WorldWideScience

Sample records for sub-diffraction-limited imaging ability

  1. Review of near-field optics and superlenses for sub-diffraction-limited nano-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Adams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Near-field optics and superlenses for imaging beyond Abbe’s diffraction limit are reviewed. A comprehensive and contemporary background is given on scanning near-field microscopy and superlensing. Attention is brought to recent research leveraging scanning near-field optical microscopy with superlenses for new nano-imaging capabilities. Future research directions are explored for realizing the goal of low-cost and high-performance sub-diffraction-limited imaging systems.

  2. Characterization of analytical figures of merit of a sub-diffraction limited fiber bundle array for SERS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-05-01

    Super resolution chemical imaging can provide high spatial resolution images that contain chemically specific information. Additionally, using a technique such as Raman scattering provides molecular specific information based on the inherent vibrations within the analyte of interest. In this work, commercially available fiber bundle arrays (1mm diameter) consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements (4μm diameter) that are then modified to obtain surface enhanced Raman scatter are employed. This allows for the visualization of vibrational information with high spatial (i.e. sub-diffraction limited) resolution over the 30,000 individual points of interrogation covering a total imaging diameter of approximately 20μm in a non-scanning format. Using these bundles, it has been shown that dithering can increase the spatial resolution of the arrays further by obtaining several sub-element shifted images. To retain the spatial resolution of such images, cross talk associated with these tpared bundles must be kept at a negligible level. In this paper, a study of luminescent particles isolated in individual fiber wells has been performed to characterize the cross talk associated with these fiber bundles. Scanning-electron microscope (SEM) images provide nanometric characterization of the fiber array, while luminescent signals allow for the quantitation of cross talk between adjacent fiber elements. From these studies negligible cross-talk associated with both untapered and tapered bundles was found to exist.

  3. Sub-diffraction limit localization of proteins in volumetric space using Bayesian restoration of fluorescence images from ultrathin specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Wang

    Full Text Available Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA(2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion, which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is -220 nm and -600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT, with its native 50-100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF, a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes.

  4. Sub-diffraction limit laser ablation via multiple exposures using a digital micromirror device

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, Daniel; Feinaeugle, Matthias; Mills, Benjamin; Grant-Jacob, James; Eason, Robert

    2017-01-01

    SEM images of resulting machined patterns Matlab scripts used to enhance SEM imagesData pertains to Applied Optics paper "Sub-diffraction limit laser ablation via multiple exposures using a digital micromirror device"

  5. Optical sub-diffraction limited focusing for confined heating and lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Luis M.

    Electronics and nanotechnology is constantly demanding a decrease in size of fabricated nanoscale features. This decrease in size has become much more difficult recently due to the limited resolution of optical systems that are fundamental to many nanofabrication methods. A lot of effort has been made to fabricate devices smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Creating devices that are capable of confining fields by means of interference patterns of propagating wave modes and surface plasmon, has proven successful to confine light into smaller spot sizes. Zone plate diffraction lenses generate spots with dimensions very close to the diffraction limit. We report the fabrication of zone plates to be used in laser direct writing of silicon nanowires. We show experimentally and with numerical models that a silicon substrate subjected to a focused spot is capable of reaching the necessary temperature for the synthesis of silicon nanowires with widths of 60 nm, which is considerably smaller than the diffraction limit of the processing laser. Nanoscale ridge apertures are devices with a great potential to confine light energy. Such apertures have been experimentally proven to create very small lithography features. We believe that these apertures can be further modified in order to achieve a practical smaller confinement in the near field region. In this thesis we discuss several attempts to design and fabricate apertures with sharp edges and implement them in a previously reported parallel lithography setup. In an attempt to use apertures for parallel fabrication of patterns, we developed a system to control the position of the near-field region with respect to a lithography substrate. To do this we use a method of interferometric-spatial- phase-imaging (ISPI). With the implementation of this method we were able to produce an array of 32X32 lines with confined widths as small as 22 nm. Nanoscale ridge apertures were also studied to be used as near field transducers

  6. The generation of nano-patterns on a pure silicon wafer in air and argon with sub-diffraction limit nanosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Alok; Sundaram, Vijay M; Wen, Sy-Bor, E-mail: syborwen@tamu.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2010-04-14

    Intense nanosecond laser pulses were delivered to sub-diffraction limit spots on pure Si wafers with a near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) for possible nanoscale direct patterning. Compared with the previous results obtained with a femtosecond laser, no evidence of nanoscale laser ablation on Si targets was observed even under the maximum allowable laser energy (i.e. before the damage of NSOM probes). The formation of nano-patterns on pure Si wafers with nanosecond laser pulses, which were in the form of protrusions, can be explained as resulting from the melting and recrystallization along with the oxidation of pure Si targets during and after the laser pulses. Note that these nano-protrusions were primarily composed of SiO{sub 2} and nano-crystallized Si (nc-Si).

  7. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E; Flores, Ranee A; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors ("Implementation" and "Learning") were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific-r = 0.26 and Writing-r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination ability

  8. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Eugene Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization, but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ, an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMR. Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from .76 to .79, and two factors (Implementation and Learning were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientifific - r = .26 and Writing - r = .31 respectively, suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe. The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus. We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination

  9. Defining a superlens operating regime for imaging fluorescent molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Elsayad

    Full Text Available It has been shown that thin metal-based films can at certain frequencies act as planar near-field lenses for certain polarization components. A desirable property of such "lenses" is that they can also enhance and focus some large transverse spatial frequency components which contain sub-diffraction limit details. Over the last decade there has been much work in optimizing designs to reduce effects (such as material losses and surface roughness that are detrimental to image reconstruction. One design that can reduce some of these undesirable effects, and which has received a fair amount of attention recently, is the stacked metal-dielectric superlens. Here we theoretically explore the imaging ability of such a design for the specific purpose of imaging a fluorescent dye (the common bio-marker GFP in the vicinity of the superlens surface. Our calculations take into consideration the interaction (damping of an oscillating electric dipole with the metallic layers in the superlens. We also assume a Gaussian frequency distribution spectrum for the dipole. We treat the metallic-alloy and dielectric-alloy layers separately using an appropriate effective medium theory. The transmission properties are evaluated via Transfer matrix (-matrix calculations that were performed in the MatLab and MathCad environments. Our study shows that it is in principle possible to image fluorescent molecules using a simple bilayer planar superlens. We find that optimal parameters for such a superlens occur when the peak dipole emission-frequency is slightly offset from the Surface Plasmon resonance frequency of the metal-dielectric interfaces. The best resolution is obtained when the fluorescent molecules are not too close (>/ approximately 10 nm or too far (>/approximately 30 nm from the superlens surface. The realization and application of a superlens with the specified design is possible using current nanofabrication techniques. When combined with e.g. a sub

  10. Defining a superlens operating regime for imaging fluorescent molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayad, Kareem; Heinze, Katrin G

    2009-12-01

    It has been shown that thin metal-based films can at certain frequencies act as planar near-field lenses for certain polarization components. A desirable property of such "lenses" is that they can also enhance and focus some large transverse spatial frequency components which contain sub-diffraction limit details. Over the last decade there has been much work in optimizing designs to reduce effects (such as material losses and surface roughness) that are detrimental to image reconstruction. One design that can reduce some of these undesirable effects, and which has received a fair amount of attention recently, is the stacked metal-dielectric superlens. Here we theoretically explore the imaging ability of such a design for the specific purpose of imaging a fluorescent dye (the common bio-marker GFP) in the vicinity of the superlens surface. Our calculations take into consideration the interaction (damping) of an oscillating electric dipole with the metallic layers in the superlens. We also assume a Gaussian frequency distribution spectrum for the dipole. We treat the metallic-alloy and dielectric-alloy layers separately using an appropriate effective medium theory. The transmission properties are evaluated via Transfer matrix (-matrix) calculations that were performed in the MatLab and MathCad environments. Our study shows that it is in principle possible to image fluorescent molecules using a simple bilayer planar superlens. We find that optimal parameters for such a superlens occur when the peak dipole emission-frequency is slightly offset from the Surface Plasmon resonance frequency of the metal-dielectric interfaces. The best resolution is obtained when the fluorescent molecules are not too close (>/ approximately 10 nm) or too far (>/approximately 30 nm) from the superlens surface. The realization and application of a superlens with the specified design is possible using current nanofabrication techniques. When combined with e.g. a sub-wavelength grating

  11. Effect of Reading Ability and Internet Experience on Keyword-Based Image Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Pei-Lan; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Sun, Chuen-Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Image searches are now crucial for obtaining information, constructing knowledge, and building successful educational outcomes. We investigated how reading ability and Internet experience influence keyword-based image search behaviors and performance. We categorized 58 junior-high-school students into four groups of high/low reading ability and…

  12. The ability of hyperspectral imaging to detect perfusion disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, Amadeus; Kämmerer, Peer W.; Dau, Michael; Grambow, Eberhard; Wahl, Philip

    2017-07-01

    Blood perfusion as the supply of tissue with blood and therefore oxygen is a key factor in clinical practice. Especially in the field of flap surgery, a reduced perfusion of transplanted skin or operated areas is often cause of various complications. The success of microvascular reconstructions is directly related to the flap perfusion. The intraoperative and postoperative assessment of the anastomoses is of great importance in order to recognize possible complications at an early stage and to revise them in good time. Is the affected tissue located on the face, successful treatment and rapid healing is even more important since aesthetic aspects play a not insignificant role. A poor perfusion is often concealed, since methods are missing for an objective assessment of the perfusion status. A method with increasing importance for clinical practice is given by hyperspectral imaging. We developed a new hyperspectral imaging system that can be used to observe tissue oxygenation and other tissue parameters and present the technical background and the parameter validation.

  13. Large area super-resolution chemical imaging via rapid dithering of a nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Super-resolution chemical imaging via Raman spectroscopy provides a significant ability to simultaneously or pseudosimultaneously monitor numerous label-free analytes while elucidating their spatial distribution on the surface of the sample. However, spontaneous Raman is an inherently weak phenomenon making trace detection and thus superresolution imaging extremely difficult, if not impossible. To circumvent this and allow for trace detection of the few chemical species present in any sub-diffraction limited resolution element of an image, we have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coherent fiber-optic imaging bundle probe consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements. When the probes are tapered, etched and coated with metal, they provide circular Raman chemical images of a sample with a field of view of approximately 20μm (i.e. diameter) via the array of 30,000 individual 50 nm fiber elements. An acousto-optic tunable filter is used to rapidly scan or select discrete frequencies for multi- or hyperspectral analysis. Although the 50nm fiber element dimensions of this probe inherently provide spatial resolutions of approximately 100nm, further increases in the spatial resolution can be achieved by using a rapid dithering process. Using this process, additional images are obtained one-half fiber diameter translations in the x- and y- planes. A piezostage drives the movement, providing the accurate and reproducible shifts required for dithering. Optimal probability algorithms are then used to deconvolute the related images producing a final image with a three-fold increase in spatial resolution. This paper describes super-resolution chemical imaging using these probes and the dithering method as well as its potential applications in label-free imaging of lipid rafts and other applications within biology and forensics.

  14. Improving the Ability of Image Sensors to Detect Faint Stars and Moving Objects Using Image Deconvolution Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavi Fors

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris. In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors.

  15. Improving the ability of image sensors to detect faint stars and moving objects using image deconvolution techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Otazu, Xavier; Prades, Albert; Cardinal, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris). In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors.

  16. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, Willem; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum

  17. Body image, perceived physical ability, and motor performance in nonoverweight and overweight Italian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Dario; Morano, Milena; Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura

    2009-02-01

    The purpose was to examine body image, perceived physical ability, and motor performance in nonoverweight (n=105, 53 boys and 52 girls) and overweight (n=105, 52 boys and 53 girls) children, ranging in age from 8 to 10 years and attending elementary schools in southeastern Italy. Body image was measured on Collins' Child Figure Drawings, while self-efficacy was assessed by the Perceived Physical Ability Scale for Children. Age-appropriate field-based tests of standing long jump, 1-kg medicine-ball throw, basketball throw, and 10-m and 20-m sprint from a standing position were also administered to gauge motor performance. Univariate analyses of variance [2 (group) x 2 (sex) x 3 (8, 9, 10 yr.)] showed that overweight children reported larger body-dissatisfaction scores, lower self-efficacy scores, and poorer performance on weight-bearing tasks than nonoverweight peers. In addition, boys had higher mean scores on physical self-efficacy and better performance on all motor tests. The correlation between Body Mass Index and body dissatisfaction was positive for boys and girls.

  18. Image-Based Dietary Assessment Ability of Dietetics Students and Interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Erica; Boushey, Carol J; Kerr, Deborah A; Tomayko, Emily J; Cluskey, Mary

    2017-02-07

    Image-based dietary assessment (IBDA) may improve the accuracy of dietary assessments, but no formalized training currently exists for skills relating to IBDA. This study investigated nutrition and dietetics students' and interns' IBDA abilities, the training and experience factors that may contribute to food identification and quantification accuracy, and the perceived challenges to performing IBDA. An online survey containing images of known foods and serving sizes representing common American foods was used to assess the ability to identify foods and serving sizes. Nutrition and dietetics students and interns from the United States and Australia (n = 114) accurately identified foods 79.5% of the time. Quantification accuracy was lower, with only 38% of estimates within ±10% of the actual weight. Foods of amorphous shape or higher energy density had the highest percent error. Students expressed general difficulty with perceiving serving sizes, making IBDA food quantification more difficult. Experience cooking at home from a recipe, frequent measuring of portions, and having a food preparation or cooking laboratory class were associated with enhanced accuracy in IBDA. Future training of dietetics students should incorporate more food-based serving size training to improve quantification accuracy while performing IBDA, while advances in IBDA technology are also needed.

  19. Diagnostic ability of differential diagnosis in ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst by imaging modalities and observers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Tae In; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Moon, Je Woon; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability in differentiating between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst according to the imaging modalities and observes. We evaluated thirty-six cases of ameloblastomas and forty-seven cases of odontogenic keratocysts all histologically confirmed. Six oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnosed the lesions by 3 methods: using panoramic radiograph, using computed tomograph (CT), and using panoramic radiograph and CT. The observers were classified by 3 groups: group 1 had experienced over 10 years in oral and mazilofacial radiologic field, group 2 had experienced for 3-4 years, and group 3 was in the process of residentship. After over 2 weeks, the observers diagnosed them by the same methods. The ROC curve areas except for group 3 were the highest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph and CT, followed by interpretation using CT only, and the lowest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph only. The overall difference was not found in diagnostic ability among groups in using panoramic radiograph only, but there was difference in diagnostic ability of group 1 and 2 vs 3 in using CT only, and combination panoramic radiograph and CT. To differentiate between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst more accurately, the experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologist should diagnose with combination of panoramic radiograph and CT.

  20. Diagnostic ability of the periapical radiographs and digital image in the detection of the artificial proximal caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Min Suk; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-15

    Recently, the digital image was introduced into radiological image. The digital image has the power of contrast enhancement, histogram control, and other digitally enhancement. At the point of the resolution, periapical radiograph is superior to the digital image, but enhanced digital procedure improves the diagnostic ability of the digital image. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability of artificial proximal caries in conventional radiographs, digital radiographs and enhanced digital radiographs (histogram specification). ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) analysis and paired t-test were used for the evaluation of detectability, and following results were acquired: 1. The mean ROC area of conventional radiographs was 0.9274. 2. The mean ROC area of unenhanced digital image was 0.9168. 3. The mean ROC area of enhanced digital image was 0.9339. 4. The diagnostic ability of three imaging methods was not significant difference (p>0.05). So, the digital images had similar diagnostic ability of artificial proximal caries to conventional radiographs. If properly enhanced digital image, it may be superior to conventional radiographs.

  1. Improving the spelling ability of Grade 3 learners through visual imaging teaching strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalene van Staden

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses two key cognitive theories underlying spelling acquisition, i.e. the developmental stage theory and the overlapping waves theory. Within the developmental stage framework, learning to spell is viewed as a process of moving from spelling that represents sound to spelling that represents meaning, following a sequence of qualitatively distinct stages in a linear fashion. In contrast, proponents of the overlapping waves theory emphasise the use of different instructional approaches at any given time. This model is process-orientated and stresses the adaptation of strategies to meet the needs of the task. Other researchers maintain that spelling is a natural process and emphasise the importance of invented spelling practices and creative writing embedded in whole-language programmes. There is, however, a lack of research validating the efficacy of an exclusively naturalistic approach to spelling. In general, research findings support a combination of incidental learning and direct instruction as most beneficial for learners with spelling problems. Thus, this study was undertaken to develop a visual imagery programme for Grade 3 learners by compromising between direct instruction in specific spelling skills (i.e. visual imaging strategies whilst also immersing learners in meaningful authentic reading activities. It was hypothesised that the spelling abilities of Afrikaans-speaking Grade 3 learners can be improved significantly by exposing them to a spelling programme that focuses on visual imaging, immediate feedback and self-correcting strategies. Researchers opposed to visual teaching methods for spelling moreover postulate, among other things, that learners with auditory preferences will not benefit from a visual approach to the teaching of spelling. In this empirical study the possible relation between preferential learning styles and spelling performance was also investigated.

  2. Nanoscale localization sampling based on nanoantenna arrays for super-resolution imaging of fluorescent monomers on sliding microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyujung; Yajima, Junichiro; Oh, Youngjin; Lee, Wonju; Oowada, Shinsuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-03-26

    Sub-diffraction-limited imaging of fluorescent monomers on sliding microtubules in vitro by nanoscale localization sampling (NLS) is reported. NLS is based on periodic nanohole antenna arrays that create locally amplified electromagnetic hot spots through surface plasmon localization. The localized near-field hot spot temporally samples microtubular movement for enhanced spatial resolution. A fourfold improvement in spatial resolution compared to conventional wide-field microscopy is demonstrated. The resolution enhancement is achieved by imaging rhodamine-labeled microtubules that are sampled by the hot spots to provide sub-diffraction-limited images at 76 nm resolution in the direction of movement and 135 nm orthogonally. The intensity distribution produced by the NLS is measured to be broader than that of conventional imaging, which is consistent with the improvement of imaging resolution. Correlation studies between neighboring nanoantennas are also performed. This confirms the possibility of measuring microtubular transport dynamics. NLS can be useful for moving objects that have a high labeling density or for performing fluctuation spectroscopy in small volumes, and may allow "super-resolution on demand" by customizing nanoantenna structures for specific resolution needs. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The Relationship between Learners' Distrust of Scientific Models, Their Spatial Ability, and the Vividness of Their Mental Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the nature of the relationship between learners' distrust of scientific models that represent unseen entities and phenomena, their spatial ability, and the vividness of their mental images. The sample consisted of 302 tenth grade students in the Sultanate of Oman. Three measures were used for this…

  4. Body image, perceived and actual physical abilities in normal-weight and overweight boys involved in individual and team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Milena; Colella, Dario; Capranica, Laura

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among body image, perception of physical abilities, and motor performance in boys involved in organized individual (i.e. tennis, fencing, judo) and team (i.e. soccer, handball, volleyball) sports. Altogether, 162 children (12.6 ± 1.0 years) were categorized as normal-weight (n = 85) or overweight (n = 77). Body image was measured using Collins' Child Figure Drawings, while individuals' perceptions of strength, speed, and agility were assessed using the Perceived Physical Ability Scale. Fitness tests of the standing long jump, 20 m sprint, and 10 × 5 m shuttle-run were also administered. Overweight boys showed greater body dissatisfaction and lower actual physical abilities than normal-weight peers. Participants involved in team sports reported lower body dissatisfaction and better performances in the shuttle-run compared with those involved in individual sports. For boys participating in team sports, body dissatisfaction was a significant mediator of the effect of body mass index on perceived physical ability. Results may influence intervention efforts, suggesting that targeting personal, psychological, and physical factors may prove efficient across physical activity locations and weight groups.

  5. Interactions of Insolation and Shading on Ability to Use Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Fecal Contaminated Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M. Lefcourt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fecal contamination of produce in fields is a recognized food safety risk, and it is a requirement that fields be surveyed for evidence of fecal contamination. It may be possible to increase the efficacy of such surveys using imaging techniques that rely on detection of fluorescence responses of fecal material to UV excitation. However, fluorescence responses are easily masked by ambient illumination. This study investigated the potential of using a shroud to reduce the impact of ambient illumination on responses measured using relatively inexpensive optical components. During periods of near peak insolation, even with full shrouding, results indicate that reliable detection would be problematic. Towards dusk, effective imaging could be accomplished even with a gap of 250 cm at the bottom of the shroud. Results suggest that imaging using relatively inexpensive components could provide the basis for detection of fecal contamination in produce fields if surveys were conducted during dawn or dusk, or at night.

  6. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  7. `That looks weird' - evaluating citizen scientists' ability to detect unusual features in ATLAS images of LHC collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, Alan James; Haas, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the HiggsHunters.org project we investigate the ability of non-expert citizen scientists to identify long-lived particles, and other unusual features, in images of LHC collisions recorded by the ATLAS experiment. More than 32,000 volunteers from 179 countries participated, classifying 1,200,000 features of interest on about 39,000 distinct images. We find that the non-expert volunteers are capable of identifying the decays of long-lived particles with an efficiency and fake-rate comparable to that of the ATLAS algorithms. Volunteers also picked out events with unexpected features, including what appeared to be an event containing a jet of muons. A survey of volunteers indicates a high level of scientific engagement and an appetite for further LHC-related citizen science projects.

  8. Comparison of the diagnostic ability of blue laser imaging magnification versus pit pattern analysis for colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Arihiro; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Yamamura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakamura, Masanao; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Kawashima, Hiroki; Miyahara, Ryoji; Goto, Hidemi

    2017-04-01

    Background and study aims There have been few evaluations of the diagnostic ability of new narrow band light observation blue laser imaging (BLI). The present prospective study compared the diagnostic ability of BLI magnification and pit pattern analysis for colorectal polyps. Patients and methods We collected lesions prospectively, and the analysis of images was made by two endoscopists, retrospectively. A total of 799 colorectal polyps were examined by BLI magnification and pit pattern analysis at Nagoya University Hospital. The Hiroshima narrow-band imaging classification was used for BLI. Differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic lesions and diagnosis of deeply invasive submucosal cancer (dSM) were compared between BLI magnification and pit pattern analysis. Type C2 in the Hiroshima classification was evaluated separately, because application of this category as an index of the depth of cancer invasion was considered difficult. Results We analyzed 748 colorectal polyps, excluding 51 polyps that were inflammatory polyps, sessile serrated adenoma/polyps, serrated adenomas, advanced colorectal cancers, or other lesions. The accuracy of differential diagnosis between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions was 98.4 % using BLI magnification and 98.7 % with pit pattern analysis. In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of BLI magnification and pit pattern analysis for dSM for cancer was 89.5 % and 92.1 %, respectively. When type C2 lesions were excluded, the diagnostic accuracy of BLI for dSM was 95.9 %. The 18 type C2 lesions comprised 1 adenoma, 9 intramucosal or slightly invasive submucosal cancers, and 8 dSM. Pit pattern analysis allowed accurate diagnosis of the depth of invasion in 13 lesions (72.2 %). Conclusions Most colorectal polyps could be diagnosed accurately by BLI magnification without pit pattern analysis, but we should add pit pattern analysis for type C2 lesions in the Hiroshima classification.

  9. Exploring Verbal, Visual and Schematic Learners' Static and Dynamic Mental Images of Scientific Species and Processes in Relation to Their Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Coll, Richard Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The current study compared different learners' static and dynamic mental images of unseen scientific species and processes in relation to their spatial ability. Learners were classified into verbal, visual and schematic. Dynamic images were classified into: appearing/disappearing, linear-movement, and rotation. Two types of scientific entities and…

  10. Do Black Women's Religious Beliefs About Body Image Influence Their Confidence in Their Ability to Lose Weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Alexandria G; Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Ruhland-Petty, Therese; Berman, Marcie; Lister, Sheila; Christensen, Kelsey

    2017-10-19

    Black women are disproportionately burdened by obesity but maintain body satisfaction and strong religious commitment. Although faith-based weight-loss interventions have been effective at promoting weight loss among blacks, little is known about how body image and religious views contribute to weight-related beliefs among religious black women. The purpose of this study was to examine whether demographic and health history factors, religious involvement, and beliefs about body image could explain motivation and confidence to lose weight among a church-affiliated sample of black women. We recruited 240 church-affiliated black women aged 18 to 80 years (average age, 55 y; SD, 12.3) in 2014 from 6 black churches that participated in a larger study, Project FIT (Faith Influencing Transformation), a clustered, diabetes/heart disease/stroke intervention among black women and men. We used baseline data from Project FIT to conduct a cross-sectional study consisting of a survey. Variables approaching significance in preliminary correlation and χ2 analyses were included in 2 multiple linear regression models examining motivation and confidence in ability to lose weight. In final regression models, body mass index was associated with motivation to lose weight (β = 0.283, P lose weight (β = 0.180, P = .01). Faith-based, weight-loss interventions targeting black women should emphasize physical well-being and highlight the health benefits of weight management rather than the benefits of altering physical appearance and should promote positive beliefs about body image, particularly relating to God.

  11. Do Black Women’s Religious Beliefs About Body Image Influence Their Confidence in Their Ability to Lose Weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Ruhland-Petty, Therese; Berman, Marcie; Lister, Sheila; Christensen, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Black women are disproportionately burdened by obesity but maintain body satisfaction and strong religious commitment. Although faith-based weight-loss interventions have been effective at promoting weight loss among blacks, little is known about how body image and religious views contribute to weight-related beliefs among religious black women. The purpose of this study was to examine whether demographic and health history factors, religious involvement, and beliefs about body image could explain motivation and confidence to lose weight among a church-affiliated sample of black women. Methods We recruited 240 church-affiliated black women aged 18 to 80 years (average age, 55 y; SD, 12.3) in 2014 from 6 black churches that participated in a larger study, Project FIT (Faith Influencing Transformation), a clustered, diabetes/heart disease/stroke intervention among black women and men. We used baseline data from Project FIT to conduct a cross-sectional study consisting of a survey. Variables approaching significance in preliminary correlation and χ2 analyses were included in 2 multiple linear regression models examining motivation and confidence in ability to lose weight. Results In final regression models, body mass index was associated with motivation to lose weight (β = 0.283, P lose weight (β = 0.180, P = .01). Conclusion Faith-based, weight-loss interventions targeting black women should emphasize physical well-being and highlight the health benefits of weight management rather than the benefits of altering physical appearance and should promote positive beliefs about body image, particularly relating to God. PMID:29049021

  12. Use of partial least squares discriminant analysis on visible-near infrared multispectral image data to examine germination ability and germ length in spinach seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Nisha; Olesen, Merete Halkjær; Gislum, René

    2012-01-01

    Because of the difficulties in obtaining homogenous germination of spinach seeds for baby leaf production, the possibility of using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) on features extracted from multispectral images of spinach seeds was investigated. The objective has been...... to discriminate between different seed sizes, as well as to predict germination ability and germ length. Images of 300 seeds including small, medium, and large seeds were taken, and the seeds were examined for germination ability and germ length. PLS-DA loadings plots were used to reduce the multidimensional...... image features to a few important features. The PLS-DA prediction resulted in an independent test set not only providing discrimination of seed size but also demonstrating how germination ability and germ length vary according to seed size. The result indicated that larger seeds had both a significantly...

  13. Synthetic strategies for controlling inter- and intramolecular interactions: Applications in single-molecule fluorescence imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and palladium catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Nicholas R.

    proximity of the Cy3 and Cy5 fluorophores, behaves as an optical photoswitch in the presence of a thiol reagent. This unique property was employed to achieve sub-diffraction-limited imaging of the stalks of Caulobacter crescentus cells with 30-nm resolution using STORM (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy). Lastly, the synthesis of the first selenium analogue of firefly luciferin is described, and this analogue is shown to be a competent substrate for firefly luciferase (fLuc). Remarkably, it exhibits red-shifted bioluminescence emission relative to the native sulfur analogue. The in vivo performance of the selenium and sulfur analogues in imaging are compared by tail-vein injection into nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts of a human breast cancer cell line that was stably transduced to express fLuc. Part II of this thesis begins by addressing design considerations in the development of palladium catalysts that effect oxidative transformations under mild conditions (i.e., 1 atm air, room temperature) using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. A newly synthesized cationic palladium complex, [(2,9-dimethylphenanthroline)Pd(OAc)]2[OTf]2, is shown to catalyze aerobic alcohol oxidation under such conditions with an unprecedented initial turnover frequency, but the presence of partially reduced oxygen species results in competitive ligand oxidation with concomitant decrease in catalyst activity. To remedy this, oxidatively resistant ligands, which are essential for the development of next-generation, high-turnover-frequency palladium catalysts that utilize oxygen as a terminal oxidant, have been prepared and effectively employed. In addition, the first general palladium-catalyzed route to the carbonylation of diols is reported. In this system, carbon monoxide (1 atm) serves the carbonyl source, (2,9-dimethylphenanthroline)Pd(OAc) 2 acts as the catalyst, and N-chlorosuccinimide and iodosobenzene are the oxidants for 1,2- and 1,3-diols, respectively. This

  14. Multiparameter double hole contrast detail phantom: Ability to detect image displacement due to off position anode stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, Nur Farahana; Majid, Zafri Azran Abdul; Sapuan, Abdul Halim; Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal Che; Junet, Laila Kalidah

    2015-04-01

    Contrast Detail phantom is a quality control tool to analyze the performance of imaging devices. Currently, its function is solely to evaluate the contrast detail characteristic of imaging system. It consists of drilled hole which gives effect to the penetration of x-ray beam divergence to pass through the base of each hole. This effect will lead to false appearance of image from its original location but it does not being visualized in the radiograph. In this study, a new design of Contrast Detail phantom's hole which consists of double hole construction has been developed. It can detect the image displacement which is due to off position of anode stem from its original location. The double hole differs from previous milled hole, whereby it consists of combination of different hole diameters. Small hole diameter (3 mm) is positioned on top of larger hole diameter (10 mm). The thickness of double hole acrylic blocks is 13 mm. Result revealed` that, Multiparameter Double Hole Contrast Detail phantom can visualize the shifted flaw image quality produced by x-ray machine due to improper position of the anode stem which is attached to rotor and stator. The effective focal spot of x-ray beam also has been shifted from the center of collimator as a result of off-position anode stem. As a conclusion, the new design of double hole Contrast Detail phantom able to measure those parameters in a well manner.

  15. Do Black Women’s Religious Beliefs About Body Image Influence Their Confidence in Their Ability to Lose Weight?

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Alexandria G.; Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Ruhland-Petty, Therese; Berman, Marcie; Lister, Sheila; Christensen, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Black women are disproportionately burdened by obesity but maintain body satisfaction and strong religious commitment. Although faith-based weight-loss interventions have been effective at promoting weight loss among blacks, little is known about how body image and religious views contribute to weight-related beliefs among religious black women. The purpose of this study was to examine whether demographic and health history factors, religious involvement, and beliefs about body i...

  16. Ability of preoperative 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging to predict the absence of side-specific extracapsular extension of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Tohru; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Kawahara, Takashi; Manabe, Tomoko; Miyake, Mototaka; Arai, Eri; Kanai, Yae; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have shown an improvement in prostate cancer diagnosis with the use of 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. We retrospectively assessed the ability of this imaging technique to predict side-specific extracapsular extension of prostate cancer. From October 2007 to August 2011, prostatectomy was carried out in 396 patients after preoperative 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Among these, 132 (primary sample) and 134 patients (validation sample) underwent 12-core prostate biopsy at the National Cancer Center Hospital of Tokyo, Japan, and at other institutions, respectively. In the primary dataset, univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to predict side-specific extracapsular extension using variables determined preoperatively, including 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging findings (T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging). A prediction model was then constructed and applied to the validation study sample. Multivariate analysis identified four significant independent predictors (P Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings, ≥2 positive biopsy cores on each side and a maximum percentage of positive cores ≥31% on each side. The negative predictive value was 93.9% in the combination model with these four predictors, meanwhile the positive predictive value was 33.8%. Good reproducibility of these four significant predictors and the combination model was observed in the validation study sample. The side-specific extracapsular extension prediction by the biopsy Gleason score and factors associated with tumor location, including a positive 3.0-Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging finding, have a high negative predictive value, but a low positive predictive value. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  17. Preliminary Results of Relationship between Preoperative Walking Ability and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Morphology in Patients with Lumbar Canal Stenosis: Comparison between Trefoil and Triangle Types of Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Parisa; Yazdanian, Taravat; Benzel, Edward C

    2017-08-01

    Cross-sectional. To examine the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphology stenosis grades and preoperative walking ability in patients with lumbar canal stenosis (LCS). No previous study has analyzed the correlation between MRI morphology stenosis grades and walking ability in patients with LCS. This prospective study included 98 consecutive patients with LCS who were candidates for surgery. Using features identified in T2-weighted axial magnetic, stenosis type was determined at the maximal stenosis level, and only trefoil and triangle stenosis grade types were considered because of sufficient sample size. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were assessed by calculating weighted kappa coefficients. Symptom severity was evaluated via the Japanese Orthopedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). Walking ability was assessed using the Self-Paced Walking Test (SPWT) and JOABPEQ subscales. Demographic characteristics, SPWT scores, and JOABPEQ scores were compared between patients with trefoil and triangle stenosis types. The mean patient age was 58.1 (standard deviation, 8.4) years. The kappa values of the MRI morphology stenosis grade types showed a perfect agreement between the stenosis grade types. The trefoil group (n=53) and triangle group (n=45) showed similar preoperative JOABPEQ subscale scores (e.g., low back pain, lumbar function, and mental health) and were not significantly different in age, BMI, duration of symptoms, or lumbar stenosis levels (all p>0.05); however, trefoil stenosis grade type was associated with a decreased walking ability according to the SPWT and JOABPEQ subscale scores. These findings suggest preoperative walking ability is more profoundly affected in patients with trefoil type stenosis than in those with triangle type stenosis.

  18. Effect of T1-mapping technique and diminished image resolution on quantification of infarct mass and its ability in predicting appropriate ICD therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Nadia A; Ramanan, Venkat; Wright, Graham A; Ukwatta, Eranga

    2018-03-01

    Myocardial infarct (MI) may consist of an infarct core (IC) and a heterogeneous, semi-viable border zone (BZ). Patients with chronic MI in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium are at increased risk of developing ventricular arrhythmias, and may therefore qualify for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy. Indices based on MI mass, as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, are shown to be sensitive in predicting adverse ventricular arrhythmic events. However, several factors, such as imaging technique and spatial resolution affect the accuracy of MI mass quantification. The aim of this study was to compare the MI masses determined by T1-mapping CMR techniques to those of conventional late Gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) using inversion-recovery fast gradient-echo (IR-FGRE). We additionally aimed to investigate the effect of diminishing image resolution on quantification of the MI mass and its ability to predict appropriate ICD therapy. Thirty-eight patients with known MI underwent acquisitions of three CMR imaging techniques: the multi-contrast late enhancement (MCLE) and modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) T1-mapping techniques, and conventional inversion recovery fast gradient echo (IR-FGRE) about 20 minutes after double-dose injection of Gadolinium. We post-processed images to quantify IC and BZ masses determined by each CMR technique using a full-width half-maximum (FWHM) approach in IR-FGRE images and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm for T1-mapping images. To determine the impact of spatial resolution in sensitivity of predicting ICD events, we artificially diminished resolution of MCLE images acquired from a separate group of 27 patients who had been followed up for ICD therapy and compared the MI masses estimated from the original and downsampled MCLE images. Twelve patients out of 27 (44%) received ICD therapy (i.e., one or more delivered shock) during the follow up stage. Between each

  19. Ability to Gain Control Over One’s Own Brain Activity and its Relation to Spiritual Practice: A Multimodal Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia E. Kober

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual practice, such as prayer or meditation, is associated with focusing attention on internal states and self-awareness processes. As these cognitive control mechanisms presumably are also important for neurofeedback (NF, we investigated whether people who pray frequently (N = 20 show a higher ability of self-control over their own brain activity compared to a control group of individuals who rarely pray (N = 20. All participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and one session of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR, 12–15 Hz based NF training. Individuals who reported a high frequency of prayer showed improved NF performance compared to individuals who reported a low frequency of prayer. The individual ability to control one’s own brain activity was related to volumetric aspects of the brain. In the low frequency of prayer group, gray matter volumes in the right insula and inferior frontal gyrus were positively associated with NF performance, supporting prior findings that more general self-control networks are involved in successful NF learning. In contrast, participants who prayed regularly showed a negative association between gray matter volume in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann’s area (BA 10 and NF performance. Due to their regular spiritual practice, they might have been more skillful in gating incoming information provided by the NF system and avoiding task-irrelevant thoughts.

  20. Measuring Creative Imagery Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M. Jankowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA, developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail, originality (the ability to produce unique imagery, and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery. TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of eight studies on a total sample of more than 1,700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument’s validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science.

  1. Measuring creative imagery abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Dorota M.; Karwowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative visual imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA), developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail), originality (the ability to produce unique imagery), and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery). TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of nine studies on a total sample of more than 1700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument's validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science. PMID:26539140

  2. Far field photoluminescence imaging of single AlGaN nanowire in the sub-wavelength scale using confinement of polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivadasan, A.K.; Dhara, Sandip [Nanomaterials and Sensors Section, Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kalpakkam (India); Sardar, Manas [Theoretical Studies Section, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    Till now the nanoscale focusing and imaging in the sub-diffraction limit is achieved mainly with the help of plasmonic field enhancement by confining the light assisted with noble metal nanostructures. Using far field imaging technique, we have recorded polarized spectroscopic photoluminescence (PL) imaging of a single AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∝100 nm using confinement of polarized light. It is found that the PL from a single NW is influenced by the proximity to other NWs. The PL intensity is proportional to 1/(l x d), where l and d are the average NW length and separation between the NWs, respectively. We suggest that the proximity induced PL intensity enhancement can be understood by assuming the existence of reasonably long lived photons in the intervening space between the NWs. A nonzero non-equilibrium population of such photons may cause stimulated emission leading to the enhancement of PL emission with the intensity proportional to 1/(l x d). The enhancement of PL emission facilitates far field spectroscopic imaging of a single semiconductor AlGaN NW of sub-wavelength dimension. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  4. Determining scope position during colonoscopy without use of ionizing radiation or magnetic imaging: the enhanced mapping ability of the NeoGuide Endoscopy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, Johannes; Jakobs, Ralf; Van Dam, Jacques; Weickert, Uwe; Riemann, Jürgen F; Eickhoff, Axel

    2011-02-01

    Knowledge of the position and shape of the endoscope could overcome many challenges of performing colonoscopy, e.g., loop formation. A novel computer-assisted colonoscope (NeoGuide Endoscopy System) delivers a real-time, three-dimensional map of the tip position and insertion tube shape in addition to the video image of the colon lumen. The aim of this study is to evaluate the mapping capabilities of the NeoGuide Endoscopy System in terms of colonic looping, insertion depth, tip position, and tip angle formation. Ten endoscopists with various levels of experience were each shown 70 map images generated by the NeoGuide endoscopy system in a benchtop anatomical colon model. First endoscopists were asked to determine the tip angle based on the map image and the system's corresponding tip positioning aid (20 images). In the second part they had to identify the scope-tip position in the colon model (40 images). In the third part ten images were presented for identification of colonic loops. The tip angle was correctly identified in 99% (198/200) of images. Using only the map images the scope position was accurately determined in 87.5% (350/400). Identification of colonic looping of the scope was appropriate in 99% (99/100). Overall accuracy was 92.4%, and overall positive predictive value was 94.9%. Three-dimensional map images generated by the NeoGuide endoscopy system provide accurate information regarding tip position, insertion tube position, and colonic looping.

  5. A Study of the Relationship between Virtual Reality (Perceived Realism) and the Ability of Children To Create, Manipulate and Utilize Mental Images for Spatially Related Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merickel, Mark L.

    The premise of the Creative Technology Project, a collaboration by Autodesk, Inc., the School of Education at Oregon State University, and Novato Unified School District in the San Francisco Bay Area, was that children's cognitive abilities could be enhanced by having them develop, displace, transform, and interact with 2D and 3D…

  6. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures - paper 2: the ability of fluorescence imaging to detect differences in fluorosis prevalence and severity for different fluoride intakes from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Srisilapanan, Patcharawan; Korwanich, Narumanas; Taylor, Andrew; Goodwin, Michaela; Pretty, Iain A

    2012-08-21

    To assess the ability of fluorescence imaging to detect a dose response relationship between fluorosis severity and different levels of fluoride in water supplies compared to remote photographic scoring in selected populations participating in an observational, epidemiological survey in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8-13 years. For each child the fluoride content of cooking water samples (CWS) was assessed to create categorical intervals of water fluoride concentration. Fluorescence images were taken of the maxillary central incisors and analyzed for dental fluorosis using two different software techniques. Output metrics for the fluorescence imaging techniques were compared to TF scores from blinded photographic scores obtained from the survey. Data from 553 subjects were available. Both software analysis techniques demonstrated significant correlations with the photographic scores. The metrics for area effected by fluorosis and the overall fluorescence loss had the strongest association with the photographic TF score (Spearman's rho 0.664 and 0.652 respectively). Both software techniques performed well for comparison of repeat fluorescence images with ICC values of 0.95 and 0.85 respectively. This study supports the potential use of fluorescence imaging for the objective quantification of dental fluorosis. Fluorescence imaging was able to discriminate between populations with different fluoride exposures on a comparable level to remote photographic scoring with acceptable levels of repeatability.

  7. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain Imaging Investigation of Phonological Awareness and Passage Comprehension Abilities in Adult Recipients of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisconti, Silvia; Shulkin, Masha; Hu, Xiaosu; Basura, Gregory J.; Kileny, Paul R.; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine how the brains of individuals with cochlear implants (CIs) respond to spoken language tasks that underlie successful language acquisition and processing. Method: During functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging, CI recipients with hearing impairment (n = 10, mean age: 52.7 ± 17.3 years) and…

  8. Safety, dosimetry and tumor detection ability of 68Ga-NOTA-AE105 - a novel radioligand for uPAR PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Brandt-Larsen, Malene

    2017-01-01

    safety and biodistribution in normal tissues and uptake in tumor lesions. METHODS: Ten patients (6 PC, 2 BC and 2 UBC) received a single intravenous dose of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 (154 + 59 MBq; range 48-208 MBq). The biodistribution and radiation dosimetry were assessed by serial PET/CT scans (10 minutes, 1...... and 2 hours p.i.). Safety assessment included measurements of vital signs with regular intervals during the imaging sessions and laboratory blood screening tests performed before and after injection. In a subgroup of patients, the in vivo stability of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 was determined in collected blood...... therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. In the study, uPAR Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using a (68)Ga-labelled version of the uPAR targeting peptide (AE105) was investigated in a group of patients with BC, PC and UBC. The aim of this first-in-humans, Phase I, clinical trial was to investigate...

  9. Characterization of the Campbell-Stokes sunshine duration recorder and its ability to derive direct solar radiation by using digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Romero, Alejandro; González, Josep-Abel; Calbó, Josep; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2014-05-01

    The World Meteorological Organization defines the sunshine duration (SD) as the time that, along a given period, direct solar irradiance (DSI) exceeds the threshold level of 120 W/m2. Since the end of 19th century, the Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder (CSSR) has been the most commonly used instrument used for measuring SD. Due to the large number of long records that exist worldwide, valuable climatic information can be extracted from them. Many authors have used the daily SD (as obtained from the measurement of the length of burn for a given card) to obtain additional information about solar radiation, by using Ångström-Prescott type formulas. Contrarily, the burn width has not been systematically used. Theoretically, the burn is wider (narrower) when the direct insolation is stronger (weaker). The aim of this research is to show the relationship between burn width and DSI, and to prove whether this relationship depends on the type of CSSR and burning card. The research has been carried out in Girona (NE Spain) for a period of two years (from January 2012 to January 2014). Two different models of CSSR (which use different types of cards) and a pyrheliometer from Kipp&Zonen were used to measure SD and DSI, respectively. A semi-automatic method based on image processing of digital scanned images of burnt cards is presented. The method can be summarized in four steps: (i) scan each band on a green background; (ii) apply a digital process to increase the contrast of the burn; (iii) define two/three points in the image, depending of the geometry of the card, to point the center of the day (12.00 TST) on the image and define the trajectory of the sun with 1-minute intervals; and (iv) apply a program to make cross-sections every minute and measure the width of burn. So, after all of this process, we obtain a temporal evolution of the burn width with 1-minute resolution and distinguishing between morning and afternoon. The results show that there is a good correlation

  10. Tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and ATR-mode sample excitation for super-resolution Raman imaging of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman, A. L.; Gordon, M. J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5080 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    A tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) excitation and collection is described and used to demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited (super-resolution) optical and chemical characterization of surfaces. ATR illumination is combined with an Au optical antenna tip to show that (i) the tip can quantitatively transduce the optical near-field (evanescent waves) above the surface by scattering photons into the far-field, (ii) the ATR geometry enables excitation and characterization of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), whose associated optical fields are shown to enhance Raman scattering from a thin layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and (iii) SPPs can be used to plasmonically excite the tip for super-resolution chemical imaging of patterned CuPc via tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). ATR-illumination TERS is also quantitatively compared with the more conventional side-on illumination scheme. In both cases, spatial resolution was better than 40 nm and tip on/tip off Raman enhancement factors were >6500. Furthermore, ATR illumination was shown to provide similar Raman signal levels at lower “effective” pump powers due to additional optical energy delivered by SPPs to the active region in the tip-surface gap.

  11. A theoretical investigation of super-resolution CARS imaging via coherent and incoherent saturation of transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, W.P.; Beeker, Willem; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, Petra; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2011-01-01

    We review two approaches to achieving sub-diffraction-limited resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy (Beeker et al., Opt. Express, 2009, 17, 22632 and Beeker et al., J. Herek, Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 012507). We performed a numerical investigation, based on the density

  12. Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  13. Tests of Cognitive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    specific abilities while Ree and others (Olea & Ree, 1994; Ree, TESTS OF GENERAL COGNITIVE ABILITY 9 Carretta, & Doub , 1998/1999; Ree, Carretta...Ree, M. J., Carretta, T. R., & Doub , T. (1998/1999). A Test of Three Models of the Role of g and Prior Job Knowledge in the Acquisition of Subsequent

  14. Girls underestimate maths ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    A study by psychologists in the US has found that high-school girls rate their competence in mathematics lower than boys, even for those with similar abilities (Front. Psychol. 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00386).

  15. Predicting Student Performance in Sonographic Scanning Using Spatial Ability as an Ability Determinent of Skill Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Douglas Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Spatial ability refers to an individual's capacity to visualize and mentally manipulate three dimensional objects. Since sonographers manually manipulate 2D and 3D sonographic images to generate multi-viewed, logical, sequential renderings of an anatomical structure, it can be assumed that spatial ability is central to the perception and…

  16. Development of arithmetical abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Levstek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arithmetic (from the word 'arithmos' which means 'numbers' is an elementary branch of mathematics. Numeracy is essential for understanding mathematics, so the development of arithmetic abilities has been an area of scientific research for a long time. Recent research has shown that the development of arithmetic abilities is not based only on gaining experience and learning. Some arithmetic abilities, especially the sense of quantity, are innate. Even babies are able to distinguish between groups with different number of elements and they perceive numeracy amodally. Six-month-olds distinguish between two groups with the numeracy ratio of 1 : 2. With age this ratio improves rapidly. Five-year-old children already distinguish between groups with the number ratio 7 : 8. The ability to compare two quantities begins to develop after 15 months of age and children learn how to count spontaneously, together with the acquisition of language. Speech enables children to understand number in its abstract, symbolic sense, thus opening the way to symbolic arithmetic. During the preschool period children use intuition when doing calculations, but in school the arithmetic is based on the knowledge of arithmetical algorithms. So, in order to acquire mathematical knowledge, it is necessary to incorporate memory and automate arithmetical processes, without the use of intuition. However, research has shown that intuition is very important and is even a predictive factor for the development of mathematical abilities throughout the schooling process.

  17. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

  18. Synchronization of Mental Abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guney, A.

    2008-01-01

    I think it is better to summarize some cognitive issues in relation to this subject; how we learn, how we should organize learning (instructions), knowledge, etc. before treating creativity and rationality. Is it, really, possible to consider creativity without any kind of involvement of the ability

  19. Music and nonmusical abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E G

    2001-06-01

    Reports that exposure to music causes benefits in nonmusical domains have received widespread attention in the mainstream media. Such reports have also influenced public policy. The so-called "Mozart effect" actually refers to two relatively distinct phenomena. One concerns short-term increases in spatial abilities that are said to occur from listening to music composed by Mozart. The other refers to the possibility that formal training in music yields nonmusical benefits. A review of the relevant findings indicates that the short-term effect is small and unreliable. Moreover, when it is evident, it can be explained by between-condition differences in the listener's mood or levels of cognitive arousal. By contrast, the effect of music lessons on nonmusical aspects of cognitive development is still an open question. Several studies have reported positive associations between formal music lessons and abilities in nonmusical (e.g., linguistic, mathematical, and spatial) domains. Nonetheless, compelling evidence for a causal link remains elusive.

  20. General English Ability, Specific Purpose English Ability, and Computer Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapphal, Kanchana

    2003-01-01

    Aims to answer the following research questions: (1) Are general English ability and specific purpose English ability related to computer skills? and (2) Is general English ability transferable to specific purpose English ability? Subjects were third year science students enrolled in an English for academic purposes course. (Author/VWL)

  1. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  2. Varieties of numerical abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaene, S

    1992-08-01

    This paper provides a tutorial introduction to numerical cognition, with a review of essential findings and current points of debate. A tacit hypothesis in cognitive arithmetic is that numerical abilities derive from human linguistic competence. One aim of this special issue is to confront this hypothesis with current knowledge of number representations in animals, infants, normal and gifted adults, and brain-lesioned patients. First, the historical evolution of number notations is presented, together with the mental processes for calculating and transcoding from one notation to another. While these domains are well described by formal symbol-processing models, this paper argues that such is not the case for two other domains of numerical competence: quantification and approximation. The evidence for counting, subitizing and numerosity estimation in infants, children, adults and animals is critically examined. Data are also presented which suggest a specialization for processing approximate numerical quantities in animals and humans. A synthesis of these findings is proposed in the form of a triple-code model, which assumes that numbers are mentally manipulated in an arabic, verbal or analogical magnitude code depending on the requested mental operation. Only the analogical magnitude representation seems available to animals and preverbal infants.

  3. Concept Car Design and Ability Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiefeng; Lu, Hairong

    The concept design as a symbol of creative design thinking, reflecting on the future design of exploratory and prospective, as a vehicle to explore the notion of future car design, design inspiration and creativity is not only a bold display, more through demonstrate the concept, reflects the company's technological strength and technological progress, and thus enhance their brand image. Present Chinese automobile design also has a very big disparity with world level, through cultivating students' concept design ability, to establish native design features and self-reliant brand image is practical and effective ways, also be necessary and pressing.

  4. Cognitive abilities and creating metaphorical names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanesyan, Marina O.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive processing of metaphor creation has been insufficiently investigated. Creating metaphors requires the ability to work in a fantastic, impossible context, using symbolic and associative means to express oneís thoughts. It has been shown recently that intelligence plays an important role in the creation of metaphors, but it is not the main factor in determining their success. The present research explores the roles of conceptual abilities, categorical abilities, and flexibility (as the factor creativity in metaphor creation. Participants (n = 38 young adults were asked to come up with names for three photos, without any special instruction to create metaphors. To classify conceptual abilities we used ìConceptual Synthesisî (M. A. Kholodnaya, 2012; to measure categorical ability we used the subtest ìSimilaritiesî (D. Wechsler, 1955; to identify the role of creativity in the metaphor process we used the test of ìUnusual Usesî (J. P. Guilford, 1960. The creation of complex metaphorical names was associated with a tendency to create highly organized mental structures and to retain them within the general semantic context (r = 0.344, p < 0.05. The tendency to create single-level situational connections was associated with a tendency to give specific names to photos (r = 0.475, p < 0.01. Photographic images proved out to be fruitful stimuli to investigate the processing of visual information. We developed a preliminary classification of names: 1 concrete; 2 situational; 3 abstract; 4 metaphorical (M1 and M2. We identified two types of metaphorical names — perceptual and complex metaphors — that relate to conceptual abilities in different ways. It is inaccurate to speak about a general concept of ìmetaphorical abilitiesî; we should differentiate the psychological mechanisms that lie at their base.

  5. Historical Evolution of Spatial Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical evolution and cross-cultural differences in spatial abilities are analyzed. Spatial abilities have been found to be significantly associated with the complexity of geographical conditions and survival demands. Although impaired spatial cognition is found in cases of, exclusively or predominantly, right hemisphere pathology, it is proposed that this asymmetry may depend on the degree of training in spatial abilities. It is further proposed that spatial cognition might have evolved in a parallel way with cultural evolution and environmental demands. Contemporary city humans might be using spatial abilities in some new, conceptual tasks that did not exist in prehistoric times: mathematics, reading, writing, mechanics, music, etc. Cross-cultural analysis of spatial abilities in different human groups, normalization of neuropsychological testing instruments, and clinical observations of spatial ability disturbances in people with different cultural backgrounds and various spatial requirements, are required to construct a neuropsychological theory of brain organization of spatial cognition.

  6. Assessment of motor imagery ability and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Felix Rodacki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in motor imagery ability in response to a specific dart throwing training. Twelve subjects (17-22 years with no previous experience in dart throwing or imagery agreed to participate. Changes in imagery ability were assessed using the Sports Imagery Questionnaire before (pretreatment and after (post-treatment an imagery training program consisting of 10 sessions. Retention (RET was assessed 2 weeks after training. The program included mental exercises designed to develop vivid images, to control one’s own images, and to increase perception about performance. Comparison of the imagery training conditions (training alone, training accompanied, observing a colleague, and during assessment showed no differences between the pretreatment, post-treatment and RET evaluations. Although imagery ability did not respond to training, significant differences between imagery domains (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and animic were found (p<0.05, except between the visual and animic domains (p=0.58. These differences might be related to subject’s domain preference subject during the imagery process and to the nature of the task in which the skill technique used seems to be a relevant aspect.

  7. Language mastery, narrative abilities and oral expression abilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of language and language mastery for science learning has been the object of extensive investigation in recent decades, leading to ample recognition. However, specific focus on the role of narrative abilities is still scarce. This work focuses on the relevance of narrative abilities for chemistry learning.

  8. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances. We ensured exogenous...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub-teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  9. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We ensured...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub-teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  10. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 (student) teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub- teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  11. Giving Devices the Ability to Exercise Reason

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Keeley

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the capabilities that separates humans from computers has been the ability to exercise "reason / judgment". Computers and computerized devices have provided excellent platforms for following rules. Computer programs provide the scripts for processing the rules. The exercise of reason, however, is more of an image processing function than a function composed of a series of rules. The exercise of reason is more right brain than left brain. It involves the interpretation of information and balancing inter-related alternatives. This paper will discuss a new way to define and process information that will give devices the ability to exercise human-like reasoning and judgment. The paper will discuss the characteristics of a "dynamic graphical language" in the context of addressing judgment, since judgment is often required to adjust rules when operating in a dynamic environment. The paper will touch on architecture issues and how judgment is integrated with rule processing.

  12. The Image Dispositif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Berardi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available What is interesting is not the image as a representation of reality, but its dynamic power, its ability to stir up and build projections, interactions and narrative frames structuring reality. What is interesting in the image is its ability to select among infinite possible perceptual experiences, so that imagination becomes imagin/action.

  13. Exceptional cognitive ability: the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinski, David

    2009-07-01

    Characterizing the outcomes related to the phenotype of exceptional cognitive abilities has been feasible in recent years due to the availability of large samples of intellectually precocious adolescents identified by modern talent searches that have been followed-up longitudinally over multiple decades. The level and pattern of cognitive abilities, even among participants within the top 1% of general intellectual ability, are related to differential developmental trajectories and important life accomplishments: The likelihood of earning a doctorate, earning exceptional compensation, publishing novels, securing patents, and earning tenure at a top university (and the academic disciplines within which tenure is most likely to occur) all vary as a function of individual differences in cognitive abilities assessed decades earlier. Individual differences that distinguish the able (top 1 in 100) from the exceptionally able (top 1 in 10,000) during early adolescence matter in life, and, given the heritability of general intelligence, they suggest that understanding the genetic and environmental origins of exceptional abilities should be a high priority for behavior genetic research, especially because the results for extreme groups could differ from the rest of the population. In addition to enhancing our understanding of the etiology of general intelligence at the extreme, such inquiry may also reveal fundamental determinants of specific abilities, like mathematical versus verbal reasoning, and the distinctive phenotypes that contrasting ability patterns are most likely to eventuate in at extraordinary levels.

  14. Balance ability and athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between balance ability and sport injury risk has been established in many cases, but the relationship between balance ability and athletic performance is less clear. This review compares the balance ability of athletes from different sports, determines if there is a difference in balance ability of athletes at different levels of competition within the same sport, determines the relationship of balance ability with performance measures and examines the influence of balance training on sport performance or motor skills. Based on the available data from cross-sectional studies, gymnasts tended to have the best balance ability, followed by soccer players, swimmers, active control subjects and then basketball players. Surprisingly, no studies were found that compared the balance ability of rifle shooters with other athletes. There were some sports, such as rifle shooting, soccer and golf, where elite athletes were found to have superior balance ability compared with their less proficient counterparts, but this was not found to be the case for alpine skiing, surfing and judo. Balance ability was shown to be significantly related to rifle shooting accuracy, archery shooting accuracy, ice hockey maximum skating speed and simulated luge start speed, but not for baseball pitching accuracy or snowboarding ranking points. Prospective studies have shown that the addition of a balance training component to the activities of recreationally active subjects or physical education students has resulted in improvements in vertical jump, agility, shuttle run and downhill slalom skiing. A proposed mechanism for the enhancement in motor skills from balance training is an increase in the rate of force development. There are limited data on the influence of balance training on motor skills of elite athletes. When the effectiveness of balance training was compared with resistance training, it was found that resistance training produced superior performance results for

  15. High ability: Giftedness and talent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Prieto Sánchez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the journal aims at putting together national and international research on high abilities, and is divided into three sections: 1 Roles and cognitive, emotional and professional competences of high ability students’ teachers, 2 Identification and assessment of high ability students, 3 Analysis of practices, programs and mentoring of high ability students’ attention to diversity.The articles are authored by scholars from nine different countries (Spain, Argentina, UK, USA, Russia, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Portugal and Poland, from sixteen different Spanish and international universities: Alicante (Spain, Autónoma de Barcelona (Spain, Málaga (Spain, Murcia (Spain, Navarra (Spain, Oviedo (Spain, Tufts University (USA, Yale University (USA, Moscow State University (Russia, Nacional de La Plata (Argentina, University of Connecticut (USA, Universidade do Minho (Portugal, Universidade da Beira Interior (Portugal, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil, King Faisal University (Saudi Arabia and Universidad de Szczecin (Poland.

  16. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  17. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-07-09

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one's mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage.

  18. Sexual orientation and cognitive abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, G E; Pillard, R C

    1991-06-01

    We asked whether homosexual and heterosexual men and women differ on standard measures of cognitive ability. Subjects were adults recruited for a family study of sexual orientation. They completed the Fy Scale of the California Psychological Inventory, a self-administered measure of psychological "femininity," and were given subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Primary Mental Abilities test which had been previously shown to discriminate between the sexes. We predicted that homosexual subjects would score significantly in the gender-atypical direction on the Fy scale. We also predicted that they would achieve scores on the tests of cognitive abilities significantly in the direction of the other gender. Comparisons were made between homosexual and heterosexual individuals within gender. Also, comparisons were made between heterosexual men and women to see if our results replicate differences typically found between the genders. As predicted, both homosexual men and women were strongly gender-atypical on the Fy scale relative to their heterosexual counterparts. However, neither differed from heterosexuals on any of the measures of cognitive abilities. Heterosexual men did better than women on the Primary Mental Abilities spatial relations test. We conclude that sexual orientation is not related to specific cognitive abilities.

  19. Deafness and motor abilities level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zwierzchowska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The audition injury hinders some motor motions and the organised coordination at the higher level and may be a cause of disturbances and disorder in some motor abilities adoption. It was assumed that deafness including its aetiology and injury mechanism may significantly influence the motor development of human being. The study aimed in checking if the deafness, as a result of various unfavourable factors, determines the motor development of children and youngsters. Consequently the dependency between qualitative features i.e.: signed motor level and aetiology, audition injury mechanism and the deafness degree was examined. The mechanism and aetiology of hearing correlated with the motor abilities displayed statistically significant dependencies in few motor trials only. Revealed correlations regarded mostly the coordination trials excluding the flexibility one. Statistically significant dependencies between the audition diminution and the motor abilities level were not found.

  20. Perinatal cortical growth and childhood neurocognitive abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbone, R; Counsell, S J; Kapellou, O; Dyet, L; Kennea, N; Hajnal, J; Allsop, J M; Cowan, F; Edwards, A D

    2011-10-18

    This observational cohort study addressed the hypothesis that after preterm delivery brain growth between 24 and 44 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) is related to global neurocognitive ability in later childhood. Growth rates for cerebral volume and cortical surface area were estimated in 82 infants without focal brain lesions born before 30 weeks PMA by using 217 magnetic resonance images obtained between 24 and 44 weeks PMA. Abilities were assessed at 2 years using the Griffiths Mental Development Scale and at 6 years using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised (WPPSI-R), the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment (NEPSY), and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). Analysis was by generalized least-squares regression. Mean test scores approximated population averages. Cortical growth was directly related to the Griffiths Developmental Quotient (DQ), the WPPSI-R full-scale IQ, and a NEPSY summary score but not the MABC score and in exploration of subtests to attention, planning, memory, language, and numeric and conceptual abilities but not motor skills. The mean (95% confidence interval) estimated reduction in cortical surface area at term corrected age associated with a 1 SD fall in test score was as follows: DQ 7.0 (5.8-8.5); IQ 6.0 (4.9-7.3); and NEPSY 9.1 (7.5-11.0) % · SD(-1). Total brain volume growth was not correlated with any test score. The rate of cerebral cortical growth between 24 and 44 weeks PMA predicts global ability in later childhood, particularly complex cognitive functions but not motor functions.

  1. Genetic transmission of reading ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swagerman, Suzanne C.; Van Bergen, Elsje; Dolan, Conor; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Koenis, Marinka M.G.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2017-01-01

    Reading is the processing of written language. Family resemblance for reading (dis)ability might be due to transmission of a genetic liability or due to family environment, including cultural transmission from parents to offspring. Familial-risk studies exploring neurobehavioral precursors for

  2. Competence: Commodification of Human Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Soonghee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the meaning and presumptions of competence in the concrete context of knowledge capitalism. First, the nature of competence as a "commodification of human ability" that obtains a standardized monetary value to sell in the labor market, is elucidated by applying Karl Marx's critical theory. Second, it is…

  3. Learning anatomy enhances spatial ability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorstenbosch, M.A.T.M.; Klaassen, T.P.; Donders, A.R.T.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Bolhuis, S.M.; Laan, R.F.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of

  4. Spatial Ability, Sexism and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Robin

    1980-01-01

    Indicates that women are eased out of science careers by factors other than a supposed lack of spatial ability. Advocates that the masculine bias in science be reduced through the humanization of science and technology and a realignment of societal goals. (GS)

  5. Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, H. H.; Maree, J. G.; Sibanda, E.

    2006-01-01

    While exceptional leaders share certain qualities like a strong personal ethic and a compelling vision of the future, research has failed to provide conclusive "proof" of the link between a leader's effectiveness and his/ her emotional intelligence (defined from a cognitive perspective, as a set of abilities). Given the increased…

  6. Learning Ability and Memory Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenfan

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between learning ability and memory-monitoring performance was studied for 289 undergraduates in a 5-stage feeling of knowing (FOK) procedure with confidence of recognition (COR) judgments. Results show that fast and slow learners do not differ in magnitude of FOK and COR. (SLD)

  7. increased larval competitive ability without

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... tion at high density should result in the increase of efficiency of conversion of food to biomass, and were better interpreted through the lens of α-selection. We show here that populations of D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta subjected to extreme larval crowding evolve greater competitive ability and pre-adult ...

  8. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  9. Specific Abilities May Increment Psychometric g for High Ability Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 04/2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04/2015 – 08/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...higher ability groups. Intelligence, 23, 45-57. Lynn, R. (1990). Does Spearman’s g decline at high levels? Some evidence from Scotland . The Journal...1979). Use of the position analysis questionnaire for establishing the job component validity of tests. Journal of Applied Psychology, 64, 51

  10. IMAGE QUATY ASSESSMENT FOR VHR REMOTE SENSING IMAGE CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data from remote sensing images are widely used for characterizing land use and land cover at present. With the increasing availability of very high resolution (VHR remote sensing images, the remote sensing image classification becomes more and more important for information extraction. The VHR remote sensing images are rich in details, but high within-class variance as well as low between-class variance make the classification of ground cover a difficult task. What’s more, some related studies show that the quality of VHR remote sensing images also has a great influence on the ability of the automatic image classification. Therefore, the research that how to select the appropriate VHR remote sensing images to meet the application of classification is of great significance. In this context, the factors of VHR remote sensing image classification ability are discussed and some indices are selected for describing the image quality and the image classification ability objectively. Then, we explore the relationship of the indices of image quality and image classification ability under a specific classification framework. The results of the experiments show that these image quality indices are not effective for indicating the image classification ability directly. However, according to the image quality metrics, we can still propose some suggestion for the application of classification.

  11. INDIVIDUAL ABILITIES AND LIFELONG LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Yu. Burov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new and emerging technologies in education, learning environments and methods that have to satisfy lifelong learning, from school age to retirement, on the basis of the psychophysiological model of the cognitive abilities formation. It covers such topics as: evaluation of a human (accounting schoolchildren, youth and adults features abilities and individual propensities, individual trajectory of learning, adaptive learning strategy and design, recommendation on curriculum design, day-to-day support for individual’s learning, assessment of a human learning environment and performance, recommendation regards vocational retraining and/or further carrier etc.. The specific goal is to facilitate a broader understanding of the promise and pitfalls of these technologies and working (learning/teaching environments in global education/development settings, with special regard to the human as subject in the system and to the collaboration of humans and technical, didactic and organizational subsystems.

  12. Pictorial Visual Rotation Ability of Engineering Design Graphics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy Vaughn; Lane, Diarmaid; Clark, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to rotate visual mental images is a complex cognitive skill. It requires the building of graphical libraries of information through short or long term memory systems and the subsequent retrieval and manipulation of these towards a specified goal. The development of mental rotation skill is of critical importance within engineering…

  13. Implicit learning as an ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Scott Barry; Deyoung, Colin G; Gray, Jeremy R; Jiménez, Luis; Brown, Jamie; Mackintosh, Nicholas

    2010-09-01

    The ability to automatically and implicitly detect complex and noisy regularities in the environment is a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Despite considerable interest in implicit processes, few researchers have conceptualized implicit learning as an ability with meaningful individual differences. Instead, various researchers (e.g., Reber, 1993; Stanovich, 2009) have suggested that individual differences in implicit learning are minimal relative to individual differences in explicit learning. In the current study of English 16-17year old students, we investigated the association of individual differences in implicit learning with a variety of cognitive and personality variables. Consistent with prior research and theorizing, implicit learning, as measured by a probabilistic sequence learning task, was more weakly related to psychometric intelligence than was explicit associative learning, and was unrelated to working memory. Structural equation modeling revealed that implicit learning was independently related to two components of psychometric intelligence: verbal analogical reasoning and processing speed. Implicit learning was also independently related to academic performance on two foreign language exams (French, German). Further, implicit learning was significantly associated with aspects of self-reported personality, including intuition, Openness to Experience, and impulsivity. We discuss the implications of implicit learning as an ability for dual-process theories of cognition, intelligence, personality, skill learning, complex cognition, and language acquisition. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adolescent substance users: problem-solving abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A; Green, V; McNeil, D W

    1993-01-01

    Cognitive ability and cognitive egocentrism were examined as predictors of problem-solving ability in adolescent substance users in a vocational training program. Problem-solving outcome variables were significantly predicted by two cognitive ability measures, as well as by measures of cognitive independence and egocentrism in thinking. Extent of substance use did not affect cognitive ability, cognitive egocentrism, or problem-solving ability.

  15. Teachers of high ability pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cándido Genovard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyze the characteristics of gifted and talented students’ expert teachers. The subject background and the specific proprieties of the instructional process to meet gifted students’ educational needs are analyzed. The value of teacher-student interactions and of teaching and learning styles are highlighted. Also, we include different action guidelines and instructional resources to use in the classroom to teach these students. There is not an ideal teacher for high ability students. However, teachers must know what the teaching-learning processes are and how these work, and the diverse psychological, content and contextual variables involved in such processes.

  16. Videogame interventions and spatial ability interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Redick, Thomas S; Webster, Sean B

    2014-01-01

    .... In the current work, we investigate the available evidence for transfer specifically to nonverbal intelligence and spatial ability measures, given recent research that these abilities may be most...

  17. The Data Set on the Multiple Abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klynge, Alice Heegaard

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a data set on multiple abilities. The abilities cover the Literacy and Math Ability, the Creative and Innovative Ability, the Learning Ability, the Communication Ability, the Social Competency, the Self-Management Ability, the Environmental Awareness, the Civic Competency......, the Intercultural Awareness, and the Health Awareness. The data stems from a unique cross-sectional survey carried out for the adult population in Denmark. Several dimensions and many questions pinpoint and measure every ability. The dimensions cover areas such as the individual behavior at work, the individual...

  18. Parkinson's disease and driving ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajiv; Pentland, Brian; Hunter, John; Provan, Frances

    2007-04-01

    To explore the driving problems associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to ascertain whether any clinical features or tests predict driver safety. The driving ability of 154 individuals with PD referred to a driving assessment centre was determined by a combination of clinical tests, reaction times on a test rig and an in-car driving test. The majority of cases (104, 66%) were able to continue driving although 46 individuals required an automatic transmission and 10 others needed car modifications. Ability to drive was predicted by the severity of physical disease, age, presence of other associated medical conditions, particularly dementia, duration of disease, brake reaction, time on a test rig and score on a driving test (all pdriving history were not correlated. Discriminant analysis revealed that the most important features in distinguishing safety to drive were severe physical disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 3), reaction time, moderate disease associated with another medical condition and high score on car testing. Most individuals with PD are safe to drive, although many benefit from car modifications or from using an automatic transmission. A combination of clinical tests and in-car driving assessment will establish safety to drive, and a number of clinical correlates can be shown to predict the likely outcome and may assist in the decision process. This is the largest series of consecutive patients seen at a driving assessment centre reported to date, and the first to devise a scoring system for on-road driving assessment.

  19. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  20. High Ability and Learner Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Hindal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The outstandingly able learner has been conceptualised, in terms of test and examination performance, as the learner showing superior academic performance which is markedly better than that of peers and in ways regarded as of value by wider society. In Kuwait, such superior examination performance leads to a classification regarded as being ‘gifted’. This study looks at the inter-correlations between performance in various subjects in examinations and then considers how examination performance correlates with measures of working memory capacity, extent of field dependency, extent of divergency and visual-spatial abilities. A very large sample of grade 7 Kuwaiti students (aged ~13 was involved, the sample being selected in such a way that it contained a high proportion of those regarded as ‘gifted’ under the procedures used in Kuwait. While specific learner characteristics have been related to examination performance, this study brings four different characteristics together to gain a picture of the way these characteristics may be seen in those who perform extremely well in examinations. Principal components analysis using varimax rotation, was used to look at the examination data and one factor accounted for 87% of the variance. A consideration of the examination papers led to the conclusion that the national examinations tested only recall-recognition. It was also found that those who performed best in all six subjects tended to be those who are highly divergent and strongly visual-spatial as well as those tending to have higher working memory capacities and being more field independent. The inter-correlations between the various learner characteristics are explained in terms of the way the brain is known to process information. The implications of the findings for assessment and for the way high ability is considered are discussed.

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  2. No Circadian Variation in Surgeons' Ability to Diagnose Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Bech; Amirian, Ilda; Kehlet Watt, Sara

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if there were circadian variations in surgeons' ability to diagnose acute appendicitis. DESIGN: Retrospective database study of all patients admitted to an acute surgical procedure under the potential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in a 4-year period. The day was divided...... patients were included. There were no age limitations or selection in sex. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the ability to diagnose appendicitis in day-evening hours vs night hours (p = 0.391), nor was any significant difference found on weekdays (Monday-Thursday) vs weekends (Friday...... of imaging had no effect on the ability to diagnose appendicitis. Male sex showed a higher probability of the diagnosis being appendicitis compared with other or no pathology (odds ratio: 3.094; p

  3. Childhood cognitive ability accounts for associations between cognitive ability and brain cortical thickness in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karama, S; Bastin, M E; Murray, C; Royle, N A; Penke, L; Muñoz Maniega, S; Gow, A J; Corley, J; Valdés Hernández, M del C; Lewis, J D; Rousseau, M-É; Lepage, C; Fonov, V; Collins, D L; Booth, T; Rioux, P; Sherif, T; Adalat, R; Starr, J M; Evans, A C; Wardlaw, J M; Deary, I J

    2014-05-01

    Associations between brain cortical tissue volume and cognitive function in old age are frequently interpreted as suggesting that preservation of cortical tissue is the foundation of successful cognitive aging. However, this association could also, in part, reflect a lifelong association between cognitive ability and cortical tissue. We analyzed data on 588 subjects from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 who had intelligence quotient (IQ) scores from the same cognitive test available at both 11 and 70 years of age as well as high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at approximately 73 years of age. Cortical thickness was estimated at 81 924 sampling points across the cortex for each subject using an automated pipeline. Multiple regression was used to assess associations between cortical thickness and the IQ measures at 11 and 70 years. Childhood IQ accounted for more than two-third of the association between IQ at 70 years and cortical thickness measured at age 73 years. This warns against ascribing a causal interpretation to the association between cognitive ability and cortical tissue in old age based on assumptions about, and exclusive reference to, the aging process and any associated disease. Without early-life measures of cognitive ability, it would have been tempting to conclude that preservation of cortical thickness in old age is a foundation for successful cognitive aging when, instead, it is a lifelong association. This being said, results should not be construed as meaning that all studies on aging require direct measures of childhood IQ, but as suggesting that proxy measures of prior cognitive function can be useful to take into consideration.

  4. Imaging dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  5. Improvement of Speaking Ability through Interrelated Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    How to improve students' ability of speaking English? That is the key point we are concerned about. This paper discusses the possibility and necessity of improving students' ability by combining the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

  6. Discourse abilities in the structure of intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronin A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. This article is devoted to empirical research on discourse abilities within the structure of cognitive abilities. Discourse abilities, as well as linguistic abilities, are part of language abilities, but they are directly linked with discourse practices and a certain communicative situation. Discourse abilities allow a person to effectively initiate, keep, expand, and complete the process of communication, using language appropriate to any given situation. These abilities contribute to making communication more effective and achieving mutual understanding between partners, while at the same time they speed up the process of forming an interaction strategy. the empirical verification of the construct “discourse abilities,” and the design of original diagnostic tests on them, led us to differentiate linguistic and discourse abilities. Objective. However, it is not yet clear what place discourse abilities occupy in the structure of cognitive abilities. This is the primary goal of our research. Method. The design of the study involved group testing (in groups of 15-35 people using the following methods: a discourse abilities test; a short selection test; a social intelligence test, and short variations of Torrance’s and Mednick’s tests. In total, 208 people (133 women and 75 men, ages 17 to 21 years participated in the study, all of them either first year humanities students or high school students from Moscow. Results and Discussion. The research results revealed that discourse abilities relevantly correlate with the majority of indicators of general and social intelligence and creativity (except non-verbal intelligence. Discourse abilities as part of the structure of cognitive capabilities form a discrete factor, and include relevant components such as verbal and general intelligence and indicators of social intelligence, such as the ability to group expressions. Structures indicative of cognitive abilities varied within the

  7. A method for achieving super-resolved widefield CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Kim M; Littleton, Brad; Turk, Douglas; McIntyre, Timothy J; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2010-08-30

    We propose a scheme for achieving widefield coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. This approach adds structured illumination to the widefield CARS configuration [Applied Physics Letters 84, 816 (2004)]. By capturing a number of images at different phases of the standing wave pattern, an image with up to three times the resolution of the original can be constructed. We develop a theoretical treatment of this system and perform numerical simulations for a typical CARS system, which indicate that resolutions around 120 nm are obtainable with the present scheme. As an imaging system, this method combines the advantages of sub-diffraction-limited resolution, endogenous contrast generation, and a wide field of view.

  8. Predicting Academic Achievement with Cognitive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Treena Eileen; Thompson, Lee Anne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explain variation in academic achievement with general cognitive ability and specific cognitive abilities. Grade point average, Wide Range Achievement Test III scores, and SAT scores represented academic achievement. The specific cognitive abilities of interest were: working memory, processing speed, and…

  9. Innovative Allies: Spatial and Creative Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Steve V.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and creative abilities are important for innovations in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, but talents are rarely developed from these abilities by schools, including among gifted children and adolescents who have a high potential to become STEM innovators. This article provides an overview of each ability and makes…

  10. Investigation of Problem-Solving and Problem-Posing Abilities of Seventh-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Elif Esra; Ünal, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of multiple problem-solving skills on the problem-posing abilities of gifted and non-gifted students and to assess whether the possession of such skills can predict giftedness or affect problem-posing abilities. Participants' metaphorical images of problem posing were also explored. Participants were 20 gifted…

  11. Video rate near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukofsky, S. J.; Grober, R. D.

    1997-11-01

    The enhanced transmission efficiency of chemically etched near-field optical fiber probes makes it possible to greatly increase the scanning speed of near-field optical microscopes. This increase in system bandwidth allows sub-diffraction limit imaging of samples at video rates. We demonstrate image acquisition at 10 frames/s, rate-limited by mechanical resonances in our scanner. It is demonstrated that the optical signal to noise ratio is large enough for megahertz single pixel acquisition rates.

  12. Mind-Reading Ability and Structural Connectivity Changes in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabinio, Monia; Rossetto, Federica; Blasi, Valeria; Savazzi, Federica; Castelli, Ilaria; Massaro, Davide; Valle, Annalisa; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM), which allows people to infer the other's mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter (WM) areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" (RME) test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: (1) the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20-70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging) and independent from executive functions; (2) structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; (3) an age and task-related decline in WM connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes.

  13. GOATS Image Projection Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    When doing mission analysis and design of an imaging system in orbit around the Earth, answering the fundamental question of imaging performance requires an understanding of the image products that will be produced by the imaging system. GOATS software represents a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric image projections. Unique features of the software include function modularity, a standard MATLAB interface, easy-to-understand first-principles-based analysis, and the ability to perform geometric image projections of framing type imaging systems. The software modules are created for maximum analysis utility, and can all be used independently for many varied analysis tasks, or used in conjunction with other orbit analysis tools.

  14. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  15. A Study on the Diagnostic Detection Ability of the Artificial Proximal Caries by Digora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyung Ran; Choi, Eui Hwan; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    Digora system is an intraoral indirect digital radiography system utilizing storage phosphor image plate. It has wide dynamic range which allows it to decrease the patient's exposure time and may increase diagnostic ability through image processing (such as edge enhancement, grey scale conversion, brightness change, and contrast enhancement). And also, it can transmit and storage image information. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability of artificial proximal caries between Conventional radiograph and Digora images (unenhanced image, brightness and contrast controlled image, and edge enhanced image). ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) analysis, paired t-tests, and F-tests were done for the statistical evaluation of detectability. The following results were acquired: 1. In Grade I lesions, the mean ROC areas of Conventional radiograph, Digora unenhanced image, Digora controlled image, and Digora edge enhanced image were 0.953, 0.933, 0.965, 0.978 (p>0.05). 2. In Grade II lesions, the mean ROC areas of Conventional radiograph, Digora unenhanced image, Digora controlled image, and Digora edge enhanced image were 0.969, 0.964, 0.988, 0.994. Among theses areas, there was just statistical significance between Diagnostic abilities of Digora edge enhanced image and Conventional radiograph (p<0.05). 3. In the Interobserver variability, the ROC curve areas of Digora edge enhanced image was lowerest in these areas, regardless of the Carious lesion depths. In conclusion, intraoral indirect digital system, Digora system, has the potential possibility as an alternative of Conventional radiograph in the diagnosis of proximal caries.

  16. A Cognitive Analysis of Students’ Mathematical Communication Ability on Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. S.; Kusnandi, K.; Suhendra, S.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to analyze the difficulties of mathematical communication ability of students in one of secondary school on “three-dimensional space” topic. This research conducted by using quantitative approach with descriptive method. The population in this research was all students of that school and the sample was thirty students that was chosen by purposive sampling technique. Data of mathematical communication were collected through essay test. Furthermore, the data were analyzed with a descriptive way. The results of this study indicate that the percentage of achievement of student mathematical communication indicators as follows 1) Stating a situation, ideas, and mathematic correlation into images, graphics, or algebraic expressions is 35%; 2) Stating daily experience into a mathematic language / symbol, or a mathematic model is 35%; and 3) Associating images or diagrams into mathematical ideas is 53.3%. Based on the percentage of achievement on each indicator, it can be concluded that the level of achievement of students’ mathematical communication ability is still low. It can be caused the students were not used to convey or write their mathematical ideas systematically. Therefore students’ mathematical communication ability need to be improved.

  17. Hip Hop Dance Experience Linked to Sociocognitive Ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Bonny

    Full Text Available Expertise within gaming (e.g., chess, video games and kinesthetic (e.g., sports, classical dance activities has been found to be linked with specific cognitive skills. Some of these skills, working memory, mental rotation, problem solving, are linked to higher performance in science, technology, math, and engineering (STEM disciplines. In the present study, we examined whether experience in a different activity, hip hop dance, is also linked to cognitive abilities connected with STEM skills as well as social cognition ability. Dancers who varied in hip hop and other dance style experience were presented with a set of computerized tasks that assessed working memory capacity, mental rotation speed, problem solving efficiency, and theory of mind. We found that, when controlling for demographic factors and other dance style experience, those with greater hip hop dance experience were faster at mentally rotating images of hands at greater angle disparities and there was a trend for greater accuracy at identifying positive emotions displayed by cropped images of human faces. We suggest that hip hop dance, similar to other more technical activities such as video gameplay, tap some specific cognitive abilities that underlie STEM skills. Furthermore, we suggest that hip hop dance experience can be used to reach populations who may not otherwise be interested in other kinesthetic or gaming activities and potentially enhance select sociocognitive skills.

  18. Hip Hop Dance Experience Linked to Sociocognitive Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Justin W; Lindberg, Jenna C; Pacampara, Marc C

    2017-01-01

    Expertise within gaming (e.g., chess, video games) and kinesthetic (e.g., sports, classical dance) activities has been found to be linked with specific cognitive skills. Some of these skills, working memory, mental rotation, problem solving, are linked to higher performance in science, technology, math, and engineering (STEM) disciplines. In the present study, we examined whether experience in a different activity, hip hop dance, is also linked to cognitive abilities connected with STEM skills as well as social cognition ability. Dancers who varied in hip hop and other dance style experience were presented with a set of computerized tasks that assessed working memory capacity, mental rotation speed, problem solving efficiency, and theory of mind. We found that, when controlling for demographic factors and other dance style experience, those with greater hip hop dance experience were faster at mentally rotating images of hands at greater angle disparities and there was a trend for greater accuracy at identifying positive emotions displayed by cropped images of human faces. We suggest that hip hop dance, similar to other more technical activities such as video gameplay, tap some specific cognitive abilities that underlie STEM skills. Furthermore, we suggest that hip hop dance experience can be used to reach populations who may not otherwise be interested in other kinesthetic or gaming activities and potentially enhance select sociocognitive skills.

  19. Risk aversion relates to cognitive ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Holm, Håkan J.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    Recent experimental studies suggest that risk aversion is negatively related to cognitive ability. In this paper we report evidence that this relation might be spurious. We recruit a large subject pool drawn from the general Danish population for our experiment. By presenting subjects with choice...... tasks that vary the bias induced by random choices, we are able to generate both negative and positive correlations between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Structural estimation allowing for heterogeneity of noise yields no significant relation between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Our...... results suggest that cognitive ability is related to random decision making rather than to risk preferences....

  20. Risk Aversion Relates to Cognitive Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Holm, Håkan J.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental studies suggest that risk aversion is negatively related to cognitive ability. In this paper we report evidence that this relation might be spurious. We recruit a large subject pool drawn from the general Danish population for our experiment. By presenting subjects with choice...... tasks that vary the bias induced by random choices, we are able to generate both negative and positive correlations between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Structural estimation allowing for heterogeneity of noise yields no significant relation between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Our...... results suggest that cognitive ability is related to random decision making, rather than to risk preferences....

  1. 4Pi live cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sauter, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    One distinctive advantage of light microscopy over electron microscopy is it ability to selectively image sub-cellular details three-dimensionally in living cells. Live cell imaging is the domain of light microscopy. In this thesis a live cell imaging setup relying on 4Pi fluorescence microscopy is presented. To speed up the imaging process and record cellular processes of the order of a few seconds a new method of multifoci-generation via the stacking of birefringent crystals is implemented....

  2. Evaluation of cutting ability and plastic deformation of reciprocating files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre KOWALCZUCK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This in vitro study evaluated the cutting ability of reciprocating files and the deformations caused by their multiple use. Five Reciproc® R25 files were divided into five groups for 10 simulated root canal preparations each. The resin blocks were weighed and photographed (12.5X and 20X before and after preparation. The canals were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Enlargement of the root canals was evaluated by comparison of pre- and post-preparation images using a computer software. The preoperative and postoperative weight differences determined the cutting ability of repeatedly used instruments. The data were analyzed using Lilliefors and Friedman statistical tests. The cutting ability and enlargement of the canals gradually decreased after each use, with significant differences observed at the 8th and 9th repetitions, respectively. There was no evidence of file deformation. The cutting ability and enlargement of the simulated canals gradually decreased when a reciprocating file was used up to 10 times.

  3. A Review of Spatial Ability Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial ability research has been approached from several psychological vantages since its beginnings in the late 1800s. This contribution attempts a summation of spatial ability research, beginning with a historical vignette and a major section on each psychological approach including the psychometric, developmental, differential and information…

  4. Functional Ability, Community Reintegration and Participation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Significantly positive correlations (p< 0.05) were found between functional ability and community reintegration (r = 0.54; p = 0.01) as well as between participation restriction and community reintegration (r = 0.34; p = 0.05). Individuals with left hemiplegia had significantly higher mean rank scores in functional ability ...

  5. High Ability Students' Voice on Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Alex C.; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    This study used a self-determination theory lens to investigate high ability learners' motivational experiences. Participants were 15 high ability youth involved in a summer learning camp for gifted students. Two major themes emerged from qualitative data analysis: (a) "The Fun Factor of Learning" and (b) "The Rewards and Pressures…

  6. Spatial Ability Learning through Educational Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julià, Carme; Antolí, Juan Òscar

    2016-01-01

    Several authors insist on the importance of students' acquisition of spatial abilities and visualization in order to have academic success in areas such as science, technology or engineering. This paper proposes to discuss and analyse the use of educational robotics to develop spatial abilities in 12 year old students. First of all, a course to…

  7. Entrepreneurial Intention and Entrepreneurial Abilities | Jayeoba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is an important indication of the role of and correlation between ability and intentions. It will be of practical benefit to conduct a follow-up/longitudinal study on future work preferences of the undergraduates who score high in entrepreneurial abilities scale as well as those who has entrepreneurial intention.

  8. Reading Abilities and Strategies: A Short Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a short analysis of reading abilities and reading strategies. Much research has been done to investigate the nature of reading, though it's had to exactly define reading abilities and strategies. Different kinds of readings are discussed in this paper and distinctions are made between first language reading and second or foreign…

  9. Purpose in Life among High Ability Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton; Finch, W. Holmes; Talib, Tasneem L.

    2010-01-01

    Leading high ability scholars have proposed theories that suggest a purpose in life may be particularly prevalent among high ability youth; however, the prevalence of purpose has not been empirically assessed among this population. Therefore using in-depth interviews the present study established the prevalence of purpose among a sample of high…

  10. Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Response-Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    A few years ago, in a tutorial in an advanced level undergraduate subject that she teaches--"Emotions, Culture and Community"--the author was a witness and participant in a pedagogical event that moved and provoked the class: It incited response-ability. This article is about that event, the meaning of response-ability, and the window…

  11. Mental Rotation Ability and Computer Game Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecu, Zeynep; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2015-01-01

    Computer games, which are currently very popular among students, can affect different cognitive abilities. The purpose of the present study is to examine undergraduate students' experiences and preferences in playing computer games as well as their mental rotation abilities. A total of 163 undergraduate students participated. The results showed a…

  12. Psycholinguistic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzabal; Giacheti, Celia M.; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N=20, mean age=8.5 years, SD=1.62) and two typically developing groups,…

  13. Does Classmate Ability Influence Students' Social Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Empirically, the link between classmate ability and individual-level student achievement has been established. And yet, within the scope of this body of literature, there is a dearth of studies examining if a relationship also persists between classmate ability and non-achievement outcomes--that is, social skills. This article fills this research…

  14. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... antagonistic ability of the adapted strains against Fom relative to the parental strains resulted from an altered ability to metabolize root exudates. Bacteria introduced into soil as agents for the biological control of plant pathogens must be capable of adaptation to a hostile environment in terms of both abiotic ...

  15. 45 CFR 1616.7 - Language ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Language ability. 1616.7 Section 1616.7 Public... § 1616.7 Language ability. In areas where a significant number of clients speak a language other than English as their principal language, a recipient shall adopt employment policies that insure that legal...

  16. Linguistic Ability: Some Myths and Some Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gail L.

    "Linguistic ability" is a widely misused term in foreign language literature. This confusion prompted an investigation into language aptitude testing, the specific goals of which included determining: the distribution of language aptitude across ability range; the validity of Pimsleur's suggestions of combined verbal and auditory scores;…

  17. Control coordination abilities in shock combat sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Boychenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: optimize the process control level of coordination abilities in martial arts. Material and Methods: analysis and compilation of scientific and methodological literature, interviews with coaches of drum martial arts, video analysis techniques, teacher observations. Results: identified specific types of coordination abilities in shock combat sports. Pod branny and offered specific and nonspecific tests to monitor the level of species athletes coordination abilities. Conclusion: it is determined that in order to achieve victory in the fight martial artists to navigate the space to be able to assess and manage dynamic and spatio-temporal parameters of movements, maintain balance, have a high coordination of movements. The proposed tests to monitor species coordination abilities athletes allow an objective assessment of not only the overall level of coordination, and the level of specific types of manifestations of this ability.

  18. Managerial Ability Of Headmasters At Sinjai District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalle Agi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine 1 a description of planning capability on the effectiveness of performance 2 a description of the ability to organize on performance 3 a description of the ability of leadership on the effectiveness of performance 4 a description of the ability of socio-emotional on the effectiveness of performance 5 a description of ability to supervise the performance effectiveness 6 the effect of capability planning organizing leadership socio-emotional simultaneous monitoring of the effectiveness of the performance. The method used is survey explanatory aimed to test the hypothesis by using the sampling method. Sampling was conducted through stratified random sampling technique. The data collection was done by using documentation and technical questionnaires. This study uses a combination of quantitative methods that dominant ie supported by qualitative methods. Quantitative data were analyzed with path analysis were processed using SPSS software while the qualitative data collected through documents and questionnaires then reduced and served. Research shows that the ability to plan does not affect the effectiveness of school performance because the programming is still normative and not yet fully involve stakeholders the ability to organize significantly influence the effectiveness categorized quite good performance leadership ability significantly influence the effectiveness of performance in both categories the ability of socio- emotional significantly influence the effectiveness of the performance in good enough category surveillance capabilities significantly influence the effectiveness of the performance of the category is quite good and the ability of planning organizing leadership socio-emotional monitoring positive and significant impact on the effectiveness of the performance of the very high category. Interesting things were found from the results of research in Sinjai is very dominant leadership abilities affect the

  19. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Paul

    2011-08-06

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2-3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  20. Layered stimulus response training improves motor imagery ability and movement execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah E; Cooley, Sam J; Cumming, Jennifer

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to test Lang's bioinformational theory by comparing the effects of layered stimulus and response training (LSRT) with imagery practice on improvements in imagery ability and performance of a motor skill (golf putting) in 24 novices (age, M = 20.13 years; SD = 1.65; 12 female) low in imagery ability. Participants were randomly assigned to a LSRT (introducing stimulus and response propositions to an image in a layered approach), motor imagery (MI) practice, or visual imagery (VI) practice group. Following baseline measures of MI ability and golf putting performance, the LSRT and MI practice groups imaged successfully performing the golf putting task 5 times each day for 4 days whereas the VI practice group imaged the ball rolling into the hole. Only the LSRT group experienced an improvement in kinesthetic MI ability, MI ability of more complex skills, and actual golf putting performance. Results support bioinformational theory by demonstrating that LSRT can facilitate visual and kinesthetic MI ability and reiterate the importance of imagery ability to ensure MI is an effective prime for movement execution.

  1. Radiographers' Ability to Detect Low-Contrast Detail in Digital Radiography Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsleem, Haney; Davidson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate radiographers' ability to detect low-contrast detail using various digital planar radiographic systems. A low-contrast detail phantom was placed between two 5-cm thick Perspex sheets (Lucite International). Images were obtained using different kilovoltage peak and milliamperage second (mAs) settings with computed radiography (CR), indirect conversion digital radiography (IDR), and direct conversion digital radiography (DR) systems. Six groups of 6 radiographers were asked to score 39 images; each group scored 2 images from each system for a total of 6 images. The seventh group scored only one image from each system for a total of 3 images. The radiographers' results were compared with the results of analyzer software. The inverse image quality factor was used to measure low-contrast detail detectability performance. Radiographers performed significantly worse than the computerized software in determining low-contrast detail in planar radiographic images (P detail detectability performance. On average, radiographers were able to detect increased image quality resulting from increased mAs. Radiographers reached results similar to the software regarding whether IDR and DR have better detectability performances than CR. Differences found among individual radiographers were not as significant with DR. When radiographers' performance in detecting low-contrast detail was evaluated and compared with that of the software, radiographers exhibited poorer performances. Because radiographers are responsible for image quality optimization, additional training might improve their ability to detect low-contrast detail in DR systems.

  2. Family Correlates of Verbal Reasoning Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellaghan, Thomas; MacNamara, John

    1972-01-01

    The relationship between verbal reasoning ability on the one hand and sex, social class, family size, and ordinal position in the family on the other were examined for a representative sample of 11-year-old Irish children. (Authors)

  3. Assessing functional ability in older patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Møldrup; Maribo, Thomas; Nielsen, Hanne Grethe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to develop an understanding of how primary and secondary care health professionals perceive current practice and challenges in assessing older patients’ functional abilities. A secondary aim was to gain insight into how these professionals perceive the need for generic tools...... from the hospital expressed a need for a fast and simple screening tool to identify those in need of further rehabilitation and care after discharge. Participants from the municipality expressed a need for a more detailed assessment tool to capture information about patients’ ability to perform daily...... to administer, to assess the quality of functional ability and predict the need for rehabilitation. The different context (hospital or primary care) seems to influence the way health professionals perceive the need for assessment of functional ability in older patients....

  4. Ability to Consent to Parkinson Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of a research study. This is a legal and ethical requirement. 2 PD can affect the ability to ... 1951, it is now a weekly with 48 issues per year. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Neurology. All rights reserved. ...

  5. Combining Ability and Heterotic Relationships between CIMMYT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Abstract. Knowledge of ... Combining Ability and Heterotic Relationships between CIMMYT and Ethiopian Maize Inbred Lines. [83]. Since its ... for hybrid performance is obtained in a single cross diallel or North Carolina Design II mating.

  6. TIE: an ability test of emotional intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Śmieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jarosław; Stolarski, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information...

  7. Musical Activity Tunes Up Absolute Pitch Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Ribe, Lars Riisgaard

    2014-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce pitches of musical tones without an external reference. Active AP (i.e., pitch production or pitch adjustment) and passive AP (i.e., pitch identification) are considered to not necessarily coincide, although no study has properly compared...... these abilities. Using a novel computerized pitch adjustment test, we investigated active AP ability in musicians with and without AP (ages 18-43). We found a significant correlation between active and passive AP indicating that AP possessors (APs) identify and produce pitch equally well. Furthermore, we found...... that APs generally undershoot when adjusting musical pitch, a tendency that decreases when musical activity increases. Finally, APs are less accurate when adjusting the pitch to black key targets than to white key targets. Hence, AP ability may be partly practice-dependent and we speculate that APs may...

  8. Spatial Abilities of Expert Clinical Anatomists: Comparison of Abilities between Novices, Intermediates, and Experts in Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ruth; Dror, Itiel E.; Smith, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Spatial ability has been found to be a good predictor of success in learning anatomy. However, little research has explored whether spatial ability can be improved through anatomy education and experience. This study had two aims: (1) to determine if spatial ability is a learned or inherent facet in learning anatomy and (2) to ascertain if there…

  9. Assessment of motor imagery ability and training

    OpenAIRE

    André Luiz Felix Rodacki; Joice Mara Facco Stefanello; Claudio Portilho Marques

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in motor imagery ability in response to a specific dart throwing training. Twelve subjects (17-22 years) with no previous experience in dart throwing or imagery agreed to participate. Changes in imagery ability were assessed using the Sports Imagery Questionnaire before (pretreatment) and after (post-treatment) an imagery training program consisting of 10 sessions. Retention (RET) was assessed 2 weeks after training. The program included mental ex...

  10. On the Origins of Calculation Abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ardila, A.

    1993-01-01

    A historical review of calculation abilities is presented. Counting, starting with finger sequencing, has been observed in different ancient and contemporary cultures, whereas number representation and arithmetic abilities are found only during the last 5000–6000 years. The rationale for selecting a base of ten in most numerical systems and the clinical association between acalculia and finger agnosia are analyzed. Finger agnosia (as a restricted form of autotopagnosia), right–left discrimina...

  11. STUDENTS’ SELF ESTEEM IN SPEAKING ABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Rosyida MR

    2016-01-01

    One of principle of communicative competence is the students know how to uselanguage according to the setting and the participants. Actually, to be able to speaktarget language, the students ar not only expected to have a great ability in grammar,vocabulary, or writing, but how brave they express their idea and use target languageto others. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate students’ self esteem to theirspeaking ability This study was carried out at Hadist major at the fourth semeste...

  12. Nurture affects gender differences in spatial abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Moshe; Gneezy, Uri; List, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Women remain significantly underrepresented in the science, engineering, and technology workforce. Some have argued that spatial ability differences, which represent the most persistent gender differences in the cognitive literature, are partly responsible for this gap. The underlying forces at work shaping the observed spatial ability differences revolve naturally around the relative roles of nature and nurture. Although these forces remain among the most hotly debated in all of the sciences...

  13. Innovative Tools to Assess Systems Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ability to understand and manipulate words and numbers as well as the ability to visualize shapes and diagrams. http://www.h fi.com/wp- content...allows an individual to process visual stimuli among distractors, understand a visual scene, and accurately encode and mentally manipulate visual ...process visual stimuli among distractors, understand a visual scene, and accurately encode and mentally manipulate visual objects or spatial relationships

  14. Tendon and ligament imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  15. Individual differences in multitasking ability and adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brent; D'Mello, Sidney; Abbott, Robert; Radvansky, Gabriel; Haass, Michael; Tamplin, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the cognitive factors that predictability and adaptability during multitasking with a flight simulator. Multitasking has become increasingly prevalent as most professions require individuals to perform multiple tasks simultaneously. Considerable research has been undertaken to identify the characteristics of people (i.e., individual differences) that predict multitasking ability. Although working memory is a reliable predictor of general multitasking ability (i.e., performance in normal conditions), there is the question of whether different cognitive faculties are needed to rapidly respond to changing task demands (adaptability). Participants first completed a battery of cognitive individual differences tests followed by multitasking sessions with a flight simulator. After a baseline condition, difficulty of the flight simulator was incrementally increased via four experimental manipulations, and performance metrics were collected to assess multitasking ability and adaptability. Scholastic aptitude and working memory predicted general multitasking ability (i.e., performance at baseline difficulty), but spatial manipulation (in conjunction with working memory) was a major predictor of adaptability (performance in difficult conditions after accounting for baseline performance). Multitasking ability and adaptability may be overlapping but separate constructs that draw on overlapping (but not identical) sets of cognitive abilities. The results of this study are applicable to practitioners and researchers in human factors to assess multitasking performance in real-world contexts and with realistic task constraints. We also present a framework for conceptualizing multitasking adaptability on the basis of five adaptability profiles derived from performance on tasks with consistent versus increased difficulty.

  16. Retinal Imaging with Smartphone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... professionals is increasing, especially with the availability of different applications. On account of cost, fundus cameras are ... Of particular advantage is the ability of Smartphones to acquire and store the images, and ... Samsung phones with additional apps/software such as the Filmic pro to obtain retinal ...

  17. Effects of gender, imagery ability, and sports practice on the performance of a mental rotation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habacha, Hamdi; Molinaro, Corinne; Dosseville, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Mental rotation is one of the main spatial abilities necessary in the spatial transformation of mental images and the manipulation of spatial parameters. Researchers have shown that mental rotation abilities differ between populations depending on several variables. This study uses a mental rotation task to investigate effects of several factors on the spatial abilities of 277 volunteers. The results demonstrate that high and low imagers performed equally well on this tasks. Athletes outperformed nonathletes regardless of their discipline, and athletes with greater expertise outperformed those with less experience. The results replicate the previously reported finding that men exhibit better spatial abilities than women. However, with high amounts of practice, the women in the current study were able to perform as well as men.

  18. Ultrasound imaging velocimetry : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelma, C.

    2017-01-01

    Whole-field velocity measurement techniques based on ultrasound imaging (a.k.a. ‘ultrasound imaging velocimetry’ or ‘echo-PIV’) have received significant attention from the fluid mechanics community in the last decade, in particular because of their ability to obtain velocity fields in flows that

  19. Cognitive styles and mental rotation ability in map learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Francesca; Moè, Angelica

    2013-11-01

    In inspecting, learning and reproducing a map, a wide range of abilities is potentially involved. This study examined the role of mental rotation (MR) and verbal ability, together with that of cognitive styles in map learning. As regards cognitive styles, the traditional distinction between verbalizers and visualizers has been taken into account, together with a more recent distinction between two styles of visualization: spatial and object. One hundred and seven participants filled in two questionnaires on cognitive styles: the Verbalizer-Visualizer Questionnaire (Richardson in J Ment Imag 1:109-125, 1977) and the Object-Spatial Imagery Questionnaire (Blajenkova et al. in Appl Cogn Psych 20:239-263, 2006), performed MR and verbal tests, learned two maps, and were then tested for their recall. It was found that MR ability and cognitive styles played a role in predicting map learning, with some distinctions within cognitive styles: verbal style favoured learning of one of the two maps (the one rich in verbal labels), which in turn was disadvantaged by the adoption of spatial style. Conversely, spatial style predicted learning of the other map, rich in visual features. The discussion focuses on implications for cognitive psychology and everyday cognition.

  20. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Body Image Developing a positive body image and a healthy mental attitude is crucial ... Read on for tips to have a healthy body image. Â Topics About body image When you ...

  1. E-tutorial improves students' ability to detect lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, BaoLin Pauline; Reed, Warren Michael; Poulos, Ann; Brennan, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    This Australian study explores the effects of an educational intervention on first-year medical radiation sciences (MRS) students by examining eye-tracking metrics while they attempted to detect breast lesions on radiologic images before and after an e-learning tutorial. The study also analyzes performance using receiver operating characteristic methodology. Fourteen first-year MRS students were equally and randomly assigned to a control or experiment group to participate in 2 image-detection sessions. The experiment group completed an online e-learning tutorial between sessions. Eighty mammographic breast images from 20 cases were obtained from a validated online image bank. Of those 20 cases, 30% were normal and 70% demonstrated a single-lesion abnormality. The experiment group demonstrated a 45% increase in the mean number of fixations per case (P = .047), with a 30% increase in sensitivity (P = .022) following the tutorial. The experiment group also demonstrated improved lesion detection overall and a 49% decrease in mean time to first fixation on the lesion (P = .016). This study demonstrates that increased lesion detection is possible after a brief e-learning tutorial. Early changes in the viewing patterns of less-experienced technologists are intriguing, and explanation may be gained from our current understanding of radiologic perception and cognitive neuroscience. The task for the first-year MRS students in this study was only to positively detect a lesion, and we recognize that a higher level of visual processing would be required to critique image quality. Exposure to the brief tutorial, however, might have triggered some learning-related neural changes at an early level of visual processing, representing stimuli relating to task performance. Participants in the experiment group improved their ability to identify breast lesions, which coincided with changes in eye position metrics and error type analysis. The data presented here suggest that the

  2. Cognitive ability and the demand for redistribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mollerstrom

    Full Text Available Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution.

  3. Cognitive ability and the demand for redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollerstrom, Johanna; Seim, David

    2014-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution.

  4. Methods for Evaluation of Some Psychomotor Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For estimation of psychomotor and sensor abilities different kinds of tests are used in the form of devices representing different technical devices which help examining sensomotor and psychomotor functions in certain conditions, as well as more complex motor abilities and skills that depend on CNS characteristics, vegetative nervous system and other functional systems and body states. These devices can be used for examining some parameters of psychomotor functions-such as speed of reaction through reactiometer or devices for examining sensor abilities-such as audiometer, ortoriter, color tests etc. In the scope of examining psychomotor skills and abilities, frequently used are different kinds of tests in the forms of devices serving for measuring ocultomotor coordination-such as Omega and Sinusoida, then Tumer`s device for measuring coordination and dissociation of hands` movements with visible control, O-Conor`s dexterimeter and Medeo`s dexterimeter-used for examining dexterity of fingers, Tremometer for examining hand stability and preciseness of movements, Minesota test for examining dexterity of hands and taping tests like “paper-pen” for examining speed and accuracy of simple movements. For examining more complex sensomotor abilities or different motor skills, special tests are used in the form of simulator, simulator and different technical devices, adjusted to specific sports situation. This category of tests includes different kinds of simulators and simulators used for examining certain aspects of sports activity.

  5. Paramedics’ Ability to Perform Drug Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eastwood, Kathyrn J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability to perform drug calculations accurately is imperative to patient safety. Research into paramedics’ drug calculation abilities was first published in 2000 and for nurses’ abilities the research dates back to the late 1930s. Yet, there have been no studies investigating an undergraduate paramedic student’s ability to perform drug or basic mathematical calculations. The objective of this study was to review the literature and determine the ability of undergraduate and qualified paramedics to perform drug calculations.Methods: A search of the prehospital-related electronic databases was undertaken using the Ovid and EMBASE systems available through the Monash University Library. Databases searched included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, JSTOR, EMBASE and Google Scholar, from their beginning until the end of August 2009. We reviewed references from articles retrieved.Results: The electronic database search located 1,154 articles for review. Six additional articles were identified from reference lists of retrieved articles. Of these, 59 were considered relevant. After reviewing the 59 articles only three met the inclusion criteria. All articles noted some level of mathematical deficiencies amongst their subjects.Conclusions: This study identified only three articles. Results from these limited studies indicate a significant lack of mathematical proficiency amongst the paramedics sampled. A need exists to identify if undergraduate paramedic students are capable of performing the required drug calculations in a non-clinical setting.[WestJEM. 2009;10:240-243.

  6. Paramedics’ Ability to Perform Drug Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Kathryn J; Boyle, Malcolm J; Williams, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to perform drug calculations accurately is imperative to patient safety. Research into paramedics’ drug calculation abilities was first published in 2000 and for nurses’ abilities the research dates back to the late 1930s. Yet, there have been no studies investigating an undergraduate paramedic student’s ability to perform drug or basic mathematical calculations. The objective of this study was to review the literature and determine the ability of undergraduate and qualified paramedics to perform drug calculations. Methods: A search of the prehospital-related electronic databases was undertaken using the Ovid and EMBASE systems available through the Monash University Library. Databases searched included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, JSTOR, EMBASE and Google Scholar, from their beginning until the end of August 2009. We reviewed references from articles retrieved. Results: The electronic database search located 1,154 articles for review. Six additional articles were identified from reference lists of retrieved articles. Of these, 59 were considered relevant. After reviewing the 59 articles only three met the inclusion criteria. All articles noted some level of mathematical deficiencies amongst their subjects. Conclusions: This study identified only three articles. Results from these limited studies indicate a significant lack of mathematical proficiency amongst the paramedics sampled. A need exists to identify if undergraduate paramedic students are capable of performing the required drug calculations in a non-clinical setting. PMID:20046240

  7. Paramedics' ability to perform drug calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Kathryn J; Boyle, Malcolm J; Williams, Brett

    2009-11-01

    The ability to perform drug calculations accurately is imperative to patient safety. Research into paramedics' drug calculation abilities was first published in 2000 and for nurses' abilities the research dates back to the late 1930s. Yet, there have been no studies investigating an undergraduate paramedic student's ability to perform drug or basic mathematical calculations. The objective of this study was to review the literature and determine the ability of undergraduate and qualified paramedics to perform drug calculations. A search of the prehospital-related electronic databases was undertaken using the Ovid and EMBASE systems available through the Monash University Library. Databases searched included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, JSTOR, EMBASE and Google Scholar, from their beginning until the end of August 2009. We reviewed references from articles retrieved. The electronic database search located 1,154 articles for review. Six additional articles were identified from reference lists of retrieved articles. Of these, 59 were considered relevant. After reviewing the 59 articles only three met the inclusion criteria. All articles noted some level of mathematical deficiencies amongst their subjects. This study identified only three articles. Results from these limited studies indicate a significant lack of mathematical proficiency amongst the paramedics sampled. A need exists to identify if undergraduate paramedic students are capable of performing the required drug calculations in a non-clinical setting.

  8. The genetic basis of music ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi Ting; McPherson, Gary E; Peretz, Isabelle; Berkovic, Samuel F; Wilson, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realization of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioral and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory, and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge.

  9. Gender differences in multitasking reflect spatial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntylä, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Demands involving the scheduling and interleaving of multiple activities have become increasingly prevalent, especially for women in both their paid and unpaid work hours. Despite the ubiquity of everyday requirements to multitask, individual and gender-related differences in multitasking have gained minimal attention in past research. In two experiments, participants completed a multitasking session with four gender-fair monitoring tasks and separate tasks measuring executive functioning (working memory updating) and spatial ability (mental rotation). In both experiments, males outperformed females in monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability mediated gender differences in multitasking. Menstrual changes accentuated these effects, such that gender differences in multitasking (and spatial ability) were eliminated between males and females who were in the menstrual phase of the menstrual cycle but not between males and females who were in the luteal phase. These findings suggest that multitasking involves spatiotemporal task coordination and that gender differences in multiple-task performance reflect differences in spatial ability.

  10. Work ability as prognostic risk marker of disability pension : Single-item work ability score versus multi-item work ability index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C.A.M.; Rhenen, van W.; Groothoff, J.W.; Klink, van der J.J.L.; Twisk, W.R.; Heymans, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Work ability predicts future disability pension (DP). A single-item work ability score (WAS) is emerging as a measure for work ability. This study compared single-item WAS with the multi-item work ability index (WAI) in its ability to identify workers at risk of DP.

  11. Grade Inflation Rates among Different Ability Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Mc Spirit

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compares grade inflation rates among different ability students at a large, open admissions public University. Specifically, this study compares trends in graduating grade point average (GPA from 1983 to 1996 across low, typical and higher ability students. This study also tests other explanations for increases in graduating GPA. These other explanations are changes in 1 ACT score 2 gender 3 college major and 4 vocational programs. With these other explanations considered, regression results still report an inflationary trend in graduating GPA. Time, as measured by college entry year, is still a significant positive predictor of GPA. More directly, comparisons of regression coefficients reveal lower ability students as experiencing the highest rate of grade increase. Higher grade inflation rates among low aptitude students suggest that faculty might be using grades to encourage learning among marginal students.

  12. Arithmetic Abilities in Children With Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq-Quaegebeur, Maryse; Casalis, Séverine; Vilette, Bruno; Lemaitre, Marie-Pierre; Vallée, Louis

    2017-01-01

    A high comorbidity between reading and arithmetic disabilities has already been reported. The present study aims at identifying more precisely patterns of arithmetic performance in children with developmental dyslexia, defined with severe and specific criteria. By means of a standardized test of achievement in mathematics ( Calculation and Number Processing Assessment Battery for Children; von Aster & Dellatolas, 2006), we analyzed the arithmetic abilities of 47 French children with dyslexia attending 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade. Of them, 40% displayed arithmetic deficits, mostly with regard to number transcoding and mental calculation. Their individual profiles of performance accounted for varying strengths and weaknesses in arithmetic abilities. Our findings showed the pathway for the development of arithmetic abilities in children with dyslexia is not unique. Our study contrasts with the hypotheses suggesting the mutual exclusiveness of the phonological representation deficit and the core number module deficit.

  13. ENHANCING WRITING ABILITY THROUGH IDEA LISTING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at developing the Idea Listing Technique (ILT to enhance the students‟ writing ability. The Classroom Action Research was applied in this study. The subjects of the study were 31 students, the students taking the course of Writing II, of the third semester of English Department of one State Islamic College at Palangka Raya, Indonesia, in the 2012/2013 academic year. The findings show that the implementation of ILT can enhance the students‟ ability in writing expository paragraph. It is indicated by the enhancements of the percentage of the students achieving the score greater than or equal to C (60-69, and of the percentage of their involvement in the writing activities during the implementation of ILT in Cycle I and II. Thus, the enhancement of the students‟ ability in writing expository paragraph can be reached but it should follow the appropriate procedures of the implementation of ILT having been developed.

  14. Construct ability Improvement for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae Soo; Lee, Jong Rim; Kim, Jong Ku [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to identify methods for improving the construct ability of nuclear power plants. This study reviewed several references of current construction practices of domestic and overseas nuclear plants in order to identify potential methods for improving construct ability. The identified methods for improving construct ability were then evaluated based on the applicability to domestic nuclear plant construction. The selected methods are expected to reduce the construction period, improve the quality of construction, cost, safety, and productivity. Selection of which methods should be implemented will require further evaluation of construction modifications, design changes, contract revisions. Among construction methods studied, platform construction methods can be applied through construction sequence modification without significant design changes, and Over the Top construction method of the NSSS, automatic welding of RCL pipes, CLP modularization, etc., are considered to be applied after design modification and adjustment of material lead time. (author). 49 refs., figs., tabs.

  15. ACCREDITATION FOR TECHNICAL ABILITIES INCLUDING COMPUTER SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Hami OZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sector Skills are defined by state-sponsored, employer-led organizations that cover specific economic sectors in the European Union and other countries in the world to reduce skills gaps and shortages, improve productivity, boost the skills of their sector workforces and improve learning supply. The accreditation and registration systems used by professional bodies raise the profile of the profession. In many countries including the European Union, professional associations are beginning to accept practice-based accreditation, generally as an alternative to their mainstream systems. Besides studying the certain agencies in the European Union for assessing/accreditating practical abilities , Accreditation for practical abilities of Information Communication Technology and Business Management/Language domains developed by Accreditation Council for Practical abilities are also studied in detail as an example to establish a similar agency in Turkey.

  16. Creativity, synthetic intelligence and high ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sainz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the construct of creativity and its relationship with high ability, presenting different definitions, assessment tools and strategies to encourage their development in the school context. The paper is structured into five sections: firstly, we define the concept of creativity. Secondly, we present the most relevant instruments used in the analysis of high ability students’ creativity. Thirdly, we look into several studies on creativity and high abilitiy, highlighting the main limitations of the research carried out. Fourthly, we present principles and strategies in order to foster creativity in the school context. Finally, some conclusions are drawn on the relationship between creativity and high ability.

  17. Emotional Intelligence and EFL Students’ Translation Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Moghimi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotional Intelligence is a challenging topic in the area of language research. Among other factors that might manipulate translators’ mind, their Emotional Intelligence level might be an influential element, too. The present research focused on examining the relationship between emotional intelligence and the students’ translation ability. It was carried out among 59 translation students in the Payam-Noor University in Iran, Mazandaran. After homogenizing the sample, the sample size was reduced to 32. The participants were required to translate some paragraphs of the short story 'A rose for Emily' and answer the Bar-On EQ-I questionnaire (1997. The results indicated that there was no relationship between EQ and the learners’ translation ability but some of the main subscales of emotional intelligence (i.e., problem solving, happiness, and flexibility had statistically weak relationship with the learners’ translation ability. The results also showed that the combination of EQ and gender were positively correlated.

  18. Elastic nonlinearity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy J; Oberait, Assad A; Barbone, Paul E; Sommer, Amy M; Gokhale, Nachiket H; Goenezent, Sevan; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated improved diagnostic performance of highly trained breast radiologists when provided with B-mode plus elastography images over B-mode images alone. In those studies we have observed that elasticity imaging can be difficult to perform if there is substantial motion of tissue out of the image plane. So we are extending our methods to 3D/4D elasticity imaging with 2D arrays. Further, we have also documented the fact that some breast tumors change contrast with increasing deformation and those observations are consistent with in vitro tissue measurements. Hence, we are investigating imaging tissue stress-strain nonlinearity. These studies will require relatively large tissue deformations (e.g., > 20%) which will induce out of plane motion further justifying 3D/4D motion tracking. To further enhance our efforts, we have begun testing the ability to perform modulus reconstructions (absolute elastic parameter) imaging of in vivo breast tissues. The reconstructions are based on high quality 2D displacement estimates from strain imaging. Piecewise linear (secant) modulus reconstructions demonstrate the changes in elasticity image contrast seen in strain images but, unlike the strain images, the contrast in the modulus images approximates the absolute modulus contrast. Nonlinear reconstructions assume a reasonable approximation to the underlying constitutive relations for the tissue and provide images of the (near) zero-strain shear modulus and a nonlinearity parameter that describes the rate of tissue stiffening with increased deformation. Limited data from clinical trials are consistent with in vitro measurements of elastic properties of tissue samples and suggest that the nonlinearity of invasive ductal carcinoma exceeds that of fibroadenoma and might be useful for improving diagnostic specificity. This work is being extended to 3D.

  19. Prudence, emotional state, personality and cognitive ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Breaban

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment to consider the emotional correlates of prudent decision making. In the experiment, we present subjects with lotteries and measure their emotional response with facial recognition software. They then make binary choices between risky lotteries that distinguish prudent from imprudent individuals. They also perform tasks to measure their cognitive ability and a number of personality characteristics. We find that a more negative emotional state correlates with greater prudence. Higher cognitive ability and less conscientiousness is also associated with greater prudence.

  20. Extracurricular enrichment workshops for high ability students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Rojo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze and explain attention to diversity measures for high ability (gifted and talented students. The model, developed in the Spanish region of Murcia, is based on cognitive psychology and aims to encourage thinking skills. The program is developed as a curriculum extension and the interests, motivations and abilities of children have been considered once these were identified. The article offers a theoretical approach, a set of objectives, and some of the activities that have been done with students.

  1. The ability to innovate in international entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yákara Vasconcelos Pereira Leite

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this article, the purpose was to analyze the ability to innovate in international entrepreneurship. Thus, a qualitative study of multiple cases was developed. Data was collected mainly by semi-structured interviews with 30 social subjects, and ATLAS.ti software supported content analysis. We observed that the entrepreneurs' innovative actions were focused on the product and production. As a result, it was found that the presence of the ability to innovate was intermittent throughout the internationalization process, except in only one of the companies, where it occurred continuously.

  2. Vocabulary abilities of children with Williams syndrome: strengths, weaknesses, and relation to visuospatial construction ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B; John, Angela E

    2008-08-01

    This project was designed to identify relative strengths and weaknesses in vocabulary ability for children with Williams syndrome (WS) and to demonstrate the importance of stringent matching criteria for cross-group comparisons. Children with WS and typically developing (TD) children completed standardized assessments of intellectual and language ability. Children with WS also completed a visuospatial construction ability assessment. Study 1: Concrete and relational vocabulary standard scores were significantly lower for 5- to 7-year-olds with WS than for TD children. Children with WS earned significantly higher standard scores for concrete than for relational vocabulary. When groups were stringently matched for relational vocabulary size, children with WS did not evidence a specific weakness in spatial vocabulary. Study 2: Standard scores for relational vocabulary were similar to those for visuospatial construction ability for 5- to 7-year-olds with WS. Study 3: Nine- to 11-year-olds with WS demonstrated very limited relational vocabulary ability; relational vocabulary ability at 5-7 years was highly correlated with later relational language ability. Concrete vocabulary is a relative strength for children with WS; relational vocabulary ability is very limited and is at about the level of visuospatial construction ability. Accurate determination of group comparison results depends on stringent group matching.

  3. Vocabulary Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: Strengths, Weaknesses, and Relation to Visuospatial Construction Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; John, Angela E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This project was designed to identify relative strengths and weaknesses in vocabulary ability for children with Williams syndrome (WS) and to demonstrate the importance of stringent matching criteria for cross-group comparisons. Methods Children with WS and typically developing (TD) children completed standardized assessments of intellectual and language ability. Children with WS also completed a visuospatial construction ability assessment. Results Study 1: Concrete and relational vocabulary standard scores were significantly lower for 5 – 7-year-olds with WS than for TD children. Children with WS earned significantly higher standard scores for concrete than for relational vocabulary. When groups were stringently matched for relational vocabulary size, children with WS did not evidence a specific weakness in spatial vocabulary. Study 2: Standard scores for relational vocabulary were similar to those for visuospatial construction ability for 5 – 7-year-olds with WS. Study 3: 9 – 11-year-olds with WS demonstrated very limited relational vocabulary ability; relational vocabulary ability at 5 – 7 years was highly correlated with later relational language ability. Conclusions Concrete vocabulary is a relative strength for children with WS; relational vocabulary ability is very limited and is at about the level of visuospatial construction ability. Accurate determination of group comparison results depends on stringent group matching. PMID:18658065

  4. Creativity, visualization abilities, and visual cognitive style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Kozhevnikov, Michael; Yu, Chen Jiao; Blazhenkova, Olesya

    2013-06-01

    Despite the recent evidence for a multi-component nature of both visual imagery and creativity, there have been no systematic studies on how the different dimensions of creativity and imagery might interrelate. The main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between different dimensions of creativity (artistic and scientific) and dimensions of visualization abilities and styles (object and spatial). In addition, we compared the contributions of object and spatial visualization abilities versus corresponding styles to scientific and artistic dimensions of creativity. Twenty-four undergraduate students (12 females) were recruited for the first study, and 75 additional participants (36 females) were recruited for an additional experiment. Participants were administered a number of object and spatial visualization abilities and style assessments as well as a number of artistic and scientific creativity tests. The results show that object visualization relates to artistic creativity and spatial visualization relates to scientific creativity, while both are distinct from verbal creativity. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that style predicts corresponding dimension of creativity even after removing shared variance between style and visualization ability. The results suggest that styles might be a more ecologically valid construct in predicting real-life creative behaviour, such as performance in different professional domains. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Ability of Slovakian Pupils to Identify Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Rodak, Rastislav

    2009-01-01

    A pupil's ability to identify common organisms is necessary for acquiring further knowledge of biology. We investigated how pupils were able to identify 25 bird species following their song, growth habits, or both features presented simultaneously. Just about 19% of birds were successfully identified by song, about 39% by growth habit, and 45% of…

  6. On Developing Students' Spatial Visualisation Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risma, Dwi Afrini; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Hartono, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    This research aims at studying on how students develop their spatial visualisation abilities. In this paper, one of five activities in an ongoing classroom activity is discussed. This paper documents students' learning activity in exploring the building blocks. The goal of teaching experiment is to support the development of students' spatial…

  7. Spatial Abilities across the Adult Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Ronconi, Lucia; De Beni, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates age-related effects across the adult life span on spatial abilities (testing subabilities based on a distinction between spatial visualization, mental rotation, and perspective taking) and spatial self-assessments. The sample consisted of 454 participants (223 women and 231 men) from 20 to 91 years of age. Results showed…

  8. Improving Spatial Ability with Mentored Sketching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L.; Miller, Craig L.

    2008-01-01

    As the result of a qualitative investigation into spatial ability, a teaching technique called mentored sketching was found to be effective for teaching visualization skills to freshman engineering students. This contribution describes the technique, how it evolved, and comments made by students as to its effectiveness. While mentored sketching…

  9. Why Do Spatial Abilities Predict Mathematical Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosto, Maria Grazia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Dale, Philip S.; Malykh, Sergey; Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Spatial ability predicts performance in mathematics and eventual expertise in science, technology and engineering. Spatial skills have also been shown to rely on neuronal networks partially shared with mathematics. Understanding the nature of this association can inform educational practices and intervention for mathematical underperformance.…

  10. Does Listening to Mozart Affect Listening Ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Becki J.; Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra; Cheah, Tsui Yi; Watson, W. Joe; Rubin, Rebecca B.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has been conducted testing Rauscher, Shaw, and Ky's (1993) Mozart Effect (ME). This study attempts to replicate, in part, research that tested the ME on listening comprehension abilities. Also included in this study is an examination of control group issues in current day research. We hypothesized that students who listen to…

  11. Kinesthetic Ability in Children with Spastic Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysagis, Nikolaos K.; Skordilis, Emmanouil K.; Koutsouki, Dimitra; Evans, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to examine the differences in kinesthetic ability, at the elbow joint, between children with (n = 15) and without (n = 15) spastic hemiplegia. The Kin Com 125 AP isokinetic dynamometer Configuration Chattanooga was used. Results revealed significant (p less than 0.05) interaction between participant groups and side which was a…

  12. 21st Century Conceptions of Musical Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This study explored conceptions of musical ability using an inventory derived from previous qualitative research. Participants included 102 musicians, 95 educators, 132 adult amateur musicians, 60 adults who were not actively engaged in making music, 193 children actively engaged in making music in addition to their engagement with the school…

  13. Information Behavior: A Socio-Cognitive Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Spink

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available How has human information behavior evolved? Our paper explores this question in the form of notions, models and theories about the relationship between information behavior and human evolution. Alexander's Ecological Dominance and Social Competition/Cooperation (EDSC model currently provides the most comprehensive overview of human traits in the development of a theory of human evolution and sociality. His model provides a basis for explaining the evolution of human socio-cognitive abilities, including ecological dominance, and social competition/cooperation. Our paper examines the human trait of information behavior as a socio-cognitive ability related to ecological dominance, and social competition/cooperation. The paper first outlines what is meant by information behavior from various interdisciplinary perspectives. We propose that information behavior is a socio-cognitive ability that is related to and enables other socio-cognitive abilities such as human ecological dominance, and social competition/cooperation. The paper reviews the current state of evolutionary approaches to information behavior and future directions for this research

  14. Work ability in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Pedersen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study work ability in patients with RA compared with the general population by investigating the rates and risks of long-term sickness absence, unemployment and disability pension, and the chance of returning to work and the changes in these risks over time (1994-2011)....

  15. Identities of Dis/Ability and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Michael; Ridley, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Centring on a small-scale capability-based case study of music provision for adults with profound dis/abilities, this paper considers the significance of music and music education in people's lives. It offers a philosophical defence of music's importance in enjoying a truly human life and then, drawing on an overview of the work of dis/abled…

  16. Ability-based emotional intelligence in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Hofer, Alex

    2017-05-01

    As one part of social cognition, emotional intelligence is a controversially discussed construct. Although well founded critique on the conceptualization of emotional intelligence has emerged over the last years, studies about emotional intelligence - especially the ability-based approach by Mayer and Salovey - can persistently be found in schizophrenia research. Studies published between October 2015 and October 2016 were included in this review. The majority of the studies addressed the associations between ability-based emotional intelligence and other clinical or neuropsychological features, for example symptom severity or executive functioning. One study investigated the effect of oxytocin on emotional intelligence and another dealt with the question, whether emotional intelligence could be an endophenotype for schizophrenia. The reviewed literature reveals that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impairments in ability-based emotional intelligence. In this context, non-social cognition, positive symptoms, and anomalous-self experiences seem to be of major relevance. The potential endophenotypic role of ability-based emotional intelligence in schizophrenia remains to be clarified.

  17. The Ability to Align Vision and Kinaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. van den Dobbelsteen (John)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the human ability to align visually and kinaesthetically perceived end positions of arm movements. We specifically looked at the spatial characteristics of movement endpoints and the responses of the visuomotor system to altered relationships between visual and

  18. Development of Network Synchronization Predicts Language Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesburg, Sam M; Tingling, Keriann; MacDonald, Matt J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations among brain areas is understood to mediate network communication supporting cognition, perception, and language. How task-dependent synchronization during word production develops throughout childhood and adolescence, as well as how such network coherence is related to the development of language abilities, remains poorly understood. To address this, we recorded magnetoencephalography while 73 participants aged 4-18 years performed a verb generation task. Atlas-guided source reconstruction was performed, and phase synchronization among regions was calculated. Task-dependent increases in synchronization were observed in the theta, alpha, and beta frequency ranges, and network synchronization differences were observed between age groups. Task-dependent synchronization was strongest in the theta band, as were differences between age groups. Network topologies were calculated for brain regions associated with verb generation and were significantly associated with both age and language abilities. These findings establish the maturational trajectory of network synchronization underlying expressive language abilities throughout childhood and adolescence and provide the first evidence for an association between large-scale neurophysiological network synchronization and individual differences in the development of language abilities.

  19. Cultural Capital and Teaching Ability Rating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    This paper studies the effect of cultural capital on teachers’ ratings of children’s oral and math ability. Cultural reproduction theory hypothesises that, holding everything else constant, children who possess cultural capital are more likely to be perceived by teachers as gifted than children who...

  20. Haplogroups as Evolutionary Markers of Cognitive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindermann, Heiner; Woodley, Michael A.; Stratford, James

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating evolutionary theories on the origins of national differences in intelligence have been criticized on the basis that both national cognitive ability measures and supposedly evolutionarily informative proxies (such as latitude and climate) are confounded with general developmental status. In this study 14 Y chromosomal…

  1. Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities. Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2011-01-01

    The fourth edition of "Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities" critically examines the breadth of research on this complex and controversial topic, with the principal aim of helping the reader to understand where sex differences are found--and where they are not. Since the publication of the third edition, there have been many exciting and…

  2. Assessing Postgraduate Students' Critical Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad Atif; Qurat-Ul-Ain, Ansa

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses to assess the critical thinking ability of postgraduate students. The target population was the male and female students at University level in Pakistan. A small sample of 45 male and 45 female students were selected randomly from The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Cornell Critical Thinking Test Series, The…

  3. Narrative Abilities of Children with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekas, Amy; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Berl, Madison; Gaillard, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a noticeable publication gap in the speech-language pathology literature regarding the language abilities of children with common types of epilepsy. This paper reviews studies that suggest a high frequency of undetected language problems in this population, and it proposes the need for pragmatically based assessment of…

  4. Emotional Intelligence: New Ability or Eclectic Traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, John D.; Salovey, Peter; Caruso, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Some individuals have a greater capacity than others to carry out sophisticated information processing about emotions and emotion-relevant stimuli and to use this information as a guide to thinking and behavior. The authors have termed this set of abilities emotional intelligence (EI). Since the introduction of the concept, however, a schism has…

  5. Host country language ability and expatriate adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    countries, one with an easy, relatively simple language and the other with a difficult, highly complex language. Consistent with Goal-Setting Theory, results indicated a relative advantage of expatriates’ language ability in terms of their adjustment in the host country with the difficult language...

  6. Immigrants, English Ability and the Digital Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Zavodny, Madeline

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the extent and causes of inequalities in information technology ownership and use between natives and immigrants in the United States, with particular focus on the role of English ability. The results indicate that, during the period 1997-2003, immigrants were significantly less likely to have access to or use a computer and…

  7. Emotional intelligence and leadership abilities | Herbst | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the question arises whether the concept of emotional intelligence has significance for leadership effectiveness. In a pioneering study in the South African context, we examined the possible relationship between four possible facets of emotional intelligence (defined as a multi-faceted ability) and five possible practices of

  8. Nurture affects gender differences in spatial abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Moshe; Gneezy, Uri; List, John A

    2011-09-06

    Women remain significantly underrepresented in the science, engineering, and technology workforce. Some have argued that spatial ability differences, which represent the most persistent gender differences in the cognitive literature, are partly responsible for this gap(.) The underlying forces at work shaping the observed spatial ability differences revolve naturally around the relative roles of nature and nurture. Although these forces remain among the most hotly debated in all of the sciences, the evidence for nurture is tenuous, because it is difficult to compare gender differences among biologically similar groups with distinct nurture. In this study, we use a large-scale incentivized experiment with nearly 1,300 participants to show that the gender gap in spatial abilities, measured by time to solve a puzzle, disappears when we move from a patrilineal society to an adjoining matrilineal society. We also show that about one-third of the effect can be explained by differences in education. Given that none of our participants have experience with puzzle solving and that villagers from both societies have the same means of subsistence and shared genetic background, we argue that these results show the role of nurture in the gender gap in cognitive abilities.

  9. Benchmarking Year Five Students' Reading Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chang Kuan; Eng, Lin Siew; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Reading and understanding a written text is one of the most important skills in English learning.This study attempts to benchmark Year Five students' reading abilities of fifteen rural schools in a district in Malaysia. The objectives of this study are to develop a set of standardised written reading comprehension and a set of indicators to inform…

  10. Numerical abilities in fish: A methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo

    2017-08-01

    The ability to utilize numerical information can be adaptive in a number of ecological contexts including foraging, mating, parental care, and anti-predator strategies. Numerical abilities of mammals and birds have been studied both in natural conditions and in controlled laboratory conditions using a variety of approaches. During the last decade this ability was also investigated in some fish species. Here we reviewed the main methods used to study this group, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each of the methods used. Fish have only been studied under laboratory conditions and among the methods used with other species, only two have been systematically used in fish-spontaneous choice tests and discrimination learning procedures. In the former case, the choice between two options is observed in a biologically relevant situation and the degree of preference for the larger/smaller group is taken as a measure of the capacity to discriminate the two quantities (e.g., two shoals differing in number). In discrimination learning tasks, fish are trained to select the larger or the smaller of two sets of abstract objects, typically two-dimensional geometric figures, using food or social companions as reward. Beyond methodological differences, what emerges from the literature is a substantial similarity of the numerical abilities of fish with those of other vertebrates studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical and motor ability, anthropometrical and growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... representation of the four different racial groups living in the NWP. The tests included the Australian Talent Search protocol, consisting of 10 parameters (four anthropometrical, one physical and five motor abilities) and four additional physical fitness parameters (abdominal, grip- and upper body strength and flexibility).

  12. Diagnostic Ability of Automated Pupillography in Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Kadambi, Sujatha V; Mehta, Pooja; Dasari, Srilakshmi; Puttaiah, Narendra K; Pradhan, Zia S; Rao, Dhanraj A S; Shetty, Rohit

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability of automated pupillography measurements in glaucoma and study the effect of inter-eye asymmetry in glaucomatous damage on the diagnostic ability. In an observational, cross-sectional study, 47 glaucoma patients and 42 control subjects underwent automated pupillography using a commercially available device. Diagnostic abilities of the pupillary response measurements were evaluated using area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC) and sensitivities at fixed specificities. Influence of inter-eye asymmetry in glaucoma [inter-eye mean deviation (MD) difference on visual fields (VF)] on the diagnostic ability of pupillography parameters was evaluated by ROC regression approach. The AUCs of automated pupillography parameters ranged from 0.60 (amplitude score with peripheral blue stimulus) to 0.82 (amplitude score with full field white stimulus, Amp-FF-W). Sensitivity at 95% specificity ranged between 5% (amplitude score with full field blue stimulus) and 45% (amplitude score with full field green stimulus). Inter-eye MD difference significantly affected the diagnostic performance of automated pupillography parameters (p glaucoma. The performance of these pupillography measurements in detecting glaucoma significantly increased with greater inter-eye asymmetry in the glaucomatous damage.

  13. Spatial Ability Improvement and Curriculum Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a significant history of research on spatial ability and visualization improvement and related curriculum content presented by members of the Engineering Design Graphics Division over the past decade. Recently, interest in this topic has again been heightened thanks to the work of several division members on research such as the…

  14. Comparing masticatory performance and mixing ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, van der A.; Mojet, J.; Tekamp, F.A.; Abbink, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Masticatory performance has often been measured by determining an individual's capacity to comminute a test food. Another method to determine masticatory performance, which is now widely used, evaluates the ability to mix and knead a food bolus. Two-coloured chewing gum and paraffin wax have been

  15. Users' abilities to review website pages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elling, Sanne; Lentz, Leo; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2012-01-01

    Web sites increasingly encourage users to provide comments on the quality of the content by clicking on a feedback button and filling out a feedback form. Little is known about users’ abilities to provide such feedback. To guide the development of evaluation tools, this study examines to what extent

  16. [Salivary testosterone and cognitive ability in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostatnikova, D; Dohnanyiova, M; Mataseje, A; Putz, Z; Laznibatova, J; Hajek, J

    2000-01-01

    There are suggestive data with indicate the link of testosterone levels with specific cognitive abilities in humans. As soon as during intrauterine development, testosterone is supposed to influence to organization of fetal specific brain structures. This influence is permanent and it is reflected in cognitive abilities during prepubetal period. In puberty, the testosterone level rapidly increases mainly in boys and it appears to influence the definitive development of cognitive functions. In this paper, results of the first four years of our logitudinal study are presented. Salivary testosterone levels in children were determined, and their effect on spatial ability was studied. Radioimmunoanalytical method of testosterone determination in saliva was developed, since saliva reflects free fraction of testosterone directly available for uptake by receptors in the central nervous system. The sampling of saliva is non-invasive and unstressful, which is important for relevant evaluation of cognitive performance. One hundred and forty-seven children (78 boys and 69 girls) at the ae of 8 to 12 were examined. The data received from intellectually gifted children attending the School for gifted children in Bratislava (100 measurements) were compared with the data received from age-matched children attending randomly chosen elementary schools (151 measurements). Lower salivary testosterone levels were found in intellectually gifted children of both sexes, and negative relationship between testosterone levels and cognitive abilities in preadolescent children was observed.

  17. Quantitative Ability as Correlates of Students' Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    against this background that this study investigated the relationship between quantitative ability (knowledge of ... the subject of teacher effectiveness a perennial one in educational discourse since the quality of education at .... administrators, principals, teachers, parents and students themselves. Statement of the Problem.

  18. Spatial Ability through Engineering Graphics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marunic, Gordana; Glazar, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability has been confirmed to be of particular importance for successful engineering graphics education and to be a component of human intelligence that can be improved through instruction and training. Consequently, the creation and communication by means of graphics demand careful development of spatial skills provided by the balanced…

  19. Depression and Abstract Problem Solving Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Kathleen M.; Doyal, Guy

    Depression has been linked to cognitive deficits and learned helplessness models in various theories. To examine depression effects on abstract problem solving ability and the relationship between intelligence and anxiety, 66 of 303 college students (23 male, 43 female), evidencing least and most depressed states as assessed by the Beck Depression…

  20. Spatial Training Improves Children's Mathematics Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Ling; Mix, Kelly S.

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether mental rotation training improved math performance in 6- to 8-year-olds. Children were pretested on a range of number and math skills. Then one group received a single session of mental rotation training using an object completion task that had previously improved spatial ability in children this age (Ehrlich, Levine, &…

  1. Ability or Finances as Constraints to Entrepreneurship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    windfall wealth. We compare the performance of these ventures to that of a matched sample of individuals who form businesses at the same time to test whether financial barriers to entrepreneurship are caused by market failure or low entrepreneurial ability. We find that constrained entrepreneurs’ ventures...

  2. Evaluation of diagnostic ability of CCD digital radiography in the detection of incipient dental caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the diagnostic ability of a CCD-based digital system (CDX-2000HQ) in the detection of incipient dental caries. 93 extracted human teeth with sound proximal surfaces and interproximal artificial cavities were radiographed using 4 imaging methods. Automatically processed No.2 Insight film (Eastman Kodak Co., U.S.A.) was used for conventional radiography, scanned images of conventional radiograms for indirect digital radiography were used. For the direct digital radiography, the CDX-2000HQ CCD system (Biomedisys Co. Korea) was used. The subtraction images were made from two direct digital images by Sunny program in the CDX-2000HQ system. Two radiologists and three endodontists examined the presence of lesions using a five-point confidence scale and compared the diagnostic ability by ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) analysis and one way ANOVA test. The mean ROC areas of conventional radiography, indirect digital radiography, direct digital radiography, and digital subtraction radiography were 0.9093, 0.9102, 0.9184, and 0.9056, respectively. The diagnostic ability of direct digital radiography was better than the other imaging modalities, but there were no statistical differences among these imaging modalities (p>0.05). These results indicate that new CCD-based digital systems (CDX-2000HQ) have the potential to serve as an alternative to conventional radiography in the detection of incipient dental caries.

  3. The genetic basis of music ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi Ting; McPherson, Gary E.; Peretz, Isabelle; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realization of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioral and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory, and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge. PMID:25018744

  4. The impact of depression on musical ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, Paul; Domschke, Katharina; Zwanzger, Peter; Evers, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    While there is sustained effort to refine the models and to further decrypt the neuronal underpinnings of cerebral music perception, empirical investigations on the associations of music perception with diagnoses others than focal brain damage need to be amplified. In the present study, a validated and standardized clinical test of musical ability was applied to a sample of severely depressed patients. Basic musical capacities of rhythm, melody and pitch perception, recognition of emotions, and musical memory were evaluated and compared to matched healthy controls and reassessed in a follow-up examination after clinical remission. We enroled 21 in-patients with major depression according to ICD-10 (F32 and F33). The score in the test of musical ability (maximum score 70) was 52.3±7.8 for the patient group and 57.8±4.3 for the control group (p=0.010). In particular, melody comparison, rhythm perception, and emotional categorising of music were impaired in patients. In the longitudinal study, patients improved from 53.6±7.8 to 56.2±6.7 (p=0.038); this improvement could be related to clinical improvement on the Hamilton Depression Scale. The sample size is small, in particular in the follow-up study. The results clearly revealed a significant reduction of musical ability in patients with depression. A part of the patients could even be diagnosed with a clinically relevant amusia. Along with significant decrease of depressive symptoms, the patients significantly improved with respect to musical ability. These findings suggest a systematic impact of depression on musical ability, they are of importance for the application of music therapy in depressive patients and for the function of music to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The genetic basis of music ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting eTan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realisation of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioural and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge.

  6. Effects of aging and depression on mnemonic discrimination ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, D A; Fontana, R; Wesnes, K A; Mills, J; Croft, R J

    2017-05-16

    Ageing and depression have been found to be associated with poorer performance in mnemonic discrimination. In the current study, a two-response format mnemonic similarity test, Cognitive Drug Research MST, was used to compare these effects. Seventy-six participants were tested; with 52 participants in the young group, aged 18-35 years, and 24 participants in the elderly group, aged 55 years or older. Twenty-two young participants and 10 elderly participants met DSM-IV criteria for MDD or dysthymia. Age-related deficits were found for lure identification and speed of response. Differences in speed of responses to lure images were found for younger depressed participants, and depressive symptom severity was found to be negatively associated with lure identification accuracy in the elderly. These findings may be viewed as putative behavioral correlates of decreased pattern separation ability, which may be indicative of altered hippocampal neurogenesis in aging and depression.

  7. Combining ability of twelve maize populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacaro Elton

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic progress depends on germplasm quality and breeding methods. Twelve maize populations and their crosses were evaluated to estimate combining ability and potential to be included as source populations in breeding programs. Plant height, point of insertion of the first ear, number of ears per plant, number of grains per ear, root and stalk lodging and grain yield were studied in two locations in Brazil, during the 1997/98 season. Genotype sum of squares was divided into general (GCA and specific (SCA combining ability. Results indicated the existence of genetic divergence for all traits analyzed, where additive effects were predominant. The high heterosis levels observed, mainly in Xanxerê, suggested the environmental influence on the manifestation of this genetic phenomenon. Populations revealed potential to be used in breeding programs; however, those more intensively submitted to selection could provide larger genetic progress, showing the importance of population improvement for the increment of the heterosis in maize.

  8. On the Origins of Calculation Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A historical review of calculation abilities is presented. Counting, starting with finger sequencing, has been observed in different ancient and contemporary cultures, whereas number representation and arithmetic abilities are found only during the last 5000–6000 years. The rationale for selecting a base of ten in most numerical systems and the clinical association between acalculia and finger agnosia are analyzed. Finger agnosia (as a restricted form of autotopagnosia, right–left discrimination disturbances, semantic aphasia, and acalculia are proposed to comprise a single neuropsychological syndrome associated with left angular gyrus damage. A classification of calculation disturbances resulting from brain damage is presented. It is emphasized that using historical/anthropological analysis, it becomes evident that acalculia, finger agnosia, and disorders in right–left discrimination (as in general, in the use of spatial concepts must constitute a single clinical syndrome, resulting from the disruption of some common brain activity and the impairment of common cognitive mechanisms.

  9. Inhibitory ability of children with developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiying; Wu, Hanrong

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory ability of children with developmental dyscalculia (DD) was investigated to explore the cognitive mechanism underlying DD. According to the definition of developmental dyscalculia, 19 children with DD-only and 10 children with DD&RD (DD combined with reading disability) were selected step by step, children in two control groups were matched with children in case groups by gender and age, and the match ratio was 1:1. Psychological testing software named DMDX was used to measure inhibitory ability of the subjects. The differences of reaction time in number Stroop tasks and differences of accuracy in incongruent condition of color-word Stroop tasks and object inhibition tasks between DD-only children and their controls reached significant levels (Pgeneral inhibitory deficits, while children with DD&RD confronted with word inhibitory deficits only.

  10. Rituals Improve Children's Ability to Delay Gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybanska, Veronika; McKay, Ryan; Jong, Jonathan; Whitehouse, Harvey

    2017-02-18

    To be accepted into social groups, individuals must internalize and reproduce appropriate group conventions, such as rituals. The copying of such rigid and socially stipulated behavioral sequences places heavy demands on executive function. Given previous research showing that challenging executive functioning improves it, it was hypothesized that engagement in ritualistic behaviors improves children's executive functioning, in turn improving their ability to delay gratification. A 3-month circle time games intervention with 210 schoolchildren (Mage  = 7.78 years, SD = 1.47) in two contrasting cultural environments (Slovakia and Vanuatu) was conducted. The intervention improved children's executive function and in turn their ability to delay gratification. Moreover, these effects were amplified when the intervention task was imbued with ritual, rather than instrumental, cues. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. Do the physical and environment PETTLEP elements predict sport imagery ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Nurwina; Williams, Sarah E; Cumming, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether physical and environment elements of PETTLEP imagery relate to the ability to image five types of sport imagery (i.e. skill, strategy, goal, affect and mastery). Two hundred and ninety participants (152 males, 148 females; Mage = 20.24 years, SD = 4.36) from various sports completed the Sport Imagery Ability Questionnaire (SIAQ), and a set of items designed specifically for the study to assess how frequently participants incorporate physical (e.g. 'I make small movements or gestures during the imagery') and environment (e.g. 'I image in the real training/competition environment') elements of PETTLEP imagery. Structural equation modelling tested a hypothesised model in which imagery priming (i.e. the best fitting physical and environment elements) significantly and positively predicted imagery ability of the different imagery types (skill, β = 0.38; strategy, β = 0.23; goal, β = 0.21; affect, β = 0.25; mastery, β = 0.22). The model was a good fit to the data: χ2 (174) = 263.87, p strategy, goal, affect and mastery imagery ability. The findings extend models of imagery use by indicating that how athletes images may influence their imagery ability.

  12. Different Perspectives: Spatial Ability Influences Where Individuals Look on a Timed Spatial Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Victoria A.; Fraser, Graham M.; Kryklywy, James H.; Mitchell, Derek G. V.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2017-01-01

    Learning in anatomy can be both spatially and visually complex. Pedagogical investigations have begun exploration as to how spatial ability may mitigate learning. Emerging hypotheses suggests individuals with higher spatial reasoning may attend to images differently than those who are lacking. To elucidate attentional patterns associated with…

  13. The Relationship between Perceived Body Size and Confidence in Ability to Teach among Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrow, Teena R.; Muller, Susan M.; Schneider, Sidney R.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the relationship between preservice teachers' perceived body sizes and confidence in their ability to teach. One hundred two participants completed a questionnaire that included 1) providing height and weight information, 2) completing The Teaching Anxiety Scale (TCHAS), 3) selecting body images best representing…

  14. Endurance ability characteristics of professional sportsmen

    OpenAIRE

    Rozenstoka, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Cycling and kettlebell sport are cyclic kinds of sport. For sport achievement is important the development of endurance ability. In kettlebell sport high performance is based on the strength endurance. One of the conditions for success in competition is sportsman’s high aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Complex cardiopulmonary exercise testing allows for simultaneous study of the responses of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems to a stated physical load stress. There is direct correlation ...

  15. Simulating Ability: Representing Skills in Games

    OpenAIRE

    Hetland, Magnus Lie

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the history of games, representing the abilities of the various agents acting on behalf of the players has been a central concern. With increasingly sophisticated games emerging, these simulations have become more realistic, but the underlying mechanisms are still, to a large extent, of an ad hoc nature. This paper proposes using a logistic model from psychometrics as a unified mechanism for task resolution in simulation-oriented games.

  16. Developing Physics E-Scaffolding Teaching Media to Increase the Eleventh-Grade Students' Problem Solving Ability and Scientific Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputri, Affa Ardhi; Wilujeng, Insih

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at revealing (1) the suitability of physics e-scaffolding teaching media with mathematical and image/diagrammatic representation, as well as (2) the effectiveness of the e-scaffolding teaching media with mathematical and image/diagrammatic representation to improve students' problem solving ability and scientific attitude. It is…

  17. Measurement of motivational imagery abilities in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Melanie; Hall, Craig

    2006-09-01

    Athletes report using imagery most often to successfully cope with and master challenging situations. This function of imagery is termed "motivational general-mastery" and includes imagining being focused, confident and in control in difficult circumstances. Also, athletes often use imagery to regulate their arousal levels (e.g. relaxing, psyching up) and this function of imagery is termed "motivational-general arousal". While most athletes report employing these two motivational functions of imagery, their ability to do so has not been examined. The aim of the present study was to develop a measure of motivational general sport imagery ability, the Motivational Imagery Ability Measure for Sport (MIAMS). This was accomplished through three phases. Across these phases, evidence was generated showing that the psychometric properties of the instrument are adequate. In addition, the relationship of scores on the MIAMS to demographic variables, including sex, sport type and competitive standard, were examined. It was found that athletes participating at a competitive level scored higher on the MIAMS than athletes participating at a recreational level.

  18. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists), whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists). The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688), implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI) may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people’s implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training. PMID:26052309

  19. The mouth and dis/ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddiard, K; Goodley, D

    2016-06-01

    Our aims in this paper are threefold. First, to understand how the mouth reveals the kinds of human beings that are de/valued in specific national locations and in global discourses with special attention on disability. Second, to subject the mouth to analysis from critical disability studies, specifically, an approach we describe as dis/ability studies. Third, to ask how the mouth might work as a site of resistance for disabled people. The paper begins by providing an introduction to critical disability studies, a perspective that foregrounds disability as the primary focus for thinking through the ways in which the body and society are shaped together. We move in this literature review towards a dis/ability studies approach that recognises the simultaneous processes of disablism (the exclusion of people with impairments) and ableism (the system by which standards of human autonomy and capability are made as key indicators of human worth). We then analyse the mouth in relation to pathologisation, human enhancement and resistance. We conclude with some final thoughts on the offerings of a dis/ability studies approach to those of interested with the intersections of the mouth and society.

  20. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of......The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite......-wollastonite-tridymite and that of anorthite-wollastonite-gehlenite. The series includes the eutectic compositions as end members. The second series consists of five compositions on a line parallel to the joining line on the alumina rich side. In the present work, GFA is described in terms of glass stability, i.e., the ability of a glass...... to resist crystallization during reheating. In addition, the fragility index (m) is derived by fitting the viscosity data with the Avramov-Milchev equation. The results show that m is inversely proportional to the glass stability for the two series of melts, implying that m is an indirect measure of GFA...

  1. Age dependence of Olympic weightlifting ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, D E

    1994-08-01

    There is increasing interest among Masters athletes in standards for comparing performances of competitors of different ages. The goal of this study was to develop one such age-comparison method by examining the age dependence of ability in Olympic-style weightlifting. Previous research on the deterioration of muscular strength and power with increasing age offers only limited guidance toward this goal; therefore, analysis of performance data was required. The variation of weightlifting ability as a function of age was examined by two different methods. First, cross-sectional data corresponding to two separate populations of Masters weightlifters were analyzed in detail. Then, a longitudinal study of 64 U.S. male Masters weightlifters was carried out, with performance versus age curves resulting from the two methods were very similar, reflecting approximately 1.0-1.5% x yr-1 deterioration rates. These curves were characterized by common features regarding the rate of decline of muscular power with increasing age, in apparent agreement with published data regarding Masters sprinters and jumpers. We tentatively conclude that Olympic weightlifting ability in trained subjects undergoes a nonlinear decline with age, in which the second derivative of the performance versus age curve repeatedly changes sign.

  2. Discovery Learning for Mathematical Literacy Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokada, D.; Herman, T.; Suhendra

    2017-09-01

    The background of this research is students’ mathematical literacy ability which is still less so most students find difficulty in solving mathematical problem in daily life. Learning which tend to be teacher centered not give change to students to develop their own ideas so the students do not master the concept well. Discovery learning is one of learning which train students how to discover mathematical concept and to train students to express their ideas. This study is quasi experimental study which is aimed to find out the enhancement of mathematical literacy ability of eighth grade students with discovery learning. This research used nonequivalent control group design. The population in this research were all students of the eight grade Junior High School in Tana Toraja. This research conclude that mathematics learning with discovery learning method in eight grade students of Junior High School can enhance the ability of mathematical literacy more significant. Discovery learning give change to students to construct their own knowledge so they can understand mathematical problem until its solution.

  3. Sexual orientation and visuo-spatial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, G; Ross-Field, L

    1986-07-01

    On the basis of a literature review it was concluded that sex differences in cognitive ability and the etiology of male homosexuality may have a common biological base, leading to the prediction that in terms of cognitive ability homosexual males (HmM) would resemble heterosexual females (HtF) rather than heterosexual males (HtM). This prediction was investigated using visuo-spatial tasks on which males are known to perform better than females. In Experiment 1 HtM performed better on a water level task than HmM and HtF whose performances did not differ significantly. A different version of the water level task and the Vincent Mechanical Diagrams Test were used in Experiment 2; on both tasks the HtM performed better than the HmM and the HtF whose performance did not differ significantly. The results are interpreted as support for a common biological determinant of cognitive ability and male sexual orientation.

  4. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSARIO eCABELLO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists, whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists. The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688, implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT. Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people’s implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training.

  5. Paralinguistic abilities of adults with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đorđević, Mirjana; Glumbić, Nenad; Brojčin, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the ability level of paralinguistic production and comprehension in adults with intellectual disability (ID) with regard to the level of their intellectual functioning and presence of co-morbid psychiatric conditions or dual diagnosis (DD). The sample consisted of 120 participants of both genders, ranging in age between 20 and 56 years (M=31.82, SD=8.702). Approximately 50% of the sample comprised participants with a co-existing psychiatric condition. Each of these two sub-samples (those with ID only and those with DD) consisted of 25 participants with mild ID and 35 participants with moderate ID. The paralinguistic scale from The Assessment Battery for Communication (ABaCo; Sacco et al., 2008) was used to assess the abilities of comprehension and production of paralinguistic elements. The results showed that the participants with mild ID are more successful than the participants with moderate ID both in paralinguistic comprehension tasks (p=.000) and in paralinguistic production tasks (p=.001). Additionally, the results indicated the presence of separate influences of both ID levels on all of the paralinguistic abilities (F [116]=42.549, p=.000) and the existence of DD (F [116]=18.215, p=.000). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists), whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists). The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688), implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI) may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people's implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training.

  7. Image exploitation for MISAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, N.; Edrich, M.; Saur, G.; Krüger, W.

    2007-04-01

    The miniature SAR-system MiSAR has been developed by EADS Germany for lightweight UAVs like the LUNASystem. MiSAR adds to these tactical UAV-systems the all-weather reconnaissance capability, which is missing until now. Unlike other SAR sensors, that produce large strip maps at update rates of several seconds, MiSAR generates sequences of SAR images with approximately 1 Hz frame rate. photo interpreters (PI) of tactical drones, now mainly experienced with visual interpretation, are not used to SARimages, especially not with SAR-image sequence characteristics. So they should be supported to improve their ability to carry out their task with a new, demanding sensor system. We have therefore analyzed and discussed with military PIs in which task MiSAR can be used and how the PIs can be supported by special algorithms. We developed image processing- and exploitation-algorithms for such SAR-image sequences. A main component is the generation of image sequence mosaics to get more oversight. This mosaicing has the advantage that also non straight /linear flight-paths and varying squint angles can be processed. Another component is a screening-component for manmade objects to mark regions of interest in the image sequences. We use a classification based approach, which can be easily adapted to new sensors and scenes. These algorithms are integrated into an image exploitation system to improve the image interpreters ability to get a better oversight, better orientation and helping them to detect relevant objects, especially considering long endurance reconnaissance missions.

  8. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  9. Image Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance that explains the process for getting images approved in One EPA Web microsites and resource directories. includes an appendix that shows examples of what makes some images better than others, how some images convey meaning more than others

  10. Work ability evaluation in neurosarcoidosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Aleksandar P.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology which affects most frequently the hilar lymph nodes and lungs. Symptomatic involvement of the central nervous system may develop in patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis or it may be the initial manifestation of the disease. This is a case report of 48-year old female patient admitted to our clinic for evaluation of working ability. The patient had a total of 24 years of service and occupational exposure and she has been employed as supplies procurement officer. On admission, she complained of the following discomforts: eye-lid pain, intellectual fatigue, psychic uneasiness, forgetfulness, dyspnea and productive cough. Neurological findings indicated the presence of the right eye ophthalmoplegia, psychoorganic syndrome and neurosarcoidosis. Ophthalmological examination evidenced bilateral ptosis and presence of anisocoria. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed discrete focal lesions of the pons (paracentral left and parietal corona radiata of the left hemisphere. Based on performed examinations and diagnostics procedures, final evaluation of patient’s working ability concluded that the patient was not capable of psychic strains and jobs associated with material accountability.

  11. Is there a relationship between ultrasound scanning ability (sonography) and visuospatial perception or psychomotor ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Suzanne; Gallagher, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background Competent sonography is thought to include a unique combination of skills not yet fully defined. This presents challenges when recruiting the correct people for training. Skills are thought to include visuospatial perception and psychomotor skills, but little is known about the relationship between these aptitudes and scanning ability. This feasibility study explored such relationships, to identify evaluation techniques which may improve selection and recruitment. Methods A sample of 30 experienced ultrasound practitioners and 30 trainees at commencement and on completion of training were administered eight tests. Results No significant relationships between experienced practitioners’ or trainees’ visuospatial abilities or psychomotor abilities and scanning abilities were found. Results demonstrated that two of the visuospatial perception tests were not influenced by training and therefore, may be measuring the innate skills of ultrasound practitioners. As ultrasound practitioners had not performed any of the tests previously, ranges of scores for each of the eight tests were established for this group. This included measures for psychomotor skills which added to the current body of knowledge for sonography. Conclusions Although no significant correlations were found between participants’ visuospatial perception or psychomotor abilities and scanning ability, performance on the Obstetric Structured Assessment Test (combining all the skills required) pre-training gave the best indication of post-training scanning performance. The Obstetric Structured Assessment Test may prove a useful tool for initial assessment of potential trainees but abilities will require further investigation. PMID:27847536

  12. Imaging in mechanical back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt; Hansen, Philip; Carrino, John A

    2016-01-01

    to expect such procedures to be undertaken. However, the majority of conventional imaging techniques do not have adequate precision to identify the primary source of pain. Not only can this be frustrating to both clinicians and patients, but importantly, inadequate correlation between imaging findings...... and symptoms hampers the ability of clinicians to devise a specific treatment plan for the patient. Therefore, there is mounting interest in new imaging techniques of the lumbar spine that may increase the clinical correlation in low back pain. In this review, we will discuss the value and limitations...... of various lumbar spine imaging techniques with focus on new emerging technologies....

  13. Improving teamwork abilities across cultural differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    2009-01-01

    The Belbin method has been applied at the education in Arctic Technology in Greenland as a way of improving the student’s teamwork abilities. The feedback from the students is that Belbin is a meaningful and relevant tool and they are very engaged during the teamwork exercises. They get...... a theoretical approach to teamwork and a language in which they can talk about their own and each others strengths and weaknesses. There are indications that it has positive effect on their subsequent teamwork....

  14. Global Disability: Empowering Children of all Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Rebecca J; Maphula, Angelina; Pullen, Paige C; Shrestha, Rita; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Roshan, Reeba; Koshy, Beena

    2017-08-01

    Worldwide, children are often not meeting their developmental potential owing to malnutrition, infection, lack of stimulation, and toxic stress. Children with disabilities are more likely to experience poverty, neglect, and abuse, and are less likely to have adequate access to education and medical care. Early childhood developmental stimulation can improve language, learning, and future participation in communities. Therapeutic supports and endeavors to reduce stigma for people of all abilities strengthen communities and allow for human thriving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Learned image representations for visual recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    This thesis addresses the problem of extracting image structures for representing images effectively in order to solve visual recognition tasks. Problems from diverse research areas (medical imaging, material science and food processing) have motivated large parts of the methodological development...... the ability to learn high-level concepts in images of faces. The thesis argues in favor of learning features and presents new methods for domains with limited amounts of labeled data allowing feature learning to be applied more broadly....

  16. Image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Blanken, Henk; Vries de, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L; Feng, L.

    2007-01-01

    The field of image processing addresses handling and analysis of images for many purposes using a large number of techniques and methods. The applications of image processing range from enhancement of the visibility of cer- tain organs in medical images to object recognition for handling by

  17. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  18. Laparoscopic baseline ability assessment by virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Atul K; Frantzides, Constantine T; Sasso, Lisa M

    2005-02-01

    Assessment of any surgical skill is time-consuming and difficult. Currently, there are no accepted metrics for most surgical skills, especially laparoscopic skills. Virtual reality has been utilized for laparoscopic training of surgical residents. Our hypothesis is that this technology can be utilized for laparoscopic ability metrics. This study involved medical students with no previous laparoscopic experience. All students were taken into a porcine laboratory in order to assess two operative tasks (measuring a piece of bowel and placing a piece of bowel into a laparoscopic bag). Then they were taken into an inanimate lab with a Minimally Invasive Surgery Trainer-Virtual Reality (MIST-VR). Each student repeatedly performed one task (placing a virtual reality ball into a receptacle). The students' scores and times from the animate lab were compared with average economy of movement and times from the MIST-VR. The MIST-VR scored both hands individually. Thirty-two first- and second-year medical students were included in the study. There was statistically significant (P reality trainer and operative tasks. While not all of the possible relationships demonstrated statistically significant correlation, the majority of the possible relationships demonstrated statistically significant correlation. Virtual reality may be an avenue for measuring laparoscopic surgical ability.

  19. Hearing ability decreases in ageing locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shira D; Windmill, James F C

    2015-07-01

    Insects display signs of ageing, despite their short lifespan. However, the limited studies on senescence emphasize longevity or reproduction. We focused on the hearing ability of ageing adult locusts, Schistocerca gregaria. Our results indicate that the youngest adults (2 weeks post-maturity) have a greater overall neurophysiological response to sound, especially for low frequencies (<10 kHz), as well as a shorter latency to this neural response. Interestingly, when measuring displacement of the tympanal membrane that the receptor neurons directly attach to, we found movement is not directly correlated with neural response. Therefore, we suggest the enhanced response in younger animals is due to the condition of their tissues (e.g. elasticity). Secondly, we found the sexes do not have the same responses, particularly at 4 weeks post-adult moult. We propose female reproductive condition reduces their ability to receive sounds. Overall our results indicate older animals, especially females, are less sensitive to sounds. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Epoxyalkenal-trapping ability of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Rosario; Aguilar, Isabel; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2017-12-15

    Lipid oxidation products have been shown to produce changes in food quality and safety as a consequence of carbonyl-amine reactions. Some of these reactions can be prevented by the use of phenolics, although the lipid-derived carbonyl trapping ability of phenolics is still poorly understood. In an attempt to fill this gap, the reactions of 4,5-epoxy-2-hexenal, 4,5-epoxy-2-heptenal, and 4,5-epoxy-2-decenal, with 2-methylresorcinol and 2,5-dimethylresorcinol were studied. These reactions produced diverse 1,3a,4,9b-tetrahydro-2H-furo[2,3-c]chromene-2,7-diols and 3,4,4a,9a-tetrahydro-1H-pyrano[3,4-b]benzofuran-3,7-diols, which were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). The produced epoxyalkenal-phenol reaction was characterized and carbonyl-phenol adducts were produced firstly by epoxide-ring opening initiated by the attack of one phenolic hydroxyl group and, then, by addition of one aromatic phenol carbon to the carbon-carbon double bond of the epoxyalkenal. This reaction rapidly deactivated the most important reactive groups of epoxyalkenals, decreasing in this way their ability to modify amino compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantile forecast discrimination ability and value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Bouallègue, Zied; Pinson, Pierre; Friederichs, Petra

    2015-01-01

    While probabilistic forecast verification for categorical forecasts is well established, some of the existing concepts and methods have not found their equivalent for the case of continuous variables. New tools dedicated to the assessment of forecast discrimination ability and forecast value are ...... is illustrated based on synthetic datasets, as well as for the case of global radiation forecasts from the high resolution ensemble COSMO-DE-EPS of the German Weather Service.......While probabilistic forecast verification for categorical forecasts is well established, some of the existing concepts and methods have not found their equivalent for the case of continuous variables. New tools dedicated to the assessment of forecast discrimination ability and forecast value...... are introduced here, based on quantile forecasts being the base product for the continuous case. The relative user characteristic (RUC) curve and the quantile value plot allow analysing the performance of a forecast for a specific user in a decision-making framework. The RUC curve is designed as a user...

  2. Combining ability's for yield components in sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hladni Nada

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop new single-cross sunflower hybrids with an altered plant model and a high genetic potential for seed yield and oil content, it is essential to study the combining ability's of the inbred lines. Full diallel crosses with six genetically divergent sunflower inbreeds were carried out in order to study the mode of inheritance and combining ability for plant height and head diameter in the F1 and F2 generations. Significant differences in the mean values for the traits concerned were observed. The most common mode of inheritance of plant height in the F1 and F2 generations was super dominance, and there were also instances of partial dominance and dominance. The mode of inheritance of head diameter in the F1 and F2 generations was dominance and super dominance. Highly significant GCA and SCA value, for plant height and head diameter were recorded. We found a line (NS-NDF with negative GCA value that was also a good genera 1 combiner for reduced plant height and head diameter. .

  3. Nature versus Nurture in Determining Athletic Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Lidor, Ronnie; Eynon, Nir

    2016-01-01

    This overview provides a general discussion of the roles of nature and nurture in determining human athletic ability. On the nature (genetics) side, a review is provided with emphasis on the historical research and on several areas which are likely to be important for future research, including next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, a number of well-designed training studies that could possibly reveal the biological mechanism ('cause') behind the association between gene variants and athletic ability are discussed. On the nurture (environment) side, we discuss common environmental variables including deliberate practice, family support, and the birthplace effect, which may be important in becoming an elite athlete. Developmental effects are difficult to disassociate with genetic effects, because the early life environment may have long-lasting effects in adulthood. With this in mind, the fetal programming hypothesis is also briefly reviewed, as fetal programming provides an excellent example of how the environment interacts with genetics. We conclude that the traditional argument of nature versus nurture is no longer relevant, as it has been clearly established that both are important factors in the road to becoming an elite athlete. With the availability of the next-generation genetics (sequencing) techniques, it is hoped that future studies will reveal the relevant genes influencing performance, as well as the interaction between those genes and environmental (nurture) factors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Improving leaping ability in elite rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M R; Tremain, L; Christiansen, J; Beitzel, J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the leaping ability of athletes in rhythmic gymnastics, a high leap demanding sport, using a controlled course of jump training. Six elite athletes underwent a course of leap training including pool training and Pilates' Method of Body Conditioning using spring controlled resistance to muscular exertion. Baseline data was obtained on a force plate that measured reaction time, leap height, and explosive power on each athlete before initiating training. After 1 month of training, leap height improved 16.2%, ground reaction time improved 50%, and explosive power improved 220%. With continued maintenance training, no decrease in effect was noted; however, no significant improvement occurred after the first month of training. At 1 yr with discontinuation of the leaping protocol but continued training within the sport, the initial gains were likewise maintained. No injuries occurred during participation in the leaping protocol. Elite rhythmic gymnasts can safely improve their leaping ability significantly through an intense course of jump training. Continued training with the leaping protocol does not appear to further enhance the benefit; however, the gains appear to be maintained at 4 months and 1 yr post training with or without additional training with the leaping protocol.

  5. The genotype role in maize competitive ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Milena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing competitive crops is an important component of the integrated weed management system, although selection of genotypes with the increased competitive ability is rather difficult. The possibility of reducing weed infestation by increasing the competitive activity of crops by growing genotypes, i.e. hybrids that better 'endure' a greater density, depends on the FAO maturity group and morphological properties of a genotype, environmental conditions and the growing regions. The competition between maize and weeds varies over the modified crop arrangement pattern. The greatest weed infestation is recorded in the crops of the sparse-spaced plants, while the height and the weight of weeds are significantly lower in closely-spaced plants. The height, growth intensity in the initial stages, embryo vigour and leaf area of the plant are important for a greater competitive ability, as they are components of competitive effects of crops on weeds. Weed infestation and maize hybrids yielding were studied in dependence on the hybrids arrangement pattern and the application of herbicides. Obtained results show statistically significant differences in the weed fresh weight, but only in certain years and in accordance with differences in the height and the leaf area of ZP maize hybrids.

  6. Development of cognitive abilities as educational goal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović-Nahod Slobodanka S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper sets out to consider cognitive abilities development depending on learning and educational goals. Three standpoints and their effects on the quality of cognition are opposed: determination of tasks and goals beforehand, non-determination of tasks and goals beforehand, and alternative models where general and specific goals are planned specification being left to curriculum executors. Thereafter, consideration is given to the learning theories where it is insisted either upon learner’s individual activities or upon planning of learning context which contains interrelations between teachers, learners and contents. Emphasis is placed on a discrepancy between theoretical ideas providing good reasons for independently constructed knowledge evaluation, on the one hand, and school practice that commonly does not attribute great importance to such knowledge on the other hand. How the development of cognitive abilities will proceed in teaching depends largely on teachers themselves - their understanding of tasks and goals, qualifications they possess for school subject they teach manner of executing instruction, and familiarity with student personality needs. We can accept the standpoint that we need the theory focusing straight on education, but must be broad enough to embrace both individual and contextual perspective as well as activities of both teachers and students.

  7. Cognitive ability and dental fear and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, My; Ek, Ulla; Fernell, Elisabeth; Holmberg, Kirsten; Westerlund, Joakim; Dahllöf, Göran

    2013-04-01

    Dental fear and anxiety (DFA), as well as dental behavior management problems, are common in children and adolescents. Several psychological factors in the child, and parental DFA, have been studied and found to correlate to the child's DFA. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and DFA in a population-based group of children with identified behavior and learning problems. In conjunction with a dental examination at 11 yr of age, 70 children were assessed with regard to DFA using the Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), and their cognitive ability was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. In addition, parental DFA was measured using the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale. The results revealed that DFA was significantly correlated to verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) but not to any other cognitive index. A significant correlation was found between parental DFA and child DFA. The results indicate that the child's verbal capacity may be one factor of importance in explaining dental fear in children. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  8. Enhancement of SAR images using fuzzy shrinkage technique in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Speckle degrades the features in the image and reduces the ability of a human observer to resolve fine detail, hence despeckling is very much required for SAR images. This paper presents speckle noise reduction in SAR images using a combination of curvelet and fuzzy logic technique to restore speckle-affected images.

  9. Esthetic abilities: a way to describe abilities of expert nurses in palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, Elisabeth; Wikström, Britt-Maj; Andershed, Birgitta

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to focus on the abilities needed to create the caring relation in palliative home care and to find ways to describe these abilities and skills from an esthetic perspective. Nurses in Palliative home care have to create a functioning relationship between themselves the patient and the patient's next of kin, this puts special demands on the nurse. A number of abilities, such as creativity, intuition, empathy and self-knowledge are mentioned in literature related to the caring relation. Many nursing theorists have referred to the art and esthetic of nursing when trying to describe these abilities. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with eight expert nurses in palliative home care. The transcribed interviews were analysed using qualitative content analyses. Three main categories where found: The will to do good, Knowledge and Perceptiveness. Subcategories that can be seen as abilities where found in the main categories knowledge and perceptiveness. The main categories can be seen as expressions for abilities, personal qualities and skills needed to create the caring relation in palliative home care. We found interesting connections between the three main categories and the concepts of esthetics, ethics and science. We also found that nurses develop in a way, i.e. similar to an artist. The concepts brought forward in this paper could be used in clinical supervision and education as well as in clinical practice. If nurses think about the three aspects: Knowledge, the will to do good and perceptiveness, the chance for a positive relation between the nurse and the patient, and the patient's next of kin might increase. One could speculate that perceptiveness is a vital ability in order to achieve the expert level of nursing and that this perspective should be taken in consideration when recruiting nurses and in curriculum development.

  10. Longitudinal Alterations of Frontoparietal and Frontotemporal Networks Predict Future Creative Cognitive Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qunlin; Beaty, Roger E; Wei, Dongtao; Yang, Junyi; Sun, Jiangzhou; Liu, Wei; Yang, Wenjing; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2018-01-01

    Creative cognition is important to academic performance and career success during late adolescence and adulthood. However, there is a lack of longitudinal data on whether brain structural development could predict improvements in creative thinking, and how such changes interact with other cognitive abilities to support creative performance. Here we examined longitudinal alterations of brain structure and their relation to creative cognitive ability in a sample of 159 healthy young adults who were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging 2-3 times over the course of 3 years. The most robust predictor of future creative ability was the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), which in conjunction with baseline creative capacity showed a 31% prediction rate. Longitudinal analysis revealed that slower decreases in gray matter density within left frontoparietal and right frontotemporal clusters predicted enhanced creative ability. Moreoever, the relationship between longitudinal alterations within frontal-related clusters and improved creative ability was moderated by the right DLPFC and working memory ability. We conclude that continuous goal-directed planning and accumulated knowledge are implemented in the right DLPFC and temporal areas, respectively, which in turn support longitudinal gains in creative cognitive ability. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution o...

  12. Quantitative imaging as cancer biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, David A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to assay tumor biologic features and the impact of drugs on tumor biology is fundamental to drug development. Advances in our ability to measure genomics, gene expression, protein expression, and cellular biology have led to a host of new targets for anticancer drug therapy. In translating new drugs into clinical trials and clinical practice, these same assays serve to identify patients most likely to benefit from specific anticancer treatments. As cancer therapy becomes more individualized and targeted, there is an increasing need to characterize tumors and identify therapeutic targets to select therapy most likely to be successful in treating the individual patient's cancer. Thus far assays to identify cancer therapeutic targets or anticancer drug pharmacodynamics have been based upon in vitro assay of tissue or blood samples. Advances in molecular imaging, particularly PET, have led to the ability to perform quantitative non-invasive molecular assays. Imaging has traditionally relied on structural and anatomic features to detect cancer and determine its extent. More recently, imaging has expanded to include the ability to image regional biochemistry and molecular biology, often termed molecular imaging. Molecular imaging can be considered an in vivo assay technique, capable of measuring regional tumor biology without perturbing it. This makes molecular imaging a unique tool for cancer drug development, complementary to traditional assay methods, and a potentially powerful method for guiding targeted therapy in clinical trials and clinical practice. The ability to quantify, in absolute measures, regional in vivo biologic parameters strongly supports the use of molecular imaging as a tool to guide therapy. This review summarizes current and future applications of quantitative molecular imaging as a biomarker for cancer therapy, including the use of imaging to (1) identify patients whose tumors express a specific therapeutic target; (2) determine

  13. Neural Variability Quenching Predicts Individual Perceptual Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazi, Ayelet; Censor, Nitzan; Dinstein, Ilan

    2017-01-04

    Neural activity during repeated presentations of a sensory stimulus exhibits considerable trial-by-trial variability. Previous studies have reported that trial-by-trial neural variability is reduced (quenched) by the presentation of a stimulus. However, the functional significance and behavioral relevance of variability quenching and the potential physiological mechanisms that may drive it have been studied only rarely. Here, we recorded neural activity with EEG as subjects performed a two-interval forced-choice contrast discrimination task. Trial-by-trial neural variability was quenched by ∼40% after the presentation of the stimulus relative to the variability apparent before stimulus presentation, yet there were large differences in the magnitude of variability quenching across subjects. Individual magnitudes of quenching predicted individual discrimination capabilities such that subjects who exhibited larger quenching had smaller contrast discrimination thresholds and steeper psychometric function slopes. Furthermore, the magnitude of variability quenching was strongly correlated with a reduction in broadband EEG power after stimulus presentation. Our results suggest that neural variability quenching is achieved by reducing the amplitude of broadband neural oscillations after sensory input, which yields relatively more reproducible cortical activity across trials and enables superior perceptual abilities in individuals who quench more. Variability quenching is a phenomenon in which neural variability across trials is reduced by the presentation of a stimulus. Although this phenomenon has been reported across a variety of animal and human studies, its functional significance and behavioral relevance have been examined only rarely. Here, we report novel empirical evidence from humans revealing that variability quenching differs dramatically across individual subjects and explains to a certain degree why some individuals exhibit better perceptual abilities than

  14. Electromagnetic imaging through thick metallic enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J. Darrer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to image through metallic enclosures is an important goal of any scanning technology for security applications. Previous work demonstrated the penetrating power of electromagnetic imaging through thin metallic enclosures, thus validating the technique for security applications such as cargo screening. In this work we study the limits of electromagnetic imaging through metallic enclosures, considering the performance of the imaging for different thicknesses of the enclosure. Our results show, that our system can image a Copper disk, even when enclosed within a 20 mm thick Aluminum box. The potential for imaging through enclosures of other materials, such as Lead, Copper, and Iron, is discussed.

  15. Numerical approximation abilities correlate with and predict informal but not formal mathematics abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertus, Melissa E; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-12-01

    Previous research has found a relationship between individual differences in children's precision when nonverbally approximating quantities and their school mathematics performance. School mathematics performance emerges from both informal (e.g., counting) and formal (e.g., knowledge of mathematics facts) abilities. It remains unknown whether approximation precision relates to both of these types of mathematics abilities. In the current study, we assessed the precision of numerical approximation in 85 3- to 7-year-old children four times over a span of 2years. In addition, at the final time point, we tested children's informal and formal mathematics abilities using the Test of Early Mathematics Ability (TEMA-3). We found that children's numerical approximation precision correlated with and predicted their informal, but not formal, mathematics abilities when controlling for age and IQ. These results add to our growing understanding of the relationship between an unlearned nonsymbolic system of quantity representation and the system of mathematics reasoning that children come to master through instruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  17. TIE: An Ability Test of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jarosław; Stolarski, Maciej S.

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions. PMID:25072656

  18. TIE: an ability test of emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jarosław; Stolarski, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions.

  19. Differential ability of ectomycorrhizas to survive drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pietro, Magali; Churin, Jean-Louis; Garbaye, Jean

    2007-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that, depending on the fungal symbiont, ectomycorrhizas are differentially affected by severe drought stress, we developed a simple method to quantify the loss of vitality of excised ectomycorrhizal tips subjected to drying under controlled conditions. The method uses 96-well microtitration plates with one single ectomycorrhizal tip per well, and is based on measuring the loss of volume and the loss of electrolytes before and after the imposed stress. This approach very significantly discriminated the two ectomycorrhizal morphotypes formed with beech (Fagus silvatica) by Lactarius subdulcis and Cenococcum geophilum, which confirmed the ability of the latter fungal species to protect roots against desiccation already suggested by previous works. The new method should contribute to the present effort in deciphering the functional diversity of complex ectomycorrhizal communities.

  20. Combining ability of white grain popcorn populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Scapim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to indicate the best improvement strategy and select parents to begin animprovement program of white grain popcorn based on the combining ability and heterosis of eight populations selected inexperiments in the northwestern region of Paraná. The traits plant and ear height, grain yield and popping expansion wereevaluated. The base populations, the F1 and five controls were evaluated in Maringá, state of Paraná, over the course of twoyears. Heterosis for popping expansion was very low and the best improvement strategy is to raise the values of poppingexpansion up to commercial levels through intrapopulation improvement of the populations BRS Angela and SC 002. Intenseselection must be applied to reduce plant and ear height; interpopulation selection must not be initiated at this moment.

  1. Towards Objective Measures of Functional Hearing Abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Innes-Brown, Hamish; Tsongas, Renee; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Aims People with impaired hearing often have difficulties in hearing sounds in a noisy background. This problem is partially a result of the auditory systems reduced capacity to process temporal information in the sound signal. In this study we examined the relationships between perceptual...... before the onset of permanent threshold shifts. Methods We measured TFS sensitivity and speech in noise performance (QuickSIN) behaviourally in 34 normally hearing adults with ages ranging from 18 to 63 years. We recorded brainstem responses to complex harmonic sounds and a 4000 Hz carrier signal...... sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) cues, brainstem encoding of complex harmonic and amplitude modulated sounds, and the ability to understand speech in noise. Understanding these links will allow the development of an objective measure that could be used to detect changes in functional hearing...

  2. The cultural space between accounts & abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitriasari, Dewi; Kampf, Constance

    of open cultural systems to explain the resources available for accounting practices in Indonesia. We examine the Global Reporting Initiative and International Accounting Standards Board websites as examples of unsettled cultures--looking at their ideologies expressed via the Internet, comparing studies......Relations between global accounting standards and local accountability practices in Indonesia, a country with a rich history influenced by both the East and West, are examined from a cultural perspective.  Key constructs include Swidler's notions of settled and unsettled cultures and the notion...... of their effectiveness to the ideal presented online.  We contrast these unsettled global cultures with the settled culture of Indonesia.  Findings include the notion of cultural space between accounts and abilities can serve as a fruitful frame of reference for understanding global standards from the perspective...

  3. TIE: an ability test of emotional intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Śmieja

    Full Text Available The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions.

  4. Weed suppression ability of spring barley varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend

    1995-01-01

    Three years of experiments with spring barley showed significant differences in weed suppression ability among varieties. Weed dry matter in the most suppressive variety, Ida, was 48% lower than the mean weed dry matter of all varieties, whereas it was 31% higher in the least suppressive variety......, Grit. Ranking varietal responses to weed competition in terms of grain yield loss corresponded well to ranking weed dry matter produced in crop weed mixtures. There was no correspondence between the varietal grain yields in pure stands and their competitiveness, suggesting that breeding to optimize...... interception model was developed to describe the light interception profiles of the varieties. A study of the estimated parameters showed significant correlation between weed dry matter, rate of canopy height development and the light interception profile. However, when estimates were standardized to eliminate...

  5. Ontogeny of numerical abilities in fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Bisazza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesised that human adults, infants, and non-human primates share two non-verbal systems for enumerating objects, one for representing precisely small quantities (up to 3-4 items and one for representing approximately larger quantities. Recent studies exploiting fish's spontaneous tendency to join the larger group showed that their ability in numerical discrimination closely resembles that of primates but little is known as to whether these capacities are innate or acquired. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the spontaneous tendency to join the larger shoal to study the limits of the quantity discrimination of newborn and juvenile guppies. One-day old fish chose the larger shoal when the choice was between numbers in the small quantity range, 2 vs. 3 fish, but not when they had to choose between large numbers, 4 vs. 8 or 4 vs. 12, although the numerical ratio was larger in the latter case. To investigate the relative role of maturation and experience in large number discrimination, fish were raised in pairs (with no numerical experience or in large social groups and tested at three ages. Forty-day old guppies from both treatments were able to discriminate 4 vs. 8 fish while at 20 days this was only observed in fish grown in groups. Control experiments showed that these capacities were maintained after guppies were prevented from using non numerical perceptual variables that co-vary with numerosity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our results suggest the ability of guppies to discriminate small numbers is innate and is displayed immediately at birth while discrimination of large numbers emerges later as a result of both maturation and social experience. This developmental dissociation suggests that fish like primates might have separate systems for small and large number representation.

  6. Visual Ability Score -- a new method to analyze ability in visually impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, O; Chedid, S G; Kronheim, J K; Henry, R K; Jones, C M; Hirose, T

    1998-02-01

    We analyzed the correlation between the Preferential Looking (PL) acuities and the Visual Ability Scores (VAS) of 600 patients (many with severe retinopathy of prematurity) to determine their ability to perform various activities within the daily environment. Visual acuity was measured by PL. Sixteen visual activities within the environment were analyzed. The VAS (range, 1-16) were calculated from the results of each activity and correlated with PL acuity. The PL acuities of the 600 patients ranged from 20/20 (1.0) to visually impaired patients is important to accurately evaluate visual abilities. We found the VAS to be an important aid for low-vision specialists, especially for those with no access to a vision evaluation system such as PL.

  7. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa Marie [Rocky Point, NY; Smith, Randy J [Wading River, NY; Warren, John B [Port Jefferson, NY; Elliott, Donald [Hampton Bays, NY

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  8. How Spatial Abilities Enhance, and Are Enhanced by, Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Mary; Keehner, Madeleine; Khooshabeh, Peter; Montello, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In two studies with a total of 324 participants, dentistry students were assessed on psychometric measures of spatial ability, reasoning ability, and on new measures of the ability to infer the appearance of a cross-section of a three-dimensional (3-D) object. We examined how these abilities and skills predict success in dental education programs,…

  9. Occupational Choice and the Endogenous Supply of Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klynge, Alice Heegaard

    I develop a selection model in which the individual’s supply of ability is endogenous and subject to selection along with occupation. Additionally, I identify and estimate the returns to creative and innovative ability, communication ability, and reading and math ability for white-collar and blue...

  10. Is Approximate Number Precision a Stable Predictor of Math Ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that children's ability to estimate numbers of items using their Approximate Number System (ANS) predicts later math ability. To more closely examine the predictive role of early ANS acuity on later abilities, we assessed the ANS acuity, math ability, and expressive vocabulary of preschoolers twice, six months apart. We…

  11. Advances in multimodal molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, Luigi; Gramanzini, Matteo; Gargiulo, Sara; Albanese, Sandra; Salvatore, Marco; Greco, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical molecular imaging is an emerging field. Improving the ability of scientists to study the molecular basis of human pathology in animals is of the utmost importance for future advances in all fields of human medicine. Moreover, the possibility of developing new imaging techniques or of implementing old ones adapted to the clinic is a significant area. Cardiology, neurology, immunology and oncology have all been studied with preclinical molecular imaging. The functional techniques of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in association with each other or with the anatomic reference provided by computed tomography (CT) as well as with anatomic and functional information provided by magnetic resonance (MR) have all been proficiently applied to animal models of human disease. All the above-mentioned imaging techniques have shown their ability to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in animal models of disease. The clinical translatability of most of the techniques motivates the ongoing study of their possible fields of application. The ability to combine two or more techniques allows obtaining as much information as possible on the molecular processes involved in pathologies, reducing the number of animals necessary in each experiment. Merging molecular probes compatible with various imaging technique will further expand the capability to achieve the best results.

  12. Imaging angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Natalie; Donaldson, Stephanie; Price, Pat

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for direct imaging of effects on tumor vasculature in assessment of response to antiangiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents. Imaging tumor vasculature depends on differences in permeability of vasculature of tumor and normal tissue, which cause changes in penetration of contrast agents. Angiogenesis imaging may be defined in terms of measurement of tumor perfusion and direct imaging of the molecules involved in angiogenesis. In addition, assessment of tumor hypoxia will give an indication of tumor vasculature. The range of imaging techniques available for these processes includes positron emission tomography (PET), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), perfusion computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US).

  13. Mirror image agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2014-10-01

    Gnosis is a modality-specific ability to access semantic knowledge of an object or stimulus in the presence of normal perception. Failure of this is agnosia or disorder of recognition. It can be highly selective within a mode. self-images are different from others as none has seen one's own image except in reflection. Failure to recognize this image can be labeled as mirror image agnosia or Prosopagnosia for reflected self-image. Whereas mirror agnosia is a well-recognized situation where the person while looking at reflected images of other objects in the mirror he imagines that the objects are in fact inside the mirror and not outside. Five patients, four females, and one male presented with failure to recognize reflected self-image, resulting in patients conversing with the image as a friend, fighting because the person in mirror is wearing her nose stud, suspecting the reflected self-image to be an intruder; but did not have prosopagnosia for others faces, non living objects on self and also apraxias except dressing apraxia in one patient. This phenomena is new to our knowledge. Mirror image agnosia is an unique phenomena which is seen in patients with parietal lobe atrophy without specificity to a category of dementing illness and seems to disappear as disease advances. Reflected self-images probably have a specific neural substrate that gets affected very early in posterior dementias specially the ones which predominantly affect the right side. At that phase most patients are mistaken as suffering from psychiatric disorder as cognition is moderately preserved. As disease becomes more widespread this symptom becomes masked. A high degree of suspicion and proper assessment might help physicians to recognize the organic cause of the symptom so that early therapeutic interventions can be initiated. Further assessment of the symptom with FMRI and PET scan is likely to solve the mystery of how brain handles reflected self-images. A new observation involving failure

  14. Group Innovation Ability of Agricultural Technological Innovation Strategic Alliance

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chishun; Yu, Jintian

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural technological innovation strategic alliance, as an important form of strategic alliance, has steadily strengthened the collaborative management among organizations and raised competitive power with the backing of improved group innovation ability. This article studies innovation ability from individual innovation ability to the group innovation ability. Firstly, basic connotation of group innovation ability is to be concluded through the comparison of individual and group innovat...

  15. Image denoising using cloud images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2013-09-01

    Image denoising manages to recover a digital image from its noisy version by exploring the statistical features inside a given noisy image. Most denoising methods perform well at low noise levels but lose efficiency at higher ones. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising method, which restores an image by exploiting the correlations between the noisy image and the images retrieved from the cloud. Given a noisy image, we first retrieve relevant images based on feature-level similarity. These images are then geometrically aligned to the noisy image to increase global statistical correlation. Using the aligned images as references, we propose recovering the image with patch-level noise removal. For each noisy patch, we first retrieve similar patches from the references and stack these patches (including the noisy one) into a three dimensional (3D) group. We then obtain the noise free (NF) patches by collaborative filtering over the 3D groups. These recovered NF patches are aggregated together, producing the desired NF image. Experimental results demonstrate that our scheme achieves significantly better results compared to state-of-the-art methods in terms of both objective and subjective qualities.

  16. INCREASING TEACHERS INQUIRY ABILITY WITH TRAINING INQUIRY ABILITY PROGRAMME AND TEACHING SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ertikanto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to produce training program inquiry ability and in teaching science through inquiry approach (is called Program. This study used the methods of research and development. Program design began with a training needs analysis, conducted through field studies and literature, then validated and tested on a limited basis for program design. The implemented programs that have been revised in the main try out in KKGSD Bandar Lampung, by using quasi- experimental design, pretest-posttest control group design. Subjects in this study is the number of elementary school teachers in the city of Bandar Lampung, which involved teachers from primary schools located in the centre of the town, suburb, and remote area in Bandar Lampung. The instrument used was the initial test and final test, questionnaire, assessment of product format, and the observation sheet. The results showed: (1 The inquiry ability of the teacher with PPKIMS through inquiry approach it was higher than with conventional PPKIMS; (2 The inquiry ability of the teacher to teaching with PPKIMS through inquiry approach and conventional PPKIMS after training program was different, and significant improvement towards teachers inquiry ability of PPKIMS through inquiry approach, and it was higher than the conventional PPKIMS.

  17. Exploring Visuospatial Thinking in Learning about Mineralogy: Spatial Orientation Ability and Spatial Visualization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-method research attempted to clarify the role of visuospatial abilities in learning about mineralogy. Various sources of data--including quantitative pre- and postmeasures of spatial visualization and spatial orientation tests and achievement scores on six measures and qualitative unstructured observations, interviews, and field trip…

  18. EFFECT OF TEACHERS’ ABILITIES ON STUDENTS’ MOTIVATION WITH VARYING LEVELS OF INTELLECTUAL ABILITIES IN THE ECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BERKOVÁ, Kateřina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intelligence and motivation are two crucial components of the education process that can significantly influence its efficiency. The level of intelligence determines our ability to learn from experience and to solve a problem successfully, whereas motivational processes energize and organize our behavior to reach our goals. This paper is connected to our previous article focused on the influence of teachers’ abilities on secondary business schools’ students’ motivation in the Economics. In our current study, we monitored the motivational potential of teachers’ abilities in a connection with students’ level of intelligence, measured by Vienna Matrices Test. As we would expect according to the results of our previous study, the expertise of teachers has the most important influence in the groups of both the above-average intelligent and the average intelligent students. Nevertheless, we found some differences in other preferences of both groups: except the teachers’ expertise, the average intelligent students refer to be motivated mostly by exposition of curriculum and ability to develop thinking, whereas above-average students refer only about the exposition of curriculum (except the teachers’ expertise. The next factor that we observed in our study is an amount of time that students spend on preparation to school.

  19. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  20. Identifying Autism through Empathizing and Systemizing Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi van der Zee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Baron-Cohen’s Empathizing-Systemizing theory plays a central role in this study due to its success in interpreting the core impairments and strengths in autism. The theory states that low empathizing skills are responsible for the social difficulties in autism, and that high levels of systemizing are accountable for the restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior in autism. We therefore hypothesized that there is a significant discrepancy between a child’s empathizing and systemizing abilities when autism is present. We developed Dutch versions of the questionnaires that are associated with the theory: the Autism Quotient questionnaire, the Empathizing Quotient questionnaire and the Systemizing Quotient questionnaire. As hypothesized, the scores of children with autism on the Empathizing Quotient questionnaire and on the Systemizing Quotient questionnaire (EQ-SQ Child_NL show a significant difference. Furthermore, the EQ-SQ Child_NL predicts the score of children in general on the Dutch version of the Autism Quotient questionnaire (AQ Child_NL.

  1. Sensory processing abilities of children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitoria T. Shimizu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess and compare the sensory processing abilities of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and children without disabilities, and to analyze the relationship between sensory processing difficulties and behavioural symptoms presented by children with ADHD. METHOD : Thirty-seven children with ADHD were compared with thirty-seven controls using a translated and adapted version of the "Sensory Profile" answered by the parents/caregivers. For the ADHD group, Sensory Profile scores were correlated to behavioural symptoms assessed using the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL and the Behavioural Teacher Rating Scale (EACI-P. The statistical analyses were conducted using the Mann Whitney test and Pearson correlation coefficients. RESULTS : Children with ADHD showed significant impairments compared to the control group in sensory processing and modulation, as well as in behavioural and emotional responses as observed in 11 out of 14 sections and 6 out of 9 factors. Differences in all Sensory Profile response patterns were also observed between the two groups of children. Sensory Profile scores showed a moderately negative correlation with CBCL and EACI-P scores in the ADHD group. CONCLUSION : These results indicate that children with ADHD may present sensory processing impairments, which may contribute to the inappropriate behavioural and learning responses displayed by children with ADHD. It also suggests the importance of understanding the sensory processing difficulties and its possible contribution to the ADHD symptomatology.

  2. Sensory processing abilities of children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Vitoria T; Bueno, Orlando F A; Miranda, Mônica C

    2014-01-01

    To assess and compare the sensory processing abilities of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and children without disabilities, and to analyze the relationship between sensory processing difficulties and behavioural symptoms presented by children with ADHD. Thirty-seven children with ADHD were compared with thirty-seven controls using a translated and adapted version of the "Sensory Profile" answered by the parents/caregivers. For the ADHD group, Sensory Profile scores were correlated to behavioural symptoms assessed using the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) and the Behavioural Teacher Rating Scale (EACI-P). The statistical analyses were conducted using the Mann Whitney test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Children with ADHD showed significant impairments compared to the control group in sensory processing and modulation, as well as in behavioural and emotional responses as observed in 11 out of 14 sections and 6 out of 9 factors. Differences in all Sensory Profile response patterns were also observed between the two groups of children. Sensory Profile scores showed a moderately negative correlation with CBCL and EACI-P scores in the ADHD group. These results indicate that children with ADHD may present sensory processing impairments, which may contribute to the inappropriate behavioural and learning responses displayed by children with ADHD. It also suggests the importance of understanding the sensory processing difficulties and its possible contribution to the ADHD symptomatology.

  3. Nature versus nurture in determining athletic ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutsaert, Tom D; Parra, Esteban J

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the truism that both nature and nurture determine human athletic ability. The major thesis developed is that environmental effects work through the process of growth and development and interact with an individual's genetic background to produce a specific adult phenotype, i.e. an athletic or nonathletic phenotype. On the nature side (genetics), a brief historical review is provided with emphasis on several areas that are likely to command future attention including the rise of genome-wide association as a mapping strategy, the problem of false positives using association approaches, as well as the relatively unknown effects of gene-gene interaction(epistasis), gene-environment interaction, and genome structure on complex trait variance. On the nurture side (environment), common environmental effects such as training-level and sports nutrition are largely ignored in favor of developmental environmental effects that are channeled through growth and development processes. Developmental effects are difficult to distinguish from genetic effects as phenotypic plasticity in response to early life environmental perturbation can produce lasting effects into adulthood. In this regard, the fetal programming (FP) hypothesis is reviewed in some detail as FP provides an excellent example of how developmental effects work and also interact with genetics. In general, FP has well-documented effects on adult body composition and the risk for adult chronic disease, but there is emerging evidence that FP affects human athletic performance as well. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Abilities of preschoolers: comparing different tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiappedi Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a strong need for studies evaluating tests in terms both of psychometric properties (i.e. their efficacy or ability to be helpful in reaching a diagnosis and of their cost-effectiveness (i.e. their efficiency. These data are essential for planning a correct evaluation to identify children's needs (both educational and abilitative. Methods We evaluated 58 children attending for the first time the last year of the Scuola dell'Infanzia. Parental view was obtained with Child Behaviour Check-List and Conners' Rating Scales - Revised, and family socio-economic status was evaluated using Hollingshead's Four Factor Index; teacher compiled the IPDA questionnaire; children were administered Raven's Progressive Matrices, Modified Bell Cancellation Test, BVN 5-11 (a neuropsychological battery. Results A correlational analysis was conducted using Spearman's Rho (since variables were not normally distributed. These asymptomatic children show a good global cognitive functioning, but also a deficit of attention and of Executive Functions. Some of the tests used seem more cost-effective than others and there are some redundancies in information obtained. Conclusions Our data show that there are significant correlations between different neuropsychological and behavioural measures. It is therefore possible to rationalize diagnostic protocols without a significant information reduction. A deeper analysis will require a preliminary definition of the psychometric properties of used tools.

  5. Visual Abilities in Children with Developmental Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Lotte G; Baggesen, Kirsten L

    Purpose:  To investigate the visual abilities of students with severe developmental delay (DD) age 6-8 starting in special needs education. Methods:  Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2008, we screened all students with severe DD starting in special needs schools in Northern Jutland, Denmark...... for vision. All students with visual acuities ≤6/12 were refractioned and examined by an ophthalmologist. Results:  Of 502 students, 56 (11%) had visual impairment (VI) [visual acuity (VA) ≤ 6/18], of which 21 had been previously undiagnosed. Legal blindness was found in 15 students (3%), of whom three had....... The number of students with decreased vision identified by screening decreased significantly during the study period (r = 0.724, p = 0.028). The number of students needed to be screened to find one student with VI was 24 and to identify legal blindness 181 needed to be screened. Conclusion:  Visual...

  6. Sustained Attention Ability Affects Simple Picture Naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Jongman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustained attention has previously been shown as a requirement for language production. However, this is mostly evident for difficult conditions, such as a dual-task situation. The current study provides corroborating evidence that this relationship holds even for simple picture naming. Sustained attention ability, indexed both by participants’ reaction times and individuals’ hit rate (the proportion of correctly detected targets on a digit discrimination task, correlated with picture naming latencies. Individuals with poor sustained attention were consistently slower and their RT distributions were more positively skewed when naming pictures compared to individuals with better sustained attention. Additionally, the need to sustain attention was manipulated by changing the speed of stimulus presentation. Research has suggested that fast event rates tax sustained attention resources to a larger degree than slow event rates. However, in this study the fast event rate did not result in increased difficulty, neither for the picture naming task nor for the sustained attention task. Instead, the results point to a speed-accuracy trade-off in the sustained attention task (lower accuracy but faster responses in the fast than in the slow event rate, and to a benefit for faster rates in the picture naming task (shorter naming latencies with no difference in accuracy. Performance on both tasks was largely comparable, supporting previous findings that sustained attention is called upon during language production.

  7. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  8. Image blur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, M.R.

    1993-04-01

    The image blur in a photograph is produced by the exposure of a moving object. Knowing the amount of image blur is important for recording useful data. If there is too much blur, it becomes hard to make quantitative measurements. This report discusses image blur, the parameters used to control it, and how to calculate it.

  9. The ability to mentally represent action is associated with low motor ability in children: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Carl; Caçola, Priscila; Bobbio, Tatiana

    2012-05-01

    Theory and anatomical research suggest that the ability to mentally represent intended actions affect level of execution. This study presents preliminary data examining the association between children's ability to mentally represent action and general motor ability. Children aged 7- to 10 years were assessed for motor imagery ability using a simulation of reach task and motor ability via the Movement ABC-2. Motor ability values, based on percentile rank, ranged from 2 to 91, with a mean of 36. The overall correlation between mental representation and motor ability yielded a moderately positive relationship (r = .39). Interestingly, when looking at motor ability subcategories, only Balance was significant in the model, explaining 20% of the variance. These results provide preliminary evidence that children's motor ability and the ability to mentally represent action are associated in a positive direction. Furthermore, given the results for Balance, we speculate that there are clinical implications regarding work with potentially at-risk children. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Willmann, Juergen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented.

  11. Image understanding using sparse representations

    CERN Document Server

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J; Turaga, Pavan; Spanias, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Image understanding has been playing an increasingly crucial role in several inverse problems and computer vision. Sparse models form an important component in image understanding, since they emulate the activity of neural receptors in the primary visual cortex of the human brain. Sparse methods have been utilized in several learning problems because of their ability to provide parsimonious, interpretable, and efficient models. Exploiting the sparsity of natural signals has led to advances in several application areas including image compression, denoising, inpainting, compressed sensing, blin

  12. MR Imaging of Wrist Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Michael D; Murthy, Naveen S

    2015-08-01

    This article discusses the normal anatomy and pathologic appearances of the intrinsic and extrinsic wrist ligaments using MR Imaging. Technological advances in surface coil design and higher magnetic field strengths have improved radiologists' ability to consistently visualize these small ligaments in their entirety. Wrist ligament anatomy, in the context of proper physiologic function, is emphasized, including common normal variants, and their appearances on MR imaging. The spectrum of disorders, incorporating overlapping appearances of senescent degenerative changes, and destabilizing ligament tears, is outlined. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging to date for various ligament abnormalities is discussed, along with significant limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Decoding the neuroanatomical basis of reading ability: a multivoxel morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Chuansheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Dong, Qi

    2013-07-31

    As a relatively recent cultural invention in human evolution, reading is an important gateway to personal development and socioeconomic success. Despite the well documented individual differences in reading ability, its neuroanatomical correlates have not been well understood, largely due to the fact that reading is a complex skill that consists of multiple components. Using a large sample of 416 college students and 7 reading tasks, the present study successfully identified three uncorrelated components of reading ability: phonological decoding, form-sound association, and naming speed. We then tried to predict individuals' scores in these components from their gray matter volume (GMV) on a subset of participants (N = 253) with high-quality structural images, adopting a multivariate support vector regression analysis with tenfold cross-validation. Our results revealed distinct neural regions that supported different aspects of reading ability: whereas phonological decoding was associated with the GMV in the left superior parietal lobe extending to the supramarginal gyrus, form-sound association was predicted by the GMV in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Naming speed was associated with GMV in distributed brain regions in the occipital, temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. Phonological decoding and form-sound association were uncorrelated with general cognitive abilities. However, naming speed was correlated with intelligence and processing speed, and some of the regions that were predictive of naming speed also predicted these general cognitive abilities. These results provide further insights on the cognitive and neural architecture of reading and the structural basis of individual differences in reading abilities.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine ...

  15. Astronomical context coder for image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pata, Petr; Schindler, Jaromir

    2015-10-01

    Recent lossless still image compression formats are powerful tools for compression of all kind of common images (pictures, text, schemes, etc.). Generally, the performance of a compression algorithm depends on its ability to anticipate the image function of the processed image. In other words, a compression algorithm to be successful, it has to take perfectly the advantage of coded image properties. Astronomical data form a special class of images and they have, among general image properties, also some specific characteristics which are unique. If a new coder is able to correctly use the knowledge of these special properties it should lead to its superior performance on this specific class of images at least in terms of the compression ratio. In this work, the novel lossless astronomical image data compression method will be presented. The achievable compression ratio of this new coder will be compared to theoretical lossless compression limit and also to the recent compression standards of the astronomy and general multimedia.

  16. Probing LSST's Ability to Detect Planets Around White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Jorge; Kipping, David

    2018-01-01

    Over the last four years more than 2,000 planets outside our solar system have been discovered, motivating us to search for and characterize potentially habitable worlds. Most planets orbit Sun-like stars, but more exotic stars can also host planets. Debris disks and disintegrating planetary bodies have been detected around white dwarf stars, the inert, Earth-sized cores of once-thriving stars like our Sun. These detections are clues that planets may exist around white dwarfs. Due to the faintness of white dwarfs and the potential rarity of planets around them, a vast survey is required to have a chance at detecting these planetary systems. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), scheduled to commence operations in 2023, will image the entire southern sky every few nights for 10 years, providing our first real opportunity to detect planets around white dwarfs. We characterized LSST’s ability to detect planets around white dwarfs through simulations that incorporate realistic models for LSST’s observing strategy and the white dwarf distribution within the Milky Way galaxy. This was done through the use of LSST's Operations Simulator (OpSim) and Catalog Simulator (CatSim). Our preliminary results indicate that, if all white dwarfs were to possess a planet, LSST would yield a detection for every 100 observed white dwarfs. In the future, a larger set of ongoing simulations will help us quantify the number of planets LSST could potentially find.

  17. Comparative Lateralizing Ability of Multimodality MRI in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabekir Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective is to compare lateralizing ability of three quantitative MR (qMRI modalities to depict changes of hippocampal architecture with clinical entities in temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods. We evaluated 14 patients with clinical and EEG proven diagnosis of unilateral TLE and 15 healthy volunteers. T1-weighted 3D dataset for volumetry, single-voxel 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI were performed for bilateral hippocampi of all subjects. Results. Individual volumetric measurements provided accurate lateralization in 85% of the patients, spectroscopy in 57%, and DTI in 57%. Higher lateralization ratios were acquired combining volumetry-spectroscopy (85%, spectroscopy-DTI (85%, and volumetry-DTI (100%. Significantly decreased NAA/(Cho+Cr ratios (p=0.002 and increased FA (p=0.001 values were obtained in ipsilateral to epileptogenic hippocampus. Duration of epilepsy and FA values showed a significant negative correlation (p=0.016, r=-0.847. The history of febrile convulsion associated with ipsilateral increased ADC values (p=0.015, r=0.851 and reduced NAA/(Cho+Cr ratios (p=0.047, r=-761. Conclusion. Volumetry, MRS, and DTI studies provide complementary information of hippocampal pathology. For lateralization of epileptogenic focus and preoperative examination, volumetry-DTI combination may be indicative of diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Spontaneous brain activity predicts learning ability of foreign sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán, Ana; González, Julio; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria; Deco, Gustavo; Ávila, César

    2013-05-29

    Can learning capacity of the human brain be predicted from initial spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) between brain areas involved in a task? We combined task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) before and after training with a Hindi dental-retroflex nonnative contrast. Previous fMRI results were replicated, demonstrating that this learning recruited the left insula/frontal operculum and the left superior parietal lobe, among other areas of the brain. Crucially, resting-state FC (rs-FC) between these two areas at pretraining predicted individual differences in learning outcomes after distributed (Experiment 1) and intensive training (Experiment 2). Furthermore, this rs-FC was reduced at posttraining, a change that may also account for learning. Finally, resting-state network analyses showed that the mechanism underlying this reduction of rs-FC was mainly a transfer in intrinsic activity of the left frontal operculum/anterior insula from the left frontoparietal network to the salience network. Thus, rs-FC may contribute to predict learning ability and to understand how learning modifies the functioning of the brain. The discovery of this correspondence between initial spontaneous brain activity in task-related areas and posttraining performance opens new avenues to find predictors of learning capacities in the brain using task-related fMRI and rs-fMRI combined.

  19. Repeated-sprint ability and aerobic fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Nicolas; Léger, Luc A; Passelergue, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to reinvestigate the relationship between aerobic fitness and fatigue indices of repeated-sprint ability (RSA), with special attention to methodological normalization. Soldiers were divided into low (n = 10) and high (n = 9) fitness groups according to a preset maximal aerobic speed (MAS) of 17 km·h(-1) (∼60 ml O2·kg(-1)·min) measured with the University of Montreal Track Test (UMTT). Subjects' assessment included the RSA test (3 sets of 5 40-m sprints with 1-minute rest between sprints and 1.5 minutes between sets), a 40-m sprint (criterion test used in the computation of fatigue indices for the RSA test), strength and power measurement of the lower limbs, and the 20-m shuttle run test (20-m SRT) and the UMTT, which are measures of maximal aerobic power. The highest correlation with the RSA fatigue indices was obtained with the 20-m SRT (r = 0.90, p = 0.0001, n = 19), a test with 180° direction changes and accelerations and decelerations. The lower correlation (r = 0.66, p tests better disclose the importance of aerobic fitness for RSA and that aerobic power is not the sole determinant of RSA. However, neither strength nor vertical jumping power was correlated to the RSA fatigue indices. Subjects with greater MAS were able to maintain almost constant level of speed throughout series of repeated sprints and achieved better recovery between series. A MAS of at least 17 km·h(-1) favors constant and high speed level during repeated sprints. From a practical point of view, a high aerobic fitness is a precious asset in counteracting fatigue in sports with numerous sprint repetitions.

  20. Heritable differences in chemosensory ability among humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newcomb Richard D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The combined senses of taste, smell and the common chemical sense merge to form what we call ‘flavor.’ People show marked differences in their ability to detect many flavors, and in this paper, we review the role of genetics underlying these differences in perception. Most of the genes identified to date encode receptors responsible for detecting tastes or odorants. We list these genes and describe their characteristics, beginning with the best-studied case, that of differences in phenylthiocarbamide (PTC detection, encoded by variants of the bitter taste receptor gene TAS2R38. We then outline examples of genes involved in differences in sweet and umami taste, and discuss what is known about other taste qualities, including sour and salty, fat (termed pinguis, calcium, and the ‘burn’ of peppers. Although the repertoire of receptors involved in taste perception is relatively small, with 25 bitter and only a few sweet and umami receptors, the number of odorant receptors is much larger, with about 400 functional receptors and another 600 potential odorant receptors predicted to be non-functional. Despite this, to date, there are only a few cases of odorant receptor variants that encode differences in the perception of odors: receptors for androstenone (musky, isovaleric acid (cheesy, cis-3-hexen-1-ol (grassy, and the urinary metabolites of asparagus. A genome-wide study also implicates genes other than olfactory receptors for some individual differences in perception. Although there are only a small number of examples reported to date, there may be many more genetic variants in odor and taste genes yet to be discovered.

  1. Enhanced Mental Image Mapping in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulieres, I.; Zeffiro, T. A.; Girard, M. L.; Mottron, L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation and manipulation of mental images represents a key ability for successfully solving visuospatial tasks like Wechsler's Block Design or visual reasoning problems, tasks where autistics perform at higher levels than predicted by their Wechsler IQ. Visual imagery can be used to compare two mental images, allowing judgment of their…

  2. Animal imaging using immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Rand, Kendra; Faris, Gregory W.

    2003-07-01

    We are using rodent animal models to study and compare contrast mechanisms for detection of breast cancer. These measurements are performed with the animals immersed in a matching scattering medium. The matching scattering medium or liquid tissue phantom comprises a mixture of Ropaque (hollow acrylic/styrene microspheres) and ink. We have previously applied matched imaging to imaging in humans. Surrounding the imaged region with a matched tissue phantom compensates for variations in tissue thickness and geometry, provides more uniform illumination, and allows better use of the dynamic range of the imaging system. If the match is good, the boundaries of the imaged region should almost vanish, enhancing the contrast from internal structure as compared to contrast from the boundaries and surface topography. For our measurements in animals, the immersion plays two additional roles. First, we can readily study tumors through tissue thickness similar to that of a human breast. Although the heterogeneity of the breast is lost, this is a practical method to study the detection of small tumors and monitor changes as they grow. Second, the immersion enhances our ability to quantify the contrast mechanisms for peripheral tumors on the animal because the boundary effects on photon migration are eliminated. We are currently developing two systems for these measurements. One is a continuous-wave (CW) system based on near-infrared LED illumination and a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. The second system, a frequency domain system, can help quantify the changes observed with the CW system.

  3. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  5. Increasing Teachers Inquiry Ability with Training Inquiry Ability Programme and Teaching Science

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ertikanto; I Wahyudi; V. Viyanti

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to produce training program inquiry ability and in teaching science through inquiry approach (is called Program). This study used the methods of research and development. Program design began with a training needs analysis, conducted through field studies and literature, then validated and tested on a limited basis for program design. The implemented programs that have been revised in the main try out in KKGSD Bandar Lampung, by using quasi- experimental design, pretest-pos...

  6. INCREASING TEACHERS INQUIRY ABILITY WITH TRAINING INQUIRY ABILITY PROGRAMME AND TEACHING SCIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ertikanto; I Wahyudi; V. Viyanti

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to produce training program inquiry ability and in teaching science through inquiry approach (is called Program). This study used the methods of research and development. Program design began with a training needs analysis, conducted through field studies and literature, then validated and tested on a limited basis for program design. The implemented programs that have been revised in the main try out in KKGSD Bandar Lampung, by using quasi- experimental design, pretest-pos...

  7. Motor-reduced visual perceptual abilities and visual-motor integration abilities of Chinese learning children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mun Yee; Leung, Frederick Koon Shing

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between motor-reduced visual perceptual abilities and visual-motor integration abilities of Chinese learning children by employing the Developmental Test of Visual Perception (Hammill, Pearson, & Voress, 1993), in which both abilities are measured in a single test. A total of 72 native Chinese learners of age 5 participated in this study. The findings indicated that the Chinese learners scored much higher in the visual-motor integration tasks than in motor-reduced visual perceptual tasks. The results support the theory of autonomous systems of motor-reduced visual perception and visual-motor integration and query current beliefs about the prior development of the former to the latter for the Chinese learners. To account for the Chinese participants' superior performance in visual-motor integration tasks over motor-reduced visual perceptual tasks, the visual-spatial properties of Chinese characters, general handwriting theories, the motor control theory and the psychogeometric theory of Chinese character-writing are referred to. The significance of the findings is then discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Perioperative nurses' ability to think critically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesler-Birch, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlational study was to assess for presence and degree of critical thinking skills among perioperative (OR) nurses. Critical thinking has become a multidisciplinary "buzz phrase"; however, critical thinking, reflective thinking, or mental discipline was discussed among educators, as early as 1912. As nurses' roles change in response to the dynamics of managed care and an increase in use of biotechnology in health care, more is expected of nurses in terms of both psychomotor and cognitive skills. Thus, critical thinking may be central to nurses' ability to meet the care expectations of patients and the skill expectations of managers, peers, and themselves. Data collected from 1 university-affiliated medical center, 1 non-university-affiliated medical center, and 3 ambulatory surgicenters. Data were collected over a 12-month period from 2008 to 2009. Convenience sample of 92 OR nurses. The sample comprised nurses with various educational levels for entry into practice: diploma, associate, and bachelor of science in nursing degrees. Subjects' clinical experience ranged from 1 month to 40 years. Administered California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory; Assessment of Critical Thinking Skills of Perioperative Nurses, an investigator-developed tool; and a demographic survey. Descriptive statistics, multiple regression, and step-wise regression were performed; power of 80% with a medium effect size was calculated. Aggregate (N = 92) for the dependent variable (level of critical thinking)and predictor variables (dispositions) were not significant. The group (medical center 1) indicated that as the level of critical thinking increased, the level of truth increased. Also, as the level of critical thinking increased, the level of open-mindedness decreased. In groups 2, 4, and 5 (surgicenters) coefficient indicated that none of the predictors were significant. A stepwise regression was calculated for group 3 (medical center

  9. Robustness enhancement for image hiding algorithm in cellular automata domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Kim, Seok-Tae; Lee, In-Kwon

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a cellular automata (CA)-domain image hiding scheme that embedding a secret image into a gray-level image, in which an effective image preprocessor technique is introduced to improve the robustness of the secret image. The image preprocessor works by transforming a secret image into many elemental images based on the lensless integral imaging technique. The properties of data redundancy and distributed memory of the elemental images reinforce the ability to resist some data loss attacks. Besides, we study an improved pixel-wise masking model to optimize the imperceptibility of the stego-image. Experiments verify that the imperceptibility and robustness requirements of the image hiding are both satisfied excellently in the proposed image hiding system.

  10. Hip Hop Dance Experience Linked to Sociocognitive Ability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Justin W Bonny; Jenna C Lindberg; Marc C Pacampara

    2017-01-01

    .... In the present study, we examined whether experience in a different activity, hip hop dance, is also linked to cognitive abilities connected with STEM skills as well as social cognition ability...

  11. Logical Abilities of Young Children-Two Styles of Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knifong, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Data representing two styples of approach to the logical abilities of young children are analyzed. The result of this analysis is contrary to popular interpretations of Piaget's views concerning the logical abilities of young children. (ST)

  12. Oral Narrative Abilities of Learning-Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Froma P.

    1986-01-01

    The literature on oral narrative comprehension, memory, and production abilities of language-learning-disabled students is reviewed. The relationship of these abilities to academic success is noted. (Author/DB)

  13. Thermal imaging cameras characteristics and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ability to see through smoke and mist and the ability to use the variances in temperature to differentiate between targets and their backgrounds are invaluable in military applications and have become major motivators for the further development of thermal imagers. As the potential of thermal imaging is more clearly understood and the cost decreases, the number of industrial and civil applications being exploited is growing quickly. In order to evaluate the suitability of particular thermal imaging cameras for particular applications, it is important to have the means to specify and measur

  14. Language Ability Predicts the Development of Behavior Problems in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Isaac T.; Bates, John E.; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Coyne, Claire A; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Van Hulle, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested, but not fully established, that language ability is important for regulating attention and behavior. Language ability may have implications for understanding attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorders, as well as subclinical problems. This article reports findings from two longitudinal studies to test (a) whether language ability has an independent effect on behavior problems, and (b) the direction of effect between language ability and...

  15. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  16. Visuo-spatial ability in colonoscopy simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Verwey, W.B.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using Visualization tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To

  17. Visuo-Spatial Ability in Colonoscopy Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Buzink, Sonja N.; Verwey, Willem B.; Jakimowicz, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using "Visualization" tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To remedy this situation, the current study…

  18. An Investigation of Reading and Language Abilities of College Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nancy L.; Hoffman, Paul R.

    2002-01-01

    Compares a range of reading-related abilities in two groups of college freshmen with higher and lower reading comprehension abilities. Indicates that abilities that appear to relate to reading comprehension include recognition of the order of phonemes in spoken syllables, recognition of words that are good semantic and syntactic fits for sentence…

  19. Predictors of work ability in occupations with psychological stress

    OpenAIRE

    Seibt, Reingard; Spitzer, Silvia; Blank, Matthes; Scheuch, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Aim This study aimed to detect health- and work-related predictors of poor and good work ability in teachers (TE) and office workers (OW). Method Work ability and its influence factors were analyzed in 100 female TE and 60 female OW aged between 25 and 60 years. The work ability was evaluated with the wo...

  20. Measuring Metasyntactic Abilities: On a Classification of Metasyntactic Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Daphnée; Labelle, Marie; Bergeron, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Researchers working on "metasyntactic abilities" (i.e., the metalinguistic ability associated with syntax) face the problem of defining and measuring them. Metasyntactic abilities is a multifaceted concept, which encompasses various types of behaviours, from being able to intentionally manipulate syntactic structures to being able to…

  1. Students' Ability in Science: Results from a Test Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkanat, Cigdem; Gokdere, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Student's ability to use and manipulate scientific concepts has been widely explored; however there is still a need to define the characteristics and nature of science ability. Also, the tests and performance scales that require minimal conceptual knowledge to measure this ability are relatively less common. The aim of this study was to develop an…

  2. Implementing Speech Community Strategy to Enhance Students’ English Speaking Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Huriyah Huriyah

    2015-01-01

    Implementing speech community strategy to enhance students English speaking ability. This classroom action research describes how the implementation of speech community strategy increases the students’ English speaking ability. The research stages consist of planning, implementing, observing, evaluating and reflecting. The study indicates that the providing of speech community can increase English speaking ability at students of SMA Sekar Kemuning Islamic Boarding School Cirebon

  3. High Intellectual Ability: Extracurricular Enrichment and Cognitive Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Riba, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide a better understanding of high intellectual abilities and of how to address the educational needs of those who possess such abilities. Within the emergent paradigm, high intellectual abilities are understood as multidimensional and as the result of lifetime development; that is, not only are they the result of their…

  4. Narrative Fiction and Expository Nonfiction Differentially Predict Verbal Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Raymond A.; Rain, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Although reading is known to be an important contributor to language abilities, it is not yet well established whether different text genres are uniquely associated with verbal abilities. We examined how exposure to narrative fiction and expository nonfiction predict language ability among university students. Exposure was measured both with…

  5. Cognitive abilities in early adolescence: an outlook from positive psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Contini de González

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to refer to social abilities in early adolescence. Personal success and social success seem to be more related to interpersonal abilities than with those cognitive abilities expressed in synthetic measures of IQ. Social abilities are also one of the major sources of self esteem and personal well-being. The concepts of social intelligence, social abilities, social competence, assertiveness and adaptative behaviour are differentiated. Social abilities are characterized. The different types of social abilities founded are described and the theories which explain those types of abilities are referred. Possible interaction between social abilities, personality and psychosocial adjustment are analyzed. Positive Psychology is defined. It is explained why the Social Abilities are part of child and adolescent’s psychological capital. It is also treated why is important to study those aspects recently mentioned in early adolescence. Opportune diagnosis of those types of adolescent resources –or their dysfunctions like aggressiveness or isolation- would allow tracing a lay out intervention programs which promote protective abilities for its development which also would help the permanence in the scholar system as a way of social inclusion. Finally, it is explained how social abilities work as a salugenic resource in early adolescence within the frame of Positive Psychology. 

  6. Motivation and Math Anxiety for Ability Grouped College Math Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Luralyn

    2013-01-01

    The author studied how math anxiety, motivation, and ability group interact to affect performance in college math courses. This clarified the effects of math anxiety and ability grouping on performance. It clarified the interrelationships between math anxiety, motivation, and ability grouping by considering them in a single analysis. It introduces…

  7. Image Inpainting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Image Inpainting Marcelo Bertalmio and Guillermo Sapiro Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota Vicent Caselles and Coloma...Ballester Escola Superior Politecnica, Universitat Pompeu Fabra Abstract Inpainting , the technique of modifying an image in an undetectable form, is as...removal/replacement of selected objects. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm for digital inpainting of still images that attempts to replicate the

  8. Intermediate Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paech Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a definition of the word ‘picture’ as a real-world object that shows other objects on its surface as a representation of its image, I propose that the intermediality of pictures of all kinds is only possible through their images, after they have been separated from their material basis or foundation (for example, a painting in its physical reality can never be directly connected with a movie. In all technical reproductions of images, such as printing processes, an image is taken from a negative matrix in order to realize multiple prints of the same representation. The most effective model of this procedure is photography: photographic images can easily be connected with their media forms to produce other, more complex forms, such as magazines, printed books, or films. Intermediate images in the form of matrices - sometimes transparent (e.g. in the light beam of a film projection, sometimes opaque - are required to transform one pictorial media form into another. Finally, for the digital matrix-image, there is no longer any difference between the matrix and the image: the matrix has become its own image, which can be linked to all other media forms.

  9. Imaging genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul M; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2010-08-01

    Imaging genomics is an emerging field that is rapidly identifying genes that influence the brain, cognition, and risk for disease. Worldwide, thousands of individuals are being scanned with high-throughput genotyping (genome-wide scans), and new imaging techniques [high angular resolution diffusion imaging and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] that provide fine-grained measures of the brain's structural and functional connectivity. Along with clinical diagnosis and cognitive testing, brain imaging offers highly reproducible measures that can be subjected to genetic analysis. Recent studies of twin, pedigree, and population-based datasets have discovered several candidate genes that consistently show small to moderate effects on brain measures. Many studies measure single phenotypes from the images, such as hippocampal volume, but voxel-wise genomic methods can plot the profile of genetic association at each 3D point in the brain. This exploits the full arsenal of imaging statistics to discover and replicate gene effects. Imaging genomics efforts worldwide are now working together to discover and replicate many promising leads. By studying brain phenotypes closer to causative gene action, larger gene effects are detectable with realistic sample sizes obtainable from meta-analysis of smaller studies. Imaging genomics has broad applications to dementia, mental illness, and public health.

  10. Association between Ability Emotional Intelligence and Left Insula during Social Judgment of Facial Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Maddalena, Chiara; Viscanti, Giovanna; Lanciano, Tiziana; Soleti, Emanuela; Mangiulli, Ivan; Taurisano, Paolo; Fazio, Leonardo; Bertolino, Alessandro; Curci, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    The human ability of identifying, processing and regulating emotions from social stimuli is generally referred as Emotional Intelligence (EI). Within EI, Ability EI identifies a performance measure assessing individual skills at perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Previous models suggest that a brain "somatic marker circuitry" (SMC) sustains emotional sub-processes included in EI. Three primary brain regions are included: the amygdala, the insula and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Here, our aim was to investigate the relationship between Ability EI scores and SMC activity during social judgment of emotional faces. Sixty-three healthy subjects completed a test measuring Ability EI and underwent fMRI during a social decision task (i.e. approach or avoid) about emotional faces with different facial expressions. Imaging data revealed that EI scores are associated with left insula activity during social judgment of emotional faces as a function of facial expression. Specifically, higher EI scores are associated with greater left insula activity during social judgment of fearful faces but also with lower activity of this region during social judgment of angry faces. These findings indicate that the association between Ability EI and the SMC activity during social behavior is region- and emotion-specific.

  11. The relationship between corticospinal excitability during motor imagery and motor imagery ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline; Pearce, Alan J; Loporto, Michela; Morris, Tony; Holmes, Paul S

    2012-01-15

    It is commonly reported that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex during action observation and motor imagery results in increases in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in muscles specific to the observed or imagined action. This study aimed to determine whether MEP amplitude was related to the motor imagery ability of participants. Participants were 15 healthy, right-handed adults (five male), with a mean age of 29.7 years. Motor imagery ability was measured using the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire-2 (VMIQ-2) and a hand rotation task. TMS was delivered during observation and imagery of a finger-thumb opposition sequence and MEPs were measured in the abductor pollicis brevis. Significant increases in MEP amplitude, from baseline, were recorded during observation and imagery conditions. The change in amplitude to both observation and imagery was expressed as a percentage of baseline amplitude. There was a significant correlation between MEP change for the imagery condition and imagery ability, with greater change linked to more vivid images and faster response times. The relationship between MEP change for the observation condition and imagery ability was less salient. This is the first study to show that the strength of corticospinal activation during imagery, which may be a determinant of the effectiveness of imagery training, is related to imagery ability in the general population, and has implications for clinical programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Association between Ability Emotional Intelligence and Left Insula during Social Judgment of Facial Emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Quarto

    Full Text Available The human ability of identifying, processing and regulating emotions from social stimuli is generally referred as Emotional Intelligence (EI. Within EI, Ability EI identifies a performance measure assessing individual skills at perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Previous models suggest that a brain "somatic marker circuitry" (SMC sustains emotional sub-processes included in EI. Three primary brain regions are included: the amygdala, the insula and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC. Here, our aim was to investigate the relationship between Ability EI scores and SMC activity during social judgment of emotional faces. Sixty-three healthy subjects completed a test measuring Ability EI and underwent fMRI during a social decision task (i.e. approach or avoid about emotional faces with different facial expressions. Imaging data revealed that EI scores are associated with left insula activity during social judgment of emotional faces as a function of facial expression. Specifically, higher EI scores are associated with greater left insula activity during social judgment of fearful faces but also with lower activity of this region during social judgment of angry faces. These findings indicate that the association between Ability EI and the SMC activity during social behavior is region- and emotion-specific.

  13. The Sport Students’ Ability of Literacy and Statistical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayah, N.

    2017-03-01

    The ability of literacy and statistical reasoning is very important for the students of sport education college due to the materials of statistical learning can be taken from their many activities such as sport competition, the result of test and measurement, predicting achievement based on training, finding connection among variables, and others. This research tries to describe the sport education college students’ ability of literacy and statistical reasoning related to the identification of data type, probability, table interpretation, description and explanation by using bar or pie graphic, explanation of variability, interpretation, the calculation and explanation of mean, median, and mode through an instrument. This instrument is tested to 50 college students majoring in sport resulting only 26% of all students have the ability above 30% while others still below 30%. Observing from all subjects; 56% of students have the ability of identification data classification, 49% of students have the ability to read, display and interpret table through graphic, 27% students have the ability in probability, 33% students have the ability to describe variability, and 16.32% students have the ability to read, count and describe mean, median and mode. The result of this research shows that the sport students’ ability of literacy and statistical reasoning has not been adequate and students’ statistical study has not reached comprehending concept, literary ability trining and statistical rasoning, so it is critical to increase the sport students’ ability of literacy and statistical reasoning

  14. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. John

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS, the relations among different pragmatic abilities and the relations between pragmatic ability and expressive vocabulary ability have yet to be addressed. In addition, analyses of the relations between the same type of pragmatic ability over time have not been reported. The present study was designed to address these questions. We considered the pragmatic language abilities of 14 children with WS at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-minute play-session with their mothers (Time 1 and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2. Children’s intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity and expressive vocabulary ability were related to the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was expected within a social interaction. Finally, the ability to verbally contribute new information to a social interaction beyond what was required to answer a question and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity at age 4 years predicted the ability to verbally contribute new information beyond what was required to answer a question at age 9 – 12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed.

  15. Children with Williams syndrome: Developmental trajectories for intellectual abilities, vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Pitts, C Holley

    2015-06-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4-15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (>7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neuroperformance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    the descent into sleep and are altered by sleep deprivation; 3) EEG /fMRI studies designed to improve our understanding of the interaction between sleep ... studies clearly indicate changes in resting state brain network connectivity in the transition from alert wakefulness to sleep . 15. SUBJECT TERMS...Neuroperformance, Sleep cycle, metabolism, thalamic structures, PET Imaging, MR Imaging, functional MRI, electroencephalography ( EEG ) 16. SECURITY

  17. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  18. Incompatible Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sassene, Michel J.; Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    is, however, based on a taken-for-granted image of asthmatics as, per se, striving to be symptom-free. This image is incompatible with interviewed asthmatics' day-to-day performances of their asthma, and renders invisible (a) that their asthma performances emphasize an economy of good passages...

  19. Blurred Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Maryse

    1975-01-01

    The growing influence of Western culture has greatly affected African women's status and image in the traditional society. Working women are confronted with the dilemma of preserving family traditions while changing their behavior and image to become members of the labor force. (MR)

  20. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  1. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  2. A look at spatial abilities in undergraduate women science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Thomas R.

    Contemporary investigations indicate that men generally perform significantly better in tasks involving visuo-spatial awareness than do women. Researchers have attempted to explain this difference through several hypotheses but as yet the reason for the dimorphism has not been established. Further, contemporary studies have indicated that enhancement of mental image formation and manipulation is possible when students are subjected to carefully designed spatial interventions. Present research was conducted to see if women in the sciences were as spatial perceptively accurate as their male counterparts. The researcher also was interested to find if the women that received the intervention excercises improved in their visuo-spatial awareness as rapidly as their male counterparts.The study was conducted on science majors at a suburban two year college. The population was randomly divided into groups (experimental, placebo, and control) each containing approximately the same number of men and women. All groups were given a battery of spatial perception tests (Ekstrom et al, 1976) at the onset of the winter semester and a second version of the battery at the conclusion of the semester. An analysis of variance followed by Scheffe contrasts were run on the results. The statistics revealed that the experimental group significantly outperformed the nonexperimental groups on the tests. When the differences between the mean scores for the women in the experimental group were statistically compared to those of the men in the experimental group the women were improving at a more rapid rate. Many women have the capacity to develop visuo-spatial aptitude and although they may start out behind men in spatial ability, they learn quickly and often catch up to the men's level when given meaningful visuo-spatial interventions.

  3. Different source image fusion based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Piao, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The fusion technology of video image is to make the video obtained by different image sensors complementary to each other by some technical means, so as to obtain the video information which is rich in information and suitable for the human eye system. Infrared cameras in harsh environments such as when smoke, fog and low light situations penetrating power, but the ability to obtain the details of the image is poor, does not meet the human visual system. Single visible light imaging can be rich in detail, high resolution images and for the visual system, but the visible image easily affected by the external environment. Infrared image and visible image fusion process involved in the video image fusion algorithm complexity and high calculation capacity, have occupied more memory resources, high clock rate requirements, such as software, c ++, c, etc. to achieve more, but based on Hardware platform less. In this paper, based on the imaging characteristics of infrared images and visible light images, the software and hardware are combined to obtain the registration parameters through software matlab, and the gray level weighted average method is used to implement the hardware platform. Information fusion, and finally the fusion image can achieve the goal of effectively improving the acquisition of information to increase the amount of information in the image.

  4. Nanomaterials for In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2017-02-08

    In vivo imaging, which enables us to peer deeply within living subjects, is producing tremendous opportunities both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool. Contrast material is often required to clearly visualize the functional architecture of physiological structures. Recent advances in nanomaterials are becoming pivotal to generate the high-resolution, high-contrast images needed for accurate, precision diagnostics. Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity, multiplexing capacity, and modularity of design. Indeed, for several imaging modalities, nanomaterials are now not simply ancillary contrast entities, but are instead the original and sole source of image signal that make possible the modality's existence. We address the physicochemical makeup/design of nanomaterials through the lens of the physical properties that produce contrast signal for the cognate imaging modality-we stratify nanomaterials on the basis of their (i) magnetic, (ii) optical, (iii) acoustic, and/or (iv) nuclear properties. We evaluate them for their ability to provide relevant information under preclinical and clinical circumstances, their in vivo safety profiles (which are being incorporated into their chemical design), their modularity in being fused to create multimodal nanomaterials (spanning multiple different physical imaging modalities and therapeutic/theranostic capabilities), their key properties, and critically their likelihood to be clinically translated.

  5. Study on the imaging ability of the 2D neutron detector based on MWPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, LiChao; Chen, YuanBo; Tang, Bin; Zhou, JianRong; Qi, HuiRong; Liu, RongGuang; Zhang, Jian; Yang, GuiAn; Xu, Hong; Chen, DongFeng; Sun, ZhiJia

    2013-10-01

    A 2D neutron detector based on 3He convertor and MWPC with an active area of 200 mm×200 mm has been successfully designed and fabricated. The detector has been tested with Am/Be neutron source and with collimated neutron beam with the wavelength of λ=1.37 Å. The best spatial resolution of 1.18 mm (FWHM) and good linearity were obtained. This is in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  6. Investigation of Prognostic Ability of Novel Imaging Markers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    option of watching a video or listening to their favorite music whey they are being scanned, They will also be provided with an "attention" button that...of the DAN to suppress the activity of the DMN (Sonuga- Barke 2007) ▫ Lapses in attention cause increased reaction times DMN DAN Support from TBI... prefrontal resources to suppress the DMN during goal directed behavior. Future Directions • Adding N-back working memory task to our paradigm ▫ Determine

  7. Individual Differences in Odor Imaging Ability Reflect Differences in Olfactory and Emotional Perception

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bensafi, M; Rouby, C

    2007-01-01

    .... Based on self-reported measures, these results suggest that, like olfactory perception, the mental imagery of smells is related to emotion and that, beyond their differences in vividness, good...

  8. Incremental Beliefs About Ability Ameliorate Self-Doubt Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has typically shown negative effects of self-doubt on performance and psychological well-being. We suggest that these self-doubt effects largely may be due to an underlying assumption that ability is innate and fixed. The present research investigated the main hypothesis that incremental beliefs about ability might ameliorate negative effects of self-doubt. We examined our hypotheses using two lab tasks: verbal reasoning and anagram tasks. Participants’ self-doubt was measured and beliefs about ability were measured after participants read articles advocating either for incremental or entity theories of ability. American College Testing (ACT scores were obtained to index actual ability level. Consistent with our hypothesis, for participants who believed ability was relatively fixed, higher self-doubt was associated with increased negative affect and lower task performance and engagement. In contrast, for participants who believed that ability was malleable, negative self-doubt effects were ameliorated; self-doubt was even associated with better task performance. These effects were further moderated by participants’ academic ability. These findings suggest that mind-sets about ability moderate self-doubt effects. Self-doubt may have negative effects only when it is interpreted as signaling that ability is immutably low.

  9. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  10. Conservation Abilities, Visuospatial Skills, and Numerosity Processing Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Katharina; Spinath, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between elementary school children's mathematical achievement and their conservation abilities, visuospatial skills, and numerosity processing speed. We also assessed differences in these abilities between children with different types of learning problems. In Study 1 ( N = 229), we investigated second to fourth graders and in Study 2 ( N = 120), third and fourth graders. Analyses revealed significant contributions of numerosity processing speed and visuospatial skills to math achievement beyond IQ. Conservation abilities were predictive in Study 1 only. Children with math difficulties showed lower visuospatial skills and conservation abilities than children with typical achievement levels and children with reading and/or spelling difficulties, whereas children with combined difficulties explicitly showed low conservation abilities. These findings provide further evidence for the relations between children's math skills and their visuospatial skills, conservation abilities, and processing speed and contribute to the understanding of deficits that are specific to mathematical difficulties.

  11. Measuring Metasyntactic Abilities: On a Classification of Metasyntactic Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Daphnée; Labelle, Marie; Bergeron, Annie

    2017-04-01

    Researchers working on metasyntactic abilities (i.e., the metalinguistic ability associated with syntax) face the problem of defining and measuring them. Metasyntactic abilities is a multifaceted concept, which encompasses various types of behaviours, from being able to intentionally manipulate syntactic structures to being able to state syntactic rules, and the way in which it is defined and measured varies greatly from one study to another. The present paper proposes a theoretically informed classification of syntax related tasks. The first part presents previous research defining and distinguishing various types of syntactic and metasyntactic abilities and their interrelations. In the second part, commonly used tasks are described and analyzed in terms of the framework presented, with the aim of better pinpointing the type of ability measured by each task. Ultimately, with this analysis of commonly used tasks, we hope to offer criteria for discriminating between the various measures of metasyntactic abilities.

  12. Evaluation Indicator System of Marketing Planning Ability Based on ANP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of “Marketing planning” curriculum in higher vocational colleges should pay attention to planning ability of students which requires a set of scientific evaluation indicator system of marketing planning ability, however, there is less in-depth study in this field, especially the quantitative research. Scientific evaluation indicator system of marketing planning ability should divide the elements of marketing planning ability reasonably, and should give them reasonable weight. Combined with document and the interview data, this paper will carry on the construction and analysis of the evaluation index system of marketing planning ability with Analytic Network Process (ANP, and use Super Decisions Software (SD to carry on the corresponding calculation and verification. Finally a set of more scientific and reasonable evaluation indicator system of marketing planning ability will be summed up.

  13. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  14. Imagery ability and imagery use in individual and team sports

    OpenAIRE

    Peltomäki, Ville

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine whether individual and team sport athletes differ in their imagery use and imagery ability, and to examine whether level of sport participation or weekly sport involvement are variables that differentiate between athletes on the basis of their levels of imagery ability and imagery use. Two measures were conducted. The Sport Imagery Ability Measure (SIAM) is a 48-item self-report measure that uses four sport related scenes to examine the dimensional,...

  15. Evaluation of motor imagery ability in neurological patients: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Heremans, Elke; Vercruysse, Sarah; Spildooren, Joke; Feys, Peter; Helsen, W.; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Motor imagery is a promising new intervention strategy within neurological rehabilitation. However, previous studies have shown that the ability to perform motor imagery is not well preserved in all neurological patients. Therefore, patients’ motor imagery ability needs to be thoroughly examined when they are included in motor imagery rehabilitation programs or studies. In the past, objective methods to evaluate motor imagery were lacking rigour, and participants’ imagery ability was often in...

  16. Abdominal syndromes and functional ability in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Avlund, K

    1994-01-01

    among subjects with reduced functional ability. A significant association was found between the occurrence of Upper Dyspepsia and a reduction of mobility and lower limb function, and between reduced functional ability and Irritable Bowel Syndrome at the five-year follow-up. It is concluded...... that abdominal syndromes are associated to functional ability, suggesting that there is a diffuse disorder affecting both smooth and striated muscles....

  17. Enhancement of uranium-accumulating ability of microorganisms by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira; Tsuruta, Takehiko [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Some microorganisms having excellent ability to accumulate uranium were isolated, from soil and water systems in and around the Ningyo-toge Station of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The enhancement of uranium-accumulating ability of microorganisms by electron-beam irradiation was examined, and the ability of JW-046 was increased 3-5% by the irradiation. The irradiation affect the growth of some of microorganisms tested. (author)

  18. IMPLEMENTING SPEECH COMMUNITY STRATEGY TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’ ENGLISH SPEAKING ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huriyah Huriyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Implementing speech community strategy to enhance students English speaking ability. This classroom action research describes how the implementation of speech community strategy increases the students’ English speaking ability. The research stages consist of planning, implementing, observing, evaluating and reflecting. The study indicates that the providing of speech community can increase English speaking ability at students of SMA Sekar Kemuning Islamic Boarding School Cirebon

  19. Healthy Adult Ageing: Multitasking Abilities and the Impact of Interruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Nevay, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    The ability to multitask plays a significant role within everyday life. This experiment investigated whether multitasking abilities are impaired in healthy adult ageing. Neuropsychological literature has shown that patients with frontal lobe damage are impaired in their ability to multitask on tests designed to assess cognitive functions used in real-life multitasking situations. Age-related reductions in brain volume are most pronounced in the frontal lobes. Therefore, it’s assumed that olde...

  20. Mathematical Proof Construction: Students’ Ability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadlifah, M.; Prabawanto, S.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to categorizing and describing students’ ability in constructing a mathematics proof. This study used descriptive-qualitative approach which involved 46 mathematics undergraduate students. The results showed that the students’ ability in mathematical proof constructing consist 2 phases, that is, visual proof and symbolic proof. Students were not using the concepts and definitions in order to constructing mathematics proof. Consequently, reinforcement of concepts will improve students’ ability to constructing an argument or explanation in mathematical proof.

  1. Awareness of Phonological Segments and Reading Ability in Italian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Giuseppe; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of Italian and English-speaking children's (N=200) segmentation abilities indicated that the discrepancies between the language groups reflected the children's phonologic and orthographic differences. (CB)

  2. The impact of menopausal symptoms on work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geukes, Marije; van Aalst, Mariëlle P; Nauta, Mary C E; Oosterhof, Henk

    2012-03-01

    Menopause is an important life event that may have a negative influence on quality of life. Work ability, a concept widely used in occupational health, can predict both future impairment and duration of sickness absence. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of menopausal symptoms on work ability. This was a cross-sectional study that used a sample of healthy working Dutch women aged 44 to 60 years. Work ability was measured using the Work Ability Index, and menopausal symptoms were measured using the Greene Climacteric Scale. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to examine the relationship between menopausal symptoms and work ability. A total of 208 women were included in this study. There was a significant negative correlation between total Greene Climacteric Scale score and Work Ability Index score. Total Greene Climacteric Scale score predicted 33.8% of the total variance in the Work Ability Index score. Only the psychological and somatic subscales of the Greene Climacteric Scale were significant predictors in multiple linear regression analysis. Together, they accounted for 36.5% of total variance in Work Ability Index score. Menopausal symptoms are negatively associated with work ability and may increase the risk of sickness absence.

  3. [Mentalization--the ability to keep mind in mind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmo, Anneli

    2010-01-01

    Mentalization is the ability to keep mind in mind, both one's own and another person's mind. Without mentalization ability, man is unable to anticipate personal and other person's reactions in different situations and to control his/her own emotional states. Insufficient mentalization ability makes life erratic and uncontrollable. It is associated with emotionally unstable personality and other psychic and neuropsychiatric disorders. At least five evidence-based forms of psychotherapy have been developed for the treatment of emotionally unstable personality disorder, all promoting the patient's mentalization ability.

  4. Fire Fighters' Ability and Willingness to Participate in a Pandemic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delaney, Jr, John

    2008-01-01

    .... Issues that may influence fire fighters ability and willingness to work include childcare, concern of family, adequate personal protective equipment, worker's compensation coverage, and availability...

  5. Effect of clinical practice on self-learning development ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Yang, Han Joon [Dept. of International Radiological Science, Hallym University of Graduate Studies, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nak Sang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Songho College, Hoengseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In order to analyze the degree of self-learning development ability after the clinical training curriculum, the results of 121 questionnaires were analyzed for 3rd and 4th grade students in radiology in the metropolitan area. The overall average of self-learning ability according to gender was 3.07±0.85, which was statistically significant according to gender. However, the results according to educational system showed that the overall average was 3.07±0.85, which was higher than the average level of self-learning development ability. There was no statistically significant difference according to educational system. The results of the self-learning development ability according to the motivation for selecting the department showed that the students who have chosen their department due to their higher employment rate after graduation had high self-development ability level(3.58±0.85) but the students who entered the school due to self-aptitude had relatively lower self-development ability level (2.30±0.40). The overall average of self-learning ability according to direction of career path was 3.08±0.76, which was over-average of self-learning development ability. Thus, there was statistically significant difference according to career path. It is necessary to improve the self-learning ability in clinical practice. In addition, the lack of statistical significance suggests problems and diversity.

  6. Linguistic abilities and its cognitive determinants: contemporary research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilova E.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents contemporary studies of linguistic abilities in psychology. The different approaches to the linguistic abilities structure are discussed in relation to empirical results on peculiarities of the second language mastering. The special attention is paid to the cognitive determinants of linguistic abilities. So the empirical data concerning the interaction between language-aptitude test scores and different abilities, e.g. verbal intelligence and working memory, are analyzed in more details. In the conclusion the research perspectives in different cognitive processes which determine the efficiency of the second language mastery are discussed

  7. Innovation ability and innovation spirit in photoelectric comprehensive experiment teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexing; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Peng

    2017-08-01

    The traditional experimental teaching methods have some shortcomings in the training the student innovation ability. In order to improve the student practical ability in the photoelectric technology, in this paper new experimental teaching modes are tried and reformed for cultivating the innovative ability of students in the linear CCD experiment. The photoelectric experiment systems are independently designed and completed by students. Compared with the traditional experimental teaching methods, this new methods have a great role in the development of the ability of creative thinking.

  8. Body Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  9. SENTINEL-1 Image Matching Using Strong Scatters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannadi, M. A.; Saadatseresht, M.; Motagh, M.

    2015-12-01

    The availability of new radar spaceborne sensors offers new interesting potentialities for the geomatics application: spatial and temporal change detection, generation of Digital Elevation Model(DEM) using radargrametry and interferometry. Since the start of the sentinel-1 mission to take images from different regions all over the world, the ability to use these images in variety domains has been treasured. This paper suggests a method for image matching using strong scatters. all the experiments are done on sentinel-1 stereo images from Jam, Bushehr, Iran.

  10. The importance of spatial ability and mental models in learning anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Allison K.

    , problem solving strategies, and study methods. Students with different levels of spatial ability visualize and think about anatomy in qualitatively different ways, which is reflected by the features of their mental models. Low spatial ability students thought about and used two-dimensional images from the textbook. They possessed basic two-dimensional models of anatomical structures; they placed emphasis on diagrams and drawings in their studies; and they re-read anatomical problems many times before answering. High spatial ability students thought fully in three-dimensional and imagined rotation and movement of the structures; they made use of many types of images and text as they studied and solved problems. They possessed elaborate three-dimensional models of anatomical structures which they were able to manipulate to solve problems; and they integrated diagrams, drawings, and written text in their studies. Middle spatial ability students were a mix between both low and high spatial ability students. They imagined two-dimensional images popping out of the flat paper to become more three-dimensional, but still relied on drawings and diagrams. Additionally, high spatial ability students used a higher proportion of anatomical terminology than low spatial ability or middle spatial ability students. This provides additional support to the premise that high spatial students' mental models are a complex mixture of imagistic representations and propositional representations that incorporate correct anatomical terminology. Low spatial ability students focused on the function of structures and ways to group information primarily for the purpose of recall. This supports the theory that low spatial students' mental models will be characterized by more on imagistic representations that are general in nature. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. Brain Structural Integrity and Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Forecast 6 Year Longitudinal Growth in Children's Numerical Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tanya M; Kochalka, John; Ngoon, Tricia J; Wu, Sarah S; Qin, Shaozheng; Battista, Christian; Menon, Vinod

    2015-08-19

    Early numerical proficiency lays the foundation for acquiring quantitative skills essential in today's technological society. Identification of cognitive and brain markers associated with long-term growth of children's basic numerical computation abilities is therefore of utmost importance. Previous attempts to relate brain structure and function to numerical competency have focused on behavioral measures from a single time point. Thus, little is known about the brain predictors of individual differences in growth trajectories of numerical abilities. Using a longitudinal design, with multimodal imaging and machine-learning algorithms, we investigated whether brain structure and intrinsic connectivity in early childhood are predictive of 6 year outcomes in numerical abilities spanning childhood and adolescence. Gray matter volume at age 8 in distributed brain regions, including the ventrotemporal occipital cortex (VTOC), the posterior parietal cortex, and the prefrontal cortex, predicted longitudinal gains in numerical, but not reading, abilities. Remarkably, intrinsic connectivity analysis revealed that the strength of functional coupling among these regions also predicted gains in numerical abilities, providing novel evidence for a network of brain regions that works in concert to promote numerical skill acquisition. VTOC connectivity with posterior parietal, anterior temporal, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices emerged as the most extensive network predicting individual gains in numerical abilities. Crucially, behavioral measures of mathematics, IQ, working memory, and reading did not predict children's gains in numerical abilities. Our study identifies, for the first time, functional circuits in the human brain that scaffold the development of numerical skills, and highlights potential biomarkers for identifying children at risk for learning difficulties. Children show substantial individual differences in math abilities and ease of math learning. Early

  12. Using higher-level inquiry to improve spatial ability in an introductory geology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lacey A.

    Visuo-spatial skills, the ability to visually take in information and create a mental image are crucial for success in fields involving science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) as well as fine arts. Unfortunately, due to a lack of curriculum focused on developing spatial skills, students enrolled in introductory college-level science courses tend to have difficulty with spatially-related activities. One of the best ways to engage students in science activities is through a learning and teaching strategy called inquiry. There are lower levels of inquiry wherein learning and problem-solving are guided by instructions and higher levels of inquiry wherein students have a greater degree of autonomy in learning and creating their own problem-solving strategy. A study involving 112 participants was conducted during the fall semester in 2014 at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) in an 1040 Introductory Geology Lab to determine if a new, high-level, inquiry-based lab would increase participants' spatial skills more than the traditional, low-level inquiry lab. The study also evaluated whether a higher level of inquiry differentially affected low versus high spatial ability participants. Participants were evaluated using a spatial ability assessment, and pre- and post-tests. The results of this study show that for 3-D to 2-D visualization, the higher-level inquiry lab increased participants' spatial ability more than the lower-level inquiry lab. For spatial rotational skills, all participants' spatial ability scores improved, regardless of the level of inquiry to which they were exposed. Low and high spatial ability participants were not differentially affected. This study demonstrates that a lab designed with a higher level of inquiry can increase students' spatial ability more than a lab with a low level of inquiry. A lab with a higher level of inquiry helped all participants, regardless of their initial spatial ability level. These findings show that curriculum

  13. Nanoparticle imaging probes for molecular imaging with computed tomography and application to cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Ryan K.; Curtis, Tyler E.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Irimata, Lisa E.; McGinnity, Tracie L.; Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2017-03-01

    Precision imaging is needed to realize precision medicine in cancer detection and treatment. Molecular imaging offers the ability to target and identify tumors, associated abnormalities, and specific cell populations with overexpressed receptors. Nuclear imaging and radionuclide probes provide high sensitivity but subject the patient to a high radiation dose and provide limited spatiotemporal information, requiring combined computed tomography (CT) for anatomic imaging. Therefore, nanoparticle contrast agents have been designed to enable molecular imaging and improve detection in CT alone. Core-shell nanoparticles provide a powerful platform for designing tailored imaging probes. The composition of the core is chosen for enabling strong X-ray contrast, multi-agent imaging with photon-counting spectral CT, and multimodal imaging. A silica shell is used for protective, biocompatible encapsulation of the core composition, volume-loading fluorophores or radionuclides for multimodal imaging, and facile surface functionalization with antibodies or small molecules for targeted delivery. Multi-agent (k-edge) imaging and quantitative molecular imaging with spectral CT was demonstrated using current clinical agents (iodine and BaSO4) and a proposed spectral library of contrast agents (Gd2O3, HfO2, and Au). Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au nanoparticles were demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and specificity for the detection of breast microcalcifications by conventional radiography and CT in both normal and dense mammary tissue using murine models. Moreover, photon-counting spectral CT enabled quantitative material decomposition of the Au and calcium signals. Immunoconjugated Au@SiO2 nanoparticles enabled highly-specific targeting of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells for contrast-enhanced detection in model tumors.

  14. Language ability predicts the development of behavior problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Isaac T; Bates, John E; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Coyne, Claire A; Lansford, Jennifer E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Pettit, Gregory S; Van Hulle, Carol A

    2013-05-01

    Prior studies have suggested, but not fully established, that language ability is important for regulating attention and behavior. Language ability may have implications for understanding attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorders, as well as subclinical problems. This article reports findings from two longitudinal studies to test (a) whether language ability has an independent effect on behavior problems, and (b) the direction of effect between language ability and behavior problems. In Study 1 (N = 585), language ability was measured annually from ages 7 to 13 years by language subtests of standardized academic achievement tests administered at the children's schools. Inattentive-hyperactive (I-H) and externalizing (EXT) problems were reported annually by teachers and mothers. In Study 2 (N = 11,506), language ability (receptive vocabulary) and mother-rated I-H and EXT problems were measured biannually from ages 4 to 12 years. Analyses in both studies showed that language ability predicted within-individual variability in the development of I-H and EXT problems over and above the effects of sex, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and performance in other academic and intellectual domains (e.g., math, reading comprehension, reading recognition, and short-term memory [STM]). Even after controls for prior levels of behavior problems, language ability predicted later behavior problems more strongly than behavior problems predicted later language ability, suggesting that the direction of effect may be from language ability to behavior problems. The findings suggest that language ability may be a useful target for the prevention or even treatment of attention deficits and EXT problems in children. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  15. Who Multi-Tasks and Why? Multi-Tasking Ability, Perceived Multi-Tasking Ability, Impulsivity, and Sensation Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Sanbonmatsu, David M.; Strayer, David L.; Nathan Medeiros-Ward; Watson, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between personality and individual differences in multi-tasking ability. Participants enrolled at the University of Utah completed measures of multi-tasking activity, perceived multi-tasking ability, impulsivity, and sensation seeking. In addition, they performed the Operation Span in order to assess their executive control and actual multi-tasking ability. The findings indicate that the persons who are most capable of multi-tasking effectively are ...

  16. Effects of viewing- and illumination geometry on settlement type classification of quickbird images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van den Bergh, F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Image texture features extracted from high-resolution remotely sensed images over urban areas have shown promise in their ability to distinguish different settlement classes. Without any explicit mechanism to counter the effects of variable...

  17. How Visuo-Spatial Mental Imagery Develops: Image Generation and Maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wimmer, Marina C; Maras, Katie L; Robinson, Elizabeth J; Doherty, Martin J; Pugeault, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ...). Experiment 1 indicated that basic image generation and maintenance abilities are present at 4 years of age but the precision with which images are generated and maintained improves particularly between 4 and 8 years...

  18. Looking Like a Leader–Facial Shape Predicts Perceived Height and Leadership Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Daniel E.; Hunter, David W.; Coetzee, Vinet; Tiddeman, Bernard P.; Xiao, Dengke; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.; Perrett, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Judgments of leadership ability from face images predict the outcomes of actual political elections and are correlated with leadership success in the corporate world. The specific facial cues that people use to judge leadership remain unclear, however. Physical height is also associated with political and organizational success, raising the possibility that facial cues of height contribute to leadership perceptions. Consequently, we assessed whether cues to height exist in the face and, if so, whether they are associated with perception of leadership ability. We found that facial cues to perceived height had a strong relationship with perceived leadership ability. Furthermore, when allowed to manually manipulate faces, participants increased facial cues associated with perceived height in order to maximize leadership perception. A morphometric analysis of face shape revealed that structural facial masculinity was not responsible for the relationship between perceived height and perceived leadership ability. Given the prominence of facial appearance in making social judgments, facial cues to perceived height may have a significant influence on leadership selection. PMID:24324651

  19. Looking like a leader-facial shape predicts perceived height and leadership ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Re

    Full Text Available Judgments of leadership ability from face images predict the outcomes of actual political elections and are correlated with leadership success in the corporate world. The specific facial cues that people use to judge leadership remain unclear, however. Physical height is also associated with political and organizational success, raising the possibility that facial cues of height contribute to leadership perceptions. Consequently, we assessed whether cues to height exist in the face and, if so, whether they are associated with perception of leadership ability. We found that facial cues to perceived height had a strong relationship with perceived leadership ability. Furthermore, when allowed to manually manipulate faces, participants increased facial cues associated with perceived height in order to maximize leadership perception. A morphometric analysis of face shape revealed that structural facial masculinity was not responsible for the relationship between perceived height and perceived leadership ability. Given the prominence of facial appearance in making social judgments, facial cues to perceived height may have a significant influence on leadership selection.

  20. Looking like a leader-facial shape predicts perceived height and leadership ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Daniel E; Hunter, David W; Coetzee, Vinet; Tiddeman, Bernard P; Xiao, Dengke; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C; Perrett, David I

    2013-01-01

    Judgments of leadership ability from face images predict the outcomes of actual political elections and are correlated with leadership success in the corporate world. The specific facial cues that people use to judge leadership remain unclear, however. Physical height is also associated with political and organizational success, raising the possibility that facial cues of height contribute to leadership perceptions. Consequently, we assessed whether cues to height exist in the face and, if so, whether they are associated with perception of leadership ability. We found that facial cues to perceived height had a strong relationship with perceived leadership ability. Furthermore, when allowed to manually manipulate faces, participants increased facial cues associated with perceived height in order to maximize leadership perception. A morphometric analysis of face shape revealed that structural facial masculinity was not responsible for the relationship between perceived height and perceived leadership ability. Given the prominence of facial appearance in making social judgments, facial cues to perceived height may have a significant influence on leadership selection.

  1. Perceptual transparency from image deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2015-01-01

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid’s surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of “invisible” transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  2. Targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-09-30

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  4. Underlying Reading-Related Skills and Abilities among Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellard, Daryl F.; Woods, Kari L.; Md Desa, Z. Deana; Vuyk, M. Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study identified underlying skill and ability differences among subgroups of adolescent and young adult struggling readers (N = 290) overall and in relation to a fluency-based instructional grouping method. We used principal axis factoring of participants' scores on 18 measures of reading-related skills and abilities identified in…

  5. GENETIC ANALYSIS ON THE COMPETITIVE ABILITY OF BARLEY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Moreover, there are different evidences from literature, showing there exists genetic differences among barley genotypes for competitive ability with oat weed. Genetic analysis for competitive ability of barley lines with oat. 'weeds' would enable the selection of barley lines that can withstand competition with oat weed.

  6. Trainee Multicultural Case Conceptualization Ability and Couples Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Allison M.; Prieto, Loreto R.

    2011-01-01

    Previous literature on the assessment of multicultural counseling competence has been concerned only with counselors' abilities when working with individual clients. We expanded this line of research by investigating trainees' multicultural case conceptualization ability in the context of working with couples. Despite the fact that trainees…

  7. Spatial Abilities and Anatomy Knowledge Assessment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Jean; Bellemare, Christian; Toulouse, Josée; Wells, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Anatomy knowledge has been found to include both spatial and non-spatial components. However, no systematic evaluation of studies relating spatial abilities and anatomy knowledge has been undertaken. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the relationship between spatial abilities test and anatomy knowledge assessment. A…

  8. Spatial Ability: A Neglected Talent in Educational and Occupational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Harrison J.; Lubinski, David

    2013-01-01

    For over 60 years, longitudinal research on tens of thousands of high ability and intellectually precocious youth has consistently revealed the importance of spatial ability for hands-on creative accomplishments and the development of expertise in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) disciplines. Yet, individual differences in…

  9. The Diagnosis Dilemma: Dyslexia and Visual-Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Zambrzycka, Joanna; Makosz, Samantha; Asdrubolini, Emma; Babic, Jovana; Best, Olivia; Bines, Tara; Cook, Samantha; Farrell, Natalie; Gisondi, Victoria; Scott, Meghan; Siderius, Christina; Smith, Dyoni

    2017-01-01

    Visual-spatial ability is important for mathematics learning but also for future STEM participation. Some studies report children with dyslexia have superior visual-spatial skills and other studies report a deficit. We sought to further explore the relationship between children formally identified as having dyslexia and visual-spatial ability.…

  10. Spatial Abilities of Medical Graduates and Choice of Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Jean; Wells, George A.; Lecourtois, Marc; Bergeron, Germain; Yetisir, Elizabeth; Martin, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial abilities have been related in previous studies to three-dimensional (3D) anatomy knowledge and the performance in technical skills. The objective of this study was to relate spatial abilities to residency programs with different levels of content of 3D anatomy knowledge and technical skills. The hypothesis was that the choice of residency…

  11. On the Development and Measurement of Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H. Bayram

    2009-01-01

    The importance of spatial ability in learning different school subjects and being successful at certain jobs has been recognized globally. The vast majority of the studies on the topic have focused on the nature of the phenomenon, the factors that affect its development), and the difference between males and females on spatial ability. However,…

  12. Measurement of Spatial Ability in an Introductory Graphic Communications Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Walter F., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Published articles on spatial ability can be found in the fields of psychology and graphics education. In the "Engineering Design Graphics Journal" for 1936-1978, six articles concerning visualization (spatial ability) were listed. As published graphics research increased, the journal (1975-1996) listed 28 articles in the visualization…

  13. Students’ ability in science: Results from a test development study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Akkanat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student’s ability to use and manipulate scientific concepts has been widely explored; however there is still a need to define the characteristics and nature of science ability. Also, the tests and performance scales that require minimal conceptual knowledge to measure this ability are relatively less common. The aim of this study was to develop an objective measure of science ability of gifted middle school students. In order to assess this ability, Science Ability Test Battery was developed by the researchers. The test battery was divided into two sub scales containing; a multiple choice questions achievement test (Science Ability Test and a performance assessment (Science Performance Test. The initial Science Ability Test consisted of 23 multiple choice items with one correct answer that required students to use science process skills and reasoning. In the study, stratified sampling was used. The test was administered to 280 middle school students in Turkey and the missing data from 26 students were excluded. In order to obtain a proof of content validity, the researchers elicited feedback from five experts in the field of science education and gifted education and necessary corrections were made in accordance of their views and suggestions. This study will be followed by another research to further analyse validity and reliability of the test.

  14. Genetic Architecture of Verbal Abilities in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Rosa A.; Bartels, Meike; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of individual differences in general verbal ability, verbal learning and letter and category fluency were examined in two independent samples of 9- and 18-year-old twin pairs and their siblings. In both age groups, we observed strong familial resemblance for general verbal ability and moderate familial resemblance for verbal learning,…

  15. Training Attention-Switching Ability in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Holly A.; Shah, Priti

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Children with ADHD show attention-switching impairment. The present study assessed attention-switching ability in adults with ADHD, the extent to which this ability can be improved via targeted training, and the degree to which training extends to novel tasks of attention-switching. Method: Adults with ADHD (n = 16) and adults without…

  16. Early Childhood Stunting and Later Fine Motor Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Susan M.; Walker, Susan P.; Grantham-McGregor, Sally; Powell, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of early childhood stunting (height for age 2SD or more below reference values) and interventions on fine motor abilities at 11 to 12 years, and the relationship between fine motor abilities and school achievement and intelligence. Method: A cohort of stunted children who had participated in…

  17. Evolution of increased larval competitive ability in Drosophila ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We recently showed that populations of D. ananassaeand D. n. nasuta subjected to extreme larval crowding evolved greater competitive ability without evolving higher ... At that time, we suggested two possible reasons for the differences in the phenotypic correlates ofgreater competitive ability seen in the studies with D.

  18. 22 CFR 41.55 - Aliens with extraordinary ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aliens with extraordinary ability. 41.55... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.55 Aliens with extraordinary ability. (a) Requirements for O classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101...

  19. The Effect of Piano Accompaniment on Kindergartners' Developmental Singing Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atterbury, Betty W.; Silcox, Lynn

    1993-01-01

    Reports the influence of piano harmonic accompaniment on singing ability of 203 kindergarten students during 1 year of instruction. Finds that no significant differences in singing ability occurred in the groups. Suggests that musical aptitude develops gradually and extensive musical exposure and instruction may be necessary to improve singing…

  20. Are Spatial Visualization Abilities Relevant to Virtual Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chwen Jen

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of virtual reality (VR)-based learning environment on learners of different spatial visualization abilities. The findings of the aptitude-by-treatment interaction study have shown that learners benefit most from the Guided VR mode, irrespective of their spatial visualization abilities. This indicates that…

  1. Training Preschoolers' Prospective Abilities through Conversation about the Extended Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyak, Nadia; Leech, Kathryn A.; Rowe, Meredith L.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to act on behalf of one's future self is related to uniquely human abilities such as planning, delay of gratification, and goal attainment. Although prospection develops rapidly during early childhood, little is known about the mechanisms that support its development. Here we explored whether encouraging children to talk about their…

  2. 20 CFR 604.4 - Application-ability to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application-ability to work. 604.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY FOR UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION § 604.4 Application—ability to work. (a) A State may consider an individual to be able to work during the week of unemployment claimed if the individual is able to work for...

  3. How to measure spatial abilities in visually impaired people?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyvers, Frank

    2012-01-01

    For the measurement of spatial abilities in sighted persons various tests exist. However, since these rely on vision, they are useless for visually impaired persons (VIPs). This study aimed at founding two self-constructed vision-free tests for spatial ability measurement of VIPs on existing

  4. Pre-Service Teachers' Mindset Beliefs about Student Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutshall, C. Anne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We all have beliefs about our ability or intelligence. The extent to which we believe ability is malleable (growth) or stable (fixed) is commonly referred to as our mindset. This research is designed to explore pre-service teachers' mindset beliefs as well as their beliefs when applied to hypothetical student scenarios. Method:…

  5. Profile of student critical thinking ability on static fluid concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulasih; Suparmi, A.; Sarwanto

    2017-11-01

    Critical thinking ability is an important part of educational goals. It has higher complex processes, such as analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating, drawing conclusion and reflection. This study is aimed to know the critical thinking ability of students in learning static fluids of senior high school students. This research uses the descriptive method which its instruments based on the indicator of critical thinking ability developed according to Ennis. The population of this research is XIth grade science class Public Senior High School, SMA N 1, Sambungmacan, Sragen, Central Java. The static fluid teaching material is delivered using Problem Based Learning Model through class experiment. The results of this study shows that the average student of XIth science class have high critical thinking skills, particularly in the ability of providing simple explanation, build basic skill, and provide advanced explanation, but they do not have high enough in ability of drawing conclusion and strategic and tactical components of critical thinking ability in the study of static fluid teaching material. The average of students critical thinking ability is 72.94, with 27,94% of students are in a low category and 72,22% of students in the high category of critical thinking ability.

  6. Intelligence quotient and perceptual ability: an inter-relationship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cognitive ability refers to the characteristic approach by the brain in processing information. These can be observed through various aspects of cognition such as intelligence and perceptual ability. Studies have shown that both mental constituents originate from the same neurological substrate in the prefrontal cortex.

  7. The Contribution of General Reading Ability to Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Deborah K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Truckenmiller, Adrea J.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between the reading ability and science achievement of students in grades 5, 8, and 9. Reading ability was assessed with four measures: word recognition, vocabulary, syntactic knowledge, and comprehension (23% of all passages were on science topics). Science achievement was assessed with state…

  8. The Relationship between Critical Thinking and EFL Learners' Speaking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Raana; Larsari, Ebrahim Ezzati; Kiasi, Mohammad Aghajanzadeh

    2016-01-01

    The current study sought to investigate the relationship between critical thinking and speaking ability among EFL students at Payame Noor University (PNU) of Rasht. This research concerned determining the fact that whether language students who are as critical thinker, perform better in their speaking ability or not. In order to answer the…

  9. EFFECT OF MOTIVATON AND CREATIVITY ON STUDENTS’ PSYCHOMOTOR ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Arpan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine: (1 the effect of motivation on students’ psychomotor ability; (2 the effect of creativity on students’ psychomotor ability; (3 the effect of motivation and creativity as in aggregate on students’ psychomotor ability; and (4 the contribution of motivation and creativity on students’ psychomotor ability in the subject of Web Programming. This research is an ex-post facto type. The population was sixth semester students of TIK Education Research Program of PGRI Pontianak totaling 217 students. The sample was 135 students with proportional random sampling techniques that determined by the Issac and Michael table. Data collection using a questionnaire. The data was analyzed using regression analysis to test the hypotheses. The results showed that: (1 motivation has a positive and significant effect on students’ psychomotor Ability; (2 creativity has a positive and significant effect on students’ psychomotor Ability; (3 motivation and creativity as in aggregate had a positive and significant effect on students’ psychomotor Ability with 68.88%; and (4 the contribution of motivation is 12.5% and creativity is 32.5% on students’ psychomotor Ability in the subject of Web Programming.

  10. combining ability and heterotic pattern in west african sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Accessions Panel (WASAP) and two female lines, were used in « Line x tester » mating design to produce thirty- eight (38) hybrids. Analysis of variance showed significant general combining ability and specific combining ability effects for grain weight, plant height, days to flowering, panicle length and chlorophyll content ...

  11. Home language and English language ability in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we analyse data on language ability collected in a new nationally representative household survey, the National Income Dynamics Study, which captures information on reading and writing ability, both in the individual's home language and in English. Two main findings are that self-assessed reading and ...

  12. Factors Determining the Innovative Ability of Manufacturing Small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Determining the Innovative Ability of Manufacturing Small and Medium Enterprises in Nigeria. ... to innovative ability among the manufacturing SMEs will be a positive disposition of the entrepreneur to build an enduring environment, particularly within the organization, that will help to nurture and sustain innovation.

  13. Combing ability analysis of among early generation maize inbred lines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Combining ability estimates are important genetic attributes ina maize breeding program aiming to develop stable andhigh yielding hybrids and synthetic varieties. The objectives of this study were to estimate combining ability effects of locally developed and introduced early generation maize inbred lines for grain yield, ...

  14. Combing Ability Analysis ofamong Early Generation Maize Inbred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dagne.cimdom

    Abstract. Combining ability estimates are important genetic attributes ina maize breeding program aiming to develop stable andhigh yielding hybrids and synthetic varieties. The objectives of this study were to estimate combining ability effects of locally developed and introduced early generation maize inbred lines for grain ...

  15. The Study of Drawing and Painting Abilities in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulama, Maria Eliza; Iovu, Mihai-Bogdan; Rus, Andreea

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is two-fold: first, to offer preschool children new learning situations in order to develop their drawing and painting abilities and second, to learn new techniques in a shorter period of time. The paper is grounded in the theory of creativity. Creativity is defined as the ability to propose something new, original and…

  16. Associations between insomnia, sleep duration and poor work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yulong; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Yan; Ning, Li; Guan, Suzhen; Ge, Hua; Li, Fuye; Liu, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the independent and joint effect of insomnia and objective sleep duration on poor work ability. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 2820 Chinese manufacturing workers were categorized as insomnia patients and individuals with normal sleeping pattern by interview according to DSM-IV criteria. Sleep duration was classified into four categories: ≥7h, 6-7h, 5-6h, and Work ability was assessed using the Chinese Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire. Regression analysis examined the independent and joint association of sleep duration and insomnia with poor work ability, after adjusting for various confounding factors. Insomnia and objective short sleep duration were both independently associated with poor work ability. Compared with the normal sleeping and ≥7h sleep duration group, the highest risk of poor work ability was in the insomnia patients with associated with increased risk of poor work ability. Objective sleep duration should be taken into consideration when assessing the work ability of people with insomnia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computer teaching process optimization strategy analysis of thinking ability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    .... Therefore, this article on how to the calculation of optimization in the process of computer teaching college students thinking ability on further discussion and analysis, and then explore the strategies and methods, so as to promote the computer teaching in the process of the cultivation of thinking ability and optimize the computer

  18. The role of cognitive abilities in laparoscopic simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Miedema, H.A.T.; Broeders, Ivo Adriaan Maria Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Learning minimally invasive surgery (MIS) differs substantially from learning open surgery and trainees differ in their ability to learn MIS. Previous studies mainly focused on the role of visuo-spatial ability (VSA) on the learning curve for MIS. In the current study, the relationship between

  19. The role of cognitive abilities in laparoscopic simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, Marleen; Schraagen, Johannes Martinus Cornelis; Miedema, Helene A.T.; Broeders, Ivo Adriaan Maria Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Learning minimally invasive surgery (MIS) differs substantially from learning open surgery and trainees differ in their ability to learn MIS. Previous studies mainly focused on the role of visuo-spatial ability (VSA) on the learning curve for MIS. In the current study, the relationship between

  20. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  1. Heterosis and combining ability in a diallel cross of okra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diallel analysis on 8 pure lines of Abelmoschus esculentus was done at 3 sites in Cameroon (Dibang, Yaoundé and Yagoua) in a randomized complete block design, with 3 replications, to estimate both the heterosis and the combining ability. The heterosis over mid-parent and the combining abilities were significant for ...

  2. QTL mapping for combining ability in different population-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 3. QTL mapping for combining ability in different population-based NCII designs: a simulation study. Lanzhi Li Congwei Sun ... The NCII design (North Carolina mating design II) has been widely applied in studies of combining ability and heterosis. The objective of our ...

  3. Effect of weight on osmoregulation ability in Rutilus frisii kutum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-02-09

    Feb 9, 2012 ... Experiments were conducted to study the downstream migratory behavior and effects of weight on osmoregulation ability of hatchery-reared Rutilus frisii kutum fingerlings during adaptation to the seawater. Accordingly, blood osmotic pressure regulation ability in kutum fingerlings with weights of 1,. 3, 5 and ...

  4. Ability performance of older workers - Internal and external influencing factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmann-Kohli, F.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der

    1996-01-01

    Internal and external factors affecting ability and performance of older employees are being analyzed in a short literature review. Internal factors like physical capacity, sensory capacity, cognitive abilities and general health are reduced with ageing; their effect on performance, however, depends

  5. Development of Repeated Sprint Ability in Talented Youth Basketball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne C. M.; de Jong, Mark C.; Tromp, Eveline J. Y.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Malina, Robert M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    te Wierike, SCM, de Jong, MC, Tromp, EJY, Vuijk, PJ, Lemmink, KAPM, Malina, RM, Elferink-Gemser, MT, and Visscher, C. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 928-934, 2014-Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated

  6. Drop Jumping as a Training Method for Jumping Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    1990-01-01

    Vertical jumping ability is of importance for good performance in sports such as basketball and volleyball. Coaches are in need of exercises that consume only little time and still help to improve their players’ jumping ability, without involving a high risk of injury. Drop jumping is assumed to

  7. Relationships among Bilingualism, Critical Thinking Ability, and Critical Thinking Disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Raymond T.; Albert, Rachel E.; Radsma, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    Nursing students (n=111) completed French and English Cloze Tests, the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, and the California Critical Thinking Skills Test. There was insufficient evidence to support a relationship between bilingualism and critical thinking ability or between critical thinking disposition and ability. Bilingualism…

  8. Abilities and Affordances: Factors Influencing Successful Child-Tablet Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Adam K.; McEwen, Rhonda N.

    2017-01-01

    Using Luhmann's communication theory and affordance theories, we develop a framework to examine how kindergarten-grade 2 students interact with tablet computers. We assessed whether cognitive ability and device configuration influence how successfully children use tablet computers. We found that children's limited ability to direct their cognitive…

  9. Colour Constancy using Sub-blocks of the Image

    OpenAIRE

    Akmol Hussain, MD; Sheikh Akbari, A; Mallik, B.

    2016-01-01

    Colour constancy is the ability to measure the colour of objects independent of the light source, while colour casting is the presence of unwanted colour in digital images. Colour casting significantly affects the performance of image processing algorithms such as image segmentation and object recognition. The presence of large uniform background within the image considerably deteriorates the performance of many state of the art colour constancy algorithms. This paper presents a colour consta...

  10. Image classification using eigenpaxels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Peter Frederick

    The intelligent control of robotic is a major limiting factor in the utilization of current robotic technology. Although the technology to accurately position robotic manipulators is well developed, practical applications are often limited by the controller's ability to interact with a complex environment. Central to this plight is the integration of sensory signals, such as vision, into the control structure. Recently, a number of promising approaches to visual information processing have been developed using artificial neural networks (ANNs). These approaches, however, are often tailored to particular applications and are therefore disparate and limited in scope. In contrast, biological neural networks perform a wide range of visual tasks yet this behavior arises from a single integrated neural structure. The work presented in this thesis details a biologically inspired image processing algorithm and its application to an image classification problem. Based on the organization of cells in the primary visual cortex of primates, this algorithm utilizes key neural mechanisms to produce efficient representations of images. Dubbed the "eigenpaxel" algorithm, excellent results are obtained despite the relative simplicity of the method. In addition, the relationship between the algorithm and biological vision may help to shed light on the processing occurring within the brain and the basis of the organization found therein.

  11. Microbial Cell Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Sullivan, Claretta [Eastern Virginia Medical School; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  12. The General Motor Ability Hypothesis: An Old Idea Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Beth; McIntyre, Fleur; Parker, Helen

    2018-01-01

    While specific motor abilities have become a popular explanation for motor performance, the older, alternate notion of a general motor ability should be revisited. Current theories lack consensus, and most motor assessment tools continue to derive a single composite score to represent motor capacity. In addition, results from elegant statistical procedures such as higher order factor analyses, cluster analyses, and Item Response Theory support a more global motor ability. We propose a contemporary model of general motor ability as a unidimensional construct that is emergent and fluid over an individual's lifespan, influenced by both biological and environmental factors. In this article, we address the implications of this model for theory, practice, assessment, and research. Based on our hypothesis and Item Response Theory, our Lifespan Motor Ability Scale can identify motor assessment tasks that are relevant and important across varied phases of lifespan development.

  13. Ability of nucleus cochlear implantees to recognize music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, S; Ito, J

    1999-07-01

    Eight adults with cochlear implants participated in experiments to test their ability to recognize music. Some subjects showed good ability to recognize songs that were sung with instrumental accompaniment but poor ability to recognize songs played on an electronic keyboard without verbal cues, indicating that they were recognizing the songs by verbal cues rather than by musical qualities such as tones and melodic intervals. This conclusion was strengthened by the finding that subjects were barely able to distinguish between songs with the same rhythm and pitch range, and they showed poor ability to discriminate musical intervals. (The closest discrimination was 4 semitones.) Subjects had good ability to distinguish among the synthesized sounds of various musical instruments played on the electronic keyboard. We speculate that subjects could distinguish the various musical instruments in the same way they distinguish among human voices using spectrographic patterns such as formants or maxima.

  14. Dimensions of affect modulated by perceived mood regulation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanitz, Christine A; Hursh, Adrienne N; Hudepohl, Adam D

    2011-06-01

    The ability to regulate mood is a facet of emotional intelligence that may contribute to an individual's physical and mental health. Precisely what is regulated when mood regulation occurs is dependent on what "makes up" mood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether perceived mood regulation ability can predict regulation of affect during task engagement and whether affect regulation is specific to valence or arousal. Measures of positive affect, negative affect, and frontal area sEMG (as a measure of arousal) were obtained from a sample of one hundred twenty-four participants categorized by their self report as possessing low or high mood regulation ability. Modulation of positive affect, but not negative affect, was predicted by perceived mood regulation ability. The results of sEMG were mixed. These data provide some support for the hypothesis that mood regulation ability can predict future efforts to regulate affect, at least in the context of task engagement.

  15. [Visual perception abilities in children with reading disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpup-Stüwe, Lina; Petermann, Franz

    2015-05-01

    Visual perceptual abilities are increasingly being neglected in research concerning reading disabilities. This study measures the visual perceptual abilities of children with disabilities in reading. The visual perceptual abilities of 35 children with specific reading disorder and 30 controls were compared using the German version of the Developmental Test of Visual Perception – Adolescent and Adult (DTVP-A). 11 % of the children with specific reading disorder show clinically relevant performance on the DTVP-A. The perceptual abilities of both groups differ significantly. No significant group differences exist after controlling for general IQ or Perceptional Reasoning Index, but they do remain after controlling for Verbal Comprehension, Working Memory, and Processing Speed Index. The number of children with reading difficulties suffering from visual perceptual disorders has been underestimated. For this reason, visual perceptual abilities should always be tested when making a reading disorder diagnosis. Profiles of IQ-test results of children suffering from reading and visual perceptual disorders should be interpreted carefully.

  16. Glass Forming Ability of Sub-Alkaline Silicate Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, F. P.; Iezzi, G.; Behrens, H.; Holtz, F.; Ventura, G.; Misiti, V.; Mollo, S.; Perugini, D.

    2014-12-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) and critical cooling rate (Rc) of six natural sub-alkaline melts from basalt to rhyolite (i.e., B100, B80R20, B60R40, B40R60, B20R80, and R100) have been quantified through cooling-induced solidification experiments of 9000, 1800, 180, 60, 7 and 1 °C/h conducted at ambient pressure and air buffering conditions, in a temperature range between 1300 °C (superliquidus region) and 800 °C (glass transition region), The phase proportion in each run-product was determined by image analysis on about 500 BS-SEM microphotographs. The phase assemblage consists of glass, clinopyroxene, spinel, and plagioclase with the occurrence of sporadic olivine, orthopyroxene and melilite. Both the glass and crystalline fractions are well correlated with the composition of residual melt. Generally, the amount of crystals decreases with increasing cooling rate. However, some exceptions occurs showing no correlations or even opposite trends. For the example of, Al2O3 and CaO in clinopyroxenes from B100, B80R20, B60R40 and B40R60, their concentrations scale as a function of both cooling rate and the degree of clinopyroxene crystallization. The value of Rc changes of 5 order of magnitude from <1 to ~9000 °C/h when the melt composition changes from R100 to B100, respectively. The most important Rc variations are measured between B80R20 and B60R40, levelling off towards B100. This trend scales with NBO/T (non bridging oxygen per tetrahedron) and can be modelled by the following master sigmoid equation: Rc = a / 1+e-(NBO/T-xo/b), where a, b and xo are fitting parameters equal to 9214, 0.040 and 0.297, respectively. Our data can be used to retrieve the solidification conditions of aphyric, degassed and oxidised lavas. Indeed, the relationship between crystal content and cooling kinetics suggests that the solidification path is more complex than previously assumed and strongly non-linear. This finding has also implications to design glass-ceramics based on natural

  17. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Angela E.; Dobson, Lauren A.; Thomas, Lauren E.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). To further address this aspect of the WS social phenotype, we used an individual differences approach to consider both cross-sectional and longitudinal relations among different pragmatic abilities for 14 children with WS, taking into account individual differences in non-verbal reasoning abilities. We also considered the relations between pragmatic abilities and expressive vocabulary ability. Participants were tested at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-min play session with their mothers (Time 1) and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2). Children’s intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question (ExtendQ) was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question (ExtendS) both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact in triadic interactions (secondary intersubjectivity) and expressive vocabulary ability were related to both ExtendQ and ExtendS. Finally, both ExtendQ and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity) at age 4 years predicted ExtendQ at age 9–12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed. PMID:22719734

  18. Pragmatic abilities of children with williams syndrome: a longitudinal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Angela E; Dobson, Lauren A; Thomas, Lauren E; Mervis, Carolyn B

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). To further address this aspect of the WS social phenotype, we used an individual differences approach to consider both cross-sectional and longitudinal relations among different pragmatic abilities for 14 children with WS, taking into account individual differences in non-verbal reasoning abilities. We also considered the relations between pragmatic abilities and expressive vocabulary ability. Participants were tested at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-min play session with their mothers (Time 1) and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2). Children's intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question (ExtendQ) was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question (ExtendS) both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact in triadic interactions (secondary intersubjectivity) and expressive vocabulary ability were related to both ExtendQ and ExtendS. Finally, both ExtendQ and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity) at age 4 years predicted ExtendQ at age 9-12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed.

  19. Generalist genes analysis of DNA markers associated with mathematical ability and disability reveals shared influence across ages and abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Sophia J; Kovas, Yulia; Petrill, Stephen A; Plomin, Robert

    2010-07-05

    The Generalist Genes Hypothesis is based upon quantitative genetic findings which indicate that many of the same genes influence diverse cognitive abilities and disabilities across age. In a recent genome-wide association study of mathematical ability in 10-year-old children, 43 SNP associations were nominated from scans of pooled DNA, 10 of which were validated in an individually genotyped sample. The 4927 children in this genotyped sample have also been studied at 7, 9 and 12 years of age on measures of mathematical ability, as well as on other cognitive and learning abilities. Using these data we have explored the Generalist Genes Hypothesis by assessing the association of the available measures of ability at age 10 and other ages with two composite 'SNP-set' scores, formed from the full set of 43 nominated SNPs and the sub-set of 10 SNPs that were previously found to be associated with mathematical ability at age 10. Both SNP sets yielded significant associations with mathematical ability at ages 7, 9 and 12, as well as with reading and general cognitive ability at age 10. Although effect sizes are small, our results correspond with those of quantitative genetic research in supporting the Generalist Genes Hypothesis. SNP sets identified on the basis of their associations with mathematical ability at age 10 show associations with mathematical ability at earlier and later ages and show associations of similar magnitude with reading and general cognitive ability. With small effect sizes expected in such complex traits, future studies may be able to capitalise on power by searching for 'generalist genes' using longitudinal and multivariate approaches.

  20. Corner-point criterion for assessing nonlinear image processing imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeau, Stéphane; Pigois, Laurent; Foing, Jean-Paul; Deshors, Gilles; Swiathy, Greggory

    2017-10-01

    Range performance modeling of optronics imagers attempts to characterize the ability to resolve details in the image. Today, digital image processing is systematically used in conjunction with the optoelectronic system to correct its defects or to exploit tiny detection signals to increase performance. In order to characterize these processing having adaptive and non-linear properties, it becomes necessary to stimulate the imagers with test patterns whose properties are similar to the actual scene image ones, in terms of dynamic range, contours, texture and singular points. This paper presents an approach based on a Corner-Point (CP) resolution criterion, derived from the Probability of Correct Resolution (PCR) of binary fractal patterns. The fundamental principle lies in the respectful perception of the CP direction of one pixel minority value among the majority value of a 2×2 pixels block. The evaluation procedure considers the actual image as its multi-resolution CP transformation, taking the role of Ground Truth (GT). After a spatial registration between the degraded image and the original one, the degradation is statistically measured by comparing the GT with the degraded image CP transformation, in terms of localized PCR at the region of interest. The paper defines this CP criterion and presents the developed evaluation techniques, such as the measurement of the number of CP resolved on the target, the transformation CP and its inverse transform that make it possible to reconstruct an image of the perceived CPs. Then, this criterion is compared with the standard Johnson criterion, in the case of a linear blur and noise degradation. The evaluation of an imaging system integrating an image display and a visual perception is considered, by proposing an analysis scheme combining two methods: a CP measurement for the highly non-linear part (imaging) with real signature test target and conventional methods for the more linear part (displaying). The application to

  1. Quantitative metrics to evaluate image quality for computed radiographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Christopher D.

    Traditional methods of evaluating a computed radiography (CR) imaging system's performance (e.g. the noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF), the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and contrast-detail analysis) were adapted in order to evaluate the feasibility of identifying a quantitative metric to evaluate image quality for digital radiographic images. The addition of simulated patient scattering media when acquiring the images to calculate these parameters altered their fundamental meaning. To avoid confusion with other research they were renamed the clinical noise power spectrum (NPSC), the clinical modulation transfer function (MTFC), the clinical detective quantum efficiency (DQEC) and the clinical contrast detail score (CDSC). These metrics were then compared to the subjective evaluation of radiographic images of an anthropomorphic phantom representing a one-year old pediatric patient. Computer algorithms were developed to implement the traditional mathematical procedures for calculating the system performance parameters. In order to easily compare these three metrics, the integral up to the system Nyquist frequency was used as the final image quality metric. These metrics are identified as the INPSC, the IMTFC and the IDQEC respectively. A computer algorithm was also developed, based on the results of the observer study, to determine the threshold contrast to noise ratio (CNRT) for objects of different sizes. This algorithm was then used to determine the CDSC by scoring images without the use of observers. The four image quality metrics identified in this study were evaluated to determine if they could distinguish between small changes in image acquisition parameters e.g., current-time product and peak-tube potential. All of the metrics were able to distinguish these small changes in at least one of the image acquisition parameters, but the ability to digitally manipulate the raw image data made the identification of a broad

  2. Correlation between depressive symptoms and subjective mastication ability and ability to pronunciation among Korean elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The present study examines the relationship between depressive symptoms and subjective chewing and pronunciation ability in Korean seniors. Our goal is to provide the data required to develop appropriate oral health interventions programs for seniors. METHODS The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) is widely used depressive symptoms assessment. A Korean version was used for the 2009 Community Health Survey, which was consulted to extract the present study’s participants comprising 50,694 Korean seniors (males, 20,582; females, 30,112) aged ≥65 years. Those with a CES-D score ≥16 were rated ‘depressed.’ SAS version 9.3 was used for the data analysis. RESULTS Prevalence of depressive symptoms increased as the participants socioeconomic status decreased, number of health issues increased, health behavior worsened, and chewing and pronunciation discomfort increased. Males with chewing difficulties were found to have 1.45 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29 to 1.63) greater risk of depressive symptoms than those without, while males with pronunciation discomfort were found to have 1.97 times greater risk of depressive symptoms than those without (95% CI, 1.76 to 2.20). Females with chewing difficulty were found to have 1.50 times (95% CI, 1.39 to 1.61) greater risk of depressive symptoms than those without, and females with pronunciation discomfort were found to have 1.55 times greater risk of depressive symptoms than those without (95% CI, 1.44 to 1.67). CONCLUSIONS Intervention programs designed to help with oral health management and alleviate depressive symptoms in seniors are urgently needed. As the prevalence of depressive symptoms may vary geographically, research examining potential variance at city, district, and town levels would be beneficial. PMID:27457065

  3. Sound induced activity in voice sensitive cortex predicts voice memory ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eWatson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ‘temporal voice areas’ (TVAs (Belin et al., 2000 of the human brain show greater neuronal activity in response to human voices than to other categories of nonvocal sounds. However, a direct link between TVA activity and voice perceptionbehaviour has not yet been established. Here we show that a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measure of activity in the TVAs predicts individual performance at a separately administered voice memory test. This relation holds whengeneral sound memory ability is taken into account. These findings provide the first evidence that the TVAs are specifically involved in voice cognition.

  4. Sound-induced activity in voice-sensitive cortex predicts voice memory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Rebecca; Latinus, Marianne; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Crabbe, Frances; Belin, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The "temporal voice areas" (TVAs; Belin et al., 2000) of the human brain show greater neuronal activity in response to human voices than to other categories of non-vocal sounds. However, a direct link between TVA activity and voice perception behavior has not yet been established. Here we show that a functional magnetic resonance imaging measure of activity in the TVAs predicts individual performance at a separately administered voice memory test. This relation holds when general sound memory ability is taken into account. These findings provide the first evidence that the TVAs are specifically involved in voice cognition.

  5. The ABCs of Math: A Genetic Analysis of Mathematics and Its Links With Reading Ability and General Cognitive Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sara A; Petrill, Stephen A; Thompson, Lee A; Plomin, Robert

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this first major report from the Western Reserve Reading Project Math component is to explore the etiology of the relationship among tester-administered measures of mathematics ability, reading ability, and general cognitive ability. Data are available on 314 pairs of monozygotic and same-sex dizygotic twins analyzed across 5 waves of assessment. Univariate analyses provide a range of estimates of genetic (h(2) = .00 -.63) and shared (c(2) = .15-.52) environmental influences across math calculation, fluency, and problem solving measures. Multivariate analyses indicate genetic overlap between math problem solving with general cognitive ability and reading decoding, whereas math fluency shares significant genetic overlap with reading fluency and general cognitive ability. Further, math fluency has unique genetic influences. In general, math ability has shared environmental overlap with general cognitive ability and decoding. These results indicate that aspects of math that include problem solving have different genetic and environmental influences than math calculation. Moreover, math fluency, a timed measure of calculation, is the only measured math ability with unique genetic influences.

  6. Surgeons' work ability and performance in surgical care: relations between organisational predictors, work engagement and work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Danzer, Gerhard; Klapp, Burghard F; Groneberg, David A

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relations and influences between work-related factors, personal resources, work engagement and work ability of surgeons working in German hospitals. The study was conducted as a cross-sectional survey investigation. We used the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire and the Work Ability Index to evaluate surgeons' work engagement, working conditions and work ability. Bivariate analyses and a stepwise regression analysis were performed. Surgeons reported a moderate work ability and work engagement. The results indicated significant associations between surgeons' sources of work engagement, work ability and work-related factors (e.g. job resources). Significant differences regarding these variables were also detected between males and females and the various age groups. The study results reflect the positive effect of supportive working conditions and work engagement on the preservation of work ability, indicating their importance in promoting surgeons' work ability. Due to the elderly population and the continuing development of health care in Germany, the demand for surgeons increases. These circumstances give reasons for a strong need to preserve and restore surgeons' work ability. New strategies for training and improving the capacity and performance of surgeons are necessary.

  7. Phase stabilized homodyne of infrared scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaoji G., E-mail: xgx214@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Gilburd, Leonid; Walker, Gilbert C., E-mail: gwalker@chem.utoronto.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-12-29

    Scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows sub diffraction limited spatial resolution. Interferometric homodyne detection in s-SNOM can amplify the signal and extract vibrational responses based on sample absorption. A stable reference phase is required for a high quality homodyne-detected near-field signal. This work presents the development of a phase stabilization mechanism for s-SNOM to provide stable homodyne conditions. The phase stability is found to be better than 0.05 rad for the mid infrared light source. Phase stabilization results in improved near field images and vibrational spectroscopies. Spatial inhomogeneities of the boron nitride nanotubes are measured and compared.

  8. Bending, splitting, compressing and expanding of electromagnetic waves in infinitely anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2018-01-01

    High-efficiency diffraction-free manipulations of electromagnetic (EM) waves are fundamentally difficult to realize, though reflectionless wave bending or sub-diffraction-limited imaging has been realized separately in previous demonstrations. Recent advances in epsilon-near-zero and anisotropic epsilon-near-infinity metamaterials have provided unique possibilities to achieve reflectionless diffraction-free EM wave manipulations. Here, we propose bending, splitting, compressing and expanding of EM waves with infinitely anisotropic media that can be achieved without diffraction or reflection. The results are verified by numerical simulations. This work furthers the study of infinitely anisotropic media, and might find applications in high-efficiency interconnection of subwavelength photonic information.

  9. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-01-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  10. High resolution projection micro stereolithography system and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Farquar, George; Weisgraber, Todd; Gemberling, Steven; Fang, Nicholas; Xu, Jun; Alonso, Matthew; Lee, Howon

    2016-11-15

    A high-resolution P.mu.SL system and method incorporating one or more of the following features with a standard P.mu.SL system using a SLM projected digital image to form components in a stereolithographic bath: a far-field superlens for producing sub-diffraction-limited features, multiple spatial light modulators (SLM) to generate spatially-controlled three-dimensional interference holograms with nanoscale features, and the integration of microfluidic components into the resin bath of a P.mu.SL system to fabricate microstructures of different materials.

  11. Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis was held at the IT University of Copenhagen in Denmark during June 15-17, 2015. The SCIA conference series has been an ongoing biannual event for more than 30 years and over the years it has nurtured a world-class regional research and development....... The topics of the accepted papers range from novel applications of vision systems, pattern recognition, machine learning, feature extraction, segmentation, 3D vision, to medical and biomedical image analysis. The papers originate from all the Scandinavian countries and several other European countries...

  12. Examining young children's social competence using functional ability profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Tara W; Snyder, Patricia A; Algina, James

    2017-08-13

    To explore the use of International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) based profiles of children's functional abilities in relation to their social competence. Subgroups based on shared profiles of functional ability were investigated as an alternative or complement to subgroups defined by disability categories. Secondary analysis of a nationally representative data set of young children identified for special education services in the United States was used for the present study. Using five subgroups of children with shared profiles of functional ability, derived from latent class analysis in previous work, regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between social competence and functional abilities profile subgroup membership. Differences among the subgroups were examined using standardized effect sizes. R2 values were used to examine explained variance in social competence in relation to subgroup membership, disability category, and these variables in combination. Functional ability profile subgroup membership was moderately related to children's social competence outcomes: social skills and problem behaviors. Effect sizes showed significant differences between subgroups. Subgroup membership accounted for more variance in social competence outcomes than disability category. The results provide empirical support for the importance of functional ability profiles when examining social competence within a population of young children with disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation The extent to which children with disabilities experience difficulty with social competence varies by their functional characteristics. Functional ability profiles can provide practitioners and researchers working young children with disabilities important tools to examine social competence and to inform interventions.

  13. Incremental validity of emotional intelligence ability in predicting academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Tiziana; Curci, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    We tested the incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence (El) in predicting academic achievement in undergraduate students, controlling for cognitive abilities and personality traits. Academic achievement has been conceptualized in terms of the number of exams, grade point average, and study time taken to prepare for each exam. Additionally, gender differences were taken into account in these relationships. Participants filled in the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, the reduced version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and academic achievement measures. Results showed that El abilities were positively related to academic achievement indices, such as the number of exams and grade point average; total El ability and the Perceiving branch were negatively associated with the study time spent preparing for exams. Furthermore, El ability adds a percentage of incremental variance with respect to cognitive ability and personality variables in explaining scholastic success. The magnitude of the associations between El abilities and academic achievement measures was generally higher for men than for women. Jointly considered, the present findings support the incremental validity of the MSCEIT and provide positive indications of the importance of El in students' academic development. The helpfulness of El training in the context of academic institutions is discussed.

  14. Masseter muscle tension and chewing ability in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yuki; Hirano, Hirohiko; Watanabe, Yutaka; Edahiro, Ayako; Sato, Emiko; Shinkai, Shoji; Yoshida, Hiroto; Mataki, Shiro

    2013-04-01

    Mastication is an important function to maintain, not only for oral health, but also for quality of life. An easy-to-use method to evaluate the chewing ability of elderly people in any environment is necessary. Few studies have discussed the effectiveness of the masseter muscle by palpation. The purpose of this study was to clarify the availability of masseter muscle tension assessment methods by investigating its relationship with oral health status, and comparing it with other methods of assessing chewing ability. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 547 community-dwelling elderly subjects (246 men and 301 women; mean age 73.8 ± 6.2 years) who participated in a comprehensive annual geriatric health examination in 2010 at Kusatsu, Gunma, Japan. Chewing ability was evaluated by masseter muscle tension palpation, differences of masseter muscle thickness, occlusal force, self-reported chewing ability, and the number of remaining and functional teeth. Masseter muscle thickness was measured by ultrasonography. Masseter muscle thickness and occlusal force showed significant differences between males and females. The strength of masseter muscle tension palpation was significantly associated with men's occlusal force, masseter muscle thickness, the number of remaining and functional teeth, and self-reported chewing ability (P muscle thickness, the number of remaining teeth, and self-reported chewing ability and results of palpation (P palpation of masseter muscle tension is a reliable and easy-to-use method to evaluate the chewing ability of elderly people. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Concept mapping learning strategy to enhance students' mathematical connection ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, M.; Kadir, Fatra, Maifalinda

    2017-05-01

    The concept mapping learning strategy in teaching and learning mathematics has been investigated by numerous researchers. However, there are still less researchers who have scrutinized about the roles of map concept which is connected to the mathematical connection ability. Being well understood on map concept, it may help students to have ability to correlate one concept to other concept in order that the student can solve mathematical problems faced. The objective of this research was to describe the student's mathematical connection ability and to analyze the effect of using concept mapping learning strategy to the students' mathematical connection ability. This research was conducted at senior high school in Jakarta. The method used a quasi-experimental with randomized control group design with the total number was 72 students as the sample. Data obtained through using test in the post-test after giving the treatment. The results of the research are: 1) Students' mathematical connection ability has reached the good enough level category; 2) Students' mathematical connection ability who had taught with concept mapping learning strategy is higher than who had taught with conventional learning strategy. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that concept mapping learning strategycould enhance the students' mathematical connection ability, especially in trigonometry.

  16. Early Skin Tumor Detection from Microscopic Images through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYESHA AMIR SIDDIQI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is done to provide appropriate detection technique for skin tumor detection. The work is done by using the image processing toolbox of MATLAB. Skin tumors are unwanted skin growth with different causes and varying extent of malignant cells. It is a syndrome in which skin cells mislay the ability to divide and grow normally. Early detection of tumor is the most important factor affecting the endurance of a patient. Studying the pattern of the skin cells is the fundamental problem in medical image analysis. The study of skin tumor has been of great interest to the researchers. DIP (Digital Image Processing allows the use of much more complex algorithms for image processing, and hence, can offer both more sophisticated performance at simple task, and the implementation of methods which would be impossibly by analog means. It allows much wider range of algorithms to be applied to the input data and can avoid problems such as build up of noise and signal distortion during processing. The study shows that few works has been done on cellular scale for the images of skin. This research allows few checks for the early detection of skin tumor using microscopic images after testing and observing various algorithms. After analytical evaluation the result has been observed that the proposed checks are time efficient techniques and appropriate for the tumor detection. The algorithm applied provides promising results in lesser time with accuracy. The GUI (Graphical User Interface that is generated for the algorithm makes the system user friendly

  17. Physical strength, fighting ability, and aggressiveness in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Reyes, José Antonio; Gil-Burmann, Carlos; Fink, Bernhard; Turiegano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that evolutionary selection pressures have shaped mental mechanisms to be able to assess one's own and other's physical strength, fighting ability, and aggressiveness. According to the recalibrational theory, anger may be linked to fighting ability and serve as a bargaining mechanism to improve welfare obtained in social conflict. We hypothesized that late adolescent men (but not mid-adolescent men or women) use this mechanism, as it would be particularly adaptive for them to avoid potential costs from direct conflict in male competition. The present study investigated the relationship between fighting ability (estimated from handgrip strength [HGS], a measure of upper body strength, and self-reported fighting ability) and aggressiveness (physical and nonphysical) in 288 Spanish adolescents aged 14-18 years. Our results indicated a positive relationship between self-perceived fighting ability and HGS in both sexes during adolescence. There was no association between fighting ability and aggressiveness in late adolescent women (17-18 years). For men, there was a positive relationship between fighting ability and physical aggression, but the strength of this relationship decreased with age. Additionally, for men, there was a positive relationship between fighting ability and anger but only in late adolescence, and thus arguing that for adolescent men aggression strategies shift from physical to nonphysical as they age. With reference to the recalibrational theory of anger, our results suggest that the sex- and age-dependent associations between fighting ability and physical and nonphysical aggression indicate divergent adaptive skills between sexes, which are driven by intrasexual competition. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Revisiting the relationship between regenerative ability and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Ashley W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Contrary to the longstanding view that newts (Notophthalamus viridescens, but not axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum, can regenerate a lens, a recent report in BMC Biology by Panagiotis Tsonis and colleagues shows axolotls indeed possess this ability during early larval stages. In contrast, they show that zebrafish never posses this ability, even as embryos. This underscores the importance of comparing regenerative ability across species and reinforces the need to consider organ regeneration in the context of evolution, development, and aging. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/103

  19. A practice course to cultivate students' comprehensive ability of photoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yong; Liu, Yang; Niu, Chunhui; Liu, Lishuang

    2017-08-01

    After the studying of many theoretical courses, it's important and urgent for the students from specialty of optoelectronic information science and engineering to cultivate their comprehensive ability of photoelectricity. We set up a comprehensive practice course named "Integrated Design of Optoelectronic Information System" (IDOIS) for the purpose that students can integrate their knowledge of optics, electronics and computer programming to design, install and debug an optoelectronic system with independent functions. Eight years of practice shows that this practice course can train students' ability of analysis, design/development and debugging of photoelectric system, improve their ability in document retrieval, design proposal and summary report writing, teamwork, innovation consciousness and skill.

  20. How to measure spatial abilities in visually impaired people?

    OpenAIRE

    Steyvers, Frank

    2012-01-01

    For the measurement of spatial abilities in sighted persons various tests exist. However, since these rely on vision, they are useless for visually impaired persons (VIPs). This study aimed at founding two self-constructed vision-free tests for spatial ability measurement of VIPs on existing conventional spatial ability tests. To do so, a group of sighted participants was selected to match a group of VIPs for which test data were already available on the two vision-free tests. They were also ...

  1. Factors associated with critical thinking abilities in psychotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Brandon A; Brown, Lily A; Miller, Ivan W

    2011-01-01

    Critical thinking is assumed to be an important factor in the promotion of evidence-based treatment practices. However, little is known about attitudinal and other dispositional factors that may influence critical thinking in psychotherapists specifically. The aim of the current study was to identify factors associated with critical thinking abilities in psychotherapists. A total of 143 licensed psychotherapists completed an Internet-based survey that assessed their critical thinking ability. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that critical thinking ability was associated with theoretical orientation, reliance on intuition in decision-making, and endorsement of erroneous beliefs about health. Implications for improving critical thinking skills in psychotherapists are discussed.

  2. Longitudinal associations between stressors and work ability in hospital workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen Martinez, Maria; da Silva Alexandre, Tiago; Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Maria do Rosario; Marina Fischer, Frida

    This study sought to assess associations between work stressors and work ability in a cohort (2009-2012) of 498 hospital workers. Time-dependent variables associated with the Work Ability Index (WAI) were evaluated using general linear mixed models. Analyses included effects of individual and work characteristics. Except for work demands, the work stressors (job control, social support, effort-reward imbalance, overcommitment and work-related activities that cause pain/injury) were associated with WAI (p work and morning shift work were associated with decreased WAI (p Work stressors negatively affected work ability over time independently of other variables.

  3. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  4. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity. These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision, imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing, thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT. This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review.

  5. High-speed inline holographic Stokesmeter imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Heifetz, Alexander; Tseng, Shih C; Shahriar, M S

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed inline holographic Stokesmeter that consists of two liquid crystal retarders and a spectrally selective holographic grating. Explicit choices of angles of orientation for the components in the inline architecture are identified to yield higher measurement accuracy than the classical architecture. We show polarimetric images of an artificial scene produced by such a Stokesmeter, demonstrating the ability to identify an object not recognized by intensity-only imaging systems.

  6. Compound imaging using Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Jensen, Jonas; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is a technique with low complexity and the ability to yield a more uniform lateral resolution with range. However, the presence of speckle artifacts in ultrasound images degrades the contrast. In conventional imaging speckle is reduced by using...... spatial compounding at the cost of a reduced frame rate. The objective is to apply spatial compounding to SASB and evaluate if the images have a reduced speckle appearance and thereby an improved image quality in terms of contrast compared to ordinary SASB. Using the simulation software Field II, RF data...... detection the five second stage images are added to form the compounded image. Using a ProFocus scanner and the 8804 linear array transducer (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) measurements of a phantom containing water filled cysts are obtained to validate the simulation results. The setup is the same...

  7. Images of time mind, science, reality

    CERN Document Server

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2016-01-01

    Have you ever wondered about Time: what it is or how to discuss it? If you have, then you may have been bewildered by the many different views and opinions in many diverse fields to be found, such as physics, mathematics, philosophy, religion, history, and science fiction novels and films. This book will help you unravel fact from fiction. It provides a broad survey of many of these views, these images of time, covering historical, cultural, philosophical, biological, mathematical and physical images of time, including classical and quantum mechanics, special and general relativity and cosmology. This book gives you more than just a review of such images. It provides the reader a basis for judging the scientific soundness of these various images. It develops the reader's critical ability to distinguish Images of Time in terms of its contextual completeness. Differentiating between metaphysical images (which cannot be scientifically validated) and those that could, in principle, be put to empirical test. Showi...

  8. Spermatogonium image recognition using Zernike moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyun, Wang; Hefei, Ling; Fuhao, Zou; Zhengding, Lu; Zhendi, Wang

    2009-07-01

    The automatic identification and classification of spermatogonium images is a very important issue in biomedical engineering research. This paper proposes a scheme for spermatogonium recognition, in which Zernike moments are used to represent image features. First of all, the mathematical morphology method is employed to extract the intact individual cell in every image, and then we normalize these binary images. Then, Zernike moments are calculated from these normalized images, followed by recognizing the spermatogonia through computing similarity of vectors composed with Zernike moments using Euclidean distance. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method, based on Zernike moments, outperforms two well-known methods, namely those based on Hu moments and boundary moments. This method has stronger distinguishing ability, showing better performance in discriminating cell images whether belong to the same cell.

  9. clinical: imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), with asso- ciation between HAD and both diffuse atrophy with ventricular dilatation9 and deep white matter lesions. Furthermore, a correlation between declining cognitive function and the loss of volume in certain brain struc- tures, including the basal ganglia and caudate nucleus,.

  10. Geriatric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe [Scientific Institute Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Peh, Wilfred C.G. [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Guermazi, Ali (eds.) [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-08-01

    Considers all aspect of geriatric imaging. Explains clearly how to distinguish the healthy elderly from those in need of treatment. Superbly illustrated. Written by recognized experts in field. In the elderly, the coexistence of various diseases, the presence of involutional and degenerative changes, and the occurrence of both physical and cognitive problems represent ''the norm.'' It is therefore important to know how to distinguish the healthy elderly from those in need of treatment as a sound basis for avoiding overdiagnosis and overtreatment. This aspect is a central theme in Geriatric Imaging, which covers a wide range of applications of different imaging techniques and clearly explains both the potential and the limitations of diagnostic imaging in geriatric patients. Individual sections are devoted to each major region or system of the body, and a concluding section focuses specifically on interventional procedures. The book, written by recognized experts in the field, is superbly illustrated and will be an ideal resource for geriatricians, radiologists, and trainees.

  11. Biblical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yeshayahu

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Marjorie Munsterberg's review of "The Bible and the Image: The History of Photography in the Holy Land 1839-1899." Claims that Munsterberg provided an incomplete and inaccurate knowledge of the book's content, and that she considered Western pictorial traditions as the only valid measure in the study of the history of…

  12. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    from text, image to object. An empirical study, based on 17 newspaper archives, demonstrates user group requirements including archivists (creators), journalists (immediate users), and newspaper readers (end-users). A word association test is completed and the terms are used to build a user interface...

  13. Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeesu Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

  14. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  15. Ultrasound in Radiology: from Anatomic, Functional, Molecular Imaging to Drug Delivery and Image-Guided Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, ultrasound has expanded medical imaging well beyond the “traditional” radiology setting - a combination of portability, low cost and ease of use makes ultrasound imaging an indispensable tool for radiologists as well as for other medical professionals who need to obtain imaging diagnosis or guide a therapeutic intervention quickly and efficiently. Ultrasound combines excellent ability for deep penetration into soft tissues with very good spatial resolution, with only a few exceptions (i.e. those involving overlying bone or gas). Real-time imaging (up to hundreds and thousands frames per second) enables guidance of therapeutic procedures and biopsies; characterization of the mechanical properties of the tissues greatly aids with the accuracy of the procedures. The ability of ultrasound to deposit energy locally brings about the potential for localized intervention encompassing: tissue ablation, enhancing penetration through the natural barriers to drug delivery in the body and triggering drug release from carrier micro- and nanoparticles. The use of microbubble contrast agents brings the ability to monitor and quantify tissue perfusion, and microbubble targeting with ligand-decorated microbubbles brings the ability to obtain molecular biomarker information, i.e., ultrasound molecular imaging. Overall, ultrasound has become the most widely used imaging modality in modern medicine; it will continue to grow and expand. PMID:26200224

  16. Metal derivatives of heterocyclic-2-thiones: Variable donor ability, C ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    thiones: Variable donor ability,. C–S rupture and new structural motifs. TARLOK S LOBANA. ∗ and RAZIA SULTANA. Department of Chemistry, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143 005, India e-mail: tarlokslobana@yahoo.co.in. Abstract.

  17. The effect of phonological development on reading ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panić Marijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a research obtained by examining the level of development of phonological skill and its influence on reading ability. The sample included 36 children of the second grade of regular elementary school (15 boys and 21 girls, average age: 8years and 8 months. The measuring instruments were: the Articulation Test, Repetition of Words and Logotomes Test, Phonemes Deletion Tasks, Voice Analysis Test, Voice Synthesis Test and Three-dimensional Reading Test. It was established that reading ability was not statistically significantly linked with voice articulation and voice analysis, but there was a statistically significant connection between reading ability and repetition of words and logotomes, phoneme deletion and voice synthesis. The reading ability is primarily determined by phonological skills of voice synthesis, phoneme deletion and repetition of words and logotomes. Extremely important is to develop cognitive functions and processes such as working (phonological memory, phonological elaboration, lexical representation, auditive perception and discrimination.

  18. Creativity and technical innovation: spatial ability's unique role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Benbow, Camilla P; Steiger, James H

    2013-09-01

    In the late 1970s, 563 intellectually talented 13-year-olds (identified by the SAT as in the top 0.5% of ability) were assessed on spatial ability. More than 30 years later, the present study evaluated whether spatial ability provided incremental validity (beyond the SAT's mathematical and verbal reasoning subtests) for differentially predicting which of these individuals had patents and three classes of refereed publications. A two-step discriminant-function analysis revealed that the SAT subtests jointly accounted for 10.8% of the variance among these outcomes (p organizational psychology. Spatial ability plays a key and unique role in structuring many important psychological phenomena and should be examined more broadly across the applied and basic psychological sciences.

  19. Resting alpha activity predicts learning ability in alpha neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya eNan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to learn how to regulate the alpha activity by neurofeedback. This study aimed to investigate whether the resting alpha activity is related to the learning ability of alpha enhancement in neurofeedback and could be used as a predictor. A total of 25 subjects performed 20 sessions of individualized alpha neurofeedback in order to learn how to enhance activity in the alpha frequency band. The learning ability was assessed by three indices respectively: the training parameter changes between two periods, within a short period and across the whole training time. It was found that the resting alpha amplitude measured before training had significant positive correlations with all learning indices and could be used as a predictor for the learning ability prediction. This finding would help the researchers in not only predicting the training efficacy in individuals but also gaining further insight into the mechanisms of alpha neurofeedback.

  20. Is playing video games related to cognitive abilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; Redick, Thomas S; McMillan, Brittany D; Hambrick, David Z; Kane, Michael J; Engle, Randall W

    2015-06-01

    The relations between video-game experience and cognitive abilities were examined in the current study. In two experiments, subjects performed a number of working memory, fluid intelligence, and attention-control measures and filled out a questionnaire about their video-game experience. In Experiment 1, an extreme-groups analysis indicated that experienced video-game players outperformed nonplayers on several cognitive-ability measures. However, in Experiments 1 and 2, when analyses examined the full range of subjects at both the task level and the latent-construct level, nearly all of the relations between video-game experience and cognitive abilities were near zero. These results cast doubt on recent claims that playing video games leads to enhanced cognitive abilities. Statistical and methodological issues with prior studies of video-game experience are discussed along with recommendations for future studies. © The Author(s) 2015.