects, allowing researchers to attempt a first design of a FEL device in different operating conditions. It provides an analysis of what is already available, what is needed, and what the challenges are to determine new progress in this field. All chapters contain complements and exercises that are designed in such a way that the reader will gradually acquire self-confidence with the matter treated in the book.

  6. Modern aspects of Josephson dynamics and superconductivity electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Askerzade, Iman; Cantürk, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    In this book new experimental investigations of properties of Josephson junctions and systems are explored with the help of recent developments in superconductivity. The theory of the Josephson effect is presented taking into account the influence of multiband and anisotropy effects in new superconducting compounds. Anharmonicity effects in current-phase relation on Josephson junctions dynamics are discussed. Recent studies in analogue and digital superconductivity electronics are presented. Topics of special interest include resistive single flux quantum logic in digital electronics. Application of Josephson junctions in quantum computing as superconducting quantum bits are analyzed. Particular attention is given to understanding chaotic behaviour of Josephson junctions and systems. The book is written for graduate students and researchers in the field of applied superconductivity.

  7. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  8. Spin dynamics of electron beams in circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldt, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Experiments using high energy beams of spin polarized, charged particles still prove to be very helpful in disclosing a deeper understanding of the fundamental structure of matter. An important aspect is to control the beam properties, such as brilliance, intensity, energy, and degree of spin polarization. In this context, the present studies show various numerical calculations of the spin dynamics of high energy electron beams in circular accelerators. Special attention has to be paid to the emission of synchrotron radiation, that occurs when deflecting charged particles on circular orbits. In the presence of the fluctuation of the kinetic energy due to the photon emission, each electron spin moves non-deterministically. This stochastic effect commonly slows down the speed of all numeric estimations. However, the shown simulations cover - using appropriate approximations - trackings for the motion of thousands of electron spins for up to thousands of turns. Those calculations are validated and complemented by empirical investigations at the electron stretcher facility ELSA of the University of Bonn. They can largely be extended to other boundary conditions and thus, can be consulted for new accelerator layouts.

  9. Microscopic Electron Dynamics in Metal Nanoparticles for Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kluczyk

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles—regularly patterned or randomly dispersed—are a key ingredient for emerging technologies in photonics. Of particular interest are scattering and field enhancement effects of metal nanoparticles for energy harvesting and converting systems. An often neglected aspect in the modeling of nanoparticles are light interaction effects at the ultimate nanoscale beyond classical electrodynamics. Those arise from microscopic electron dynamics in confined systems, the accelerated motion in the plasmon oscillation and the quantum nature of the free electron gas in metals, such as Coulomb repulsion and electron diffusion. We give a detailed account on free electron phenomena in metal nanoparticles and discuss analytic expressions stemming from microscopic (Random Phase Approximation—RPA and semi-classical (hydrodynamic theories. These can be incorporated into standard computational schemes to produce more reliable results on the optical properties of metal nanoparticles. We combine these solutions into a single framework and study systematically their joint impact on isolated Au, Ag, and Al nanoparticles as well as dimer structures. The spectral position of the plasmon resonance and its broadening as well as local field enhancement show an intriguing dependence on the particle size due to the relevance of additional damping channels.

  10. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  11. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2015-01-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  12. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  13. Structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of amorphous silicon: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Car, R.; Parrinello, M.

    1988-01-18

    An amorphous silicon structure is obtained with a computer simulation based on a new molecular-dynamics technique in which the interatomic potential is derived from a parameter-free quantum mechanical method. Our results for the atomic structure, the phonon spectrum, and the electronic properties are in excellent agreement with experiment. In addition we study details of the microscopic dynamics which are not directly accessible to experiment. We find in particular that structural defects are associated with weak bonds. These may give rise to low-frequency vibrational modes.

  14. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Signatures of collective electron dynamics in the angular distributions of electrons ejected during ultrashort laser pulse interactions with C+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysaght, M A; Hutchinson, S; Van der Hart, H W

    2009-01-01

    We use the time-dependent R-matrix approach to investigate an ultrashort pump-probe scheme to observe collective electron dynamics in C + driven by the repulsion of two equivalent p electrons. By studying the two-dimensional momentum distributions of the ejected electron as a function of the time-delay between an ultrashort pump pulse and an ionizing ultrashort probe pulse it is possible to track the collective dynamics inside the C + ion in the time domain.

  16. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  17. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  18. Dynamical photo-induced electronic properties of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltako, K.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Raymond, L.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices and machines are emerging as promising functional elements, naturally flexible and efficient, for next-generation technologies. A deeper understanding of carrier dynamics in molecular junctions is expected to benefit many fields of nanoelectronics and power devices. We determine time-resolved charge current flowing at the donor-acceptor interface in molecular junctions connected to metallic electrodes by means of quantum transport simulations. The current is induced by the interaction of the donor with a Gaussian-shape femtosecond laser pulse. Effects of the molecular internal coupling, metal-molecule tunneling, and light-donor coupling on photocurrent are discussed. We then define the time-resolved local density of states which is proposed as an efficient tool to describe the absorbing molecule in contact with metallic electrodes. Non-equilibrium reorganization of hybridized molecular orbitals through the light-donor interaction gives rise to two phenomena: the dynamical Rabi shift and the appearance of Floquet-like states. Such insights into the dynamical photoelectronic structure of molecules are of strong interest for ultrafast spectroscopy and open avenues toward the possibility of analyzing and controlling the internal properties of quantum nanodevices with pump-push photocurrent spectroscopy.

  19. Electronic transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borlenghi, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the mutual influence between electronic transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic hybrid metallic nano-structures. At first, we have developed a theoretical model, based on random matrix theory, to describe at microscopic level spin dependent transport in a heterogeneous nano-structure. This model, called Continuous Random Matrix Theory (CRMT), has been implemented in a simulation code that allows one to compute local (spin torque, spin accumulation and spin current) and macroscopic (resistance) transport properties of spin valves. To validate this model, we have compared it with a quantum theory of transport based on the non equilibrium Green's functions formalism. Coupling the two models has allowed to perform a multi-scale description of metallic hybrid nano-structures, where ohmic parts are described using CRMT, while purely quantum parts are described using Green's functions. Then, we have coupled CRMT to a micro-magnetic simulation code, in order to describe the complex dynamics of the magnetization induced by spin transfer effect. The originality of this approach consists in modelling a spectroscopic experiment based on a mechanical detection of the ferromagnetic resonance, and performed on a spin torque nano-oscillator. This work has allowed us to obtain the dynamical phase diagram of the magnetization, and to detect the selection rules for spin waves induced by spin torque, as well as the competition between the Eigen-modes of the system when a dc current flows through the multilayer, in partial agreement with experimental data. (author)

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of electronically excited molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietard, Aude

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis investigated the ultrafast dynamics of photo-chromic molecules and argon clusters in the gas phase at the femtosecond timescale. Pump-probe experiments are performed in a set-up which associates a versatile pulsed molecular beam coupled to a photoelectron/photoion velocity map imager (VMI) and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Theses pump-probe experiments provides the temporal evolution of the electronic distribution for each system of interest. Besides, a modelization has been performed in order to characterize the density and the velocity distribution in the pulsed beam. Regarding the photo-chromic di-thienyl-ethene molecules, parallel electronic relaxation pathways were observed. This contrasts with the observation of sequential relaxation processes in most molecules studied so far. In the present case, the initial wave packet splits in two parts. One part is driven to the ground state at the femtosecond time scale through a conical intersection, and the second part remains for ps in the excited state and experiences oscillations in a suspended well. This study has shed light into the intrinsic dynamics of the molecules under study and a general relaxation mechanism has been proposed, which applies to the whole family of di-thienyl-ethene molecules whatever the state of matter (gas phase or solution) in which they have been investigated. Concerning argon clusters excited at about 14 eV, two behaviors of different time scale have been observed at different time scales. The first one occurs in the first picoseconds of the dynamics. It corresponds to the electronic relaxation of an excitonic state at a rate of 1 eV.ps -1 . The second phenomenon corresponds to the localization of the exciton on the excimer Ar 2 *. This phenomenon is observed 4-5 ps after the excitation. In this study, we also observed the ejection of excited argon atoms, addressing the lifetime of the delocalized excitonic state. This work provide additional informations

  1. Ultrashort and coherent single-electron pulses for diffraction at ultimate resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Friedrich Oscar

    2013-01-01

    energies of tens of keV which extends the attosecond streaking methodology to freely propagating electrons. We study the laser streaking effect in detail both experimentally and by numerical simulations and reveal its potential for characterizing electron pulses with durations down to the sub-femtosecond regime. In addition, the method enables the determination of the energy bandwidth and the chirp of the electrons. Finally, we developed a microspectrometer for the characterization of samples for ultrafast electron diffraction. These samples have a typical thickness of tens of nanometers and are often only a few hundred micrometers in diameter.

  2. Effects of parallel electron dynamics on plasma blob transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, Justin R.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Umansky, Maxim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The 3D effects on sheath connected plasma blobs that result from parallel electron dynamics are studied by allowing for the variation of blob density and potential along the magnetic field line and using collisional Ohm's law to model the parallel current density. The parallel current density from linear sheath theory, typically used in the 2D model, is implemented as parallel boundary conditions. This model includes electrostatic 3D effects, such as resistive drift waves and blob spinning, while retaining all of the fundamental 2D physics of sheath connected plasma blobs. If the growth time of unstable drift waves is comparable to the 2D advection time scale of the blob, then the blob's density gradient will be depleted resulting in a much more diffusive blob with little radial motion. Furthermore, blob profiles that are initially varying along the field line drive the potential to a Boltzmann relation that spins the blob and thereby acts as an addition sink of the 2D potential. Basic dimensionless parameters are presented to estimate the relative importance of these two 3D effects. The deviation of blob dynamics from that predicted by 2D theory in the appropriate limits of these parameters is demonstrated by a direct comparison of 2D and 3D seeded blob simulations.

  3. Electronic structure and molecular dynamics of Na2Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Nathaniel O. J.; McDouall, Joseph J. W.

    Following the first report (Mile, B., Sillman, P. D., Yacob, A. R. and Howard, J. A., 1996, J. chem. Soc. Dalton Trans , 653) of the EPR spectrum of the mixed alkali-metal trimer Na2Li a detailed study has been made of the electronic structure and structural dynamics of this species. Two isomeric forms have been found: one of the type, Na-Li-Na, of C , symmetry and another, Li-Na-Na, of C symmetry. Also, there are two linear saddle points which correspond to 'inversion' transition structures, and a saddle point of C symmetry which connects the two minima. A molecular dynamics investigation of these species shows that, at the temperature of the reported experiments (170 K), the C minimum is not 'static', but undergoes quite rapid inversion. At higher temperatures the C minimum converts to the C form, but by a mechanism very different from that suggested by minimum energy path considerations. 2 2v s s 2v 2v s

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of resonant electrons interacting with coherent Langmuir waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Miwa; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2018-03-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of resonant particles interacting with coherent waves in space plasmas. Magnetospheric plasma waves such as whistler-mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and hiss emissions contain coherent wave structures with various discrete frequencies. Although these waves are electromagnetic, their interaction with resonant particles can be approximated by equations of motion for a charged particle in a one-dimensional electrostatic wave. The equations are expressed in the form of nonlinear pendulum equations. We perform test particle simulations of electrons in an electrostatic model with Langmuir waves and a non-oscillatory electric field. We solve equations of motion and study the dynamics of particles with different values of inhomogeneity factor S defined as a ratio of the non-oscillatory electric field intensity to the wave amplitude. The simulation results demonstrate deceleration/acceleration, thermalization, and trapping of particles through resonance with a single wave, two waves, and multiple waves. For two-wave and multiple-wave cases, we describe the wave-particle interaction as either coherent or incoherent based on the probability of nonlinear trapping.

  5. Dynamic electronic institutions in agent oriented cloud robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Vineet; Morel, Olivier; Malik, Aamir; Saad, Naufal; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The dot-com bubble bursted in the year 2000 followed by a swift movement towards resource virtualization and cloud computing business model. Cloud computing emerged not as new form of computing or network technology but a mere remoulding of existing technologies to suit a new business model. Cloud robotics is understood as adaptation of cloud computing ideas for robotic applications. Current efforts in cloud robotics stress upon developing robots that utilize computing and service infrastructure of the cloud, without debating on the underlying business model. HTM5 is an OMG's MDA based Meta-model for agent oriented development of cloud robotic systems. The trade-view of HTM5 promotes peer-to-peer trade amongst software agents. HTM5 agents represent various cloud entities and implement their business logic on cloud interactions. Trade in a peer-to-peer cloud robotic system is based on relationships and contracts amongst several agent subsets. Electronic Institutions are associations of heterogeneous intelligent agents which interact with each other following predefined norms. In Dynamic Electronic Institutions, the process of formation, reformation and dissolution of institutions is automated leading to run time adaptations in groups of agents. DEIs in agent oriented cloud robotic ecosystems bring order and group intellect. This article presents DEI implementations through HTM5 methodology.

  6. Electron accommodation dynamics in the DNA base thymine

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sarah B.; Stephansen, Anne B.; Yokoi, Yuki; Yandell, Margaret A.; Kunin, Alice; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of electron attachment to the DNA base thymine are investigated using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the gas phase iodide-thymine (I-T) complex. An ultraviolet pump pulse ejects an electron from the iodide and prepares an iodine-thymine temporary negative ion that is photodetached with a near-IR probe pulse. The resulting photoelectrons are analyzed with velocity-map imaging. At excitation energies ranging from -120 meV to +90 meV with respect to the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 4.05 eV for I-T, both the dipole-bound and valence-bound negative ions of thymine are observed. A slightly longer rise time for the valence-bound state than the dipole-bound state suggests that some of the dipole-bound anions convert to valence-bound species. No evidence is seen for a dipole-bound anion of thymine at higher excitation energies, in the range of 0.6 eV above the I-T VDE, which suggests that if the dipole-bound anion acts as a "doorway" to the valence-bound anion, it only does so at excitation energies near the VDE of the complex.

  7. Electron accommodation dynamics in the DNA base thymine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sarah B.; Yandell, Margaret A.; Kunin, Alice [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Stephansen, Anne B. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 København Ø (Denmark); Yokoi, Yuki; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The dynamics of electron attachment to the DNA base thymine are investigated using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the gas phase iodide-thymine (I{sup −}T) complex. An ultraviolet pump pulse ejects an electron from the iodide and prepares an iodine-thymine temporary negative ion that is photodetached with a near-IR probe pulse. The resulting photoelectrons are analyzed with velocity-map imaging. At excitation energies ranging from −120 meV to +90 meV with respect to the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 4.05 eV for I{sup −}T, both the dipole-bound and valence-bound negative ions of thymine are observed. A slightly longer rise time for the valence-bound state than the dipole-bound state suggests that some of the dipole-bound anions convert to valence-bound species. No evidence is seen for a dipole-bound anion of thymine at higher excitation energies, in the range of 0.6 eV above the I{sup −}T VDE, which suggests that if the dipole-bound anion acts as a “doorway” to the valence-bound anion, it only does so at excitation energies near the VDE of the complex.

  8. Dynamical localization of two electrons in triple-quantum-dot shuttles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Jinxian; Duan, Suqing; Yang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical localization phenomena in two-electron quantum-dot shuttles driven by an ac field have been investigated and analyzed by the Floquet theory. The dynamical localization occurs near the anti-crossings in Floquet eigenenergy spectrum. The oscillation of the quantum-dot shuttles may increase the possibility of the dynamical localization. Especially, even if the two electrons are initialized in two neighbor dots, they can be localized there for appropriate intensity of the driven field. The studies may help the understanding of dynamical localization in electron shuttles and expand the application potential of nanoelectromechanical devices. -- Highlights: ► The dynamical localization in electron shuttle is studied by Floquet theory. ► There is a relation between quasi-energy anti-crossings and dynamical localization. ► The oscillation of quantum dot increases the dynamical localization. ► Even the electrons are initialized in different dots, the localization can occur.

  9. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b 1 , 6a 1 , 4b 2 , and 1a 2 orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A 1 , B 1 , and B 2 symmetries, which correspond to C–H stretching and H–C–H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing

  10. On the fly quantum dynamics of electronic and nuclear wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Ksenia G.; Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2018-05-01

    Multielectronic states quantum dynamics on a grid is described in a manner motivated by on the fly classical trajectory computations. Non stationary electronic states are prepared by a few cycle laser pulse. The nuclei respond and begin moving. We solve the time dependent Schrödinger equation for the electronic and nuclear dynamics for excitation from the ground electronic state. A satisfactory accuracy is possible using a localized description on a discrete grid. This enables computing on the fly for both the nuclear and electronic dynamics including non-adiabatic couplings. Attosecond dynamics in LiH is used as an example.

  11. Study and realization of an electron linear accelerator. Dynamics of accelerated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.

    1966-12-01

    The theoretical characteristics of the electron linear accelerator are: 30 MeV for the energy W S and 250 mA for the peak current I c . The main utilization is the intense production of fast neutrons by the reactions (γ,n) and (γ,f) induced in a target of natural uranium by the accelerated electrons. In the first part of the thesis, relative to the study and the realization of the accelerator, a new equation of dispersion is established analytically when the guide is loaded with round-edged irises. The relation is compared with the equation established by CHU and Hansen, WALKINSHAW, KVASIL in the case of a guide loaded with flat-edged irises. The experimental and theoretical curves of dispersion are compared. The accuracy of every relation of dispersion is estimated. The second part of the thesis is relative to the theoretical study of the electrons dynamics in the guide; it allows the derivation of the parameters of the beam: dispersion of phase, energy, dispersion of energy and the relation W S = f (I c ). The results relative to the first experiments are given and compared with the theoretical expectations. (author) [fr

  12. Electron cyclotron heating and supra-thermal electron dynamics in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnesin, S.

    2011-10-15

    This thesis is concerned with the physics of supra-thermal electrons in thermonuclear, magnetically confined plasmas. Under a variety of conditions, in laboratory as well as space plasmas, the electron velocity distribution function is not in thermodynamic equilibrium owing to internal or external drives. Accordingly, the distribution function departs from the equilibrium Maxwellian, and in particular generally develops a high-energy tail. In tokamak plasmas, this occurs especially as a result of injection of high-power electromagnetic waves, used for heating and current drive, as well as a result of internal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The physics of these phenomena is intimately tied to the properties and dynamics of this supra-thermal electron population. This motivates the development of instrumental apparatus to measure its properties as well as of numerical codes to simulate their dynamics. Both aspects are reflected in this thesis work, which features advanced instrumental development and experimental measurements as well as numerical modeling. The instrumental development consisted of the complete design of a spectroscopic and tomographic system of four multi-detector hard X-ray (HXR) cameras for the TCV tokamak. The goal is to measure bremsstrahlung emission from supra-thermal electrons with energies in the 10-300 keV range, with the ultimate aim of providing the first full tomographic reconstruction at these energies in a noncircular plasma. In particular, supra-thermal electrons are generated in TCV by a high-power electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system and are also observed in the presence of MHD events, such as sawtooth oscillations and disruptive instabilities. This diagnostic employs state-of-the-art solid-state detectors and is optimized for the tight space requirements of the TCV ports. It features a novel collimator concept that combines compactness and flexibility as well as full digital acquisition of the photon pulses, greatly

  13. Electron cyclotron heating and supra-thermal electron dynamics in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S.

    2011-10-01

    This thesis is concerned with the physics of supra-thermal electrons in thermonuclear, magnetically confined plasmas. Under a variety of conditions, in laboratory as well as space plasmas, the electron velocity distribution function is not in thermodynamic equilibrium owing to internal or external drives. Accordingly, the distribution function departs from the equilibrium Maxwellian, and in particular generally develops a high-energy tail. In tokamak plasmas, this occurs especially as a result of injection of high-power electromagnetic waves, used for heating and current drive, as well as a result of internal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The physics of these phenomena is intimately tied to the properties and dynamics of this supra-thermal electron population. This motivates the development of instrumental apparatus to measure its properties as well as of numerical codes to simulate their dynamics. Both aspects are reflected in this thesis work, which features advanced instrumental development and experimental measurements as well as numerical modeling. The instrumental development consisted of the complete design of a spectroscopic and tomographic system of four multi-detector hard X-ray (HXR) cameras for the TCV tokamak. The goal is to measure bremsstrahlung emission from supra-thermal electrons with energies in the 10-300 keV range, with the ultimate aim of providing the first full tomographic reconstruction at these energies in a noncircular plasma. In particular, supra-thermal electrons are generated in TCV by a high-power electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system and are also observed in the presence of MHD events, such as sawtooth oscillations and disruptive instabilities. This diagnostic employs state-of-the-art solid-state detectors and is optimized for the tight space requirements of the TCV ports. It features a novel collimator concept that combines compactness and flexibility as well as full digital acquisition of the photon pulses, greatly

  14. Dynamics of valence-shell electrons and nuclei probed by strong-field holography and rescattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, Samuel G.; Bhargava Ram, Niraghatam; Atala, Marcos; Shvetsov-Shilovski, Nikolay I; von Conta, Aaron; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Lein, Manfred; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Strong-field photoelectron holography and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) are two powerful emerging methods for probing the ultrafast dynamics of molecules. However, both of them have remained restricted to static systems and to nuclear dynamics induced by strong-field ionization. Here we extend these promising methods to image purely electronic valence-shell dynamics in molecules using photoelectron holography. In the same experiment, we use LIED and photoelectron holography simultaneously, to observe coupled electronic-rotational dynamics taking place on similar timescales. These results offer perspectives for imaging ultrafast dynamics of molecules on femtosecond to attosecond timescales. PMID:28643771

  15. Dynamic properties of electrons in solids by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.

    1980-12-01

    Illustrative cases of the use of neutron scattering in the study of the electronic properties of materials discussed here include scattering by localised electrons, narrow band materials and electron plasmas. (U.K.)

  16. Dynamic Corneal Surface Mapping with Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, S.; Gualini, M. M. S.

    2013-06-01

    In view of the fast advancement in ophthalmic technology and corneal surgery, there is a strong need for the comprehensive mapping and characterization techniques for corneal surface. Optical methods with precision non-contact approaches have been found to be very useful for such bio measurements. Along with the normal mapping approaches, elasticity of corneal surface has an important role in its characterization and needs to be appropriately measured or estimated for broader diagnostics and better prospective surgical results, as it has important role in the post-op corneal surface reconstruction process. Use of normal corneal topographic devices is insufficient for any intricate analysis since these devices operate at relatively moderate resolution. In the given experiment, Pulsed Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry has been utilized along with an excitation mechanism to measure the dynamic response of the sample cornea. A Pulsed ESPI device has been chosen for the study because of its micron-level resolution and other advantages in real-time deformation analysis. A bovine cornea has been used as a sample in the subject experiment. The dynamic response has been taken on a chart recorder and it is observed that it does show a marked deformation at a specific excitation frequency, which may be taken as a characteristic elasticity parameter for the surface of that corneal sample. It was seen that outside resonance conditions the bovine cornea was not that much deformed. Through this study, the resonance frequency and the corresponding corneal deformations are mapped and plotted in real time. In these experiments, data was acquired and processed by FRAMES plus computer analysis system. With some analysis of the results, this technique can help us to refine a more detailed corneal surface mathematical model and some preliminary work was done on this. Such modelling enhancements may be useful for finer ablative surgery planning. After further experimentation

  17. Dynamic evaluation of swallowing disorders with electron-beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raith, J.; Lindbichler, F.; Kern, R.; Groell, R.; Rienmueller, R.

    1996-01-01

    Three cases preselected by videofluorography were studied to evaluate whether electron beam tomography (EBT) permits more detailed dynamic imaging of swallowing disorders focusing on the mesonasopharyngeal segment, the hypopharynx and the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Immediately after videofluorographic examination of the oropharyngeal deglutition, EBT is performed. The patient is in a supine position and while the patient swallows a 20 ml bolus of water or diluted iodine containing contrast agent, a sequence of 20 images per level is scanned. The levels, which are determined by using the scout view, are oriented parallel to the hard palate either at the level of the hard palate to image the mesonasopharyngel segment or just above the hyoid bone to focus on the hypopharynx or at the location of the USE. The scan technique is a single-slice cinemode with a slice thickness of 3 mm (exposure time 100 ms, interscan delay 16 ms, 130 kV, 620 mA). The following structural interactions that we have so far been unable to image can be clearly demonstrated with EBT: During normal swallowing, the mesonasopharyngeal segment is completely and symmetrically closed by the soft palate and Passavant's cushion; lateral hypopharyngeal pouches can be located more precisely; and disorders of the UES can be differentiated into functional or morphologically caused disorders (e.g., goiter or cervical osteophytes). Videofluorography and cinematography are still the gold standard in functional evaluation of swallowing disorders. However, EBT permits dynamic imaging of pharyngeal deglutition in a preselected transverse plane and can give useful additional information concerning functional anatomical changes in the pharynx during swallowing. Further clinical evaluation is needed. (orig.) [de

  18. Complex dynamics in planar two-electron quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, Sebastian Josef Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots play an important role in a wide range of recent experimental and technological developments. In particular they are promising candidates for realisations of quantum bits and further applications in quantum information theory. The harmonically confined Hooke's atom model is experimentally verified and separates in centre-of-mass and relative coordinates. Findings that are contradictory to this separability call for an extension of the model, in particular changing the confinement potential. In order to study effects of an anharmonic confinement potential on spectral properties of planar two-electron quantum dots a sophisticated numerical approach is developed. Comparison between the Helium atom, Hooke's atom and an anharmonic potential model are undertaken in order to improve the description of quantum dots. Classical and quantum features of complexity and chaos are investigated and used to characterise the dynamics of the system to be mixed regular-chaotic. Influence of decoherence can be described by quantum fidelity, which measures the effect of a perturbation on the time evolution. The quantum fidelity of eigenstates of the system depends strongly on the properties of the perturbation. Several methods for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation are implemented and a high level of accuracy for long time evolutions is achieved. The concept of offset entanglement, the entanglement of harmonic models in the noninteracting limit, is introduced. This concept explains different questions raised in the literature for harmonic quantum dot models, recently. It shows that only in the groundstate the electrons are not entangled in the fermionic sense. The applicability, validity, and origin of Hund's first rule in general quantum dot models is further addressed. In fact Hund's first rule is only applicable, and in this case also valid, for one pair of singlet and triplet states in Hooke's atom. For more realistic models of two-electron quantum dots an

  19. Complex dynamics in planar two-electron quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeter, Sebastian Josef Arthur

    2013-06-25

    Quantum dots play an important role in a wide range of recent experimental and technological developments. In particular they are promising candidates for realisations of quantum bits and further applications in quantum information theory. The harmonically confined Hooke's atom model is experimentally verified and separates in centre-of-mass and relative coordinates. Findings that are contradictory to this separability call for an extension of the model, in particular changing the confinement potential. In order to study effects of an anharmonic confinement potential on spectral properties of planar two-electron quantum dots a sophisticated numerical approach is developed. Comparison between the Helium atom, Hooke's atom and an anharmonic potential model are undertaken in order to improve the description of quantum dots. Classical and quantum features of complexity and chaos are investigated and used to characterise the dynamics of the system to be mixed regular-chaotic. Influence of decoherence can be described by quantum fidelity, which measures the effect of a perturbation on the time evolution. The quantum fidelity of eigenstates of the system depends strongly on the properties of the perturbation. Several methods for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation are implemented and a high level of accuracy for long time evolutions is achieved. The concept of offset entanglement, the entanglement of harmonic models in the noninteracting limit, is introduced. This concept explains different questions raised in the literature for harmonic quantum dot models, recently. It shows that only in the groundstate the electrons are not entangled in the fermionic sense. The applicability, validity, and origin of Hund's first rule in general quantum dot models is further addressed. In fact Hund's first rule is only applicable, and in this case also valid, for one pair of singlet and triplet states in Hooke's atom. For more realistic models of two-electron

  20. A diagnostic for electron dynamics in tokamaks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiff, F.; Boyd, D.

    1997-12-01

    The diagnostic was installed on TdeV and brought into operation. It was optimized to the extent that time and money permitted. A considerable quantity of data was accumulated and analyzed. Experiments ended in August 1995. The apparatus has been removed from TdeV and returned to the University of Maryland. Each of these activities is detailed here. The diagnostic worked very well. Although the distribution functions behaved in ways that were not anticipated and the refractive losses were sometimes higher than projected, the authors were able to adapt to the unexpected. In the authors' estimation, all of the effects listed above are significant, and warrant further study. The diagnostic is ready for use as a tool to study the physics of current drive and current profile modification. A mechanism for steering the launched beams is desirable to cope with the strong variations in refraction which are seen. Phased array launchers seem attractive for this purpose. Tuning of the length of the waveguide run is important to avoid troublesome reflections (return losses). It may be best to build in this capability in a future system. The perpendicular dynamics of the current driven electrons are invisible to us with the present form of the diagnostic. Simultaneous measurements at fundamental and harmonic frequencies would make perpendicular distribution function measurements possible

  1. Investigation of attosecond ionization dynamics in gases and solids with intense few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanov, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of intense light fields with dielectric materials has fascinated scientists since the invention of pulsed lasers in the early sixties. Despite the many decades of research, the interest in the field keeps growing because of the potential technological applications of optical (meta-) materials and the prospects of light-controlled peta-Hertz electronics as well as the improving understanding of the fundamental processes behind light-matter interactions. The progress in the short-pulse laser technology that delivered ever-shorter light pulses was echoed by the discoveries of different progressively shorter time scales in the cycle of excitation and energy/charge relaxation in transparent solids, many parts of which are now well understood. The ultimate challenge lies in recovering the earliest stages of the dynamics which are linked to optical-field-ionization that proceeds within a fraction of an optical cycle. One of the complications of advancing the attosecond science to the bulk media is the problem of inducing and detecting a synchronized attosecond response. The charged particles spectroscopy, well developed in gaseous media during last decade and capable of reaching an attosecond temporal resolution cannot be used as an experimental tool for investigation since direct detection of charged particles is impossible in the volume of a solid material. However, solids are the natural place where electronic processes on the sub-femtosecond or attosecond time scale are expected. Very recently several methods for measuring attosecond dynamics in condensed media have been proposed utilizing optical fields in the transparency range of the material. In this thesis a method, suggested in our scientific group is presented. It is an all-optical method based on the detection of optical harmonics originating from ultrafast modulation of a free electron current due to ionization in the field of intense few-cycle laser pulses. This technique will allow retrieving

  2. First principles based multiparadigm modeling of electronic structures and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai

    Electronic structures and dynamics are the key to linking the material composition and structure to functionality and performance. An essential issue in developing semiconductor devices for photovoltaics is to design materials with optimal band gaps and relative positioning of band levels. Approximate DFT methods have been justified to predict band gaps from KS/GKS eigenvalues, but the accuracy is decisively dependent on the choice of XC functionals. We show here for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2, the parent compounds of the promising CIGS solar cells, conventional LDA and GGA obtain gaps of 0.0-0.01 and 0.02-0.24 eV (versus experimental values of 1.04 and 1.67 eV), while the historically first global hybrid functional, B3PW91, is surprisingly the best, with band gaps of 1.07 and 1.58 eV. Furthermore, we show that for 27 related binary and ternary semiconductors, B3PW91 predicts gaps with a MAD of only 0.09 eV, which is substantially better than all modern hybrid functionals, including B3LYP (MAD of 0.19 eV) and screened hybrid functional HSE06 (MAD of 0.18 eV). The laboratory performance of CIGS solar cells (> 20% efficiency) makes them promising candidate photovoltaic devices. However, there remains little understanding of how defects at the CIGS/CdS interface affect the band offsets and interfacial energies, and hence the performance of manufactured devices. To determine these relationships, we use the B3PW91 hybrid functional of DFT with the AEP method that we validate to provide very accurate descriptions of both band gaps and band offsets. This confirms the weak dependence of band offsets on surface orientation observed experimentally. We predict that the CBO of perfect CuInSe2/CdS interface is large, 0.79 eV, which would dramatically degrade performance. Moreover we show that band gap widening induced by Ga adjusts only the VBO, and we find that Cd impurities do not significantly affect the CBO. Thus we show that Cu vacancies at the interface play the key role in

  3. Vlasov simulations of electron hole dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Vasko, Ivan; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Electron holes (EHs) or phase space vortices are solitary electrostatic waves existing due to electrons trapped within EH electrostatic potential. Since the first direct observation [1], EHs have been widely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere: in reconnecting current sheets [2], injection fronts [3], auroral region [4], and many other space plasma systems. EHs have typical spatial scales up to tens of Debye lengths, electric field amplitudes up to hundreds of mV/m and propagate along magnetic field lines with velocities of about electron thermal velocity [5]. The role of EHs in energy dissipation and supporting of large-scale potential drops is under active investigation. The accurate interpretation of spacecraft observations requires understanding of EH evolution in inhomogeneous plasma. The critical role of plasma density gradients in EH evolution was demonstrated in [6] using PIC simulations. Interestingly, up to date no studies have addressed a role of magnetic field gradients in EH evolution. In this report, we use 1.5D gyrokinetic Vlasov code to demonstrate the critical role of magnetic field gradients in EH dynamics. We show that EHs propagating into stronger (weaker) magnetic field are decelerated (accelerated) with deceleration (acceleration) rate dependent on the magnetic field gradient. Remarkably, the reflection points of decelerating EHs are independent of the average magnetic field gradient in the system and depend only on the EH parameters. EHs are decelerated (accelerated) faster than would follow from the "quasi-particle" concept assuming that EH is decelerated (accelerated) entirely due to the mirror force acting on electrons trapped within EH. We demonstrate that EH propagation in inhomogeneous magnetic fields results in development of a net potential drop along an EH, which depends on the magnetic field gradient. The revealed features will be helpful for interpreting spacecraft observations and results of advanced particle simulations. In

  4. Electron-phonon thermalization in a scalable method for real-time quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Valerio; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Kohanoff, Jorge J.; Correa, Alfredo A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantum simulation method that follows the dynamics of out-of-equilibrium many-body systems of electrons and oscillators in real time. Its cost is linear in the number of oscillators and it can probe time scales from attoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. Contrary to Ehrenfest dynamics, it can thermalize starting from a variety of initial conditions, including electronic population inversion. While an electronic temperature can be defined in terms of a nonequilibrium entropy, a Fermi-Dirac distribution in general emerges only after thermalization. These results can be used to construct a kinetic model of electron-phonon equilibration based on the explicit quantum dynamics.

  5. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods...... such as electron(7-10) or X-ray diffraction(11) and X-ray absorption(12) yield complementary information about the atomic motions. Time-resolved methods that are directly sensitive to both valence-electron dynamics and atomic motions include photoelectron spectroscopy(13-15) and high-harmonic generation(16......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  6. Dynamics of photoionization from molecular electronic wavepacket states in intense pulse laser fields: A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-04-07

    A theory for dynamics of molecular photoionization from nonadiabatic electron wavepackets driven by intense pulse lasers is proposed. Time evolution of photoelectron distribution is evaluated in terms of out-going electron flux (current of the probability density of electrons) that has kinetic energy high enough to recede from the molecular system. The relevant electron flux is in turn evaluated with the complex-valued electronic wavefunctions that are time evolved in nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics in laser fields. To uniquely rebuild such wavefunctions with its electronic population being lost by ionization, we adopt the complex-valued natural orbitals emerging from the electron density as building blocks of the total wavefunction. The method has been implemented into a quantum chemistry code, which is based on configuration state mixing for polyatomic molecules. Some of the practical aspects needed for its application will be presented. As a first illustrative example, we show the results of hydrogen molecule and its isotope substitutes (HD and DD), which are photoionized by a two-cycle pulse laser. Photon emission spectrum associated with above threshold ionization is also shown. Another example is taken from photoionization dynamics from an excited state of a water molecule. Qualitatively significant effects of nonadiabatic interaction on the photoelectron spectrum are demonstrated.

  7. Dynamics of zonal shear collapse with hydrodynamic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, R. J.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a theory for the collapse of the edge zonal shear layer, as observed at the density limit at low β. This paper investigates the scaling of the transport and mean profiles with the adiabaticity parameter α, with special emphasizes on fluxes relevant to zonal flow (ZF) generation. We show that the adiabaticity parameter characterizes the strength of production of zonal flows and so determines the state of turbulence. A 1D reduced model that self-consistently describes the spatiotemporal evolution of the mean density n ¯ , the azimuthal flow v¯ y , and the turbulent potential enstrophy ɛ=⟨(n˜ -∇2ϕ˜ ) 2/2 ⟩ —related to fluctuation intensity—is presented. Quasi-linear analysis determines how the particle flux Γn and vorticity flux Π=-χy∇2vy+Πre s scale with α, in both hydrodynamic and adiabatic regimes. As the plasma response passes from adiabatic (α > 1) to hydrodynamic (α y=Πre s/χy —representative of the strength of the shear—also drops. The shear layer then collapses and turbulence is enhanced. The collapse is due to a decrease in ZF production, not an increase in damping. A physical picture for the onset of collapse is presented. The findings of this paper are used to motivate an explanation of the phenomenology of low β density limit evolution. A change from adiabatic ( α=kz2vth 2/(|ω|νei)>1 ) to hydrodynamic (α < 1) electron dynamics is associated with the density limit.

  8. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Wang Feng; Li Xin; Yuan Yanping; Xiao Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train. (paper)

  9. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  11. Static structure, microscopic dynamics and electronic properties of the liquid Bi–Li alloy. An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, J; Alemany, M M G; Gallego, L J; González, L E; González, D J

    2013-01-01

    We report an ab initio molecular dynamics study of the static, dynamic and electronic properties of the liquid Bi x Li 1−x alloy, which is a complex binary system with a marked tendency to heterocoordination. The calculated total static structure factors are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The partial dynamic structure factors exhibit side peaks indicative of propagating density fluctuations, and for some concentrations we have found a density fluctuation mode with phase velocity greater than the hydrodynamic sound velocity. We have also evaluated other dynamical properties such as the diffusion coefficients, the shear viscosity and the adiabatic sound velocity. The electronic density of states show that the liquid Bi x Li 1−x alloy has a metallic character, although with strong deviations from the free-electron parabolic curve. The results reported improve the understanding of binary liquid alloys with both fast and slow propagating collective modes. (paper)

  12. Variational nonadiabatic dynamics in the moving crude adiabatic representation: Further merging of nuclear dynamics and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2018-03-01

    A new methodology of simulating nonadiabatic dynamics using frozen-width Gaussian wavepackets within the moving crude adiabatic representation with the on-the-fly evaluation of electronic structure is presented. The main feature of the new approach is the elimination of any global or local model representation of electronic potential energy surfaces; instead, the electron-nuclear interaction is treated explicitly using the Gaussian integration. As a result, the new scheme does not introduce any uncontrolled approximations. The employed variational principle ensures the energy conservation and leaves the number of electronic and nuclear basis functions as the only parameter determining the accuracy. To assess performance of the approach, a model with two electronic and two nuclear spacial degrees of freedom containing conical intersections between potential energy surfaces has been considered. Dynamical features associated with nonadiabatic transitions and nontrivial geometric (or Berry) phases were successfully reproduced within a limited basis expansion.

  13. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    The potential for using conducting polymers as the active material in optoelectronic devices has come to fruition in the past few years. Understanding the fundamental photophysics behind their operations points to the significant role played by the polymer interface in their performance. Current device architectures involve the use of bulk heterojunctions which intimately blend the donor and acceptor polymers to significantly increase not only their interfacial surface area but also the probability of exciton formation within the vicinity of the interface. In this dissertation, we detail the role played by the interface on the behavior and performance of bulk heterojunction systems. First, we explore the relation between the exciton binding energy to the band offset in determining device characteristics. As a general rule, when the exciton binding energy is greater than the band offset, the exciton remains the lowest energy excited state leading to efficient light-emitting properties. On the other hand, if the offset is greater than the binding energy, charge separation becomes favorable leading to better photovoltaic behavior. Here, we use a Wannier function, configuration interaction based approach to examine the essential excited states and predict the vibronic absorption and emission spectra of the PPV/BBL, TFB/F8BT and PFB/F8BT heterojunctions. Our results underscore the role of vibrational relaxation in the formation of charge-transfer states following photoexcitation. In addition, we look at the relaxation dynamics that occur upon photoexcitation. For this, we adopt the Marcus-Hush semiclassical method to account for lattice reorganization in the calculation of the interconversion rates in TFB/F8BT and PFB/F8BT. We find that, while a tightly bound charge-transfer state (exciplex) remains the lowest excited state, a regeneration pathway to the optically active lowest excitonic state in TFB/F8BT is possible via thermal repopulation from the exciplex. Finally

  14. Implementing and evaluating a fictitious electron dynamics method for the calculation of electronic structure: Application to the Si(100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M J H; Claassens, C H

    2006-01-01

    A density matrix based fictitious electron dynamics method for calculating electronic structure has been implemented within a semi-empirical quantum chemistry environment. This method uses an equation of motion that implicitly ensures the idempotency constraint on the density matrix. Test calculations showed that this method has potential of being combined with simultaneous atomic dynamics, in analogy to the popular Car-Parrinello method. In addition, the sparsity of the density matrix and the sophisticated though flexible way of ensuring idempotency conservation while integrating the equation of motion creates the potential of developing a fast linear scaling method

  15. Ab initio/interpolated quantum dynamics on coupled electronic states with full configuration interaction wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.; Martinez, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new approach to first-principles molecular dynamics that combines a general and flexible interpolation method with ab initio evaluation of the potential energy surface. This hybrid approach extends significantly the domain of applicability of ab initio molecular dynamics. Use of interpolation significantly reduces the computational effort associated with the dynamics over most of the time scale of interest, while regions where potential energy surfaces are difficult to interpolate, for example near conical intersections, are treated by direct solution of the electronic Schroedinger equation during the dynamics. We demonstrate the concept through application to the nonadiabatic dynamics of collisional electronic quenching of Li(2p). Full configuration interaction is used to describe the wave functions of the ground and excited electronic states. The hybrid approach agrees well with full ab initio multiple spawning dynamics, while being more than an order of magnitude faster. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  17. Dynamical mechanism of charge separation by photoexcited generation of proton–electron pairs in organic molecular systems. A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro, E-mail: kyamamoto@fukui.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Takatsuka, Kazuo, E-mail: kaztak@fukui.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-08-22

    Graphical abstract: Asymptotic biradical state produced by the excited-state coupled proton–electron transfer (CPET), resulting in charge separation (proton–electron pair creation) on a proton–electron acceptor A, in a series of photochemical systems generally denoted as X–Mn–OH{sub 2}⋯A, where X = (OH, Ca(OH){sub 3}) and A = (N-methylformamidine, guanidine, imidazole, or ammonia clusters). - Abstract: In this perspective article, we review, along with presenting new results, a series of our theoretical analyses on the excited-state mechanism of charge separation (proton–electron pair creation) relevant to the photoinduced water-splitting reaction (2H{sub 2}O → 4H{sup +} + 4e{sup −} + O{sub 2}) in organic and biological systems, which quite often includes Mn clusters in various molecular configurations. The present mechanism is conceived to be universal in the triggering process of the photoexcited water splitting dynamics. In other words, any Mn-based catalytic charge separation is quite likely to be initiated according to this mechanism. As computationally tractable yet realistic models, we examine a series of systems generally expressed as X–Mn–OH{sub 2}⋯A, where X = (OH, Ca(OH){sub 3}) and A = (N-methylformamidine, guanidine, imidazole or ammonia cluster) in terms of the theory of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics. We first find both an electron and a proton are simultaneously transferred to the acceptors through conical intersections upon photoexcitation. In this mechanism, the electron takes different pathways from that of the proton and reaches the densely lying Rydberg-like states of the acceptors in the end, thereby inducing charge separation. Therefore the presence of the Rydberg-like diffused unoccupied states as an electron acceptor is critical for this reaction to proceed. We also have found another crucial nonadiabatic process that deteriorates the efficiency of charge separation by rendering the created pair of proton

  18. Dynamics of electrons in gradient nanostructures (exactly solvable model)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shvartsburg, A. B.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír; Petite, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2009), s. 77-88 ISSN 1434-6028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : wave propagation * tunneling * electronic transport Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.466, year: 2009

  19. Dynamics of Pierce instability of hot electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, A.M.; Novikov, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    On the base of a new method of numerical solution of the Vlasov equation evolution of complete function of electron distribution at the injection of hot electron beams into plasma bounded with electrodes is investigated. It is shown that despite the development of electrostatic instabilities in the system the currents can run substantially exceeding the Pierce critical current

  20. Attosecond-correlated dynamics of two electrons in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... 2Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany ... involving a highly correlated electronic transition state. ... laser is low, the recolliding electron can have a maximum energy of about 15 eV which.

  1. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Single-Electron Tunneling Devices with Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a single-electron source, modeled as a quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to an adjacent lead in time-dependent density-functional theory. Based on this system, we develop a time-nonlocal exchange-correlation potential by exploiting analogies with quantum-transport theory. The time nonlocality manifests itself in a dynamical potential step. We explicitly link the time evolution of the dynamical step to physical relaxation timescales of the electron dynamics. Finally, we discuss prospects for simulations of larger mesoscopic systems.

  2. Some aspects of electron dynamics in solid alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, I.I.; Funabashi, K.

    1975-01-01

    The excess electron mobility in 3-methylpentane (3MP) is in the range of 0.02-0.1 cm 2 /v.s. for 4.2-85 0 K. The mobility is nearly independent of temperature below 35 0 K, while the activation energy is about 0.01 eV for 35 0 K-85 0 K. The magnitude of mobility and its temperature dependence are consistent with the hopping and tunneling motion of electron between trapped (or localized) states. The decay kinetics of the absorption spectrum of trapped electrons in 3MP also suggest the presence of many trapping sites, and a small mean free path of retrapping for a quasi-free electron. It is conjectured that the electron-transport in 3MP glass is the phonon-assisted hopping or tunneling and the mean free path (or the mobility) at the quasi-free state is not as large as 100 A (or 150 cm 2 /v.s.). The mean free path of scattering for an excess electron at the quasi-free level in various alkane glasses can be found approximately from measurement of attenuation constants for electron beams (Chang and Berry). The relationship of these attenuation constants with V 0 (quasi-free state) will be discussed. The effect of electron-phonon coupling on the effective mass of excess electrons will also be discussed in terms of a simple model. The effective mass is a sensitive function of the ratio of the relaxation energy to the phonon energy

  3. Ultrafast equilibration of excited electrons in dynamical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhibin; Allen, Roland E

    2009-12-02

    In our density-functional-based simulations of materials responding to femtosecond-scale laser pulses, we have observed a potentially useful phenomenon: the excited electrons automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within ∼100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion. Microscopic simulations like these can then provide the separate electronic and kinetic temperatures, chemical potentials, pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses as input for studies on larger lengths and timescales.

  4. Runaway electrons dynamics and confinement in Tore-Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Geraud, A.; Joyer, P.; Martin, G.; Rax, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The lack of energy of runaway electrons, confined in Tore Supra tokamak, is studied. Ohmic discharges, obtained with helium gas, exhibit a small amount of runaway electrons on both hard X-ray monitors and neutron sensors. The observations show an important lack of energy for runaway electrons confined in Tore Supra. It is assumed to be dued to a small pitch-angle scattering (a few degrees), and many candidates for this are compared: the strongest known one collisions seems not to be enough by an order of magnitude. Density and magnetic scans on Tore Supra are needed to discriminate between enhanced collisional scattering processes and purely magnetic phenomena

  5. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  6. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  7. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  8. Quasirelativism, narrowband properties and forced dynamics of electrons in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlov, B S; Strepetov, A V

    2002-01-01

    The narrow-zone semiconductors, which are applied for creating the quantum networks, characterized by small effective masses of electrons at the Fermi level and consequently by high electron mobility in the lattice. The obviously soluble model, clarifying one of the possible mechanisms for the small effective masses origination, is constructed in the proposed work. The other mathematical model, constructed in this work, describes the possible mechanism for controlling the alternating quantum current by the one-dimensional lattice through a travelling wave

  9. Kinetic theory for electron dynamics near a positive ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrighton, Jeffrey M; Dufty, James W

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical description of time correlation functions for electron properties in the presence of a positive ion of charge number Z is given. The simplest case of an electron gas distorted by a single ion is considered. A semi-classical representation with a regularized electron–ion potential is used to obtain a linear kinetic theory that is asymptotically exact at short times. This Markovian approximation includes all initial (equilibrium) electron–electron and electron–ion correlations through renormalized pair potentials. The kinetic theory is solved in terms of single-particle trajectories of the electron–ion potential and a dielectric function for the inhomogeneous electron gas. The results are illustrated by a calculation of the autocorrelation function for the electron field at the ion. The dependence on charge number Z is shown to be dominated by the bound states of the effective electron–ion potential. On this basis, a very simple practical representation of the trajectories is proposed and shown to be accurate over a wide range including strong electron–ion coupling. This simple representation is then used for a brief analysis of the dielectric function for the inhomogeneous electron gas

  10. Storm-time radiation belt electron dynamics: Repeatability in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Boyd, A. J.; Turner, D. L.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During intervals of enhanced solar wind driving the outer radiation belt becomes extremely dynamic leading to geomagnetic storms. During these storms the flux of energetic electrons can vary by over 4 orders of magnitude. Despite recent advances in understanding the nature of competing storm-time electron loss and acceleration processes the dynamic behavior of the outer radiation belt remains poorly understood; the outer radiation belt can exhibit either no change, an enhancement, or depletion in radiation belt electrons. Using a new analysis of the total radiation belt electron content, calculated from the Van Allen probes phase space density (PSD), we statistically analyze the time-dependent and global response of the outer radiation belt during storms. We demonstrate that by removing adiabatic effects there is a clear and repeatable sequence of events in storm-time radiation belt electron dynamics. Namely, the relativistic (μ=1000 MeV/G) and ultra-relativistic (μ=4000 MeV/G) electron populations can be separated into two phases; an initial phase dominated by loss followed by a second phase dominated by acceleration. At lower energies, the radiation belt seed population of electrons (μ=150 MeV/G) shows no evidence of loss but rather a net enhancement during storms. Further, we investigate the dependence of electron dynamics as a function of the second adiabatic invariant, K. These results demonstrate a global coherency in the dynamics of the source, relativistic and ultra-relativistic electron populations as function of the second adiabatic invariant K. This analysis demonstrates two key aspects of storm-time radiation belt electron dynamics. First, the radiation belt responds repeatably to solar wind driving during geomagnetic storms. Second, the response of the radiation belt is energy dependent, relativistic electrons behaving differently than lower energy seed electrons. These results have important implications in radiation belt research. In particular

  11. Study and realization of an electron linear accelerator. Dynamics of accelerated electrons; Etude et realisation d'un accelerateur lineaire d'electrons. Dynamique des electrons acceleres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-04-01

    The theoretical characteristics of the electron linear accelerator are: 30 MeV for the energy W{sub S} and 250 mA for the peak current I{sub c}. The main utilization is the intense production of fast neutrons by the reactions ({gamma},n) and ({gamma},f) induced in a target of natural uranium by the accelerated electrons. In the first part of the thesis, relative to the study and the realization of the accelerator, a new equation of dispersion is established analytically when the guide is loaded with round-edged irises. The relation is compared with the equation established by CHU and Hansen, WALKINSHAW, KVASIL in the case of a guide loaded with flat-edged irises. The experimental and theoretical curves of dispersion are compared. The accuracy of every relation of dispersion is estimated. The second part of the thesis is relative to the theoretical study of the electrons dynamics in the guide; it allows the derivation of the parameters of the beam: dispersion of phase, energy, dispersion of energy and the relation W{sub S} = f (I{sub c}). The results relative to the first experiments are given and compared with the theoretical expectations. (author) [French] Les caracteristiques nominales theoriques de l'accelerateur lineaire d'electrons sont: 30 MeV pour l'energie W{sub S} et 250 mA pour le courant de crete I{sub c}. L'utilisation principale envisagee est la production de neutrons rapides par les reactions ({gamma},n) et ({gamma},f) induites dans une cible d'uranium naturel par les electrons acceleres. Dans la premiere partie de la these relative a l'elude et a la realisation de l'accelerateur, une nouvelle equation de dispersion (ou equation aux frequences) est etablie analytiquement pour un guide charge par des iris a bord rond. Cette relation est comparee a celles etablies par CHU et HANSEN, WALKINSHAW, KVASIL dans le cas du guide charge par des iris a bord plat. On compare les courbes de dispersion theoriques et experimentales et on evalue la precision de

  12. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on generalized quantum Langevin equations for the tight-binding wavefunction amplitudes and lattice displacements, electron and phonon quantum transport are obtained exactly using molecular dynamics (MD) in the ballistic regime. The electron-phonon interactions can be handled with a quasi...

  13. High dynamic range isotope ratio measurements using an analog electron multiplier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Williams, P.; Lorinčík, Jan; Franzreb, K.; Herwig, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2013), s. 549-552 ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 894 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Isotope ratios * electron multiplier * dynamic range Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2013

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartnig, C.B.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of solvent reorganization in the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction, i.e. O2+e-¿O2-, modeled as taking place in the outer Helmholtz plane. The first electron transfer step is usually considered the rate-determining step from many

  15. Dynamical fragmentation and very high speed projection of micro-particulates with a pulsed electrons generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassany, B.; Courchinoux, R.; Bertron, I.; Malaise, F.; Hebert, D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows how to use a pulsed electrons beam to simulate the dynamical fragmentation of copper sheets and to eject diamond, tantalum and tungsten micro-particulates at very high speed (∼1000 m/s). These experiments were performed with the electrons generator CESAR of CEA/CESTA (France). (J.S.)

  16. Creation and dynamical co-evolution of electron and ion channel transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of magnetic confinement devices have found transitions to an enhanced confinement regime. Simple dynamical models have been able to capture much of the dynamics of these barriers however an open question has been the disconnected nature of the electron thermal transport channel sometimes observed in the presence of a standard ('ion channel' barrier. By adding to simple barrier model an evolution equation for electron fluctuations we can investigate the interaction between the formation of the standard ion channel barrier and the somewhat less common electron channel barrier. Barrier formation in the electron channel is even more sensitive to the alignment of the various gradients making up the sheared radial electric field than the ion barrier is. Electron channel heat transport is found to significantly increase after the formation of the ion channel barrier but before the electron channel barrier is formed. This increased transport is important in the barrier evolution. (author)

  17. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy (∼20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes

  18. Electron injection dynamics in high-potential porphyrin photoanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Rebecca L; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2015-05-19

    There is a growing need to utilize carbon neutral energy sources, and it is well known that solar energy can easily satisfy all of humanity's requirements. In order to make solar energy a viable alternative to fossil fuels, the problem of intermittency must be solved. Batteries and supercapacitors are an area of active research, but they currently have relatively low energy-to-mass storage capacity. An alternative and very promising possibility is to store energy in chemical bonds, or make a solar fuel. The process of making solar fuel is not new, since photosynthesis has been occurring on earth for about 3 billion years. In order to produce any fuel, protons and electrons must be harvested from a species in its oxidized form. Photosynthesis uses the only viable source of electrons and protons on the scale needed for global energy demands: water. Because artificial photosynthesis is a lofty goal, water oxidation, which is a crucial step in the process, has been the initial focus. This Account provides an overview of how terahertz spectroscopy is used to study electron injection, highlights trends from previously published reports, and concludes with a future outlook. It begins by exploring similarities and differences between dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) for producing electricity and a putative device for splitting water and producing a solar fuel. It then identifies two important problems encountered when adapting DSSC technology to water oxidation-improper energy matching between sensitizer energy levels with the potential for water oxidation and the instability of common anchoring groups in water-and discusses steps to address them. Emphasis is placed on electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides because this process is the initial step in charge transport. Both the rate and efficiency of electron injection are analyzed on a sub-picosecond time scale using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS). Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrins are

  19. Microchannel electron multiplier: improvement in gain performances and detection dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audier, M.; Delmotte, J.C.; Boutot, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The performances of an MCP are a function of its geometrical characteristics (diameter d and ratio 1/d of a channel, useful area) and of the applied voltage. Gain and mean output current are limited by saturation phenomena. By using a particular cascaded MCP's configuration, it is possible to simultaneously improve the gain, its associated fluctuations and the detection dynamics (detected level, counting rate). For gains 10 6 7 , the fluctuations, can be kept as low as 20% and an improvement by a factor > 10 can be obtained on the detection dynamics [fr

  20. Absorption distances in the dynamical theory of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Yoshihiko; Goto, Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The contrast effect of the electron microscopic image at crystal defects is characterized by two parameters; extincion distance and absorption distance. Both quantities are orginally defined for the elastic scattering. Since the inelastic scattering contributes to the electron microscopic image, parameters used for the interpretation of the images are not the same as those for the elastic scattering. It is shown that the difference of absorption distance beteen the theoretical estimation and that used for interpretation is due to the contrst effect of the small angle inelastic scattering. (author)

  1. Electron plasma dynamics during autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C. J., E-mail: cbaker@physics.ucsd.edu; Danielson, J. R., E-mail: jrdanielson@ucsd.edu; Hurst, N. C., E-mail: nhurst@physics.ucsd.edu; Surko, C. M., E-mail: csurko@ucsd.edu [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Chirped-frequency autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode is used to move electron plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap across the magnetic field for advanced plasma and antimatter applications. Plasmas of 10{sup 8} electrons, with radii small compared to that of the confining electrodes, can be moved from the magnetic axis to ≥90% of the electrode radius with near unit efficiency and reliable angular positioning. Translations of ≥70% of the wall radius are possible for a wider range of plasma parameters. Details of this process, including phase and displacement oscillations in the plasma response and plasma expansion, are discussed, as well as possible extensions of the technique.

  2. Fast electrons from multi-electron dynamics in xenon clusters induced by inner-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostedt, Christoph; Thomas, Heiko; Hoener, Matthias; Moeller, Thomas; Saalmann, Ulf; Georgescu, Ionut; Gnodtke, Christian; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Fast electrons emitted from xenon clusters in strong femtosecond 90 eV pulses have been measured at the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Energy absorption occurs mainly through atomic inner-shell photo-ionization. Photo-electrons are trapped in the strong Coulomb potential of the cluster ions and form a non-equilibrium plasma with supra-atomic density. Its equilibration through multiple energy-exchanging collisions within the entire cluster volume produces electrons with energies well beyond the dominant emission line of atomic xenon. Here, in contrast to traditional low-frequency laser plasma heating, the plasma gains energy from electrons delivered through massive single-photon excitation from bound states. Electron emission induced by thermalization of a non-equilibrium plasma is expected to be a general phenomenon occurring for strong atomic x-ray absorption in extended systems.

  3. Dynamics of user networks in on-line electronic auctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slanina, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2014), "1450002-1"-"1450002-14" ISSN 0219-5259 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09078 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : networks * random graphs * dynamics Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.968, year: 2014

  4. The dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Eliasson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of recent analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of electron and ion holes in a collisionless plasma. The new results are based on the class of analytic solutions which were found by Schamel more than three decades ago, and which here work as initial conditions to numerical simulations of the dynamics of ion and electron holes and their interaction with radiation and the background plasma. Our analytic and numerical studies reveal that ion holes in an electron-ion plasma can trap Langmuir waves, due the local electron density depletion associated with the negative ion hole potential. Since the scale-length of the ion holes are on a relatively small Debye scale, the trapped Langmuir waves are Landau damped. We also find that colliding ion holes accelerate electron streams by the negative ion hole potentials, and that these streams of electrons excite Langmuir waves due to a streaming instability. In our Vlasov simulation of two colliding ion holes, the holes survive the collision and after the collision, the electron distribution becomes flat-topped between the two ion holes due to the ion hole potentials which work as potential barriers for low-energy electrons. Our study of the dynamics between electron holes and the ion background reveals that standing electron holes can be accelerated by the self-created ion cavity owing to the positive electron hole potential. Vlasov simulations show that electron holes are repelled by ion density minima and attracted by ion density maxima. We also present an extension of Schamel's theory to relativistically hot plasmas, where the relativistic mass increase of the accelerated electrons have a dramatic effect on the electron hole, with an increase in the electron hole potential and in the width of the electron hole. A study of the interaction between electromagnetic waves with relativistic electron holes shows that electromagnetic waves can be both linearly and nonlinearly

  5. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...

  6. Study of warm dense plasma electronic dynamics by optical interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deneuville, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime is characterised by a density close to the solid density and an electron temperature close to the Fermi temperature. In this work, the nonequilibrium Warm Dense Matter is studied during the solid to liquid phase transition induced by an ultra short laser interacting with a solid. A 30 femtosecond time resolution pump-probe experiment (FDI) is set up, yielding to the measurement of the heated sample complex reflectivity for both S and P polarisation. We have determined a criterion based on the measured reflectivities, which permits to control the interface shape of the probed matter. For pump laser fluences around 1 J/cm 2 , the hydrodynamics of the heated matter is studied and experimental results are compared to the two-temperatures code ESTHER. Furthermore, the evolution of the dielectric function at 800 nm and 400 nm is inferred from our measurements on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Within the Drude-Lorentz model for the conduction electrons, the dielectric function yields information such as ionisation state, electronic temperature and electron collision frequency. (author) [fr

  7. Orbital and spin dynamics of intraband electrons in quantum rings driven by twisted light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G F; Tamborenea, P I; Berakdar, J

    2011-12-19

    We theoretically investigate the effect that twisted light has on the orbital and spin dynamics of electrons in quantum rings possessing sizable Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The system Hamiltonian for such a strongly inhomogeneous light field exhibits terms which induce both spin-conserving and spin-flip processes. We analyze the dynamics in terms of the perturbation introduced by a weak light field on the Rasha electronic states, and describe the effects that the orbital angular momentum as well as the inhomogeneous character of the beam have on the orbital and the spin dynamics.

  8. Monopole and topological electron dynamics in adiabatic spintronic and graphene systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.G.; Jalil, M.B.A.; Fujita, T.

    2010-01-01

    A unified theoretical treatment is presented to describe the physics of electron dynamics in semiconductor and graphene systems. Electron spin's fast alignment with the Zeeman magnetic field (physical or effective) is treated as a form of adiabatic spin evolution which necessarily generates a monopole in magnetic space. One could transform this monopole into the physical and intuitive topological magnetic fields in the useful momentum (K) or real spaces (R). The physics of electron dynamics related to spin Hall, torque, oscillations and other technologically useful spinor effects can be inferred from the topological magnetic fields in spintronic, graphene and other SU(2) systems.

  9. Attosecond dynamics of electrons in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Hans Jakob

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss two recent experiments carried out in our group that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18 s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. We advance high-harmonic spectroscopy to resolve spatially and temporally the migration of an electron hole immediately following ionization of iodoacetylene, while simultaneously demonstrating extensive control over the process. A multidimensional approach, based on the measurement of both even and odd harmonic orders, enables us to reconstruct both quantum amplitudes and phases of the electronic states with a resolution of ~ 100 as. We separately reconstruct quasi-field-free and laser-controlled charge migration as a function of the spatial orientation of the molecule and determine the shape of the hole created by ionization. The second experiment is carried out on a free-flowing microjet of liquid water. We use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from liquid water using the RABBIT technique. We measure a delay on the order of 50 as between electrons emitted from the HOMO of liquid water compared to that of gas-phase water and a substantially reduced modulation contrast of the corresponding sidebands. Since our measurements on solvated water molecules are referenced to isolated ones, the measured delays reflect (i) the photoionization delays caused by electron transport through the aqueous environment and (ii) the effect of solvation on the parent molecule. The relative modulation contrast, in turn, contains information on (iii) the modification of transition amplitudes and (iv) dephasing processes. These experiments make the liquid phase and its fascinating

  10. Opto-electronic conversion logic behaviour through dynamic modulation of electron/energy transfer states at the TiO2-carbon quantum dot interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yonglai; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xuefeng; Shen, Mingrong; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-07

    Here we show a bias-mediated electron/energy transfer process at the CQDs-TiO(2) interface for the dynamic modulation of opto-electronic properties. Different energy and electron transfer states have been observed in the CQDs-TNTs system due to the up-conversion photoluminescence and the electron donation/acceptance properties of the CQDs decorated on TNTs.

  11. Structural, dynamical, electronic, and bonding properties of laser-heated silicon: An ab initio molecular-dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1997-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystalline silicon. We found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bonding. As a result the system undergoes a melting

  12. Spin dynamics of electrons in strong fields studied via bremsstrahlung from a polarized electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashenov, Stanislav [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm University (Sweden); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Baeck, Torbjoern; Cederwall, Bo; Khaplanov, Anton; Schaessburger, Kai-Uwe [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Barday, Roman; Enders, Joachim; Poltoratska, Yuliya [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet, Darmstadt (Germany); Surzhykov, Andrey [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Linear polarization of the photons emitted in the process of the atomic field electron bremsstrahlung has been studied at the newly developed 100 keV polarized electron source of TU Darmstadt. A correlation between the initial orientation of the electron spin and the degree and the angle of photon linear polarization has been measured for the first time. For this purpose a hard x-ray Compton polarimeter consisting of a segmented high purity germanium detector and an external passive photon scattering target have been applied. Linear polarization sensitive Compton and Rayleigh photon scattering distributions have been sampled by the segmented detector. The observed polarization correlation reveals a precession of the electron spin as it moves in the field of the nucleus. The full-relativistic calculations for the case of radiative recombination into a Rydberg series limit have been corroborated by the measurement. The results of this experiment suggest a new method for electron beam polarimetry.

  13. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Asit; Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index κ on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  14. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Asit, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index κ on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  15. Electron and proton kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This timely book presents new research results on high-energy particle physics related to solar flares, covering the theory and applications of the reconnection process in a clear and comprehensible way. It investigates particle kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres and their diagnostics from spectral observations, while providing an analysis of the observation data and techniques and comparing various models. Written by an internationally acclaimed expert, this is vital reading for all solar, astro-, and plasma physicists working in the field.

  16. Electron Dynamics in a Subproton-Gyroscale Magnetic Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Dorelli, John C.; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Avanov, Levon A.; Gliese, Ulrik B.; Barrie, Alexander C.; Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Dickson, Charles; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic holes are ubiquitous in space plasmas, occurring in the solar wind, downstream of planetary bow shocks, and inside the magnetosphere. Recently, kinetic-scale magnetic holes have been observed near Earth's central plasma sheet. The Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission enables measurement of both ions and electrons with 2 orders of magnitude increased temporal resolution over previous magnetospheric instruments. Here we present data from MMS taken in Earth's nightside plasma sheet and use high-resolution particle and magnetometer data to characterize the structure of a subproton-scale magnetic hole. Electrons with gyroradii above the thermal gyroradius but below the current layer thickness carry a current sufficient to account for a 10-20 depression in magnetic field magnitude. These observations suggest that the size and magnetic depth of kinetic-scale magnetic holes is strongly dependent on the background plasma conditions.

  17. Electronic dynamics induced by laser in (D)KDP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, G.; Geoffroy, G.; Dyan, A.; Piombini, H.; Geoffroy, G.; Guizard, S.

    2011-01-01

    DKDP (KD 2 PO 4 ) and KDP (KH 2 PO 4 ) crystals that are used in frequency conversion systems have a damage threshold that limits the development of power lasers. It is assumed that laser-induced damage (LID) stems for a precursor defect present in the crystal or quickly generated by the laser-radiation. The Socrate bench has been useful for studying the evolution of LID but the understanding of the very beginning of the LID requires a new method. We have performed femtosecond interferometric measures to study the behaviour of charge carriers. We show that the valence electrons are excited through multi-photon absorption and their relaxation time depends on the isotope (hydrogen or deuterium). The various electron populations are computed through an adequate simulation and the comparison with experimental data has allowed us to get values for multi-photon absorption cross-sections and relaxation times

  18. Studies of collision dynamics in electron capture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    This thesis presents some recent development in time-dependent coupled channel methods for one- and two-electron systems. The methods have been applied to detailed studies on several different aspects of charge transfer processes in ion-atom collisions at intermediate to low energies. Measurable quantities, such as partial and total cross sections, partial cross sections in projectile energy gain, orientation and alignment fractions, have been calculated. Confrontation with experiments has in general given good agreement. 29 refs

  19. Studies of collision dynamics in electron capture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.

    1989-12-01

    The thesis presents some recent development in time-dependent coupled channel methods for one- and two-electron systems. The methods have been applied to detailed studies on several different aspects of charge transfer processes in ion-atom collisions at intermediate to low energies. Measurable quantities, such as partial and total cross sections, partial cross sections in projectile energy gain, orientation and alignment fractions, have been calculated. Confrontation with experiments has in general given good agreement. 14 refs., 2 figs

  20. Attosecond Electron Processes in Materials: Excitons, Plasmons, and Charge Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-19

    focused using a f=1.5 m lens into a 250 micron hollow core fiber (HCF) filled with neon gas at atmospheric pressure to stretch the pulse spectrum from... insulator to metal transition. Introduction: The goal of this work was to understand the generation, transport, and manipulation of electronic charge...chemically sensitive probe pulse utilizing specific core level transitions in atoms that are part of a material under study. The measurements follow

  1. Electron beam dynamics in the LIU-30/250 accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakhrushin, Yu.P.; Kuznetsov, V.S.; Tikhomirov, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation of coherent oscillations of electron beam in the LIU-30/250 accelerating system are presented. Transport systems both with continuous field and the discrete ones are considered. The following conclusions are made: amplitude of coherent oscillations inevitably grows in the real transport channel; the presence of correctors can lead to sufficient losses of beam pulse duration; discrete system is the optimal system for beam transport without sufficient losses. 7 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Quantum-Dynamical Theory of Electron Exchange Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Ritchie

    2013-01-01

    aggregate, is elucidated. The relationship depends on the use of spin-dependent quantum trajectories (SDQT to evaluate Coulomb’s law between any two electrons as an instantaneous interaction in space and time rather than as a quantum-mean interaction in the form of screening and exchange potentials. Hence FDS depends in an ab initio sense on the inference of SDQT from Dirac’s equation, which provides for relativistic Lorentz invariance and a permanent magnetic moment (or spin in the electron’s equation of motion. Schroedinger’s time-dependent equation can be used to evaluate the SDQT in the nonrelativistic regime of electron velocity. Remarkably FDS is a relativistic property of an ensemble of electron, even though it is of order c0 in the nonrelativistic limit, in agreement with experimental observation. Finally it is shown that covalent versus separated-atoms limits can be characterized by the SDQT. As an example of the use of SDQT in a canonical structure problem, the energies of the 1Σg and 3Σu states of H2 are calculated and compared with the accurate variational energies of Kolos and Wolniewitz.

  3. Dynamics in ion-molecule collisions at high velocities: One- and two-electron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yudong.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the dynamic interactions in ion-molecule collisions. Theoretical methods are developed for single and multiple electron transitions in fast collisions with diatomic molecules by heavy-ion projectiles. Various theories and models are developed to treat the three basic inelastic processes (excitation, ionization and charge transfer) involving one and more electrons. The development, incorporating the understanding of ion-atom collision theories with some unique characteristics for molecular targets, provides new insights into phenomena that are absent from collisions with atomic targets. The influence from the multiple scattering centers on collision dynamics is assessed. For diatomic molecules, effects due to a fixed molecular orientation or alignment are calculated and compared with available experimental observations. Compared with excitation and ionization, electron capture, which probes deeper into the target, presents significant two-center interference and strong orientation dependence. Attention has been given in this dissertation to exploring mechanisms for two-and multiple electron transitions. Application of independent electron approximation to transfer excitation from molecular hydrogen is studied. Electron-electron interaction originated from projectile and target nuclear centers is studied in conjunction with the molecular nature of target. Limitations of the present theories and models as well as possible new areas for future theoretical and experimental applications are also discussed. This is the first attempt to describe multi-electron processes in molecular dynamics involving fast highly charged ions

  4. Pauli blocking and laser manipulation of the electron dynamics in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The dynamics of ion-atom collisions are governed primarily by the Coulomb interactions between the active electrons and the projectile and target nuclei. This contribution is devoted to the question whether and how other phenomena can modify the outcome of atomic scattering experiments. Firstly, the role of the Pauli exclusion principle on electronic transitions will be considered. Supported by experimental data it will be argued that Pauli blocking may have an important influence on electron transfer processes if collision systems with electrons on target and projectile in the initial channel are addressed [1]. Secondly, it will be discussed to which extent the electron dynamics can be modified and manipulated by an external interaction, namely by a suitable laser field [2]. The prototype scattering system He 2+ -H will be considered in the framework of the semiclassical approximation, i.e., projectile and laser interactions are described in terms of time-dependent external potentials which govern the quantum dynamics of the electron. The focus will be on slow collisions, in which electron transfer dominates, and on relatively short wavelengths such that both time dependent potentials vary on comparable time scales. A strong enhancement of laser-assisted electron transfer is found at collision energies below 1 keV/amu [3]. Its origin and its disappearance at higher energies as well as implications for planned experiments will be discussed

  5. Dynamic Pricing in Electronic Commerce Using Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Tapu Kumar; Tran, Thomas T.

    In this paper, we propose an approach where feed-forward neural network is used for dynamically calculating a competitive price of a product in order to maximize sellers’ revenue. In the approach we considered that along with product price other attributes such as product quality, delivery time, after sales service and seller’s reputation contribute in consumers purchase decision. We showed that once the sellers, by using their limited prior knowledge, set an initial price of a product our model adjusts the price automatically with the help of neural network so that sellers’ revenue is maximized.

  6. Dynamic, electronically switchable surfaces for membrane protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C S; Dusseiller, M; Makohliso, S; Heuschkel, M; Sharma, S; Keller, B; Vörös, J

    2006-02-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool that provides a high throughput of bioanalytical information within a single experiment. These miniaturized and parallelized binding assays are highly sensitive and have found widespread popularity especially during the genomic era. However, as drug diagnostics studies are often targeted at membrane proteins, the current arraying technologies are ill-equipped to handle the fragile nature of the protein molecules. In addition, to understand the complex structure and functions of proteins, different strategies to immobilize the probe molecules selectively onto a platform for protein microarray are required. We propose a novel approach to create a (membrane) protein microarray by using an indium tin oxide (ITO) microelectrode array with an electronic multiplexing capability. A polycationic, protein- and vesicle-resistant copolymer, poly(l-lysine)-grafted-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG), is exposed to and adsorbed uniformly onto the microelectrode array, as a passivating adlayer. An electronic stimulation is then applied onto the individual ITO microelectrodes resulting in the localized release of the polymer thus revealing a bare ITO surface. Different polymer and biological moieties are specifically immobilized onto the activated ITO microelectrodes while the other regions remain protein-resistant as they are unaffected by the induced electrical potential. The desorption process of the PLL-g-PEG is observed to be highly selective, rapid, and reversible without compromising on the integrity and performance of the conductive ITO microelectrodes. As such, we have successfully created a stable and heterogeneous microarray of biomolecules by using selective electronic addressing on ITO microelectrodes. Both pharmaceutical diagnostics and biomedical technology are expected to benefit directly from this unique method.

  7. Studies of dynamics of electron clouds in STAR silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Brandon, N; Caines, H; Chen, W; Dimassimo, D; Dyke, H; Hall, J R; Hardtke, D; Hoffmann, G W; Humanic, T J; Kotova, A I; Kotov, I V; Kraner, H W; Li, Z; Lynn, D; Middelkamp, P; Ott, G; Pandey, S U; Pruneau, C A; Rykov, V L; Schambach, J; Sedlmeir, J; Sugarbaker, E R; Takahashi, J; Wilson, W K

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons generated in silicon drift detectors was studied using an IR LED. Electrons were generated at different drift distances. In this way, the evolution of the cloud as a function of drift time was measured. Two methods were used to measure the cloud size. The method of cumulative functions was used to extract the electron cloud profiles. Another method obtains the cloud width from measurements of the charge collected on a single anode as a function of coordinate of the light spot. The evolution of the electron cloud width with drift time is compared with theoretical calculations. Experimental results agreed with theoretical expectations.

  8. Nonequilibrium Dynamics in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Electron Plasma after Ultrafast Intersubband Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutgen, S.; Kaindl, R.A.; Woerner, M.; Elsaesser, T.; Hase, A.; Kuenzel, H.; Gulia, M.; Meglio, D.; Lugli, P.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum wells is studied after excitation from the n=1 to the n=2 conduction subband. Femtosecond pump-probe experiments demonstrate for the first time athermal distributions of n=1 electrons on a surprisingly long time scale of 2ps. Thermalization involves intersubband scattering of excited electrons via optical phonon emission with a time constant of 1ps and intrasubband Coulomb and phonon scattering. Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations show that the slow electron equilibration results from Pauli blocking and screening of carrier-carrier scattering. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Charge dynamics in aluminum oxide thin film studied by ultrafast scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Maurizio; Sala, Vittorio; Irde, Gabriele; Pietralunga, Silvia Maria; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    The excitation dynamics of defects in insulators plays a central role in a variety of fields from Electronics and Photonics to Quantum computing. We report here a time-resolved measurement of electron dynamics in 100 nm film of aluminum oxide on silicon by Ultrafast Scanning Electron Microscopy (USEM). In our pump-probe setup, an UV femtosecond laser excitation pulse and a delayed picosecond electron probe pulse are spatially overlapped on the sample, triggering Secondary Electrons (SE) emission to the detector. The zero of the pump-probe delay and the time resolution were determined by measuring the dynamics of laser-induced SE contrast on silicon. We observed fast dynamics with components ranging from tens of picoseconds to few nanoseconds, that fits within the timescales typical of the UV color center evolution. The surface sensitivity of SE detection gives to the USEM the potential of applying pump-probe investigations to charge dynamics at surfaces and interfaces of current nano-devices. The present work demonstrates this approach on large gap insulator surfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Size dependence investigations of hot electron cooling dynamics in metal/adsorbates nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Christophe; Abid, Jean-Pierre; Girault, Hubert H.

    2005-01-01

    The size dependence of electron-phonon coupling rate has been investigated by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy for gold nanoparticles (NPs) wrapped in a shell of sulfate with diameter varying from 1.7 to 9.2 nm. Broad-band spectroscopy gives an overview of the complex dynamics of nonequilibrium electrons and permits the choice of an appropriate probe wavelength for studying the electron-phonon coupling dynamics. Ultrafast experiments were performed in the weak perturbation regime (less than one photon in average per nanoparticle), which allows the direct extraction of the hot electron cooling rates in order to compare different NPs sizes under the same conditions. Spectroscopic data reveals a decrease of hot electron energy loss rates with metal/adsorbates nanosystem sizes. Electron-phonon coupling time constants obtained for 9.2 nm NPs are similar to gold bulk materials (∼1 ps) whereas an increase of hot electron cooling time up to 1.9 ps is observed for sizes of 1.7 nm. This is rationalized by the domination of surface effects over size (bulk) effects. The slow hot electron cooling is attributed to the adsorbates-induced long-lived nonthermal regime, which significantly reduces the electron-phonon coupling strength (average rate of phonon emission)

  11. Calculation of dynamic and electronic properties of perfect and defect crystals by semiempirical quantum mechanical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunger, A.

    1975-07-01

    Semiempirical all-valence-electron LCAO methods, that were previously used to study the electronic structure of molecules are applied to three problems in solid state physics: the electronic band structure of covalent crystals, point defect problems in solids and lattice dynamical study of molecular crystals. Calculation methods for the electronic band structure of regular solids are introduced and problems regarding the computation of the density matrix in solids are discussed. Three models for treating the electronic eigenvalue problem in the solid, within the proposed calculation schemes, are discussed and the proposed models and calculation schemes are applied to the calculation of the electronic structure of several solids belonging to different crystal types. The calculation models also describe electronic properties of deep defects in covalent insulating crystals. The possible usefulness of the semieipirical LCAO methods in determining the first order intermolecular interaction potential in solids and an improved model for treating the lattice dynamics and related thermodynamical properties of molecular solids are presented. The improved lattice dynamical is used to compute phonon dispersion curves, phonon density of states, stable unit cell structure, lattice heat capacity and thermal crystal parameters, in α and γ-N 2 crystals, using the N 2 -N 2 intermolecular interaction potential that has been computed from the semiempirical LCAO methods. (B.G.)

  12. Dynamics of solid inner-shell electrons in collisions with bare and dressed swift ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanari, C.C.; Miraglia, J. E.; Arista, N.R.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the dynamical interactions of swift heavy projectiles and solid inner-shell electrons. The dielectric formalism employed to deal with the free-electron gas is extended to account for the core electrons, by using the local plasma approximation. Results for stopping power, energy straggling, and inner-shell ionization in collisions of bare ions with metals are displayed, showing very good accord with the experimental data. Simultaneous excitations of projectile and target electrons are also analyzed. In the high-energy range we find a similar contribution of target core and valence electrons to the probability of projectile-electron loss. The problem of no excitation threshold within the local plasma approximation and the possibility of collective excitations of the shells are discussed

  13. Dynamics of electron wave packet in a disordered chain with delayed nonlinear response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongjun; Xiong Shijie

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of one electron wave packet in a linear chain with random on-site energies and a nonadiabatic electron-phonon interaction which is described by a delayed cubic nonlinear term in the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We show that in the regime where the wave packet is delocalized in the case with only the delayed nonlinearity, the wave packet becomes localized when the disorder is added and the localization is enhanced by increasing the disorder. In the regime where the self-trapping phenomenon occurs in the case with only the delayed nonlinearity, by adding the disorder the general dynamical features of the wave packet do not change if the nonlinearity parameter is small, but the dynamics shows the subdiffusive behavior if the nonlinearity parameter is large. The numerical results demonstrate complicated wave packet dynamics of systems with both the disorder and nonlinearity.

  14. Short-Range Electron Transfer in Reduced Flavodoxin: Ultrafast Nonequilibrium Dynamics Coupled with Protein Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mainak; He, Ting-Fang; Lu, Yangyi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2018-05-03

    Short-range electron transfer (ET) in proteins is an ultrafast process on the similar timescales as local protein-solvent fluctuations thus the two dynamics are coupled. Here, we use semiquinone flavodoxin and systematically characterized the photoinduced redox cycle with eleven mutations of different aromatic electron donors (tryptophan and tyrosine) and local residues to change redox properties. We observed the forward and backward ET dynamics in a few picoseconds, strongly following a stretched behavior resulting from a coupling between local environment relaxations and these ET processes. We further observed the hot vibrational-state formation through charge recombination and the subsequent cooling dynamics also in a few picoseconds. Combined with the ET studies in oxidized flavodoxin, these results coherently reveal the evolution of the ET dynamics from single to stretched exponential behaviors and thus elucidate critical timescales for the coupling. The observed hot vibration-state formation is robust and should be considered in all photoinduced back ET processes in flavoproteins.

  15. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: carrier trapping versus electron-hole recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpene, E; Mancini, E; Dallera, C; Schwen, D; Ronning, C; Silvestri, S De

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films by means of femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity. We estimated the electron-phonon relaxation time of a few hundred femtoseconds and we observed that under low optical excitation photo-generated carriers decay according to two distinct mechanisms attributed to trapping by defect states and direct electron-hole recombination. With high excitation, when photo-carrier and trap densities are comparable, a unique temporal evolution develops, as the time dependence of the trapping process becomes degenerate with the electron-hole recombination. This experimental evidence highlights the role of defects in the ultrafast electronic dynamics and is not specific to this particular form of carbon, but has general validity for amorphous and disordered semiconductors

  16. Runaway electrons dynamics and confinement in TORE-SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Geraud, A.; Joyer, P.; Martin, G.; Rax, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Ohmic discharges in TORE-SUPRA are sufficiently long (∼ 6 s) for runaway electrons (R.E.) to reach a steady energy state: their energy limit is determined by the balance between parallel electric field acceleration (20 MeV/V.s in TORE-SUPRA) and radiation losses due to the curvature of the trajectories. When R.E. energy is supposed to be only parallel, this provides estimate of order of 70 MeV (value usually called 'synchrotron limit') reached in less than 2 seconds. Experimental observations on TORE-SUPRA of photoneutron emission together with residual induced radioactivity in the first wall components tend to prove that the actual value is much lower than 70 MeV (i.e. 15-35 MeV). Earlier observations in ORMAK, PLT and TFR already showed R.E. energy a slightly less than expected from standard loop voltage acceleration calculations. Explanations given for this lack of energy (as skin-effect lowering the electric field during the ramp-up phase or balance between continuous creation and losses) seems not to hold on TORE-SUPRA and therefore another mechanism must be considered to explain the R.E. energy limitation. 4 refs., 2 figs

  17. Dynamic plasma screening effects on semiclassical inelastic electron endash ion collisions in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In dense plasmas, dynamic plasma screening effects are investigated on 1s→2p dipole transition probabilities for electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions. The electron endash ion interaction potential is considered by introduction of the plasma dielectric function. A semiclassical straight-line trajectory method is applied to the path of the projectile electron in order to visualize the semiclassical transition probability as a function of the impact parameter, projectile energy, and plasma parameters. The transition probability including the dynamic plasma screening effect is always greater than that including the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is smaller than the electron thermal velocity, the dynamic polarization screening effect becomes the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is greater than the electron thermal velocity, then the interaction potential is almost unshielded. The difference between the dynamic and static plasma screening effects is more significant for low-energy projectiles. It is also found that the static plasma screening formula obtained by the Debye endash Hueckel model overestimates the plasma screening effects on the atomic excitation processes in dense plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Transformation dynamics of Ni clusters into NiO rings under electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.knez@felmi-zfe.at [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Kothleitner, Gerald [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, Wolfgang E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Hofer, Ferdinand [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    We report the transformation of nickel clusters into NiO rings by an electron beam induced nanoscale Kirkendall effect. High-purity nickel clusters consisting of a few thousand atoms have been used as precursors and were synthesized with the superfluid helium droplet technique. Aberration-corrected, analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy was applied to oxidise and simultaneously analyse the nanostructures. The transient dynamics of the oxidation could be documented by time lapse series using high-angle annular dark-field imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. A two-step Cabrera-Mott oxidation mechanism was identified. It was found that water adsorbed adjacent to the clusters acts as oxygen source for the electron beam induced oxidation. The size-dependent oxidation rate was estimated by quantitative EELS measurements combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings could serve to better control sample changes during examination in an electron microscope, and might provide a methodology to generate other metal oxide nanostructures. - Highlights: • Beam induced conversion of Ni clusters into crystalline NiO rings has been observed. • Ni clusters were grown with the superfluid He-droplet technique. • oxidizeSTEM was utilized to investigate and simultaneously oxidize these clusters. • Oxidation dynamics was captured in real-time. • Cluster sizes and the oxidation rate were estimated via EELS and molecular dynamics.

  19. Explicit role of dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation on singlet-triplet splitting in carbenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seal, Prasenjit; Chakrabarti, Swapan

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theoretical studies have been performed on carbene systems to determine the singlet-triplet splitting and also to explore the role of electron correlation. Using an approximate method of separation of dynamical and nondynamical correlation, it is found that dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation stabilizes the singlet state relative to the triplet for halo carbenes in both BLYP and B3LYP methods. Calculations performed on higher homologues of methylene suggest that beyond CH(CH 3 ), both the electron correlations have leveling effect in stabilizing the singlet state relative to the triplet. It has also been observed while dynamical electron correlation fails to provide any substantial degree of stabilization to the singlet states of higher homologues of methylene in B3LYP method, an opposite trend is observed for nondynamical counterpart. Among the larger systems studied (9-triptycyl)(α-naphthyl)-carbene has the highest stability of the triplet state whereas bis-imidazol-2-ylidenes has the most stable singlet state. Interestingly, the values of the dynamical electron correlation for each state of each system studied are different for the two methods used. The reason behind this apparent discrepancy lies in the fact that the coefficients of the LYP part in B3LYP and BLYP functionals are different

  20. Liquidity dynamics in an electronic open limit order book: An event study approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gomber, Peter; Schweickert, Uwe; Theissen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of liquidity in Xetra, an electronic open limit order book. We use the Exchange Liquidity Measure (XLM), a measure of the cost of a roundtrip trade of given size V. This measure captures the price and the quantity dimension of liquidity. We present descriptive statistics, analyze the cross-sectional determinants of the XLM measure and document its intraday pattern. Our main contribution is an analysis of the dynamics of the XLM measure around liquidity shocks. We use i...

  1. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    Science, University ofMichigan, AnnArbor,MI 48109-2099, USA E-mail: czulick@umich.edu Keywords: laser- plasma ,mass-limited, fast electrons , sheath...New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 063020 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/6/063020 PAPER Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser... plasma interactions CZulick, ARaymond,AMcKelvey, VChvykov, AMaksimchuk, AGRThomas, LWillingale, VYanovsky andKKrushelnick Center forUltrafast Optical

  2. 2012 ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY & DYNAMICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 22-27, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Bern

    2012-07-27

    Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, coherent electronic energy transport in biology, excited state theory and dynamics, excitonics, electronic spectroscopy of cold and ultracold molecules, and the spectroscopy of nanostructures. Several sessions will highlight innovative techniques such as time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy, frequency combs, and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy that have forged stimulating new connections between gas-phase and condensed-phase work.

  3. Web-EEDF: open source software for modeling the electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janda, M.; Machala, Z.; Morvova, M.; Francek, V.; Lukac, P.

    2005-01-01

    We present a free software for modeling the electron dynamics in the uniform electric field named Web-EEDF. It uses a Monte Carlo algorithm to calculate electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) and other plasma parameters in various mixtures. Obtained results are in good agreement with literature. This software represents the first stage in a more complex modeling of plasma chemical processes leading to the decomposition of various air pollutants in electrical discharges at atmospheric pressure (Authors)

  4. Lattice dynamics and electronic properties of superconducting Nbsub(x)Vsub(1-x)N compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geibel, C.; Rietschel, H.; Pelizzone, M.; Junod, A.; Muller, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Nbsub(x)Vsub(1-x)N-system presents a pronounced minimum in Tsub(c) at the composition Nbsub(0.5)Vsub(0.5)N. We investigated the structural, the electronic properties and the lattice dynamics of these compounds to study whether this minimum is induced by structural defects, a decrease of the electron-phonon-coupling or by spin fluctuations. (orig.)

  5. Trust and Control Dynamics in Agrifood Supply Networks: Communication Strategies for Electronic Transaction Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Melanie; Hausen, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    Agrifood supply networks are dynamic structures where firms regularly face the need to search for new market partners. A decision for a transaction with a new partner requires the existence of appropriate control and safeguard mechanisms as well as trust to overcome perceived risk and uncertainties. Electronic transaction environments offer new potentials for the identification of new transaction partners. However, trust and control need to be communicated appropriately in electronic transact...

  6. Dynamical "in situ" observation of biological samples using variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 126, - (2008), 012046:1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2007 (EMAG 2007). Glasgow, 03.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0886; GA AV ČR KJB200650602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : biological sample * VP-SEM * dynamical experiments Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Dynamics of total electron content distribution during strong geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, E. I.; Afraimovich, E. L.; Kosogorov, E. A.

    We worked out a new method of mapping of total electron content TEC equal lines displacement velocity The method is based on the technique of global absolute vertical TEC value mapping Global Ionospheric Maps technique GIM GIM with 2-hours time resolution are available from Internet underline ftp cddisa gsfc nasa gov in standard IONEX-files format We determine the displacement velocity absolute value as well as its wave vector orientation from increments of TEC x y derivatives and TEC time derivative for each standard GIM cell 5 in longitude to 2 5 in latitude Thus we observe global traveling of TEC equal lines but we also can estimate the velocity of these line traveling Using the new method we observed anomalous rapid accumulation of the ionosphere plasma at some confined area due to the depletion of the ionization at the other spacious territories During the main phase of the geomagnetic storm on 29-30 October 2003 very large TEC enhancements appeared in the southwest of North America TEC value in that area reached up to 200 TECU 1 TECU 10 16 m -2 It was found that maximal velocity of TEC equal lines motion exceeded 1500 m s and the mean value of the velocity was about 400 m s Azimuth of wave vectors of TEC equal lines were orientated toward the center of region with anomaly high values of TEC the southwest of North America It should be noted that maximal TEC values during geomagnetically quiet conditions is about 60-80 TECU the value of TEC equal lines

  8. Dynamic correlation of photo-excited electrons: Anomalous levels induced by light–matter coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiankai [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); Song, Bo, E-mail: bosong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear light–matter coupling plays an important role in many aspects of modern physics, such as spectroscopy, photo-induced phase transition, light-based devices, light-harvesting systems, light-directed reactions and bio-detection. However, excited states of electrons are still unclear for nano-structures and molecules in a light field. Our studies unexpectedly present that light can induce anomalous levels in the electronic structure of a donor–acceptor nanostructure with the help of the photo-excited electrons transferring dynamically between the donor and the acceptor. Furthermore, the physics underlying is revealed to be the photo-induced dynamical spin–flip correlation among electrons. These anomalous levels can significantly enhance the electron current through the nanostructure. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the understanding of the photo-excited electrons with dynamic correlations, which provides a push to the development and application of techniques based on photosensitive molecules and nanostructures, such as light-triggered molecular devices, spectroscopic analysis, bio-molecule detection, and systems for solar energy conversion.

  9. Thermo-dynamical contours of electronic-vibrational spectra simulated using the statistical quantum-mechanical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomogaev, Vladimir; Pomogaeva, Anna; Avramov, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Three polycyclic organic molecules in various solvents focused on thermo-dynamical aspects were theoretically investigated using the recently developed statistical quantum mechanical/classical molecular dynamics method for simulating electronic-vibrational spectra. The absorption bands of estradiol...

  10. Dynamical optimization techniques for the calculation of electronic structure in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedek, R.; Min, B.I.; Garner, J.

    1989-01-01

    The method of dynamical simulated annealing, recently introduced by Car and Parrinello, provides a new tool for electronic structure computation as well as for molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, we explore an optimization technique that is complementary to dynamical simulated annealing, the method of steepest descents (SD). As an illustration, SD is applied to calculate the total energy of diamond-Si, a system previously treated by Car and Parrinello. The adaptation of SD to treat metallic systems is discussed and a numerical application is presented. (author) 18 refs., 3 figs

  11. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaozheng Ji

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening

  12. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shaozheng; Piazza, Luca; Cao, Gaolong; Park, Sang Tae; Reed, Bryan W; Masiel, Daniel J; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2017-09-01

    Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM) that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening shows a close to

  13. Electron-Cloud Pinch Dynamics in Presence of Lattice Magnet Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G

    2011-01-01

    The pinch of the electron cloud due to a passing proton bunch was extensively studied in a field free region and in a dipolar magnetic field. For the latter study, a strong field approximation helped to formulate the equations of motion and to understand the complex electron pinch dynamics, which exhibited some similarities with the field-free situation. Here we extend the analysis to the case of electron pinch in quadrupoles and in sextupoles. We discuss the limits of validity for the strong field approximation and we evaluate the relative magnitude of the peak tune shift along the bunch expected for the different fields.

  14. Simulations of Electron Cloud Effects on the Beam Dynamics for the FNAL Main Injector Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine M.; Grote, David

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab main injector (MI) is being considered for an upgrade as part of the high intensity neutrino source (HINS) effort. This upgrade will involve a significant increasing of the bunch intensity relative to its present value. Such an increase will place the MI in a regime in which electron-cloud effects are expected to become important. We have used the electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP, recently augmented with new modeling capabilities and simulation techniques, to study the dynamics of beam-electron cloud interaction. This work in progress involves a systematic assessment of beam instabilities due to the presence of electron clouds

  15. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  16. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  17. In Situ Characterization of Inconel 718 Post-Dynamic Recrystallization within a Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Zouari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure evolution within the post-dynamic regime following hot deformation was investigated in Inconel 718 samples with different dynamically recrystallized volume fractions and under conditions such that no δ-phase particles were present. In situ annealing treatments carried out to mimic post-dynamic conditions inside the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM chamber suggest the occurrence of both metadynamic and static recrystallization mechanisms. Static recrystallization was observed in addition to metadynamic recrystallization, only when the initial dynamically recrystallized volume fraction was very small. The initial volume fraction of dynamically recrystallized grains appears to be decisive for subsequent microstructural evolution mechanisms and kinetics. In addition, the formation of annealing twins is observed along with the growth of recrystallized grains, but then the twin density decreases as the material enters the capillarity-driven grain growth regime.

  18. How electronic dynamics with Pauli exclusion produces Fermi-Dirac statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Triet S; Nanguneri, Ravindra; Parkhill, John

    2015-04-07

    It is important that any dynamics method approaches the correct population distribution at long times. In this paper, we derive a one-body reduced density matrix dynamics for electrons in energetic contact with a bath. We obtain a remarkable equation of motion which shows that in order to reach equilibrium properly, rates of electron transitions depend on the density matrix. Even though the bath drives the electrons towards a Boltzmann distribution, hole blocking factors in our equation of motion cause the electronic populations to relax to a Fermi-Dirac distribution. These factors are an old concept, but we show how they can be derived with a combination of time-dependent perturbation theory and the extended normal ordering of Mukherjee and Kutzelnigg for a general electronic state. The resulting non-equilibrium kinetic equations generalize the usual Redfield theory to many-electron systems, while ensuring that the orbital occupations remain between zero and one. In numerical applications of our equations, we show that relaxation rates of molecules are not constant because of the blocking effect. Other applications to model atomic chains are also presented which highlight the importance of treating both dephasing and relaxation. Finally, we show how the bath localizes the electron density matrix.

  19. How electronic dynamics with Pauli exclusion produces Fermi-Dirac statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Triet S.; Nanguneri, Ravindra; Parkhill, John

    2015-01-01

    It is important that any dynamics method approaches the correct population distribution at long times. In this paper, we derive a one-body reduced density matrix dynamics for electrons in energetic contact with a bath. We obtain a remarkable equation of motion which shows that in order to reach equilibrium properly, rates of electron transitions depend on the density matrix. Even though the bath drives the electrons towards a Boltzmann distribution, hole blocking factors in our equation of motion cause the electronic populations to relax to a Fermi-Dirac distribution. These factors are an old concept, but we show how they can be derived with a combination of time-dependent perturbation theory and the extended normal ordering of Mukherjee and Kutzelnigg for a general electronic state. The resulting non-equilibrium kinetic equations generalize the usual Redfield theory to many-electron systems, while ensuring that the orbital occupations remain between zero and one. In numerical applications of our equations, we show that relaxation rates of molecules are not constant because of the blocking effect. Other applications to model atomic chains are also presented which highlight the importance of treating both dephasing and relaxation. Finally, we show how the bath localizes the electron density matrix

  20. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H2O and D2O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H2O and 102 ± 8 fs in D2O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  1. Study on dynamics of beams of high luminosity in electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, V.A.; Shchedrin, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    To increase the electron beam luminosity in electron linacs (ELA), designed for electron microscopy, a numerical analysis of the electron dynamics in the ELA is carried out. Insufficiency of the available data on longitudinal beam motion in the 10 -4 -10 -5 relative energy spread on radial motion, as well as inadequacy of the data on aberrations of the second order introduced by the accelerating structure are shown. The necessary accountancy of the longitudinal Coulomb field is also shown. For the 1-10 MeV electron energies, 10 9 and 5x10 9 cm -3 bunch density, 5 deg-0.5 deg phase extension the beam current varies within the 0.2-10 mA. The bunch moves in the drift space of the 2.5 m length. The energy spread is 8x10 -8 (1 MeV) to 10 -4 (10 MeV) at the 2 mA beam current [ru

  2. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Romarly F. da; Varella, Márcio T. do N; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Neves, Rafael F. C.; Lopes, Maria Cristina A.; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Jones, Darryl B.

    2016-01-01

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C 5 H 4 O 2 ). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (N open ) at either the static-exchange (N open  ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (N open  ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections.

  3. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Romarly F.; do N. Varella, Márcio T.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Neves, Rafael F. C.; Lopes, Maria Cristina A.; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C5H4O2). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (Nopen) at either the static-exchange (Nopen ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (Nopen ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections.

  4. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Romarly F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-859 (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo 09210-580 (Brazil); Varella, Márcio T. do N [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, São Paulo, São Paulo 05315-970 (Brazil); Bettega, Márcio H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, Curitiba, Paraná 81531-990 (Brazil); Neves, Rafael F. C. [Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Lopes, Maria Cristina A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Blanco, Francisco [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, Gustavo [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Jones, Darryl B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); and others

    2016-03-28

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (N{sub open}) at either the static-exchange (N{sub open} ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (N{sub open} ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections.

  5. Response to 'Comment on 'Ultrafast electron optics: Propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets'' [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 803 (2003)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwick, Bradley J.; Dwyer, Jason R.; Jordan, Robert E.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-01-01

    In this reply, we address the main issues raised by Qian et al. regarding our recent article [J. Appl. Phys. 92, 1643 (2002)]. In particular, we reiterate the approximations used in the development of the mean-field model and demonstrate how the form used for the on-axis potential is applicable to the study of femtosecond electron packet propagation and is not in need of correction. We also repeat our assertion that the one-dimensional (1-D) fluid model developed by Qian et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 91, 462 (2002)] overestimates space-charge-induced pulse broadening and is in qualitative disagreement with femtosecond electron packet propagation dynamics. The key differences between the mean-field and 1-D fluid model are discussed and their range of applicability is clarified

  6. The dynamic flowgraph methodology as a safety analysis tool : programmable electronic system design and verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtermans, M.J.M.; Apostolakis, G.E.; Brombacher, A.C.; Karydas, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) during the design and verification of programmable electronic safety-related systems. The safety system consists of hardware as well as software. This paper explains and demonstrates the use of DFM, and

  7. Langevin Dynamics with Spatial Correlations as a Model for Electron-Phonon Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, A.; Caro, M.; Caro, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Klintenberg, M.; Correa, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    Stochastic Langevin dynamics has been traditionally used as a tool to describe nonequilibrium processes. When utilized in systems with collective modes, traditional Langevin dynamics relaxes all modes indiscriminately, regardless of their wavelength. We propose a generalization of Langevin dynamics that can capture a differential coupling between collective modes and the bath, by introducing spatial correlations in the random forces. This allows modeling the electronic subsystem in a metal as a generalized Langevin bath endowed with a concept of locality, greatly improving the capabilities of the two-temperature model. The specific form proposed here for the spatial correlations produces a physical wave-vector and polarization dependency of the relaxation produced by the electron-phonon coupling in a solid. We show that the resulting model can be used for describing the path to equilibration of ions and electrons and also as a thermostat to sample the equilibrium canonical ensemble. By extension, the family of models presented here can be applied in general to any dense system, solids, alloys, and dense plasmas. As an example, we apply the model to study the nonequilibrium dynamics of an electron-ion two-temperature Ni crystal.

  8. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik D.; Knecht, Stefan; Kielberg, Jesper Skau

    2015-01-01

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electroncorrelation...... effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems....

  9. Learning nitrogen-vacancy electron spin dynamics on a silicon quantum photonic simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Paesani, S.; Santagati, R.; Knauer, S.; Gentile, A. A.; Wiebe, N.; Petruzzella, M.; Laing, A.; Rarity, J. G.; O'Brien, J. L.; Thompson, M. G.

    2017-01-01

    We present the experimental demonstration of quantum Hamiltonian learning. Using an integrated silicon-photonics quantum simulator with the classical machine learning technique, we successfully learn the Hamiltonian dynamics of a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center's electron ground-state spin.

  10. Predicting the topology of dynamic neural networks for the simulation of electronic circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilders, W.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the use of the state-space modelling MOESP algorithm to generate precise information about the number of neurons and hidden layers in dynamic neural networks developed for the behavioural modelling of electronic circuits. The Bartels–Stewart algorithm is used to transform

  11. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  12. Beam dynamics and rf evolution in a multistage klystron-like free- electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, S.

    1991-01-01

    Current understandings of beam dynamics and RF evolution in a klystron-like free-electron laser are present. Phase sensitiveness to injection jitters estimated by existing two theories is discussed. BBU suppression due to linear detuning is proposed as an alternative of ever proposed techniques. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Management factors affecting aggression in dynamic group housing systems with electronic sow feeding - a field trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, L S; Bertelsen, D; Jensen, K H

    1999-01-01

    A series of 24-h video studies on four commercial Danish pig herds investigated the behaviour of pregnant sows kept in dynamic groups (72 to 200 sows) with electronic sow feeding (ESF). The herds mainly differed with respect to provision of a layer of unchopped straw as bedding material, the freq...

  14. Conformational dynamics of semiflexibly bridged electron donor-acceptor systems comprising long aliphatic tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleisteiner, B.; Marian, T.; Schneider, S.; Brouwer, A.M.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    In continuation of our previous work on the conformational dynamics (harpooning mechanism) of semiflexibly bridged electron donor-acceptor systems we have studied a derivative with two long aliphatic chains tethered to the donor and acceptor moieties, respectively. The fitting of the time- and

  15. Compensation of aberrations of deflected electron probe by means of dynamical focusing with stigmator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Norio; Ebe, Toyoe; Ikehata, Koichi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Terada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Electron beam passing through a deflecting field is in general, subjected to aberrations such as distortion, astigmatism and coma in accordance with the deflecting angle. Accordingly the aberration defect of deflected beam is the most serious limiting factor in the performances of micromachining, microminiaturization and high resolution scanning electron microscopes. From many investigators' results, it is obvious that three important compensation methods to aberrations exist in principle, i.e., double deflection system, dynamical focusing, and the dynamical correction using a stigmator. In this paper, based on the aberration formula derived from the eikonal or the path method, the practical data of the aberration constants of deflected electron beam for the sequential deflection system with parallel plates are calculated, and using its result, the distorted spot patterns of an electron probe deflected in two-dimensional directions for various defocusings are graphically displayed by the aid of a computer. Further, by means of the dynamical focusing with a stigmator, the conditions to completely compensate the second order astigmatic aberration are derived, and spot patterns and the electron density distributions within the spots in the case when the compensating conditions are satisfied are also graphically displayed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Nanosecond time-resolved investigations using the in situ of dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGrange, Thomas; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Reed, B.W.; Taheri, Mitra; Pesavento, J. Bradley; Kim, Judy S.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2008-01-01

    Most biological processes, chemical reactions and materials dynamics occur at rates much faster than can be captured with standard video rate acquisition methods in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). Thus, there is a need to increase the temporal resolution in order to capture and understand salient features of these rapid materials processes. This paper details the development of a high-time resolution dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) that captures dynamics in materials with nanosecond time resolution. The current DTEM performance, having a spatial resolution <10 nm for single-shot imaging using 15 ns electron pulses, will be discussed in the context of experimental investigations in solid state reactions of NiAl reactive multilayer films, the study of martensitic transformations in nanocrystalline Ti and the catalytic growth of Si nanowires. In addition, this paper will address the technical issues involved with high current, electron pulse operation and the near-term improvements to the electron optics, which will greatly improve the signal and spatial resolutions, and to the laser system, which will allow tailored specimen and photocathode drive conditions

  17. Nanosecond time-resolved investigations using the in situ of dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGrange, Thomas [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: lagrange@llnl.gov; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Reed, B.W.; Taheri, Mitra; Pesavento, J. Bradley [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kim, Judy S.; Browning, Nigel D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Most biological processes, chemical reactions and materials dynamics occur at rates much faster than can be captured with standard video rate acquisition methods in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). Thus, there is a need to increase the temporal resolution in order to capture and understand salient features of these rapid materials processes. This paper details the development of a high-time resolution dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) that captures dynamics in materials with nanosecond time resolution. The current DTEM performance, having a spatial resolution <10 nm for single-shot imaging using 15 ns electron pulses, will be discussed in the context of experimental investigations in solid state reactions of NiAl reactive multilayer films, the study of martensitic transformations in nanocrystalline Ti and the catalytic growth of Si nanowires. In addition, this paper will address the technical issues involved with high current, electron pulse operation and the near-term improvements to the electron optics, which will greatly improve the signal and spatial resolutions, and to the laser system, which will allow tailored specimen and photocathode drive conditions.

  18. OCCURRENCE OF ACCELERATING FIELD, FORMATION AND DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAM NEAR JUPITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Maslov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The possible dynamics of the electron beam, formed in the vicinity of Io, the natural satellite of Jupiter, and injected toward Jupiter, has been investigated analytically. When a beam penetrates the Jupiter plasma to a certain depth, the beam-plasma instability can be developed. In this case, the distribution function of electrons is expanded additionally by excited oscillations. These electrons, when their energy is of order of a required certain value, cause UV polar light. For closing of a current, the formation of a double electric layer is necessary. The necessary parameters and conditions for the formation of a double layer with a large jump of an electric potential at a certain height have been formulated, its properties, stability, behavior over time and beam reflection in its field for closing of a current have been described. Reflection of the beam can lead to its vortex dynamics.

  19. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C., E-mail: clayton@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  20. The Reactivity and Structural Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoclusters Using Electron Microscopy, in situ X-Ray Spectroscopy, Electronic Structure Theories, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Judith C.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Johnson, Duane; Frenkel, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    The distinguishing feature of our collaborative program of study is the focus it brings to emergent phenomena originating from the unique structural/electronic environments found in nanoscale materials. We exploit and develop frontier methods of atomic-scale materials characterization based on electron microscopy (Yang) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Frenkel) that are in turn coupled innately with advanced first principles theory and methods of computational modeling (Johnson). In the past year we have made significant experimental advances that have led to important new understandings of the structural dynamics of what are unquestionably the most important classes of heterogeneous catalysts-the materials used to both produce and mitigate the consequences of the use of liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

  1. Self-field effects on electron dynamics in free-electron lasers with axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzanejhad, S.; Maraghechi, B.; Mohsenpour, T.

    2004-01-01

    A self-consistent method for the analysis of self-magnetic field for a free-electron laser with a one-dimensional helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field is presented. The equilibrium orbits and their stability, under the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields, are analyzed. New unstable orbits, in the first part of the Group I orbits and in the resonance region of the Group II orbits, are found. It is shown that an increase in the defocusing effect of self-fields will widen the unstable orbits. An anomalous self-field regime is found where an increase in the defocusing effect of self-fields can have stabilizing effect on the resonance region

  2. Time-dependent theoretical treatments of the dynamics of electrons and nuclei in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deumens, E.; Diz, A.; Longo, R.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    An overview is presented of methods for time-dependent treatments of molecules as systems of electrons and nuclei. The theoretical details of these methods are reviewed and contrasted in the light of a recently developed time-dependent method called electron-nuclear dynamics. Electron-nuclear dynamics (END) is a formulation of the complete dynamics of electrons and nuclei of a molecular system that eliminates the necessity of constructing potential-energy surfaces. Because of its general formulation, it encompasses many aspects found in other formulations and can serve as a didactic device for clarifying many of the principles and approximations relevant in time-dependent treatments of molecular systems. The END equations are derived from the time-dependent variational principle applied to a chosen family of efficiently parametrized approximate state vectors. A detailed analysis of the END equations is given for the case of a single-determinantal state for the electrons and a classical treatment of the nuclei. The approach leads to a simple formulation of the fully nonlinear time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including nuclear dynamics. The nonlinear END equations with the ab initio Coulomb Hamiltonian have been implemented at this level of theory in a computer program, ENDyne, and have been shown feasible for the study of small molecular systems. Implementation of the Austin Model 1 semiempirical Hamiltonian is discussed as a route to large molecular systems. The linearized END equations at this level of theory are shown to lead to the random-phase approximation for the coupled system of electrons and nuclei. The qualitative features of the general nonlinear solution are analyzed using the results of the linearized equations as a first approximation. Some specific applications of END are presented, and the comparison with experiment and other theoretical approaches is discussed

  3. Electron currents in field reversed mirror dynamics: Theory and hybrid simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    To model the dynamics of the Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) as a whole we have developed a 1-D radical hybrid code which also incorporates the above electron null current model. This code, named FROST, models the plasma as azimuthally symmetric with no axial dependence. A multi-group method in energy and canonical angular momentum describes the large-orbit ions from the beam. Massless fluid equations describe electrons and low energy ions. Since a fluid treatment for electrons is invalid near a field null, the null region electron current model discussed above has been included for this region, a unique feature. Results of simulation of neutral beam start-up in a 2XIIB-like plasma is discussed. There FROST predicts that electron currents will retard, but not prevent reversal of the magnetic field at the plasma center. These results are optimistic when compared to actual reversal experiments in 2XIIB, because there finite axial length effects and micro-instabilities substantially deteriorated the ion confinement. Nevertheless, because of the importance of the electron current in a low field region in the FRM, FROST represents a valuable intermediate step toward a more complete description of FRM dynamics. 54 refs., 50 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Michael R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: armstrong30@llnl.gov; Boyden, Ken [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred [N Division, Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-280, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kim, Judy S. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  5. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Boyden, Ken; Browning, Nigel D.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M.; Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred; Kim, Judy S.; King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R.

    2007-01-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10 7 electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution -6 s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed

  6. A variational approach to nonsmooth dynamics applications in unilateral mechanics and electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Adly, Samir

    2017-01-01

    This brief examines mathematical models in nonsmooth mechanics and nonregular electrical circuits, including evolution variational inequalities, complementarity systems, differential inclusions, second-order dynamics, Lur'e systems and Moreau's sweeping process. The field of nonsmooth dynamics is of great interest to mathematicians, mechanicians, automatic controllers and engineers. The present volume acknowledges this transversality and provides a multidisciplinary view as it outlines fundamental results in nonsmooth dynamics and explains how to use them to study various problems in engineering. In particular, the author explores the question of how to redefine the notion of dynamical systems in light of modern variational and nonsmooth analysis. With the aim of bridging between the communities of applied mathematicians, engineers and researchers in control theory and nonlinear systems, this brief outlines both relevant mathematical proofs and models in unilateral mechanics and electronics.

  7. Dynamic Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope Freeze Drying Observation for Fresh Water Algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, H.T.; Ghaly, W.A.; Zahran, N.F.; Helal, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    A new perpetration method for serving in dynamic examinations of the fresh water algae is developed in connection with the Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope (LV-SEM) freeze drying technique. Specimens are collected from fresh water of Ismailia channel then transferred directly to freeze by liquid nitrogen and dried in the chamber of the scanning electron microscope in the low vacuum mode. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the drying method presented the microstructure of algae. Dehydration in a graded ethanol series is not necessary in the new method. Dried algae specimen is observed in SEM high vacuum mode after conductive coating at higher resolution. Low-vacuum SEM freeze drying technique is a simple, time-saving and reproducible method for scanning electron microscopy that is applicable to various aquatic microorganisms covered with soft tissues.

  8. Correlated proton-electron hole dynamics in protonated water clusters upon extreme ultraviolet photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ultrafast nuclear and electronic dynamics of protonated water clusters H+(H2On after extreme ultraviolet photoionization is investigated. In particular, we focus on cluster cations with n = 3, 6, and 21. Upon ionization, two positive charges are present in the cluster related to the excess proton and the missing electron, respectively. A correlation is found between the cluster's geometrical conformation and initial electronic energy with the size of the final fragments produced. For situations in which the electron hole and proton are initially spatially close, the two entities become correlated and separate in a time-scale of 20 to 40 fs driven by strong non-adiabatic effects.

  9. Correlated proton-electron hole dynamics in protonated water clusters upon extreme ultraviolet photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast nuclear and electronic dynamics of protonated water clusters H+(H2O)n after extreme ultraviolet photoionization is investigated. In particular, we focus on cluster cations with n = 3, 6, and 21. Upon ionization, two positive charges are present in the cluster related to the excess proton and the missing electron, respectively. A correlation is found between the cluster's geometrical conformation and initial electronic energy with the size of the final fragments produced. For situations in which the electron hole and proton are initially spatially close, the two entities become correlated and separate in a time-scale of 20 to 40 fs driven by strong non-adiabatic effects. PMID:26798842

  10. Correlation between electron-irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, Shogo; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawata, Hiroaki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Masaaki, E-mail: yasuda@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tada, Kazuhiro [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the correlation between electron irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene. The electron irradiation effect is introduced by the binary collision model in the MD simulation. By applying a tensile stress to graphene, the number of adatom-vacancy (AV) and Stone–Wales (SW) defects increase under electron irradiation, while the number of single-vacancy defects is not noticeably affected by the applied stress. Both the activation and formation energies of an AV defect and the activation energy of an SW defect decrease when a tensile stress is applied to graphene. Applying tensile stress also relaxes the compression stress associated with SW defect formation. These effects induced by the applied stress cause the increase in AV and SW defect formation under electron irradiation.

  11. Direct Observation of Individual Charges and Their Dynamics on Graphene by Low-Energy Electron Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-09-14

    Visualizing individual charges confined to molecules and observing their dynamics with high spatial resolution is a challenge for advancing various fields in science, ranging from mesoscopic physics to electron transfer events in biological molecules. We show here that the high sensitivity of low-energy electrons to local electric fields can be employed to directly visualize individual charged adsorbates and to study their behavior in a quantitative way. This makes electron holography a unique probing tool for directly visualizing charge distributions with a sensitivity of a fraction of an elementary charge. Moreover, spatial resolution in the nanometer range and fast data acquisition inherent to lens-less low-energy electron holography allows for direct visual inspection of charge transfer processes.

  12. Simulating electron wave dynamics in graphene superlattices exploiting parallel processing advantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Manuel J.; Fernandes, David E.; Silveirinha, Mário G.; Falcão, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a parallel computing framework to characterize the propagation of electron waves in graphene-based nanostructures. The electron wave dynamics is modeled using both "microscopic" and effective medium formalisms and the numerical solution of the two-dimensional massless Dirac equation is determined using a Finite-Difference Time-Domain scheme. The propagation of electron waves in graphene superlattices with localized scattering centers is studied, and the role of the symmetry of the microscopic potential in the electron velocity is discussed. The computational methodologies target the parallel capabilities of heterogeneous multi-core CPU and multi-GPU environments and are built with the OpenCL parallel programming framework which provides a portable, vendor agnostic and high throughput-performance solution. The proposed heterogeneous multi-GPU implementation achieves speedup ratios up to 75x when compared to multi-thread and multi-core CPU execution, reducing simulation times from several hours to a couple of minutes.

  13. Mapping momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling and nonequilibrium phonon dynamics with ultrafast electron diffuse scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mark J.; René de Cotret, Laurent P.; Otto, Martin R.; Chatelain, Robert P.; Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Sutton, Mark; Siwick, Bradley J.

    2018-04-01

    Despite their fundamental role in determining material properties, detailed momentum-dependent information on the strength of electron-phonon and phonon-phonon coupling (EPC and PPC, respectively) across the entire Brillouin zone has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that ultrafast electron diffuse scattering (UEDS) directly provides such information. By exploiting symmetry-based selection rules and time resolution, scattering from different phonon branches can be distinguished even without energy resolution. Using graphite as a model system, we show that UEDS patterns map the relative EPC and PPC strength through their profound sensitivity to photoinduced changes in phonon populations. We measure strong EPC to the K -point TO phonon of A1' symmetry (K -A1' ) and along the entire TO branch between Γ -K , not only to the Γ -E2 g phonon. We also determine that the subsequent phonon relaxation of these strongly coupled optical phonons involve three stages: decay via several identifiable channels to TA and LA phonons (1 -2 ps), intraband thermalization of the non-equilibrium TA/LA phonon populations (30 -40 ps) and interband relaxation of the TA/LA modes (115 ps). Combining UEDS with ultrafast angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy will yield a complete picture of the dynamics within and between electron and phonon subsystems, helping to unravel complex phases in which the intertwined nature of these systems has a strong influence on emergent properties.

  14. Capturing Chemistry in Action with Electrons: Realization of Atomically Resolved Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, Anatoly A; Weber, Peter M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-08-23

    One of the grand challenges in chemistry has been to directly observe atomic motions during chemical processes. The depiction of the nuclear configurations in space-time to understand barrier crossing events has served as a unifying intellectual theme connecting the different disciplines of chemistry. This challenge has been cast as an imaging problem in which the technical issues reduce to achieving not only sufficient simultaneous space-time resolution but also brightness for sufficient image contrast to capture the atomic motions. This objective has been met with electrons as the imaging source. The review chronicles the first use of electron structural probes to study reactive intermediates, to the development of high bunch charge electron pulses with sufficient combined spatial-temporal resolution and intensity to literally light up atomic motions, as well as the means to characterize the electron pulses in terms of temporal brightness and image reconstruction. The use of femtosecond Rydberg spectroscopy as a novel means to use internal electron scattering within the molecular reference frame to obtain similar information on reaction dynamics is also discussed. The focus is on atomically resolved chemical reaction dynamics with pertinent references to work in other areas and forms of spectroscopy that provide additional information. Effectively, we can now directly observe the far-from-equilibrium atomic motions involved in barrier crossing and categorize chemistry in terms of a power spectrum of a few dominant reaction modes. It is this reduction in dimensionality that makes chemical reaction mechanisms transferrable to seemingly arbitrarily complex (large N) systems, up to molecules as large as biological macromolecules (N > 1000 atoms). We now have a new way to reformulate reaction mechanisms using an experimentally determined dynamic mode basis that in combination with recent theoretical advances has the potential to lead to a new conceptual basis for

  15. The lattice dynamical studies of rare earth compounds: electron-phonon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Prafulla K.; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Singh, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    During the last two decades chalcogenides and pnictides of rare earth (RE) atoms have drawn considerable attention of the solid state physicists because of their peculiar electronic, magnetic, optical and phonon properties. Some of these compounds e.g. sulphides and selenides of cerium (Ce), samarium (Sm), yttrium (Y), ytterbium (Yb), europium (Eu) and thulium (Tm) and their alloys show nonintegral valence (between 2 and 3), arising due to f-d electron hybridization at ambient temperature and pressure. The rare earth mixed valence compounds (MVC) reviewed in this article crystallize in simple cubic structure. Most of these compounds show the existence of strong electron-phonon coupling at half way to the zone boundary. This fact manifests itself through softening of the longitudinal acoustic mode, negative value of elastic constant C 12 etc. The purpose of this contribution is to review some of the recent activities in the fields of lattice dynamics and allied properties of rare earth compounds. The present article is primarily devoted to review the effect of electron-phonon interactions on the dynamical properties of rare earth compounds by using the lattice dynamical model theories based on charged density deformations and long-range many body forces. While the long range charge transfer effect arises due to f-d hybridization of nearly degenerate 4f-5d bands of rare earth ions, the density deformation comes into the picture of breathing motion of electron shells. These effects of charge transfer and charge density deformation when considered in the lattice dynamical models namely the three body force rigid ion model (TRM) and breathing shell model (BSM) are quite successful in explaining the phonon anomalies in these compounds and undoubtedly unraveled many important physical process governing the phonon anomalies in rare earth compounds

  16. Relaxation processes in aqueous solutions upon X-ray exposure. Entanglement of electronic and nuclear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, Isaak

    2017-07-01

    About a decade ago new types of electronic non-radiative relaxation processes, involving the environment of an electronically excited or ionized monomer, have been predicted for van der Waals clusters and these were also the first systems where such processes have been detected experimentally. These new autoionization channels encompass the recombination of an electron and a hole, and the energy transfer to a neighboring atom or molecule. Two processes can be distinguished here. In the intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) the hole created upon ionization of a monomer is filled by a valence electron of the same species, and the energy released in this electron-hole recombination is used to ionize a neighboring species. In the electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) the initial hole is filled by an electron from a neighboring species, and the energy released by this recombination is either used to ionize the same neighbor species, or to ionize a third monomer. In more recent experiments on liquid water it has been discovered that these non- local autoionization processes are strongly coupled with ultrafast nuclear dynamics. The core ionization initiates proton motion along a hydrogen donor-bond of the electronically excited water cation. This nuclear dynamics leads to the formation of transient cationic species where a proton is shared by two neighboring water molecules. Subsequent autoionization, either via Auger decay, ICD or ETMD, then occurs from any of such structure transients. This relaxation process is termed proton transfer mediated charge separation, PTM-CS. It has been found in a number of experiments that the probability of PTM-CS to occur depends on the hydrogen-bond strength between the core-ionized molecule and solvent molecules.

  17. Freezing hot electrons. Electron transfer and solvation dynamics at D{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehler, A.J.

    2007-05-15

    The present work investigates the electron transfer and solvation dynamics at the D{sub 2}O/Cu(111), D{sub 2}O/Ru(001), and NH{sub 3}/Cu(111) interfaces using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. Within this framework, the influence of the substrate, adsorbate structure and morphology, solvation site, coverage, temperature, and solvent on the electron dynamics are studied, yielding microscopic insight into the underlying fundamental processes. Transitions between different regimes of ET, substrate-dominated, barrier-determined, strong, and weak coupling are observed by systematic variation of the interfacial properties and development of empirical model descriptions. It is shown that the fundamental steps of the interfacial electron dynamics are similar for all investigated systems: Metal electrons are photoexcited to unoccupied metal states and transferred into the adlayer via the adsorbate's conduction band. The electrons localize at favorable sites and are stabilized by reorientations of the surrounding polar solvent molecules. Concurrently, they decay back two the metal substrate, as it offers a continuum of unoccupied states. However, the detailed characteristics vary for the different investigated interfaces: For amorphous ice-metal interfaces, the electron transfer is initially, right after photoinjection, dominated by the substrate's electronic surface band structure. With increasing solvation, a transient barrier evolves at the interface that increasingly screens the electrons from the substrate. Tunneling through this barrier becomes the rate-limiting step for ET. The competition of electron decay and solvation leads to lifetimes of the solvated electrons in the order of 100 fs. Furthermore, it is shown that the electrons bind in the bulk of the ice layers, but on the edges of adsorbed D{sub 2}O clusters and that the ice morphology strongly influences the electron dynamics. For the amorphous NH{sub 3}/Cu(111

  18. Ultrafast electron dynamics at alkali/ice structures adsorbed on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study the interaction between excess electrons in water ice structures adsorbed on metal surfaces and other charged or neutral species, like alkali ions, or chemically reactive molecules, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), respectively. The excess electrons in the ice can interact with the ions directly or indirectly via the hydrogen bonded water molecules. In both cases the presence of the alkali influences the population, localization, and lifetime of electronic states of excess electrons in the ice adlayer. These properties are of great relevance when considering the highly reactive character of the excess electrons, which can mediate chemical reactions by dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The influence of alkali adsorption on electron solvation and transfer dynamics in ice structures is investigated for two types of adsorption configurations using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. In the first system alkali atoms are coadsorbed on top of a wetting amorphous ice film adsorbed on Cu(111). At temperatures between 60 and 100 K alkali adsorption leads to the formation of positively charged alkali ions at the ice/vacuum interface. The interaction between the alkali ions at the surface and the dipole moments of the surrounding water molecules results in a reorientation of the water molecules. As a consequence new electron trapping sites, i.e. at local potential minima, are formed. Photoinjection of excess electrons into these alkali-ion covered amorphous ice layers, results in the trapping of a solvated electron at an alkali-ion/water complex. In contrast to solvation in pure amorphous ice films, where the electrons are located in the bulk of the ice layer, solvated electrons at alkali-ion/water complexes are located at the ice/vacuum interface. They exhibit lifetimes of several picoseconds and show a fast energetic stabilization. With ongoing solvation, i.e. pump-probe time delay, the electron transfer is

  19. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  20. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  1. Electron thermal energy transport research based on dynamical relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notake, Takashi; Inagaki, Shigeru; Tamura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    In the nuclear fusion plasmas, both of thermal energy and particle transport governed by turbulent flow are anomalously enhanced more than neoclassical levels. Thus, to clarify a relationship between the turbulent flow and the anomalous transports has been the most worthwhile work. There are experimental results that the turbulent flow induces various phenomena on transport processes such as non-linearity, transition, hysteresis, multi-branches and non-locality. We are approaching these complicated problems by analyzing not conventional power balance but these phenomena directly. They are recognized as dynamical trajectories in the flux and gradient space and must be a clue to comprehend a physical mechanism of arcane anomalous transport. Especially, to elucidate the mechanism for electron thermal energy transport is critical in the fusion plasma researches because the burning plasmas will be sustained by alpha-particle heating. In large helical device, the dynamical relationships between electron thermal energy fluxes and electron temperature gradients are investigated by using modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating and modern electron cyclotron emission diagnostic systems. Some trajectories such as hysteresis loop or line segments with steep slope which represent non-linear property are observed in the experiment. (author)

  2. Evaluation and analysis of the factors influencing the electron beam dynamics through the buncher of LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, F.; Abbasi, F.; Lamehi, M.; Shaker, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the importance of the buncher in linear electron accelerators is discussed and two types of bunchers, velocity-modulation and disk-loaded, are introduced. Higher bunching factor, larger initial phase range, and smaller final phase range are favorable in the disk-loaded buncher. Our investigations showed that the aforementioned situations can be met by appropriate changes in the field strength and the phase velocity. In this study, factors affecting the bunching of electrons have been surveyed using the equations of electron motion. The dynamics of the electron movement through the buncher has been simulated. The results of simulation and calculations revealed that: (1) in order to deliver the maximum energy to the electrons, phase velocity should vary so that a phase of - 90 degrees is achieved by the electrons after the bunching, (2) reducing the initial field strength also increases the initial phase range. If the field strength is large from the beginning, the phase velocity variations will be large and rapidly reach a value of 1. In this case, the initial phase range will become small, (3) the electron gun voltage changes the initial phase; the larger the value of the gun voltage, the wider the initial phase range, and vice versa. The result of this study is going to be applied for design and fabrication of the first Iranian linear accelerator that is under construction.

  3. Momentum mapping spectrometer for probing the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raj; Bhatt, Pragya; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new experimental setup for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by the impact of keV electrons using the well-known technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of mainly a time- and position-sensitive multi-hit particle detector for ion analysis and a channel electron multiplier detector for detecting the ejected electrons. Different components of the setup and the relevant electronics for data acquisition are described in detail with their working principles. In order to verify the reliable performance of the setup, we have recorded the collision-induced ionic spectra of the CO 2 molecule by the impact of keV electrons. Information about the ion pairs of CO + :O + , C + :O + and O + :O + resulting from dissociative ionizing collisions of 20 and 26 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of CO 2 molecules has been obtained. Under conditions of the present experiment, the momentum resolutions of the spectrometer for the combined momenta of CO + and O + ions in the direction of the time-of-flight axis and perpendicular to the direction of an electron beam are found to be 10.0 ± 0.2 and 15.0 ± 0.3 au, respectively

  4. Influence of non-collisional laser heating on the electron dynamics in dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilleau, L.; Duchateau, G.; Chimier, B.; Geoffroy, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron dynamics in dielectric materials induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically addressed. The laser driven temporal evolution of the energy distribution of electrons in the conduction band is described by a kinetic Boltzmann equation. In addition to the collisional processes for energy transfer such as electron-phonon-photon and electron-electron interactions, a non-collisional process for photon absorption in the conduction band is included. It relies on direct transitions between sub-bands of the conduction band through multiphoton absorption. This mechanism is shown to significantly contribute to the laser heating of conduction electrons for large enough laser intensities. It also increases the time required for the electron distribution to reach the equilibrium state as described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Quantitative results are provided for quartz irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm and for intensities in the range of tens of TW cm-2, lower than the ablation threshold. The change in the energy deposition induced by this non-collisional heating process is expected to have a significant influence on the laser processing of dielectric materials.

  5. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  6. Plasma excitation processes in flue gas simulated with Monte Carlo electron dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tas, M.A.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Rutgers, W.R. [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands). Div. of Electrical Energy Systems

    1997-06-07

    The excitation of gas molecules in flue gas by electron impact is calculated with a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm for electron dynamics in partially ionized gases. The MC algorithm is straightforward for any mixture of molecules for which cross sections are available. Electron drift is simulated in the first case for homogeneous electric fields and in the second case for secondary electrons which are produced by electron-beam irradiation. The electron energy distribution function {epsilon}-bar{sub {theta}}, V-bar{sub d}, {lambda}-bar, the energy branching and the rate of excitation are calculated for standard gas mixtures of Ar-N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. These fundamental process parameters are needed for the study of reactions to remove NO{sub x} from flue gas. The calculated results indicate that the production of highly excited molecules in the high electric field of a streamer corona discharge has an efficiency similar to that of electron-beam irradiation. (author)

  7. Nonadiabatic Dynamics May Be Probed through Electronic Coherence in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-09

    We present a hierarchy of Fermi golden rules (FGRs) that incorporate strongly coupled electronic/nuclear dynamics in time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) signals at different levels of theory. Expansion in the joint electronic and nuclear eigenbasis yields the numerically most challenging exact FGR (eFGR). The quasistatic Fermi Golden Rule (qsFGR) neglects nuclear motion during the photoionization process but takes into account electronic coherences as well as populations initially present in the pumped matter as well as those generated internally by coupling between electronic surfaces. The standard semiclassical Fermi Golden Rule (scFGR) neglects the electronic coherences and the nuclear kinetic energy during the ionizing pulse altogether, yielding the classical Condon approximation. The coherence contributions depend on the phase-profile of the ionizing field, allowing coherent control of TRPES signals. The photoelectron spectrum from model systems is simulated using these three levels of theory. The eFGR and the qsFGR show temporal oscillations originating from the electronic or vibrational coherences generated as the nuclear wave packet traverses a conical intersection. These oscillations, which are missed by the scFGR, directly reveal the time-evolving splitting between electronic states of the neutral molecule in the curve-crossing regime.

  8. Centrifugal Separation and Equilibration Dynamics in an Electron-Antiproton Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Cesar, C. L.; Friesen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  9. Nano-electron beam induced current and hole charge dynamics through uncapped Ge nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M. [Laboratoire de Recherche en Nanosciences, Bat. 6, case no 15, UFR Sciences, Universite de Reims Champagne Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Amiard, G.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint Jerome - Case 142, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2012-04-16

    Dynamics of hole storage in spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process on an oxide layer grown on an n-doped <001> silicon substrate is studied using a nano-electron beam induced current technique. Carrier generation is produced by an electron beam irradiation. The generated current is collected by an atomic force microscope--tip in contact mode at a fixed position away from the beam spot of about 0.5 {mu}m. This distance represents the effective diffusion length of holes. The time constants of holes charging are determined and the effect of the NC size is underlined.

  10. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  11. Excited-state dynamics of oxazole: A combined electronic structure calculations and dynamic simulations study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Jun; Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Yu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and surface hopping simulations have been performed to investigate the excited-state decay of the parent oxazole in the gas phase. Our calculations show that the S_2 state decay of oxazole is an ultrafast process characterized by the ring-opening and ring-closure of the five-membered oxazole ring, in which the triplet contribution is minor. The ring-opening involves the O−C bond cleavage affording the nitrile ylide and airine intermediates, while the ring-closure gives rise to a bicyclic species through a 2−5 bond formation. The azirine and bicyclic intermediates in the S_0 state are very likely involved in the phototranspositions of oxazoles. This is different from the previous mechanism in which these intermediates in the T_1 state have been proposed for these phototranspositions.

  12. Excited-state dynamics of oxazole: A combined electronic structure calculations and dynamic simulations study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Jun [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Education University, Guiyang, Guizhou 550018 (China); Guizhou Synergetic Innovation Center of Scientific Big Data for Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Guizhou Education University, Guiyang 550018 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Photochemistry, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Xie, Zhi-Zhong [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yu, Xiaodong, E-mail: yuxdhy@163.com [Department of Architecture and Chemical Engineering, Tangshan Polytechnic College, Tangshan 063020 (China)

    2016-08-02

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and surface hopping simulations have been performed to investigate the excited-state decay of the parent oxazole in the gas phase. Our calculations show that the S{sub 2} state decay of oxazole is an ultrafast process characterized by the ring-opening and ring-closure of the five-membered oxazole ring, in which the triplet contribution is minor. The ring-opening involves the O−C bond cleavage affording the nitrile ylide and airine intermediates, while the ring-closure gives rise to a bicyclic species through a 2−5 bond formation. The azirine and bicyclic intermediates in the S{sub 0} state are very likely involved in the phototranspositions of oxazoles. This is different from the previous mechanism in which these intermediates in the T{sub 1} state have been proposed for these phototranspositions.

  13. Dynamical Cooper pairing in non-equilibrium electron-phonon systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knap, Michael [Technical University of Munich (Germany); Harvard University (United States); Babadi, Mehrtash; Refael, Gil [Caltech (United States); Martin, Ivar [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Demler, Eugene [Harvard University (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast laser pulses have been used to manipulate complex quantum materials and to induce dynamical phase transitions. One of the most striking examples is the transient enhancement of superconductivity in several classes of materials upon irradiating them with high intensity pulses of terahertz light. Motivated by these experiments we analyze the Cooper pairing instabilities in non-equilibrium electron-phonon systems. We demonstrate that the light induced non-equilibrium state of phonons results in a simultaneous increase of the superconducting coupling constant and the electron scattering. We analyze the competition between these effects and show that in a broad range of parameters the dynamic enhancement of Cooper pair formation dominates over the increase in the scattering rate. This opens the possibility of transient light induced superconductivity at temperatures that are considerably higher than the equilibrium transition temperatures. Our results pave new pathways for engineering high-temperature light-induced superconducting states.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  15. Quantum-classical transition in the electron dynamics of thin metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasiak, R; Manfredi, G; Hervieux, P-A [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux, CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg (France); Haefele, M [INRIA Nancy Grand-Est and Institut de Recherche en Mathematiques Avancees, 7 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: Giovanni.Manfredi@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

    2009-06-15

    The quantum electrons dynamics in a thin metal film is studied numerically using the self-consistent Wigner-Poisson equations. The initial equilibrium is computed from the Kohn-Sham equations at finite temperature, and then mapped into the phase-space Wigner function. The time-dependent results are compared systematically with those obtained previously with a classical approach (Vlasov-Poisson equations). It is found that, for large excitations, the quantum and classical dynamics display the same low-frequency oscillations due to ballistic electrons bouncing back and forth on the film surfaces. However, below a certain excitation energy (roughly corresponding to one quantum of plasmon energy {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub p}), the quantum and classical results diverge, and the ballistic oscillations are no longer observed. These results provide an example of a quantum-classical transition that may be observed with current pump-probe experiments on thin metal films.

  16. Quantum-classical transition in the electron dynamics of thin metal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasiak, R; Manfredi, G; Hervieux, P-A; Haefele, M

    2009-01-01

    The quantum electrons dynamics in a thin metal film is studied numerically using the self-consistent Wigner-Poisson equations. The initial equilibrium is computed from the Kohn-Sham equations at finite temperature, and then mapped into the phase-space Wigner function. The time-dependent results are compared systematically with those obtained previously with a classical approach (Vlasov-Poisson equations). It is found that, for large excitations, the quantum and classical dynamics display the same low-frequency oscillations due to ballistic electrons bouncing back and forth on the film surfaces. However, below a certain excitation energy (roughly corresponding to one quantum of plasmon energy ℎω p ), the quantum and classical results diverge, and the ballistic oscillations are no longer observed. These results provide an example of a quantum-classical transition that may be observed with current pump-probe experiments on thin metal films.

  17. An ab-initio study of mechanical, dynamical and electronic properties of MgEu intermetallic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Ramesh; Jaiganesh, G.; Jayalakshmi, V.

    2018-04-01

    The theoretical investigation on the mechanical, dynamical and electronic properties of MgEu in CsCl-type structure has been carried out through the ab-initio calculations within the framework of the density functional theory and the density functional perturbation theory. For the purpose, Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package and Phonopy packages were used. Our calculated ground-state properties of MgEu are in good agreement with other available results. Our computed elastic constants and phonon spectrum results suggest that MgEu is mechanically and dynamically stable up to 5 GPa. The thermodynamic quantities as a function of temperatures are also reported and discussed. The band structure, density of states and charge density also calculated to understand the electronic properties of MgEu.

  18. Bursts of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Electron Storage Rings: a Dynamical Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, Marco

    2002-09-17

    Evidence of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) has been reported recently at the electron storage rings of several light source facilities. The main features of the observations are (i) a radiation wavelength short compared to the nominal bunch length, and (ii) a coherent signal showing recurrent bursts of duration much shorter than the radiation damping time, but with spacing equal to a substantial fraction of the damping time. We present a model of beam longitudinal dynamics that reproduces these features.

  19. Dynamical behaviour of fast electrons in a crystalline lamella; Comportement dynamique des electrons rapides dans une lamelle cristalline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perio, Pierre; Tournarie, Max [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France)

    1960-07-01

    The substitution of the reciprocal space by a 'mixed space' simplifies the use of the dynamical equation. The Friedel law is preserved. The Ventzel-Kramers-Brillouin-Rayleigh approximation appears as a planar approximation and explains the evolution of some images in electron microscopy. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 249, p. 2218-2220, sitting of 23 November 1959 [French] La substitution d'un 'espace mixte' a l'espace reciproque facilite la manipulation de l'equation dynamique. La loi de Friedel est conservee. L'approximation Ventzel-Kramers-Brillouin-Rayleigh apparait comme une approximation plane et explique l'evolution de certaines images en microscopie electronique. Reproduction d'un article publie dans les Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 249, p. 2218-2220, seance du 23 novembre 1959.

  20. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, M.; Pilon, R.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  1. Electronic relaxation dynamics of a metal atom deposited on argon cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awali, Slim

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a study on the interaction between electronically excited atomic states and a non-reactive environment. We have theoretically and experimentally studied situations where a metal atom (Ba or K) is placed in a finite size environment (argon cluster). The presence of the medium affects the electronic levels of the atom. On the other side, the excitation of the atom induces a relaxation dynamics of the electronic energy through the deformation of the cluster. The experimental part of this work focuses on two aspects: the spectroscopy and the dynamics. In both cases a first laser electronically excites the metal atom and the second ionizes the excited system. The observable is the photoelectron spectrum recorded after photoionization and possibly information on the photoion which are also produced. This pump/probe technique, with also two lasers, provide the ultrafast dynamic when the lasers pulses used are of ultrashort (60 fs). The use of nanosecond lasers leads to resonance spectroscopic measurement, unresolved temporally, which give information on the position of the energy levels of the studied system. From a theoretical point-of-view, the excited states of M-Ar n were calculated at the ab initio level, using large core pseudo-potential to limit the active electrons of the metal to valence electrons. The study of alkali metals (potassium) is especially well adapted to this method since only one electron is active. The ab-initio calculation and a Monte-Carlo simulation where coupled to optimize the geometry of the KAr n (n = 1-10) cluster when K is in the ground state of the neutral and the ion, or excited in the 4p or 5s state. Calculations were also conducted in collaboration with B. Gervais (CIMAP, Caen) on KAr n clusters having several tens of argon atoms. Absorption spectra were also calculated. From an experimental point-of-view, we were able to characterize the excited states of potassium and barium perturbed by the clusters. In both cases a

  2. Dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the electron-extraction scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, Víctor [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Palacián, Jesús [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-01-23

    We study the classical dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the presence of a constant electric field in the electron-extraction situation [1], e.g., when the field attracts the electron to the vacuum. From a dynamical point of view, this field configuration provides a dynamics richer than in the usual ion-extraction scheme, because, depending on the values of field and the atom–surface distance, the atom can be ionized only towards the metal surface, only to the vacuum or to the both sides. The evolution of the phase space structure as a function of the atom–surface distance is explored in the bound regime of the atom. In the high energy regime, the ionization mechanism is also investigated. We find that the classical results of this work are in good agreement with the results obtained in the wave-packet propagation study carried out by So et al. [1]. - Highlights: • We study a classical hydrogen atom near a metal surface plus a electric field. • We explore the phase space structure as a function of the field strength. • We find most of the electronic orbits are oriented along the field direction. • We study the ionization of the atom for several atom–surface distances. • This classical study is in good agreement with the quantum results.

  3. Emission spectroscopic studies on dynamics of molecular excitation and dissociation by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro

    1986-01-01

    Emission spectrum by controlled electron impact has been a successful technique for the investigation of molecular dynamics. (1) Molecular excitation. Aromatic molecules give an optical emission similar to fluorescence. However, as is shown by the vibrational structure and the electron energy dependence of benzene emission, its excitation process is not necessarily optical. Some aliphatic molecules also exhibit an emission band at the ultraviolet region. (2) Molecular dissociation. Analysis of the Doppler profile, the threshold energy, the excitation function and the isotope effect of the atomic emission produced in electron-molecule collisions has clarified the dynamics of the molecular dissociation. Especially the Doppler profile has given the translational energy distribution of the fragment atom, which is very useful to disclose the potential energy curve. Its angular dependence has recently found to allow determination of the symmetry of the intermediate excited state and the magnetic sublevel distribution of the fragment atom. These finding has revealed detailed state-to-state dynamics of the molecular dissociation. (author)

  4. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics of rhombohedral BiAlO_3 from first-principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczkowski, J.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic, dynamical (zone-center phonon modes and Born effective charge tensors), and ferroelectric properties of the rhombohedral BiAlO_3 were calculated within various exchange-correlation functionals. The standard local-density (LDA) and generalized gradient (GGA) approximations, and nonlocal hybrid Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) were used. We have also performed the electronic structure calculations with meta-GGA Tran-Blaha functional. BiAlO_3 is indirect band gap semiconductor with the value of band gap: 2.87 eV (GGA), 4.14 eV (HSE), and 3.78 eV (TB-mBJ). The calculated spontaneous polarization is 81 μC/cm"2 (87 μC/cm"2) for GGA (HSE). The vibrational spectrum including LO-TO splitting was calculated within GGA. The zone-center phonon modes with LO-TO splitting for BiAlO_3 were compared with those in isostructural BiFeO_3. - Highlights: • Electronic structure of the rhombohedral phase of BiAlO_3 were calculated. • Structural, elastic, dynamical, and ferroelectric properties were investigated. • Calculations were done within GGA, hybrid HSE, and TB-mBJ functionals. • The lattice dynamics with LO-TO splitting were investigated within GGA functional.

  5. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  6. Beam Dynamics Simulation of Photocathode RF Electron Gun at the PBP-CMU Linac Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buakor, K.; Rimjaem, S.

    2017-09-01

    Photocathode radio-frequency (RF) electron guns are widely used at many particle accelerator laboratories due to high quality of produced electron beams. By using a short-pulse laser to induce the photoemission process, the electrons are emitted with low energy spread. Moreover, the photocathode RF guns are not suffered from the electron back bombardment effect, which can cause the limited electron current and accelerated energy. In this research, we aim to develop the photocathode RF gun for the linac-based THz radiation source. Its design is based on the existing gun at the PBP-CMU Linac Laboratory. The gun consists of a one and a half cell S-band standing-wave RF cavities with a maximum electric field of about 60 MV/m at the centre of the full cell. We study the beam dynamics of electrons traveling through the electromagnetic field inside the RF gun by using the particle tracking program ASTRA. The laser properties i.e. transverse size and injecting phase are optimized to obtain low transverse emittance. In addition, the solenoid magnet is applied for beam focusing and emittance compensation. The proper solenoid magnetic field is then investigated to find the optimum value for proper emittance conservation condition.

  7. Angstrom analysis with dynamic in-situ aberration corrected electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2010-01-01

    Following the pioneering development of atomic resolution in-situ environmental TEM (ETEM) for direct probing of gas-solid reactions, recent developments are presented of dynamic real time in-situ studies at the Angstrom level in an aberration corrected electron microscope. The in-situ data from Pt-Pd nanoparticles on carbon with the corresponding FFT/optical diffractogram (OD) illustrate an achieved resolution of 0 C and higher, in a double aberration corrected JEOL 2200 FS TEM/STEM employing a wider gap objective pole piece and gas tolerant TMP column pumping system. Direct observations of dynamic biofuel catalysts under controlled calcinations conditions and quantified with catalytic reactivity and physico-chemical studies show the benefits in-situ aberration correction in unveiling the evolution of surface active sites necessary for the development efficient heterogeneous catalysts. The new results open up opportunities for dynamic studies of materials in an aberration corrected environment and direct future development activities.

  8. Hot electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: Implications for quantum dot photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, William A., III

    Finding a viable supply of clean, renewable energy is one of the most daunting challenges facing the world today. Solar cells have had limited impact in meeting this challenge because of their high cost and low power conversion efficiencies. Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, are promising materials for use in novel solar cells because they can be processed with potentially inexpensive solution-based techniques and because they are predicted to have novel optoelectronic properties that could enable the realization of ultra-efficient solar power converters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the behavior of highly-excited, or "hot," charge carriers near quantum-dot and semiconductor interfaces, which is of paramount importance to the rational design of high-efficiency devices. The elucidation of these ultrafast hot electron dynamics is the central aim of this Dissertation. I present a theoretical framework for treating the electronic interactions between quantum dots and bulk semiconductor surfaces and propose a novel experimental technique, time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TR-SHG), for probing these interactions. I then describe a series of experimental investigations into hot electron dynamics in specific quantum-dot/semiconductor systems. A two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (2PPE) study of the technologically-relevant ZnO(1010) surface reveals ultrafast (sub-30fs) cooling of hot electrons in the bulk conduction band, which is due to strong electron-phonon coupling in this highly polar material. The presence of a continuum of defect states near the conduction band edge results in Fermi-level pinning and upward (n-type) band-bending at the (1010) surface and provides an alternate route for electronic relaxation. In monolayer films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots, chemical treatment with either hydrazine or 1,2-ethanedithiol results in strong and tunable electronic coupling between neighboring quantum dots

  9. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  10. Structural dynamics of surfaces by ultrafast electron crystallography: experimental and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sascha; Liang, Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-12-07

    Recent studies in ultrafast electron crystallography (UEC) using a reflection diffraction geometry have enabled the investigation of a wide range of phenomena on the femtosecond and picosecond time scales. In all these studies, the analysis of the diffraction patterns and their temporal change after excitation was performed within the kinematical scattering theory. In this contribution, we address the question, to what extent dynamical scattering effects have to be included in order to obtain quantitative information about structural dynamics. We discuss different scattering regimes and provide diffraction maps that describe all essential features of scatterings and observables. The effects are quantified by dynamical scattering simulations and examined by direct comparison to the results of ultrafast electron diffraction experiments on an in situ prepared Ni(100) surface, for which structural dynamics can be well described by a two-temperature model. We also report calculations for graphite surfaces. The theoretical framework provided here allows for further UEC studies of surfaces especially at larger penetration depths and for those of heavy-atom materials. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. Transverse Space-Charge Field-Induced Plasma Dynamics for Ultraintense Electron-Beam Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tarkeshian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Similarly to laser or x-ray beams, the interaction of sufficiently intense particle beams with neutral gases will result in the creation of plasma. In contrast to photon-based ionization, the strong unipolar field of a particle beam can generate a plasma where the electron population receives a large initial momentum kick and escapes, leaving behind unshielded ions. Measuring the properties of the ensuing Coulomb exploding ions—such as their kinetic energy distribution, yield, and spatial distribution—can provide information about the peak electric fields that are achieved in the electron beams. Particle-in-cell simulations and analytical models are presented for high-brightness electron beams of a few femtoseconds or even hundreds of attoseconds, and transverse beam sizes on the micron scale, as generated by today’s free electron lasers. Different density regimes for the utilization as a potential diagnostics are explored, and the fundamental differences in plasma dynamical behavior for e-beam or photon-based ionization are highlighted. By measuring the dynamics of field-induced ions for different gas and beam densities, a lower bound on the beam charge density can be obtained in a single shot and in a noninvasive way. The exponential dependency of the ionization yield on the beam properties can provide unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, at the submicrometer and subfemtosecond scales, respectively, offering a practical and powerful approach to characterizing beams from accelerators at the frontiers of performance.

  12. Multiobjective genetic algorithm optimization of the beam dynamics in linac drivers for free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bartolini

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Linac driven free electron lasers (FELs operating in the x-ray region require a high brightness electron beam in order to reach saturation within a reasonable distance in the undulator train or to enable sophisticated seeding schemes using external lasers. The beam dynamics optimization is usually a time consuming process in which many parameters of the accelerator and the compression system have to be controlled simultaneously. The requirements on the electron beam quality may also vary significantly with the particular application. For example, the beam dynamics optimization strategy for self-amplified spontaneous emission operation and seeded operation are rather different: seeded operation requires a more careful control of the beam uniformity over a relatively large portion of the longitudinal current distribution of the electron bunch and is therefore more challenging from an accelerator physics point of view. Multiobjective genetic algorithms are particularly well suited when the optimization of many parameters is targeting several objectives simultaneously, often with conflicting requirements. In this paper we propose a novel optimization strategy based on a combination of multiobjective optimization with a fast computation of the FEL performance. The application to the proposed UK’s New Light Source is reported and the benefits of this method are highlighted.

  13. Coupled forward-backward trajectory approach for nonequilibrium electron-ion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Kelly, Aaron; Rubio, Angel

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a simple ansatz for the wave function of a many-body system based on coupled forward and backward propagating semiclassical trajectories. This method is primarily aimed at, but not limited to, treating nonequilibrium dynamics in electron-phonon systems. The time evolution of the system is obtained from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle, and we show that this ansatz yields Ehrenfest mean-field theory in the limit that the forward and backward trajectories are orthogonal, and in the limit that they coalesce. We investigate accuracy and performance of this method by simulating electronic relaxation in the spin-boson model and the Holstein model. Although this method involves only pairs of semiclassical trajectories, it shows a substantial improvement over mean-field theory, capturing quantum coherence of nuclear dynamics as well as electron-nuclear correlations. This improvement is particularly evident in nonadiabatic systems, where the accuracy of this coupled trajectory method extends well beyond the perturbative electron-phonon coupling regime. This approach thus provides an attractive route forward to the ab initio description of relaxation processes, such as thermalization, in condensed phase systems.

  14. Self-Consistent 3D Modeling of Electron Cloud Dynamics and Beam Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, Miguel; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Molvik, A.; Stoltz, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present recent advances in the modeling of beam electron-cloud dynamics, including surface effects such as secondary electron emission, gas desorption, etc, and volumetric effects such as ionization of residual gas and charge-exchange reactions. Simulations for the HCX facility with the code WARP/POSINST will be described and their validity demonstrated by benchmarks against measurements. The code models a wide range of physical processes and uses a number of novel techniques, including a large-timestep electron mover that smoothly interpolates between direct orbit calculation and guiding-center drift equations, and a new computational technique, based on a Lorentz transformation to a moving frame, that allows the cost of a fully 3D simulation to be reduced to that of a quasi-static approximation

  15. Dynamical effects of electron-hole correlation and giant quantum attenuation of ultrasound in semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The giant quantum attenuation of ultrasound in bismuth and other semimetals is noticeably enhanced when certain pair of Landau subbands of electrons and holes participate simultaneously in an attenuation peak. A theoretical analysis is presented which emphasizes importance of dynamical effects of the electron-hole correlation. In the temperature range between 1K and 4K covered by most experiments, the correlation effect is found to be weak on the real part of the relevant response function which gives change in sound velocity. This implies that equilibrium properties of the system are not much influenced by the correlation effect. Nonetheless, the electron-hole correlation is shown to have a drastic consequence on the imaginary part of the response function probed by the ultrasonic attenuation. Proposal for experiment is advanced to discriminate relative importance of this exciton-like correlation from that of repulsive correlation between carriers with the same charge. (orig.)

  16. Numerical simulation of electrons dynamics in a microtron on 6 - 10 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashmakov, Y. A.; Dyubkov, V. S.; Lozeev, Y. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Electron dynamics in 6.5 MeV classic microtron of the Lebedev Physics Institute (LPI) is investigated by means of numerical methods. Particular emphasis is placed on the formation mechanism of electron bunches at the first circular orbits. An effect of microtron main parameters such as accelerating RF field amplitude, DC magnetic field, as well as a geometry and a position of a thermal emitter on characteristics of electron beam extracted from the microtron are studied. In the space of mentioned parameters a region corresponding an optimal microtron operation mode is found. It is noted that the unique geometric and energy characteristics of accelerated beam makes use of microtron attractive not only as injector into a synchrotron, but also as a driver in experiments on generation of coherent terahertz electromagnetic radiation.

  17. Chemically induced dynamic electron polarization. Pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Thurnauer, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    The radical pair model of chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) is experimentally verified. Aqueous solutions of alcohols were irradiated with 3 MeV electrons and observed with time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Relative line intensities of the polarized EPR spectra of radicals from methanol and especially ethylene glycol, alone and in the presence of radicals from compounds containing halogens, illustrates the polarization dependence on the g-factor differences between the radical pair components. The observation of the relative polarization enhancement in the various lines of the multiline EPR spectra illustrates the polarization dependence on the hyperfine terms. Intrinsic enhancements are calculated and are shown to be proportional to the observed enhancement, showing that the radical pair model of CIDEP is qualitatively correct

  18. Dynamics of electron bunches at the laser–plasma interaction in the bubble regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.I., E-mail: vmaslov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Svystun, O.M., E-mail: svistun_elena@mail.ru; Onishchenko, I.N.; Tkachenko, V.I.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-bunches self-injection, observed in laser–plasma accelerators in the bubble regime, affects the energy gain of electrons accelerated by laser wakefield. However, understanding of dynamics of the electron bunches formed at laser–plasma interaction may be challenging. We present here the results of fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of laser wakefield acceleration driven by a short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The trapping and acceleration of three witness electron bunches by the bubble-like structures were observed. It has been shown that with time the first two witness bunches turn into drivers and contribute to acceleration of the last witness bunch.

  19. On 2D electron cloud dynamics in high-current plasma lens for ion beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, A. A.; Litovko, I. V.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Zadorozhny, V. F.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we are dealing with the appear the stable existence and dynamics of 2-D electron vortical structures in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The collective interactions in which the electron motion is nonlinear and ion motion is linear, is concerned. By using of the kinetic equation and the catastrophe theory approach we deduce an origin of the vortical structures. The nonlinear differential equation for the electric potential in a hydrodynamical approximation is obtained. It describes a drift motion of the electrons in oscillating electric fields of the high-current plasma lens(PL), arising due to presence the principal unremoval radical gradient of the axical component of the magnetic field. It was shown that the considered equations have contained the solutions in the form of the single vortical structures. The stability of the structures are given

  20. Dynamical Processes in Open Quantum Systems from a TDDFT Perspective: Resonances and Electron Photoemission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; De Giovannini, Umberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of different computational methods to describe time-dependent phenomena in open quantum systems and their extension to a density-functional framework. We focus the discussion on electron emission processes in atoms and molecules addressing excited-state lifetimes and dissipative processes. Initially we analyze the concept of an electronic resonance, a central concept in spectroscopy associated with a metastable state from which an electron eventually escapes (electronic lifetime). Resonances play a fundamental role in many time-dependent molecular phenomena but can be rationalized from a time-independent context in terms of scattering states. We introduce the method of complex scaling, which is used to capture resonant states as localized states in the spirit of usual bound-state methods, and work on its extension to static and time-dependent density-functional theory. In a time-dependent setting, complex scaling can be used to describe excitations in the continuum as well as wave packet dynamics leading to electron emission. This process can also be treated by using open boundary conditions which allow time-dependent simulations of emission processes without artificial reflections at the boundaries (i.e., borders of the simulation box). We compare in detail different schemes to implement open boundaries, namely transparent boundaries using Green functions, and absorbing boundaries in the form of complex absorbing potentials and mask functions. The last two are regularly used together with time-dependent density-functional theory to describe the electron emission dynamics of atoms and molecules. Finally, we discuss approaches to the calculation of energy and angle-resolved time-dependent pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular systems.

  1. PREFACE: 19th International Conference on Electron Dynamics in Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON'19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, T.; Martín-Martínez, M. J.; Mateos, J.

    2015-10-01

    The 19th International Conference on Electron Dynamics in Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON'19) was held at the Hospedería Fonseca (Universidad de Salamanca, Spain), on 29 June - 2 July, 2015, and was organized by the Electronics Area from the University of Salamanca. The Conference is held biannually and covers the recent progress in the field of electron dynamics in solid-state materials and devices. This was the 19th meeting of the international conference series formerly named Hot Carriers in Semiconductors (HCIS), first held in Modena in 1973. In the edition of 1997 in Berlin the name of the conference changed to International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors, keeping the same acronym, HCIS; and finally in the edition of Montpellier in 2009 the name was again changed to the current one, International Conference on Electron Dynamics in Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON). The latest editions took place in Santa Barbara, USA, in 2011 and Matsue, Japan, in 2013. Research work on electron dynamics involves quite different disciplines, and requires both fundamental and technological scientific efforts. Attendees to the conference come mostly from academic institutions, belonging to both theoretical and experimental groups working in a variety of fields, such as solid-state physics, electronics, optics, electrical engineering, material science, laser physics, etc. In this framework, events like the EDISON conference become a basic channel for the progress in the field. Here, researchers working in different areas can meet, present their latest advances and exchange their ideas. The program of EDISON'19 included 13 invited papers, 61 oral contributions and 73 posters. These contributions originated from scientists in more than 30 different countries. The Conference gathered 140 participants, coming from 24 different countries, most from Europe, but also with a significant participation

  2. First Results of Modeling Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics with the SAMI3 Plasmasphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, C. M.; Glocer, A.; Huba, J.; Fok, M. C. H.; Kang, S. B.; Buzulukova, N.

    2017-12-01

    The radiation belts were one of the first discoveries of the Space Age some sixty years ago and radiation belt models have been improving since the discovery of the radiation belts. The plasmasphere is one region that has been critically important to determining the dynamics of radiation belt populations. This region of space plays a critical role in describing the distribution of chorus and magnetospheric hiss waves throughout the inner magnetosphere. Both of these waves have been shown to interact with energetic electrons in the radiation belts and can result in the energization or loss of radiation belt electrons. However, radiation belt models have been historically limited in describing the distribution of cold plasmaspheric plasma and have relied on empirically determined plasmasphere models. Some plasmasphere models use an azimuthally symmetric distribution of the plasmasphere which can fail to capture important plasmaspheric dynamics such as the development of plasmaspheric drainage plumes. Previous work have coupled the kinetic bounce-averaged Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model used to model ring current and radiation belt populations with the Block-adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATSRUS) global magnetohydrodynamic model to self-consistently obtain the magnetospheric magnetic field and ionospheric potential. The present work will utilize this previous coupling and will additionally couple the SAMI3 plasmasphere model to better represent the dynamics on the plasmasphere and its role in determining the distribution of waves throughout the inner magnetosphere. First results on the relevance of chorus, hiss, and ultralow frequency waves on radiation belt electron dynamics will be discussed in context of the June 1st, 2013 storm-time dropout event.

  3. Dynamical electron diffraction simulation for non-orthogonal crystal system by a revised real space method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, C L; Liu, Q B; Cai, C Y; Huang, J; Zhou, G W; Wang, Y G

    2015-01-01

    In the transmission electron microscopy, a revised real space (RRS) method has been confirmed to be a more accurate dynamical electron diffraction simulation method for low-energy electron diffraction than the conventional multislice method (CMS). However, the RRS method can be only used to calculate the dynamical electron diffraction of orthogonal crystal system. In this work, the expression of the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is derived. By taking Na2 Ti3 O7 and Si as examples, the correctness of the derived RRS formula for non-orthogonal crystal system is confirmed by testing the coincidence of numerical results of both sides of Schrödinger equation; moreover, the difference between the RRS method and the CMS for non-orthogonal crystal system is compared at the accelerating voltage range from 40 to 10 kV. Our results show that the CMS method is almost the same as the RRS method for the accelerating voltage above 40 kV. However, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the CMS method introduces significant errors, not only for the higher-order Laue zone diffractions, but also for zero-order Laue zone. These indicate that the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is necessary to be used for more accurate dynamical simulation when the accelerating voltage is low. Furthermore, the reason for the increase of differences between those diffraction patterns calculated by the RRS method and the CMS method with the decrease of the accelerating voltage is discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Deeply trapped electrons in imaging plates and their utilization for extending the dynamic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, Hiroko; Kondo, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The absorption spectra of deep centers in an imaging plate (IP) made of BaFBr 0:85 I 0:15 :Eu 2+ have been studied in the ultraviolet region. Electrons trapped in deep centers are considered to be the cause of unerasable and reappearing latent images in IPs over-irradiated with X-rays. Deep centers showed a dominant peak at around 320 nm, followed by two small peaks at around 345 and 380 nm. By utilizing deeply trapped electrons, we have attempted to extend the dynamic range of an IP. The IP was irradiated by 150-kV X-rays with doses from 8.07 mGy to 80.7 Gy. Reading out the latent image by the stimulation of Eu 2+ luminescence with a 633-nm He-Ne laser light from a conventional Fuji reader showed a linear relationship with irradiated dose up to 0.8 Gy, but then becoming non-linear. After fully erasing with visible light, unerasable latent images were read out using 635-nm semi-conductor laser light combined with a photon-counting detection system. The dose-response curve so obtained gave a further two orders of magnitude extending the dynamic range up to 80.7 Gy. Comprehensive results indicate that electrons supplied from deep centers to the F centers provided the extended dynamic range after the F centers became saturated. Based on these facts, a model of the excitation of deeply trapped electrons and PSL processes is proposed.

  5. Dynamical nuclear spin polarization induced by electronic current through double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Monis, Carlos; Platero, Gloria; Inarrea, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    We analyse electron-spin relaxation in electronic transport through coherently coupled double quantum dots (DQDs) in the spin blockade regime. In particular, we focus on hyperfine (HF) interaction as the spin-relaxation mechanism. We pay special attention to the effect of the dynamical nuclear spin polarization induced by the electronic current on the nuclear environment. We discuss the behaviour of the electronic current and the induced nuclear spin polarization versus an external magnetic field for different HF coupling intensities and interdot tunnelling strengths. We take into account, for each magnetic field, all HF-mediated spin-relaxation processes coming from different opposite spin level approaches. We find that the current as a function of the external magnetic field shows a peak or a dip and that the transition from a current dip to a current peak behaviour is obtained by decreasing the HF coupling or by increasing the interdot tunnelling strength. We give a physical picture in terms of the interplay between the electrons tunnelling out of the DQD and the spin-flip processes due to the nuclear environment.

  6. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H{sub 2}O and 102 ± 8 fs in D{sub 2}O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  7. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency-agile gyrotron for electron decoupling and pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Faith J.; Saliba, Edward P.; Albert, Brice J.; Alaniva, Nicholas; Sesti, Erika L.; Gao, Chukun; Golota, Natalie C.; Choi, Eric J.; Jagtap, Anil P.; Wittmann, Johannes J.; Eckardt, Michael; Harneit, Wolfgang; Corzilius, Björn; Th. Sigurdsson, Snorri; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2018-04-01

    We describe a frequency-agile gyrotron which can generate frequency-chirped microwave pulses. An arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) within the NMR spectrometer controls the microwave frequency, enabling synchronized pulsed control of both electron and nuclear spins. We demonstrate that the acceleration of emitted electrons, and thus the microwave frequency, can be quickly changed by varying the anode voltage. This strategy results in much faster frequency response than can be achieved by changing the potential of the electron emitter, and does not require a custom triode electron gun. The gyrotron frequency can be swept with a rate of 20 MHz/μs over a 670 MHz bandwidth in a static magnetic field. We have already implemented time-domain electron decoupling with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) with this device. In this contribution, we show frequency-swept DNP enhancement profiles recorded without changing the NMR magnet or probe. The profile of endofullerenes exhibits a DNP profile with a <10 MHz linewidth, indicating that the device also has sufficient frequency stability, and therefore phase stability, to implement pulsed DNP mechanisms such as the frequency-swept solid effect. We describe schematics of the mechanical and vacuum construction of the device which includes a novel flanged sapphire window assembly. Finally, we discuss how commercially available continuous-wave gyrotrons can potentially be converted into similar frequency-agile high-power microwave sources.

  9. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  10. Contrasting dynamics of electrons and protons in the near-Earth plasma sheet during dipolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhin, Andrey Y.; Grigorenko, Elena E.; Kronberg, Elena A.; Koleva, Rositza; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Kozak, Ludmila; Daly, Patrick W.

    2018-05-01

    The fortunate location of Cluster and the THEMIS P3 probe in the near-Earth plasma sheet (PS) (at X ˜ -7-9 RE) allowed for the multipoint analysis of properties and spectra of electron and proton injections. The injections were observed during dipolarization and substorm current wedge formation associated with braking of multiple bursty bulk flows (BBFs). In the course of dipolarization, a gradual growth of the BZ magnetic field lasted ˜ 13 min and it was comprised of several BZ pulses or dipolarization fronts (DFs) with duration ≤ 1 min. Multipoint observations have shown that the beginning of the increase in suprathermal ( > 50 keV) electron fluxes - the injection boundary - was observed in the PS simultaneously with the dipolarization onset and it propagated dawnward along with the onset-related DF. The subsequent dynamics of the energetic electron flux was similar to the dynamics of the magnetic field during the dipolarization. Namely, a gradual linear growth of the electron flux occurred simultaneously with the gradual growth of the BZ field, and it was comprised of multiple short ( ˜ few minutes) electron injections associated with the BZ pulses. This behavior can be explained by the combined action of local betatron acceleration at the BZ pulses and subsequent gradient drifts of electrons in the flux pile up region through the numerous braking and diverting DFs. The nonadiabatic features occasionally observed in the electron spectra during the injections can be due to the electron interactions with high-frequency electromagnetic or electrostatic fluctuations transiently observed in the course of dipolarization. On the contrary, proton injections were detected only in the vicinity of the strongest BZ pulses. The front thickness of these pulses was less than a gyroradius of thermal protons that ensured the nonadiabatic acceleration of protons. Indeed, during the injections in the energy spectra of protons the pronounced bulge was clearly observed in a

  11. Longitudinal and transverse dynamics of ions from residual gas in an electron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelin, A.; Bruni, C.; Radevych, D.

    2018-05-01

    The ion cloud produced from residual gas in an electron accelerator can degrade machine performances and produce instabilities. The ion dynamics in an accelerator is governed by the beam-ion interaction, magnetic fields and eventual mitigation strategies. Due to the fact that the beam has a nonuniform transverse size along its orbit, the ions move longitudinally and accumulate naturally at some points in the accelerator. In order to design effective mitigation strategies it is necessary to understand the ion dynamics not only in the transverse plane but also in the longitudinal direction. After introducing the physics behind the beam-ion interaction, we show how to get accumulation points for a realistic electron storage ring lattice. Simulations of the ion cloud dynamics, including the effect of magnetic fields on the ions, clearing electrodes and clearing gaps are shown. Longitudinal ion trapping due to the magnetic mirror effect in the dipole fringe fields is also detailed. Finally, the effectiveness of clearing electrode using longitudinal clearing fields is discussed and compared to clearing electrodes producing transverse field only.

  12. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  13. Imaging Magnetic Vortices Dynamics Using Lorentz Electron Microscopy with GHz Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimei

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic vortices in thin films are naturally formed spiral spin configurations with a core polarization pointing out of the film plane. They typically represent ground states with high structural and thermal stability as well as four different chirality-polarity combinations, offering great promise in the development of spin-based devices. For applications to spin oscillators, non-volatile memory and logic devices, the fundamental understanding and precise control of vortex excitations and dynamic switching behavior are essential. The compact dimensionality and fast spin dynamics set grand challenges for direct imaging technologies. Recently, we have developed a unique method to directly visualize the dynamic magnetic vortex motion using advanced Lorentz electron microscopy combined with GHz electronic excitations. It enables us to map the orbit of a magnetic vortex core in a permalloy square with modality. Our approach is complementary to X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and is of general interest to the magnetism community as it paves a way to study fundamental spin phenomena with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Collaborations with S.D. Pollard, J.F. Pulecio, D.A. Arena and K.S. Buchanan are acknowledged. Work supported by DOE-BES, Material Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  14. Dynamic Electron Correlation Effects on the Ground State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Huntress, Mark; Schapiro, Igor; Lindh, Roland; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-11-13

    The ground state potential energy surface of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments (e.g., bovine rhodopsin) features a low-lying conical intersection surrounded by regions with variable charge-transfer and diradical electronic structures. This implies that dynamic electron correlation may have a large effect on the shape of the force fields driving its reactivity. To investigate this effect, we focus on mapping the potential energy for three paths located along the ground state CASSCF potential energy surface of the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation taken as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore. The first path spans the bond length alternation coordinate and intercepts a conical intersection point. The other two are minimum energy paths along two distinct but kinetically competitive thermal isomerization coordinates. We show that the effect of introducing the missing dynamic electron correlation variationally (with MRCISD) and perturbatively (with the CASPT2, NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2 methods) leads, invariably, to a stabilization of the regions with charge transfer character and to a significant reshaping of the reference CASSCF potential energy surface and suggesting a change in the dominating isomerization mechanism. The possible impact of such a correction on the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore is discussed.

  15. Nonadiabatic Dynamics for Electrons at Second-Order: Real-Time TDDFT and OSCF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Triet S; Parkhill, John

    2015-07-14

    We develop a new model to simulate nonradiative relaxation and dephasing by combining real-time Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) with our recent open-systems theory of electronic dynamics. The approach has some key advantages: it has been systematically derived and properly relaxes noninteracting electrons to a Fermi-Dirac distribution. This paper combines the new dissipation theory with an atomistic, all-electron quantum chemistry code and an atom-centered model of the thermal environment. The environment is represented nonempirically and is dependent on molecular structure in a nonlocal way. A production quality, O(N(3)) closed-shell implementation of our theory applicable to realistic molecular systems is presented, including timing information. This scaling implies that the added cost of our nonadiabatic relaxation model, time-dependent open self-consistent field at second order (OSCF2), is computationally inexpensive, relative to adiabatic propagation of real-time time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) or time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Details of the implementation and numerical algorithm, including factorization and efficiency, are discussed. We demonstrate that OSCF2 approaches the stationary self-consistent field (SCF) ground state when the gap is large relative to k(b)T. The code is used to calculate linear-response spectra including the effects of bath dynamics. Finally, we show how our theory of finite-temperature relaxation can be used to correct ground-state DFT calculations.

  16. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of electrons in Au clusters capped with dodecanethiol molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamanaka, Y.; Fukagawa, K.; Tai, Y.; Murakami, J.; Nakamura, A.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated electron relaxation dynamics of size-selected Au clusters capped by dodecanethiol molecules in the cluster sizes of 28-142 atoms using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Absorption spectra of 28-71-atom clusters show discrete peaks due to the optical transitions between quantized states, while an absorption band due to the surface plasmon is observed in 142-atom clusters. In the differential absorption spectra measured by the pump-probe experiments, a large redshift of 140 meV lasting over 10 ps and absorption bleaching decaying within 2 ps are observed at the absorption peaks of 28-atom clusters. The redshift is ascribed to a charge transfer between Au clusters and dodecanethiol molecules adsorbed on the cluster surface, and the bleaching is due to blocking of the optical transitions between the ground state and the occupied electronic states due to the Pauli's-exclusion principle. Such behavior is in contrast to the 142-atom clusters, where the cooling of hot electrons generated by photo-excitation determines the relaxation dynamics. These results indicate molecular properties of the 28-atom Au cluster-dodecanethiol system

  17. Configurable Electronics with Low Noise and 14-bit Dynamic Range for Photodiode-based Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H; Yin, Z; Zhou, D; Cao, X; Li, Q; Liu, Y; Zou, F; Skaali, B; Awes, T C

    2006-01-01

    We describe the principles and measured performance characteristics of custom configurable 32-channel shaper/digitizer Front End Electronics (FEE) cards with 14-bit dynamic range for use with gain-adjustable photon detectors. The electronics has been designed for the PHOS calorimeter of ALICE with avalanche photodiode (APD) readout operated at -25 C ambient temperature and a signal shaping time of $1 {\\mu}s$. The electronics has also been adopted by the EMCal detector of ALICE with the same APD readout, but operated at an ambient temperature of +20 C and with a shaping time of 100ns. The CR-RC2 signal shapers on the FEE cards are implemented in discrete logic on a 10-layer board with two shaper sections for each input channel. The two shaper sections with gain ratio of 16:1 are digitized by 10-bit ADCs and provide an effective dynamic range of 14 bits. Gain adjustment for each individual APD is available through 32 bias voltage control registers of 10-bit range. The fixed gains and shaping times of the pole-z...

  18. Static and Dynamic Electron Microscopy Investigations at the Atomic and Ultrafast Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Pranav Kumar

    Advancements in the electron microscopy capabilities - aberration-corrected imaging, monochromatic spectroscopy, direct-electron detectors - have enabled routine visualization of atomic-scale processes with millisecond temporal resolutions in this decade. This, combined with progress in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder technology and nanofabrication techniques, allows comprehensive experiments on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. The development of ultrafast (sub-nanosecond) time-resolved TEM with ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has further pushed the envelope of in situ TEM to sub-nanosecond temporal resolution while maintaining sub-nanometer spatial resolution. A plethora of materials phenomena - including electron-phonon coupling, phonon transport, first-order phase transitions, bond rotation, plasmon dynamics, melting, and dopant atoms arrangement - are not yet clearly understood and could be benefitted with the current in situ TEM capabilities having atomic-level and ultrafast precision. Better understanding of these phenomena and intrinsic material dynamics (e.g. how phonons propagate in a material, what time-scales are involved in a first-order phase transition, how fast a material melts, where dopant atoms sit in a crystal) in new-generation and technologically important materials (e.g. two-dimensional layered materials, semiconductor and magnetic devices, rare-earth-element-free permanent magnets, unconventional superconductors) could bring a paradigm shift in their electronic, structural, magnetic, thermal and optical applications. Present research efforts, employing cutting-edge static and dynamic in situ electron microscopy resources at the University of Minnesota, are directed towards understanding the atomic-scale crystallographic structural transition and phonon transport in an iron-pnictide parent compound LaFeAsO, studying the mechanical stability of fast moving hard-drive heads in heat

  19. Shock Acceleration of Electrons and Synchrotron Emission from the Dynamical Ejecta of Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Maeda, Keiichi; Kawanaka, Norita

    2018-05-01

    Neutron star mergers (NSMs) eject energetic subrelativistic dynamical ejecta into circumbinary media. Analogous to supernovae and supernova remnants, the NSM dynamical ejecta are expected to produce nonthermal emission by electrons accelerated at a shock wave. In this paper, we present the expected radio and X-ray signals by this mechanism, taking into account nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and magnetic field amplification. We suggest that the NSM is unique as a DSA site, where the seed relativistic electrons are abundantly provided by the decays of r-process elements. The signal is predicted to peak at a few 100–1000 days after the merger, determined by the balance between the decrease of the number of seed electrons and the increase of the dissipated kinetic energy, due to the shock expansion. While the resulting flux can ideally reach the maximum flux expected from near-equipartition, the available kinetic energy dissipation rate of the NSM ejecta limits the detectability of such a signal. It is likely that the radio and X-ray emission are overwhelmed by other mechanisms (e.g., an off-axis jet) for an observer placed in a jet direction (i.e., for GW170817). However, for an off-axis observer, to be discovered once a number of NSMs are identified, the dynamical ejecta component is predicted to dominate the nonthermal emission. While the detection of this signal is challenging even with near-future facilities, this potentially provides a robust probe of the creation of r-process elements in NSMs.

  20. A real-time extension of density matrix embedding theory for non-equilibrium electron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2018-02-01

    We introduce real-time density matrix embedding theory (DMET), a dynamical quantum embedding theory for computing non-equilibrium electron dynamics in strongly correlated systems. As in the previously developed static DMET, real-time DMET partitions the system into an impurity corresponding to the region of interest coupled to the surrounding environment, which is efficiently represented by a quantum bath of the same size as the impurity. In this work, we focus on a simplified single-impurity time-dependent formulation as a first step toward a multi-impurity theory. The equations of motion of the coupled impurity and bath embedding problem are derived using the time-dependent variational principle. The accuracy of real-time DMET is compared to that of time-dependent complete active space self-consistent field (TD-CASSCF) theory and time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory for a variety of quantum quenches in the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM), in which the Hamiltonian is suddenly changed (quenched) to induce a non-equilibrium state. Real-time DMET shows a marked improvement over the mean-field TDHF, converging to the exact answer even in the non-trivial Kondo regime of the SIAM. However, as expected from analogous behavior in static DMET, the constrained structure of the real-time DMET wavefunction leads to a slower convergence with respect to active space size, in the single-impurity formulation, relative to TD-CASSCF. Our initial results suggest that real-time DMET provides a promising framework to simulate non-equilibrium electron dynamics in which strong electron correlation plays an important role, and lays the groundwork for future multi-impurity formulations.

  1. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Dickey, Elizabeth C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2017-02-15

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals. Further, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system. - Highlights: • A novel technique to directly polar domains utilizing EBSD is demonstrated. • The technique relies on dynamical diffraction simulations of EBSD patterns. • The technique is demonstrated by mapping 180° domains in LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals. • Further application of this technique to other materials classes is discussed.

  2. Quantum corrected Langevin dynamics for adsorbates on metal surfaces interacting with hot electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the importance of including quantized initial conditions in Langevin dynamics for adsorbates interacting with a thermal reservoir of electrons. For quadratic potentials the time evolution is exactly described by a classical Langevin equation and it is shown how to rigorously obtain...... quantum mechanical probabilities from the classical phase space distributions resulting from the dynamics. At short time scales, classical and quasiclassical initial conditions lead to wrong results and only correctly quantized initial conditions give a close agreement with an inherently quantum...... mechanical master equation approach. With CO on Cu(100) as an example, we demonstrate the effect for a system with ab initio frictional tensor and potential energy surfaces and show that quantizing the initial conditions can have a large impact on both the desorption probability and the distribution...

  3. How Does the Electron Dynamics Affect the Reconnection Rate in a Typical Reconnection Layer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether the microscale controls the macroscale or vice-versa remains one of the most challenging problems in plasmas. A particular topic of interest within this context is collisionless magnetic reconnection, where both points of views are espoused by different groups of researchers. This presentation will focus on this topic. We will begin by analyzing the properties of electron diffusion region dynamics both for guide field and anti-parallel reconnection, and how they can be scaled to different inflow conditions. As a next step, we will study typical temporal variations of the microscopic dynamics with the objective of understanding the potential for secular changes to the macroscopic system. The research will be based on a combination of analytical theory and numerical modeling.

  4. Beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration in drifting intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, K.F.; Hintze, W.

    1976-01-01

    Collective ion acceleration at the injection of a relativistic electron beam into a low-pressure gas or a plasma is discussed and its strong dependence on the beam-front dynamics is shown. A simple one-dimensional model taking explicitly into account the motion and ionizing action of the ions in the beam-front region is developed for the calculation of the beam drift velocity. The obtained pressure dependence is in good agreement with experimental data. The energy distribution is shown of the ions accelerated in the moving potential well of the space charge region. Scaling laws for the beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration are derived. (J.U.)

  5. Dynamical generalization of a solvable family of two-electron model atoms with general interparticle repulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehaus, T A; Suhai, S; March, N H

    2008-01-01

    Holas, Howard and March (2003 Phys. Lett. A 310 451) have obtained analytic solutions for ground-state properties of a whole family of two-electron spin-compensated harmonically confined model atoms whose different members are characterized by a specific interparticle potential energy u(r 12 ). Here, we make a start on the dynamic generalization of the harmonic external potential, the motivation being the serious criticism levelled recently against the foundations of time-dependent density-functional theory (e.g., Schirmer and Dreuw 2007 Phys. Rev. A 75 022513). In this context, we derive a simplified expression for the time-dependent electron density for arbitrary interparticle interaction, which is fully determined by a one-dimensional non-interacting Hamiltonian. Moreover, a closed solution for the momentum space density in the Moshinsky model is obtained

  6. Visualizing Electron Beam Dynamics and Instabilities with Synchrotron Radiation at the APS

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Bing Xin

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third generation hard x-ray source serving a large user community. In order to characterize the high-brilliance beams, the APS diagnostics beamlines have been developed into a full photon diagnostics suite. We will describe the design and capabilities of the APS visible light imaging line, the bend magnet x-ray pinhole camera, and a unique diagnostics undulator beamline. Their primary functions are to support the APS user operations by providing information on beam sizes (20 - 100 micrometers), divergence (3 – 25 microradians), and bunch length (20 – 50 ps). Through the use of examples, we will show how these complementary imaging tools are used to visualize the electron dynamics and investigate beam instabilities. Special emphasis will be put on the use of undulator radiation, which is uniquely suitable for time-resolved imaging of electron beam with high spatial resolution, and for measurements of longitudinal beam properties such as beam energy spread...

  7. Tuning the Electronic and Dynamical Properties of a Molecule by Atom Trapping Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dong; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Abad, Enrique; Dappe, Yannick J; Smogunov, Alexander; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2017-11-28

    The ability to trap adatoms with an organic molecule on a surface has been used to obtain a range of molecular functionalities controlled by the choice of the molecular trapping site and local deprotonation. The tetraphenylporphyrin molecule used in this study contains three types of trapping sites: two carbon rings (phenyl and pyrrole) and the center of a macrocycle. Catching a gold adatom on the carbon rings leads to an electronic doping of the molecule, whereas trapping the adatom at the macrocycle center with single deprotonation leads to a molecular rotor and a second deprotonation leads to a molecular jumper. We call "atom trapping chemistry" the control of the structure, electronic, and dynamical properties of a molecule achieved by trapping metallic atoms with a molecule on a surface. In addition to the examples previously described, we show that more complex structures can be envisaged.

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.; Ceroke, P.J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.H.; Fruianu, M.; Belford, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon chars have been synthesized in our laboratory from a variety of starting materials, by means of a highly controlled pyrolysis technique. These chars exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line shapes which change with the local oxygen concentration in a reproducible and stable fashion; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 1 H nuclear spin population in conjunction with electron Zeeman pumping. Low-frequency EPR, DNP and DNP-enhanced MRI all show promise as oximetry methods when used with carbon chars. (author)

  9. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakir, U.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-05-15

    The effect of non-Maxwellian distributed ions on electron temperature gradient mode is investigated. The linear dispersion relation of η{sub e}−mode is obtained which shows that the behavior of this mode changes in the presence of superthermal ions. The growth rate of η{sub e}−mode driven linear instability is found and is observed to modify due to nonthermal ions. However, it is found that this leaves the electron energy transport coefficient unchanged. In the nonlinear regime, a dipolar vortex solution is derived which indicates that the dynamic behavior of the vortices changes with the inclusion of kappa distributed ions. The importance of present study with respect to space and laboratory plasmas is also pointed out.

  10. Dynamics of Longitudinal Phase-Space Modulations in an rf Compressor for Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the UV or x-ray radiation spectrum require peak beam currents that are generally higher than those obtainable by present electron sources, thus making bunch compression necessary. Compression, however, may heighten the effects of collective forces and degrade the beam quality. In this paper they provide a framework for investigating some of these effects in rf compressors by focusing on the longitudinal dynamics of small-amplitude density perturbations, which have the potential to cause the disruptive appearance of the so-called microbunching instability. They develop a linear theory valid for low-to-moderate compression factors under the assumption of a 1D impedance model of longitudinal space charge and provide validation against macroparticle simulations.

  11. On the importance of excited state dynamic response electron correlation in polarizable embedding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Janus J; Sauer, Stephan P A; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Jensen, Hans J Aa; Kongsted, Jacob

    2012-09-30

    We investigate the effect of including a dynamic reaction field at the lowest possible ab inito wave function level of theory, namely the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent field level within the polarizable embedding (PE) formalism. We formulate HF based PE within the linear response theory picture leading to the PE-random-phase approximation (PE-RPA) and bridge the expressions to a second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) frame such that dynamic reaction field contributions are included at the RPA level in addition to the static response described at the SOPPA level but with HF induced dipole moments. We conduct calculations on para-nitro-aniline and para-nitro-phenolate using said model in addition to dynamic PE-RPA and PE-CAM-B3LYP. We compare the results to recently published PE-CCSD data and demonstrate how the cost effective SOPPA-based model successfully recovers a great portion of the inherent PE-RPA error when the observable is the solvatochromic shift. We furthermore demonstrate that whenever the change in density resulting from the ground state-excited state electronic transition in the solute is not associated with a significant change in the electric field, dynamic response contributions formulated at the HF level of theory manage to capture the majority of the system response originating from derivative densities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Multi-time scale dynamics in power electronics-dominated power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoming; Hu, Jiabing; Cheng, Shijie

    2017-09-01

    Electric power infrastructure has recently undergone a comprehensive transformation from electromagnetics to semiconductors. Such a development is attributed to the rapid growth of power electronic converter applications in the load side to realize energy conservation and on the supply side for renewable generations and power transmissions using high voltage direct current transmission. This transformation has altered the fundamental mechanism of power system dynamics, which demands the establishment of a new theory for power system control and protection. This paper presents thoughts on a theoretical framework for the coming semiconducting power systems.

  13. The electronic and optical properties of warm dense nitrous oxide using quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yujuan; Wang Cong; Zhang Ping

    2012-01-01

    First-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory have been used to study the electronic and optical properties of fluid nitrous oxide under extreme conditions. Systematic descriptions of pair-correlation function, atomic structure, and the charge density distribution are used to investigate the dissociation of fluid nitrous oxide. The electrical and optical properties are derived from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is found that the nonmetal-metal transition for fluid nitrous oxide can be directly associated to the dissociation and has significant influence on the optical properties of the fluid.

  14. Hydrodynamic theory for quantum plasmonics: Linear-response dynamics of the inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic theory of metals, offering systematic studies of the linear-response dynamics for an inhomogeneous electron gas. We include the quantum functional terms of the Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy, the von Weizsa¨cker kinetic energy, and the exchange-correlation Coulomb...... energies under the local density approximation. The advantages, limitations, and possible improvements of the hydrodynamic theory are transparently demonstrated. The roles of various parameters in the theory are identified. We anticipate that the hydrodynamic theory can be applied to investigate the linear...... response of complex metallic nanostructures, including quantum effects, by adjusting theory parameters appropriately....

  15. Dynamics of annular bright field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, S.D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of image formation in the so-called annular bright field mode in scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereby an annular detector is used with detector collection range lying within the cone of illumination, i.e. the bright field region. We show that this imaging mode allows us to reliably image both light and heavy columns over a range of thickness and defocus values, and we explain the contrast mechanisms involved. The role of probe and detector aperture sizes is considered, as is the sensitivity of the method to intercolumn spacing and local disorder.

  16. The Generalized Coherent State ansatz: Application to quantum electron-vibrational dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.borrelli@unito.it [DISAFA, Università di Torino, I-10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Gelin, Maxim F. [Departement of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2016-12-20

    A new ansatz for molecular vibronic wave functions based on a superposition of time-dependent Generalized Coherent States is developed and analysed. The methodology is specifically tailored to describe the time evolution of the wave function of a system in which several interacting electronic states are coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The equations of motion for the wave packet parameters are obtained by using the Dirac–Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. The methodology is used to describe the quantum dynamical behavior of a model polaron system and its scaling and convergence properties are discussed and compared with numerically exact results.

  17. Condition of damping of anomalous radial transport, determined by ordered convective electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.I.; Barchuk, S.V.; Lapshin, V.I.; Volkov, E.D.; Melentsov, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown, that at development of instability due to a radial gradient of density in the crossed electric and magnetic fields in nuclear fusion installations ordering convective cells can be excited. It provides anomalous particle transport. The spatial structures of these convective cells have been constructed. The radial dimensions of these convective cells depend on their amplitudes and on a radial gradient of density. The convective-diffusion equation for radial dynamics of the electrons has been derived. At the certain value of the universal controlling parameter, the convective cell excitation and the anomalous radial transport are suppressed. (author)

  18. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain-reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuning of electronic properties and dynamical stability of graphene oxide with different functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-09-01

    The structural, electronic and vibrational properties of graphene oxide (GO) with varying proportion of epoxy and hydroxyl functional groups have been studied using density functional theory. The functional groups and oxygen density have an obvious influence on the electronic and vibrational properties. The dependence of band gap on associated functional groups and oxygen density shows a possibility of tuning the band gap of graphene by varying the functional groups as well as oxidation level. The absorption of high oxygen content in graphene leads to the gap opening and resulting in a transition from semimetal to semiconductor. Phonon dispersion curves show no imaginary frequency or no softening of any phonon mode throughout the Brillouin zone which confirms the dynamical stability of all considered GO models. Different groups and different oxygen density result into the varying characteristics of phonon modes. The computed results show good agreement with the experimental observations. Our results present interesting possibilities for engineering the electronic properties of graphene and GO and impact the fabrication of new electronics.

  20. Femtosecond dynamics of electron transfer in a neutral organic mixed-valence compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimenka, Raman; Margraf, Markus; Koehler, Juliane; Heckmann, Alexander; Lambert, Christoph; Fischer, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    In this article we report a femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption study of a neutral organic mixed-valence (MV) compound with the aim to gain insight into its charge-transfer dynamics upon optical excitation. The back-electron transfer was investigated in five different solvents, toluene, dibutyl ether, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzonitrile and n-hexane. In the pump step, the molecule was excited at 760 nm and 850 nm into the intervalence charge-transfer band. The resulting transients can be described by two time constant. We assign one time constant to the rearrangement of solvent molecules in the charge-transfer state and the second time constant to back-electron transfer to the electronic ground state. Back-electron transfer rates range from 1.5 x 10 12 s -1 in benzonitrile through 8.3 x 10 11 s -1 in MTBE, around 1.6 x 10 11 s -1 in dibutylether and toluene and to 3.8 x 10 9 s -1 in n-hexane

  1. Spin dynamics of electron beams in circular accelerators; Spindynamik von Elektronenstrahlen in Kreisbeschleunigern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldt, Oliver

    2014-04-15

    Experiments using high energy beams of spin polarized, charged particles still prove to be very helpful in disclosing a deeper understanding of the fundamental structure of matter. An important aspect is to control the beam properties, such as brilliance, intensity, energy, and degree of spin polarization. In this context, the present studies show various numerical calculations of the spin dynamics of high energy electron beams in circular accelerators. Special attention has to be paid to the emission of synchrotron radiation, that occurs when deflecting charged particles on circular orbits. In the presence of the fluctuation of the kinetic energy due to the photon emission, each electron spin moves non-deterministically. This stochastic effect commonly slows down the speed of all numeric estimations. However, the shown simulations cover - using appropriate approximations - trackings for the motion of thousands of electron spins for up to thousands of turns. Those calculations are validated and complemented by empirical investigations at the electron stretcher facility ELSA of the University of Bonn. They can largely be extended to other boundary conditions and thus, can be consulted for new accelerator layouts.

  2. Dynamics of electronic dephasing in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Dugan; Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Fransted, Kelly A; Caram, Justin R; Freed, Karl F; Engel, Gregory S; Wen Jianzhong

    2010-01-01

    Electronic coherence has been shown to persist in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) antenna complex from green sulfur bacteria at 77 K for at least 660 fs, several times longer than the typical lifetime of a coherence in a dynamic environment at this temperature. Such long-lived coherence was proposed to improve energy transfer efficiency in photosynthetic systems by allowing an excitation to follow a quantum random walk as it approaches the reaction centre. Here we present a model for bath-induced electronic transitions, demonstrating that the protein matrix protects coherences by globally correlating fluctuations in transition energies. We also quantify the dephasing rates for two particular electronic coherences in the FMO complex at 77 K using two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy and find that the lifetimes of individual coherences are distinct. Within the framework of noise-assisted transport, this result suggests that the FMO complex has been locally tuned by natural selection to optimize transfer efficiency by exploiting quantum coherence.

  3. Quantum molecular dynamics study on energy transfer to the secondary electron in surface collision process of an ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibahara, M; Satake, S; Taniguchi, J

    2008-01-01

    In the present study the quantum molecular dynamics method was applied to an energy transfer problem to an electron during ionic surface collision process in order to elucidate how energy of ionic collision transfers to the emitted electrons. Effects of various physical parameters, such as the collision velocity and interaction strength between the observed electron and the classical particles on the energy transfer to the electron were investigated by the quantum molecular dynamics method when the potassium ion was collided with the surface so as to elucidate the energy path to the electron and the predominant factor of energy transfer to the electron. Effects of potential energy between the ion and the electron and that between the surface molecule and the electron on the electronic energy transfer were shown in the present paper. The energy transfer to the observed secondary electron through the potential energy term between the ion and the electron was much dependent on the ion collision energy although the energy increase to the observed secondary electron was not monotonous through the potential energy between the ion and surface molecules with the change of the ion collision energy

  4. Computational Benchmarking for Ultrafast Electron Dynamics: Wave Function Methods vs Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Micael J T; Mignolet, Benoit; Kus, Tomasz; Papadopoulos, Theodoros A; Remacle, F; Verstraete, Matthieu J

    2015-05-12

    Attosecond electron dynamics in small- and medium-sized molecules, induced by an ultrashort strong optical pulse, is studied computationally for a frozen nuclear geometry. The importance of exchange and correlation effects on the nonequilibrium electron dynamics induced by the interaction of the molecule with the strong optical pulse is analyzed by comparing the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation based on the correlated field-free stationary electronic states computed with the equationof-motion coupled cluster singles and doubles and the complete active space multi-configurational self-consistent field methodologies on one hand, and various functionals in real-time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on the other. We aim to evaluate the performance of the latter approach, which is very widely used for nonlinear absorption processes and whose computational cost has a more favorable scaling with the system size. We focus on LiH as a toy model for a nontrivial molecule and show that our conclusions carry over to larger molecules, exemplified by ABCU (C10H19N). The molecules are probed with IR and UV pulses whose intensities are not strong enough to significantly ionize the system. By comparing the evolution of the time-dependent field-free electronic dipole moment, as well as its Fourier power spectrum, we show that TD-DFT performs qualitatively well in most cases. Contrary to previous studies, we find almost no changes in the TD-DFT excitation energies when excited states are populated. Transitions between states of different symmetries are induced using pulses polarized in different directions. We observe that the performance of TD-DFT does not depend on the symmetry of the states involved in the transition.

  5. Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Simulation of Collisionless Plasma Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Lin; Xueyi Wang; Liu Chen; Zhihong Lin

    2009-08-11

    Fully kinetic-particle simulations and hybrid simulations have been utilized for decades to investigate various fundamental plasma processes, such as magnetic reconnection, fast compressional waves, and wave-particle interaction. Nevertheless, due to disparate temporal and spatial scales between electrons and ions, existing fully kinetic-particle codes have to employ either unrealistically high electron-to-ion mass ratio, me/mi, or simulation domain limited to a few or a few ten's of the ion Larmor radii, or/and time much less than the global Alfven time scale in order to accommodate available computing resources. On the other hand, in the hybrid simulation, the ions are treated as fully kinetic particles but the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The electron kinetic effects, e.g., wave-particle resonances and finite electron Larmor radius effects, are completely missing. Important physics, such as the electron transit time damping of fast compressional waves or the triggering mechanism of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas is absent in the hybrid codes. Motivated by these considerations and noting that dynamics of interest to us has frequencies lower than the electron gyrofrequency, we planned to develop an innovative particle simulation model, gyrokinetic (GK) electrons and fully kinetic (FK) ions. In the GK-electron and FK-ion (GKe/FKi) particle simulation model, the rapid electron cyclotron motion is removed, while keeping finite electron Larmor radii, realistic me/mi ratio, wave-particle interactions, and off-diagonal components of electron pressure tensor. The computation power can thus be significantly improved over that of the full-particle codes. As planned in the project DE-FG02-05ER54826, we have finished the development of the new GK-electron and FK-ion scheme, finished its benchmark for a uniform plasma in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D systems against linear waves obtained from analytical theories, and carried out a further convergence

  6. Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Simulation of Collisionless Plasma Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Chen, Liu; Lin, Zhihong

    2009-01-01

    Fully kinetic-particle simulations and hybrid simulations have been utilized for decades to investigate various fundamental plasma processes, such as magnetic reconnection, fast compressional waves, and wave-particle interaction. Nevertheless, due to disparate temporal and spatial scales between electrons and ions, existing fully kinetic-particle codes have to employ either unrealistically high electron-to-ion mass ratio, me/mi, or simulation domain limited to a few or a few ten's of the ion Larmor radii, or/and time much less than the global Alfven time scale in order to accommodate available computing resources. On the other hand, in the hybrid simulation, the ions are treated as fully kinetic particles but the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The electron kinetic effects, e.g., wave-particle resonances and finite electron Larmor radius effects, are completely missing. Important physics, such as the electron transit time damping of fast compressional waves or the triggering mechanism of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas is absent in the hybrid codes. Motivated by these considerations and noting that dynamics of interest to us has frequencies lower than the electron gyrofrequency, we planned to develop an innovative particle simulation model, gyrokinetic (GK) electrons and fully kinetic (FK) ions. In the GK-electron and FK-ion (GKe/FKi) particle simulation model, the rapid electron cyclotron motion is removed, while keeping finite electron Larmor radii, realistic me/mi ratio, wave-particle interactions, and off-diagonal components of electron pressure tensor. The computation power can thus be significantly improved over that of the full-particle codes. As planned in the project DE-FG02-05ER54826, we have finished the development of the new GK-electron and FK-ion scheme, finished its benchmark for a uniform plasma in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D systems against linear waves obtained from analytical theories, and carried out a further convergence test

  7. Correlated nuclear and electronic dynamics in photoionized systems studied by quantum and mixed quantum-classical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng

    2014-09-01

    The advent of free electron lasers and high harmonic sources enables the investigation of electronic and nuclear dynamics of molecules and solids with atomic spatial resolution and femtosecond/attosecond time resolution, using bright and ultrashort laser pulses of frequency from terahertz to hard x-ray range. With the help of ultrashort laser pulses, the nuclear and electronic dynamics can be initiated, monitored and actively controlled at the typical time scale in the femtosecond to attosecond realm. Meanwhile, theoretical tools are required to describe the underlying mechanism. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical tools based on full quantum mechanical multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) and mixed quantum classical approaches, which can be applied to describe the dynamical behavior of gas phase molecules and strongly correlated solids in the presence of ultrashort laser pulses. In the first part of this thesis, the focus is on the motion of electron holes in gas phase molecular ions created by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photoionization and watched by spectroscopic approaches. The XUV photons create electron-hole in the valence orbitals of molecules by photoionization, the electron hole, as a positively charged quasi-particle, can then interact with the nuclei and the rest of electrons, leading to coupled non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics. I present our study on electron-hole relaxation dynamics in valence ionized molecular ions of moderate size, using quantum wave packet and mixed quantum-classical approaches, using photoionized [H + (H 2 O) n ] + molecular ion as example. We have shown that the coupled motion of the electron-hole and the nuclei can be mapped out with femtosecond resolution by core-level x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, in specific cases, the XUV photon can create a coherent electron hole, that can maintain its coherence to time scales of ∝ 1 picosecond. Employing XUV pump - IR probe

  8. Utilization of an electronic portal imaging device for measurement of dynamic wedge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, Eric S.; Miner, Marc S.; Butker, Elizabeth K.; Sutton, Danny S.; Davis, Lawrence W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Due to the motion of the collimator during dynamic wedge treatments, the conventional method of collecting comprehensive wedge data with a water tank and a scanning ionization chamber is obsolete. It is the objective of this work to demonstrate the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and software to accomplish this task. Materials and Methods: A Varian Clinac[reg] 2300 C/D, equipped with a PortalVision TM EPID and Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software, was used to produce the radiation field. The Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software allows for a band of 10 of 256 high voltage electrodes to be continuously read and averaged by the 256 electrometer electrodes. The file that is produced contains data relating to the integrated ionization at each of the 256 points, essentially the cross plane beam profile. Software was developed using Microsoft C ++ to reformat the data for import into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing for easy mathematical manipulation and graphical display. Beam profiles were measured by the EPID with a 100 cm TSD for various field sizes. Each field size was measured open, steel wedged, and dynamically wedged. Scanning ionization chamber measurements performed in a water tank were compared to the open and steel wedged fields. Ionization chamber measurements taken in a water tank were compared with the dynamically wedged measurements. For the EPID measurements the depth was varied using Gammex RMI Solid Water TM placed directly above the EPID sensitive volume. Bolus material was placed between the Solid Water TM and the EPID to avoid an air gap. Results: Comparison of EPID measurements with those from an ion chamber in a water tank showed a discrepancy of ∼5%. Scans were successfully obtained for open, steel wedged and dynamically wedged beams. Software has been developed to allow for easy graphical display of beam profiles. Conclusions: Measurement of dynamic wedge data proves to be easily

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of the role of electronic losses in damage creation of ion irradiated Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, P.N.; Deshpande, S.P

    2014-01-01

    Damage creation due to the irradiation of 14 MeV fusion neutrons and the subsequent mechanical failure and alteration of the fuel retention properties of tungsten plasma-facing materials is one of the major concerns of the fusion reactors. In addition to nuclear reactions and the subsequent transmutations, the energetic neutron impars its kinetic energy either partly or completely to a lattice tungsten atom thereby creating a primary knock-on atom (PKA) which, is considered as the onset of damage creation in the lattice. The PKA continues to undergo collisions with the lattice atoms which eventually leads to a collision cascade. In order to understand the collision process, one often simulates such systems using surrogate ions, such as energetic W ions itself, in particle accelerators and due to the experimental constraints (such as the stability of the beam) one often has to opt for high energetic ion beams (∼ 30 MeV) which surpasses the PKA energies created by neutron (∼100s of KeV) in W. Hence it is important to distinguish how the very high energetic tungsten atoms interact with the lattice atoms in comparison with the low energy PKA created by the neutron. One of the key difference is that at higher energies the electronic losses become important which decides the collision dynamics. In this presentation the effect of electronic losses in the damage creation using molecular dynamics simulations have been discussed

  10. Dynamic wedge, electron energy and beam profile Q.A. using an ionization chamber linear array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.B.; Todd, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of multi-modal linacs the quality assurance workload of a Physical Sciences department has increased dramatically. The advent of dynamic wedges has further complicated matters because of the need to invent accurate methods to perform Q.A. in a reasonable time. We have been using an ionization chamber linear array, the Thebes 7000 TM by Victoreen, Inc., for some years to measure X-ray and electron beam profiles. Two years ago we developed software to perform Q.A. on our dynamic wedges using the array and more recently included a routine to check electron beam energies using the method described by Rosenow, U.F. et al., Med. Phys. 18(1) 19-25. The integrated beam and profile management system has enabled us to maintain a comprehensive quality assurance programme on all our linaccs. Both our efficiency and accuracy have increased to the point where we are able to keep up with the greater number of tests required without an increase in staff or hours spent in quality assurance. In changing the processor from the Z80 of the Thebes console to the 486 of the PC we have also noticed a marked increase in the calibration stability of the array. (author)

  11. Structural predictions for Correlated Electron Materials Using the Functional Dynamical Mean Field Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haule, Kristjan

    2018-04-01

    The Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) in combination with the band structure methods has been able to address reach physics of correlated materials, such as the fluctuating local moments, spin and orbital fluctuations, atomic multiplet physics and band formation on equal footing. Recently it is getting increasingly recognized that more predictive ab-initio theory of correlated systems needs to also address the feedback effect of the correlated electronic structure on the ionic positions, as the metal-insulator transition is almost always accompanied with considerable structural distortions. We will review recently developed extension of merger between the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and DMFT method, dubbed DFT+ embedded DMFT (DFT+eDMFT), whichsuccessfully addresses this challenge. It is based on the stationary Luttinger-Ward functional to minimize the numerical error, it subtracts the exact double-counting of DFT and DMFT, and implements self-consistent forces on all atoms in the unit cell. In a few examples, we will also show how the method elucidated the important feedback effect of correlations on crystal structure in rare earth nickelates to explain the mechanism of the metal-insulator transition. The method showed that such feedback effect is also essential to understand the dynamic stability of the high-temperature body-centered cubic phase of elemental iron, and in particular it predicted strong enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling over DFT values in FeSe, which was very recently verified by pioneering time-domain experiment.

  12. Visualizing electron dynamics in organic materials: Charge transport through molecules and angular resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Stephan

    Being able to visualize the dynamics of electrons in organic materials is a fascinating perspective. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory allow to realize this hope, as they visualize the flow of charge through molecular structures in real-space and real-time. We here present results on two fundamental processes: Photoemission from organic semiconductor molecules and charge transport through molecular structures. In the first part we demonstrate that angular resolved photoemission intensities - from both theory and experiment - can often be interpreted as a visualization of molecular orbitals. However, counter-intuitive quantum-mechanical electron dynamics such as emission perpendicular to the direction of the electrical field can substantially alter the picture, adding surprising features to the molecular orbital interpretation. In a second study we calculate the flow of charge through conjugated molecules. The calculations show in real time how breaks in the conjugation can lead to a local buildup of charge and the formation of local electrical dipoles. These can interact with neighboring molecular chains. As a consequence, collections of ''molecular electrical wires'' can show distinctly different characteristics than ''classical electrical wires''. German Science Foundation GRK 1640.

  13. Optical Response of Warm Dense Matter Using Real-Time Electron Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael; Magyar, Rudolph

    2014-03-01

    The extreme temperatures and solid-like densities in warm dense matter present a unique challenge for theory, wherein neither conventional models from condensed matter nor plasma physics capture all of the relevant phenomenology. While Kubo-Greenwood DFT calculations have proven capable of reproducing optical properties of WDM, they require a significant number of virtual orbitals to reach convergence due to their perturbative nature. Real-time TDDFT presents a complementary framework with a number of computationally favorable properties, including reduced cost complexity and better scalability, and has been used to reproduce the optical response of finite and ordered extended systems. We will describe the use of Ehrenfest-TDDFT to evolve coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in WDM systems, and the subsequent evaluation of optical response functions from the real-time electron dynamics. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach will be discussed relative to the current state-of-the-art. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed

  15. Density functional theory based molecular dynamics study of hydration and electronic properties of aqueous La(3+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Cyril; Vitorge, Pierre; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Spezia, Riccardo; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2010-07-28

    Structural and electronic properties of La(3+) immersed in bulk water have been assessed by means of density functional theory (DFT)-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations. Correct structural properties, i.e., La(III)-water distances and La(III) coordination number, can be obtained within the framework of Car-Parrinello simulations providing that both the La pseudopotential and conditions of the dynamics (fictitious mass and time step) are carefully set up. DFT-MD explicitly treats electronic densities and is shown here to provide a theoretical justification to the necessity of including polarization when studying highly charged cations such as lanthanoids(III) with classical MD. La(3+) was found to strongly polarize the water molecules located in the first shell, giving rise to dipole moments about 0.5 D larger than those of bulk water molecules. Finally, analyzing Kohn-Sham orbitals, we found La(3+) empty 4f orbitals extremely compact and to a great extent uncoupled from the water conduction band, while the 5d empty orbitals exhibit mixing with unoccupied states of water.

  16. Dynamics of Interocular Suppression in Amblyopic Children during Electronically Monitored Occlusion Therapy: First Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrein, Stephan; Kohnen, Thomas; Fronius, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Interocular suppression is assumed to be the mechanism leading to impaired visual acuity, especially in strabismic amblyopia. Little is known about the dynamics of suppression during treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the development of the depth of suppression and its relation to changes in visual acuity during electronically monitored occlusion treatment. In a prospective pilot study, 15 amblyopes (8 with and 7 without strabismus) aged 5 to 16 years (mean 10.24 years) were examined before initiation of patching and then every 3 to 6 weeks for 4 months. To quantify suppression, a red filter ladder (Sbisa bar) was used, attenuating the image of the dominant eye until the patients reported a binocular perception (diplopia, rivalry, color mixture) or a change in eye dominance. Acuity was assessed with crowded Landolt rings. Daily occlusion was recorded using occlusion dose monitors. The depth of interocular suppression showed a biphasic change: it increased significantly during the first month (P=0.02), while visual acuity improved (mean 0.14 log units ±0.13; Pocclusion and suppression changes was not statistically significant. This first insight into the functional changes during electronically monitored patching suggests a complex relationship between visual acuity and interocular suppression that seems to be influenced by the presence of strabismus. Knowledge of the dynamics of interocular suppression is crucial for enhancing the outcome of occlusion treatment and also for the evaluation of its future role compared to emerging dichoptic treatments.

  17. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain–reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. - Author-Highlights: • We derive a simple dynamic scattering formalism for dark field electron holography based on a perturbative two-beam theory. • The formalism facilitates the projection of 3D strain fields by a simple weighting integral. • The weighted projection depends analytically on the diffraction order, the excitation error and the specimen thickness. • The weighting integral formalism represents an important prerequisite towards the development of tomographic strain reconstruction techniques

  18. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of IR-driven electron dynamics in a charge transfer model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falge, Mirjam; Fröbel, Friedrich Georg; Engel, Volker; Gräfe, Stefanie

    2017-08-02

    If the adiabatic approximation is valid, electrons smoothly adapt to molecular geometry changes. In contrast, as a characteristic of diabatic dynamics, the electron density does not follow the nuclear motion. Recently, we have shown that the asymmetry in time-resolved photoelectron spectra serves as a tool to distinguish between these dynamics [Falge et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2012, 3, 2617]. Here, we investigate the influence of an additional, moderately intense infrared (IR) laser field, as often applied in attosecond time-resolved experiments, on such asymmetries. This is done using a simple model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion. We calculate time-resolved photoelectron spectra and their asymmetries and demonstrate that the spectra directly map the bound electron-nuclear dynamics. From the asymmetries, we can trace the IR field-induced population transfer and both the field-driven and intrinsic (non-)adiabatic dynamics. This holds true when considering superposition states accompanied by electronic coherences. The latter are observable in the asymmetries for sufficiently short XUV pulses to coherently probe the coupled states. It is thus documented that the asymmetry is a measure for phases in bound electron wave packets and non-adiabatic dynamics.

  19. Dynamic plasma screening effects on electron capture process in hydrogenic ion fully stripped ion collisions in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In dense plasmas, dynamic plasma screening effects are investigated on electron capture from hydrogenic ions by past fully stripped ions. The classical Bohr Lindhard model has been applied to obtain the electron capture probability. The interaction potential in dense plasmas is represented in terms of the longitudinal dielectric function. The classical straight-line trajectory approximation is applied to the motion of the projectile ion in order to visualize the electron capture probability as a function of the impact parameter, projectile energy, and plasma parameters. The electron capture probability including the dynamic plasma screening effect is always greater than that including the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is smaller than the electron thermal velocity, the dynamic polarization screening effect becomes the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is greater than the plasma electron thermal velocity, the interaction potential is almost unshielded. The difference between the dynamic and static plasma screening effects is more significant for low energy projectiles. It is found that the static screening formula obtained by the Debye Hueckel model overestimates the plasma screening effects on the electron capture processes in dense plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  1. Dynamic Confinement of ITER Plasma by O-Mode Driver at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2009-05-01

    A low B-field side launched electron cyclotron O-Mode driver leads to the dynamic rf confinement, in addition to rf turbulent heating, of ITER plasma. The scaling law for the local energy confinement time τE is evaluated (τE ˜ 3neTe/2Q, where (3/2) neTe is the local plasma thermal energy density and Q is the local rf turbulent heating rate). The dynamics of unstable dissipative trapped particle modes (DTPM) strongly coupled to Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for gyrotron frequency 170GHz; power˜24 MW CW; and on-axis B-field ˜ 10T. In the case of dynamic stabilization of DTPM turbulence and for the heavily damped T-G modes, the energy confinement time scales as τE˜(I0)-2, whereby I0(W/m^2) is the O-Mode driver irradiance. R. Prater et. al., Nucl. Fusion 48, No 3 (March 2008). E. P. Velikhov, History of the Russian Tokamak and the Tokamak Thermonuclear Fusion Research Worldwide That Led to ITER (Documentary movie; Stefan Studios Int'l, La Jolla, CA, 2008; E. P. Velikhov, V. Stefan.) M N Rosenbluth, Phys. Scr. T2A 104-109 1982 B. B. Kadomtsev and O. P. Pogutse, Nucl. Fusion 11, 67 (1971).

  2. Theoretical study of electronic and dynamic properties of simple metal clusters in jellium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Amine Madjet, M.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the electronic properties of alkali-metal clusters in various theoretical approximations and in the framework of the spherical jellium model. We have investigated the ground state properties of alkali clusters both in the LDA (local density approximation) and in HF (Hartree-Fock) theory. We have compared the LDA predictions of the ground state properties to predictions obtained within the HF theory. Such a comparison permitted us to check the validity of the local density functional theory in describing the ground state of a finite fermion system. For the study of collective dipolar excitations in clusters, we have considered an electromagnetic excitation. We have investigated the collective modes in the following approximations: random phase approximation (RPA), time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA) and the sum-rules approach. An assessment of the approximation for the continuum state within the RPA is made by comparing with TDLDA calculations for the static and dynamic electronic properties. The comparative study that we have done on the exchange-correlation effects on the electronic and optical properties have shown that the discrepancies with measured data are due mostly to the jellium approximation for the ionic background. (author). 69 refs., 30 figs., 18 tabs

  3. An Evaluation of Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration for Signal and Image Processing in Professional Electronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulagnier Denis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Signal and image processing applications require a lot of computing resources. For low-volume applications like in professional electronics applications, FPGA are used in combination with DSP and GPP in order to reach the performances required by the product roadmaps. Nevertheless, FPGA designs are static, which raises a flexibility issue with new complex or software defined applications like software-defined radio (SDR. In this scope, dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR is used to bring a virtualization layer upon the static hardware of FPGA. During the last decade, DPR has been widely studied in academia. Nevertheless, there are very few real applications using it, and therefore, there is a lack of feedback providing relevant issues to address in order to improve its applicability. This paper evaluates the interest and limitations when using DPR in professional electronics applications and provides guidelines to improve its applicability. It makes a fair evaluation based on experiments made on a set of signal and image processing applications. It identifies the missing elements of the design flow to use DPR in professional electronics applications. Finally, it introduces a fast reconfiguration manager providing an 84-time improvement compared to the vendor solution.

  4. Dynamics of Singlet Fission and Electron Injection in Self-Assembled Acene Monolayers on Titanium Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Justin C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pace, Natalie A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arias, Dylan H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Steven T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Granger, Devin B. [University of Kentucky; Anthony, John E. [University of Kentucky

    2018-02-26

    We employ a combination of linear spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and transient absorption spectroscopy to characterize the interplay between electron transfer and singlet fission dynamics in polyacene-based dyes attached to nanostructured TiO2. For triisopropyl silylethynyl (TIPS)-pentacene, we find that the singlet fission time constant increases to 6.5 ps on a nanostructured TiO2 surface relative to a thin film time constant of 150 fs, and that triplets do not dissociate after they are formed. In contrast, TIPS-tetracene singlets quickly dissociate in 2 ps at the molecule/TiO2 interface, and this dissociation outcompetes the relatively slow singlet fission process. The addition of an alumina layer slows down electron injection, allowing the formation of triplets from singlet fission in 40 ps. However, the triplets do not inject electrons, which is likely due to a lack of sufficient driving force for triplet dissociation. These results point to the critical balance required between efficient singlet fission and appropriate energetics for interfacial charge transfer.

  5. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism

  6. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-06-01

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  7. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-21

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  8. Simulations of the dissociation of small helium clusters with ab initio molecular dynamics in electronically excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closser, Kristina D.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics resulting from electronic excitations of helium clusters were explored using ab initio molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed with configuration interaction singles and adiabatic classical dynamics coupled to a state-following algorithm. 100 different configurations of He 7 were excited into the 2s and 2p manifold for a total of 2800 trajectories. While the most common outcome (90%) was complete fragmentation to 6 ground state atoms and 1 excited state atom, 3% of trajectories yielded bound, He 2 * , and <0.5% yielded an excited helium trimer. The nature of the dynamics, kinetic energy release, and connections to experiments are discussed

  9. Local Dynamic Stability Assessment of Motion Impaired Elderly Using Electronic Textile Pants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Lockhart, Thurmon E; Jones, Mark; Martin, Tom

    2008-10-01

    A clear association has been demonstrated between gait stability and falls in the elderly. Integration of wearable computing and human dynamic stability measures into home automation systems may help differentiate fall-prone individuals in a residential environment. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the capability of a pair of electronic textile (e-textile) pants system to assess local dynamic stability and to differentiate motion-impaired elderly from their healthy counterparts. A pair of e-textile pants comprised of numerous e-TAGs at locations corresponding to lower extremity joints was developed to collect acceleration, angular velocity and piezoelectric data. Four motion-impaired elderly together with nine healthy individuals (both young and old) participated in treadmill walking with a motion capture system simultaneously collecting kinematic data. Local dynamic stability, characterized by maximum Lyapunov exponent, was computed based on vertical acceleration and angular velocity at lower extremity joints for the measurements from both e-textile and motion capture systems. Results indicated that the motion-impaired elderly had significantly higher maximum Lyapunov exponents (computed from vertical acceleration data) than healthy individuals at the right ankle and hip joints. In addition, maximum Lyapunov exponents assessed by the motion capture system were found to be significantly higher than those assessed by the e-textile system. Despite the difference between these measurement techniques, attaching accelerometers at the ankle and hip joints was shown to be an effective sensor configuration. It was concluded that the e-textile pants system, via dynamic stability assessment, has the potential to identify motion-impaired elderly.

  10. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y., E-mail: ding@slac.stanford.edu; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Helml, W. [Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  11. Matching sub-fs electron bunches for laser-driven plasma acceleration at SINBAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J., E-mail: jun.zhu@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Assmann, R.W.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present theoretical and numerical studies of matching sub-femtosecond space-charge-dominated electron bunch into the Laser-plasma Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) foreseen at the SINBAD facility. The longitudinal space-charge (SC) effect induced growths of the energy spread and longitudinal phase-space chirp are major issues in the matching section, which will result in bunch elongation, emittance growth and spot size dilution. In addition, the transverse SC effect would lead to a mismatch of the beam optics if it were not compensated for. Start-to-end simulations and preliminary optimizations were carried out in order to understand the achievable beam parameters at the entrance of the plasma accelerator.

  12. Electron-beam dynamics for an advanced flash-radiography accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-22

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in cell (PIC) codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup (BBU), image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. Beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  13. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron microscopy in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-14

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft, synthetic nanoparticles with a comparative analysis using conventional TEM methods. This comparison is made with the simple aim of describing what is an unprecedented example of in situ imaging by TEM. However, we contend the technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. In this case, particles were studied which were obtained from the direct polymerization of an oxaliplatin analog, designed for an ongoing program in novel chemotherapeutic delivery systems. The resulting nanoparticles provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ, and point toward key design parameters that enable this new characterization approach for organic nanomaterials. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles to- gether with their characterization in liquid water.

  14. Path integral molecular dynamics for exact quantum statistics of multi-electronic-state systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinzijian; Liu, Jian

    2018-03-14

    An exact approach to compute physical properties for general multi-electronic-state (MES) systems in thermal equilibrium is presented. The approach is extended from our recent progress on path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), Liu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024103 (2016)] and Zhang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 147, 034109 (2017)], for quantum statistical mechanics when a single potential energy surface is involved. We first define an effective potential function that is numerically favorable for MES-PIMD and then derive corresponding estimators in MES-PIMD for evaluating various physical properties. Its application to several representative one-dimensional and multi-dimensional models demonstrates that MES-PIMD in principle offers a practical tool in either of the diabatic and adiabatic representations for studying exact quantum statistics of complex/large MES systems when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, Condon approximation, and harmonic bath approximation are broken.

  15. Multiaperture ion beam extraction from gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance source of multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, A.; Dorf, M.; Zorin, V.; Bokhanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Razin, S.; Skalyga, V.; Rossbach, J.; Spaedtke, P.; Balabaev, A.

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source with quasi-gas-dynamic regime of plasma confinement (ReGIS), constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia, provides opportunities for extracting intense and high-brightness multicharged ion beams. Despite the short plasma lifetime in a magnetic trap of a ReGIS, the degree of multiple ionization may be significantly enhanced by the increase in power and frequency of the applied microwave radiation. The present work is focused on studying the intense beam quality of this source by the pepper-pot method. A single beamlet emittance measured by the pepper-pot method was found to be ∼70 π mm mrad, and the total extracted beam current obtained at 14 kV extraction voltage was ∼25 mA. The results of the numerical simulations of ion beam extraction are found to be in good agreement with experimental data

  16. Rapid solidification growth mode transitions in Al-Si alloys by dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehling, John D.; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Gibbs, John W.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Mertens, James C.E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Clarke, Amy J.; McKeown, Joseph T.

    2017-01-01

    In situ dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) imaging of Al-Si thin-film alloys was performed to investigate rapid solidification behavior. Solidification of alloys with compositions from 1 to 15 atomic percent Si was imaged during pulsed laser melting and subsequent solidification. Solely α-Al solidification was observed in Al-1Si and Al-3Si alloys, and solely kinetically modified eutectic growth was observed in Al-6Si and Al-9Si alloys. A transition in the solidification mode in eutectic and hypereutectic alloys (Al-12Si and Al-15Si) from nucleated α-Al dendrites at lower solidification velocities to planar eutectic growth at higher solidification velocities was observed, departing from trends previously seen in laser-track melting experiments. Comparisons of the growth modes and corresponding velocities are compared with previous solidification models, and implications regarding the models are discussed.

  17. Resistivity recovery simulations of electron-irradiated iron: Kinetic Monte Carlo versus cluster dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Torre, J.; Fu, C.-C.; Willaime, F.; Barbu, A.; Bocquet, J.-L.

    2006-01-01

    The isochronal resistivity recovery in high purity α-iron irradiated by electrons was successfully reproduced by a multiscale modelling approach. The stability and mobility of small self-defect clusters determined by ab initio methods were used as input data for an event based Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model, used to explore the defect population evolution during the annealing and to extract the resistivity recovery peaks. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using an efficient mesoscale model, the Cluster Dynamics (CD), instead of KMC in this approach. The comparison between the two methods for various CD initial conditions shows the importance of spatial correlations between defects, which are neglected in the CD model. However, using appropriate initial conditions, e.g. starting from the concentration of Frenkel pairs after the uncorrelated stage I E , the CD model captures the main characteristics of subsequent defect population evolution, and it can therefore be used for fast and semi-quantitative investigations

  18. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder...... gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature...... was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature...

  19. Electronic properties of liquid Hg-In alloys : Ab-initio molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Nalini; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Thakur, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the structural properties of liquid Hg-In alloys. The interatomic interactions are described by ab-initio pseudopotentials given by Troullier and Martins. Three liquid Hg-In alloys (Hg_1_0In_9_0, Hg_3_0In_7_0_,_. Hg_5_0In_5_0, Hg_7_0In_3_0, and Hg_9_0Pb_1_0) at 299 K are considered. The calculated results for liquid Hg (l-Hg) and lead (l-In) are also drawn. Along with the calculated results of considered five liquid alloys of Hg-In alloy. The results obtained from electronic properties namely total density of state and partial density of states help to find the local arrangement of Hg and In atoms and the presence of liquid state in the considered five alloys.

  20. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-28

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  1. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Gupta, Sanjay D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  2. Charging dynamics and strong localization of a two-dimensional electron cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dianoux, R; Smilde, H J H; Marchi, F; Buffet, N; Mur, P; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of charge injection in silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon dioxide matrix is studied using electrostatic force microscopy. We show that the presence of silicon nanocrystals with a density of 10 11 cm -2 is essential for strong localization of charges, and results in exceptional charge retention properties compared to nanocrystal-free SiO 2 samples. In both systems, a logarithmic dependence of the diameter of the charged area on the injection time is experimentally observed on a timescale between 0.1 and 10 s (voltage≤10 V). A field-emission injection, limited by Coulomb blockade and a lateral charge spreading due to a repulsive radial electric field are used to model the sample charging. Once the tip is retracted, the electron cloud is strongly confined in the nanocrystals and remains static

  3. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabhi, Shweta D. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumarsinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar 364001 (India); Gupta, Sanjay D. [V. B. Institute of Science, Department of Physics, C. U. Shah University, Wadhwan City - 363030, Surendranagar (India); Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: prafullaj@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India)

    2014-05-28

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  4. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  5. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A; Rego, Luis G C

    2015-01-01

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron–nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron–hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures. (paper)

  6. Laser-induced electron dynamics including photoionization: A heuristic model within time-dependent configuration interaction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann

    2009-09-21

    We report simulations of laser-pulse driven many-electron dynamics by means of a simple, heuristic extension of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TD-CIS) approach. The extension allows for the treatment of ionizing states as nonstationary states with a finite, energy-dependent lifetime to account for above-threshold ionization losses in laser-driven many-electron dynamics. The extended TD-CIS method is applied to the following specific examples: (i) state-to-state transitions in the LiCN molecule which correspond to intramolecular charge transfer, (ii) creation of electronic wave packets in LiCN including wave packet analysis by pump-probe spectroscopy, and, finally, (iii) the effect of ionization on the dynamic polarizability of H(2) when calculated nonperturbatively by TD-CIS.

  7. To the theory of X-ray and electron dynamic scattering in defect-containing crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukhovskij, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    The novel approach to the X-ray and electron dynamic scattering theory based on the dynamic equations ''in the dispersion surface representation'' is formulated. The formally exact solution of two-wave diffraction scattering problem is obtained using the scattering matrix, the obvious expression for which is found. The general formulae describing the plane wave diffraction scattering in absorbing crystals in the weak distortion range has been obtained. The formulae allows one to determine the total change sign of the displacement function Δα(x,y)=2πg vectorx(R vector (r vector) 1 -R vector(r vector) 2 ) on the base of the known sign of the mean deflection magnitude in a crystal as a whole from the exact Bragg position (g vector - the inverse lattice vector, R vector - the displacement field vector, t - the crystal thickness, R vector(r vector) 1 =R vector (r) ar z=t, R vector(r vector) 2 =R(r) at z=0). In the quasiclassical approximation the formation of the diffraction image of a dislocation positioned in such a way that the dislocation axis is parallel to the diffraction reflection vector is considered for the incident plane and spherical waves

  8. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  9. Rehealable, fully recyclable, and malleable electronic skin enabled by dynamic covalent thermoset nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhanan; Zhu, Chengpu; Li, Yan; Lei, Xingfeng; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jianliang

    2018-02-01

    Electronic skin (e-skin) mimicking functionalities and mechanical properties of natural skin can find broad applications. We report the first dynamic covalent thermoset-based e-skin, which is connected through robust covalent bonds, rendering the resulting devices good chemical and thermal stability at service condition. By doping the dynamic covalent thermoset with conductive silver nanoparticles, we demonstrate a robust yet rehealable, fully recyclable, and malleable e-skin. Tactile, temperature, flow, and humidity sensing capabilities are realized. The e-skin can be rehealed when it is damaged and can be fully recycled at room temperature, which has rarely, if at all, been demonstrated for e-skin. After rehealing or recycling, the e-skin regains mechanical and electrical properties comparable to the original e-skin. In addition, malleability enables the e-skin to permanently conform to complex, curved surfaces without introducing excessive interfacial stresses. These properties of the e-skin yield an economical and eco-friendly technology that can find broad applications in robotics, prosthetics, health care, and human-computer interface.

  10. Dynamic analysis and electronic circuit implementation of a novel 3D autonomous system without linear terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, J.; Jafari, S.; Njitacke, Z. T.; Yousefi Azar Khanian, M.; Cheukem, A.

    2017-11-01

    Mathematical models (ODEs) describing the dynamics of almost all continuous time chaotic nonlinear systems (e.g. Lorenz, Rossler, Chua, or Chen system) involve at least a nonlinear term in addition to linear terms. In this contribution, a novel (and singular) 3D autonomous chaotic system without linear terms is introduced. This system has an especial feature of having two twin strange attractors: one ordinary and one symmetric strange attractor when the time is reversed. The complex behavior of the model is investigated in terms of equilibria and stability, bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponent plots, time series and Poincaré sections. Some interesting phenomena are found including for instance, period-doubling bifurcation, antimonotonicity (i.e. the concurrent creation and annihilation of periodic orbits) and chaos while monitoring the system parameters. Compared to the (unique) case previously reported by Xu and Wang (2014) [31], the system considered in this work displays a more 'elegant' mathematical expression and experiences richer dynamical behaviors. A suitable electronic circuit (i.e. the analog simulator) is designed and used for the investigations. Pspice based simulation results show a very good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  11. High-speed nanoscale characterization of dewetting via dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hihath, Sahar; Santala, Melissa K.; Campbell, Geoffrey; Benthem, Klaus van

    2016-01-01

    The dewetting of thin films can occur in either the solid or the liquid state for which different mass transport mechanisms are expected to control morphological changes. Traditionally, dewetting dynamics have been examined on time scales between several seconds to hours, and length scales ranging between nanometers and millimeters. The determination of mass transport mechanisms on the nanoscale, however, requires nanoscale spatial resolution and much shorter time scales. This study reports the high-speed observation of dewetting phenomena for kinetically constrained Ni thin films on crystalline SrTiO_3 substrates. Movie-mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM) was used for high-speed image acquisition during thin film dewetting at different temperatures. DTEM imaging confirmed that the initial stages of film agglomeration include edge retraction, hole formation, and growth. Finite element modeling was used to simulate temperature distributions within the DTEM samples after laser irradiation with different energies. For pulsed laser irradiation at 18 μJ, experimentally observed hole growth suggests that Marangoni flow dominates hole formation in the liquid nickel film. After irradiation with 13.8 μJ, however, the observations suggest that dewetting was initiated by nucleation of voids followed by hole growth through solid-state surface diffusion.

  12. High-speed nanoscale characterization of dewetting via dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hihath, Sahar [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave., Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave., Davis, California 95616 (United States); Santala, Melissa K.; Campbell, Geoffrey [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Benthem, Klaus van, E-mail: benthem@ucdavis.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Ave., Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-08-28

    The dewetting of thin films can occur in either the solid or the liquid state for which different mass transport mechanisms are expected to control morphological changes. Traditionally, dewetting dynamics have been examined on time scales between several seconds to hours, and length scales ranging between nanometers and millimeters. The determination of mass transport mechanisms on the nanoscale, however, requires nanoscale spatial resolution and much shorter time scales. This study reports the high-speed observation of dewetting phenomena for kinetically constrained Ni thin films on crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. Movie-mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM) was used for high-speed image acquisition during thin film dewetting at different temperatures. DTEM imaging confirmed that the initial stages of film agglomeration include edge retraction, hole formation, and growth. Finite element modeling was used to simulate temperature distributions within the DTEM samples after laser irradiation with different energies. For pulsed laser irradiation at 18 μJ, experimentally observed hole growth suggests that Marangoni flow dominates hole formation in the liquid nickel film. After irradiation with 13.8 μJ, however, the observations suggest that dewetting was initiated by nucleation of voids followed by hole growth through solid-state surface diffusion.

  13. Molecular dynamics-based refinement and validation for sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; McGreevy, Ryan; Stone, John E; Zhao, Jianhua; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-07

    Two structure determination methods, based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) paradigm, are presented that resolve sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps with either single structures or ensembles of such structures. The methods, denoted cascade MDFF and resolution exchange MDFF, sequentially re-refine a search model against a series of maps of progressively higher resolutions, which ends with the original experimental resolution. Application of sequential re-refinement enables MDFF to achieve a radius of convergence of ~25 Å demonstrated with the accurate modeling of β-galactosidase and TRPV1 proteins at 3.2 Å and 3.4 Å resolution, respectively. The MDFF refinements uniquely offer map-model validation and B-factor determination criteria based on the inherent dynamics of the macromolecules studied, captured by means of local root mean square fluctuations. The MDFF tools described are available to researchers through an easy-to-use and cost-effective cloud computing resource on Amazon Web Services.

  14. Single-Particle Dynamics in Electron Storage Rings with Extremely Low Emittance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    Electron storage rings are widely used for high luminosity colliders, damping rings in high-energy linear colliders, and synchrotron light sources. They have become essential facilities to study high-energy physics and material and medical sciences. To further increase the luminosity of colliders or the brightness of synchrotron light sources, the beam emittance is being continually pushed downward, recently to the nanometer region. In the next decade, another order of reduction is expected. This requirement of ultra-low emittance presents many design challenges in beam dynamics, including better analysis of maps and improvement of dynamic apertures. To meet these challenges, we have refined transfer maps of common elements in storage rings and developed a new method to compute the resonance driving terms as they are built up along a beamline. The method is successfully applied to a design of PEP-X as a future light source with 100-pm emittance. As a result, we discovered many unexpected cancelations of the fourth-order resonance terms driven by sextupoles within an achromat.

  15. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mølgaard Mortensen, Peter; Willum Hansen, Thomas; Birkedal Wagner, Jakob; Degn Jensen, Anker

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature difference over the TEM grid is less than 5 °C, at what must be considered typical conditions, and it is concluded that the conditions on the sample grid in the ETEM can be considered as isothermal during general use. - Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics used for mapping flow and temperature in ETEM setup. • Temperature gradient across TEM grid in furnace based heating holder very small in ETEM. • Conduction from TEM grid and gas in addition to radiation from TEM grid most important. • Pressure drop in ETEM limited to the pressure limiting apertures

  16. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  17. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  18. Design, commissioning and operational results of wide dynamic range BPM switched electrode electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.; Doolittle, L.; Ursic, R.; Wagner, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a high-intensity, continuous-wave electron accelerator for nuclear physics. Total acceleration of 4 GeV is achieved by recirculating the beam through two 400-MeV linacs. The operating currents over which the linac beam position monitoring system must meet specifications are 1 μA to 1000 μA. A system was developed in 1994 and installed in the spring of 1995 that switches four electrode signals at 120 kHz through two signal-conditioning chains that use computer-controlled variable gain amplifiers with a dynamic range greater than 80 dB. The system timing was tuned to the machine recirculation period of 4.2 μs so that components of the multipass beam could be resolved in the linacs. Other features of this VME-based system include long-term stability and high-speed data acquisition, which make it suitable for use as both a time-domain diagnostic tool and as part of a variety of beam feedback systems. The computer interface has enough control over the hardware to make a thorough self-calibration and verification-of-operation routine possible. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. Effect of self-interstitial diffusion anisotropy in electron-irradiated zirconium: A cluster dynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christien, F.; Barbu, A.

    2005-01-01

    A model based on the cluster dynamics approach was proposed in [A. Hardouin Duparc, C. Moingeon, N. Smetniansky-de-Grande, A. Barbu, J. Nucl. Mater. 302 (2002) 143] to describe point defect agglomeration in metals under irradiation. This model is restricted to materials where point defect diffusion is isotropic and is thus not applicable to anisotropic metals such as zirconium. Following the approach proposed by Woo [C.H. Woo, J. Nucl. Mater. 159 (1988) 237], we extended in this work the model to the case where self-interstitial atoms (SIA) diffusion is anisotropic. The model was then applied to the loop microstructure evolution of a zirconium thin foil irradiated with electrons in a high-voltage microscope. First, the inputs were validated by comparing the numerical results with Hellio et al. experimental results [C. Hellio, C.H. de Novion, L. Boulanger, J. Nucl. Mater. 159 (1988) 368]. Further calculations were made to evidence the effect of the thin foil orientation on the dislocation loop microstructure under irradiation. The result is that it is possible to reproduce for certain orientations the 'unexpected' vacancy loop growth experimentally observed in electron-irradiated zirconium [M. Griffiths, M.H. Loretto, R.E. Sallmann, J. Nucl. Mater. 115 (1983) 313; J. Nucl. Mater. 115 (1983) 323; Philos. Mag. A 49 (1984) 613]. This effect is directly linked to SIA diffusion anisotropy

  20. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-01

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  1. Atomic and electronic structures of a-SiC:H from tight-binding molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivashchenko, V I; Shevchenko, V I; Ivashchenko, L A; Rusakov, G V

    2003-01-01

    The atomic and electronic properties of amorphous unhydrogenated (a-SiC) and hydrogenated (a-SiC:H) silicon carbides are studied using an sp sup 3 s sup * tight-binding force model with molecular dynamics simulations. The parameters of a repulsive pairwise potential are determined from ab initio pseudopotential calculations. Both carbides are generated from dilute vapours condensed from high temperature, with post-annealing at low temperature for a-SiC:H. A plausible model for the inter-atomic correlations and electronic states in a-SiC:H is suggested. According to this model, the formation of the amorphous network is weakly sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Hydrogen passivates effectively only the weak bonds of threefold-coordinated atoms. Chemical ordering is very much affected by the cooling rate and the structure of the high-temperature vapour. The as-computed characteristics are in rather good agreement with the results for a-SiC and a-Si:H from ab initio calculations.

  2. Effects of parallel dynamics on vortex structures in electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    2011-01-01

    Vortex structures and related heat transport properties in slab electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are comprehensively investigated by means of nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations, with the aim of elucidating the underlying physical mechanisms of the transition from turbulent to coherent states. Numerical results show three different types of vortex structures, i.e., coherent vortex streets accompanied with the transport reduction, turbulent vortices with steady transport, and a zonal-flow-dominated state, depending on the relative magnitude of the parallel compression to the diamagnetic drift. In particular, the formation of coherent vortex streets is correlated with the strong generation of zonal flows for the cases with weak parallel compression, even though the maximum growth rate of linear ETG modes is relatively large. The zonal flow generation in the ETG turbulence is investigated by the modulational instability analysis with a truncated fluid model, where the parallel dynamics such as acoustic modes for electrons is incorporated. The modulational instability for zonal flows is found to be stabilized by the effect of the finite parallel compression. The theoretical analysis qualitatively agrees with secondary growth of zonal flows found in the slab ETG turbulence simulations, where the transition of vortex structures is observed.

  3. Separation of electron and hole dynamics in the semimetal LaSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, F.; Xu, J.; Botana, A. S.; Xiao, Z. L.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, W. G.; Chung, D. Y.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Norman, M. R.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.

    2017-09-01

    We report investigations on the magnetotransport in LaSb, which exhibits extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR). Foremost, we demonstrate that the resistivity plateau can be explained without invoking topological protection. We then determine the Fermi surface from Shubnikov–de Haas (SdH) quantum oscillation measurements and find good agreement with the bulk Fermi pockets derived from first-principles calculations. Using a semiclassical theory and the experimentally determined Fermi pocket anisotropies, we quantitatively describe the orbital magnetoresistance, including its angle dependence.We show that the origin of XMR in LaSb lies in its high mobility with diminishing Hall effect, where the high mobility leads to a strong magnetic-field dependence of the longitudinal magnetoconductance. Unlike a one-band material, when a system has two or more bands (Fermi pockets) with electron and hole carriers, the added conductance arising from the Hall effect is reduced, hence revealing the latent XMR enabled by the longitudinal magnetoconductance. With diminishing Hall effect, the magnetoresistivity is simply the inverse of the longitudinal magnetoconductivity, enabling the differentiation of the electron and hole contributions to the XMR, which varies with the strength and orientation of the magnetic field. This work demonstrates a convenient way to separate the dynamics of the charge carriers and to uncover the origin of XMR in multiband materials with anisotropic Fermi surfaces. Our approach can be readily applied to other XMR materials.

  4. Circularly polarized harmonic generation by intense bicircular laser pulses: electron recollision dynamics and frequency dependent helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Mauger, François; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations for one and two electron cyclic molecules {{{H}}}nq+ exposed to intense bichromatic circularly polarized laser pulses of frequencies {ω }1 and {ω }2, such that {ω }1/{ω }2={n}1/{n}2 (integer) produce circularly polarized high order harmonics with a cut-off recollision maximum energy at and greater than the linear polarization law (in atomic units) {N}m{ω }1={I}p+3.17{U}p, where I p is the ionization potential and {U}p={(2{E}0)}2/4{ω }2 is the ponderomotive energy defined by the field E 0 (intensity I={{cE}}02/8π ) from each pulse and mean frequency ω =({ω }1+{ω }2)/2 . An electron recollision model in a rotating frame at rotating frequency {{Δ }}ω =({ω }1-{ω }2)/2 predicts this simple result as a result of recollision dynamics in a combination of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses. The harmonic helicities and their intensities are shown to depend on compatible symmetries of the net pulse electric fields with that of the molecules.

  5. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc1 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-01

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc1 bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ˜0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  6. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc1 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc 1 bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins

  7. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  8. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A 1 symmetry on the 9a 1 momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing

  9. A nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance study on the dynamics of pentacoordinated organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keijzer, A.E.H. de.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the role of the steric and electronic effects on the fundamental dynamic behaviour of pentacoordinated phosporus compounds is further elaborated. In chapter 2 a variable temperature 13 C NMR study, performed on a series of monocyclic oxyphosphoranes, is presented. The investigations were carried out to determine the influence of the conformational transmission effect on the barriers to pseudorotation in pentacoordinated phosphorus compounds. Chapter 3 also comprises a variable temperature 13 C NMR study on pentacoordinated phosphorus compounds. In this chapter, however, an additional high-resolution 1 H NMR study on the conformational equilibria around the P-O-C-C-O fragments is included. These studies were performed in order to determine whether the enhancement of the reorganization rates around phosphorus is brought about by accelerated pseudorotation or by the involvement of hexacoordinated zwitterionic phosphorus intermediates. In chapter 4, a 31 P NMR study on the solvolysis rate of several phosphinate esters is described. This study was performed in order to determine the influence of the conformational transmission effect on the solvolysis rate of phosphate esters. A number of phosphates is examined in which, during the course of the solvolysis reaction, the conformational transmission effect is bound to be present or absent respectively. Moreover, it is discussed in which way the concept of conformational transmission induced differences in solvolysis rates can be used as a probe to examine the reactions of biologically important phosphate esters. In chapters 5 and 6 ESR studies on the influence of steric and electronic factors on phosphoranyl formation in solution, and on the intramolecular electron transfer in phosphoranyl radicals are presented. (author). 121 refs.; 33 figs.; 17 figs

  10. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymenko, M. V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); Klein, M. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levine, R. D. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Remacle, F., E-mail: fremacle@ulg.ac.be [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-07-14

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  11. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klymenko, M. V.; Klein, M.; Levine, R. D.; Remacle, F.

    2016-01-01

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  12. Impact of Shock Front Rippling and Self-reformation on the Electron Dynamics at Low-Mach-number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongwei; Lu, Quanming; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui

    2018-04-01

    Electron dynamics at low-Mach-number collisionless shocks are investigated by using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various shock normal angles. We found: (1) The reflected ions and incident electrons at the shock front provide an effective mechanism for the quasi-electrostatic wave generation due to the charge-separation. A fraction of incident electrons can be effectively trapped and accelerated at the leading edge of the shock foot. (2) At quasi-perpendicular shocks, the electron trapping and reflection is nonuniform due to the shock rippling along the shock surface and is more likely to take place at some locations accompanied by intense reflected ion-beams. The electron trapping process has a periodical evolution over time due to the shock front self-reformation, which is controlled by ion dynamics. Thus, this is a cross-scale coupling phenomenon. (3) At quasi-parallel shocks, reflected ions can travel far back upstream. Consequently, quasi-electrostatic waves can be excited in the shock transition and the foreshock region. The electron trajectory analysis shows these waves can trap electrons at the foot region and reflect a fraction of them far back upstream. Simulation runs in this paper indicate that the micro-turbulence at the shock foot can provide a possible scenario for producing the reflected electron beam, which is a basic condition for the type II radio burst emission at low-Mach-number interplanetary shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs).

  13. An open-source framework for analyzing N-electron dynamics. II. Hybrid density functional theory/configuration interaction methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Gunter; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2017-10-30

    In this contribution, we extend our framework for analyzing and visualizing correlated many-electron dynamics to non-variational, highly scalable electronic structure method. Specifically, an explicitly time-dependent electronic wave packet is written as a linear combination of N-electron wave functions at the configuration interaction singles (CIS) level, which are obtained from a reference time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation. The procedure is implemented in the open-source Python program detCI@ORBKIT, which extends the capabilities of our recently published post-processing toolbox (Hermann et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2016, 37, 1511). From the output of standard quantum chemistry packages using atom-centered Gaussian-type basis functions, the framework exploits the multideterminental structure of the hybrid TDDFT/CIS wave packet to compute fundamental one-electron quantities such as difference electronic densities, transient electronic flux densities, and transition dipole moments. The hybrid scheme is benchmarked against wave function data for the laser-driven state selective excitation in LiH. It is shown that all features of the electron dynamics are in good quantitative agreement with the higher-level method provided a judicious choice of functional is made. Broadband excitation of a medium-sized organic chromophore further demonstrates the scalability of the method. In addition, the time-dependent flux densities unravel the mechanistic details of the simulated charge migration process at a glance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Molecular dynamics and simulations study on the vibrational and electronic solvatochromism of benzophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Umapathy, Siva, E-mail: umapathy@ipc.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: chandra@bii.a-star.edu.sg [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Verma, Chandra, E-mail: umapathy@ipc.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: chandra@bii.a-star.edu.sg [Bioinformatics Institute - A*STAR, 30 Biopolis Street, # 07-01 Matrix, Singapore 138671 (Singapore); School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2016-02-14

    Solvent plays a key role in diverse physico-chemical and biological processes. Therefore, understanding solute-solvent interactions at the molecular level of detail is of utmost importance. A comprehensive solvatochromic analysis of benzophenone (Bzp) was carried out in various solvents using Raman and electronic spectroscopy, in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations of supramolecular solute-solvent clusters generated using classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations (c-MDSs). The >C=O stretching frequency undergoes a bathochromic shift with solvent polarity. Interestingly, in protic solvents this peak appears as a doublet: c-MDS and ad hoc explicit solvent ab initio calculations suggest that the lower and higher frequency peaks are associated with the hydrogen bonded and dangling carbonyl group of Bzp, respectively. Additionally, the dangling carbonyl in methanol (MeOH) solvent is 4 cm{sup −1} blue-shifted relative to acetonitrile solvent, despite their similar dipolarity/polarizability. This suggests that the cybotactic region of the dangling carbonyl group in MeOH is very different from its bulk solvent structure. Therefore, we propose that this blue-shift of the dangling carbonyl originates in the hydrophobic solvation shell around it resulting from extended hydrogen bonding network of the protic solvents. Furthermore, the 1{sup 1}nπ{sup ∗} (band I) and 1{sup 1}ππ{sup ∗} (band II) electronic transitions show a hypsochromic and bathochromic shift, respectively. In particular, these shifts in protic solvents are due to differences in their excited state-hydrogen bonding mechanisms. Additionally, a linear relationship is obtained for band I and the >C=O stretching frequency (cm{sup −1}), which suggests that the different excitation wavelengths in band I correspond to different solvation states. Therefore, we hypothesize that the variation in excitation wavelengths in band I could arise from different solvation states leading to

  15. Plasma dynamics near an earth satellite and neutralization of its electric charge during electron beam injection into the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamics of the ionospheric plasma in the vicinity of an earth satellite injecting an electron beam. The time evolution of the electric charge of the satellite is determined. The electric potential of the satellite is found to be well below the beam-cutoff potential. It is shown that, under conditions typical of active experiments in space, the plasma electrons are capable of neutralizing the satellite's charge

  16. Effects of temperature and isotopic substitution on electron attachment dynamics of guanine–cytosine base pair: Ring-polymer and classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, Yusuke; Seki, Yusuke [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Takayanagi, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tako@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Shiga, Motoyuki [Center for Computational Science and E-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 148-4, Kashiwanoha Campus, 178-4 Wakashiba, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0871 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Dynamics of excess electron attachment to guanine–cytosine base pair. • Ring-polymer and classical molecular dynamics simulations are performed. • Temperature and isotope substitution effects are investigated. - Abstract: The dynamical process of electron attachment to a guanine–cytosine pair in the normal (h-GC) and deuterated (d-GC) forms has been studied theoretically by semiclassical ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) simulations using the empirical valence bond model. The initially formed dipole-bound anion is converted rapidly to the valence-bound anion within about 0.1 ps in both h-GC and d-GC. However, the subsequent proton transfer in h-GC occurs with a rate five times greater than the deuteron transfer in d-GC. The change of rates with isotopic substitution and temperature variation in the RPMD simulations are quantitatively and qualitatively different from those in the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, demonstrating the importance of nuclear quantum effects on the dynamics of this system.

  17. Effects of temperature and isotopic substitution on electron attachment dynamics of guanine–cytosine base pair: Ring-polymer and classical molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoshima, Yusuke; Seki, Yusuke; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of excess electron attachment to guanine–cytosine base pair. • Ring-polymer and classical molecular dynamics simulations are performed. • Temperature and isotope substitution effects are investigated. - Abstract: The dynamical process of electron attachment to a guanine–cytosine pair in the normal (h-GC) and deuterated (d-GC) forms has been studied theoretically by semiclassical ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) simulations using the empirical valence bond model. The initially formed dipole-bound anion is converted rapidly to the valence-bound anion within about 0.1 ps in both h-GC and d-GC. However, the subsequent proton transfer in h-GC occurs with a rate five times greater than the deuteron transfer in d-GC. The change of rates with isotopic substitution and temperature variation in the RPMD simulations are quantitatively and qualitatively different from those in the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, demonstrating the importance of nuclear quantum effects on the dynamics of this system.

  18. Dynamical simulation of electron transfer processes in self-assembled monolayers at metal surfaces using a density matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucker, V.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.; Coto, P. B.

    2018-03-01

    A single-particle density matrix approach is introduced to simulate the dynamics of heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) processes at interfaces. The characterization of the systems is based on a model Hamiltonian parametrized by electronic structure calculations and a partitioning method. The method is applied to investigate ET in a series of nitrile-substituted (poly)(p-phenylene)thiolate self-assembled monolayers adsorbed at the Au(111) surface. The results show a significant dependence of the ET on the orbital symmetry of the donor state and on the molecular and electronic structure of the spacer.

  19. Dynamical simulation of electron transfer processes in self-assembled monolayers at metal surfaces using a density matrix approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucker, V; Bockstedte, M; Thoss, M; Coto, P B

    2018-03-28

    A single-particle density matrix approach is introduced to simulate the dynamics of heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) processes at interfaces. The characterization of the systems is based on a model Hamiltonian parametrized by electronic structure calculations and a partitioning method. The method is applied to investigate ET in a series of nitrile-substituted (poly)(p-phenylene)thiolate self-assembled monolayers adsorbed at the Au(111) surface. The results show a significant dependence of the ET on the orbital symmetry of the donor state and on the molecular and electronic structure of the spacer.

  20. Electron-spin dynamics in Mn-doped GaAs using time-resolved magneto-optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, I. A.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Korenev, V. L.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Zhukov, E. A.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2009-08-01

    We study the electron-spin dynamics in p -type GaAs doped with magnetic Mn acceptors by means of time-resolved pump-probe and photoluminescence techniques. Measurements in transverse magnetic fields show a long spin-relaxation time of 20 ns that can be uniquely related to electrons. Application of weak longitudinal magnetic fields above 100 mT extends the spin-relaxation times up to microseconds which is explained by suppression of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus spin relaxation for the electron on the Mn acceptor.

  1. Radiation belt seed population and its association with the relativistic electron dynamics: A statistical study: Radiation Belt Seed Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C. L.; Wang, Y. X.; Ni, B.; Zhang, J.-C.

    2017-01-01

    Using the Van Allen Probes data, we study the radiation belt seed population and it associated with the relativistic electron dynamics during 74 geomagnetic storm events. Based on the flux changes of 1 MeV electrons before and after the storm peak, these storm events are divided into two groups of “non-preconditioned” and “preconditioned”. The statistical study shows that the storm intensity is of significant importance for the distribution of the seed population (336 keV electrons) in the outer radiation belt. However, substorm intensity can also be important to the evolution of the seed population for some geomagnetic storm events. For non-preconditioned storm events, the correlation between the peak fluxes and their L-shell locations of the seed population and relativistic electrons (592 keV, 1.0 MeV, 1.8 MeV, and 2.1 MeV) is consistent with the energy-dependent dynamic processes in the outer radiation belt. For preconditioned storm events, the correlation between the features of the seed population and relativistic electrons is not fully consistent with the energy-dependent processes. It is suggested that the good correlation between the radiation belt seed population and ≤1.0 MeV electrons contributes to the prediction of the evolution of ≤1.0 MeV electrons in the Earth’s outer radiation belt during periods of geomagnetic storms.

  2. Electron and photon reconstruction and performance in ATLAS using a dynamical, topological cell clustering-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The electron and photon reconstruction in ATLAS has moved towards the use of a dynamical, topo- logical cell-based approach for cluster building, owing to advancements in the calibration procedure which allow for such a method to be applied. The move to this new technique allows for improved measurements of electron and photon energies, particularly in situations where an electron radiates a bremsstrahlung photon, or a photon converts to an electron-poistron pair. This note details the changes to the ATLAS electron and photon reconstruction software, and assesses its performance under current LHC luminosity conditions using simulated data. Changes to the converted photon reconstruction are also detailed, which improve the reconstruction efficiency of double-track converted photons, as well as reducing the reconstruction of spurious one-track converted photons. The performance of the new reconstruction algorithm is also presented in a number of important topologies relevant to precision Standard Model physics,...

  3. Can Excited State Electronic Coherence Be Tuned via Molecular Structural Modification? A First-Principles Quantum Electronic Dynamics Study of Pyrazolate-Bridged Pt(II) Dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingerfelt, David B.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Radler, Joseph J.; Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Kim, Pyosang; Castellano, Felix N.; Chen, Lin X.; Li, Xiaosong

    2017-02-24

    Materials and molecular systems exhibiting long-lived electronic coherence can facilitate coherent transport, opening the door to efficient charge and energy transport beyond traditional methods. Recently, signatures of a possible coherent, recurrent electronic motion were identified in femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy experiments on a binuclear platinum complex, where a persistent periodic beating in the transient absorption signal’s anisotropy was observed. In this study, we investigate the excitonic dynamics that underlie the suspected electronic coherence for a series of binuclear platinum complexes exhibiting a range of interplatinum distances. Results suggest that the long-lived coherence can only result when competitive electronic couplings are in balance. At longer Pt-Pt distances, the electronic couplings between the two halves of the binuclear system weaken, and exciton localization and recombination is favored on short time scales. For short Pt-Pt distances, electronic couplings between the states in the coherent superposition are stronger than the coupling with other excitonic states, leading to long-lived coherence.

  4. Combined convective and diffusive modeling of the ring current and radiation belt electron dynamics using the VERB-4D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, N.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.; Kellerman, A. C.; Wang, D.

    2017-12-01

    Ring current and radiation belts are key elements in the global dynamics of the Earth's magnetosphere. Comprehensive mathematical models are useful tools that allow us to understand the multiscale dynamics of these charged particle populations. In this work, we present results of simulations of combined ring current - radiation belt electron dynamics using the four-dimensional Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB-4D) code. The VERB-4D code solves the modified Fokker-Planck equation including convective terms and models simultaneously ring current (1 - 100 keV) and radiation belt (100 keV - several MeV) electron dynamics. We apply the code to the number of geomagnetic storms that occurred in the past, compare the results with different satellite observations, and show how low-energy particles can affect the high-energy populations. Particularly, we use data from Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) mission that provides a very good MLT coverage with 1.5-hour time resolution. The POES data allow us to validate the approach of the VERB-4D code for modeling MLT-dependent processes such as electron drift, wave-particle interactions, and magnetopause shadowing. We also show how different simulation parameters and empirical models can affect the results, making a particular emphasis on the electric and magnetic field models. This work will help us reveal advantages and disadvantages of the approach behind the code and determine its prediction efficiency.

  5. Dynamic shock compaction of a ZrO2-RuO2 electronic nanocomposite: toward functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zyl, W.E.; Carton, Erik P.; Raming, T.P.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Verweij, H.

    2005-01-01

    An electronic ZrO2-RuO2 nanocomposite was fabricated by dynamic compaction (DC) at 1.5 GPa resulting in a maximum relative density of 88% in the material. The DC process formed pristine elongated conical-shaped compacts 3 cm in length. The compacts retained their original nanometer-sized grains (~20

  6. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model...

  7. Electronic structure and core-level spectra of light actinide dioxides in the dynamical mean-field theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolorenč, Jindřich; Shick, Alexander; Lichtenstein, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 8 (2015), "085125-1"-"085125-10" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-05872J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electronic-structure calculations * dynamical mean-field theory * Mott insulators * actinides * oxides * photoemission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  8. Reusability of coded data in the primary care electronic medical record : A dynamic cohort study concerning cancer diagnoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, Annet; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Helsper, Charles W.; Numans, Mattijs E.

    Objectives: To assess quality and reusability of coded cancer diagnoses in routine primary care data. To identify factors that influence data quality and areas for improvement. Methods: A dynamic cohort study in a Dutch network database containing 250,000 anonymized electronic medical records (EMRs)

  9. Characterising thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors through dynamic electrothermal measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a method to characterise thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through dynamic electrothermal measurements. A measured relation between RF gain and the channel temperature (Tc) is formed and used for indirect measurements...

  10. The Primary Care Electronic Library: RSS feeds using SNOMED-CT indexing for dynamic content delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Judas; de Lusignan, Simon; Kostkova, Patty; Madge, Bruce; Marsh, A; Biniaris, C

    2006-01-01

    Rich Site Summary (RSS) feeds are a method for disseminating and syndicating the contents of a website using extensible mark-up language (XML). The Primary Care Electronic Library (PCEL) distributes recent additions to the site in the form of an RSS feed. When new resources are added to PCEL, they are manually assigned medical subject headings (MeSH terms), which are then automatically mapped to SNOMED-CT terms using the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. The library is thus searchable using MeSH or SNOMED-CT. Our syndicate partner wished to have remote access to PCEL coronary heart disease (CHD) information resources based on SNOMED-CT search terms. To pilot the supply of relevant information resources in response to clinically coded requests, using RSS syndication for transmission between web servers. Our syndicate partner provided a list of CHD SNOMED-CT terms to its end-users, a list which was coded according to UMLS specifications. When the end-user requested relevant information resources, this request was relayed from our syndicate partner's web server to the PCEL web server. The relevant resources were retrieved from the PCEL MySQL database. This database is accessed using a server side scripting language (PHP), which enables the production of dynamic RSS feeds on the basis of Source Asserted Identifiers (CODEs) contained in UMLS. Retrieving resources using SNOMED-CT terms using syndication can be used to build a functioning application. The process from request to display of syndicated resources took less than one second. The results of the pilot illustrate that it is possible to exchange data between servers using RSS syndication. This method could be utilised dynamically to supply digital library resources to a clinical system with SNOMED-CT data used as the standard of reference.

  11. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  12. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  13. Dynamic investigation of electron trapping and charge decay in electron-irradiated Al sub 2 O sub 3 in a scanning electron microscope: Methodology and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhfakh, S; Belhaj, M; Fakhfakh, Z; Kallel, A; Rau, E I

    2002-01-01

    The charging and discharging of polycrystalline Al sub 2 O sub 3 submitted to electron-irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are investigated by means of the displacement current method. To circumvent experimental shortcomings inherent to the use of the basic sample holder, a redesign of the latter is proposed and tests are carried out to verify its operation. The effects of the primary beam accelerating voltage on charging, flashover and discharging phenomena during and after electron-irradiation are studied. The experimental results are then analyzed. In particular, the divergence between the experimental data and those predicted by the total electron emission yield approach (TEEYA) is discussed. A partial discharge was observed immediately after the end of the electron-irradiation exposure. The experimental data suggests, that the discharge is due to the evacuation to the ground, along the insulator surface, of released electrons from shallow traps at (or in the close vicinity of) the insulat...

  14. The Properties of Lion Roars and Electron Dynamics in Mirror Mode Waves Observed by the Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuillard, H.; Le Contel, O.; Chust, T.; Berthomier, M.; Retino, A.; Turner, D. L.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Cozzani, G.; Catapano, F.; Alexandrova, A.; Mirioni, L.; Graham, D. B.; Argall, M. R.; Fischer, D.; Wilder, F. D.; Gershman, D. J.; Varsani, A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Marklund, G.; Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K. A.; Ahmadi, N.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Needell, G.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bromund, K. R.; Wei, H.; Plaschke, F.; Anderson, B. J.; Le, G.; Moore, T. E.; Giles, B. L.; Paterson, W. R.; Pollock, C. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Avanov, L. A.; Saito, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Fennell, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    Mirror mode waves are ubiquitous in the Earth's magnetosheath, in particular behind the quasi-perpendicular shock. Embedded in these nonlinear structures, intense lion roars are often observed. Lion roars are characterized by whistler wave packets at a frequency ˜100 Hz, which are thought to be generated in the magnetic field minima. In this study, we make use of the high time resolution instruments on board the Magnetospheric MultiScale mission to investigate these waves and the associated electron dynamics in the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath on 22 January 2016. We show that despite a core electron parallel anisotropy, lion roars can be generated locally in the range 0.05-0.2fce by the perpendicular anisotropy of electrons in a particular energy range. We also show that intense lion roars can be observed up to higher frequencies due to the sharp nonlinear peaks of the signal, which appear as sharp spikes in the dynamic spectra. As a result, a high sampling rate is needed to estimate correctly their amplitude, and the latter might have been underestimated in previous studies using lower time resolution instruments. We also present for the first-time 3-D high time resolution electron velocity distribution functions in mirror modes. We demonstrate that the dynamics of electrons trapped in the mirror mode structures are consistent with the Kivelson and Southwood (1996) model. However, these electrons can also interact with the embedded lion roars: first signatures of electron quasi-linear pitch angle diffusion and possible signatures of nonlinear interaction with high-amplitude wave packets are presented. These processes can lead to electron untrapping from mirror modes.

  15. Recent results on solvation dynamics of electron and spur reactions of solvated electron in polar solvents studied by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report several studies done recently at ELYSE laboratory on the solvation dynamics of electron and on the kinetics of solvated electron in the spur reactions, performed by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis, respectively. Solvated electrons have been produced in polyol (1,2-Etanediol, 1,2-Propanediol and 1,3-Propanediol) by two-photon ionization of the solvent with 263 nm femtosecond laser pulses at room temperature. The two-photon absorption coefficient of these solvents at 263 nm has been determined. The dynamics of electron solvation in polyols has been studied by pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy. So, time resolved absorption spectra ranging from 430 to 720 nm have been measured (Figure 1). A blue shift of the spectra is observed for the first tens of picoseconds. Using Bayesian data analysis method, the observed solvation dynamics are reconstructed with different models: stepwise mechanisms, continuous relaxation models or combinations of stepwise and continuous relaxation. That analysis clearly indicates that it is not obvious to select a unique model to describe the solvation dynamics of electron in diols. We showed that several models are able to reproduce correctly the data: a two-step model, a heterogeneous or bi-exponential continuous relaxation model and even a hybrid model with a stepwise transition and homogeneous continuous relaxation. Nevertheless, the best fits are given by the continuous spectral relaxation models. The fact that the time-evolution of the absorption spectrum of the solvated electron in diols can be accurately described by the temperature dependent absorption spectrum of the ground state solvated electron suggests that the spectral blue shift is mostly caused by the continuous relaxation of the electron trapped in a large distribution of solvent cages. Similar trends on electron solvation dynamics are observed in the cases of 1,2-ethanediol, 1,3-propanediol and 1,2 propanediol

  16. Beyond the electronic textbook model: software techniques to make on-line educational content dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M S; Dreyer, K

    2001-06-01

    We describe a working software technology that enables educators to incorporate their expertise and teaching style into highly interactive and Socratic educational material for distribution on the world wide web. A graphically oriented interactive authoring system was developed to enable the computer novice to create and store within a database his or her domain expertise in the form of electronic knowledge. The authoring system supports and facilitates the input and integration of several types of content, including free-form, stylized text, miniature and full-sized images, audio, and interactive questions with immediate feedback. The system enables the choreography and sequencing of these entities for display within a web page as well as the sequencing of entire web pages within a case-based or thematic presentation. Images or segments of text can be hyperlinked with point-and-click to other entities such as adjunctive web pages, audio, or other images, cases, or electronic chapters. Miniature (thumbnail) images are automatically linked to their full-sized counterparts. The authoring system contains a graphically oriented word processor, an image editor, and capabilities to automatically invoke and use external image-editing software such as Photoshop. The system works in both local area network (LAN) and internet-centric environments. An internal metalanguage (invisible to the author but stored with the content) was invented to represent the choreographic directives that specify the interactive delivery of the content on the world wide web. A database schema was developed to objectify and store both this electronic knowledge and its associated choreographic metalanguage. A database engine was combined with page-rendering algorithms in order to retrieve content from the database and deliver it on the web in a Socratic style, assess the recipient's current fund of knowledge, and provide immediate feedback, thus stimulating in-person interaction with a human expert

  17. Electronic, Optical, and Lattice Dynamical Properties of Tetracalcium Trialuminate (Ca4Al6O13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayue Mei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties of tetracalcium trialuminate (Ca4Al6O13 with a special sodalite cage structure were calculated based on the density functional theory. Theoretical results show that Ca4Al6O13 is ductile and weakly anisotropic. The calculated Young’s modulus and Poisson ratio are 34.18 GPa and 0.32, respectively. Ca4Al6O13 is an indirect-gap semiconductor with a band gap of 5.41 eV. The top of the valence band derives from O 2p states, and the bottom of conduction band consists of Ca 3d states. Transitions from O 2p, 2s states to empty Ca 4s, 3d and Al 3s, 3p states constitute the major peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function. Ca4Al6O13 is a good UV absorber for photoelectric devices due to the high absorption coefficient and low reflectivity. The lattice vibration analysis reveals that O atoms contribute to the high-frequency portions of the phonon spectra, while Ca and Al atoms make important contributions to the middle- and low-frequency portions. At the center of the first Brillouin zone, lattice vibrations include the Raman active modes (E, A1, infrared active mode (T2, and silentmodes (T1, A2. Typical atomic displacement patterns were also investigated to understand the vibration modes more intuitively.

  18. Dynamic susceptibility of a free electron gas in a D dimensions and its analytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1990-01-01

    Properties of the free electron susceptibility as a complex function of a wave vector k and a complex frequency ω are examined. Dimensionality D of the space plays a role of a parameter, which may assume noninteger values also. While for general D the susceptibility is obtained in terms of hypergeometric functions, for integer D it can be reduced to a combination of elementary functions. A singular behavior at the points of non-analyticity ω = k modul 1±k/2 is investigated; with increasing D the singularity becomes weaker. A continued fraction representation is obtained and approximations to the susceptibility, based on it, are proposed. The Hartree-Fock static structure factor is obtained as a function of both k and D. An important for applications problem of frequency integration of the dynamic structure factor of interacting-particle systems is investigated. Explicit expressions for integration along the imaginary axis, ready for numerical work, are obtained for D = 3 and 2. (author). 20 refs

  19. Ultrafast electron-lattice coupling dynamics in VO2 and V2O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Elsa; Gilbert Corder, Stephanie N.; Yun, Sun Jin; Wang, Siming; Ramírez, Juan Gabriel; West, Kevin; Zhang, Jingdi; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Schuller, Ivan K.; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Liu, Mengkun; Averitt, Richard D.

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast optical pump-optical probe and optical pump-terahertz probe spectroscopy were performed on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3 ) thin films over a wide temperature range. A comparison of the experimental data from these two different techniques and two different vanadium oxides, in particular a comparison of the spectral weight oscillations generated by the photoinduced longitudinal acoustic modulation, reveals the strong electron-phonon coupling that exists in both materials. The low-energy Drude response of V2O3 appears more amenable than VO2 to ultrafast strain control. Additionally, our results provide a measurement of the temperature dependence of the sound velocity in both systems, revealing a four- to fivefold increase in VO2 and a three- to fivefold increase in V2O3 across the insulator-to-metal phase transition. Our data also confirm observations of strong damping and phonon anharmonicity in the metallic phase of VO2, and suggest that a similar phenomenon might be at play in the metallic phase of V2O3 . More generally, our simple table-top approach provides relevant and detailed information about dynamical lattice properties of vanadium oxides, paving the way to similar studies in other complex materials.

  20. A comprehensive spectral theory of zonal-mode dynamics in trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Gatto, R.; Baver, D.A.; Fernandez, E.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive, self-consistent theory for spectral dynamics in trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence offers critical new understanding and insights into zonal-mode physics. This theory shows that 1) zonal mode structure, anisotropy, excitation, and temporal behavior arise at and from the interface of nonlinear advection and linear wave properties; 2) waves induce a marked spectral energy-transfer anisotropy that preferentially drives zonal modes relative to non zonal modes; 3) triplet correlations involving density (as opposed to those involving only flow) mediate the dominant energy transfer at long wavelengths; 4) energy transfer becomes inverse in the presence of wave anisotropy, where otherwise it is forward; 5) zonal-mode excitation is accompanied by excitation of a spectrum of damped eigenmodes, making zonal modes nonlinearly damped; and 6) the combination of anisotropic transfer to zonal modes and their nonlinear damping make this the dominant saturation mechanism for TEM turbulence. This accounts for the reduction of turbulence level by zonal modes, not zonal-flow ExB shearing. (author)

  1. Antwerp Advanced Study Institute on Electronic Structure, Dynamics and Quantum Structural Properties of Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Camp, Piet

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 Advanced Study Institute on "Electronic Structure, Dynamics and Quantum Structural Properties of Condensed Matter" took place at the Corsendonk Conference Center, close to the City of Antwerpen, from July 16 till 27, 1984. This NATO Advanced Study Institute was motivated by the research in my Institute, where, in 1971, a project was started on "ab-initio" phonon calculations in Silicon. I~ is my pleasure to thank several instances and people who made this ASI possible. First of all, the sponsor of the Institute, the NATO Scientific Committee. Next, the co-sponsors: Agfa-Gevaert, Bell Telephone Mfg. Co. N.V., C & A, Esso Belgium·, CDC Belgium, Janssens Pharmaceutica, Kredietbank and the Scientific Office of the U.S. Army. Special thanks are due to Dr. P. Van Camp and Drs. H. Nachtegaele, who, over several months, prepared the practical aspects of the ASI with the secretarial help of Mrs. R.-M. Vandekerkhof. I also like to. thank Mrs. M. Cuyvers who prepared and organized the subject and material ...

  2. Three-body dynamical interference in electron and positron collision with positronium atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ghanbari Adivi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this project, the Faddeev-Watson-Lovelace (FWL formalism is generalized to large scattering angles. The angular range includes 0-180 degrees. Using this method, the charge transfer differential cross-sections are calculated, in a second-order approximation, for collision of energetic positrons and electrons with neutral positronium atoms. In this approximation, the rearrangement amplitude contains two first-order and three second-order partial amplitudes. The first first-order term is the Born amplitude in a first-order approximation. The second one corresponds to capturing the transferred particle without perturbing the state of this particle. This term, in fact, describes a knock-on process. Since the masses of the particles and the absolute values of their charges are equal, one expects that the second-order terms be similar in magnitude. This aspect causes the instructive interference of the partial amplitudes in some angles and destructive interference in some others. However, it is predicted that these amplitudes have local maxima in direction of the recoiling of the projectile. In order to investigate this situation, the second-order partial amplitudes are calculated and their relations with the parity of the initial and final states of the scattering system are analyzed. In particular, the role of dynamical interference of these partial amplitudes in creation of the kinematical peak and the peak corresponding to the knock-on scattering in angular distribution of the differential cross sections is investigated.

  3. Dynamics of coupled electron-nuclei-systems in laser fields; Dynamik gekoppelter Elektronen-Kern-Systeme in Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falge, Mirjam

    2012-07-01

    This work aimed at the theoretical analysis of high harmonic generation in molecules and the influence of coupled electron and nuclear dynamics on ultra-short pulse ionization processes. In the first part of this thesis, the isotope effect and influence of vibrational excitation on high harmonic generation were investigated for the isotope pairs H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}. It was shown that on the one hand high harmonic intensities strongly depend on the vibrational quantum number of the initial state of the water molecule and on the other hand the spectra of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O exhibit a clear isotope effect for certain vibrationally excited states. Also it was shown that high harmonics of vibrationally excited states show an even more pronounced isotope effect than the ground state. The second and third part of this work treats the influence of coupled electron and nuclear dynamics on photoelectron spectra. In order to facilitate a numerically exact description of this dynamics, a simple one-dimensional model system (Shin-Metiu model) was used. It consists of only a single electronic and nuclear degree-of-freedom and allows for a switching between adiabatic and strongly non-adiabatic dynamics by its parameterization. This model served for the analysis of the dynamics of three different cases ranging from weak over intermediate to strong electron-nuclear coupling. To investigate the influence of non-adiabatic effects on photoelectron spectra, time-resolved photoelectron spectra were calculated applying two methods: a numerically exact treatment and an adiabatic approach neglecting the electron-nuclear coupling. Subsequently, the dependence of the efficiency of a non-adiabatic transition on the nuclear mass was analysed. To this end, the population dynamics and photoelectron spectra were calculated numerically exactly for a strong electron and nuclear coupling. Thereafter the asymmetry in forward and backward direction of time

  4. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.; Regeta, K.; Gorfinkiel, J.D.; Masin, Z.; Grimme, S.; Bannwarth, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: 1) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, 2) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and 3) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds. (authors)

  5. Dynamic simulation of charging processes in polar dielectrics irradiated by the electron bunches of middle level energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslovskaya, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays the scanning electron microscopy techniques are widely used practically in condenser matter physics to study properties and structure of solids. The electron probe of scanning electron microscope is not merely a passive indicator of the geometrical or potential profile of the sample surface, but also the source producing ionizing, electric and thermal action on the sample. The application of raster electron methods to polar materials, responding to electric and heat exposures of the electron bunches allows us to get a response and create new modes of image formation. Let assume, that a sample surface of dielectric is irradiated by thin focused electron bunches of middle level energy (with order 1÷50 keV). When electrons bombard the dielectric sample the accumulation of absorbed electrons occurs. As a result generated charged areas can irregular drift the initial bunches. Charging effect occurs at any magnifications and any actual probe current. This work considers the results of dynamic simulation of charging process in polar dielectrics under the investigation with the scanning electron microscope. The purpose of present study is design and model implementation of three-dimensional dynamic model of charge relaxation in polar materials irradiated by electron bunches of middle level energy. The mathematical problem definition is given by the system of the continuity equation and Poisson equation. Final system of equations was modified in terms of intrinsic radiation-induced conductivity in sample as well as cylindrical symmetry of the problem. The simulation is based on numerical method solving of boundary problem for partial derivative equation system. In addition the initial electron distribution is determined by Monte-Carlo method using the programming implementation. To solve this problem we used the computational methods of solution of nonstationary mathematical physics problem such as finite difference method and finite element method realized with

  6. Structural, dynamic, electronic, and vibrational properties of flexible, intermediate, and stressed rigid As-Se glasses and liquids from first principles molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchy, M.; Kachmar, A.; Micoulaut, M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, electronic, and dynamic properties of amorphous and liquid As x Se 1-x (0.10 Dynamics. Within the above range of compositions, thresholds, and anomalies are found in the behavior of reciprocal and real space properties that can be correlated to the experimental location of the Boolchand intermediate phase in these glassy networks, observed at 0.27 dynamical atomic-scale fingerprints for the onset of rigidity within the network, while also providing a much more complex picture than the one derived from mean-field approaches of stiffness transitions

  7. Structural, dynamic, electronic, and vibrational properties of flexible, intermediate, and stressed rigid As-Se glasses and liquids from first principles molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauchy, M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1593 (United States); Kachmar, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Micoulaut, M., E-mail: mmi@lptl.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-11-21

    The structural, vibrational, electronic, and dynamic properties of amorphous and liquid As{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} (0.10 Dynamics. Within the above range of compositions, thresholds, and anomalies are found in the behavior of reciprocal and real space properties that can be correlated to the experimental location of the Boolchand intermediate phase in these glassy networks, observed at 0.27 dynamical atomic-scale fingerprints for the onset of rigidity within the network, while also providing a much more complex picture than the one derived from mean-field approaches of stiffness transitions.

  8. Electron charge and spin delocalization revealed in the optically probed longitudinal and transverse spin dynamics in n -GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belykh, V. V.; Kavokin, K. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of the electron spin dynamics as consequence of carrier delocalization in n -type GaAs is investigated by the recently developed extended pump-probe Kerr/Faraday rotation spectroscopy. We find that isolated electrons localized on donors demonstrate a prominent difference between the longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates in a magnetic field, which is almost absent in the metallic phase. The inhomogeneous transverse dephasing time T2* of the spin ensemble strongly increases upon electron delocalization as a result of motional narrowing that can be induced by increasing either the donor concentration or the temperature. An unexpected relation between T2* and the longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 is found, namely, that their product is about constant, as explained by the magnetic field effect on the spin diffusion. We observe a two-stage longitudinal spin relaxation, which suggests the establishment of spin temperature in the system of exchange-coupled donor-bound electrons.

  9. Visualizing Surface Plasmons with Photons, Photoelectrons, and Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Gong, Yu; Hage, F. S.; Cottom, J.; Joly, Alan G.; Brydson, R.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-06-21

    Both photons and electrons may be used to excite surface plasmon polaritons, the collective charge density fluctuations at the surface of metal nanostructures. By virtue of their nanoscopic and dissipative nature, a detailed characterization of surface plasmon (SP) eigenmodes in real space-time ultimately requires joint sub-nanometer spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. The latter realization has driven significant developments in the past few years, aimed at interrogating both localized and propagating SP modes over the relevant length and time scales. In this mini-review, we briefly highlight different techniques we employ to visualize the enhanced electric fields associated with SPs. Specifically, we discuss recent hyperspectral optical microscopy, tip-enhanced Raman nano-spectroscopy, nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy, as well as correlated scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements targeting prototypical plasmonic nanostructures and constructs. Through selected practical examples, we examine the information content in multidimensional images recorded by taking advantage of each of the aforementioned techniques. In effect, we illustrate how SPs can be visualized at the ultimate limits of space and time.

  10. Dynamics of electron solvation in I-(CH3OH)n clusters (4 ≤n≤ 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Ryan M.; Yandell, Margaret A.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of electron solvation following excitation of the charge-transfer-to-solvent precursor state in iodide-doped methanol clusters, I - (CH 3 OH) n=4-11 , are studied with time-resolved photoelectron imaging. This excitation produces a I ... (CH 3 OH) n - cluster that is unstable with respect to electron autodetachment and whose autodetachment lifetime increases monotonically from ∼800 fs to 85 ps as n increases from 4 to 11. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) and width of the excited state feature in the photoelectron spectrum show complex time dependence during the lifetime of this state. The VDE decreases over the first 100-400 fs, then rises exponentially to a maximum with a ∼1 ps time constant, and finally decreases by as much as 180 meV with timescales of 3-20 ps. The early dynamics are associated with electron transfer from the iodide to the methanol cluster, while the longer-time changes in VDE are attributed to solvent reordering, possibly in conjunction with ejection of neutral iodine from the cluster. Changes in the observed width of the spectrum largely follow those of the VDEs; the dynamics of both are attributed to the major rearrangement of the solvent cluster during relaxation. The relaxation dynamics are interpreted as a reorientation of at least one methanol molecule and the disruption and formation of the solvent network in order to accommodate the excess charge.

  11. Dynamics of electron solvation in I(-)(CH3OH)n clusters (4 ≤ n ≤ 11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan M; Yandell, Margaret A; Neumark, Daniel M

    2011-03-28

    The dynamics of electron solvation following excitation of the charge-transfer-to-solvent precursor state in iodide-doped methanol clusters, I(-)(CH(3)OH)(n = 4-11), are studied with time-resolved photoelectron imaging. This excitation produces a I···(CH(3)OH)(n)(-) cluster that is unstable with respect to electron autodetachment and whose autodetachment lifetime increases monotonically from ~800 fs to 85 ps as n increases from 4 to 11. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) and width of the excited state feature in the photoelectron spectrum show complex time dependence during the lifetime of this state. The VDE decreases over the first 100-400 fs, then rises exponentially to a maximum with a ~1 ps time constant, and finally decreases by as much as 180 meV with timescales of 3-20 ps. The early dynamics are associated with electron transfer from the iodide to the methanol cluster, while the longer-time changes in VDE are attributed to solvent reordering, possibly in conjunction with ejection of neutral iodine from the cluster. Changes in the observed width of the spectrum largely follow those of the VDEs; the dynamics of both are attributed to the major rearrangement of the solvent cluster during relaxation. The relaxation dynamics are interpreted as a reorientation of at least one methanol molecule and the disruption and formation of the solvent network in order to accommodate the excess charge.

  12. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrogen on lead films: An ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saalfrank, Peter [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Juaristi, J. I. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Alducin, M.; Muiño, R. Díez [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Blanco-Rey, M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-12-21

    Using density functional theory and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Electronic Friction (AIMDEF), we study the adsorption and dissipative vibrational dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on free-standing lead films of increasing thickness. Lead films are known for their oscillatory behaviour of certain properties with increasing thickness, e.g., energy and electron spillout change in discontinuous manner, due to quantum size effects [G. Materzanini, P. Saalfrank, and P. J. D. Lindan, Phys. Rev. B 63, 235405 (2001)]. Here, we demonstrate that oscillatory features arise also for hydrogen when chemisorbed on lead films. Besides stationary properties of the adsorbate, we concentrate on finite vibrational lifetimes of H-surface vibrations. As shown by AIMDEF, the damping via vibration-electron hole pair coupling dominates clearly over the vibration-phonon channel, in particular for high-frequency modes. Vibrational relaxation times are a characteristic function of layer thickness due to the oscillating behaviour of the embedding surface electronic density. Implications derived from AIMDEF for frictional many-atom dynamics, and physisorbed species will also be given.

  13. Empty-electronic-state evolution for Sc and electron dynamics at the 3p-3d giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y.; Wagener, T.J.; Gao, Y.; Weaver, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Inverse photoemission has been used to study the developing electronic states of an early transition metal, Sc, during thin-film growth and to investigate the effects of these states on the 3p-3d giant dipole resonance. Energy- and coverage-dependent intensity variations of the empty Sc states show that the 3d maximum moves 1.1 eV toward the Fermi level as the thickness of the Sc film increases from 1 to 300 A as measured with an incident electron energy of 41.25 eV, an effect attributed to metallic band formation via hybridization of atomic 4s and 3d states. Incident-energy-dependent intensity variations for these empty Sc features show resonant photon emission for incident electron energies above the 3p threshold, with maxima at 43 and 44 eV for 300- and 5-A-thick films, respectively. Considerations of hybridization-induced energy shifts of the empty Sc 3d states demonstrate that the radiative energy changes very little with Sc coverages. These studies indicate coupling of decay channels involving the inverse photoemission continuum and the recombination of the atomic 3p-3d giant dipole transition, the energy of the latter being determined by atomic 3p-3d excitation processes

  14. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance

  15. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  16. Dynamics of a relativistic electron beam in a high-current diode with a knife-edge cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babykin, V.M.; Gordeev, A.V.; Golovin, G.T.; Korolev, V.D.; Kopchikov, A.V.; Tulupov, M.V.; Chernenko, A.S.; Shuvaev, V.Yu.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of practical applications, e.g., producing discharges in large volumes in order to pump gas lasers and for short x-ray pulses, it is necessary to generate electron beams in megamp range with electron energies from hundreds of kilovolts to several megavolts. It has been possible to obtain high currents (I ± 1 MA) by using diodes with knife-edge cathodes. Knife-edge diodes have an important advantage over the parapotential type because the ion current in them comprises a relatively small fraction of the total current. This is because the electron path in the accelerating gap of knife-edge diodes is quite short in comparison with that in high-current parapotential diodes. From the point of view of applying ribbon-shaped or narrow electron beams, the important problems are in measuring the current-voltage characteristics of the diodes and determining the dynamics of the energy spectrum and the angular spread of the electrons. The generation of an electron beam with a current ∼130 kA and pulse length ∼60 ns is studied. The current-voltage characteristics of knife-edge diodes with various geometries, the dynamics of the angular spread, and the beam structure are studied. As a result of the study of the REB dynamics it is found that the operation of the diode with these experiments can be approximated by a proposed formula which includes the finite thickness of the knife-edge cathode and the motion of the plasma and ions in the discharge gap. Breaking up of the beam into individual current-carrying channels is observed with the characteristic scale ∼1-2 mm. It is noted that for the diode geometry with a knife-edge cathode, when the magnetic field changes sign and passes through zero, an instability can exist which is analogous to the dissipative tearing instability

  17. Analytical formulation for modulation of time-resolved dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect by electron excitation in dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otobe, T.

    2017-12-01

    Analytical formulation of subcycle modulation (SCM) of dielectrics including electron excitation is presented. The SCM is sensitive to not only the time-resolved dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect (Tr-DFKE) [T. Otobe et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 045124 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045124], which is the nonlinear response without the electron excitation, but also the excited electrons. The excited electrons enhance the modulation with even harmonics of pump laser frequency, and generate the odd-harmonics components. The new aspect of SCM is a consequence of (i) the interference between the electrons excited by the pump laser and those excited by the probe-pulse laser and (ii) oscillation of the generated wave packed by the pump laser. When the probe- and pump-pulse polarizations are parallel, the enhancement of the even harmonics and the generation of the odd-harmonics modulation appear. However, if the polarizations are orthogonal, the effect arising from the electron excitations becomes weak. By comparing the parabolic and cosine band models, I found that the electrons under the intense laser field move as quasifree particles.

  18. Effects of fast monoenergetic electrons on the ion dynamics near the cathode in a pulsed direct current plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifian, M.; Shokri, B.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed one-dimensional simulation of the ion dynamics of the plasma sheath near a substrate (cathode) in the presence of fast monoenergetic electrons has been carried out in this article. The sheath evolution is investigated by using a fluid model assuming that the ions, plasma electrons and monoenergetic, fast electrons act as three fluids (fluid approach). The effect of the density of fast electrons on the ion density, ion velocity, and ion energy near the cathode and the evolution of the sheath boundary in front of the cathode are separately explored. Also, the variation of the ion velocity and ion density at the vicinity of the cathode as a function of time is investigated in the absence and presence of the electron beam. Results indicate that the presence of fast electrons in the sheath causes significant change in the sheath thickness and therefore basically changes the ion velocity, ion density, and ion impact energy on the cathode compared to the absence of the electron beam case

  19. Dynamics of positron beam from a convertor target while beam additional accelerating in a travelling wave electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhilavyan, L.Z.; Karev, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the dynamics of a positron beam produced in a tantalum converter of the 6 mm thickness in the process of beam reacceleration in an electron linac (ELA) are presented. The mean finite positron currents and their dependences on the accelerating electric field are measured. The energy spectra of accelerated positrons are given. A good agreement between the calculated and experimental data is shown. As a result of investigations some peculiarities of positron production on the ELA intersection targets, which are defined by both the initial positron beam parameters from the converter and the dynamics of positron reacceleration in the ELA [ru

  20. Spatial and temporal correlation in dynamic, multi-electron quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godunov, A.L.; McGuire, J.H.; Shakov, Kh.Kh. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States); Ivanov, P.B.; Shipakov, V.A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Merabet, H.; Bruch, R.; Hanni, J. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV (United States)

    2001-12-28

    Cross sections for ionization with excitation and for double excitation in helium are evaluated in a full second Born calculation. These full second Born calculations are compared to calculations in the independent electron approximation, where spatial correlation between the electrons is removed. Comparison is also made to calculations in the independent time approximation, where time correlation between the electrons is removed. The two-electron transitions considered here are caused by interactions with incident protons and electrons with velocities ranging between 2 and 10 au. Good agreement is found between our full calculations and experiment, except for the lowest velocities, where higher Born terms are expected to be significant. Spatial electron correlation, arising from internal electron-electron interactions, and time correlation, arising from time ordering of the external interactions, can both give rise to observable effects. Our method may be used for photon impact. (author)

  1. Micellar aggregates of saponins from Chenopodium quinoa: characterization by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verza, S G; de Resende, P E; Kaiser, S; Quirici, L; Teixeira, H F; Gosmann, G; Ferreira, F; Ortega, G G

    2012-04-01

    Entire seeds of Chenopodium quinoa Willd are a rich protein source and are also well-known for their high saponin content. Due to their amphiphily quinoa saponins are able to form intricate micellar aggregates in aqueous media. In this paper we study the aggregates formed by self-association of these compounds from two quinoa saponin fractions (FQ70 and FQ90) as well as several distinctive nanostructures obtained after their complexation with different ratios of cholesterol (CHOL) and phosphatidylcholine (PC). The FQ70 and FQ90 fractions were obtained by reversed-phase preparative chromatography. The structural features of their resulting aggregates were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Novel nanosized spherical vesicles formed by self-association with mean diameter about 100-200 nm were observed in FQ70 aqueous solutions whereas worm-like micelles an approximate width of 20 nm were detected in FQ90 aqueous solutions. Under experimental conditions similar to those reported for the preparation of Quillaja saponaria ISCOM matrices, tubular and ring-like micelles arose from FQ70:CHOL:PC and FQ90:CHOL:PC formulations, respectively. However, under these conditions no cage-like ISCOM matrices were observed. The saponin composition of FQ70 and FQ90 seems to determine the nanosized structures viewed by TEM. Phytolaccagenic acid, predominant in FQ70 and FQ90 fractions, is accountable for the formation of the nanosized vesicles and tubular structures observed by TEM in the aqueous solutions of both samples. Conversely, ring-like micelles observed in FQ90:CHOL:PC complexes can be attributed to the presence of less polar saponins present in FQ90, in particular those derived from oleanolic acid.

  2. Effects of functional group substitution on electron spectra and solvation dynamics in a family of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, James F.; Lall-Ramnarine, Sharon I.; Raju, Ravinder; Scumpia, Alexander; Bellevue, Sherly; Ragbir, Revans; Engel, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Ionic liquids containing ether-, alcohol- and alkyl-functionalized quaternary ammonium dications were studied by pulse radiolysis. Spectra on nanosecond timescales revealed that solvation of the excess electron is particularly slow in the case of the alcohol-derivatized ionic liquids. The blue shift of the electron spectrum to the customary 650 nm peak takes 25-40 ns at 21 deg. C. Comparison with the relaxation dynamics observed in viscous 1,2,6-trihydroxyhexane reveals the hindering effect of the ionic liquid lattice on hydroxypropyl side chain reorientation

  3. Dynamical instability, strong anharmonicity and electron-phonon coupling in KOs2O6: First-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Jiafa; Li, Bin; He, Junqi

    2017-09-01

    First-principles pseudopotential calculations on phonon and electronic properties of β -pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6 are performed. The imaginary soft-phonon modes with a special double-well potential for the lowest Eu(1) mode and the second lowest T1u(1) mode are reported, which indicates the dynamical instability in KOs2O6. However, the double wells are too small to induce a structural phase transformation in KOs2O6. The strong anharmonicity especially for K T2g(1) phonon mode is got, which is approved to be from the strong electron-phonon coupling that supports the superconductivity in KOs2O6.

  4. Electron dynamics in the core-excited CS2 molecule revealed through resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, T; Carniato, S; Journel, L; Guillemin, R; Kawerk, E; Simon, M; Žitnik, M; Kavčič, M; Bučar, K; Bohinc, R; Petric, M; Da Cruz, V Vaz; Gel'mukhanov, F

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the CS 2 molecule near the S 1s edge. We show that localization of the S 1s core-hole occurs in CS 2 during the RIXS process due to the orientational dephasing of interference between the waves scattering on the two sulfur atoms. Strong evolution of the RIXS profile with the excitation energy far below the first absorption resonance reflects the onset of electron dynamics triggered by a coherent excitation of multiple electronic states. (paper)

  5. Dynamical electron-phonon coupling, G W self-consistency, and vertex effect on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We study the impact of dynamical electron-phonon (el-ph) effects on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water by accounting for frequency-dependent Fan contributions in the el-ph mediated self-energy within the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). We find that the dynamical el-ph coupling effects greatly reduce the static el-ph band-gap correction of the hydrogen-rich molecular ice crystal from-2.46 to -0.23 eV in great contrast to the result of Monserrat et al. [Phys. Rev. B 92, 140302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140302]. This is of particular importance as otherwise the static el-ph gap correction would considerably reduce the electronic band gap, leading to considerable underestimation of the intense peaks of optical absorption spectra of ice which would be in great disagreement to experimental references. By contrast, the static el-ph gap correction of liquid water is very moderate (-0.32 eV), and inclusion of dynamical effects slightly reduces the gap correction to -0.19 eV. Further, we determine the diverse sensitivity of ice and liquid water to the G W self-consistency and show that the energy-only self-consistent approach (GnWn ) exhibits large implicit vertex character in comparison to the quasiparticle self-consistent approach, for which an explicit calculation of vertex corrections is necessary for good agreement with experiment.

  6. Temporal dynamics of the longitudinal bunch profile in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heigoldt, Matthias

    2017-05-19

    This thesis deals with the temporal characterisation of electron bunches produced by a laser plasma accelerator. In the so-called laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, an ultra-short high-intensity laser pulse excites a plasma wave, which can sustain accelerating electric fields of several hundred GV/m, thus exceeding the fields attainable by current state-of-the-art radio frequency (RF) accelerators by four orders of magnitude, offering the prospect of downsizing both the size and cost of such machines. Furthermore, by intrinsically confining the accelerated electron beam to the μm-scale size of the plasma wave, LWFAs provide ultra-short and highly brilliant beams, sparking great scientific interest for their application as a driver for compact sources of ultra-short X-ray pulses, e.g. Thomson-scattering, betatron sources or table-top free-electron lasers (FELs). The bunch profile is an important quantity for the application of these sources. With particular regard to the envisioned table-top FELs, it also determines the available peak current, an import input parameter for an appropriate undulator design that is optimized to support the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process. The experiments presented in this thesis comprise the measurement of the temporal profile of electron bunches produced by LWFA and further investigation of the evolution of the temporal profile in dependence of the acceleration distance and the plasma density. By measuring the intensity spectrum of coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by LWFA-driven electron bunches in the frequency domain, the experiments allow a reconstruction of the longitudinal bunch profiles with unprecedented resolution. Compared to earlier work, a key improvement is the single-shot coverage of a broadband spectral range of more than four octaves, which yields a time resolution of the reconstructed bunch profile in the sub-femtosecond region. This work further inspired the development of a new

  7. Temporal dynamics of the longitudinal bunch profile in a laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heigoldt, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with the temporal characterisation of electron bunches produced by a laser plasma accelerator. In the so-called laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, an ultra-short high-intensity laser pulse excites a plasma wave, which can sustain accelerating electric fields of several hundred GV/m, thus exceeding the fields attainable by current state-of-the-art radio frequency (RF) accelerators by four orders of magnitude, offering the prospect of downsizing both the size and cost of such machines. Furthermore, by intrinsically confining the accelerated electron beam to the μm-scale size of the plasma wave, LWFAs provide ultra-short and highly brilliant beams, sparking great scientific interest for their application as a driver for compact sources of ultra-short X-ray pulses, e.g. Thomson-scattering, betatron sources or table-top free-electron lasers (FELs). The bunch profile is an important quantity for the application of these sources. With particular regard to the envisioned table-top FELs, it also determines the available peak current, an import input parameter for an appropriate undulator design that is optimized to support the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process. The experiments presented in this thesis comprise the measurement of the temporal profile of electron bunches produced by LWFA and further investigation of the evolution of the temporal profile in dependence of the acceleration distance and the plasma density. By measuring the intensity spectrum of coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by LWFA-driven electron bunches in the frequency domain, the experiments allow a reconstruction of the longitudinal bunch profiles with unprecedented resolution. Compared to earlier work, a key improvement is the single-shot coverage of a broadband spectral range of more than four octaves, which yields a time resolution of the reconstructed bunch profile in the sub-femtosecond region. This work further inspired the development of a new

  8. S-Matrix theory of laser-induced nonsequential double ionization: from electron-electron dynamics to absolute-phase diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Schomerus, H.; Liu, X.; Becker, W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We provide a summarizing account of a series of investigations, in which laser-induced nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) is described as the inelastic collision of an electron with its parent ion, and treated quantummechanically, within the strong-field approximation. In particular, we employ a specific uniform saddle-point approximation whose only validity requirement is that the saddles occur in pairs. As a first step, we address the question of how the type of the interaction by which the second electron is dislodged, as well as final-state electron-electron repulsion, influences the NDSI differential electron momentum distributions. We found that a contact-type interaction and uncorrelated final electron states yields the best agreement with the experimental results, namely circular-shaped distributions peaked at p 1II = p 2II = ±2 √U p , where p nII (n = 1,2) denotes the electron momentum components parallel to the laser-field polarization and U p the ponderomotive energy. Final-state repulsion leads to a broadening in such distributions, with respect to p 1II = p 2II , whereas a Coulomb-type interaction favors unequal momenta. The influence of the interaction and of final-state electron-electron repulsion is most extreme if at least one of the transverse momentum components is kept small, while, for large transverse momenta, different types of interaction or two-electron final states lead to minor discrepancies. In all cases, we obtain very similar results as compared to a classical ensemble computation, in which electrons are released with a quasi-static tunneling rate, apart from minor differences near the boundary of the momentum region for which the collision process in question is classically allowed. Such results suggest that the residual ion has a strong influence on the dynamics of both electrons in NSDI, screening the long-range interaction and the final-state Coulomb repulsion. This interpretation is strengthened by more recent

  9. Electron Gas Dynamic Conductivity Tensor on the Nanotube Surface in Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ermolaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kubo formula was derived for the electron gas conductivity tensor on the nanotube surface in longitudinal magnetic field considering spatial and time dispersion. Components of the degenerate and nondegenerate electron gas conductivity tensor were calculated. The study has showed that under high electron density, the conductivity undergoes oscillations of de Haas-van Alphen and Aharonov-Bohm types with the density of electrons and magnetic field changes.

  10. Electronic structure and electron dynamics at an organic molecule/metal interface: interface states of tetra-tert-butyl-imine/Au(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Sebastian; Wolf, Martin; Tegeder, Petra; Luo Ying; Haag, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectroscopies have been used to investigated the electronic structure, electron dynamics and localization at the interface between tetra-tert-butyl imine (TBI) and Au(111). At a TBI coverage of one monolayer (ML), the two highest occupied molecular orbitals, HOMO and HOMO-1, are observed at an energy of -1.9 and -2.6 eV below the Fermi level (E F ), respectively, and coincide with the d-band features of the Au substrate. In the unoccupied electronic structure, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) has been observed at 1.6 eV with respect to E F . In addition, two delocalized states that arise from the modified image potential at the TBI/metal interface have been identified. Their binding energies depend strongly on the adsorption structure of the TBI adlayer, which is coverage dependent in the submonolayer (≤1 ML) regime. Thus the binding energy of the lower interface state (IS) shifts from 3.5 eV at 1.0 ML to 4.0 eV at 0.5 ML, which is accompanied by a pronounced decrease in its lifetime from 100 fs to below 10 fs. This is a result of differences in the wave function overlap with electronic states of the Au(111) substrate at different binding energies. This study shows that in order to fully understand the electronic structure of organic adsorbates at metal surfaces, not only adsorbate- and substrate-induced electronic states have to be considered but also ISs, which are the result of a potential formed by the interaction between the adsorbate and the substrate.

  11. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  12. Analysis of plasma dynamic response to modulated electron cyclotron heating in TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, I.

    2008-01-01

    different types of modulating signals. This set-up was used to study simultaneous propagation of heat waves induced by MECH in non-sawtoothing plasmas, and in discharges with sawtooth activity. A new analysis method for the characterization of the plasma non-linear dynamic response to modulated heating was developed on the basis of Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) technique. This method applied to signals from different diagnostics, such as electron cyclotron emission and soft X-ray measurements, was extensively used to quantitatively characterize the effect of nonlinear phase coupling. In sawtooth free discharges a detailed analysis of the propagation of heat waves demonstrated that their phase coupling is solely related to properties of heat sources. It was demonstrated that if two heat waves are induced by non-coupled power sources (multi-beam MECH) then no phase coupling occurs. In the opposite case, when a source of perturbation (MECH) contains coupled harmonics, the corresponding heat waves demonstrate phase coupling. It was shown that these coupled heat waves loose their phase coherence while propagating in plasma. The dissipation of phase coupling is due to different phase velocities of heat waves and their diffusive damping. The new type of ECH power modulation accompanied with bicoherence analysis was proposed as a candidate for a reliable identification of EC power deposition location in a case of high frequency and low modulation depth MECH, including multi-beam heating. This type of MECH can be particularly important for real time control applications. In cases when MECH is applied to sawtoothing plasmas a direct experimental evidence of MECH-sawtooth non-linear phase coupling has been demonstrated using HOSA techniques, in particular bispectrum and bicoherence profiles. The detailed analysis presented here demonstrates a direct proof of periodic modification of sawtooth behavior by modulated ECH. It was shown that a simple diffusive model for the

  13. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z., E-mail: mmo09@slac.stanford.edu; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Sokolowski-Tinten, K. [Faculty of Physics and Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 μm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime.

  14. Electronic band structure, optical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of cesium chloride (CsCl from first-principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingol Suat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric structural optimization, electronic band structure, total density of states for valence electrons, density of states for phonons, optical, dynamical, and thermodynamical features of cesium chloride have been investigated by linearized augmented plane wave method using the density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation. Ground state properties of cesium chloride are studied. The calculated ground state properties are consistent with experimental results. Calculated band structure indicates that the cesium chloride structure has an indirect band gap value of 5.46 eV and is an insulator. From the obtained phonon spectra, the cesium chloride structure is dynamically stable along the various directions in the Brillouin zone. Temperature dependent thermodynamic properties are studied using the harmonic approximation model.

  15. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  16. Entanglement dynamics of two electron-spin qubits in a strongly detuned and dissipative quantum-dot-cavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Shaohua; Deng Xiaopeng; Song Kehui; Wen Wei; Shi Zhengang

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamics of two electron-spin qubits in the quantum-dot (QD)-microcavity system in the large-detuning limit and subjected to two different noise sources: electron-spin dephasing and relaxation. We show that when one of the two dots is prepared initially in the excited state, the created entanglement exhibits oscillatory behavior at the beginning of evolution and then completely disappears over time. For two QDs that are initially in either the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bell states or the Werner states, their entanglement evolution exhibits the same behavior in the presence of pure dephasing, but is completely different under the relaxation process. We also show that the interdot interaction induced by a single-mode cavity field does not contribute to the dynamics of entanglement for these Bell states and Werner states.

  17. Structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of OsB and ReB: Density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanling; Zeng, Zhi; Lin, Haiqing

    2010-06-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of ReB and OsB are investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. It turns out that ReB and OsB are metallic ultra-incompressible solids with small elastic anisotropy and high hardness. The change of c/ a ratio in OsB indicates that there is a structural phase transition at about 31 GPa. Phonon spectra calculations show that both OsB and ReB are stable dynamically and there are abnormal phonon dispersions along special directions in Brillouin zone. OsB and ReB do not show superconductivity due to very weak electron-phonon interactions in them.

  18. Structure impact on the thermal and electronic properties of bismuth telluride by ab-initio and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Termentzidis, K; Pokropivny, A; Xiong, S-Y; Chumakov, Y; Volz, S; Woda, M; Cortona, P

    2012-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics and ab-initio methods to predict the thermal and electronic properties of new materials with high figures of merit. The simulated systems are bulk bismuth tellurides with antisite and vacancy defects. Optimizations of the materials under investigation are performed by the SIESTA code for subsequent calculations of force constants, electronic properties, and Seebeck coefficients. The prediction of the thermal conductivity is made by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) using the LAMMPS code. The thermal conductivity of bulk bismuth telluride with different stoichiometry and with a number of substitution defects is calculated. We have found that the thermal conductivity can be decreased by 60% by introducing vacancy defects. The calculated thermal conductivities for the different structures are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  20. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics at the interface of single layer FeSe and SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Balatsky, Alexander; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with the superconducting energy gap opening at temperatures close to or above the liquid nitrogen boiling point in the single-layer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 has attracted significant interest. It suggests that the interface effects can be utilized to enhance the superconductivity. It has been shown recently that the coupling between the electrons in FeSe and vibrational modes at the interface play an important role. Here we report on a detailed study of electronic structure and lattice dynamics in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 interface by using the state-of-art electronic structure method within the density functional theory. The nature of the vibrational modes at the interface and their coupling to the electronic degrees of freedom are analyzed. In addition, the effect of hole and electron doping in SrTiO3 on the electron-mode coupling strength is also considered. This work was carried out under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. DOE at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, and was supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.