WorldWideScience

Sample records for sub-daily time scales

  1. Evapotranspiration partition at sub-daily scale using laser and chamber techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Parkes, S. D.; McCabe, M. F.; Azcurra, C.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning is important for quantifying the water budget and understanding vegetation control on water cycles in various ecosystems. With the development of spectroscopy-based techniques for in-situ isotope measurements, the use of stable isotope based ET partition is rising rapidly. The sub-daily scale ET partition, however, is still rarely seen in the literature. In this study, we conducted an intensive field campaign measuring ET partition using laser-based isotope and chamber techniques in a pasture system between May and June 2012 in eastern Australia. Six soil collars were used, three of which had natural vegetation and the other three were bare soil collars where vegetation was artificially removed. The vegetated and bare soil collars were used to determine the isotopic composition of ET and evaporation, respectively. The isotopic composition of the transpiration flux was determined using a Licor leaf chamber for grasses inside the vegetated collars. The diurnal patterns in isotopic compositions were observed. In the morning, the isotopic compositions were depleted. The isotopic composition of ET became more enriched and leveled off during midday. Similar patterns were found for the isotopic composition of evaporation. Overall the total ET flux over the campaign was dominated by evaporation, though transpiration contributions were high between 10am and 12pm. This study demonstrated the use of chamber-based measurements for direct partitioning of ET at sub-daily scale and showed a rarely observed diurnal pattern of ET partition.

  2. The analogue method for precipitation prediction: finding better analogue situations at a sub-daily time step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Pascal; Obled, Charles; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Analogue methods (AMs) predict local weather variables (predictands) such as precipitation by means of a statistical relationship with predictors at a synoptic scale. The analogy is generally assessed on gradients of geopotential heights first to sample days with a similar atmospheric circulation. Other predictors such as moisture variables can also be added in a successive level of analogy. The search for candidate situations similar to a given target day is usually undertaken by comparing the state of the atmosphere at fixed hours of the day for both the target day and the candidate analogues. This is a consequence of using standard daily precipitation time series, which are available over longer periods than sub-daily data. However, it is unlikely for the best analogy to occur at the exact same hour for the target and candidate situations. A better analogue situation may be found with a time shift of several hours since a better fit can occur at different times of the day. In order to assess the potential for finding better analogues at a different hour, a moving time window (MTW) has been introduced. The MTW resulted in a better analogy in terms of the atmospheric circulation and showed improved values of the analogy criterion on the entire distribution of the extracted analogue dates. The improvement was found to increase with the analogue rank due to an accumulation of better analogues in the selection. A seasonal effect has also been identified, with larger improvements shown in winter than in summer. This may be attributed to stronger diurnal cycles in summer that favour predictors taken at the same hour for the target and analogue days. The impact of the MTW on the precipitation prediction skill has been assessed by means of a sub-daily precipitation series transformed into moving 24 h totals at 12, 6, and 3 h time steps. The prediction skill was improved by the MTW, as was the reliability of the prediction. Moreover, the improvements were greater for days

  3. ESOLIP - estimate of solid and liquid precipitation at sub-daily time resolution by combining snow height and rain gauge measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, E.; Bertoldi, G.; Leitinger, G.; Della Chiesa, S.; Niedrist, G.; Tappeiner, U.

    2013-07-01

    Measuring precipitation in mountain areas is a demanding task, but essential for hydrological and environmental themes. Especially in small Alpine catchments with short hydrological response, precipitation data with high temporal resolution are required for a better understanding of the hydrological cycle. Since most climate/meteorological stations are situated at the easily accessible bottom of valleys, and the few heated rain gauges installed at higher elevation sites are problematic in winter conditions, an accurate quantification of winter (snow) precipitation at high elevations remains difficult. However, there are an increasing number of micro-meteorological stations and snow height sensors at high elevation locations in Alpine catchments. To benefit from data of such stations, an improved approach to estimate solid and liquid precipitation (ESOLIP) is proposed. ESOLIP allows gathering hourly precipitation data throughout the year by using unheated rain gauge data, careful filtering of snow height sensors as well as standard meteorological data (air temperature, relative humidity, global shortwave radiation, wind speed). ESOLIP was validated at a well-equipped test site in Stubai Valley (Tyrol, Austria), comparing results to winter precipitation measured with a snow pillow and a heated rain gauge. The snow height filtering routine and indicators for possible precipitation were tested at a field site in Matsch Valley (South Tyrol, Italy). Results show a good match with measured data because variable snow density is taken into account, which is important when working with freshly fallen snow. Furthermore, the results show the need for accurate filtering of the noise of the snow height signal and they confirm the unreliability of heated rain gauges for estimating winter precipitation. The described improved precipitation estimate ESOLIP at sub-daily time resolution is helpful for precipitation analysis and for several hydrological applications like monitoring

  4. Modelling in-stream temperature and dissolved oxygen at sub-daily time steps: an application to the River Kennet, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard J; Boorman, David B

    2012-04-15

    The River Kennet in southern England shows a clear diurnal signal in both water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations through the summer months. The water quality model QUESTOR was applied in a stepwise manner (adding modelled processes or additional data) to simulate the flow, water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations along a 14 km reach. The aim of the stepwise model building was to find the simplest process-based model which simulated the observed behaviour accurately. The upstream boundary used was a diurnal signal of hourly measurements of water temperature and dissolved oxygen. In the initial simulations, the amplitude of the signal quickly reduced to zero as it was routed through the model; a behaviour not seen in the observed data. In order to keep the correct timing and amplitude of water temperature a heating term had to be introduced into the model. For dissolved oxygen, primary production from macrophytes was introduced to better simulate the oxygen pattern. Following the modifications an excellent simulation of both water temperature and dissolved oxygen was possible at an hourly resolution. It is interesting to note that it was not necessary to include nutrient limitation to the primary production model. The resulting model is not sufficiently proven to support river management but suggests that the approach has some validity and merits further development. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of methods to estimate future sub-daily design rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Johnson, F.; Evans, J.; Sharma, A.

    2017-12-01

    Warmer temperatures are expected to increase extreme short-duration rainfall due to the increased moisture-holding capacity of the atmosphere. While attention has been paid to the impacts of climate change on future design rainfalls at daily or longer time scales, the potential changes in short duration design rainfalls have been often overlooked due to the limited availability of sub-daily projections and observations. This study uses a high-resolution regional climate model (RCM) to predict the changes in sub-daily design rainfalls for the Greater Sydney region in Australia. Sixteen methods for predicting changes to sub-daily future extremes are assessed based on different options for bias correction, disaggregation and frequency analysis. A Monte Carlo cross-validation procedure is employed to evaluate the skill of each method in estimating the design rainfall for the current climate. It is found that bias correction significantly improves the accuracy of the design rainfall estimated for the current climate. For 1 h events, bias correcting the hourly annual maximum rainfall simulated by the RCM produces design rainfall closest to observations, whereas for multi-hour events, disaggregating the daily rainfall total is recommended. This suggests that the RCM fails to simulate the observed multi-duration rainfall persistence, which is a common issue for most climate models. Despite the significant differences in the estimated design rainfalls between different methods, all methods lead to an increase in design rainfalls across the majority of the study region.

  6. WegenerNet 1km-scale sub-daily rainfall data and their application: a hydrological modeling study on the sensitivity of small-catchment runoff to spatial rainfall variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sungmin; Hohmann, Clara; Foelsche, Ulrich; Fuchsberger, Jürgen; Rieger, Wolfgang; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2017-04-01

    WegenerNet Feldbach region (WEGN), a pioneering experiment for weather and climate observations, has recently completed its first 10-year precipitation measurement cycle. The WEGN has measured precipitation, temperature, humidity, and other parameters since the beginning of 2007, supporting local-level monitoring and modeling studies, over an area of about 20 km x 15 km centered near the City of Feldbach (46.93 ˚ N, 15.90 ˚ E) in the Alpine forelands of southeast Austria. All the 151 stations in the network are now equipped with high-quality Meteoservis sensors as of August 2016, following an equipment with Friedrichs sensors at most stations before, and continue to provide high-resolution (2 km2/5-min) gauge based precipitation measurements for interested users in hydro-meteorological communities. Here we will present overall characteristics of the WEGN, with a focus on sub-daily precipitation measurements, from the data processing (data quality control, gridded data products generation, etc.) to data applications (e.g., ground validation of satellite estimates). The latter includes our recent study on the propagation of uncertainty from rainfall to runoff. The study assesses responses of small-catchment runoff to spatial rainfall variability in the WEGN region over the Raab valley, using a physics-based distributed hydrological model; Water Flow and Balance Simulation Model (WaSiM), developed at ETH Zurich (Schulla, ETH Zurich, 1997). Given that uncertainty due to resolution of rainfall measurements is believed to be a significant source of error in hydrologic modeling especially for convective rainfall that dominates in the region during summer, the high-resolution of WEGN data furnishes a great opportunity to analyze effects of rainfall events on the runoff at different spatial resolutions. Furthermore, the assessment can be conducted not only for the lower Raab catchment (area of about 500 km2) but also for its sub-catchments (areas of about 30-70 km2

  7. SDCLIREF - A sub-daily gridded reference dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Raul R.; Willkofer, Florian; Schmid, Franz-Josef; Trentini, Fabian; Komischke, Holger; Ludwig, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is expected to impact the intensity and frequency of hydrometeorological extreme events. In order to adequately capture and analyze extreme rainfall events, in particular when assessing flood and flash flood situations, data is required at high spatial and sub-daily resolution which is often not available in sufficient density and over extended time periods. The ClimEx project (Climate Change and Hydrological Extreme Events) addresses the alteration of hydrological extreme events under climate change conditions. In order to differentiate between a clear climate change signal and the limits of natural variability, unique Single-Model Regional Climate Model Ensembles (CRCM5 driven by CanESM2, RCP8.5) were created for a European and North-American domain, each comprising 50 members of 150 years (1951-2100). In combination with the CORDEX-Database, this newly created ClimEx-Ensemble is a one-of-a-kind model dataset to analyze changes of sub-daily extreme events. For the purpose of bias-correcting the regional climate model ensembles as well as for the baseline calibration and validation of hydrological catchment models, a new sub-daily (3h) high-resolution (500m) gridded reference dataset (SDCLIREF) was created for a domain covering the Upper Danube and Main watersheds ( 100.000km2). As the sub-daily observations lack a continuous time series for the reference period 1980-2010, the need for a suitable method to bridge the gap of the discontinuous time series arouse. The Method of Fragments (Sharma and Srikanthan (2006); Westra et al. (2012)) was applied to transform daily observations to sub-daily rainfall events to extend the time series and densify the station network. Prior to applying the Method of Fragments and creating the gridded dataset using rigorous interpolation routines, data collection of observations, operated by several institutions in three countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland), and the subsequent quality control of the observations

  8. Cardiovascular effects of sub-daily levels of ambient fine particles: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perron Stéphane

    2010-06-01

    fraction and concurrent gaseous pollutant exposures. Experimental studies appear more promising for elucidating the physiological mechanisms, time courses and causes than epidemiological studies which employ central pollution monitors for measuring effects and for assessing their time course. Although further studies are needed to strengthen the evidence, given that exposure to sub-daily high levels of PM (for a few hours is frequent and given the suggestive evidence that sub-daily PM exposures are associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular effects, we recommend that persons with cardiovascular diseases avoid such situations.

  9. Combination of radar and daily precipitation data to estimate meaningful sub-daily point precipitation extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Geoff; Bardossy, Andras; Sinclair, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The use of radar measurements for the space time estimation of precipitation has for many decades been a central topic in hydro-meteorology. In this presentation we are interested specifically in daily and sub-daily extreme values of precipitation at gauged or ungauged locations which are important for design. The purpose of the presentation is to develop a methodology to combine daily precipitation observations and radar measurements to estimate sub-daily extremes at point locations. Radar data corrected using precipitation-reflectivity relationships lead to biased estimations of extremes. Different possibilities of correcting systematic errors using the daily observations are investigated. Observed gauged daily amounts are interpolated to un-sampled points and subsequently disaggregated using the sub-daily values obtained by the radar. Different corrections based on the spatial variability and the sub-daily entropy of scaled rainfall distributions are used to provide unbiased corrections of short duration extremes. In addition, a statistical procedure not based on a matching day by day correction is tested. In this last procedure, as we are only interested in rare extremes, low to medium values of rainfall depth were neglected leaving 12 days of ranked daily maxima in each set per year, whose sum typically comprises about 50% of each annual rainfall total. The sum of these 12 day maxima is first interpolated using a Kriging procedure. Subsequently this sum is disaggregated to daily values using a nearest neighbour procedure. The daily sums are then disaggregated by using the relative values of the biggest 12 radar based days in each year. Of course, the timings of radar and gauge maxima can be different, so the new method presented here uses radar for disaggregating daily gauge totals down to 15 min intervals in order to extract the maxima of sub-hourly through to daily rainfall. The methodologies were tested in South Africa, where an S-band radar operated

  10. A graphical approach to characterize sub-daily flow regimes and evaluate its alterations due to hydropeaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carlos; Román, Alfonso; Bejarano, Maria Dolores; Garcia de Jalon, Diego; Carolli, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Most flow regime characterizations focus on long time scale flow patterns, which are not precise enough to capture key components of short-term flow fluctuations. Recent proposed methods describing sub-daily flow fluctuations are focused on limited components of the flow regime being unable to fully represent it, or on the identification of peaking events based on subjectively defined thresholds, being unsuitable for evaluations of short-term flow regime alterations through comparisons between regulated and free-flowing rivers. This study aims to launch an innovative approach based on the visual display of quantitative information to address the challenge of the short-term hydrologic characterization and evaluation of alteration resulting from hydropeaking. We propose a graphical method to represent a discrete set of ecologically relevant indices that characterize and evaluate the alteration of sub-daily flow regimes. The frequency of occurrence of classified values of a descriptive hydrological variable is represented in a map-like graph where longitude, latitude and altitude represent the Julian day, the value of the variable and the frequency of occurrence, respectively. Subsequently, we tested the method on several rivers, both free-flowing and subjected to hydropower production. The advantages of our approach compared to other analytical methods are: (i) it displays a great amount of information without oversimplification; (ii) it takes into account changes in the intensity, timing and frequency of the sub-daily flows, without needing a priori defined thresholds to identify hydropeaking events; and (iii) it supports the Water Framework Directive goal. Specifically, results from applications of our graphical method agree with Sauterleute and Charmasson (2014) analytical method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Creating a global sub-daily precipitation dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley

    2017-04-01

    Extremes of precipitation can cause flooding and droughts which can lead to substantial damages to infrastructure and ecosystems and can result in loss of life. It is still uncertain how hydrological extremes will change with global warming as we do not fully understand the processes that cause extreme precipitation under current climate variability. The INTENSE project is using a novel and fully-integrated data-modelling approach to provide a step-change in our understanding of the nature and drivers of global precipitation extremes and change on societally relevant timescales, leading to improved high-resolution climate model representation of extreme rainfall processes. The INTENSE project is in conjunction with the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP)'s Grand Challenge on 'Understanding and Predicting Weather and Climate Extremes' and the Global Water and Energy Exchanges Project (GEWEX) Science questions. The first step towards achieving this is to construct a new global sub-daily precipitation dataset. Data collection is ongoing and already covers North America, Europe, Asia and Australasia. Comprehensive, open source quality control software is being developed to set a new standard for verifying sub-daily precipitation data and a set of global hydroclimatic indices will be produced based upon stakeholder recommendations. This will provide a unique global data resource on sub-daily precipitation whose derived indices, e.g. monthly/annual maxima, will be freely available to the wider scientific community.

  12. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dong-shan; Gao, Yu-ping; Zhao, Shu-hong

    2017-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observations are not evenly sampled, and the internals between two data points range from several hours to more than half a month. Further more, these data sets are sparse. All this makes it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, a cubic spline interpolation is used to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points uniform. Then, the Vondrak filter is employed to smooth the data set, and get rid of the high-frequency noises, and finally the weighted average method is adopted to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The newly released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set is used to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set includes the 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars observed by the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and the 305-meter Arecibo telescope. It is found that the algorithm used in this paper can reduce effectively the influence caused by the noises in pulsar timing residuals, and improve the long-term stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale. Results indicate that the long-term (> 1 yr) stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale is better than 3.4 × 10-15.

  13. Calculation of new snow densities from sub-daily automated snow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfricht, Kay; Hartl, Lea; Koch, Roland; Marty, Christoph; Lehning, Michael; Olefs, Marc

    2017-04-01

    :10 approximation (i.e. 100 kgm-3), which is mainly based on daily values in the Alps. Variations in new snow density could not be explained in a satisfactory manner using meteorological data measured at the same location. Likewise, some of the tested parametrizations of new snow density, which primarily use air temperature as a proxy, result in median new snow densities close to the ones from automated measurements, but show only a low correlation between calculated and measured new snow densities. The case study on the influence of snow settling on HN resulted on average in an underestimation of HN by 17%, which corresponds to 2-3% of the cumulated HN from the previous 24 hours. Therefore, the mean hourly new snow densities may be overestimated by 14%. The analysis in this study is especially limited with respect to the meteorological influence on the HS measurement using ultra-sonic rangers. Nevertheless, the reasonable mean values encourage calculating new snow densities from standard hydro-meteorological measurements using more precise observation devices such as optical snow depth sensors and more sensitive scales for SWE measurements also on sub-daily time-scales.

  14. Simulating sub-daily Intensity-Frequency-Duration curves in Australia using a dynamical high-resolution regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegna, Gabriel A.; White, Christopher J.; Remenyi, Tomas A.; Corney, Stuart P.; Fox-Hughes, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Climate change has the potential to significantly alter the characteristics of high-intensity, short-duration rainfall events, potentially leading to more severe and more frequent flash floods. Research has shown that future changes to such events could far exceed expectations based on temperature scaling and basic physical principles alone, but that computationally expensive convection-permitting models are required to accurately simulate sub-daily extreme rainfall events. It is therefore crucial to be able to model future changes to sub-daily duration extreme rainfall events as cost effectively as possible, especially in Australia where such information is scarce. In this study, we seek to determine what the shortest duration of extreme rainfall is that can be simulated by a less computationally expensive convection-parametrizing Regional Climate Model (RCM). We examine the ability of the Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM), a ∼10 km high-resolution convection-parametrizing RCM, to reproduce sub-daily Intensity-Frequency-Duration (IFD) curves corresponding to two long-term observational stations in the Australian island state of Tasmania, and examine the future model projections. We find that CCAM simulates observed extreme rainfall statistics well for 3-h durations and longer, challenging the current understanding that convection-permitting models are needed to accurately model sub-daily extreme rainfall events. Further, future projections from CCAM for the end of this Century show that extreme sub-daily rainfall intensities could increase by more than 15% per °C, far exceeding the 7% scaling estimate predicted by the Clausius-Clapeyron vapour pressure relationship and the 5% scaling estimate recommended by the Australian Rainfall and Runoff guide.

  15. Sub-daily precipitation disaggregation for a simulation of annual runoff maxima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Anna; Seibert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Measurement of precipitation has been often restricted to daily totals only. This applies especially to observations from the previous century which constitutes a valuable source of long-term precipitation records needed for statistical analysis such as for annual runoff maxima. In this respect, the knowledge about the exact temporal distribution of these precipitation totals at sub-daily time steps can play an important role on the magnitude of simulated runoff maxima using these data. But it is difficult to estimate the sub-daily temporal distribution of precipitation if it was not measured. Instead, the effect of the precipitation in the form of runoff measured at the catchment outlet, which is usually available at sub-daily time steps for longer periods, provides an alternative to evaluate the potential effect of the need to disaggregate precipitation data. In this study we assess how the choice of the temporal distribution of daily precipitation totals might affect the simulation of the catchment runoff annual maxima when using a hydrological model. To examine this issue, we tested six different settings of precipitation total distribution within the day. These are: 1) uniform distribution (daily totals uniquely divided over 24 hours); all daily totals fall within a respective time window, i.e., 2) one hour, 3) two successive hours, 4) three successive hours, 5) six successive hours, and 6) twelve successive hours, each time randomly selected for each observation day independently. To assess the effect on simulated runoff maxima, such generated hourly precipitation datasets were next used as input into a pre-calibrated HBV model. As a reference, we used model simulations with observed hourly precipitation data. This study was conducted using thirty years of precipitation and runoff observations in three Swiss catchments. Our results showed that the annual maxima were best simulated when distributing daily totals over twelve successive hours randomly selected

  16. Characterizing effects of hydropower plants on sub-daily flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, María Dolores; Sordo-Ward, Álvaro; Alonso, Carlos; Nilsson, Christer

    2017-07-01

    A characterization of short-term changes in river flow is essential for understanding the ecological effects of hydropower plants, which operate by turning the turbines on or off to generate electricity following variations in the market demand (i.e., hydropeaking). The goal of our study was to develop an approach for characterizing the effects of hydropower plant operations on within-day flow regimes across multiple dams and rivers. For this aim we first defined ecologically meaningful metrics that provide a full representation of the flow regime at short time scales from free-flowing rivers and rivers exposed to hydropeaking. We then defined metrics that enable quantification of the deviation of the altered short-term flow regime variables from those of the unaltered state. The approach was successfully tested in two rivers in northern Sweden, one free-flowing and another regulated by cascades of hydropower plants, which were additionally classified based on their impact on short-term flows in sites of similar management. The largest differences between study sites corresponded to metrics describing sub-daily flow magnitudes such as amplitude (i.e., difference between the highest and the lowest hourly flows) and rates (i.e., rise and fall rates of hourly flows). They were closely followed by frequency-related metrics accounting for the numbers of within-day hourly flow patterns (i.e., rises, falls and periods of stability of hourly flows). In comparison, between-site differences for the duration-related metrics were smallest. In general, hydropeaking resulted in higher within-day flow amplitudes and rates and more but shorter periods of a similar hourly flow patterns per day. The impacted flow feature and the characteristics of the impact (i.e., intensity and whether the impact increases or decreases whatever is being described by the metric) varied with season. Our approach is useful for catchment management planning, defining environmental flow targets

  17. Development of stream-subsurface flow module in sub-daily simulation of Escherichia coli using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjeong; Boithias, Laurie; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Silvera, Norbert; Thammahacksa, Chanthamousone; Latsachack, Keooudone; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Pierret, Alain; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Water contaminated with pathogenic bacteria poses a large threat to public health, especially in the rural areas in the tropics where sanitation and drinking water facilities are often lacking. Several studies have used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to predict the export of in-stream bacteria at a watershed-scale. However, SWAT is limited to in-stream processes, such as die-off, resuspension and, deposition; and it is usually implemented on a daily time step using the SCS Curve Number method, making it difficult to explore the dynamic fate and transport of bacteria during short but intense events such as flash floods in tropical humid montane headwaters. To address these issues, this study implemented SWAT on an hourly time step using the Green-Ampt infiltration method, and tested the effects of subsurface flow (LATQ+GWQ in SWAT) on bacterial dynamics. We applied the modified SWAT model to the 60-ha Houay Pano catchment in Northern Laos, using sub-daily rainfall and discharge measurements, electric conductivity-derived fractions of overland and subsurface flows, suspended sediments concentrations, and the number of fecal indicator organism Escherichia coli monitored at the catchment outlet from 2011 to 2013. We also took into account land use change by delineating the watershed with the 3-year composite land use map. The results show that low subsurface flow of less than 1 mm recovered the underestimation of E. coli numbers during the dry season, while high subsurface flow caused an overestimation during the wet season. We also found that it is more reasonable to apply the stream-subsurface flow interaction to simulate low in-stream bacteria counts. Using fecal bacteria to identify and understand the possible interactions between overland and subsurface flows may well also provide some insight into the fate of other bacteria, such as those involved in biogeochemical fluxes both in-stream and in the adjacent soils and hyporheic zones.

  18. Combining Radar and Daily Precipitation Data to Estimate Meaningful Sub-daily Precipitation Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, G. G. S.; Bardossy, A.

    2016-12-01

    Short duration extreme rainfalls are important for design. The purpose of this presentation is not to improve the day by day estimation of precipitation, but to obtain reasonable statistics for the subdaily extremes at gauge locations. We are interested specifically in daily and sub-daily extreme values of precipitation at gauge locations. We do not employ the common procedure of using time series of control station to determine the missing data values in a target. We are interested in individual rare events, not sequences. The idea is to use radar to disaggregate daily totals to sub-daily amounts. In South Arica, an S-band radar operated relatively continuously at Bethlehem from 1998 to 2003, whose scan at 1.5 km above ground [CAPPI] overlapped a dense (10 km spacing) set of 45 pluviometers recording in the same 6-year period. Using this valuable set of data, we are only interested in rare extremes, therefore small to medium values of rainfall depth were neglected, leaving 12 days of ranked daily maxima in each set per year, whose sum typically comprised about 50% of each annual rainfall total. The method presented here uses radar for disaggregating daily gauge totals in subdaily intervals down to 15 minutes in order to extract the maxima of sub-hourly through to daily rainfall at each of 37 selected radar pixels [1 km square in plan] which contained one of the 45 pluviometers not masked out by the radar foot-print. The pluviometer data were aggregated to daily totals, to act as if they were daily read gauges; their only other task was to help in the cross-validation exercise. The extrema were obtained as quantiles by ordering the 12 daily maxima of each interval per year. The unusual and novel goal was not to obtain the reproduction of the precipitation matching in space and time, but to obtain frequency distributions of the gauge and radar extremes, by matching their ranks, which we found to be stable and meaningful in cross-validation tests. We provide and

  19. Relating precipitation to fronts at a sub-daily basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Riccardo; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Gouveia, Célia

    2017-04-01

    High impact events over Western Iberia include precipitation extremes that are cause for concern as they lead to flooding, landslides, extensive property damage and human casualties. These events are usually associated with low pressure systems over the North Atlantic moving eastward towards the European western coasts (Liberato and Trigo, 2014). A method to detect fronts and to associate amounts of precipitation to each front is tested, distinguishing between warm and cold fronts. The 6-hourly ERA-interim 1979-2012 reanalysis with 1°x1° horizontal resolution is used for the purpose. An objective front identification method (the Thermal Method described in Shemm et al., 2014) is applied to locate fronts all over the Northern Hemisphere considering the equivalent potential temperature as thermal parameter to use in the model. On the other hand, we settled a squared search box of tuneable dimension (from 2 to 10 degrees long) to look for a front in the neighbourhood of a grid point affected by precipitation. A sensitivity analysis is performed and the optimal dimension of the box is assessed in order to avoid over(under) estimation of precipitation. This is performed in the light of the variability and typical dynamics of warm/cold frontal systems in the Western Europe region. Afterwards, using the extreme event ranking over Iberia proposed by Ramos et al. (2014) the first ranked extreme events are selected in order to validate the method with specific case studies. Finally, climatological and trend maps of frontal activity are produced both on annual and seasonal scales. Trend maps show a decrease of frontal precipitation over north-western Europe and a slight increase over south-western Europe, mainly due to warm fronts. REFERENCES Liberato M.L.R. and R.M. Trigo (2014) Extreme precipitation events and related impacts in Western Iberia. Hydrology in a Changing World: Environmental and Human Dimensions. IAHS Red Book No 363, 171-176. ISSN: 0144-7815. Ramos A.M., R

  20. Expanding HadISD: quality-controlled, sub-daily station data from 1931

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert J. H.; Willett, Kate M.; Parker, David E.; Mitchell, Lorna

    2016-09-01

    HadISD is a sub-daily, station-based, quality-controlled dataset designed to study past extremes of temperature, pressure and humidity and allow comparisons to future projections. Herein we describe the first major update to the HadISD dataset. The temporal coverage of the dataset has been extended to 1931 to present, doubling the time range over which data are provided. Improvements made to the station selection and merging procedures result in 7677 stations being provided in version 2.0.0.2015p of this dataset. The selection of stations to merge together making composites has also been improved and made more robust. The underlying structure of the quality control procedure is the same as for HadISD.1.0.x, but a number of improvements have been implemented in individual tests. Also, more detailed quality control tests for wind speed and direction have been added. The data will be made available as NetCDF files at http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadisd and updated annually.

  1. Time-frequency / time-scale analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Flandrin, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    This highly acclaimed work has so far been available only in French. It is a detailed survey of a variety of techniques for time-frequency/time-scale analysis (the essence of "Wavelet Analysis"). This book has broad and comprehensive coverage of a topic of keen interest to a variety of engineers, especially those concerned with signal and image processing. Flandrin provides a discussion of numerous issues and problems that arise from a mixed description in time and frequency, as well as problems in interpretation inherent in signal theory. Key Features * Detailed coverage of both linear and quadratic solutions * Various techniques for both random and deterministic signals.

  2. Integral equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of integral equations on time scales. It also contains elegant analytical and numerical methods. This book is primarily intended for senior undergraduate students and beginning graduate students of engineering and science courses. The students in mathematical and physical sciences will find many sections of direct relevance. The book contains nine chapters and each chapter is pedagogically organized. This book is specially designed for those who wish to understand integral equations on time scales without having extensive mathematical background.

  3. Characteristics of sub-daily precipitation extremes in observed data and regional climate model simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, Romana; Kyselý, Jan; Hanel, M.

    in press (2017) ISSN 0177-798X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-18675S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : sub-daily precipitation * regional climate models * extremes * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.640, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00704-017-2102-0

  4. Sub-daily extreme events distribution and changes in Northeastern Brazil in the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Basso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regional analysis of extreme hydrological events is connected with the availability of a dense network of rainfall data that is absent or inaccessible in Brazil, especially for sub-daily information. In engineering, extreme events rainfall information is represented by intensity–duration–frequency (IDF relationships which are the most commonly used tools in water resources engineering for planning and design. Even if the sub-daily information that is included in the relationships is not available, the extreme rainfall information rest in the fundamentals of the IDF. This paper analyzes spatial distribution and track changes in sub-daily precipitation over Northeastern (NE Brazil. Precipitation was estimated from IDF relationships information in Brazil based in rainfall measured from 1920's to 1950's (but still used in engineering projects and information from the last half of the 20th century obtained from several IDFs gathered from municipalities' manuals, local symposia and books in many cases not easily obtainable. Results showed an intensification of extreme events in recent years, especially in shorter duration rainfall (less than 12 h. Hourly rainfall is bigger in almost all the Brazilian region, but especially in littoral and Northern portion, however, 12 and 24 h rainfall exhibit increases in the North, but, lower values in the Southern half of the region in concordance with flood changes reported by Milly et al. (2005. Analyzing the ratio between 1 and 24 h rainfall is possible to confirm its increase in all the region, with up to 35% in some areas. These results were able to show insight of sub-daily extreme events changes during 20th century in NE Brazil were previous reports were not found. The results also alerts for the necessity of engineering projects review, as outdated information is still being used for design purposes.

  5. Enhancement of sub-daily positioning solutions for surface deformation monitoring at Deception volcano (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, G.; Berrocoso, M.; Fernández-Ros, A.; García, A.

    2013-02-01

    Deception Island is one of the most visited places in Antarctica. There are biological, geological, and archeological features that are major attractions within Port Foster, its horse shoe-shaped natural inner bay, and two scientific bases that are occupied during austral summers. Deception Island is an active volcano, however, and needs to be monitored in order to reduce risk to people on the island. Surface deformation in response to fluid pressure is one of the main volcanic activities to observe. Automated data acquisition and processing using the global navigation satellite systems allow measurements of surface deformation in near real time. Nevertheless, the positioning repeatability in sub-daily solutions is affected by geophysical influences such as ocean tidal loading, among others. Such periodic influences must be accurately modeled to achieve similar repeatability as daily solutions that average them. However, a single solution each 24 h will average out the deformation suffered during that period, and the position update waiting time can be a limitation for near real-time purposes. Throughout the last five austral summer campaigns in Deception, using simultaneous wireless communications between benchmarks, a processing strategy was developed to achieve millimeter-level half-hourly positioning solutions that have similar repeatability as those given by 24-h solutions. For these half-hourly solutions, a tidal analysis was performed to assess any mismodeling of ocean tide loading, and a discrete Kalman filter was designed and implemented to enhance the sub-daily positioning repeatability. With these solutions, the volcano-dynamic activity resulting in localized surface deformation for the last five austral summer campaigns is addressed. Although based on only three carefully located benchmarks, it is shown that Deception has been shortening and subsiding during these last 4 years. The method's accuracy in baselines up to a few hundred kilometers assures

  6. Time scales in spectator fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, C.; Fritz, S.; Bassini, R.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Gaff-Ejakov, S. J.; Gourio, D.; Groß, C.; Immé, G.; Iori, I.; Kleinevoß, U.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunze, W. D.; Lynen, U.; Maddalena, V.; Mahi, M.; Möhlenkamp, T.; Moroni, A.; Müller, W. F. J.; Nociforo, G.; Ocker, B.; Ohed, T.; Pertruzzelli, F.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F. P.; Saija, A.; Schnittker, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Seidel, W.; Serfling, V.; Sfienti, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trzcinski, A.; Verde, G.; Wörner, A.; Xi, Hongfei; Zwieglinski, B.

    2001-01-01

    Proton-proton correlations and correlations of p-alpha, d-alpha, and t-alpha from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations. PACS numbers: 25.70.Pq, 21.65.+f, 25.70.Mn

  7. Non-stationarity in daily and sub-daily intense rainfall – Part 1: Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jakob

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was driven by a need to clarify how variations in climate might affect intense rainfall and the potential for flooding. Sub-daily durations are of particular interest for urban applications. Worldwide, few such observation-based studies exist, which is mainly due to limitations in data. While there are still large discrepancies between precipitation data sets from observations and models, both show that there is a tendency for moist regions to become wetter and for dry regions to become drier. However, changes in extreme conditions may show the opposite sign to those in average conditions. Where changes in observed intense precipitation have been studied, this has typically been for daily durations or longer.

    The purpose of this two-part study is to examine daily and sub-daily rainfall extremes for evidence of non-stationarity. Here the problem was addressed by supplementing one long record (Part 1 by a set of shorter records for a 30-yr concurrent period (Part 2. Variations in frequency and magnitude of rainfall extremes across durations from 6 min to 72 h were assessed using data from sites in the south-east of Australia. For the analyses presented in this paper, a peaks-over-threshold approach was chosen since it allows investigating changes in frequency as well as magnitude. Non-parametric approaches were used to assess changes in frequency, magnitude, and quantile estimates as well as the statistical significance of changes for one station (Sydney Observatory Hill for the period 1921 to 2005. Deviations from the long-term average vary with season, duration, and threshold. The effects of climate variations are most readily detected for the highest thresholds. Deviations from the long-term average tend to be larger for frequencies than for magnitudes, and changes in frequency and magnitude may have opposite signs.

    Investigations presented in this paper show that variations in frequency and magnitude of events at

  8. Time scales, their users, and leap seconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Seago, John H.

    2011-08-01

    Numerous time scales exist to address specific user requirements. Accurate dynamical time scales (barycentric, geocentric and terrestrial) have been developed based on the theory of relativity. A family of time scales has been developed based on the rotation of the Earth that includes Universal Time (specifically UT1), which serves as the traditional astronomical basis of civil time. International Atomic Time (TAI) is also maintained as a fundamental time scale based on the output of atomic frequency standards. Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is an atomic scale for worldwide civil timekeeping, referenced to TAI, but with epoch adjustments via so-called leap seconds to remain within one second of UT1. A review of the development of the time scales, the status of the leap-second issue, and user considerations and perspectives are discussed. A description of some more recent applications for time usage is included.

  9. Regional frequency analysis of observed sub-daily rainfall maxima over eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hemin; Wang, Guojie; Li, Xiucang; Chen, Jing; Su, Buda; Jiang, Tong

    2017-02-01

    Based on hourly rainfall observational data from 442 stations during 1960-2014, a regional frequency analysis of the annual maxima (AM) sub-daily rainfall series (1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-h rainfall, using a moving window approach) for eastern China was conducted. Eastern China was divided into 13 homogeneous regions: Northeast (NE1, NE2), Central (C), Central North (CN1, CN2), Central East (CE1, CE2, CE3), Southeast (SE1, SE2, SE3, SE4), and Southwest (SW). The generalized extreme value performed best for the AM series in regions NE, C, CN2, CE1, CE2, SE2, and SW, and the generalized logistic distribution was appropriate in the other regions. Maximum return levels were in the SE4 region, with value ranges of 80-270 mm (1-h to 24-h rainfall) and 108-390 mm (1-h to 24-h rainfall) for 20- and 100 yr, respectively. Minimum return levels were in the CN1 and NE1 regions, with values of 37-104 mm and 53-140 mm for 20 and 100 yr, respectively. Comparing return levels using the optimal and commonly used Pearson-III distribution, the mean return-level differences in eastern China for 1-24-h rainfall varied from -3-4 mm to -23-11 mm (-10%-10%) for 20-yr events, reaching -6-26 mm (-10%-30%) and -10-133 mm (-10%-90%) for 100-yr events. In view of the large differences in estimated return levels, more attention should be given to frequency analysis of sub-daily rainfall over China, for improved water management and disaster reduction.

  10. Estimates of expansion time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expansion of a spacefaring civilization show that descendants of that civilization should be found near virtually every useful star in the Galaxy in a time much less than the current age of the Galaxy. Only extreme assumptions about local population growth rates, emigration rates, or ship ranges can slow or halt an expansion. The apparent absence of extraterrestrials from the solar system suggests that no such civilization has arisen in the Galaxy.

  11. Kalman plus weights: a time scale algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    KPW is a time scale algorithm that combines Kalman filtering with the basic time scale equation (BTSE). A single Kalman filter that estimates all clocks simultaneously is used to generate the BTSE frequency estimates, while the BTSE weights are inversely proportional to the white FM variances of the clocks. Results from simulated clock ensembles are compared to previous simulation results from other algorithms.

  12. Time Scale in Least Square Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Yeniay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of dynamic equations in time scale is a new area in mathematics. Time scale tries to build a bridge between real numbers and integers. Two derivatives in time scale have been introduced and called as delta and nabla derivative. Delta derivative concept is defined as forward direction, and nabla derivative concept is defined as backward direction. Within the scope of this study, we consider the method of obtaining parameters of regression equation of integer values through time scale. Therefore, we implemented least squares method according to derivative definition of time scale and obtained coefficients related to the model. Here, there exist two coefficients originating from forward and backward jump operators relevant to the same model, which are different from each other. Occurrence of such a situation is equal to total number of values of vertical deviation between regression equations and observation values of forward and backward jump operators divided by two. We also estimated coefficients for the model using ordinary least squares method. As a result, we made an introduction to least squares method on time scale. We think that time scale theory would be a new vision in least square especially when assumptions of linear regression are violated.

  13. New ERP predictions based on (sub-)daily ocean tides from satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. We have started a project, SPOT (Short Period Ocean Tidal variations in Earth Rotation), with the goal to develop a new model of short period Earth rotation variations based on one of the best currently available empirical ocean tide models obtained from satellite altimetry. We employ the EOT11a model which is an upgrade of EOT08a, developed at DGFI, Munich. As EOT11a does not provide the tidal current velocities which are fundamental contributors to Earth rotation excitation, the calculation of current velocities from the tidal elevations is one of three main areas of research in project SPOT. The second key aspect is the conversion from ocean tidal angular momentum to the corresponding ERP variations using state-of-the-art transfer functions. A peculiar innovation at this step will be to consider the Earth's response to ocean tidal loading based on a realistic Earth model, including an anelastic mantle. The third part of the project deals with the introduction of the effect of minor tides. Ocean tide models usually only provide major semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal terms and the minor tides have to be inferred through admittance assumptions. Within the proposed project, selected minor tidal terms and the corresponding ERP variations shall be derived directly from satellite altimetry data. We determine ocean tidal angular momentum of four diurnal and five sub-daily tides from EOT11a and apply the angular momentum approach to derive a new model of ocean tidal Earth rotation variations. This poster gives a detailed description of project SPOT as well as the status of work progress. First results are presented as well.

  14. Random integral equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Lupulescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the existence and uniqueness of random solution of a random integral equation of Volterra type on time scales. We also study the asymptotic properties of the unique random solution.

  15. JY1 time scale: a new Kalman-filter time scale designed at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jian; Parker, Thomas E.; Levine, Judah

    2017-11-01

    We report on a new Kalman-filter hydrogen-maser time scale (i.e. JY1 time scale) designed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The JY1 time scale is composed of a few hydrogen masers and a commercial Cs clock. The Cs clock is used as a reference clock to ease operations with existing data. Unlike other time scales, the JY1 time scale uses three basic time-scale equations, instead of only one equation. Also, this time scale can detect a clock error (i.e. time error, frequency error, or frequency drift error) automatically. These features make the JY1 time scale stiff and less likely to be affected by an abnormal clock. Tests show that the JY1 time scale deviates from the UTC by less than  ±5 ns for ~100 d, when the time scale is initially aligned to the UTC and then is completely free running. Once the time scale is steered to a Cs fountain, it can maintain the time with little error even if the Cs fountain stops working for tens of days. This can be helpful when we do not have a continuously operated fountain or when the continuously operated fountain accidentally stops, or when optical clocks run occasionally.

  16. Even order self adjoint time scale problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Anderson

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Even order self adjoint differential time scale expressions are introduced, together with associated self adjoint boundary conditions; the result is established by induction. Several fourth-order nabla-delta delta-nabla examples are given for select self adjoint boundary conditions, together with the specific corresponding Green's functions over common time scales. One derived Green's function is shown directly to be symmetric.

  17. Equilibration Time Scales of Physically Relevant Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pedro García-Pintos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of understanding, from first principles, the conditions under which a quantum system equilibrates rapidly with respect to a concrete observable. On the one hand, previously known general upper bounds on the time scales of equilibration were unrealistically long, with times scaling linearly with the dimension of the Hilbert space. These bounds proved to be tight since particular constructions of observables scaling in this way were found. On the other hand, the computed equilibration time scales for certain classes of typical measurements, or under the evolution of typical Hamiltonians, are unrealistically short. However, most physically relevant situations fall outside these two classes. In this paper, we provide a new upper bound on the equilibration time scales which, under some physically reasonable conditions, give much more realistic results than previously known. In particular, we apply this result to the paradigmatic case of a system interacting with a thermal bath, where we obtain an upper bound for the equilibration time scale independent of the size of the bath. In this way, we find general conditions that single out observables with realistic equilibration times within a physically relevant setup.

  18. Metabolic imaging in multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2014-03-15

    We report here a novel combination of time-resolved imaging methods for probing mitochondrial metabolism in multiple time scales at the level of single cells. By exploiting a mitochondrial membrane potential reporter fluorescence we demonstrate the single cell metabolic dynamics in time scales ranging from microseconds to seconds to minutes in response to glucose metabolism and mitochondrial perturbations in real time. Our results show that in comparison with normal human mammary epithelial cells, the breast cancer cells display significant alterations in metabolic responses at all measured time scales by single cell kinetics, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and by scaling analysis of time-series data obtained from mitochondrial fluorescence fluctuations. Furthermore scaling analysis of time-series data in living cells with distinct mitochondrial dysfunction also revealed significant metabolic differences thereby suggesting the broader applicability (e.g. in mitochondrial myopathies and other metabolic disorders) of the proposed strategies beyond the scope of cancer metabolism. We discuss the scope of these findings in the context of developing portable, real-time metabolic measurement systems that can find applications in preclinical and clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long term stability of atomic time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Gérard; Arias, Elisa Felicitas

    2012-08-01

    International Atomic Time TAI gets its stability from some 400 atomic clocks worldwide that generate the free atomic scale EA L and its accuracy from a small number of primary frequency standards (PFS) which frequency measurements are used to steer the EAL frequency. Because TAI is computed in "real - time" (every month) and has operational constraints, it is not optimal and the BIPM computes in deferred time another time scale TT(BIPM), which is based on a weighted average of the evaluations of TAI frequency by the PFS. We show that a point has been reached where the stability of atomic time scales, the accuracy of primary frequency standards, and the capabilities of frequency transfer are approximately at a similar level, in the low 10 - 16 in relative frequency. The goal is now to reach and surpass 1x10 - 16 and the three fields are in various stages of advancement towards this aim. We review the stability and accuracy recently achieved by frequency standards, focusing on primary frequency standards on one hand, and on new secondary realizations e.g. based on optical transitions on the other hand. We study how these performances can translate to the performance of atomic time scales, and the possible implications of the availability of new high - accuracy frequency standards operating on a regular basis. Finally we show how time transfer is trying to keep up with the progresses of frequency standards. Time transfer is presently the limiting factor at short averaging time (e.g. 1 - 2 weeks) but it should not be limiting the long term stability of atomic time scales, which is the main need of many applications in astronomy.

  20. Time scales involved in emergent market coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, J.; Drożdż, S.; Speth, J.

    2004-06-01

    In addressing the question of the time scales characteristic for the market formation, we analyze high-frequency tick-by-tick data from the NYSE and from the German market. By using returns on various time scales ranging from seconds or minutes up to 2 days, we compare magnitude of the largest eigenvalue of the correlation matrix for the same set of securities but for different time scales. For various sets of stocks of different capitalization (and the average trading frequency), we observe a significant elevation of the largest eigenvalue with increasing time scale. Our results from the correlation matrix study can be considered as a manifestation of the so-called Epps effect. There is no unique explanation of this effect and it seems that many different factors play a role here. One of such factors is randomness in transaction moments for different stocks. Another interesting conclusion to be drawn from our results is that in the contemporary markets the emergence of significant correlations occurs on time scales much smaller than in the more distant history.

  1. Length and Time Scales in Continental Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B. R.; Bunge, H.

    2003-12-01

    Nonlinear feedback between continents and the mantle through thermal blanketing has long been surmised as a mechanism for continental drift and Wilson cycles. Paleomagnetism provides ample evidence for large scale (10,000 km) continental motion on time scales of several hundred million years, indicative of large scale mantle circulation. While much has been learned about the interactions between continents and mantle flow from analog and numerical modeling studies in two and three dimensions, a rigorous sensitivity study on the effects of continents in high resolution 3D spherical mantle convection models has yet to be pursued. As a result, a quantitative understanding of the scales of continental motion as they relate to relevant fluid dynamic processes is lacking. Here we focus on the effect of continental size. Continents covering 30% of the surface are representative of a supercontinent such as Pangea, smaller continents (10% of Earth's surface) are representative of present day Asia, and still smaller continents (3% of Earth's surface) are similar to present day Antarctica. These continents are introduced into simple end-member mantle flow regimes characterized by combinations of bottom or internal heating and uniform or layered mantle viscosity. We find that large scale mantle structure, and correspondingly the large scale displacement of continents, depends not only on mantle heating mode and radial viscosity structure, but also on continental size. Supercontinents promote heterogeneity on the largest scales (spherical harmonic degree one), especially when combined with strong bottom heating and a high viscosity lower mantle. Degree one heterogeneities in turn drive cyclical continental motion, with continents moving from the hot to the cold hemisphere on time scales of several hundred million years. Smaller continents are unable to initiate degree one convection. As a result, their motion is governed by shorter length and time scales. We apply these

  2. Conformable fractional Dirac system on time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsen, Tuba; Yilmaz, Emrah; Goktas, Sertac

    2017-01-01

    We study the conformable fractional (CF) Dirac system with separated boundary conditions on an arbitrary time scale [Formula: see text]. Then we extend some basic spectral properties of the classical Dirac system to the CF case. Eventually, some asymptotic estimates for the eigenfunction of the CF Dirac eigenvalue problem are obtained on [Formula: see text]. So, we provide a constructive procedure for the solution of this problem. These results are important steps to consolidate the link between fractional calculus and time scale calculus in spectral theory.

  3. Multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Bohner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales, taking readers beyond the traditional calculus texts. Covering topics from parameter-dependent integrals to partial differentiation on time scales, the book’s nine pedagogically oriented chapters provide a pathway to this active area of research that will appeal to students and researchers in mathematics and the physical sciences. The authors present a clear and well-organized treatment of the concept behind the mathematics and solution techniques, including many practical examples and exercises.

  4. The hippocampus, time, and memory across scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Marc W; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-11-01

    A wealth of experimental studies with animals have offered insights about how neural networks within the hippocampus support the temporal organization of memories. These studies have revealed the existence of "time cells" that encode moments in time, much as the well-known "place cells" map locations in space. Another line of work inspired by human behavioral studies suggests that episodic memories are mediated by a state of temporal context that changes gradually over long time scales, up to at least a few thousand seconds. In this view, the "mental time travel" hypothesized to support the experience of episodic memory corresponds to a "jump back in time" in which a previous state of temporal context is recovered. We suggest that these 2 sets of findings could be different facets of a representation of temporal history that maintains a record at the last few thousand seconds of experience. The ability to represent long time scales comes at the cost of discarding precise information about when a stimulus was experienced--this uncertainty becomes greater for events further in the past. We review recent computational work that describes a mechanism that could construct such a scale-invariant representation. Taken as a whole, this suggests the hippocampus plays its role in multiple aspects of cognition by representing events embedded in a general spatiotemporal context. The representation of internal time can be useful across nonhippocampal memory systems. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. The Second Noether Theorem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka B. Malinowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the second Noether theorem to variational problems on time scales. As corollaries we obtain the classical second Noether theorem, the second Noether theorem for the h-calculus and the second Noether theorem for the q-calculus.

  6. Stability of graph communities across time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvenne, J-C; Yaliraki, S N; Barahona, M

    2010-07-20

    The complexity of biological, social, and engineering networks makes it desirable to find natural partitions into clusters (or communities) that can provide insight into the structure of the overall system and even act as simplified functional descriptions. Although methods for community detection abound, there is a lack of consensus on how to quantify and rank the quality of partitions. We introduce here the stability of a partition, a measure of its quality as a community structure based on the clustered autocovariance of a dynamic Markov process taking place on the network. Because the stability has an intrinsic dependence on time scales of the graph, it allows us to compare and rank partitions at each time and also to establish the time spans over which partitions are optimal. Hence the Markov time acts effectively as an intrinsic resolution parameter that establishes a hierarchy of increasingly coarser communities. Our dynamical definition provides a unifying framework for several standard partitioning measures: modularity and normalized cut size can be interpreted as one-step time measures, whereas Fiedler's spectral clustering emerges at long times. We apply our method to characterize the relevance of partitions over time for constructive and real networks, including hierarchical graphs and social networks, and use it to obtain reduced descriptions for atomic-level protein structures over different time scales.

  7. Implications of short time scale dynamics on long time processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystel El Hage

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a comprehensive overview of the structural dynamics in topical gas- and condensed-phase systems on multiple length and time scales. Starting from vibrationally induced dissociation of small molecules in the gas phase, the question of vibrational and internal energy redistribution through conformational dynamics is further developed by considering coupled electron/proton transfer in a model peptide over many orders of magnitude. The influence of the surrounding solvent is probed for electron transfer to the solvent in hydrated I−. Next, the dynamics of a modified PDZ domain over many time scales is analyzed following activation of a photoswitch. The hydration dynamics around halogenated amino acid side chains and their structural dynamics in proteins are relevant for iodinated TyrB26 insulin. Binding of nitric oxide to myoglobin is a process for which experimental and computational analyses have converged to a common view which connects rebinding time scales and the underlying dynamics. Finally, rhodopsin is a paradigmatic system for multiple length- and time-scale processes for which experimental and computational methods provide valuable insights into the functional dynamics. The systems discussed here highlight that for a comprehensive understanding of how structure, flexibility, energetics, and dynamics contribute to functional dynamics, experimental studies in multiple wavelength regions and computational studies including quantum, classical, and more coarse grained levels are required.

  8. Significance of time scale differences in psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonowski, W

    2009-02-01

    We present modeling of both rational processes (thoughts) and emotional processes (feelings) on a two-dimensional lattice and on extremely simplified two-dimensional phase space of the brain. Our purpose is to analyze influence of differences in time-scales of various types of processes. In particular, we show that no 'central executive structure' between consciousness and unconsciousness, the existence of which was suggested by psychologists, is not needed.

  9. Some nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In what follows, R denotes the set of real numbers, Z denotes the set of integers and C denotes the set of complex numbers. A time scale T is an ..... {[p − 1 + a(t)]e ¯A(t, t0) − (p − 1)}1/p for all t ∈ T0. The proof of Corollary 3.3 is complete. 4. An application. In this section, we present an example to illustrate our main results.

  10. uncertain dynamic systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lakshmikantham

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A basic feedback control problem is that of obtaining some desired stability property from a system which contains uncertainties due to unknown inputs into the system. Despite such imperfect knowledge in the selected mathematical model, we often seek to devise controllers that will steer the system in a certain required fashion. Various classes of controllers whose design is based on the method of Lyapunov are known for both discrete [4], [10], [15], and continuous [3–9], [11] models described by difference and differential equations, respectively. Recently, a theory for what is known as dynamic systems on time scales has been built which incorporates both continuous and discrete times, namely, time as an arbitrary closed sets of reals, and allows us to handle both systems simultaneously [1], [2], [12], [13]. This theory permits one to get some insight into and better understanding of the subtle differences between discrete and continuous systems. We shall, in this paper, utilize the framework of the theory of dynamic systems on time scales to investigate the stability properties of conditionally invariant sets which are then applied to discuss controlled systems with uncertain elements. For the notion of conditionally invariant set and its stability properties, see [14]. Our results offer a new approach to the problem in question.

  11. Discounting in Games across Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Chatterjee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce two-level discounted games played by two players on a perfect-information stochastic game graph. The upper level game is a discounted game and the lower level game is an undiscounted reachability game. Two-level games model hierarchical and sequential decision making under uncertainty across different time scales. We show the existence of pure memoryless optimal strategies for both players and an ordered field property for such games. We show that if there is only one player (Markov decision processes, then the values can be computed in polynomial time. It follows that whether the value of a player is equal to a given rational constant in two-level discounted games can be decided in NP intersected coNP. We also give an alternate strategy improvement algorithm to compute the value.

  12. Parametric instabilities in picosecond time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldis, H.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Rozmus, W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Labaune, C.; Mounaix, Ph.; Pesme, D.; Baton, S. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Tikhonchuk, V.T. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1993-03-01

    The coupling of intense laser light with plasmas is a rich field of plasma physics, with many applications. Among these are inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray lasers, particle acceleration, and x-ray sources. Parametric instabilities have been studied for many years because of their importance to ICF; with laser pulses with duration of approximately a nanosecond, and laser intensities in the range 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2} these instabilities are of crucial concern because of a number of detrimental effects. Although the laser pulse duration of interest for these studies are relatively long, it has been evident in the past years that to reach an understanding of these instabilities requires their characterization and analysis in picosecond time scales. At the laser intensities of interest, the growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is of the order of picoseconds, and of an order of magnitude shorter for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In this paper the authors discuss SBS and SRS in the context of their evolution in picosecond time scales. They describe the fundamental concepts associated with their growth and saturation, and recent work on the nonlinear treatment required for the modeling of these instabilities at high laser intensities.

  13. EDITORIAL: Special issue on time scale algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Tavella, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    This special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the tutorials presented on the first day. The symposium was attended by 76 persons, from every continent except Antarctica, by students as well as senior scientists, and hosted by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando, Spain, whose staff further enhanced their nation's high reputation for hospitality. Although a timescale can be simply defined as a weighted average of clocks, whose purpose is to measure time better than any individual clock, timescale theory has long been and continues to be a vibrant field of research that has both followed and helped to create advances in the art of timekeeping. There is no perfect timescale algorithm, because every one embodies a compromise involving user needs. Some users wish to generate a constant frequency, perhaps not necessarily one that is well-defined with respect to the definition of a second. Other users might want a clock which is as close to UTC or a particular reference clock as possible, or perhaps wish to minimize the maximum variation from that standard. In contrast to the steered timescales that would be required by those users, other users may need free-running timescales, which are independent of external information. While no algorithm can meet all these needs, every algorithm can benefit from some form of tuning. The optimal tuning, and even the optimal algorithm, can depend on the noise characteristics of the frequency standards, or of their comparison systems, the most precise and accurate of which are currently Two Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GPS carrier phase time transfer. The interest in time scale algorithms and its associated statistical methodology began around 40 years ago when the Allan variance appeared and when the metrological institutions started realizing ensemble atomic time using more than

  14. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large

  15. Time Scales, Bedforms and Bedload Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, B.

    2015-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in mountain streams may exhibit wide fluctuations even under constant flow conditions. A better understanding of bedload pulses is key to predict natural hazards induced by torrential activity and sediment issues in mountainous areas. Several processes such as bedforms migration, grain sorting and random particles' trajectories are evoked as the driving agents of pulse formation and development. Quantifying the effects of these processes is a difficult task. This work aims to investigate the interactions between bedload transport and bedform dynamics in steep gravel-bed rivers. Experiments are carried out in a 17-m long 60-cm wide flume inclined at an angle of 2.7%. The bed is initially flat and made of homogenous natural gravel with a mean diameter of 6 mm. We imposed 200 identical hydrographs (of 1 hr duration) at the flume inlet (the bed surface was not flattened out during these cycling floods). The input hydrograph and the input sediment discharge are nearly triangular. Bed topography is measured after each flood using ultrasound sensors while the bedload transport rate is steadily monitored at the outlet using accelerometers (accelerometers fixed on metallic plates record the impacts of the grains flowing out of the flume). For the sake of comparison, a similar experiment consisting of 19 floods of 10 hours is carried out under constant supply conditions. We show that accelerometers are a cost effective technique to obtain high-frequency bedload discharge data. Spectral analysis of the bedload timeseries is used to highlight the different time scales corresponding to different bedload transport processes. We show that long timeseries are necessary to capture the different processes that drive bedload transport, including the resilience time after a perturbation of the bed. The alternate bars that develop and migrate along the flume are found to significantly influence bedload transport rate fluctuations.

  16. Changes in sub-daily precipitation extremes in a global climate model with super-parameterization under CO2 warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairoutdinov, Marat; Zhou, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Virtually all of the projections for future change of extreme precipitation statistics under CO2 warming have been made using global climate models (GCMs) in which clouds and, in particular, convective cloud systems are not explicitly resolved, but rather parameterized. In our study, a different kind of a GCM, a super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SP-CAM), is employed. In SP-CAM, all the conventional cloud parameterizations are replaced with a small-domain cloud resolving model (CRM), called super-parameterization (SP). The SP is embedded in each grid column of the host GCM. The resolution of each embedded CRM is 4 km, which is generally sufficient to explicitly represent deep convection, which is mostly responsible for extreme precipitation events. In this study, we use the SP-CAM to contrast to the present and to conventional climate model, CAM, the sub-daily extreme precipitation statistics in response to the sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) and CO2 levels as projected for the end of 21st century in response to the IPCC AR5 RCP8.5 emission scenario. Different mechanisms for extreme precipitation changes are discussed.

  17. Considering Time-Scale Requirements for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    geocentric reference frame with the SI second realized on the rotating geoid as the scale unit. It is a continuous atomic time scale that was...of dating in a specific reference system and is to be used as the time basis in the theory of motion in the system. In metrology it can be argued...the B8lycentric and Geocentric Celestial Reference Systems, two time scales, Barycentric Coor- dinate Time (TCB) and Geocentric Coordinate Time (TCG

  18. Assessing the importance of spatio-temporal RCM resolution when estimating sub-daily extreme precipitation under current and future climate conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunyer Pinya, Maria Antonia; Luchner, J.; Onof, C.

    2017-01-01

    The increase in extreme precipitation is likely to be one of the most significant impacts of climate change in cities due to increased pluvial flood risk. Hence, reliable information on changes in sub-daily extreme precipitation is needed for robust adaptation strategies. This study explores extr...

  19. Local Observability of Systems on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Bartosiewicz

    2013-01-01

    unified way using the language of real analytic geometry, ideals of germs of analytic functions, and their real radicals. It is shown that some properties related to observability are preserved under various discretizations of continuous-time systems.

  20. Time scales separation for dynamo action

    OpenAIRE

    Dormy, Emmanuel; Gerard-Varet, David

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The study of dynamo action in astrophysical objects classically involves two timescales: the slow diffusive one and the fast advective one. We investigate the possibility of field amplification on an intermediate timescale associated with time dependent modulations of the flow. We consider a simple steady configuration for which dynamo action is not realised. We study the effect of time dependent perturbations of the flow. We show that {some} vanishing {low frequency} ...

  1. Detecting separate time scales in genetic expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, David A; Brady, Siobhan M; Fink, Thomas M A; Benfey, Philip N; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2010-06-16

    Biological processes occur on a vast range of time scales, and many of them occur concurrently. As a result, system-wide measurements of gene expression have the potential to capture many of these processes simultaneously. The challenge however, is to separate these processes and time scales in the data. In many cases the number of processes and their time scales is unknown. This issue is particularly relevant to developmental biologists, who are interested in processes such as growth, segmentation and differentiation, which can all take place simultaneously, but on different time scales. We introduce a flexible and statistically rigorous method for detecting different time scales in time-series gene expression data, by identifying expression patterns that are temporally shifted between replicate datasets. We apply our approach to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle dataset and an Arabidopsis thaliana root developmental dataset. In both datasets our method successfully detects processes operating on several different time scales. Furthermore we show that many of these time scales can be associated with particular biological functions. The spatiotemporal modules identified by our method suggest the presence of multiple biological processes, acting at distinct time scales in both the Arabidopsis root and yeast. Using similar large-scale expression datasets, the identification of biological processes acting at multiple time scales in many organisms is now possible.

  2. Detecting separate time scales in genetic expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fink Thomas MA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological processes occur on a vast range of time scales, and many of them occur concurrently. As a result, system-wide measurements of gene expression have the potential to capture many of these processes simultaneously. The challenge however, is to separate these processes and time scales in the data. In many cases the number of processes and their time scales is unknown. This issue is particularly relevant to developmental biologists, who are interested in processes such as growth, segmentation and differentiation, which can all take place simultaneously, but on different time scales. Results We introduce a flexible and statistically rigorous method for detecting different time scales in time-series gene expression data, by identifying expression patterns that are temporally shifted between replicate datasets. We apply our approach to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle dataset and an Arabidopsis thaliana root developmental dataset. In both datasets our method successfully detects processes operating on several different time scales. Furthermore we show that many of these time scales can be associated with particular biological functions. Conclusions The spatiotemporal modules identified by our method suggest the presence of multiple biological processes, acting at distinct time scales in both the Arabidopsis root and yeast. Using similar large-scale expression datasets, the identification of biological processes acting at multiple time scales in many organisms is now possible.

  3. Long-time data storage: relevant time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic processes relevant for long-time storage of information about human kind are discussed, ranging from biological and geological processes to the lifecycle of stars and the expansion of the universe. Major results are that life will end ultimately and the remaining time that the earth is

  4. Multimode time-dependent gyrotron equations for different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2017-09-01

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. For a long time, the gyrotron theory was developed assuming that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity fill time. Correspondingly, it was assumed that during this transit time, the amplitude of microwave oscillations remains constant. However, there are situations when this assumption is not fulfilled, or is marginally fulfilled. In such cases, a different mathematical formalism has to be used. The present paper generalizes the new formalism to the multi mode case. The particular example considered indicates that in some cases the results obtained by means of the old and the new formalism differ significantly.

  5. Nuclear disassembly time scales using space time correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D.; Colin, J.; Lecolley, J.F.; Meslin, C.; Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Bilwes, B.; Cosmo, F. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France); Galin, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); and others

    1996-09-01

    The lifetime, {tau}, with respect to multifragmentation of highly excited nuclei is deduced from the analysis of strongly damped Pb+Au collisions at 29 MeV/u. The method is based on the study of space-time correlations induced by `proximity` effects between fragments emitted by the two primary products of the reaction and gives the time between the re-separation of the two primary products and the subsequent multifragment decay of one partner. (author). 2 refs.

  6. Bridging the Time and Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Michael

    1997-08-01

    The field of nanomechanics clearly exemplifies many of the challenges commonly encountered in micromechanics. For instance, one of the main difficulties inherent to nanomechanics is the need to consider multiple length and temporal scales straddling the grey zone between atomistics and continuum behavior. A case in point is nanoindentation. While much of the material under the indentor can be idealized as a continuum to a good approximation---making it grossly inefficient to carry out direct atomistic simulations in such regions---the plasticity which ensues during the early stages of indentation is carried by a small number of discrete dislocations. Recent experimental observations of nanoindentation in Fe-3wt%Si single crystals by Gerberich et al. (1985) reveal that, when an indentor with a tip radius of 66 nm is driven to depths of 6 to 26 nm, roughly 15-70 dislocations can be impugned as the primary carriers of irreversible deformation. Evidently, such low dislocation numbers defy effective treatment by continuum theories, and demand an explicit consideration of the individual dislocations. From the standpoint of modeling, these issues pose competing resolution demands---and point to the need for---models that can effect a seamless transition from regions that are well described as continua to those requiring an explicit treatment of the lattice degrees of freedom. A second point as concerns the development of models is the desirability of ensuring that the constitutive description of the material is faithful to the underlying atomistics. Direct atomistic simulation, e. g., by molecular dynamics, trivially satisfies this requirement. There, each and every lattice degree of freedom is explicitly accounted for, and the deformation of the crystal follows directly from the atomic interactions. However, the trend toward simulating ever larger systems (with the present record somewhere in the neighborhood of 10^9 atoms) leaves us faced with a daunting bookkeeping

  7. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    length and time scales is required in order to understand and predict structure and dynamics in such com- ... nanoseconds. Tailoring the functional properties of materials on a macroscopic scale (1 m/1 s) involves averaging over scales smaller by several orders of ..... tures in the phase diagram of water, including new.

  8. Bounds of Certain Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Pachpatte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study explicit bounds of certain dynamic integral inequalities on time scales. These estimates give the bounds on unknown functions which can be used in studying the qualitative aspects of certain dynamic equations. Using these inequalities we prove the uniqueness of some partial integro-differential equations on time scales.

  9. Evolution of equilibrium pickering emulsions: a matter of time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraft, D.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824291; Luigjes, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31412330X; de Folter, J.W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325787662; Philipse, A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073532894; Kegel, W.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113729464

    2010-01-01

    A new class of equilibrium solid-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions harbors a competition of two processes on disparate time scales that affect the equilibrium droplet size in opposing ways. The aim of this work is to elucidate the molecular origins of these two time scales and demonstrate their

  10. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  11. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag constellations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    .... Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at multiple temporal scales, partly due...

  12. Intermediate time scaling in classical continuous-spin models

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, S K; Chung, J S

    1999-01-01

    The time-dependent total spin correlation functions of the two- and the three-dimensional classical XY models seem to have a very narrow first dynamic scaling interval and, after this interval, a much broader anomalous second dynamic scaling interval appears. In this paper, this intriguing feature found in our previous work is re-examined. By introducing a phenomenological characteristic time for this intermediate time interval, the second dynamic scaling behavior can be explained. Moreover, the dynamic critical exponent found from this novel characteristic time is found to be identical to that found from the usual dynamic scaling theory developed in the wave vector and frequency domain. For continuous spin models, in which the spin variable related to a long-range order parameter is not a constant of motion, our method yielded the dynamic critical exponent with less computational efforts.

  13. AFSC/ABL: Ugashik sockeye salmon scale time series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A time series of scale samples (1956 b?? 2002) collected from adult sockeye salmon returning to Ugashik River were retrieved from the Alaska Department of Fish and...

  14. AFSC/ABL: Naknek sockeye salmon scale time series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A time series of scale samples (1956 2002) collected from adult sockeye salmon returning to Naknek River were retrieved from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game....

  15. Gronwall-OuIang-Type Integral Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohner Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present several Gronwall-OuIang-type integral inequalities on time scales. Firstly, an OuIang inequality on time scales is discussed. Then we extend the Gronwall-type inequalities to multiple integrals. Some special cases of our results contain continuous Gronwall-type inequalities and their discrete analogues. Several examples are included to illustrate our results at the end.

  16. Galaxy merger time-scales in the Illustris Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Areli; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Hernquist, Lars E.; Wellons, Sarah; Moreno, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this project we are investigate merger time-scales, define as the time delays from dark matter halo viral crossing to galaxy-galaxy coalescence. Our project uses merger history trees drawn from the Illustris Simulation, a cosmological hydrodynamic run that follows the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Preliminary results indicate that merger time-scales are not sensitive to stellar mass or mass ratio, in stark contrast to what has been found earlier with cosmological dark-matter-only simulations. Work towards understanding the source of this disagreement is currently in progress.

  17. Multiple time scales in multi-state models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobelli, Simona; Carstensen, Bendix

    2013-12-30

    In multi-state models, it has been the tradition to model all transition intensities on one time scale, usually the time since entry into the study ('clock-forward' approach). The effect of time since an intermediate event has been accommodated either by changing the time scale to time since entry to the new state ('clock-back' approach) or by including the time at entry to the new state as a covariate. In this paper, we argue that the choice of time scale for the various transitions in a multi-state model should be dealt with as an empirical question, as also the question of whether a single time scale is sufficient. We illustrate that these questions are best addressed by using parametric models for the transition rates, as opposed to the traditional Cox-model-based approaches. Specific advantages are that dependence of failure rates on multiple time scales can be made explicit and described in informative graphical displays. Using a single common time scale for all transitions greatly facilitates computations of probabilities of being in a particular state at a given time, because the machinery from the theory of Markov chains can be applied. However, a realistic model for transition rates is preferable, especially when the focus is not on prediction of final outcomes from start but on the analysis of instantaneous risk or on dynamic prediction. We illustrate the various approaches using a data set from stem cell transplant in leukemia and provide supplementary online material in R. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Exponentials and Laplace transforms on nonuniform time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Torres, Delfim F. M.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a coherent approach to signals and systems theory on time scales. The two derivatives from the time-scale calculus are used, i.e., nabla (forward) and delta (backward), and the corresponding eigenfunctions, the so-called nabla and delta exponentials, computed. With these exponentials, two generalised discrete-time Laplace transforms are deduced and their properties studied. These transforms are compatible with the standard Laplace and Z transforms. They are used to study discrete-time linear systems defined by difference equations. These equations mimic the usual continuous-time equations that are uniformly approximated when the sampling interval becomes small. Impulse response and transfer function notions are introduced. This implies a unified mathematical framework that allows us to approximate the classic continuous-time case when the sampling rate is high or to obtain the standard discrete-time case, based on difference equations, when the time grid becomes uniform.

  19. SNO+ Liquid Scintillator Characterization: Timing, Quenching, and Energy Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, E., E-mail: eosullivan@owl.phy.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Stirling Hall, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Wan Chan Tseung, H.S., E-mail: hwan@uw.edu [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Tolich, N. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); O' Keeffe, H.M.; Chen, M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Stirling Hall, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    This contribution describes laboratory measurements designed to investigate the optical properties of linear alkybenzene (LAB). Presented here is the measurement of the scintillation light timing profiles due to alpha and beta-particle excitation, the calculation of alpha/beta discrimination capability based on these timing distributions, and the investigation of electron energy scale.

  20. Cognitive componets of speech at different time scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ling; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive component analysis (COCA) is defined as unsupervised grouping of data leading to a group structure well aligned with that resulting from human cognitive activity. We focus here on speech at different time scales looking for possible hidden ‘cognitive structure’. Statistical regularities...... have earlier been revealed at multiple time scales corresponding to: phoneme, gender, height and speaker identity. We here show that the same simple unsupervised learning algorithm can detect these cues. Our basic features are 25-dimensional short time Mel-frequency weighted cepstral coefficients...

  1. Thermodynamics constrains allometric scaling of optimal development time in insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Dillon

    Full Text Available Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1 the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2 numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the "hotter is better" hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of

  2. Thermodynamics constrains allometric scaling of optimal development time in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael E; Frazier, Melanie R

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the "hotter is better" hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes. The

  3. Inferring synaptic structure in presence of neural interaction time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Capone

    Full Text Available Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network's activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model's time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones.

  4. Time-dependent scaling patterns in high frequency financial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Noemi; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-10-01

    We measure the influence of different time-scales on the intraday dynamics of financial markets. This is obtained by decomposing financial time series into simple oscillations associated with distinct time-scales. We propose two new time-varying measures of complexity: 1) an amplitude scaling exponent and 2) an entropy-like measure. We apply these measures to intraday, 30-second sampled prices of various stock market indices. Our results reveal intraday trends where different time-horizons contribute with variable relative amplitudes over the course of the trading day. Our findings indicate that the time series we analysed have a non-stationary multifractal nature with predominantly persistent behaviour at the middle of the trading session and anti-persistent behaviour at the opening and at the closing of the session. We demonstrate that these patterns are statistically significant, robust, reproducible and characteristic of each stock market. We argue that any modelling, analytics or trading strategy must take into account these non-stationary intraday scaling patterns.

  5. Evaluation of scaling invariance embedded in short time series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Pan

    Full Text Available Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length ~10(2. Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of 0.2,0.3,...,0.9 show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias (≤0.03 and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ≤0.05. Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records.

  6. Decoupling Shoreline Behavior Over Variable Time and Space Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, C. J.; Plant, N. G.; Henderson, R.; Schwab, W. C.; Nelson, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    A combination of small-scale sediment transport processes and large-scale geologic, oceanographic, and morphologic processes drives shoreline change on time scales ranging from single storm events to decades. The relative importance of storm processes versus geological control on event response and long-term evolution of barrier islands is largely unknown but is important for understanding decadal-scale evolution Here, we investigate the primary controls on shoreline response along Fire Island, NY, a 50-km long barrier island, on timescales that resolve storms and decadal variations over a period of 80 yrs. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis is applied to a time series of shoreline positions to identify coherent patterns of shoreline variability that can be correlated to oceanographic or geologic framework parameters to help identify the controlling short-term or long-term processes. The analysis shows that storm response and recovery dominates the shoreline behavior on the largest spatial scales in the form of alternating episodes of shoreline retreat and advance that have a length scale of 1 km. The shoreline response to and recovery from Hurricane Sandy is included in this EOF analysis and indicates that this historic storm is not notable or distinguishable from several other large storms of the prior decade. This suggests that Fire Island is historically, and continues to be, resilient to severe storms. A secondary mode of the EOF analysis supports that the framework geology of the barrier island system, represented by known variations in inner shelf bathymetry, sediment availability, beach-shoreface morphology, and long-term rates of shoreline change, controls multi-decadal shoreline evolution. The geologic processes that control the long-term morphodynamics result in the ends of the island responding in opposite phase to the central portion. A third mode reveals an intermediate-scale pattern that persists over both long and short-term time scales

  7. Memory on multiple time-scales in an Abelian sandpile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Melatos, Andrew; Kieu, Tien; Webster, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    We report results of a numerical analysis of the memory effects in two-dimensional Abelian sandpiles. It is found that a sandpile forgets its instantaneous configuration in two distinct stages: a fast stage and a slow stage, whose durations roughly scale as N and N2 respectively, where N is the linear size of the sandpile. We confirm the presence of the longer time-scale by an independent diagnostic based on analysing emission probabilities of a hidden Markov model applied to a time-averaged sequence of avalanche sizes. The application of hidden Markov modelling to the output of sandpiles is novel. It discriminates effectively between a sandpile time series and a shuffled control time series with the same time-averaged event statistics and hence deserves further development as a pattern-recognition tool for Abelian sandpiles.

  8. An Ultralow Leakage Synaptic Scaling Homeostatic Plasticity Circuit With Configurable Time Scales up to 100 ks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ning; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2017-12-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is a stabilizing mechanism commonly observed in real neural systems that allows neurons to maintain their activity around a functional operating point. This phenomenon can be used in neuromorphic systems to compensate for slowly changing conditions or chronic shifts in the system configuration. However, to avoid interference with other adaptation or learning processes active in the neuromorphic system, it is important that the homeostatic plasticity mechanism operates on time scales that are much longer than conventional synaptic plasticity ones. In this paper we present an ultralow leakage circuit, integrated into an automatic gain control scheme, that can implement the synaptic scaling homeostatic process over extremely long time scales. Synaptic scaling consists in globally scaling the synaptic weights of all synapses impinging onto a neuron maintaining their relative differences, to preserve the effects of learning. The scheme we propose controls the global gain of analog log-domain synapse circuits to keep the neuron's average firing rate constant around a set operating point, over extremely long time scales. To validate the proposed scheme, we implemented the ultralow leakage synaptic scaling homeostatic plasticity circuit in a standard 0.18 m complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process, and integrated it in an array of dynamic synapses connected to an adaptive integrate and fire neuron. The circuit occupies a silicon area of 84  m 22 m and consumes approximately 10.8 nW with a 1.8 V supply voltage. We present experimental results from the homeostatic circuit and demonstrate how it can be configured to exhibit time scales of up to 100 ks, thanks to a controllable leakage current that can be scaled down to 0.45 aA (2.8 electrons per second).

  9. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tiplicity of length and time scales is required in order to understand and predict structure and dynamics in such complex systems. .... spatial resolution, and is ideally suited to explore dynamics of protein folding, protein-DNA interac- .... the significant topographic features of the poten- tial energy landscape, such as number, ...

  10. Wind power impacts and electricity storage - a time scale perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Meibom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    technologies – batteries, flow batteries, compressed air energy storage, electrolysis combined with fuel cells, and electric vehicles – are moreover categorised with respect to the time scales at which they are suited to support wind power integration. While all of these technologies are assessed suitable...

  11. Time scales of radiation damage decay in four optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Frank; Geis, Norbert; Katterloher, Reinhard; Bender, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the qualification campaigns for the near infrared spectrometer and photometer instrument (NISP) on board the ESA/EUCLID satellite six optical materials where characterized with respect to their transmission losses after a radiation dose representing the mission exposure to high energy particles in the outer Lagrange point L2. Data was taken between 500 and 2000nm on six 25mm thick coated probes. Thickness and coating being representative for the NISP flight configuration. With this paper we present results owing up the radiation damage shown in [1]. We where able to follow up the decay of the radiation damage over almost one year under ambient conditions. This allows us to distinguish between curing effects that happen on different time-scales. As for some of the materials no radiation damage and thus no curing was detected, all materials that showed significant radiation damage in the measured passband showed two clearly distinguished time scales of curing. Up to 70% of the transmission losses cured on half decay time scales of several tens of days, while the rest of the damage cures on time scales of years.

  12. Single-molecule binding experiments on long time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elenko, Mark P.; Szostak, Jack W.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    We describe an approach for performing single-molecule binding experiments on time scales from hours to days, allowing for the observation of slower kinetics than have been previously investigated by single-molecule techniques. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is used to image the

  13. Exponential stability of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffoul Youssef N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the exponential stability of the zero solution to a system of dynamic equations on time scales. We do this by defining appropriate Lyapunov-type functions and then formulate certain inequalities on these functions. Several examples are given.

  14. THEORETICAL REVIEW The Hippocampus, Time, and Memory Across Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Marc W.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of experimental studies with animals have offered insights about how neural networks within the hippocampus support the temporal organization of memories. These studies have revealed the existence of “time cells” that encode moments in time, much as the well-known “place cells” map locations in space. Another line of work inspired by human behavioral studies suggests that episodic memories are mediated by a state of temporal context that changes gradually over long time scales, up to at least a few thousand seconds. In this view, the “mental time travel” hypothesized to support the experience of episodic memory corresponds to a “jump back in time” in which a previous state of temporal context is recovered. We suggest that these 2 sets of findings could be different facets of a representation of temporal history that maintains a record at the last few thousand seconds of experience. The ability to represent long time scales comes at the cost of discarding precise information about when a stimulus was experienced—this uncertainty becomes greater for events further in the past. We review recent computational work that describes a mechanism that could construct such a scale-invariant representation. Taken as a whole, this suggests the hippocampus plays its role in multiple aspects of cognition by representing events embedded in a general spatiotemporal context. The representation of internal time can be useful across nonhippocampal memory systems. PMID:23915126

  15. Anomalous multiphoton photoelectric effect in ultrashort time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersztych, J; Raynaud, M

    2005-09-30

    In a multiphoton photoelectric process, an electron needs to absorb a given number of photons to escape the surface of a metal. It is shown for the first time that this number is not a constant depending only on the characteristics of the metal and light, but varies with the interaction duration in ultrashort time scales. The phenomenon occurs when electromagnetic energy is transferred, via ultrafast excitation of electron collective modes, to conduction electrons in a duration less than the electron energy damping time. It manifests itself through a dramatic increase of electron production.

  16. Stability of perturbed dynamic system on time scales with initial time difference

    OpenAIRE

    Yakar, Coşkun; OĞUR, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of solutions of a perturbed dynamic system with respect to an original unperturbed dynamic system, which have initial time difference, are investigated on arbitrary time scales. Notions of stability, asymptotic stability, and instability with initial time difference are introduced. Sufficient conditions of stability properties are given with the help of Lyapunov-like functions.

  17. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  18. Assessing the importance of spatio-temporal RCM resolution when estimating sub-daily extreme precipitation under current and future climate conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunyer Pinya, Maria Antonia; Luchner, J.; Onof, C.

    2017-01-01

    The increase in extreme precipitation is likely to be one of the most significant impacts of climate change in cities due to increased pluvial flood risk. Hence, reliable information on changes in sub-daily extreme precipitation is needed for robust adaptation strategies. This study explores...... extreme precipitation over Denmark generated by the regional climate model (RCM) HIRHAM-ECEARTH at different spatial resolutions (8, 12, 25 and 50km), three RCM from the RiskChange project at 8km resolution and three RCMs from ENSEMBLES at 25km resolution at temporal aggregations from 1 to 48h......) are more consistent across all temporal aggregations in the representation of high-order moments and extreme precipitation. The biases in the spatial pattern of extreme precipitation change across temporal and spatial resolution. The hourly extreme value distributions of the HIRHAM-ECEARTH simulations...

  19. Stability in Totally Nonlinear Neutral Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Belaid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Let T be a time scale which is unbounded above and below and such that 0∈T. Let id-τ:[0,∞∩T→T be such that (id-τ([0,∞∩T is a time scale. We use the Krasnoselskii-Burton's fixed point theorem to obtain stability results about the zero solution for the following totally nonlinear neutral dynamic equation with variable delay x^{△}(t=-a(th(x^{σ}(t+c(tx^{△}(t-τ(t+b(tG(x(t,x(t-τ(t, t∈[0,∞∩T, where f^{△} is the △-derivative on T and f^{△} is the △-derivative on (id-τ(T. The results obtained here extend the work of Ardjouni, Derrardjia and Djoudi [2].

  20. Foraging constraints reverse the scaling of activity time in carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, Matteo; Carbone, Chris; Pawar, Samraat

    2017-12-04

    The proportion of time an animal spends actively foraging in a day determines its long-term fitness. Here, we derive a general mathematical model for the scaling of this activity time with body size in consumers. We show that this scaling can change from positive (increasing with size) to negative (decreasing with size) if the detectability and availability of preferred prey sizes is a limiting factor. These predictions are supported by a global dataset on 73 terrestrial carnivore species from 8 families spanning >3 orders of magnitude in size. Carnivores weighing ∼5 kg experience high foraging costs because their diets include significant proportions of relatively small (invertebrate) prey. As a result, they show an increase in activity time with size. This shifts to a negative scaling in larger carnivores as they shift to foraging on less costly vertebrate prey. Our model can be generalized to other classes of terrestrial and aquatic consumers and offers a general framework for mechanistically linking body size to population fitness and vulnerability in consumers.

  1. Backpropagation and ordered derivatives in the time scales calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffertt, John; Wunsch, Donald C

    2010-08-01

    Backpropagation is the most widely used neural network learning technique. It is based on the mathematical notion of an ordered derivative. In this paper, we present a formulation of ordered derivatives and the backpropagation training algorithm using the important emerging area of mathematics known as the time scales calculus. This calculus, with its potential for application to a wide variety of inter-disciplinary problems, is becoming a key area of mathematics. It is capable of unifying continuous and discrete analysis within one coherent theoretical framework. Using this calculus, we present here a generalization of backpropagation which is appropriate for cases beyond the specifically continuous or discrete. We develop a new multivariate chain rule of this calculus, define ordered derivatives on time scales, prove a key theorem about them, and derive the backpropagation weight update equations for a feedforward multilayer neural network architecture. By drawing together the time scales calculus and the area of neural network learning, we present the first connection of two major fields of research.

  2. Microsecond time-scale kinetics of transient biochemical reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mitić

    Full Text Available To afford mechanistic studies in enzyme kinetics and protein folding in the microsecond time domain we have developed a continuous-flow microsecond time-scale mixing instrument with an unprecedented dead-time of 3.8 ± 0.3 μs. The instrument employs a micro-mixer with a mixing time of 2.7 μs integrated with a 30 mm long flow-cell of 109 μm optical path length constructed from two parallel sheets of silver foil; it produces ultraviolet-visible spectra that are linear in absorbance up to 3.5 with a spectral resolution of 0.4 nm. Each spectrum corresponds to a different reaction time determined by the distance from the mixer outlet, and by the fluid flow rate. The reaction progress is monitored in steps of 0.35 μs for a total duration of ~600 μs. As a proof of principle the instrument was used to study spontaneous protein refolding of pH-denatured cytochrome c. Three folding intermediates were determined: after a novel, extremely rapid initial phase with τ = 4.7 μs, presumably reflecting histidine re-binding to the iron, refolding proceeds with time constants of 83 μs and 345 μs to a coordinatively saturated low-spin iron form in quasi steady state. The time-resolution specifications of our spectrometer for the first time open up the general possibility for comparison of real data and molecular dynamics calculations of biomacromolecules on overlapping time scales.

  3. Transposition and Time-Scale Invariant Geometric Music Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemström, Kjell

    This paper considers how to adapt geometric algorithms, developed for content-based music retrieval of symbolically encoded music, to be robust against time deformations required by real-world applications. In this setting, music is represented by sets of points in plane. A matching, pertinent to the application, involves two such sets of points and invariances under translations and time scalings. We give an algorithm for finding exact occurrences, under such a setting, of a given query point set, of size m, within a database point set, of size n, with running time O(mn 2logn); partial occurrences are found in O(m 2 n 2logn) time. The algorithms resemble the sweepline algorithm introduced in [1].

  4. Stability theory for dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martynyuk, Anatoly A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a first in the world to present three approaches for stability analysis of solutions of dynamic equations. The first approach is based on the application of dynamic integral inequalities and the fundamental matrix of solutions of linear approximation of dynamic equations. The second is based on the generalization of the direct Lyapunovs method for equations on time scales, using scalar, vector and matrix-valued auxiliary functions. The third approach is the application of auxiliary functions (scalar, vector, or matrix-valued ones) in combination with differential dynamic inequalities. This is an alternative comparison method, developed for time continuous and time discrete systems. In recent decades, automatic control theory in the study of air- and spacecraft dynamics and in other areas of modern applied mathematics has encountered problems in the analysis of the behavior of solutions of time continuous-discrete linear and/or nonlinear equations of perturbed motion. In the book “Men of Ma...

  5. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  6. The impacts of wind power integration on sub-daily variation in river flows downstream of hydroelectric dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jordan D; Patino-Echeverri, Dalia; Characklis, Gregory W

    2014-08-19

    Due to their operational flexibility, hydroelectric dams are ideal candidates to compensate for the intermittency and unpredictability of wind energy production. However, more coordinated use of wind and hydropower resources may exacerbate the impacts dams have on downstream environmental flows, that is, the timing and magnitude of water flows needed to sustain river ecosystems. In this paper, we examine the effects of increased (i.e., 5%, 15%, and 25%) wind market penetration on prices for electricity and reserves, and assess the potential for altered price dynamics to disrupt reservoir release schedules at a hydroelectric dam and cause more variable and unpredictable hourly flow patterns (measured in terms of the Richards-Baker Flashiness (RBF) index). Results show that the greatest potential for wind energy to impact downstream flows occurs at high (∼25%) wind market penetration, when the dam sells more reserves in order to exploit spikes in real-time electricity prices caused by negative wind forecast errors. Nonetheless, compared to the initial impacts of dam construction (and the dam's subsequent operation as a peaking resource under baseline conditions) the marginal effects of any increased wind market penetration on downstream flows are found to be relatively minor.

  7. The Role of Time-Scales in Socio-hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-04-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water. Water Resour. Res., 51, 6988-7022, doi:10.1002/2015WR017896.

  8. Many roads to synchrony: natural time scales and their algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ryan G; Mahoney, John R; Ellison, Christopher J; Crutchfield, James P

    2014-04-01

    We consider two important time scales-the Markov and cryptic orders-that monitor how an observer synchronizes to a finitary stochastic process. We show how to compute these orders exactly and that they are most efficiently calculated from the ε-machine, a process's minimal unifilar model. Surprisingly, though the Markov order is a basic concept from stochastic process theory, it is not a probabilistic property of a process. Rather, it is a topological property and, moreover, it is not computable from any finite-state model other than the ε-machine. Via an exhaustive survey, we close by demonstrating that infinite Markov and infinite cryptic orders are a dominant feature in the space of finite-memory processes. We draw out the roles played in statistical mechanical spin systems by these two complementary length scales.

  9. Multi-Scale Dissemination of Time Series Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qingsong; Zhou, Yongluan; Su, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of continuous dissemination of time series data, such as sensor measurements, to a large number of subscribers. These subscribers fall into multiple subscription levels, where each subscription level is specified by the bandwidth constraint of a subscriber......, which is an abstract indicator for both the physical limits and the amount of data that the subscriber would like to handle. To handle this problem, we propose a system framework for multi-scale time series data dissemination that employs a typical tree-based dissemination network and existing time......-series compression models. Due to the bandwidth limits regarding to potentially sheer speed of data, it is inevitable to compress and re-compress data along the dissemination paths according to the subscription level of each node. Compression would caused the accuracy loss of data, thus we devise several algorithms...

  10. Modelling galaxy merger time-scales and tidal destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simha, Vimal; Cole, Shaun

    2017-12-01

    We present a model for the dynamical evolution of subhaloes based on an approach combining numerical and analytical methods. Our method is based on tracking subhaloes in an N-body simulation up to the latest epoch that it can be resolved, and applying an analytic prescription for its merger time-scale that takes dynamical friction and tidal disruption into account. When applied to cosmological N-body simulations with mass resolutions that differ by two orders of magnitude, the technique produces halo occupation distributions that agree to within 3 per cent. This model has now been implemented in the GALFORM semi-analytic model of galaxy formation.

  11. On balanced approximations for time integration of multiple time scale systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knoll, D A; Margolin, L G; Mousseau, V A

    2003-01-01

    The effect of various numerical approximations used to solve linear and nonlinear problems with multiple time scales is studied in the framework of modified equation analysis (MEA). First, MEA is used to study the effect of linearization and splitting in a simple nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE), and in a linear partial differential equation (PDE). Several time discretizations of the ODE and PDE are considered, and the resulting truncation terms are compared analytically and numerically. It is demonstrated quantitatively that both linearization and splitting can result in accuracy degradation when a computational time step larger than any of the competing (fast) time scales is employed. Many of the issues uncovered on the simple problems are shown to persist in more realistic applications. Specifically, several differencing schemes using linearization and/or time splitting are applied to problems in nonequilibrium radiation-diffusion, magnetohydrodynamics, and shallow water flow, and their solut...

  12. A Review of Time-Scale Modification of Music Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Driedger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-scale modification (TSM is the task of speeding up or slowing down an audio signal’s playback speed without changing its pitch. In digital music production, TSM has become an indispensable tool, which is nowadays integrated in a wide range of music production software. Music signals are diverse—they comprise harmonic, percussive, and transient components, among others. Because of this wide range of acoustic and musical characteristics, there is no single TSM method that can cope with all kinds of audio signals equally well. Our main objective is to foster a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of TSM procedures. To this end, we review fundamental TSM methods, discuss typical challenges, and indicate potential solutions that combine different strategies. In particular, we discuss a fusion approach that involves recent techniques for harmonic-percussive separation along with time-domain and frequency-domain TSM procedures.

  13. Very Long Time Scales and Black Hole Thermal Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Barbón, José L F

    2003-01-01

    We estimate the very long time behaviour of correlation functions in the presence of eternal black holes. It was pointed out by Maldacena (hep-th 0106112) that their vanishing would lead to a violation of a unitarity-based bound. The value of the bound is obtained from the holographic dual field theory. The correlators indeed vanish in a semiclassical bulk approximation. We trace the origin of their vanishing to the continuum energy spectrum in the presence of event horizons. We elaborate on the two very long time scales involved: one associated with the black hole and the other with a thermal gas in the vacuum background. We find that assigning a role to the thermal gas background, as suggested in the above work, does restore the compliance with a time-averaged unitarity bound. We also find that additional configurations are needed to explain the expected time dependence of the Poincar\\'e recurrences and their magnitude. It is suggested that, while a semiclassical black hole does reproduce faithfully ``coars...

  14. Critical time scales for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of local accumulation time (LAT) was introduced by Berezhkovskii and co-workers to give a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to approach the steady-state solution [A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Such a measure is referred to as a critical time. Here, we show that LAT is, in fact, identical to the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was first introduced by McNabb [A. McNabb and G. C. Wake, IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Although McNabb's initial argument was motivated by considering the mean particle lifetime (MPLT) for a linear death process, he applied the ideas to study diffusion. We extend the work of these authors by deriving expressions for the MAT for a general one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction problem. Using a combination of continuum and discrete approaches, we show that MAT and MPLT are equivalent for certain uniform-to-uniform transitions; these results provide a practical interpretation for MAT by directly linking the stochastic microscopic processes to a meaningful macroscopic time scale. We find that for more general transitions, the equivalence between MAT and MPLT does not hold. Unlike other critical time definitions, we show that it is possible to evaluate the MAT without solving the underlying partial differential equation (pde). This makes MAT a simple and attractive quantity for practical situations. Finally, our work explores the accuracy of certain approximations derived using MAT, showing that useful approximations for nonlinear kinetic processes can be obtained, again without treating the governing pde directly.

  15. Continent-scale global change attribution in European birds - combining annual and decadal time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Thorup, Kasper; Tøttrup, Anders P; Chylarecki, Przemysław; Jiguet, Frédéric; Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Noble, David G; Reif, Jiri; Schmid, Hans; van Turnhout, Chris; Burfield, Ian J; Foppen, Ruud; Voříšek, Petr; van Strien, Arco; Gregory, Richard D; Rahbek, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Species attributes are commonly used to infer impacts of environmental change on multiyear species trends, e.g. decadal changes in population size. However, by themselves attributes are of limited value in global change attribution since they do not measure the changing environment. A broader foundation for attributing species responses to global change may be achieved by complementing an attributes-based approach by one estimating the relationship between repeated measures of organismal and environmental changes over short time scales. To assess the benefit of this multiscale perspective, we investigate the recent impact of multiple environmental changes on European farmland birds, here focusing on climate change and land use change. We analyze more than 800 time series from 18 countries spanning the past two decades. Analysis of long-term population growth rates documents simultaneous responses that can be attributed to both climate change and land-use change, including long-term increases in populations of hot-dwelling species and declines in long-distance migrants and farmland specialists. In contrast, analysis of annual growth rates yield novel insights into the potential mechanisms driving long-term climate induced change. In particular, we find that birds are affected by winter, spring, and summer conditions depending on the distinct breeding phenology that corresponds to their migratory strategy. Birds in general benefit from higher temperatures or higher primary productivity early on or in the peak of the breeding season with the largest effect sizes observed in cooler parts of species' climatic ranges. Our results document the potential of combining time scales and integrating both species attributes and environmental variables for global change attribution. We suggest such an approach will be of general use when high-resolution time series are available in large-scale biodiversity surveys. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For

  17. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  18. BOX-COX REGRESSION METHOD IN TIME SCALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ATİLLA GÖKTAŞ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Box-Cox regression method with λj, for j = 1, 2, ..., k, power transformation can be used when dependent variable and error term of the linear regression model do not satisfy the continuity and normality assumptions. The situation obtaining the smallest mean square error  when optimum power λj, transformation for j = 1, 2, ..., k, of Y has been discussed. Box-Cox regression method is especially appropriate to adjust existence skewness or heteroscedasticity of error terms for a nonlinear functional relationship between dependent and explanatory variables. In this study, the advantage and disadvantage use of Box-Cox regression method have been discussed in differentiation and differantial analysis of time scale concept.

  19. The Dynamics of Cuspate Spits at Geological Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchette, F.; Manna, M.; Camps, N.; Mohammadi, B.

    2016-12-01

    Zenkovitch (1959) first described cuspate spits as a limited category of shore-connected features that result from symmetrical wind/ wave forcings and/ or peculiar initial shore configuration. Later on, Asthon et al. (2001) and Asthon and Murray (2006) proned that cuspate spits, flying spits and other shoreline features derive from instabilities inherent in the relationship between alongshore sediment transport and local shoreline orientation. They exhibited a comprehensive weakly non-linear theory for cuspate and spit dynamics, and gave a striking numerical solutions to the problem. Recently, Bouchette et al. (2014) provided an alternative explicit formulation for the growth of cuspate spits through time. From this last formulation, it was demonstrated that there exists an exact relationship between the amplitude, the length of a cuspate on one side, and the longshore diffusivity and the time on the other side. In the present work, we explore how this relationship can be used to predict various coastal characteristics at decadal/geological time scales as soon as a cuspate develops in the area concerned. This formulation can be considered as a method for the datation of a cuspate spit. Alternatively, it can allow to estimate the mean fluxes of sediment trapped along the shore. The model is validated thanks to a comparison with observed cuspates. The cuspate law suggests that the length of the cuspate and its amplitude may be related through a power law (to the power of three). We demonstrate that this power law is not a simple mathematical result but does exist in the nature. The occurrence of a power law suggests also that more underlying physics remain to be analysed in the process of nucleation and growth of cuspate spits.Asthon, A., Murray, B., 2006. High-angle wave instability and emergent shoreline shapes: 1) modeling of sand waves, flying spits and capes. Journal of Geophysical Research, 111, F04011. Asthon, A., Murray, B., Arnault, O., 2001. Formation of

  20. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Ultra-Rapid Orbit Product (sub-daily files, generated 4 times/day) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This derived product set consists of Global Navigation Satellite System Ultra-Rapid Orbit Product (daily files, generated daily) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  1. Ozone time scale decomposition and trend assessment from surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleti, Eirini; Hueglin, Christoph; Takahama, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of ozone precursors have been regulated in Europe since around 1990 with control measures primarily targeting to industries and traffic. In order to understand how these measures have affected air quality, it is now important to investigate concentrations of tropospheric ozone in different types of environments, based on their NOx burden, and in different geographic regions. In this study, we analyze high quality data sets for Switzerland (NABEL network) and whole Europe (AirBase) for the last 25 years to calculate long-term trends of ozone concentrations. A sophisticated time scale decomposition method, called the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) (Huang,1998;Wu,2009), is used for decomposition of the different time scales of the variation of ozone, namely the long-term trend, seasonal and short-term variability. This allows subtraction of the seasonal pattern of ozone from the observations and estimation of long-term changes of ozone concentrations with lower uncertainty ranges compared to typical methodologies used. We observe that, despite the implementation of regulations, for most of the measurement sites ozone daily mean values have been increasing until around mid-2000s. Afterwards, we observe a decline or a leveling off in the concentrations; certainly a late effect of limitations in ozone precursor emissions. On the other hand, the peak ozone concentrations have been decreasing for almost all regions. The evolution in the trend exhibits some differences between the different types of measurement. In addition, ozone is known to be strongly affected by meteorology. In the applied approach, some of the meteorological effects are already captured by the seasonal signal and already removed in the de-seasonalized ozone time series. For adjustment of the influence of meteorology on the higher frequency ozone variation, a statistical approach based on Generalized Additive Models (GAM) (Hastie,1990;Wood,2006), which corrects for meteorological

  2. Science at the Time-scale of the Electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Margaret

    2010-03-01

    Replace this text with your abstract Ever since the invention of the laser 50 years ago and its application in nonlinear optics, scientists have been striving to extend coherent laser beams into the x-ray region of the spectrum. Very recently however, the prospects for tabletop coherent sources, with attosecond pulse durations, at very short wavelengths even in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum at wavelengths new ability to manipulate electrons on the fastest, attosecond, time-scales of our natural world. My talk will discuss new experimental data that demonstrates high harmonic generation of laser-like, fully coherent, 10 attosecond duration, soft x-ray beams at photon energies around 0.5keV. Several applications will also be discussed, including making a movie of how electron orbitals in a molecule change shape as a molecule breaks apart, following how fast a magnetic material can flip orientation, understanding how fast heat flows in a nanocircuit, or building a microscope without lenses. [4pt] [1] T. Popmintchev et al., ``Phase matched upconversion of coherent ultrafast laser light into the soft and hard x-ray regions of the spectrum'', PNAS 106, 10516 (2009). [0pt] [2] C. LaOVorakiat et al., ``Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Magneto-Optics at the M-edge Using a Tabletop High-Harmonic Source'', Physical Review Letters 103, 257402 (2009). [0pt] [3] M. Siemens et al. ``Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams'', Nature Materials 9, 26 (2010). [0pt] [4] K. Raines et al., ``Three-dimensional structure determination from a single view,'' Nature 463, 214 (2010). [0pt] [5] W. Li et al., ``Time-resolved Probing of Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules using High Harmonic Generation'', Science 322, 1207 (2008).

  3. Time scaled phylogeography and demography of Bradypus torquatus (Pilosa: Bradypodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A.A. Schetino

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The maned sloth Bradypus torquatus (Bradypodidae:Pilosa is an endangered and endemic species of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil, a biome that was anthropogenically reduced to about 7% of its original extent. Nowadays, an apparently decreasing population is restricted to few remaining rainforest fragments. We analyzed nuclear and mitochondrial genes of 69 individuals from the Brazilian states of Bahia, Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro to estimate their current and historical population dynamics. The diversification history of B. torquatus populations was mainly led by dispersal and vicariant events occurring during Pliocene and Pleistocene associated to several climatic and vegetation changes. Besides, the current distribution of remaining populations was also likely affected by recent anthropogenic deforestation occurring in the last five centuries in Brazil, resulting in local extinction of many intermediate B. torquatus populations. Our time scaled phylogeographic results indicate that in the Pliocene, an ancestral population of B. torquatus was originally located in the intermediate Atlantic Forest region between BA and ES states and dispersed northwards and southwards to its current range. These results indicate also that the northern and southern Atlantic Forest B. torquatus lineages should have independent management plans and conservation policies due to their ancient history of isolation and evolutionary independency.

  4. Continent-scale global change attribution in European birds - combining annual and decadal time scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Thorup, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Species attributes are commonly used to infer impacts of environmental change on multiyear species trends, e.g. decadal changes in population size. However, by themselves attributes are of limited value in global change attribution since they do not measure the changing environment. A broader...... foundation for attributing species responses to global change may be achieved by complementing an attributes-based approach by one estimating the relationship between repeated measures of organismal and environmental changes over short time scales. To assess the benefit of this multiscale perspective, we...... that can be attributed to both climate change and land-use change, including long-term increases in populations of hot-dwelling species and declines in long-distance migrants and farmland specialists. In contrast, analysis of annual growth rates yield novel insights into the potential mechanisms driving...

  5. A conceptual framework for time and space scale interactions in the climate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehl, G.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States); Lukas, R. [University of Hawaii (United States); Kiladis, G.N. [NOAA Aeronomy Lab (United States); Weickmann, K.M. [NOAA Climate Diagnostics Center (United States); Matthews, A.J. [University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Wheeler, M. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (Australia)

    2001-07-01

    Interactions involving various time and space scales, both within the tropics and between the tropics and midlatitudes, are ubiquitous in the climate system. We propose a conceptual framework for understanding such interactions whereby longer time scales and larger space scales set the base state for processes on shorter time scales and smaller space scales, which in turn have an influence back on the longer time scales and larger space scales in a continuum of process-related interactions. Though not intended to be comprehensive, we do cite examples from the literature to provide evidence for the validity of this framework. Decadal time scale base states of the coupled climate system set the context for the manifestation of interannual time scales (El Nino/Southern Oscillation, ENSO and tropospheric biennial oscillation, TBO) which are influenced by and interact with the annual cycle and seasonal time scales. Those base states in turn influence the large-scale coupled processes involved with intraseasonal and submonthly time scales, tied to interactions within the tropics and extratropics, and tropical-midlatitude teleconnections. All of these set the base state for processes on the synoptic and mesoscale and regional/local space scales. Events at those relatively short time scales and small space scales may then affect the longer time scale and larger space scale processes in turn, reaching back out to submonthly, intraseasonal, seasonal, annual, TBO, ENSO and decadal. Global coupled models can capture some elements of the decadal, ENSO, TBO, annual and seasonal time scales with the associated global space scales. However, coupled models are less successful at simulating phenomena at subseasonal and shorter time scales with hemispheric and smaller space scales. In the context of the proposed conceptual framework, the synergistic interactions of the time and space scales suggest that a high priority must be placed on improved simulations of all of the time and

  6. Mapping Playgrids for Learning across Space, Time, and Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollett, Ty; Kalir, Jeremiah H.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the production of learner-generated playgrids. Playgrids are produced when learners knit together social media tools to participate across settings and scales, accomplish their goals, pursue interests, and make their learning more enjoyable and personally meaningful. Through case study methodology we examine how two…

  7. Spatial scaling of optical fluctuations during substorm-time aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Kozelov

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A study of statistical features of auroras during substorm activity is presented, emphasizing characteristics which are commonly applied to turbulent flows. Data from all-sky television (TV observations from the Barentsburg observatory (Svalbard have been used. Features of the probability density function (PDF of auroral fluctuations have been examined at different spatial scales. We find that the observed PDFs generally have a non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed shape. The generalized structure function (GSF for the auroral luminosity fluctuations has been analyzed to determine the scaling properties of the higher (up to 6 order moments, and the evolution of the scaling indices during the actual substorm event has been determined. The scaling features obtained can be interpreted as signatures of turbulent motion of the magnetosphere-ionosphere plasma. Relations to previously obtained results of avalanche analysis of the same event, as well as possible implications for the validity of self-organized criticality models and turbulence models of the substorm activity, are discussed.

  8. Changes in channel morphology over human time scales [Chapter 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Buffington

    2012-01-01

    Rivers are exposed to changing environmental conditions over multiple spatial and temporal scales, with the imposed environmental conditions and response potential of the river modulated to varying degrees by human activity and our exploitation of natural resources. Watershed features that control river morphology include topography (valley slope and channel...

  9. Grasping Deep Time with Scaled Space in Personal Environs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Deep time comprises the deep past before written history all the way back to the Big Bang as well as the deep future from the time of our grandchildren and beyond the lifetime of our Sun. Numerous installations called time walks or geology paths have previously been designed to communicate...... of modern man, the age of dinosaurs ended at 650 m and the Big Bang is 137 km away. This choice obviously makes mental calculations easy, and all of time fits inside a geographical area of moderate size and so helps the citizen gain ownership to this learning tool and hence to time. The idea was tested...

  10. Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braswell, B.H. Jr.

    1996-12-01

    Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

  11. Probing single-photon ionization on the attosecond time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Klünder, K; Gisselbrecht, M; Fordell, T; Swoboda, M; Guénot, D; Johnsson, P; Caillat, J; Mauritsson, J; Maquet, A; Taïeb, R; L'Huillier, A

    2010-01-01

    We study photoionization of argon atoms excited by attosecond pulses using an interferometric measurement technique. We measure the difference in time delays between electrons emitted from the $3s^2$ and from the $3p^6$ shell, at different excitation energies ranging from 32 to 42 eV. The determination of single photoemission time delays requires to take into account the measurement process, involving the interaction with a probing infrared field. This contribution can be estimated using an universal formula and is found to account for a substantial fraction of the measured delay.

  12. Coherent spectroscopies on ultrashort time and length scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Three spectroscopic techniques are presented that provide simultaneous spatial and temporal resolution: modified confocal microscopy with heterodyne detection, space-time-resolved spectroscopy using coherent control concepts, and coherent two-dimensional nano-spectroscopy. Latest experimental results are discussed.

  13. Dynamic modelling of heavy metals - time scales and target loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch, M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade steady-state methods have been developed to assess critical loads of metals avoiding long-term risks in view of food quality and eco-toxicological effects on organisms in soils and surface waters. However, dynamic models are needed to estimate the times involved in attaining a

  14. Perception of short time scale intervals in a hypnotic virtuoso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noreika, Valdas; Falter, Christine M.; Arstila, Valtteri; Wearden, John H.; Kallio, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hypnotized individuals underestimate temporal intervals in the range of several seconds to tens of minutes. However, no previous work has investigated whether duration perception is equally disorderly when shorter time intervals are probed. In this study, duration

  15. Time Scales in the JPL and CfA Ephemerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decades, the IAU has repeatedly attempted to correct its definition of the basic fundamental argument used in the emphemerides. Finally, they have defined a time system which is physically possible, according to the accepted standard theory of gravitation.

  16. Time and space scales for measuring urban growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available After the last two centuries of intense and unprecedented urbanization, we need a clear understanding of the ongoing trends of urban growth for a better insight of their possible future. Two main processes are analysed : first, the inter-urban concentration of population, with its consequence of a relative decline of the smallest towns ; second, urban sprawl, including a shift of population density in the central part of cities towards their peripheries. Using recent data on population and employment in French urban functional areas, we show that the spatial and temporal framework in which urban growth is computed may considerably alter the results and their consecutive interpretation. When the city is defined as a continuously built-up area (the French agglomération, the measurement of concentration of urban population does not give the same result than when using as a definition the spatial scale of functional urban areas (the French aires urbaines. Similarly, the analyse of the spatial redistribution of population between urban centres, close and outer suburbs are reconsidered under trends of a longer duration has been given very different results, according to the way of defining cities and spaces.

  17. Long time scale simulation of a grain boundary in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.; Henkelman, G.; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    A general, twisted and tilted, grain boundary in copper has been simulated using the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method to study the atomistic structure of the non-crystalline region and the mechanism of annealing events that occur at low temperature. The simulated time interval spanned 67 mu s...... at 135 K. Similar final configurations were obtained starting from different initial structures: (i) by bringing the two grains into contact without any intermediate layer, and (ii) by inserting an amorphous region between the grains. The results obtained were analyzed with a radial distribution function...

  18. Model Reduction Using Multiple Time Scales in Stochastic Gene Regulatory Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peles, Slaven; Munsky, Brian; Khammash, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    .... Multiple time scales in mathematical models often lead to serious computational difficulties, such as numerical stiffness in the case of differential equations or excessively redundant Monte Carlo...

  19. Global Exponential Stability of Delayed Cohen-Grossberg BAM Neural Networks with Impulses on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of calculus on time scales, the homeomorphism theory, Lyapunov functional method, and some analysis techniques, sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability of the equilibrium point of Cohen-Grossberg bidirectional associative memory (BAM neural networks with distributed delays and impulses on time scales. This is the first time applying the time-scale calculus theory to unify the discrete-time and continuous-time Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural network with impulses under the same framework.

  20. Microcomputer interface board for time-resolved multichannel scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Cathy L.; Martin, Richard M.

    1987-08-01

    A low-cost multichannel scaler and signal-averaging system with user selectable channel widths ranging from 1 to 255 μs has been developed for molecular beam time-of-flight (TOF) experiments. It has the ability to collect up to 255 channels and has a programmable delay of up to 0.65 s. On-board logic can accommodate a 15-MHz count rate. Completely contained on a 7×2 3/4 -in. Apple II prototyping board (with the exception of a 5-A, 5-V external power supply), the interface fits into a peripheral port of the Apple II. The interface was tested by measuring the TOF distribution of Ar metastables from a supersonic nozzle beam source.

  1. The signature of atmospheric tides in sub-daily variations of Earth rotation as unveiled by globally-gridded atmospheric angular momentum functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Salstein, D. A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally-driven atmospheric tides provide a small but distinct contribution to shortperiod variations of Earth rotation parameters (ERP). The effect of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, commonly denoted as S1 and S2, respectively, is in the range of 2 - 10 uas for polar motion and 2 - 10 uas for changes in length-of-day (LOD). Even though ocean tides represent a much more dominant driving agent for ERP fluctuations at short time scales, high-frequency atmospheric effects are non-negligible, particularly given the prospective measurement accuracy of space geodetic techniques. However, previous studies, such as Brzezinski et al. (2002), de Viron et al. (2005) or Schindelegger et al. (2011), have been noticeably inconclusive on the exact amplitude and phase values of S1 and S2 atmospheric excitation signals. This study aims at shedding light on the origin of these uncertainties with respect to the axial component of Earth's rotation vector by investigating times series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) functions that are given on global grids and computed from three-hourly meteorological data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The signature of diurnal and semi-diurnal atmospheric tides is clearly visible in the gridded axial AAM functions, revealing a distinct spatial and temporal phase difference between pressure and wind tidal constituents of about ± π. It is shown that due to this counterbalance and the explicit axisymmetric spatial structure of S1 and S2, the net effect in sub-diurnal AAM (which is calculated from the global sum of gridded AAM functions) is always a small quantity, particularly sensitive to minor differences between the analysis fields of numerical weather models.

  2. From points to patterns - Transferring point scale groundwater measurements to catchment scale response patterns using time series modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderer, M.; McGlynn, B. L.; van Meerveld, I. H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed groundwater measurements across a catchment can provide information on subsurface stormflow generation and hydrologic connectivity of hillslopes to the stream network. However, groundwater dynamics can be highly variable in space and time, especially in steep headwater catchments. Prediction of groundwater response patterns at non-monitored sites requires transferring point scale information to the catchment scale through analysis of continuous groundwater level time series and their relationships to covariates such as topographic indices or landscape position. We applied time series analysis to a 4 year dataset of continuous groundwater level data for 51 wells distributed across a 20 ha pre-alpine headwater catchment in Switzerland to address the following questions: 1) Is the similarity or difference between the groundwater time series related to landscape position? 2) How does the relationship between groundwater dynamics and landscape position change across long (seasonal) and shorter (event) time scales and varying antecedent wetness conditions? 3) How can time series modeling be used to predict groundwater responses at non-monitored sites? We employed hierarchical clustering of the observed groundwater time series using both dynamic time warping and correlation based distance matrices. Based on the common site characteristics of the members of each cluster, the time series models were transferred to all non-monitored sites. This categorical approach provided maps of spatio-temporal groundwater dynamics across the entire catchment. We further developed a continuous approach based on process-based hydrological modeling and water table dynamic similarity. We suggest that continuous measurements at representative points and subsequent time series analysis can shed light into groundwater dynamics at the landscape scale and provide new insights into space-time patterns of hydrologic connectivity and streamflow generation.

  3. Fine Scale Baleen Whale Behavior Observed Via Tagging Over Daily Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    computer lab via Cat5e cables. To assist in finding whales, we had a DMON-equipped Slocum glider and a DMON-equipped wave glider doing passive acoustic...surveys in the Great South Channel before and during the cruise. The gliders are capable of detecting 3 the calls of right, fin, sei, and humpback...South Channel as well as small-scale surveys in the vicinity of the gliders when right/sei whale calls were acoustically detected. Despite all of

  4. Marine Dispersal Scales Are Congruent over Evolutionary and Ecological Time

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsky, Malin L.

    2016-12-15

    The degree to which offspring remain near their parents or disperse widely is critical for understanding population dynamics, evolution, and biogeography, and for designing conservation actions. In the ocean, most estimates suggesting short-distance dispersal are based on direct ecological observations of dispersing individuals, while indirect evolutionary estimates often suggest substantially greater homogeneity among populations. Reconciling these two approaches and their seemingly competing perspectives on dispersal has been a major challenge. Here we show for the first time that evolutionary and ecological measures of larval dispersal can closely agree by using both to estimate the distribution of dispersal distances. In orange clownfish (Amphiprion percula) populations in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, we found that evolutionary dispersal kernels were 17 km (95% confidence interval: 12–24 km) wide, while an exhaustive set of direct larval dispersal observations suggested kernel widths of 27 km (19–36 km) or 19 km (15–27 km) across two years. The similarity between these two approaches suggests that ecological and evolutionary dispersal kernels can be equivalent, and that the apparent disagreement between direct and indirect measurements can be overcome. Our results suggest that carefully applied evolutionary methods, which are often less expensive, can be broadly relevant for understanding ecological dispersal across the tree of life.

  5. Mars Polar Motion at Short Time-Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehant, V. M.; de Viron, O.; Karatekin, O.; van Hoolst, T.

    2005-12-01

    The rotation of Mars is not constant in time and presents irregularities that are mostly associated with the seasonal CO2 mass exchange between Mars' atmosphere and polar caps. This large mass redistribution (about a third of the total atmospheric mass is considered to be exchanged) induces variations in Mars' rotation speed as well as in polar motion. The effects of the atmosphere on the rotation can be estimated by using the angular momentum approach: because of conservation of angular momentum of Mars (solid body and atmosphere), considered as isolated, any change in the angular momentum of the atmosphere is associated with an opposite change in the angular momentum of the solid body of the planet. Mars' polar motion is computed for Mars models with three homogeneous layers (solid inner core, fluid outer core, and mantle) for different excitation causes (atmosphere, ice caps, and quakes). We estimate the amplitude of the polar motion resulting from atmospheric excitation, for a reasonable interval of damping factor values, for the two polar motion normal modes, i.e. the Chandler wobble and the Inner Core wobble. We show how the amplitude of the CW excited by the atmospheric noise can be interpreted in terms of anelasticity of the Martian mantle, through the CW damping factor. The damping is estimated from the observation of the mode itself under hypotheses on the type of forcing noise. We show that the signature of the inner core in the polar motion is very small, and is unlikely to be detected with the present observational precision. We further investigate the possibility to excite these normal modes through Marsquakes, and show that the predicted quake moments are not large enough to excite polar motion to an observable level. The analysis of polar motion, and in particular the determination of its normal mode components, is promising because normal mode periods and amplitudes are directly related to the properties of the deep interior. The precision needed

  6. Freshwater flushing time scales of the Vashishti Estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Sarma, R.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    Results are presented for the Vashishti estuary, Kerala, India to evaluate its freshwater flushing time scales based on 8 sets of observations of longitudinal salinity distributions. The results of the flushing time using the fraction of freshwater...

  7. Periodic solutions for a food chain system with Monod-Haldane functional response on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejun Zhuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study a three species food chain model on time scales, with Monod-Haldane functional response and time delay. With the help of coincidence degree theory, we establish the existence of periodic solutions.

  8. Scale (in)variance in a unified diffusion model of decision making and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simen, Patrick; Vlasov, Ksenia; Papadakis, Samantha

    2016-03-01

    Weber's law is the canonical scale-invariance law in psychology: when the intensities of 2 stimuli are scaled by any value k, the just-noticeable-difference between them also scales by k. A diffusion model that approximates a spike-counting process accounts for Weber's law (Link, 1992), but there exist surprising corollaries of this account that have not yet been described or tested. We show that (a) this spike-counting diffusion model predicts time-scale invariant decision time distributions in perceptual decision making, and time-scale invariant response time (RT) distributions in interval timing; (b) for 2-choice perceptual decisions, the model predicts equal accuracy but faster responding for stimulus pairs with equally scaled-up intensities; (c) the coefficient of variation (CV) of decision times should remain constant across average intensity scales, but should otherwise decrease as a specific function of stimulus discriminability and speed-accuracy trade-off; and (d) for timing tasks, RT CVs should be constant for all durations, and RT skewness should always equal 3 times the CV. We tested these predictions using visual, auditory and vibrotactile decision tasks and visual interval timing tasks in humans. The data conformed closely to the predictions in all modalities. These results support a unified theory of decision making and timing in terms of a common, underlying spike-counting process, compactly represented as a diffusion process. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Ordinary fractional differential equations are in fact usual entire ordinary differential equations on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Berenice C.; Barbanti, Luciano

    2014-12-01

    Despite the huge number of works considering fractional derivatives or derivatives on time scales some basic facts remain to be evaluated. Here we will be showing that the fractional derivative of monomials is in fact an entire derivative considered on an appropriate time scale.

  10. Some Opial Dynamic Inequalities Involving Higher Order Derivatives on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Saker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We will prove some new Opial dynamic inequalities involving higher order derivatives on time scales. The results will be proved by making use of Hölder's inequality, a simple consequence of Keller's chain rule and Taylor monomials on time scales. Some continuous and discrete inequalities will be derived from our results as special cases.

  11. On a nonstandard Volterra type dynamic integral equation on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Pachpatte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present paper is to study some basic qualitative properties of solutions of a nonstandard Volterra type dynamic integral equation on time scales. The tools employed in the analysis are based on the applications of the Banach fixed point theorem and a certain integral inequality with explicit estimate on time scales.

  12. Technical Report on the 6th Time Scale Algorithm Symposium and Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-29

    concerning the NTP timekeeping are presented. From all the presentations and lectures given in the conference 6 are selected and encouraged for...Realization of the Swedish National Distributed Time Scale (Carsten Rieck, SP, Sweden) 10:30 10:50 Brazilian Atomic Time Scale TA(ONRJ) (Ricardo Josee

  13. Vartiational Optimal-Control Problems with Delayed Arguments on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeljawad (Maraaba Thabet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with variational optimal-control problems on time scales in the presence of delay in the state variables. The problem is considered on a time scale unifying the discrete, the continuous, and the quantum cases. Two examples in the discrete and quantum cases are analyzed to illustrate our results.

  14. Modeling the uncertainty associated with the observation scale of space/time natural processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Serre, M.

    2005-12-01

    In many mapping applications of spatiotemporally distributed hydrological processes, the traditional space/time Geostatistics approaches have played a significant role to estimate a variable of interest at unsampled locations. Measured values are usually sparsely located over space and time due to the difficulty and cost of obtaining data. In some cases, the data for the hydrological variable of interest may have been collected at different temporal or spatial observation scales. Even though mixing data measured at different space/time scales may alleviate the problem of the sparsity of the data available, it essentially disregards the scale effect of estimation results. The importance of the scale effect must be recognized since a variable displays different physical properties depending on the spatial or temporal scale at which it is observed. In this study we develop a mathematical framework to derive the conditional Probability Density Function (PDF) of a variable at the local scale given an observation of that variable at a larger spatial or temporal scale, which properly models the uncertainty associated with the different observations scales of space/time natural processes. The developed framework allows to efficiently mix data observed at a variety of scales by accounting for data uncertainty associated with each observation scale present, and therefore generates soft data rigorously assimilated in the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) method of modern Geostatistics to increase the mapping accuracy of the map at the scale of interest. We investigate the proposed approach with synthetic case studies involving observations of a space/time process at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. These case studies demonstrate the power of the proposed approach by leading to a set of maps with a noticeable increase of mapping accuracy over classical approaches not accounting for the scale effects. Hence the proposed approach will be useful for a wide variety of

  15. Dual-time scale crystal plasticity FE model for cyclic deformation of Ti alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Kirane, Kedar; Ghosh, Somnath

    2007-12-01

    A dual-time scale finite element model is developed in this paper for simulating cyclic deformation in a Titanium alloy Ti-6242. The material is characterized by crystal plasticity constitutive relations. Modeling cyclic deformation using conventional time integration algorithms in a single time scale can be prohibitive for crystal plasticity computations. Typically 3D crystal plasticity based fatigue simulations found in the literature are in the range of 100 cycles. Results are subsequently extrapolated to thousands of cycles, which can lead to considerable error in fatigue predictions. However, the dual-time scale model enables simulations up to a significantly high number of cycles to reach local states of damage initiation leading to fatigue crack growth. This formulation decomposes the governing equations into two sets of problems, corresponding to a coarse time scale (low frequency) cycle-averaged problem and a fine time scale (high frequency) oscillatory problem. A statistically equivalent 3D polycrystalline model of Ti-6242 is simulated by the crystal plasticity finite element model to study the evolution of local stresses and strains in the microstructure with cyclic loading. The comparison with the single time scale reference solution shows excellent accuracy while the efficiency gained through time-scale compression can be enormous.

  16. Quantifying catchment-scale mixing and its effect on time-varying travel time distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der Y.; Torfs, P.J.J.F.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-01-01

    Travel time distributions are often used to characterize catchment discharge behavior, catchment vulnerability to pollution and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, these distributions vary with time because they are a function of rainfall and evapotranspiration. It is

  17. Quantifying catchment-scale mixing and its effects on time varying travel time distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, Y. van der; Torfs, P.J.J.F.; Zee, S.E.A.T.M. van der; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-01-01

    Travel time distributions are often used to characterize catchment discharge behavior, catchment vulnerability to pollution and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, these distributions vary with time because they are a function of rainfall and evapotranspiration. It is

  18. Acceleration time scale for the first-order Fermi acceleration in relativistic shock waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarz, J.; Ostrowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration time scale for the process of first-order Fermi acceleration in relativistic shock waves with oblique magnetic field configurations is investigated by the method of Monte Carlo particle simulations. We demonstrate the presence of correlation between the particle energy gain at interaction with the shock and the respective time elapsed since the previous interaction. Because of that any derivation of the acceleration time scale can not use the distribution of energy gains and ...

  19. Modelling soil carbon movement by erosion over large scales and long time periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, John; Davies, Jessica; Tipping, Ed

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural intensification accelerates physical erosion rates and the transport of carbon within the landscape. In order to improve understanding of how past, present and future anthropogenic land-use change has and will influence carbon and nutrient cycling, it is necessary to develop quantitative tools that can predict soil erosion and carbon movement at large temporal and spatial scales, that are consistent with the time constants of biogeochemical processes and the spatial scales of land-use change and natural resources. However, representing erosion and its impact on the carbon cycle over large spatial scales and long time periods is challenging. Erosion and sediment transport processes operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales with splash erosion dominating at the sub-plot scale and occurring within seconds, up to gully formation operating at field-catchment scales over days to months. In addition, most erosion production observations are made at the experimental plot scale, where fine time scales and detailed processes dominate. This is coupled with complexities associated with carbon detachment, decomposition and uncertainties surrounding carbon burial rates and stability - all of which occur over widely different temporal and spatial scales. As such, these data cannot be simply scaled to inform erosion and carbon representation at the regional scale, where topography, vegetation cover and landscape organisation become more important controls on sediment fluxes. We have developed a simple energy-based regional scale method of soil erosion modelling, which is integration into a hydro-biogeochemical model that will simulate carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus pools and fluxes across the UK from the industrial revolution to the present day. The model is driven by overland flow, dynamic vegetation cover, soil properties, and topographic distributions and produces sediment production and yield at the 5km grid scale. In this paper we will introduce the

  20. Effect of helicity on the correlation time of large scales in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2017-11-01

    Solutions of the forced Navier-Stokes equation have been conjectured to thermalize at scales larger than the forcing scale, similar to an absolute equilibrium obtained for the spectrally truncated Euler equation. Using direct numeric simulations of Taylor-Green flows and general-periodic helical flows, we present results on the probability density function, energy spectrum, autocorrelation function, and correlation time that compare the two systems. In the case of highly helical flows, we derive an analytic expression describing the correlation time for the absolute equilibrium of helical flows that is different from the E-1 /2k-1 scaling law of weakly helical flows. This model predicts a new helicity-based scaling law for the correlation time as τ (k ) ˜H-1 /2k-1 /2 . This scaling law is verified in simulations of the truncated Euler equation. In simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations the large-scale modes of forced Taylor-Green symmetric flows (with zero total helicity and large separation of scales) follow the same properties as absolute equilibrium including a τ (k ) ˜E-1 /2k-1 scaling for the correlation time. General-periodic helical flows also show similarities between the two systems; however, the largest scales of the forced flows deviate from the absolute equilibrium solutions.

  1. The multiple time scales of sleep dynamics as a challenge for modelling the sleeping brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Eckehard; Claussen, Jens Christian; Achermann, Peter

    2011-10-13

    A particular property of the sleeping brain is that it exhibits dynamics on very different time scales ranging from the typical sleep oscillations such as sleep spindles and slow waves that can be observed in electroencephalogram (EEG) segments of several seconds duration over the transitions between the different sleep stages on a time scale of minutes to the dynamical processes involved in sleep regulation with typical time constants in the range of hours. There is an increasing body of work on mathematical and computational models addressing these different dynamics, however, usually considering only processes on a single time scale. In this paper, we review and present a new analysis of the dynamics of human sleep EEG at the different time scales and relate the findings to recent modelling efforts pointing out both the achievements and remaining challenges.

  2. Estimating the distribution of rest-frame time-scales for blazar jets: a statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, I.; Blinov, D.; Papadakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.

    2017-03-01

    In any flux-density limited sample of blazars, the distribution of the time-scale modulation factor Δt΄/Δt, which quantifies the change in observed time-scales compared to the rest-frame ones due to redshift and relativistic compression follows an exponential distribution with a mean depending on the flux limit of the sample. In this work, we produce the mathematical formalism that allows us to use this information in order to uncover the underlining rest-frame probability density function of measurable time-scales of blazar jets. We extensively test our proposed methodology using a simulated Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar population with a 1.5 Jy flux-density limit in the simple case (where all blazars share the same intrinsic time-scale), in order to identify limits of applicability and potential biases due to observational systematics and sample selection. We find that for monitoring with time intervals between observations longer than ∼30 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale under investigation the method loses its ability to produce robust results. For time intervals of ∼3 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale, the error of the method is as low as 1 per cent in recovering the intrinsic rest-frame time-scale. We applied our method to rotations of the optical polarization angle of blazars observed by RoboPol. We found that the intrinsic time-scales of the longest duration rotation event in each blazar follows a narrow distribution, well described by a normal distribution with mean 87 d and standard deviation 5 d. We discuss possible interpretations of this result.

  3. Time scale defined by the fractal structure of the price fluctuations in foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki

    2010-04-01

    In this contribution, a new time scale named C-fluctuation time is defined by price fluctuations observed at a given resolution. The intraday fractal structures and the relations of the three time scales: real time (physical time), tick time and C-fluctuation time, in foreign exchange markets are analyzed. The data set used is trading prices of foreign exchange rates; US dollar (USD)/Japanese yen (JPY), USD/Euro (EUR), and EUR/JPY. The accuracy of the data is one minute and data within a minute are recorded in order of transaction. The series of instantaneous velocity of C-fluctuation time flowing are exponentially distributed for small C when they are measured by real time and for tiny C when they are measured by tick time. When the market is volatile, for larger C, the series of instantaneous velocity are exponentially distributed.

  4. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  5. Glottal closure instant and voice source analysis using time-scale ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For each period, the optimal LoMA is computed by linking amplitude maxima at each scale of a wavelet transform, using a dynamic programming algorithm. A time-scale analysis of the linear acoustic model of speech production shows several interesting properties. The LoMA points to the glottal closure instants. The LoMA ...

  6. Time scales of porphyry Cu deposit formation: insights from titanium diffusion in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Celestine N.; Reed, Mark H.; Mercer, Cameron M.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyry dikes and hydrothermal veins from the porphyry Cu-Mo deposit at Butte, Montana, contain multiple generations of quartz that are distinct in scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images and in Ti concentrations. A comparison of microprobe trace element profiles and maps to SEM-CL images shows that the concentration of Ti in quartz correlates positively with CL brightness but Al, K, and Fe do not. After calibrating CL brightness in relation to Ti concentration, we use the brightness gradient between different quartz generations as a proxy for Ti gradients that we model to determine time scales of quartz formation and cooling. Model results indicate that time scales of porphyry magma residence are ~1,000s of years and time scales from porphyry quartz phenocryst rim formation to porphyry dike injection and cooling are ~10s of years. Time scales for the formation and cooling of various generations of hydrothermal vein quartz range from 10s to 10,000s of years. These time scales are considerably shorter than the ~0.6 m.y. overall time frame for each porphyry-style mineralization pulse determined from isotopic studies at Butte, Montana. Simple heat conduction models provide a temporal reference point to compare chemical diffusion time scales, and we find that they support short dike and vein formation time scales. We interpret these relatively short time scales to indicate that the Butte porphyry deposit formed by short-lived episodes of hydrofracturing, dike injection, and vein formation, each with discrete thermal pulses, which repeated over the ~3 m.y. generation of the deposit.

  7. A Dynamically Computed Convective Time Scale for the Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many convective parameterization schemes define a convective adjustment time scale τ as the time allowed for dissipation of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The Kain–Fritsch scheme defines τ based on an estimate of the advective time period for deep con...

  8. Time-frequency scaling transformation of the phonocardiogram based of the matching pursuit method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Durand, L G; Senhadji, L; Lee, H C; Coatrieux, J L

    1998-08-01

    A time-frequency scaling transformation based on the matching pursuit (MP) method is developed for the phonocardiogram (PCG). The MP method decomposes a signal into a series of time-frequency atoms by using an iterative process. The modification of the time scale of the PCG can be performed without perceptible change in its spectral characteristics. It is also possible to modify the frequency scale without changing the temporal properties. The technique has been tested on 11 PCG's containing heart sounds and different murmurs. A scaling/inverse-scaling procedure was used for quantitative evaluation of the scaling performance. Both the spectrogram and a MP-based Wigner distribution were used for visual comparison in the time-frequency domain. The results showed that the technique is suitable and effective for the time-frequency scale transformation of both the transient property of the heart sounds and the more complex random property of the murmurs. It is also shown that the effectiveness of the method is strongly related to the optimization of the parameters used for the decomposition of the signals.

  9. Existence Results for Higher-Order Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Yanbin; Liu Jian

    2009-01-01

    By using the fixed-point index theorem, we consider the existence of positive solutions for the following nonlinear higher-order four-point singular boundary value problem on time scales , ; , ; , ; , , where , , , , , , , and is rd-continuous.

  10. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Functional Dynamic Equations with Damping on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Tuğla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study oscillatory behavior of second-order dynamic equations with damping under some assumptions on time scales. New theorems extend and improve the results in the literature. Illustrative examples are given.

  11. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  12. Atmospheric modelling and prediction at time scales from days to seasons

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Daily weather forecasts are skilful and are initial-value problems, while at the seasonal time scale, slowly varying surface forcing, for example from the tropical Pacific Ocean, can induce atmospheric anomalies that are sufficiently long...

  13. Zero-order Approximation of Three-time Scale Singular Linear-quadratic Optimal Control Problem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalashnikova, M. A

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the construction of a zero-order approximation of the solution of a three-time scale singular perturbed linear-quadratic optimal control problem with the help of the direct scheme method...

  14. In a warming climate, just how predictable are temperature extremes at weather and seasonal time scales?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available , just how predictable are temperature extremes at weather and seasonal time scales? Willem A. Landman Estelle Marx Ruth Park Stephanie Landman Melissa Lazenby Climate change projections First-order quadratic difference equation ? Lorenz...

  15. Multiple time scales in modeling the incidence of infections acquired in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wolkewitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU their risk of getting an infection will be highly depend on the length of stay at-risk in the ICU. In addition, risk of infection is likely to vary over calendar time as a result of fluctuations in the prevalence of the pathogen on the ward. Hence risk of infection is expected to depend on two time scales (time in ICU and calendar time as well as competing events (discharge or death and their spatial location. The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply appropriate statistical models for the risk of ICU-acquired infection accounting for multiple time scales, competing risks and the spatial clustering of the data. Methods A multi-center data base from a Spanish surveillance network was used to study the occurrence of an infection due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The analysis included 84,843 patient admissions between January 2006 and December 2011 from 81 ICUs. Stratified Cox models were used to study multiple time scales while accounting for spatial clustering of the data (patients within ICUs and for death or discharge as competing events for MRSA infection. Results Both time scales, time in ICU and calendar time, are highly associated with the MRSA hazard rate and cumulative risk. When using only one basic time scale, the interpretation and magnitude of several patient-individual risk factors differed. Risk factors concerning the severity of illness were more pronounced when using only calendar time. These differences disappeared when using both time scales simultaneously. Conclusions The time-dependent dynamics of infections is complex and should be studied with models allowing for multiple time scales. For patient individual risk-factors we recommend stratified Cox regression models for competing events with ICU time as the basic time scale and calendar time as a covariate. The inclusion of calendar time and stratification by ICU

  16. A two-time-scale autopilot for high-performance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Chatterji, G. B.; Cheng, V. H. L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-time-scale autopilot is proposed for the Aircraft Controls Design Challenge problem. This control law uses a nonlinear aircraft model constructed from the given vehicle simulation. The vehicle model is partitioned into slow translational dynamics and fast rotational dynamics. Feedback linearization is then employed to synthesize control laws for these two-time scales. Due to the nature of the synthesis, the control law is suitable for automatic trajectory following, and also for pilot control.

  17. New time-scale criteria for model simplification of bio-reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA based on time-scale analysis is known to be an effective method for simplifying metabolic reaction system, but the conventional analysis becomes time-consuming and tedious when the system is large. Although there are automatic methods, they are based on eigenvalue calculations of the Jacobian matrix and on linear transformations, which have a high computation cost. A more efficient estimation approach is necessary for complex systems. Results This work derived new time-scale factor by focusing on the problem structure. By mathematically reasoning the balancing behavior of fast species, new time-scale criteria were derived with a simple expression that uses the Jacobian matrix directly. The algorithm requires no linear transformation or decomposition of the Jacobian matrix, which has been an essential part for previous automatic time-scaling methods. Furthermore, the proposed scale factor is estimated locally. Therefore, an iterative procedure was also developed to find the possible multiple boundary layers and to derive an appropriate reduced model. Conclusion By successive calculation of the newly derived time-scale criteria, it was possible to detect multiple boundary layers of full ordinary differential equation (ODE models. Besides, the iterative procedure could derive the appropriate reduced differential algebraic equation (DAE model with consistent initial values, which was tested with simple examples and a practical example.

  18. LARGE SCALE IMAGE PROCESSING IN REAL-TIME ENVIRONMENTS WITH KAFKA

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon-Ki Kim; Chang-Sung Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Recently, real-time image data generated is increasing not only in resolution but also in amount. This large-scale image originates from a large number of camera channels. There is a way to use GPU for high-speed processing of images, but it cannot be done efficiently by using single GPU for large-scale image processing. In this paper, we provide a new method for constructing a distributed environment using open source called Apache Kafka for real-time processing of large-scale images. This m...

  19. Small-time Scale Network Traffic Prediction Based on Complex-valued Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Accurate models play an important role in capturing the significant characteristics of the network traffic, analyzing the network dynamic, and improving the forecasting accuracy for system dynamics. In this study, complex-valued neural network (CVNN) model is proposed to further improve the accuracy of small-time scale network traffic forecasting. Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is proposed to optimize the complex-valued and real-valued parameters of CVNN model. Small-scale traffic measurements data namely the TCP traffic data is used to test the performance of CVNN model. Experimental results reveal that CVNN model forecasts the small-time scale network traffic measurement data very accurately

  20. A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lilai, E-mail: llxu@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Gao, Peiqing, E-mail: peiqing15@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China); Cui, Shenghui, E-mail: shcui@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liu, Chun, E-mail: xmhwlc@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ► The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ► At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ► At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ► At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 – 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 – 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to

  1. Putting scales into evolutionary time: the divergence of major scale insect lineages (Hemiptera) predates the radiation of modern angiosperm hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vea, Isabelle M.; Grimaldi, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation of flowering plants in the mid-Cretaceous transformed landscapes and is widely believed to have fuelled the radiations of major groups of phytophagous insects. An excellent group to test this assertion is the scale insects (Coccomorpha: Hemiptera), with some 8,000 described Recent species and probably the most diverse fossil record of any phytophagous insect group preserved in amber. We used here a total-evidence approach (by tip-dating) employing 174 morphological characters of 73 Recent and 43 fossil taxa (48 families) and DNA sequences of three gene regions, to obtain divergence time estimates and compare the chronology of the most diverse lineage of scale insects, the neococcoid families, with the timing of the main angiosperm radiation. An estimated origin of the Coccomorpha occurred at the beginning of the Triassic, about 245 Ma [228–273], and of the neococcoids 60 million years later [210–165 Ma]. A total-evidence approach allows the integration of extinct scale insects into a phylogenetic framework, resulting in slightly younger median estimates than analyses using Recent taxa, calibrated with fossil ages only. From these estimates, we hypothesise that most major lineages of coccoids shifted from gymnosperms onto angiosperms when the latter became diverse and abundant in the mid- to Late Cretaceous. PMID:27000526

  2. Putting scales into evolutionary time: the divergence of major scale insect lineages (Hemiptera) predates the radiation of modern angiosperm hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vea, Isabelle M; Grimaldi, David A

    2016-03-22

    The radiation of flowering plants in the mid-Cretaceous transformed landscapes and is widely believed to have fuelled the radiations of major groups of phytophagous insects. An excellent group to test this assertion is the scale insects (Coccomorpha: Hemiptera), with some 8,000 described Recent species and probably the most diverse fossil record of any phytophagous insect group preserved in amber. We used here a total-evidence approach (by tip-dating) employing 174 morphological characters of 73 Recent and 43 fossil taxa (48 families) and DNA sequences of three gene regions, to obtain divergence time estimates and compare the chronology of the most diverse lineage of scale insects, the neococcoid families, with the timing of the main angiosperm radiation. An estimated origin of the Coccomorpha occurred at the beginning of the Triassic, about 245 Ma [228-273], and of the neococcoids 60 million years later [210-165 Ma]. A total-evidence approach allows the integration of extinct scale insects into a phylogenetic framework, resulting in slightly younger median estimates than analyses using Recent taxa, calibrated with fossil ages only. From these estimates, we hypothesise that most major lineages of coccoids shifted from gymnosperms onto angiosperms when the latter became diverse and abundant in the mid- to Late Cretaceous.

  3. A multi-time scale approach to remaining useful life prediction in rolling bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuning; Yan, Ruqiang; Gao, Robert X.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multi-time scale approach to bearing defect tracking and remaining useful life (RUL) prediction, which integrates enhanced phase space warping (PSW) with a modified Paris crack growth model. As a data-driven method, PSW describes the dynamical behavior of the bearing being tested on a fast-time scale, whereas the Paris crack growth model, as a physics-based model, characterizes the bearing's defect propagation on a slow-time scale. Theoretically, PSW constructs a tracking metric by evaluating the phase space trajectory warping of the bearing vibration data, and establishes a correlation between measurement on a fast-time scale and defect growth variables on a slow-time scale. Furthermore, PSW is enhanced by a multi-dimensional auto-regression (AR) model for improved accuracy in defect tracking. Also, the Paris crack growth model is modified by a time-piecewise algorithm for real-time RUL prediction. Case studies performed on two run-to-failure experiments indicate that the developed technique is effective in tracking the evolution of bearing defects and accurately predict the bearing RUL, thus contributing to the literature of bearing prognosis .

  4. Scaling collapse and structure functions: identifying self-affinity in finite length time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Chapman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical determination of the scaling properties and exponents of time series presents a formidable challenge in testing, and developing, a theoretical understanding of turbulence and other out-of-equilibrium phenomena. We discuss the special case of self affine time series in the context of a stochastic process. We highlight two complementary approaches to the differenced variable of the data: i attempting a scaling collapse of the Probability Density Functions which should then be well described by the solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and ii using structure functions to determine the scaling properties of the higher order moments. We consider a method of conditioning that recovers the underlying self affine scaling in a finite length time series, and illustrate it using a Lévy flight.

  5. Time scales in the approach to equilibrium of macroscopic quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Hara, Takashi; Tasaki, Hal

    2013-10-04

    We prove two theorems concerning the time evolution in general isolated quantum systems. The theorems are relevant to the issue of the time scale in the approach to equilibrium. The first theorem shows that there can be pathological situations in which the relaxation takes an extraordinarily long time, while the second theorem shows that one can always choose an equilibrium subspace, the relaxation to which requires only a short time for any initial state.

  6. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms - and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries - in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of -0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of -0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  7. Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis as a Method for Time-Series Analysis of Climate Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Balzter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is mounting that the temporal dynamics of the climate system are changing at the same time as the average global temperature is increasing due to multiple climate forcings. A large number of extreme weather events such as prolonged cold spells, heatwaves, droughts and floods have been recorded around the world in the past 10 years. Such changes in the temporal scaling behaviour of climate time-series data can be difficult to detect. While there are easy and direct ways of analysing climate data by calculating the means and variances for different levels of temporal aggregation, these methods can miss more subtle changes in their dynamics. This paper describes multi-scale entropy (MSE analysis as a tool to study climate time-series data and to identify temporal scales of variability and their change over time in climate time-series. MSE estimates the sample entropy of the time-series after coarse-graining at different temporal scales. An application of MSE to Central European, variance-adjusted, mean monthly air temperature anomalies (CRUTEM4v is provided. The results show that the temporal scales of the current climate (1960–2014 are different from the long-term average (1850–1960. For temporal scale factors longer than 12 months, the sample entropy increased markedly compared to the long-term record. Such an increase can be explained by systems theory with greater complexity in the regional temperature data. From 1961 the patterns of monthly air temperatures are less regular at time-scales greater than 12 months than in the earlier time period. This finding suggests that, at these inter-annual time scales, the temperature variability has become less predictable than in the past. It is possible that climate system feedbacks are expressed in altered temporal scales of the European temperature time-series data. A comparison with the variance and Shannon entropy shows that MSE analysis can provide additional information on the

  8. Time tracking and interaction of energy-eddies at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardesa, Jose I.; Vela-Martin, Alberto; Jimenez, Javier

    2016-11-01

    We study the energy cascade through coherent structures obtained in time-resolved simulations of incompressible, statistically steady isotropic turbulence. The structures are defined as geometrically connected regions of the flow with high kinetic energy. We compute the latter by band-pass filtering the velocity field around a scale r. We analyse the dynamics of structures extracted with different r, which are a proxy for eddies containing energy at those r. We find that the size of these "energy-eddies" scales with r, while their lifetime scales with the local eddy-turnover r 2 / 3ɛ - 1 / 3 , where ɛ is the energy dissipation averaged over all space and time. Furthermore, a statistical analysis over the lives of the eddies shows a slight predominance of the splitting over the merging process. When we isolate the eddies which do not interact with other eddies of the same scale, we observe a parent-child dependence by which, on average, structures are born at scale r during the decaying part of the life of a structure at scale r' > r . The energy-eddy at r' lives in the same region of space as that at r. Finally, we investigate how interactions between eddies at the same scale are echoed across other scales. Funded by the ERC project Coturb.

  9. Studying time of flight imaging through scattering media across multiple size scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to optical imaging in a variety of different environments and across many size and time scales. Scattering complicates imaging on large scales when imaging through the atmosphere when imaging from airborne or space borne platforms, through marine fog, or through fog and dust in vehicle navigation, for example in self driving cars. On smaller scales, scattering is the major obstacle when imaging through human tissue in biomedical applications. Despite the large variety of participating materials and size scales, light transport in all these environments is usually described with very similar scattering models that are defined by the same small set of parameters, including scattering and absorption length and phase function. We attempt a study of scattering and methods of imaging through scattering across different scales and media, particularly with respect to the use of time of flight information. We can show that using time of flight, in addition to spatial information, provides distinct advantages in scattering environments. By performing a comparative study of scattering across scales and media, we are able to suggest scale models for scattering environments to aid lab research. We also can transfer knowledge and methodology between different fields.

  10. Urban Freight Management with Stochastic Time-Dependent Travel Times and Application to Large-Scale Transportation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed the vehicle routing problem (VRP in large-scale urban transportation networks with stochastic time-dependent (STD travel times. The subproblem which is how to find the optimal path connecting any pair of customer nodes in a STD network was solved through a robust approach without requiring the probability distributions of link travel times. Based on that, the proposed STD-VRP model can be converted into solving a normal time-dependent VRP (TD-VRP, and algorithms for such TD-VRPs can also be introduced to obtain the solution. Numerical experiments were conducted to address STD-VRPTW of practical sizes on a real world urban network, demonstrated here on the road network of Shenzhen, China. The stochastic time-dependent link travel times of the network were calibrated by historical floating car data. A route construction algorithm was applied to solve the STD problem in 4 delivery scenarios efficiently. The computational results showed that the proposed STD-VRPTW model can improve the level of customer service by satisfying the time-window constraint under any circumstances. The improvement can be very significant especially for large-scale network delivery tasks with no more increase in cost and environmental impacts.

  11. Mountain erosion over 10 yr, 10 k.y., and 10 m.y. time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Kirchner; Robert C. Finkel; Clifford S. Riebe; Darryl E. Granger; James L. Clayton; John G. King; Walter F. Megahan

    2001-01-01

    We used cosmogenic 10Be to measure erosion rates over 10 k.y. time scales at 32 Idaho mountain catchments, ranging from small experimental watersheds (0.2 km2) to large river basins (35 000 km2). These long-term sediment yields are, on average, 17 times higher than stream sediment fluxes measured over...

  12. Mixing and flushing time scales in the Azhikode Estuary, southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Revichandran, C.; Pylee, A.

    Flushing time scales of the Azhikode Estuary, Kerala, India showed pronounced dry season and wet season signals as well as large inter-annual variation. Cumulative flushing time of the estuary varies from 4.8 tide cycles in April to 1.22 tide cycles...

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring of the Syracuse Athena temple: scale invariance in the timing of ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, G; Carpinteri, A; Lacidogna, G; Manuello, A

    2011-03-11

    We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

  14. Almost periodic solutions of impulsive BAM neural networks with variable delays on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a class of impulsive BAM neural networks with variable delays on time scales. Some sufficient conditions are established to ensure the existence and exponential stability of almost periodic solutions for such class of impulsive BAM neural networks. The results are essentially new when T=R or T=Z. It is the first time that the existence and exponential stability of almost periodic solutions for impulsive BAM neural networks are obtained on time scales. Furthermore, an example and numerical simulations are given to illustrate our effectiveness of the obtained results.

  15. Comparative analysis of DNA replication timing reveals conserved large-scale chromosomal architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Yaffe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the timing of DNA replication is coordinated across megabase-scale domains in metazoan genomes, yet the importance of this aspect of genome organization is unclear. Here we show that replication timing is remarkably conserved between human and mouse, uncovering large regions that may have been governed by similar replication dynamics since these species have diverged. This conservation is both tissue-specific and independent of the genomic G+C content conservation. Moreover, we show that time of replication is globally conserved despite numerous large-scale genome rearrangements. We systematically identify rearrangement fusion points and demonstrate that replication time can be locally diverged at these loci. Conversely, rearrangements are shown to be correlated with early replication and physical chromosomal proximity. These results suggest that large chromosomal domains of coordinated replication are shuffled by evolution while conserving the large-scale nuclear architecture of the genome.

  16. Dynamics of Bayesian non-Gaussian sensorimotor learning with multiple time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baohua; Hofmann, David; Sober, Samuel; Nemenman, Ilya

    Various theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that sensorimotor learning in animals happens on multiple time scales. In such models, animals can respond to perturbations quickly but keep memories for a long period of time. However, those previous models only focus on average learning behaviors. Here, we propose a model with multiple time scales that deals with the dynamics of whole behavior distributions. The model includes multiple memories, each with a non-Gaussian distribution and its own associated time scale. The memories are combined to generate a distribution of the desired motor command. Our model explains simultaneously the dynamics of distributions of the songbird vocal behaviors in various experiments, including adaptations after step changes or ramps in the error signals and dynamics of forgetting during the washout period, where an immediate sharp approach to the baseline is followed by a prolonged decay. This work was supported partially by NIH Grant # 1 R01 EB022872, and NIH Grant # NS084844.

  17. Modeling multiple time scale firing rate adaptation in a neural network of local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Brian Nils

    2015-02-01

    In response to stimulus changes, the firing rates of many neurons adapt, such that stimulus change is emphasized. Previous work has emphasized that rate adaptation can span a wide range of time scales and produce time scale invariant power law adaptation. However, neuronal rate adaptation is typically modeled using single time scale dynamics, and constructing a conductance-based model with arbitrary adaptation dynamics is nontrivial. Here, a modeling approach is developed in which firing rate adaptation, or spike frequency adaptation, can be understood as a filtering of slow stimulus statistics. Adaptation dynamics are modeled by a stimulus filter, and quantified by measuring the phase leads of the firing rate in response to varying input frequencies. Arbitrary adaptation dynamics are approximated by a set of weighted exponentials with parameters obtained by fitting to a desired filter. With this approach it is straightforward to assess the effect of multiple time scale adaptation dynamics on neural networks. To demonstrate this, single time scale and power law adaptation were added to a network model of local field potentials. Rate adaptation enhanced the slow oscillations of the network and flattened the output power spectrum, dampening intrinsic network frequencies. Thus, rate adaptation may play an important role in network dynamics.

  18. Timing of millennial-scale climate change in Antarctica and Greenland during the last glacial period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunier, T; Brook, E J

    2001-01-01

    A precise relative chronology for Greenland and West Antarctic paleotemperature is extended to 90,000 years ago, based on correlation of atmospheric methane records from the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 and Byrd ice cores. Over this period, the onset of seven major millennial-scale warmings....... This pattern provides further evidence for the operation of a "bipolar see-saw" in air temperatures and an oceanic teleconnection between the hemispheres on millennial time scales....

  19. Scaling of time-dependent stagnant lid convection: Application to small-scale convection on Earth and other terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatov, V. S.; Moresi, L.-N.

    2000-09-01

    Small-scale convection associated with instabilities at the bottom of the lithospheric plates on the Earth and other terrestrial planets occurs in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection. Systematic numerical simulations of time-dependent, internally heated stagnant lid convection suggest simple scaling relationships for a variety of convective parameters and in a broad range of power law viscosities. Application of these scaling relationships to the Earth's oceanic lithosphere shows that for either diffusion or dislocation viscosity of olivine, convective instabilities occur in the lower part of the lithosphere between 85 and 100 km depth (the rheological sublayer). ``Wet'' olivine satisfies constraints on the heat flux and mantle temperature better than ``dry'' olivine, supporting the view that the upper mantle of the Earth is wet. This is also consistent with the fact that the rheological sublayer is located below the Gutenberg discontinuity which was proposed to represent a sharp change in water content. The viscosity of asthenosphere is (3-6)×1018Pas, consistent with previous estimates. The velocities of cold plumes are relatively high reaching several meters per year in the dislocation creep regime. A low value of the heat flux in old continental cratons suggests that continental lithosphere might be convectively stable unless it is perturbed by processes associated with plate tectonics and hot plumes. The absence of plate tectonics on other terrestrial planets and the low heat transport efficiency of stagnant lid convection can lead to widespread melting during the thermal evolution of the terrestrial planets. If the terrestrial planets are dry, small-scale convection cannot occur at subsolidus temperatures.

  20. Scale relativity and fractal space-time a new approach to unifying relativity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Nottale, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive survey of the development of the theory of scale relativity and fractal space-time. It suggests an original solution to the disunified nature of the classical-quantum transition in physical systems, enabling the basis of quantum mechanics on the principle of relativity, provided this principle is extended to scale transformations of the reference system. In the framework of such a newly generalized relativity theory (including position, orientation, motion and now scale transformations), the fundamental laws of physics may be given a general form that unifies

  1. Multiple-Time-Scales Hierarchical Frequency Stability Control Strategy of Medium-Voltage Isolated Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhuoli; Yang, Ping; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an islanded medium-voltage (MV) microgrid placed in Dongao Island is presented, which integrates renewable-energy-based distributed generations (DGs), energy storage system (ESS), and local loads. In an isolated microgrid without connection to the main grid to support the frequency......, it is more complex to control and manage. Thus in order to maintain the frequency stability in multiple-time-scales, a hierarchical control strategy is proposed. The proposed control architecture divides the system frequency in three zones: (A) stable zone, (B) precautionary zone and (C) emergency zone....... In this way, dynamic stability control that cope with disturbances in short-time scale is implemented by microgrid central controller (MGCC) within Zone B and Zone C. Meanwhile, steady-state stability control to solve the peaks and valleys problem of loads and DGs in long-time scale is executed by microgrid...

  2. Cavity-Enhanced Real-Time Monitoring of Single-Charge Jumps at the Microsecond Time Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arnold

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We use fast coherent reflectivity measurements, in a strongly coupled quantum dot micropillar device, to monitor in real time single-charge jumps at the microsecond time scale. Thanks to the strong enhancement of light-matter interaction inside the cavity, and to a close to shot-noise-limited detection setup, the measurement rate is 5 orders of magnitude faster than with previous optical experiments of direct single-charge sensing with quantum dots. The monitored transitions, identified at any given time with a less than 0.2% error probability, correspond to a carrier being captured and then released by a single material defect. This high-speed technique opens the way for the real-time monitoring of other rapid single quantum events, such as the quantum jumps of a single spin.

  3. Enhanced identification and exploitation of time scales for model reduction in stochastic chemical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Uribe, Carlos A; Verghese, George C; Tzafriri, Abraham R

    2008-12-28

    Widely different time scales are common in systems of chemical reactions and can be exploited to obtain reduced models applicable to the time scales of interest. These reduced models enable more efficient computation and simplify analysis. A classic example is the irreversible enzymatic reaction, for which separation of time scales in a deterministic mass action kinetics model results in approximate rate laws for the slow dynamics, such as that of Michaelis-Menten. Recently, several methods have been developed for separation of slow and fast time scales in chemical master equation (CME) descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics, yielding separate reduced CMEs for the slow variables and the fast variables. The paper begins by systematizing the preliminary step of identifying slow and fast variables in a chemical system from a specification of the slow and fast reactions in the system. The authors then present an enhanced time-scale-separation method that can extend the validity and improve the accuracy of existing methods by better accounting for slow reactions when equilibrating the fast subsystem. The resulting method is particularly accurate in systems such as enzymatic and protein interaction networks, where the rates of the slow reactions that modify the slow variables are not a function of the slow variables. The authors apply their methodology to the case of an irreversible enzymatic reaction and show that the resulting improvements in accuracy and validity are analogous to those obtained in the deterministic case by using the total quasi-steady-state approximation rather than the classical Michaelis-Menten. The other main contribution of this paper is to show how mass fluctuation kinetics models, which give approximate evolution equations for the means, variances, and covariances of the concentrations in a chemical system, can feed into time-scale-separation methods at a variety of stages.

  4. Quantifying nearshore morphological recovery time scales using argus video imaging : Palm Beach, Sydney and Duck, North Carolina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.; Holman, R.; De Schipper, M.A.; Lippmann, T.; Wehof, J.; Duong, T.M.; Roelvink, D.; Stive, M.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Time scales of post-storm nearshore morphological recovery and physical processes governing these time scales are poorly understood at present. The ability to predict nearshore morphological recovery time scales based on pre-, during- or post-resetting storm conditions is an essential requirement

  5. Soot aging time scales in polluted regions during day and night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Riemer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging of soot is one of the key uncertainties in the estimation of both the direct and indirect climate effect. While freshly emitted soot is initially hydrophobic and externally mixed, it can be transferred into an internal mixture by coagulation, condensation or photochemical processes. These aging processes affect the hygroscopic qualities and hence the growth behaviour, the optical properties and eventually the lifetime of the soot particles. However, due to computational limits the aging of soot in global climate models is often only parameterised by an estimated turnover rate resulting in a lifetime of soot of several days. Hence, the aging process of soot is one of the key uncertainties governing the burden and effect of black carbon. In this study, we discuss the time scale on which diesel soot is transferred from an external to an internal mixture based on the results of our simulations with a comprehensive mesoscale model. For daytime conditions during summer condensation of sulphuric acid is dominant and the aging process occurs on a time scale of τ =8h close to the sources and τ =2h above the source region. During winter comparable time scales are found but ammonium nitrate becomes more important. During night time condensation is not effective. Then coagulation is the most important aging process and our results show time scales between 10h and 40h.

  6. Scaling analysis of high-frequency time series of gamma-ray counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Susana; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Gamma radiation is being monitored in a dedicated campaign set-up at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM), established and supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America with the collaboration of the Government of the Autonomous Region of the Azores and University of the Azores. The temporal variability of gamma radiation is mainly determined by the time-varying concentration of radon progeny, which in turn is influenced by meteorological conditions and precipitation scavenging. The resulting time series of high-frequency (1-minute) gamma-ray counts displays therefore a complex temporal structure on multiple time scales, including long-range dependent behavior. This work addresses the scaling properties of the time series of gamma-ray counts from the ENA site (data freely available from the ARM data archive) using both wavelet and model-based methods for the estimation of the scaling exponent. The time series is dominated by sharp peaks associated with events of strong precipitation. The effect of these peaks on the estimation of the scaling exponent, as well as the effect of temporal aggregation (1-minute versus 15-minute aggregated data) is further addressed.

  7. Plotting systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure on a real time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velden, M; Wölk, C

    1990-11-01

    Since a valid non-invasive method for continuously measuring blood pressure is available for the psychophysiological laboratory, a procedure must be found for depicting blood pressure characteristics (systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure) on a real time scale, that is not simply from one heartbeat to the next. Values for blood pressure characteristics are actualized by heartbeats and thus occur at discrete points in time only, quite like values for heart rate. It is being assumed that the conditions for the blood pressure characteristics vary continuously, however, and that a value, actualized by a heartbeat, is representative for a time interval extending halfway before and after the point in time where it occurs. For computing a value for a real time interval it is proposed to weight the blood pressure values according to the amount of time their respective time intervals extend within the real time interval.

  8. A Statistical Analysis of the Scaling Laws for the Confinement Time Distinguishing between Core and Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, E.; Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Lupelli, I.; Gaudio, P.

    The H mode of confinement in Tokamaks is characterized by a thin region of high gradients, located at the edge of the plasma and called the Edge Transport Barrier. Even if various theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretation of the edge physics, the main empirical scaling laws of the plasma confinement time are expressed in terms of global plasma parameters and they do not discriminate between the edge and core regions. Moreover all the scaling laws are assumed to be power law monomials. In the present paper, a new methodology is proposed to investigate the validity of both assumptions. The approach is based on Symbolic Regression via Genetic Programming and allows first the extraction of the most statistically reliable models from the available experimental data in the ITPA database. Non linear fitting is then applied to the mathematical expressions found by Symbolic regression. The obtained scaling laws are compared with the traditional scalings in power law form.

  9. Time-variable gravity potential components for optical clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C.; Denker, H.; Timmen, L.

    2016-12-01

    The latest generation of optical atomic clocks is approaching the level of one part in 1018 in terms of frequency stability and uncertainty. For clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales, a relativistic redshift effect of the clock frequencies has to be taken into account at a corresponding uncertainty level of about 0.1 m2 s-2 and 0.01 m in terms of gravity potential and height, respectively. Besides the predominant static part of the gravity potential, temporal variations must be considered in order to avoid systematic frequency shifts. Time-variable gravity potential components induced by tides and non-tidal mass redistributions are investigated with regard to the level of one part in 1018. The magnitudes and dominant time periods of the individual gravity potential contributions are investigated globally and for specific laboratory sites together with the related uncertainty estimates. The basics of the computation methods are presented along with the applied models, data sets and software. Solid Earth tides contribute by far the most dominant signal with a global maximum amplitude of 4.2 m2 s-2 for the potential and a range (maximum-to-minimum) of up to 1.3 and 10.0 m2 s-2 in terms of potential differences between specific laboratories over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. Amplitudes of the ocean tidal loading potential can amount up to 1.25 m2 s-2, while the range of the potential between specific laboratories is 0.3 and 1.1 m2 s-2 over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. These are the only two contributors being relevant at a 10-17 level. However, several other time-variable potential effects can particularly affect clock comparisons at the 10-18 level. Besides solid Earth pole tides, these are non-tidal mass redistributions in the atmosphere, the oceans and the continental water storage.

  10. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    This book deals with special relativity theory and its application to cosmology. It presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The book will be of interest to cosmologists, astrophysicists, theoretical

  11. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    This book presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large-scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The relationship between cosmic velocity, acceleration and distances is given. In the appendices gravitation is added in the form of a cosmological g

  12. Volatility Clustering and Scaling for Financial Time Series due to Attractor Bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, A.; Hołyst, J. A.; Helbing, D.

    2002-09-01

    A microscopic model of financial markets is considered, consisting of many interacting agents (spins) with global coupling and discrete-time heat bath dynamics, similar to random Ising systems. The interactions between agents change randomly in time. In the thermodynamic limit, the obtained time series of price returns show chaotic bursts resulting from the emergence of attractor bubbling or on-off intermittency, resembling the empirical financial time series with volatility clustering. For a proper choice of the model parameters, the probability distributions of returns exhibit power-law tails with scaling exponents close to the empirical ones.

  13. Hierarchical Dynamics of Ecological Communities: Do Scales of Space and Time Match?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Göthe, Emma; Johnson, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Theory posits that community dynamics organize at distinct hierarchical scales of space and time, and that the spatial and temporal patterns at each scale are commensurate. Here we use time series modeling to investigate fluctuation frequencies of species groups within invertebrate metacommunities in 26 boreal lakes over a 20-year period, and variance partitioning analysis to study whether species groups with different fluctuation patterns show spatial signals that are commensurate with the scale-specific fluctuation patterns identified. We identified two groups of invertebrates representing hierarchically organized temporal dynamics: one species group showed temporal variability at decadal scales (slow patterns of change), whilst another group showed fluctuations at 3 to 5-year intervals (faster change). This pattern was consistently found across all lakes studied. A spatial signal was evident in the slow but not faster-changing species groups. As expected, the spatial signal for the slow-changing group coincided with broad-scale spatial patterns that could be explained with historical biogeography (ecoregion delineation, and dispersal limitation assessed through a dispersal trait analysis). In addition to spatial factors, the slow-changing groups correlated with environmental variables, supporting the conjecture that boreal lakes are undergoing environmental change. Taken together our results suggest that regionally distinct sets of taxa, separated by biogeographical boundaries, responded similarly to broad-scale environmental change. Not only does our approach allow testing theory about hierarchically structured space-time patterns; more generally, it allows assessing the relative role of the ability of communities to track environmental change and dispersal constraints limiting community structure and biodiversity at macroecological scales. PMID:23874905

  14. A Systematic Multi-Time Scale Solution for Regional Power Grid Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W. J.; Liu, Z. G.; Cheng, T.; Hu, B. Q.; Liu, X. Z.; Zhou, Y. F.

    2017-10-01

    Many aspects need to be taken into consideration in a regional grid while making schedule plans. In this paper, a systematic multi-time scale solution for regional power grid operation considering large scale renewable energy integration and Ultra High Voltage (UHV) power transmission is proposed. In the time scale aspect, we discuss the problem from month, week, day-ahead, within-day to day-behind, and the system also contains multiple generator types including thermal units, hydro-plants, wind turbines and pumped storage stations. The 9 subsystems of the scheduling system are described, and their functions and relationships are elaborated. The proposed system has been constructed in a provincial power grid in Central China, and the operation results further verified the effectiveness of the system.

  15. Spike-contrast: A novel time scale independent and multivariate measure of spike train synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciba, Manuel; Isomura, Takuya; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Bahmer, Andreas; Thielemann, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    Synchrony within neuronal networks is thought to be a fundamental feature of neuronal networks. In order to quantify synchrony between spike trains, various synchrony measures were developed. Most of them are time scale dependent and thus require the setting of an appropriate time scale. Recently, alternative methods have been developed, such as the time scale independent SPIKE-distance by Kreuz et al. In this study, a novel time-scale independent spike train synchrony measure called Spike-contrast is proposed. The algorithm is based on the temporal "contrast" (activity vs. non-activity in certain temporal bins) and not only provides a single synchrony value, but also a synchrony curve as a function of the bin size. For most test data sets synchrony values obtained with Spike-contrast are highly correlated with those of the SPIKE-distance (Spearman correlation value of 0.99). Correlation was lower for data containing multiple time scales (Spearman correlation value of 0.89). When analyzing large sets of data, Spike-contrast performed faster. Spike-contrast is compared to the SPIKE-distance algorithm. The test data consisted of artificial spike trains with various levels of synchrony, including Poisson spike trains and bursts, spike trains from simulated neuronal Izhikevich networks, and bursts made of smaller bursts (sub-bursts). The high correlation of Spike-contrast with the established SPIKE-distance for most test data, suggests the suitability of the proposed measure. Both measures are complementary as SPIKE-distance provides a synchrony profile over time, whereas Spike-contrast provides a synchrony curve over bin size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatiotemporal patterns of drought at various time scales in Shandong Province of Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Depeng; Cai, Siyang; Xu, Zongxue; Li, Fulin; Sun, Wenchao; Yang, Xiaojing; Kan, Guangyuan; Liu, Pin

    2018-01-01

    The temporal variations and spatial patterns of drought in Shandong Province of Eastern China were investigated by calculating the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month time scales. Monthly precipitation and air temperature time series during the period 1960-2012 were collected at 23 meteorological stations uniformly distributed over the region. The non-parametric Mann-Kendall test was used to explore the temporal trends of precipitation, air temperature, and the SPEI drought index. S-mode principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to identify the spatial patterns of drought. The results showed that an insignificant decreasing trend in annual total precipitation was detected at most stations, a significant increase of annual average air temperature occurred at all the 23 stations, and a significant decreasing trend in the SPEI was mainly detected at the coastal stations for all the time scales. The frequency of occurrence of extreme and severe drought at different time scales generally increased with decades; higher frequency and larger affected area of extreme and severe droughts occurred as the time scale increased, especially for the northwest of Shandong Province and Jiaodong peninsular. The spatial pattern of drought for SPEI-1 contains three regions: eastern Jiaodong Peninsular and northwestern and southern Shandong. As the time scale increased to 3, 6, and 12 months, the order of the three regions was transformed into another as northwestern Shandong, eastern Jiaodong Peninsular, and southern Shandong. For SPEI-24, the location identified by REOF1 was slightly shifted from northwestern Shandong to western Shandong, and REOF2 and REOF3 identified another two weak patterns in the south edge and north edge of Jiaodong Peninsular, respectively. The potential causes of drought and the impact of drought on agriculture in the study area have also been discussed. The temporal variations and spatial patterns

  17. Sensitivity of the breastfeeding motivational measurement scale: a known group analysis of first time mothers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Stockdale

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding has immense public health value for mothers, babies, and society. But there is an undesirably large gap between the number of new mothers who undertake and persist in breastfeeding compared to what would be a preferred level of accomplishment. This gap is a reflection of the many obstacles, both physical and psychological, that confront new mothers. Previous research has illuminated many of these concerns, but research on this problem is limited in part by the unavailability of a research instrument that can measure the key differences between first-time mothers and experienced mothers, with regard to the challenges they face when breastfeeding and the instructional advice they require. An instrument was designed to measure motivational complexity associated with sustained breast feeding behaviour; the Breastfeeding Motivational Measurement Scale. It contains 51 self-report items (7 point Likert scale that cluster into four categories related to perceived value of breast-feeding, confidence to succeed, factors that influence success or failure, and strength of intentions, or goal. However, this scale has not been validated in terms of its sensitivity to profile the motivation of new mothers and experienced mothers. This issue was investigated by having 202 breastfeeding mothers (100 first time mothers fill out the scale. The analysis reported in this paper is a three factor solution consisting of value, midwife support, and expectancies for success that explained the characteristics of first time mothers as a known group. These results support the validity of the BMM scale as a diagnostic tool for research on first time mothers who are learning to breastfeed. Further research studies are required to further test the validity of the scale in additional subgroups.

  18. Sensitivity of the breastfeeding motivational measurement scale: a known group analysis of first time mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Janine; Sinclair, Marlene; Kernohan, George; McCrum-Gardner, Evie; Keller, John

    2013-01-01

    Breastfeeding has immense public health value for mothers, babies, and society. But there is an undesirably large gap between the number of new mothers who undertake and persist in breastfeeding compared to what would be a preferred level of accomplishment. This gap is a reflection of the many obstacles, both physical and psychological, that confront new mothers. Previous research has illuminated many of these concerns, but research on this problem is limited in part by the unavailability of a research instrument that can measure the key differences between first-time mothers and experienced mothers, with regard to the challenges they face when breastfeeding and the instructional advice they require. An instrument was designed to measure motivational complexity associated with sustained breast feeding behaviour; the Breastfeeding Motivational Measurement Scale. It contains 51 self-report items (7 point Likert scale) that cluster into four categories related to perceived value of breast-feeding, confidence to succeed, factors that influence success or failure, and strength of intentions, or goal. However, this scale has not been validated in terms of its sensitivity to profile the motivation of new mothers and experienced mothers. This issue was investigated by having 202 breastfeeding mothers (100 first time mothers) fill out the scale. The analysis reported in this paper is a three factor solution consisting of value, midwife support, and expectancies for success that explained the characteristics of first time mothers as a known group. These results support the validity of the BMM scale as a diagnostic tool for research on first time mothers who are learning to breastfeed. Further research studies are required to further test the validity of the scale in additional subgroups.

  19. Jump robust two time scale covariance estimation and realized volatility budgets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudt, K.M.R.; Zhang, J.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the daily integrated variance and covariance of stock returns using high-frequency data in the presence of jumps, market microstructure noise and non-synchronous trading. For this we propose jump robust two time scale (co)variance estimators and verify their reduced bias and mean square

  20. Short time-scale variability in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.A.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V-band variability analysis of the point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey on time-scales from 24 min to tens of days. We find that about one per cent of the point sources down to V = 24 are variables. We discuss the variability-detection probabilities for each field

  1. Optically stimulated phosphorescence in orthoclase feldspar over the millisecond to second time scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2010-01-01

    ) from orthoclase feldspar covering over 8 orders of magnitude (50 ns to 7 s). A detailed characterisation of the slowly decaying signals (ms to s time scales) from feldspar is undertaken to obtain further insight into the role of re-trapping in both the IR stimulated luminescence (IRSL...

  2. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order nonlinear dynamic equations of the form on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  3. A Strong Limit Theorem for Two-Time-Scale Fucntional Stochastic Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Jianhai; Song, Qingshuo; Yin, George; Yuan, Chenggui

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on a class of two-time-scale functional stochastic differential equations, where the phase space of the segment processes is infinite-dimensional. It develops ergodicity of the fast component and obtains a strong limit theorem for the averaging principle in the spirit of Khasminskii's averaging approach for the slow component.

  4. A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Variability is one of the extremely observational properties. In the radio bands, variability is caused by the shock in the jet. In this case, emissions increase rapidly following an exponential curve, and then decrease rapidly also in an exponential curve. The variability time scale is important with regard to the ...

  5. A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio Sources. Yong Huang1,2,∗. , Jun-Hui Fan2,3 & Jing Pan2,3. 1School of Computer Science & Educational Software, Guangzhou University,. Guangzhou, China. 2Astronomy Science and Technology Research Laboratory of Department of Education.

  6. Anti-control of chaos of single time-scale brushless DC motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zheng-Ming; Chang, Ching-Ming; Chen, Yen-Sheng

    2006-09-15

    Anti-control of chaos of single time-scale brushless DC motors is studied in this paper. In order to analyse a variety of periodic and chaotic phenomena, we employ several numerical techniques such as phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents. Anti-control of chaos can be achieved by adding an external constant term or an external periodic term.

  7. Labour productivity, economies of scale and opening time in large retail establishments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractDifferences in labour productivity are dealt with for large French retail establishments. Influences of scale, weekly opening time, assortment composition, wage rate and share of counter service are considered. The relationship used is a result of analyses in the field of small retail

  8. Existence of Solutions for Nonlinear Four-Point -Laplacian Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topal SGulsan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We are concerned with proving the existence of positive solutions of a nonlinear second-order four-point boundary value problem with a -Laplacian operator on time scales. The proofs are based on the fixed point theorems concerning cones in a Banach space. Existence result for -Laplacian boundary value problem is also given by the monotone method.

  9. Positive Solutions of a Nonlinear Fourth-Order Dynamic Eigenvalue Problem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Let T be a time scale and a,b∈T, aλ*, respectively, for some λ*. The main tools to prove the existence results are the Schauder fixed point theorem and the upper and lower solution method.

  10. Hardy inequality on time scales and its application to half-linear dynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řehák Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-scale version of the Hardy inequality is presented, which unifies and extends well-known Hardy inequalities in the continuous and in the discrete setting. An application in the oscillation theory of half-linear dynamic equations is given.

  11. Solution Matching for a Second Order Boundary Value Problem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprillya Lanz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a time scale such that <;,∈. We will show the existence and uniqueness of solutions for the second-order boundary value problem ΔΔ(=(,(,Δ(,∈[,],(=,(=, by matching a solution of the first equation satisfying boundary conditions on [,] with a solution of the first equation satisfying boundary conditions on [,], where ∈(,.

  12. Theoretical and Numerical Properties of a Gyrokinetic Plasma: Issues Related to Transport Time Scale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.W. Lee

    2003-09-17

    Particle simulation has played an important role for the recent investigations on turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. In this paper, theoretical and numerical properties of a gyrokinetic plasma as well as its relationship with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed with the ultimate aim of simulating microturbulence in transport time scale using massively parallel computers.

  13. Development and Preliminary Validation of the Time Management for Exercise Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Laurie-ann M.; Rogers, W. Todd

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect preliminary validity evidence for a time management scale for exercise. An initial pool of 91 items was developed from existing literature. Ten exercise/health psychologists evaluated each of the items in terms of relevance and representativeness. Forty-nine items met all criteria. Exploratory factor…

  14. Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Xiufeng; Hong, Tianzhen; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-06-03

    This paper describes work in progress toward an urban-scale system aiming to reduce energy use in neighboring buildings by providing three components: a database for accessing past and present weather data from high quality weather stations; a network for communicating energy-saving strategies between building owners; and a set of modeling tools for real-time building energy simulation.

  15. Extension of the astronomically calibrated (polarity) time scale to the Miocene/Pliocene boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgen, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    The early Pleistocene to late Pliocene astronormcally calibrated time scale of Shackleton et al. [1] and Hllgen [2] is extended to the Mlocene/Pllocene boundary This is done by correlating the detailed record of CaCO 3 cycles in the Trubl and the lower part of the overlying Narbone Formation

  16. Identifying time scales for violation/preservation of Stokes-Einstein relation in supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Kim, Kang

    2017-08-01

    The violation of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation D ~ (η/T)-1 between the shear viscosity η and the translational diffusion constant D at temperature T is of great importance for characterizing anomalous dynamics of supercooled water. Determining which time scales play key roles in the SE violation remains elusive without the measurement of η. We provide comprehensive simulation results of the dynamic properties involving η and D in the TIP4P/2005 supercooled water. This enabled the thorough identification of the appropriate time scales for the SE relation Dη/T. In particular, it is demonstrated that the temperature dependence of various time scales associated with structural relaxation, hydrogen bond breakage, stress relaxation, and dynamic heterogeneities can be definitely classified into only two classes. That is, we propose the generalized SE relations that exhibit "violation" or "preservation." The classification depends on the examined time scales that are coupled or decoupled with the diffusion. On the basis of the classification, we explain the physical origins of the violation in terms of the increase in the plateau modulus and the nonexponentiality of stress relaxation. This implies that the mechanism of SE violation is attributed to the attained solidity upon supercooling, which is in accord with the growth of non-Gaussianity and spatially heterogeneous dynamics.

  17. Time scales: from Nabla calculus to Delta calculus and vice versa via duality

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, M. Cristina

    2009-01-01

    In this note we show how one can obtain results from the nabla calculus from results on the delta calculus and vice versa via a duality argument. We provide applications of the main results to the calculus of variations on time scales.

  18. Assessment of the methods for determining net radiation at different time-scales of meteorological variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When modeling the soil/atmosphere interaction, it is of paramount importance to determine the net radiation flux. There are two common calculation methods for this purpose. Method 1 relies on use of air temperature, while Method 2 relies on use of both air and soil temperatures. Nowadays, there has been no consensus on the application of these two methods. In this study, the half-hourly data of solar radiation recorded at an experimental embankment are used to calculate the net radiation and long-wave radiation at different time-scales (half-hourly, hourly, and daily using the two methods. The results show that, compared with Method 2 which has been widely adopted in agronomical, geotechnical and geo-environmental applications, Method 1 is more feasible for its simplicity and accuracy at shorter time-scale. Moreover, in case of longer time-scale, daily for instance, less variations of net radiation and long-wave radiation are obtained, suggesting that no detailed soil temperature variations can be obtained. In other words, shorter time-scales are preferred in determining net radiation flux.

  19. Time scale of scour around a pile in combined waves and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thor Ugelvig; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    The time scale of the scour process around a circular vertical pile is studied in combined waves and current. A series of tests were carried out in a flume with pile diameters 40 mm and 75 mm, in both steady current, waves and combined waves and current. In the combined wave and current flow regime...

  20. Quality of mixing in a stired bioreactor used for animal cells culture: heterogeneities in a lab scale bioreactor and evolution of mixing time with scale up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collignon, ML; Dossin, D; Delafosse, A; Crine, M; Toye, D

    2010-01-01

    .... The mixing time is measured by conductimetry inside 20 l, 80 l, 600 l tanks. The Grenville correlation is adjusted on these experimental measurements to improve the prediction of the mixing time during the scale-up of the...

  1. Multiple Physical Time Scales and Dead Time Rule in Few-Nanometers Sized Graphene-SiOx-Graphene Memristors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósa, László; El Abbassi, Maria; Makk, Péter; Sánta, Botond; Nef, Cornelia; Csontos, Miklós; Calame, Michel; Halbritter, András

    2017-11-08

    The resistive switching behavior in SiOx-based phase change memory devices confined by few nanometer wide graphene nanogaps is investigated. Our experiments and analysis reveal that the switching dynamics is not only determined by the commonly observed bias voltage dependent set and reset times. We demonstrate that an internal time scale, the dead time, plays a fundamental role in the system's response to various driving signals. We associate the switching behavior with the formation of microscopically distinct SiOx amorphous and crystalline phases between the graphene electrodes. The reset transition is attributed to an amorphization process due to a voltage driven self-heating; it can be triggered at any time by appropriate voltage levels. In contrast, the formation of the crystalline ON state is conditional and only occurs after the completion of a thermally assisted structural rearrangement of the as-quenched OFF state which takes place within the dead time after a reset operation. Our results demonstrate the technological relevance of the dead time rule which enables a zero bias access of both the low and high resistance states of a phase change memory device by unipolar voltage pulses.

  2. Evolution of equilibrium Pickering emulsions--a matter of time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; Luigjes, Bob; de Folter, Julius W J; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-09-30

    A new class of equilibrium solid-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions harbors a competition of two processes on disparate time scales that affect the equilibrium droplet size in opposing ways. The aim of this work is to elucidate the molecular origins of these two time scales and demonstrate their effects on the evolution of the emulsion droplet size. First, spontaneous emulsification into particle-covered droplets occurs through in situ generation of surface-active molecules by hydrolysis of molecules of the oil phase. We show that surface tensions of the oil-water interfaces in the absence of stabilizing colloidal particles are connected to the concentration of these surface-active molecules, and hence also to the equilibrium droplet size in the presence of colloids. As a consequence, the hydrolysis process sets the time scale of formation of these solid-stabilized emulsions. A second time scale is governing the ultimate fate of the solid-stabilized equilibrium emulsions: by condensation of the in situ generated amphiphilic molecules onto the colloidal particles, their wetting properties change, leading to a gradual transfer from the aqueous to the oil phase via growth of the emulsion droplets. This migration is observed macroscopically by a color change of the water and oil phases, as well as by electron microscopy after polymerization of the oil phase in a phase separated sample. Surprisingly, the relative oil volume sets the time scale of particle transfer. Phase separation into an aqueous phase and an oil phase containing colloidal particles is influenced by sedimentation of the emulsion droplets. The two processes of formation of surface-active molecules through hydrolysis and condensation thereof on the colloidal surface have an opposite influence on the droplet size. By their interplay, a dynamic equilibrium is created where the droplet size always adjusts to the thermodynamically stable state.

  3. A real-time multi-scale 2D Gaussian filter based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haibo; Gai, Xingqin; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Multi-scale 2-D Gaussian filter has been widely used in feature extraction (e.g. SIFT, edge etc.), image segmentation, image enhancement, image noise removing, multi-scale shape description etc. However, their computational complexity remains an issue for real-time image processing systems. Aimed at this problem, we propose a framework of multi-scale 2-D Gaussian filter based on FPGA in this paper. Firstly, a full-hardware architecture based on parallel pipeline was designed to achieve high throughput rate. Secondly, in order to save some multiplier, the 2-D convolution is separated into two 1-D convolutions. Thirdly, a dedicate first in first out memory named as CAFIFO (Column Addressing FIFO) was designed to avoid the error propagating induced by spark on clock. Finally, a shared memory framework was designed to reduce memory costs. As a demonstration, we realized a 3 scales 2-D Gaussian filter on a single ALTERA Cyclone III FPGA chip. Experimental results show that, the proposed framework can computing a Multi-scales 2-D Gaussian filtering within one pixel clock period, is further suitable for real-time image processing. Moreover, the main principle can be popularized to the other operators based on convolution, such as Gabor filter, Sobel operator and so on.

  4. Robust scaling laws for energy confinement time, including radiated fraction, in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the limitations of scalings in power-law form that are obtained from traditional log regression have become increasingly evident in many fields of research. Given the wide gap in operational space between present-day and next-generation devices, robustness of the obtained models in guaranteeing reasonable extrapolability is a major issue. In this paper, a new technique, called symbolic regression, is reviewed, refined, and applied to the ITPA database for extracting scaling laws of the energy-confinement time at different radiated fraction levels. The main advantage of this new methodology is its ability to determine the most appropriate mathematical form of the scaling laws to model the available databases without the restriction of their having to be power laws. In a completely new development, this technique is combined with the concept of geodesic distance on Gaussian manifolds so as to take into account the error bars in the measurements and provide more reliable models. Robust scaling laws, including radiated fractions as regressor, have been found; they are not in power-law form, and are significantly better than the traditional scalings. These scaling laws, including radiated fractions, extrapolate quite differently to ITER, and therefore they require serious consideration. On the other hand, given the limitations of the existing databases, dedicated experimental investigations will have to be carried out to fully understand the impact of radiated fractions on the confinement in metallic machines and in the next generation of devices.

  5. Earth History databases and visualization - the TimeScale Creator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, James; Lugowski, Adam; Gradstein, Felix

    2010-05-01

    The "TimeScale Creator" team (www.tscreator.org) and the Subcommission on Stratigraphic Information (stratigraphy.science.purdue.edu) of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (www.stratigraphy.org) has worked with numerous geoscientists and geological surveys to prepare reference datasets for global and regional stratigraphy. All events are currently calibrated to Geologic Time Scale 2004 (Gradstein et al., 2004, Cambridge Univ. Press) and Concise Geologic Time Scale (Ogg et al., 2008, Cambridge Univ. Press); but the array of intercalibrations enable dynamic adjustment to future numerical age scales and interpolation methods. The main "global" database contains over 25,000 events/zones from paleontology, geomagnetics, sea-level and sequence stratigraphy, igneous provinces, bolide impacts, plus several stable isotope curves and image sets. Several regional datasets are provided in conjunction with geological surveys, with numerical ages interpolated using a similar flexible inter-calibration procedure. For example, a joint program with Geoscience Australia has compiled an extensive Australian regional biostratigraphy and a full array of basin lithologic columns with each formation linked to public lexicons of all Proterozoic through Phanerozoic basins - nearly 500 columns of over 9,000 data lines plus hot-curser links to oil-gas reference wells. Other datapacks include New Zealand biostratigraphy and basin transects (ca. 200 columns), Russian biostratigraphy, British Isles regional stratigraphy, Gulf of Mexico biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy, high-resolution Neogene stable isotope curves and ice-core data, human cultural episodes, and Circum-Arctic stratigraphy sets. The growing library of datasets is designed for viewing and chart-making in the free "TimeScale Creator" JAVA package. This visualization system produces a screen display of the user-selected time-span and the selected columns of geologic time scale information. The user can change the

  6. Multi-time Scale Joint Scheduling Method Considering the Grid of Renewable Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijun, E.; Wang, Weichen; Cao, Jin; Wang, Xin; Kong, Xiangyu; Quan, Shuping

    2018-01-01

    Renewable new energy power generation prediction error like wind and light, brings difficulties to dispatch the power system. In this paper, a multi-time scale robust scheduling method is set to solve this problem. It reduces the impact of clean energy prediction bias to the power grid by using multi-time scale (day-ahead, intraday, real time) and coordinating the dispatching power output of various power supplies such as hydropower, thermal power, wind power, gas power and. The method adopts the robust scheduling method to ensure the robustness of the scheduling scheme. By calculating the cost of the abandon wind and the load, it transforms the robustness into the risk cost and optimizes the optimal uncertainty set for the smallest integrative costs. The validity of the method is verified by simulation.

  7. Data warehousing technologies for large-scale and right-time data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiufeng, Liu

    heterogeneous sources into a central data warehouse (DW) by Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) at regular time intervals, e.g., monthly, weekly, or daily. But now, it becomes challenging for large-scale data, and hard to meet the near real-time/right-time business decisions. This thesis considers some...... modifications on-the-fly when the data is materialized or queried. The data is made available in the DW exactly when needed and users can get bulk-load speeds, but INSERT-like data availability. Third, this thesis presents the first dimensional ETL programming framework using MapReduce. Parallel ETL is needed...... for large-scale data, but it is not easy to implement. This presented framework makes this very easy by using the high-level ETL-specific constructs, including those for star schema, snowflake schema, slowly changing dimensions (SCDs) and very large dimensions. The framework can achieve high programming...

  8. Singular perturbations and time scales in the design of digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Desineni S.; Price, Douglas B.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of application of the methodology of Singular Perturbations and Time Scales (SPATS) to the control of digital flight systems. A block diagonalization method is described to decouple a full order, two time (slow and fast) scale, discrete control system into reduced order slow and fast subsystems. Basic properties and numerical aspects of the method are discussed. A composite, closed-loop, suboptimal control system is constructed as the sum of the slow and fast optimal feedback controls. The application of this technique to an aircraft model shows close agreement between the exact solutions and the decoupled (or composite) solutions. The main advantage of the method is the considerable reduction in the overall computational requirements for the evaluation of optimal guidance and control laws. The significance of the results is that it can be used for real time, onboard simulation. A brief survey is also presented of digital flight systems.

  9. Advancing atmospheric river forecasts into subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Cory F.; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Maloney, Eric D.; Mundhenk, Bryan D.

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric rivers are elongated plumes of intense moisture transport that are capable of producing extreme and impactful weather. Along the West Coast of North America, they occasionally cause considerable mayhem—delivering flooding rains during periods of heightened activity and desiccating droughts during periods of reduced activity. The intrinsic chaos of the atmosphere makes the prediction of atmospheric rivers at subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales (3 to 5 weeks) an inherently difficult task. We demonstrate here that the potential exists to advance forecast lead times of atmospheric rivers into subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales through knowledge of two of the atmosphere's most prominent oscillations, the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). Strong MJO and QBO activity modulates the frequency at which atmospheric rivers strike—offering an opportunity to improve subseasonal-to-seasonal forecast models and thereby skillfully predict atmospheric river activity up to 5 weeks in advance.

  10. Synchronizaton and causality across time-scales of observed and modelled ENSO dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Kravtsov, Sergey; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-04-01

    Phase-phase and phase-amplitude interactions between dynamics on different temporal scales has been observed in ENSO dynamics, captured by the NINO3.4 index, using the approach for identification of cross-scale interactions introduced recently by Paluš [1]. The most pronounced interactions across scales are phase coherence and phase-phase causality in which the annual cycle influences the dynamics on the quasibiennial scale. The phase of slower phenomena on the scale 4-6 years influences not only the combination frequencies around the period one year, but also the phase of the annual cycle and also the amplitude of the oscillations in the quasibiennial range. In order to understand these nonlinear phenomena we investigate cross-scale interactions in synthetic, modelled NINO3.4 time series. The models taken into account were a selection of 96 historic runs from CMIP5 project, and two low-dimensional models - parametric recharge oscillator (PRO) [2], which is a two-dimensional dynamical model and a data-driven model based on the idea of linear inverse models [3]. The latter is a statistical model, in our setting 25-dimensional. While the two dimensions of the PRO model are not enough to capture all the cross-scale interactions, the results from the data-driven model are more promising and they resemble the interactions found in NINO3.4 measured data set. We believe that combination of models of different complexity will help to uncover mechanisms of the cross-scale interactions which might be the key for better understanding of the irregularities in the ENSO dynamics. This study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic within the Program KONTAKT II, Project No. LH14001. [1] M. Palus, Phys. Rev. Let. 112 078702 (2014) [2] K. Stein et al., J. Climate, 27, 14 (2014) [3] Kondrashov et al., J. Climate, 18, 21 (2005)

  11. Multi-scale approach for simulating time-delay biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Zhang, Chengjian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a multi-scale approach for simulating time-delay biochemical reaction systems when there are wide ranges of molecular numbers. The authors construct a new efficient approach based on partitioning into slow and fast subsets in conjunction with predictor-corrector methods. This multi-scale approach is shown to be much more efficient than existing methods such as the delay stochastic simulation algorithm and the modified next reaction method. Numerical testing on several important problems in systems biology confirms the accuracy and computational efficiency of this approach.

  12. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paradisi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures.

    The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold.

    A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold.

    From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate.

    The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that

  13. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, P.; Cesari, R.; Donateo, A.; Contini, D.; Allegrini, P.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures. The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ) ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold. A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold. From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate. The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that this renewal point process can be associated to birth and death of coherent structures and to turbulent transport near the ground, where the contribution of turbulent coherent structures becomes dominant.

  14. Comparison between scaling law and nonparametric Bayesian estimate for the recurrence time of strong earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, R.

    2009-04-01

    According to the unified scaling theory the probability distribution function of the recurrence time T is a scaled version of a base function and the average value of T can be used as a scale parameter for the distribution. The base function must belong to the scale family of distributions: tested on different catalogues and for different scale levels, for Corral (2005) the (truncated) generalized gamma distribution is the best model, for German (2006) the Weibull distribution. The scaling approach should overcome the difficulty of estimating distribution functions over small areas but theorical limitations and partial instability of the estimated distributions have been pointed out in the literature. Our aim is to analyze the recurrence time of strong earthquakes that occurred in the Italian territory. To satisfy the hypotheses of independence and identical distribution we have evaluated the times between events that occurred in each area of the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources and then we have gathered them by eight tectonically coherent regions, each of them dominated by a well characterized geodynamic process. To solve problems like: paucity of data, presence of outliers and uncertainty in the choice of the functional expression for the distribution of t, we have followed a nonparametric approach (Rotondi (2009)) in which: (a) the maximum flexibility is obtained by assuming that the probability distribution is a random function belonging to a large function space, distributed as a stochastic process; (b) nonparametric estimation method is robust when the data contain outliers; (c) Bayesian methodology allows to exploit different information sources so that the model fitting may be good also to scarce samples. We have compared the hazard rates evaluated through the parametric and nonparametric approach. References Corral A. (2005). Mixing of rescaled data and Bayesian inference for earthquake recurrence times, Nonlin. Proces. Geophys., 12, 89

  15. Modeling and Validating Time, Buffering, and Utilization of a Large-Scale, Real-Time Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Alejandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Data acquisition systems for large-scale high-energy physics experiments have to handle hundreds of gigabytes per second of data, and are typically realized as specialized data centers that connect a very large number of front-end electronics devices to an event detection and storage system. The design of such systems is often based on many assumptions, small-scale experiments and a substantial amount of over-provisioning. In this work, we introduce a discrete event-based simulation tool that models the data flow of the current ATLAS data acquisition system, with the main goal to be accurate with regard to the main operational characteristics. We measure buffer occupancy counting the number of elements in buffers, resource utilization measuring output bandwidth and counting the number of active processing units, and their time evolution by comparing data over many consecutive and small periods of time. We perform studies on the error of simulation when comparing the results to a large amount of real-world ope...

  16. Modeling and Validating Time, Buffering, and Utilization of a Large-Scale, Real-Time Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Alejandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Data acquisition systems for large-scale high-energy physics experiments have to handle hundreds of gigabytes per second of data, and are typically implemented as specialized data centers that connect a very large number of front-end electronics devices to an event detection and storage system. The design of such systems is often based on many assumptions, small-scale experiments and a substantial amount of over-provisioning. In this paper, we introduce a discrete event-based simulation tool that models the dataflow of the current ATLAS data acquisition system, with the main goal to be accurate with regard to the main operational characteristics. We measure buffer occupancy counting the number of elements in buffers; resource utilization measuring output bandwidth and counting the number of active processing units, and their time evolution by comparing data over many consecutive and small periods of time. We perform studies on the error in simulation when comparing the results to a large amount of real-world ...

  17. Stratigraphy and Characteristic Time Scales of Northern Polar and Circumpolar Deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    2002-05-01

    The north polar region is dominated by the polar cap cut by troughs and Chasma Boreale, surrounded by the north polar erg and overlying the Vastitas Borealis Formation. A thin layer of mantle with characteristic "basketball" texture typical for high latitudes covers the surface of Vastitas Borealis Formation. Study of the high-resolution MGS MOC images showed that the dunes migrate over this mantle. The stratigraphic relationships of this mantle and icy deposits, as well as Chasma Boreale-related deposits are more complex. Chasma Boreale has been interpreted to be initiated as an outflow event (Fishbaugh and Head, JGR, JE001351, 2002). We estimate that the time scale of the meltwater accumulation at the base of the polar cap and the time scale of establishing the thermal equilibrium in the cap are on the order of 0.5 Myr or greater. We compare this time scale with the characteristic astronomically predicted time scales: the time scale of obliquity oscillations (0.05 Myr), the period of obliquity oscillations about 25 deg (3.5 Myr), and the time scale of chaotic obliquity variations (5 Myr). During the period 3.5 - 5 Myr ago the obliquity oscillated around 35 deg, which led to noticeably higher polar cap temperatures and a shallower depth of the melting isotherm than during the present epoch. Predictions of obliquity in the earlier epochs beyond 5 Myr are impossible. We conclude that the period of intensive reshaping of the polar cap and formation of Chasma Boreale occurred 3.5 Myr ago or earlier. During the last 3.5 Myr the cap was rather similar to present; minor erosion and deposition of the upper layers could occur, along with modest trough migration in the short epochs of the highest obliquity. The accumulation of the main mass of the finely layered deposits occurred at least 0.5 - 1 Myr (and may be much earlier) than the Chasma Boreale flood. The accumulation could occur in response to some obliquity-driven climate variation or due to some endogenic discharge

  18. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  19. Modeling and simulation of nuclear fuel in scenarios with long time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Carlos E.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: eduardo.espinosa@ufrgs.br, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DENUC/PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear reactors play a key role in defining the energy matrix. A study by the Fraunhofer Society shows in different time scales for long periods of time the distribution of energy sources. Regardless of scale, the use of nuclear energy is practically constant. In these scenarios, the nuclear fuel behavior over time is of interest. For kinetics of long-term scales, changing the chemical composition of fuel is significant. Thus, it is appropriate to consider fission products called neutron poisons. Such products are of interest in the nuclear reactor, since they become parasitic neutron absorbers and result in long thermal heat sources. The objective of this work is to solve the kinetics system coupled to neutron poison products. To solve this system, we use similar ideas to the method of Adomian decomposition. Initially, one separates the system of equations as the sum of a linear part and a non-linear part in order to solve a recursive system. The nonlinearity is treated as Adomian polynomial. We present numerical results of the effects of changing the power of a reactor, scenarios such as start-up and shut-down. For these results we consider time dependent reactivity, such as linear reactivity, quadratic polynomial and oscillatory. With these results one can simulate the chemical composition of the fuel due to the reuse of the spent fuel in subsequent cycles. (author)

  20. Equilibrium distributions of simple biochemical reaction systems for time-scale separation in stochastic reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélykúti, Bence; Hespanha, João P; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-08-06

    Many biochemical reaction networks are inherently multiscale in time and in the counts of participating molecular species. A standard technique to treat different time scales in the stochastic kinetics framework is averaging or quasi-steady-state analysis: it is assumed that the fast dynamics reaches its equilibrium (stationary) distribution on a time scale where the slowly varying molecular counts are unlikely to have changed. We derive analytic equilibrium distributions for various simple biochemical systems, such as enzymatic reactions and gene regulation models. These can be directly inserted into simulations of the slow time-scale dynamics. They also provide insight into the stimulus-response of these systems. An important model for which we derive the analytic equilibrium distribution is the binding of dimer transcription factors (TFs) that first have to form from monomers. This gene regulation mechanism is compared to the cases of the binding of simple monomer TFs to one gene or to multiple copies of a gene, and to the cases of the cooperative binding of two or multiple TFs to a gene. The results apply equally to ligands binding to enzyme molecules.

  1. Modeling Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Forcing on Centennial and Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R.; Rind, D.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of experiments to explore clima responses to two types of solar spectral forcing on decadal and centennial time scales - one based on prior reconstructions, and another implied by recent observations from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral 1rradiance Monitor). We apply these forcings to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global/Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM). that couples atmosphere with ocean, and has a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full response to the two solar forcing scenarios. We show different climate responses to the two solar forCing scenarios on decadal time scales and also trends on centennial time scales. Differences between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions are highlighted, including impacts of the time lagged reSponse of the lower atmosphere and ocean. This contrasts with studies that assume separate equilibrium conditions at solar maximum and minimum. We discuss model feedback mechanisms involved in the solar forced climate variations.

  2. Exchanged ridge demodulation of time-scale manifold for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo

    2014-05-01

    The vibration or acoustic signal from rotating machinery with localized fault usually behaves as the form of amplitude modulation (AM) and/or frequency modulation (FM). The demodulation techniques are conventional ways to reveal the fault characteristics from the analyzed signals. One of these techniques is the time-scale manifold (TSM) ridge demodulation method with the merits of good time-frequency localization and in-band noise suppression properties. However, due to the essential attribute of wavelet ridge, the survived in-band noise on the achieved TSM will still disturb the envelope extraction of fault-induced impulses. This paper presents an improved TSM ridge demodulation method, called exchanged ridge demodulation of TSM, by combining the benefits of the first two TSMs: the noise suppression of the first TSM and the noise separation of the second TSM. Specifically, the ridge on the second TSM can capture the fault-induced impulses precisely while avoiding the in-band noise smartly. By putting this ridge on the first TSM, the corresponding instantaneous amplitude (IA) waveform can represent the real envelope of pure faulty impulses. Moreover, an adaptive selection method for Morlet wavelet parameters is also proposed based on the smoothness index (SI) in the time-scale domain for an optimal time-scale representation of analyzed signal. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by means of a simulation study and applications to diagnosis of bearing defects and gear fault.

  3. Time-Sliced Perturbation Theory for Large Scale Structure I: General Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, Diego; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein--de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This pave...

  4. Fiber Optic Sensor for Real-Time Sensing of Silica Scale Formation in Geothermal Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Takuya; Orii, Tatsuya; Ueda, Akira; Ozawa, Akiko; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2017-06-13

    We present a novel fiber optic sensor for real-time sensing of silica scale formation in geothermal water. The sensor is fabricated by removing the cladding of a multimode fiber to expose the core to detect the scale-formation-induced refractive index change. A simple experimental setup was constructed to measure the transmittance response using white light as a source and a spectroscopy detector. A field test was performed on geothermal water containing 980 mg/L dissolved silica at 93 °C in Sumikawa Geothermal Power Plant, Japan. The transmittance response of the fiber sensor decreased due to the formation of silica scale on the fiber core from geothermal water. An application of this sensor in the evaluation of scale inhibitors was demonstrated. In geothermal water containing a pH modifier, the change of transmittance response decreased with pH decrease. The effectiveness of a polyelectrolyte inhibitor in prevention of silica scale formation was easily detectable using the fiber sensor in geothermal water.

  5. REAL-TIME VIDEO SCALING BASED ON CONVOLUTION NEURAL NETWORK ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Safinaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, video super resolution techniques becomes mandatory requirements to get high resolution videos. Many super resolution techniques researched but still video super resolution or scaling is a vital challenge. In this paper, we have presented a real-time video scaling based on convolution neural network architecture to eliminate the blurriness in the images and video frames and to provide better reconstruction quality while scaling of large datasets from lower resolution frames to high resolution frames. We compare our outcomes with multiple exiting algorithms. Our extensive results of proposed technique RemCNN (Reconstruction error minimization Convolution Neural Network shows that our model outperforms the existing technologies such as bicubic, bilinear, MCResNet and provide better reconstructed motioning images and video frames. The experimental results shows that our average PSNR result is 47.80474 considering upscale-2, 41.70209 for upscale-3 and 36.24503 for upscale-4 for Myanmar dataset which is very high in contrast to other existing techniques. This results proves our proposed model real-time video scaling based on convolution neural network architecture’s high efficiency and better performance.

  6. Relative importance of time, land use and lithology on determining aquifer-scale denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Tamara; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Abbott, Benjamin W.; Marçais, Jean; Babey, Tristan; Thomas, Zahra; Peiffer, Stefan; Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Laverman, Anniet; Fleckenstein, Jan; Boulvais, Philippe; Pinay, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    Unconfined shallow aquifers are commonly contaminated by nitrate in agricultural regions, because of excess fertilizer application over the last decades. Watershed studies have indicated that 1) changes in agricultural practices have caused changes in nitrate input over time, 2) denitrification occurs in localized hotspots within the aquifer, and 3) heterogeneous groundwater flow circulation has led to strong nitrate gradients in aquifers that are not yet well understood. In this study we investigated the respective influence of land use, groundwater transit time distribution, and hotspot distribution on groundwater denitrification with a particular interest on how a detailed understanding of transit time distributions could be used to upscale the point denitrification measurements to the aquifer-scale. We measured CFC-based groundwater age, oxygen, nitrate, and dinitrogen gas excess in 16 agricultural wells of an unconfined crystalline aquifer in Brittany, France. Groundwater age data was used to calibrate a mechanistic groundwater flow model of the study site. Historical nitrate inputs were reconstructed by using measured nitrate concentrations, dinitrogen gas excess and transit time distributions of the wells. Field data showed large differences in denitrification activity among wells, strongly associated with differences in transit time distribution. This suggests that knowing groundwater flow dynamics and consequent transit time distributions at the catchment-scale could be used to estimate the overall denitrification capacity of agricultural aquifers.

  7. Consistent allometric scaling of stomatal sizes and densities across taxonomic ranks and geologic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H. J.; Price, C. A.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Dekker, S. C.; Veneklaas, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Stomatal pores on plants leaves are an important link in the chain of processes that determine biosphere fluxes of water and carbon. Stomatal density (i.e. the number of stomata per area) and the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture are particularly relevant traits in this context because they determine the theoretical maximum diffusive stomatal conductance (gsmax) and thereby set an upper limit for leaf gas exchange. Observations on (sub)fossil leaves revealed that changes in stomatal densities are anti-correlated with changes in stomatal sizes at developmental and evolutionary timescales. Moreover, this anti-correlation appears consistently within single species, across multiple species in the extant plant community and at evolutionary time scales. The consistency of the relation between stomatal densities and sizes suggests that common mechanisms constrain the adaptation of these traits across the plant community. In an attempt to identify such potential generic constraints, we investigated the allometry between stomatal densities and sizes in the extant plant community and across geological time. As the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture is typically derived from the length of the stomatal pore, we considered the allometric scaling of pore length (lp) with stomatal density (Ds) as the power law: lp = k . Dsa in which k is a normalization constant and the exponent a is the slope of the scaling relation. Our null-hypothesis predicts that stomatal density and pore length scale along a constant slope of -1/2 based on a scale-invariant relation between pore length and the distance between neighboring pores. Our alternative hypothesis predicts a constant slope of -1 based on the idea that stomatal density and pore length scale along an invariant gsmax. To explore these scaling hypotheses in the extant plant community we compiled a dataset of combined observations of stomatal density and pore length on 111 species from published literature and new

  8. Weakest-Link Scaling and Finite Size Effects on Recurrence Times Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T; Kaniadakis, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Tectonic earthquakes result from the fracturing of the Earth's crust due to the loading induced by the motion of the tectonic plates. Hence, the statistical laws of earthquakes must be intimately connected to the statistical laws of fracture. The Weibull distribution is a commonly used model of earthquake recurrence times (ERT). Nevertheless, deviations from Weibull scaling have been observed in ERT data and in fracture experiments on quasi-brittle materials. We propose that the weakest-link-scaling theory for finite-size systems leads to the kappa-Weibull function, which implies a power-law tail for the ERT distribution. We show that the ERT hazard rate function decreases linearly after a waiting time which is proportional to the system size (in terms of representative volume elements) raised to the inverse of the Weibull modulus. We also demonstrate that the kappa-Weibull can be applied to strongly correlated systems by means of simulations of a fiber bundle model.

  9. Virtual water trade and time scales for loss of water sustainability: a comparative regional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Prashant; Nishad, Shiv Narayan

    2015-03-20

    Assessment and policy design for sustainability in primary resources like arable land and water need to adopt long-term perspective; even small but persistent effects like net export of water may influence sustainability through irreversible losses. With growing consumption, this virtual water trade has become an important element in the water sustainability of a nation. We estimate and contrast the virtual (embedded) water trades of two populous nations, India and China, to present certain quantitative measures and time scales. Estimates show that export of embedded water alone can lead to loss of water sustainability. With the current rate of net export of water (embedded) in the end products, India is poised to lose its entire available water in less than 1000 years; much shorter time scales are implied in terms of water for production. The two cases contrast and exemplify sustainable and non-sustainable virtual water trade in long term perspective.

  10. Fission time-scale in experiments and in multiple initiation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamian, S. A., E-mail: karamian@nrmail.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Rate of fission for highly-excited nuclei is affected by the viscose character of the systemmotion in deformation coordinates as was reported for very heavy nuclei with Z{sub C} > 90. The long time-scale of fission can be described in a model of 'fission by diffusion' that includes an assumption of the overdamped diabatic motion. The fission-to-spallation ratio at intermediate proton energy could be influenced by the viscosity, as well. Within a novel approach of the present work, the cross examination of the fission probability, time-scales, and pre-fission neutron multiplicities is resulted in the consistent interpretation of a whole set of the observables. Earlier, different aspects could be reproduced in partial simulations without careful coordination.

  11. Modeling heat dominated electric breakdown in air, with adaptivity to electron or ion time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2017-09-01

    We model heat dominated electrical breakdown in air in a short planar gap. We couple the discharge dynamics in fluid approximation with the hydrodynamic motion of the air heated by the discharge. To be computationally efficient, we derive a reduced model on the ion time scale, and we switch between the full model on the electron time scale and the reduced model. We observe an ion pulse reaching the cathode, releasing electrons by secondary emission, and these electrons create another ion pulse. These cycles of ion pulses might lead to electrical breakdown. This breakdown is driven by Ohmic heating, thermal shocks and induced pressure waves, rather than by the streamer mechanism of local field enhancement at the streamer tip.

  12. Oscillation of second-order forced nonlinear dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Saker

    2005-11-01

    on a time scale ${\\mathbb{T}}$ when $a(t>0$. We establish some sufficient conditions which ensure that every solution oscillates or satisfies $\\lim \\inf_{t\\rightarrow \\infty }\\left\\vert x(t\\right\\vert =0.$ Our oscillation results when $r(t=0$ improve the oscillation results for dynamic equations on time scales that has been established by Erbe and Peterson [Proc. Amer. Math. Soc \\ 132 (2004, 735-744], Bohner, Erbe and Peterson [J. Math. Anal. Appl. 301 (2005, 491--507] since our results do not require $\\int_{t_{0}}^{\\infty }q(t\\Delta t>0$ and $\\int_{\\pm t_{0}}^{\\pm \\infty } \\frac{du}{f(u}<\\infty .$ Also, as a special case when ${\\mathbb{T=R}}$, and $r(t=0$ our results improve some oscillation results for differential equations. Some examples are given to illustrate the main results.

  13. Unification of Small and Large Time Scales for Biological Evolution: Deviations from Power Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2003-02-01

    We develop a unified model that describes both “micro” and “macro” evolutions within a single theoretical framework. The ecosystem is described as a dynamic network; the population dynamics at each node of this network describes the “microevolution” over ecological time scales (i.e., birth, ageing, and natural death of individual organisms), while the appearance of new nodes, the slow changes of the links, and the disappearance of existing nodes accounts for the “macroevolution” over geological time scales (i.e., the origination, evolution, and extinction of species). In contrast to several earlier claims in the literature, we observe strong deviations from power law in the regime of long lifetimes.

  14. Numerical methods for large-scale, time-dependent partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of numerical methods for time dependent partial differential equations is presented. The emphasis is on practical applications to large scale problems. A discussion of new developments in high order methods and moving grids is given. The importance of boundary conditions is stressed for both internal and external flows. A description of implicit methods is presented including generalizations to multidimensions. Shocks, aerodynamics, meteorology, plasma physics and combustion applications are also briefly described.

  15. Interval Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Forced Functional Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order forced functional dynamic equations of the form (r(t(xΔ(tγΔ+∑i=0n‍qi(t|x(δi(t|αisgn  x(δi(t=e(t on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  16. A real-time social media aggregation tool: Reflections from five large-scale events

    OpenAIRE

    Rogstadius, Jakob; Kostakos, Vassilis; Laredo, Jim; Vukovic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Social media is gaining interest among emergency response professionals and researchers as a source of real-time information about ongoing events. In this paper we summarize conclusions drawn while using a software prototype that collects, clusters and visualizes status updates from the social microblogging service Twitter in relation to five large-scale events during the spring of 2011. We identify different uses for gathered information and discuss metrics for prioritization of information ...

  17. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  18. Oscillation Theorems for Second-Order Half-Linear Advanced Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Tang

    2011-01-01

    (((Δ(Δ+(((=0 on an arbitrary time scale with sup =∞, where (≥ and ∫∞(Δ/(1/(<∞. Some sufficient conditions for oscillation of the studied equation are established. Our results not only improve and complement those results in the literature but also unify the oscillation of the second-order half-linear advanced differential equation and the second-order half-linear advanced difference equation. Three examples are included to illustrate the main results.

  19. Radial migration of preplanetary material - Implications for the accretion time scale problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, K.; Ward, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Radial drift of planetesimals due to density wave interaction with the solar nebula is considered. The mechanism is most effective for large masses and provides mobility over a size range where aerodynamic drag is unimportant. The process could shorten accretion time scales to O(100,000-1,000,000 years) throughout the solar system. Accumulation stalls down when growing objects are massive enough to open gaps in the gas disk. Implications of this process for current cosmogonic models are discussed.

  20. A typology of time-scale mismatches and behavioral interventions to diagnose and solve conservation problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robyn S; Hardisty, David J; Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca S; Runge, Michael C; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Urban, Dean L; Maguire, Lynn A; Hastings, Alan; Mumby, Peter J; Peters, Debra P C

    2016-02-01

    Ecological systems often operate on time scales significantly longer or shorter than the time scales typical of human decision making, which causes substantial difficulty for conservation and management in socioecological systems. For example, invasive species may move faster than humans can diagnose problems and initiate solutions, and climate systems may exhibit long-term inertia and short-term fluctuations that obscure learning about the efficacy of management efforts in many ecological systems. We adopted a management-decision framework that distinguishes decision makers within public institutions from individual actors within the social system, calls attention to the ways socioecological systems respond to decision makers' actions, and notes institutional learning that accrues from observing these responses. We used this framework, along with insights from bedeviling conservation problems, to create a typology that identifies problematic time-scale mismatches occurring between individual decision makers in public institutions and between individual actors in the social or ecological system. We also considered solutions that involve modifying human perception and behavior at the individual level as a means of resolving these problematic mismatches. The potential solutions are derived from the behavioral economics and psychology literature on temporal challenges in decision making, such as the human tendency to discount future outcomes at irrationally high rates. These solutions range from framing environmental decisions to enhance the salience of long-term consequences, to using structured decision processes that make time scales of actions and consequences more explicit, to structural solutions aimed at altering the consequences of short-sighted behavior to make it less appealing. Additional application of these tools and long-term evaluation measures that assess not just behavioral changes but also associated changes in ecological systems are needed. © 2015

  1. Terminal value problems for first and second order nonlinear equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Tisdell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine "terminal" value problems for dynamic equations on time scales - that is, a dynamic equation whose solutions are asymptotic at infinity. We present a number of new theorems that guarantee the existence and uniqueness of solutions, as well as some comparison-type results. The methods we employ feature dynamic inequalities, weighted norms, and fixed-point theory.

  2. Time scales of foam stability in shallow conduits: Insights from analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, L.; Scheu, B.; Cimarelli, C.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic systems can exhibit periodical trends in degassing activity, characterized by a wide range of time scales. Understanding the dynamics that control such periodic behavior can provide a picture of the processes occurring in the feeding system. Toward this end, we analyzed the periodicity of outgassing in a series of decompression experiments performed on analogue material (argon-saturated silicone oil plus glass beads/fibers) scaled to serve as models of basaltic magma. To define the effects of liquid viscosity and crystal content on the time scale of outgassing, we investigated both: (1) pure liquid systems, at differing viscosities (100 and 1000 Pa s), and (2) particle-bearing suspensions (diluted and semidiluted). The results indicate that under dynamic conditions (e.g., decompressive bubble growth and fluid ascent within the conduit), the periodicity of foam disruption may be up to several orders of magnitude less than estimates based on the analysis of static conditions. This difference in foam disruption time scale is inferred to result from the contribution of bubble shear and bubble growth to inter-bubble film thinning. The presence of particles in the semidiluted regime is further linked to shorter bubble bursting times, likely resulting from contributions of the presence of a solid network and coalescence processes to the relative increase in bubble breakup rates. Finally, it is argued that these experiments represent a good analogue of gas-piston activity (i.e., the periodical rise-and-fall of a basaltic lava lake surface), implying a dominant role for shallow foam accumulation as a source process for these phenomena.

  3. A typology of time-scale mismatches and behavioral interventions to diagnose and solve conservation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robyn S.; Hardisty, David J.; Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca S.; Runge, Michael C.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Urban, Dean L.; Maguire, Lynn A.; Hastings, Alan; Mumby, Peter J.; Peters, Debra P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological systems often operate on time scales significantly longer or shorter than the time scales typical of human decision making, which causes substantial difficulty for conservation and management in socioecological systems. For example, invasive species may move faster than humans can diagnose problems and initiate solutions, and climate systems may exhibit long-term inertia and short-term fluctuations that obscure learning about the efficacy of management efforts in many ecological systems. We adopted a management-decision framework that distinguishes decision makers within public institutions from individual actors within the social system, calls attention to the ways socioecological systems respond to decision makers’ actions, and notes institutional learning that accrues from observing these responses. We used this framework, along with insights from bedeviling conservation problems, to create a typology that identifies problematic time-scale mismatches occurring between individual decision makers in public institutions and between individual actors in the social or ecological system. We also considered solutions that involve modifying human perception and behavior at the individual level as a means of resolving these problematic mismatches. The potential solutions are derived from the behavioral economics and psychology literature on temporal challenges in decision making, such as the human tendency to discount future outcomes at irrationally high rates. These solutions range from framing environmental decisions to enhance the salience of long-term consequences, to using structured decision processes that make time scales of actions and consequences more explicit, to structural solutions aimed at altering the consequences of short-sighted behavior to make it less appealing. Additional application of these tools and long-term evaluation measures that assess not just behavioral changes but also associated changes in ecological systems are needed.

  4. Influence of Sediment Cohesion on Deltaic Morphodynamics and Stratigraphy Over Basin-Filling Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Matthew Benson, W.; Harlan, Margaret; Robichaux, Patrick; Sha, Xiaoyu; Xu, Kehui; Straub, Kyle M.

    2017-10-01

    Results from physical and numerical experiments suggest that sediment cohesion influences deltaic morphodynamics by promoting the development and maintenance of channels. As a result, cohesion is thought to increase the magnitude and time scales of internally generated (autogenic) processes and the dimensions of their stratigraphic products. We test these hypotheses by examining the surface processes and stratigraphic products from a suite of physical experiments where the influence of cohesion is isolated over temporal and spatial scales important for basin filling. Given the stochastic nature of autogenic sediment transport processes, we develop and employ a range of statistical tools and metrics. We observe that (1) an increase in sediment cohesion decreases lateral channel mobility and thus increases the time necessary to regrade deltaic surfaces; (2) enhanced channelization, due to sediment cohesion, increases the time necessary for the deposits of autogenic processes to average together and produce stratigraphic products with shapes set by the generation of regional accommodation; (3) cohesion promotes the transport of suspended sediment to terrestrial overbank and marine environments, which decreases the volume of channel, relative to overbank and marine deposits in the stratigraphic record. This increase in overbank and marine deposition changes the spatial distribution of sand in stratigraphy, with higher cohesion linked to enhanced segregation of fine particles from coarse sand in the experimental deposits. Combined, these results illustrate how the cohesion of sediment is fundamental in setting autogenic spatial and temporal scales and needs to be considered when inverting stratigraphic architecture for paleo-environmental history.

  5. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  6. Building a minimum frustration framework for brain functions over long time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Flå, Tor; Peters, James F

    2016-08-01

    The minimum frustration principle (MFP) is a computational approach stating that, over the long time scales of evolution, proteins' free energy decreases more than expected by thermodynamical constraints as their amino acids assume conformations progressively closer to the lowest energetic state. This Review shows that this general principle, borrowed from protein folding dynamics, can also be fruitfully applied to nervous function. Highlighting the foremost role of energetic requirements, macromolecular dynamics, and above all intertwined time scales in brain activity, the MFP elucidates a wide range of mental processes from sensations to memory retrieval. Brain functions are compared with trajectories that, over long nervous time scales, are attracted toward the low-energy bottom of funnel-like structures characterized by both robustness and plasticity. We discuss how the principle, derived explicitly from evolution and selection of a funneling structure from microdynamics of contacts, is unlike other brain models equipped with energy landscapes, such as the Bayesian and free energy principles and the Hopfield networks. In summary, we make available a novel approach to brain function cast in a biologically informed fashion, with the potential to be operationalized and assessed empirically. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Simulating recurrent event data with hazard functions defined on a total time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn-Eimermacher, Antje; Ingel, Katharina; Ozga, Ann-Kathrin; Preussler, Stella; Binder, Harald

    2015-03-08

    In medical studies with recurrent event data a total time scale perspective is often needed to adequately reflect disease mechanisms. This means that the hazard process is defined on the time since some starting point, e.g. the beginning of some disease, in contrast to a gap time scale where the hazard process restarts after each event. While techniques such as the Andersen-Gill model have been developed for analyzing data from a total time perspective, techniques for the simulation of such data, e.g. for sample size planning, have not been investigated so far. We have derived a simulation algorithm covering the Andersen-Gill model that can be used for sample size planning in clinical trials as well as the investigation of modeling techniques. Specifically, we allow for fixed and/or random covariates and an arbitrary hazard function defined on a total time scale. Furthermore we take into account that individuals may be temporarily insusceptible to a recurrent incidence of the event. The methods are based on conditional distributions of the inter-event times conditional on the total time of the preceeding event or study start. Closed form solutions are provided for common distributions. The derived methods have been implemented in a readily accessible R script. The proposed techniques are illustrated by planning the sample size for a clinical trial with complex recurrent event data. The required sample size is shown to be affected not only by censoring and intra-patient correlation, but also by the presence of risk-free intervals. This demonstrates the need for a simulation algorithm that particularly allows for complex study designs where no analytical sample size formulas might exist. The derived simulation algorithm is seen to be useful for the simulation of recurrent event data that follow an Andersen-Gill model. Next to the use of a total time scale, it allows for intra-patient correlation and risk-free intervals as are often observed in clinical trial data

  8. Sampling plant diversity and rarity at landscape scales: importance of sampling time in species detectability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Nielsen, Scott E; Grainger, Tess N; Kohler, Monica; Chipchar, Tim; Farr, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Documenting and estimating species richness at regional or landscape scales has been a major emphasis for conservation efforts, as well as for the development and testing of evolutionary and ecological theory. Rarely, however, are sampling efforts assessed on how they affect detection and estimates of species richness and rarity. In this study, vascular plant richness was sampled in 356 quarter hectare time-unlimited survey plots in the boreal region of northeast Alberta. These surveys consisted of 15,856 observations of 499 vascular plant species (97 considered to be regionally rare) collected by 12 observers over a 2 year period. Average survey time for each quarter-hectare plot was 82 minutes, ranging from 20 to 194 minutes, with a positive relationship between total survey time and total plant richness. When survey time was limited to a 20-minute search, as in other Alberta biodiversity methods, 61 species were missed. Extending the survey time to 60 minutes, reduced the number of missed species to 20, while a 90-minute cut-off time resulted in the loss of 8 species. When surveys were separated by habitat type, 60 minutes of search effort sampled nearly 90% of total observed richness for all habitats. Relative to rare species, time-unlimited surveys had ∼ 65% higher rare plant detections post-20 minutes than during the first 20 minutes of the survey. Although exhaustive sampling was attempted, observer bias was noted among observers when a subsample of plots was re-surveyed by different observers. Our findings suggest that sampling time, combined with sample size and observer effects, should be considered in landscape-scale plant biodiversity surveys.

  9. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  10. Residence time distribution measurements in a pilot-scale poison tank using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Goswami, Sunil; Samantray, J S; Sharma, V K; Maheshwari, N K

    2015-09-01

    Various types of systems are used to control the reactivity and shutting down of a nuclear reactor during emergency and routine shutdown operations. Injection of boron solution (borated water) into the core of a reactor is one of the commonly used methods during emergency operation. A pilot-scale poison tank was designed and fabricated to simulate injection of boron poison into the core of a reactor along with coolant water. In order to design a full-scale poison tank, it was desired to characterize flow of liquid from the tank. Residence time distribution (RTD) measurement and analysis was adopted to characterize the flow dynamics. Radiotracer technique was applied to measure RTD of aqueous phase in the tank using Bromine-82 as a radiotracer. RTD measurements were carried out with two different modes of operation of the tank and at different flow rates. In Mode-1, the radiotracer was instantaneously injected at the inlet and monitored at the outlet, whereas in Mode-2, the tank was filled with radiotracer and its concentration was measured at the outlet. From the measured RTD curves, mean residence times (MRTs), dead volume and fraction of liquid pumped in with time were determined. The treated RTD curves were modeled using suitable mathematical models. An axial dispersion model with high degree of backmixing was found suitable to describe flow when operated in Mode-1, whereas a tanks-in-series model with backmixing was found suitable to describe flow of the poison in the tank when operated in Mode-2. The results were utilized to scale-up and design a full-scale poison tank for a nuclear reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interrelations between the perception of time and space in large-scale environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Martin; Hölzl, Rupert; Kleinböhl, Dieter

    2014-04-01

    Interactions between perceived temporal and spatial properties of external stimuli (e.g. duration and size) suggest common neural mechanisms underlying the perception of time and space. This conclusion, however, lacks support from studies in large-scale environments, showing that judgements on travelled distances and associated travel times are independent from each other. Here, we used a different approach to test whether the perception of travelled distances is influenced by the perception of time. Unlike previous studies, in which temporal and spatial judgements were related to the same experience of walking, we assessed time and distance perception in analogous, but separate versions of estimation and production tasks. In estimation tasks, participants estimated the duration of a presented sound (time) or the length of a travelled distance (space), and in production tasks, participants terminated a sound after a numerically specified duration (time) or covered a numerically specified distance (space). The results show systematic overestimation of time and underestimation of travelled distance, and the latter reflecting previously reported misperceptions of visual distance. Time and distance judgements were related within individuals for production, but not for estimation tasks. These results suggest that temporal information might constitute a probabilistic cue for path integration.

  12. Valuing Treatments for Parkinson Disease Incorporating Process Utility: Performance of Best-Worst Scaling, Time Trade-Off, and Visual Analogue Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Marieke Geertruida Maria; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; van Til, Janine Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare treatment profiles including both health outcomes and process characteristics in Parkinson disease using best-worst scaling (BWS), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analogue scales (VAS). Methods From the model comprising of seven attributes with

  13. Transport on intermediate time scales in flows with cat's eye patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschke, Patrick; Sokolov, Igor M.; Zaks, Michael A.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    We consider the advection-diffusion transport of tracers in a one-parameter family of plane periodic flows where the patterns of streamlines feature regions of confined circulation in the shape of "cat's eyes," separated by meandering jets with ballistic motion inside them. By varying the parameter, we proceed from the regular two-dimensional lattice of eddies without jets to the sinusoidally modulated shear flow without eddies. When a weak thermal noise is added, i.e., at large Péclet numbers, several intermediate time scales arise, with qualitatively and quantitatively different transport properties: depending on the parameter of the flow, the initial position of a tracer, and the aging time, motion of the tracers ranges from subdiffusive to superballistic. We report on results of extensive numerical simulations of the mean-squared displacement for different initial conditions in ordinary and aged situations. These results are compared with a theory based on a Lévy walk that describes the intermediate-time ballistic regime and gives a reasonable description of the behavior for a certain class of initial conditions. The interplay of the walk process with internal circulation dynamics in the trapped state results at intermediate time scales in nonmonotonic characteristics of aging not captured by the Lévy walk model.

  14. US stock market efficiency over weekly, monthly, quarterly and yearly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    In financial markets, the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis implies that price returns are serially uncorrelated sequences. In other words, prices should follow a random walk behavior. Recent developments in evolutionary economic theory (Lo, 2004) have tailored the concept of adaptive market hypothesis (AMH) by proposing that market efficiency is not an all-or-none concept, but rather market efficiency is a characteristic that varies continuously over time and across markets. Within the AMH framework, this work considers the Dow Jones Index Average (DJIA) for studying the deviations from the random walk behavior over time. It is found that the market efficiency also varies over different time scales, from weeks to years. The well-known detrended fluctuation analysis was used for the characterization of the serial correlations of the return sequences. The results from the empirical showed that interday and intraday returns are more serially correlated than overnight returns. Also, some insights in the presence of business cycles (e.g., Juglar and Kuznets) are provided in terms of time variations of the scaling exponent.

  15. Degradation modeling of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells using dual time scale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, E.; Maximini, M.; Bauschulte, A.; vom Schloß, J.; Hermanns, R. T. E.

    2015-02-01

    HT-PEM fuel cells suffer from performance losses due to degradation effects. Therefore, the durability of HT-PEM is currently an important factor of research and development. In this paper a novel approach is presented for an integrated short term and long term simulation of HT-PEM accelerated lifetime testing. The physical phenomena of short term and long term effects are commonly modeled separately due to the different time scales. However, in accelerated lifetime testing, long term degradation effects have a crucial impact on the short term dynamics. Our approach addresses this problem by applying a novel method for dual time scale simulation. A transient system simulation is performed for an open voltage cycle test on a HT-PEM fuel cell for a physical time of 35 days. The analysis describes the system dynamics by numerical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, a performance assessment is performed in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach. The presented approach reduces the simulation time by approximately 73% compared to conventional simulation approach without losing too much accuracy. The approach promises a comprehensive perspective considering short term dynamic behavior and long term degradation effects.

  16. Neighborhood street scale elements, sedentary time and cardiometabolic risk factors in inactive ethnic minority women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Lee

    Full Text Available Cardiometabolic risk factors such as obesity, excess percent body fat, high blood pressure, elevated resting heart rate and sedentary behavior have increased in recent decades due to changes in the environment and lifestyle. Neighborhood micro-environmental, street scale elements may contribute to health above and beyond individual characteristics of residents.To investigate the relationship between neighborhood street scale elements and cardiometabolic risk factors among inactive ethnic minority women.Women (N = 410 completed measures of BMI, percent body fat, blood pressure, resting heart rate, sedentary behavior and demographics. Trained field assessors completed the Pedestrian Environment Data Scan in participants' neighborhoods. Data were collected from 2006-2008. Multiple regression models were conducted in 2011 to estimate the effect of environmental factors on cardiometabolic risk factors.Adjusted regression models found an inverse association between sidewalk buffers and blood pressure, between traffic control devices and resting heart rate, and a positive association between presence of pedestrian crossing aids and BMI (ps<.05. Neighborhood attractiveness and safety for walking and cycling were related to more time spent in a motor vehicle (ps<.05.Findings suggest complex relationships among micro-environmental, street scale elements that may confer important cardiometabolic benefits and risks for residents. Living in the most attractive and safe neighborhoods for physical activity may be associated with longer times spent sitting in the car.

  17. Characteristic time scales of electroencephalograms of narcoleptic patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Won; Shin, Hongbeom; Kim, Eui-Joong; Koo, Young-Jin; Choi, Byunghun; Park, Kwang Suk; Jeong, Do-Un

    2010-10-01

    Sleep electroencephalograms (EEGs) typically showed correlated fluctuations that became random-like oscillations beyond a characteristic time scale. To investigate this behavior quantitatively, the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was applied to EEGs of 10 narcoleptic patients (22.0 ± 4.0 yrs; 6 males) and 8 healthy controls (24.0 ± 2.0 yrs; 5 males). The characteristic time scales of the narcoleptics and controls were estimated as 1.8 ± 0.7 and 4.4 ± 1.2s, respectively (significance level, pDFA of the EEGs segmented into 30s epochs and found that the DFA scaling exponents increased in deep sleep stages. These results were verified with power spectrum and auto-correlation analysis, and reproduced by a mathematical model. We thus concluded that characteristics of EEGs of narcoleptic patients could be differentiated from those of healthy subjects, suggesting a potential application of DFA in diagnosing narcolepsy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  19. Muscles innervated by a single motor neuron exhibit divergent synaptic properties on multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Dawn M; Pritchard, Amy E; Latimer, John K; Wakefield, Andrew T

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive changes in the output of neural circuits underlying rhythmic behaviors are relayed to muscles via motor neuron activity. Presynaptic and postsynaptic properties of neuromuscular junctions can impact the transformation from motor neuron activity to muscle response. Further, synaptic plasticity occurring on the time scale of inter-spike intervals can differ between multiple muscles innervated by the same motor neuron. In rhythmic behaviors, motor neuron bursts can elicit additional synaptic plasticity. However, it is unknown whether plasticity regulated by the longer time scale of inter-burst intervals also differs between synapses from the same neuron, and whether any such distinctions occur across a physiological activity range. To address these issues, we measured electrical responses in muscles innervated by a chewing circuit neuron, the lateral gastric (LG) motor neuron, in a well-characterized small motor system, the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the Jonah crab, Cancer borealisIn vitro and in vivo, sensory, hormonal and modulatory inputs elicit LG bursting consisting of inter-spike intervals of 50-250 ms and inter-burst intervals of 2-24 s. Muscles expressed similar facilitation measured with paired stimuli except at the shortest inter-spike interval. However, distinct decay time constants resulted in differences in temporal summation. In response to bursting activity, augmentation occurred to different extents and saturated at different inter-burst intervals. Further, augmentation interacted with facilitation, resulting in distinct intra-burst facilitation between muscles. Thus, responses of multiple target muscles diverge across a physiological activity range as a result of distinct synaptic properties sensitive to multiple time scales. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Human-Water Interactions: The Role of Time-Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloeschl, G.; Sivapalan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time Scale Interactions and the Co-evolution of Humans and Water. Water Resour. Res., 51, in press.

  1. BME estimation of residential exposure to ambient PM10 and ozone at multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christakos, George; Jerrett, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Long-term human exposure to ambient pollutants can be an important contributing or etiologic factor of many chronic diseases. Spatiotemporal estimation (mapping) of long-term exposure at residential areas based on field observations recorded in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Air Quality System often suffer from missing data issues due to the scarce monitoring network across space and the inconsistent recording periods at different monitors. We developed and compared two upscaling methods: UM1 (data aggregation followed by exposure estimation) and UM2 (exposure estimation followed by data aggregation) for the long-term PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter estimations and applied them in multiple time scales to estimate PM and ozone exposures for the residential areas of the Health Effects of Air Pollution on Lupus (HEAPL) study. We used Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) analysis for the two upscaling methods. We performed spatiotemporal cross-validations at multiple time scales by UM1 and UM2 to assess the estimation accuracy across space and time. Compared with the kriging method, the integration of soft information by the BME method can effectively increase the estimation accuracy for both pollutants. The spatiotemporal distributions of estimation errors from UM1 and UM2 were similar. The cross-validation results indicated that UM2 is generally better than UM1 in exposure estimations at multiple time scales in terms of predictive accuracy and lack of bias. For yearly PM10 estimations, both approaches have comparable performance, but the implementation of UM1 is associated with much lower computation burden. BME-based upscaling methods UM1 and UM2 can assimilate core and site-specific knowledge bases of different formats for long-term exposure estimation. This study shows that UM1 can perform reasonably well when the aggregation process does not alter the spatiotemporal structure of the original data set; otherwise, UM2 is preferable.

  2. Bedload transport flux fluctuations over a wide range of time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Fu, X.; Ancey, C.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport is a highly fluctuating process. Our previous study (Ma et al., 2014) demonstrated a three-regime relation of the variance of bedload transport flux across a wide range of sampling time scales. This study further explored the fluctuation spectrum of at-a-point bedload transport flux with different sampling times. We derived out analytical solutions of the third- and fourth-order moments of bedload transport flux, based on a physically-based formulation (Ancey et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2014). A formulation of the probability density function of bedload transport flux was constructed based on the 1st through 4th order moments. Experimental data were used to test against the solutions of both the moments and PDF. Interestingly, the higher order statistical moments were found to exhibit the three-regime pattern as well. This study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of bedload transport flux fluctuation and emphasizes its timescale-dependent features resulting from the discrete nature and correlated motion of bedload material. The correlated structures of bedload transport, such as bed forms and particle clusters, deserve to be further exploration in future studies. Keywords: bedload transport; stochastic theory; high order moment; fluctuation; time scale; PDF. Ancey, C., Davison, A. C., Bohm, T., Jodeau, M., and Frey, P. Entrainment and motion of coarse particles in a shallow water stream down a steep slope, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2008, 595, 83-114, doi: 10.1017/S0022112007008774. Ma, H. B., Heyman, J., Fu, X. D., Mettra, F., Ancey, C. and Parker, G. Bedload transport over a broad range of time scales: determination of three regimes of fluctuations. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 2014. (under review)

  3. Scaling behavior of EEG amplitude and frequency time series across sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Tismer, Sebastian; Gans, Fabian; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Penzel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We study short-term and long-term persistence properties (related with auto-correlations) of amplitudes and frequencies of EEG oscillations in 176 healthy subjects and 40 patients during nocturnal sleep. The amplitudes show scaling from 2 to 500 seconds (depending on the considered band) with large fluctuation exponents during (nocturnal) wakefulness (0.73-0.83) and small ones during deep sleep (0.50-0.69). Light sleep is similar to deep sleep, while REM sleep (0.64-0.76) is closer to wakefulness except for the EEG γ band. Some of the frequency time series also show long-term scaling, depending on the selected bands and stages. Only minor deviations are seen for patients with depression, anxiety, or Parkinson's disease.

  4. The Sensitivity of Income Polarization - Time, length of accounting periods, equivalence scales, and income definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain

    This study looks at polarization and its components’ sensitivity to assumptions about equivalence scales, income definition, ethical income distribution parameters, and the income accounting period. A representative sample of Danish individual incomes from 1984 to 2002 is utilised. Results show...... that polarization has increased over time, regardless of the applied measure, when the last part of the period is compared to the first part of the period. Primary causes being increased inequality (alienation) and faster income growth among high incomes relative to those in the middle of the distribution....... Increasing the accounting period confirms the reduction in inequality found for shorter periods, but polarization is virtually unchanged, because income group identification increases. Applying different equivalence scales does not change polarization ranking for different years, but identification ranks...

  5. Time asynchronous relative dimension in space method for multi-scale problems in fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markesteijn, A. P.; Karabasov, S. A.

    2014-02-01

    A novel computational method is presented for solving fluid dynamics equations in the multi-scale framework when the system size is an important parameter of the governing equations. The method (TARDIS) is based on a concurrent transformation of the governing equations in space and time and solving the transformed equations on a uniform Cartesian grid with the corresponding causality conditions at the grid interfaces. For implementation in the framework of TARDIS, the second-order CABARET scheme of Karabasov and Goloviznin [1] is selected for it provides a good combination of numerical accuracy, computational efficiency and simplicity of realisation. Numerical examples are first provided for several isothermal gas dynamics test problems and then for modelling of molecular fluctuations inside a microscopic flow channel and ultrasound wave propagation through a nano-scale region of molecular fluctuations.

  6. Rate dependence of grain boundary sliding via time-scaling atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Farah; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2017-02-01

    Approaching experimentally relevant strain rates has been a long-standing challenge for molecular dynamics method which captures phenomena typically on the scale of nanoseconds or at strain rates of 107 s-1 and higher. Here, we use grain boundary sliding in nanostructures as a paradigmatic problem to investigate rate dependence using atomistic simulations. We employ a combination of time-scaling computational approaches, including the autonomous basin climbing method, the nudged elastic band method, and kinetic Monte Carlo, to access strain rates ranging from 0.5 s-1 to 107 s-1. Combined with a standard linear solid model for viscoelastic behavior, our simulations reveal that grain boundary sliding exhibits noticeable rate dependence only below strain rates on the order of 10 s-1 but is rate independent and consistent with molecular dynamics at higher strain rates.

  7. Cosmological perturbations in inflationary models with anisotropic space-time scaling in a Lifshitz background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Koyama, Kazuya; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-11-01

    Models of inflation in a gravitational background with an anisotropic space-time scaling are studied. The background is a higher-dimensional Lifshitz throat with the anisotropy scaling z≠1. After the dimensional reduction, the four-dimensional general covariance is explicitly broken to a three-dimensional spatial diffeomorphism. As a result the cosmological perturbation theory in this setup with less symmetries have to be formulated. We present the consistent cosmological perturbation theory for this setup. We find that the effective four-dimensional gravitational wave perturbations propagate with a different speed than the higher dimensional gravitational excitations. Depending on the model parameters, for an observer inside the throat, the four-dimensional gravitational wave propagation can be superluminal. We also find that the Bardeen potential and the Newtonian potential are different. This can have interesting observational consequences for lensing and cosmic microwave background fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that at the linearized level the inflaton field excitations vanish.

  8. Spatio-temporal modeling of connectome-scale brain network interactions via time-evolving graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jinhe; Luo, Liao; Dong, Qinglin; Lv, Jinglei; Zhao, Yu; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Tianming

    2017-11-09

    Many recent literature studies have revealed interesting dynamics patterns of functional brain networks derived from fMRI data. However, it has been rarely explored how functional networks spatially overlap (or interact) and how such connectome-scale network interactions temporally evolve. To explore these unanswered questions, this paper presents a novel framework for spatio-temporal modeling of connectome-scale functional brain network interactions via two main effective computational methodologies. First, to integrate, pool and compare brain networks across individuals and their cognitive states under task performances, we designed a novel group-wise dictionary learning scheme to derive connectome-scale consistent brain network templates that can be used to define the common reference space of brain network interactions. Second, the temporal dynamics of spatial network interactions is modeled by a weighted time-evolving graph, and then a data-driven unsupervised learning algorithm based on the dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is adopted to identify behavioral patterns of brain networks during the temporal evolution process of spatial overlaps/interactions. Experimental results on the Human Connectome Project (HCP) task fMRI data showed that our methods can reveal meaningful, diverse behavior patterns of connectome-scale network interactions. In particular, those networks' behavior patterns are distinct across HCP tasks such as motor, working memory, language and social tasks, and their dynamics well correspond to the temporal changes of specific task designs. In general, our framework offers a new approach to characterizing human brain function by quantitative description for the temporal evolution of spatial overlaps/interactions of connectome-scale brain networks in a standard reference space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the

  10. Time Scales of Conformational Gating in a Lipid-Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaieda, Shuji; Halle, Bertil

    2015-06-25

    Lipid-binding proteins sequester amphiphilic molecules in a large internal cavity occupied by ∼30 water molecules, some of which are displaced by the ligand. The role of these internal water molecules in lipid binding and release is not understood. We use magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) to directly monitor internal-water dynamics in apo and palmitate-bound rat intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (rIFABP). Specifically, we record the water (2)H and (17)O MRD profiles of the apo and holo forms of rIFABP in solution or immobilized by covalent cross-links. A global analysis of this extensive data set identifies three internal-water classes with mean survival times of ∼1 ns, ∼100 ns, and ∼6 μs. We associate the two longer time scales with conformational fluctuations of the gap between β-strands D and E (∼6 μs) and of the portal at the helix-capped end of the β-barrel (∼100 ns). These fluctuations limit the exchange rates of a few highly ordered structural water molecules but not the dissociation rate of the fatty acid. The remaining 90% (apo) or 70% (holo) of cavity waters exchange among internal hydration sites on a time scale of ∼1 ns but exhibit substantial orientational order, particularly in the holo form.

  11. Time scales and structures of wave interaction exemplified with water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashova, Elena

    2013-05-01

    Presently two models for computing energy spectra in weakly nonlinear dispersive media are known: kinetic wave turbulence theory, using a statistical description of an energy cascade over a continuous spectrum (K-cascade), and the D-model, describing resonant clusters and energy cascades (D-cascade) in a deterministic way as interaction of distinct modes. In this letter we give an overview of these structures and their properties and a list of criteria about which model of energy cascade should be used in the analysis of a given experiment, using water waves as an example. Applying the time scale analysis to weakly nonlinear wave systems modeled by the focusing nonlinear Schödinger equation, we demonstrate that K-cascade and D-cascade are not competing processes but rather two processes taking place at different time scales, at different characteristic levels of nonlinearity and based on different physical mechanisms. Applying those criteria to data known from experiments with surface water waves we find that the energy cascades observed occur at short characteristic times compatible only with a D-cascade. The only pre-requisite for a D-cascade being a focusing nonlinear Schödinger equation, the same analysis may be applied to existing experiments with wave systems appearing in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, electrodynamics, plasma, convection theory, etc.

  12. Relativistic electron acceleration and decay time scales in the inner and outer radiation belts: SAMPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Hovestadt, D.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy electrons have been measured systematically in a low-altitude (520 x 675 km), nearly polar (inclination = 82 deg) orbit by sensitive instruments onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). Count rate channels with electron energy thresholds ranging from 0.4 MeV to 3.5 MeV in three different instruments have been used to examine relativistic electron variations as a function of L-shell parameter and time. A long run of essentially continuous data (July 1992 - July 1993) shows substantial acceleration of energetic electrons throughout much of the magnetosphere on rapid time scales. This acceleration appears to be due to solar wind velocity enhancements and is surprisingly large in that the radiation belt 'slot' region often is filled temporarily and electron fluxes are strongly enhanced even at very low L-values (L aprroximately 2). A superposed epoch analysis shows that electron fluxes rise rapidly for 2.5 is approximately less than L is approximately less than 5. These increases occur on a time scale of order 1-2 days and are most abrupt for L-values near 3. The temporal decay rate of the fluxes is dependent on energy and L-value and may be described by J = Ke-t/to with t(sub o) approximately equals 5-10 days. Thus, these results suggest that the Earth's magnetosphere is a cosmic electron accelerator of substantial strength and efficiency.

  13. Model based analysis of the time scales associated to pump start-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dazin, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.dazin@lille.ensam.fr [Arts et métiers ParisTech/LML Laboratory UMR CNRS 8107, 8 bld Louis XIV, 59046 Lille cedex (France); Caignaert, Guy [Arts et métiers ParisTech/LML Laboratory UMR CNRS 8107, 8 bld Louis XIV, 59046 Lille cedex (France); Dauphin-Tanguy, Geneviève, E-mail: genevieve.dauphin-tanguy@ec-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, Ecole Centrale de Lille/CRISTAL UMR CNRS 9189, BP 48, 59651, Villeneuve d’Ascq cedex F 59000 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A dynamic model of a hydraulic system has been built. • Three periods in a pump start-up have been identified. • The time scales of each period have been estimated. • The parameters affecting the rapidity of a pump start-up have been explored. - Abstract: The paper refers to a non dimensional analysis of the behaviour of a hydraulic system during pump fast start-ups. The system is composed of a radial flow pump and its suction and delivery pipes. It is modelled using the bond graph methodology. The prediction of the model is validated by comparison to experimental results. An analysis of the time evolution of the terms acting on the total pump pressure is proposed. It allows for a decomposition of the start-up into three consecutive periods. The time scales associated with these periods are estimated. The effects of parameters (angular acceleration, final rotation speed, pipe length and resistance) affecting the start-up rapidity are then explored.

  14. Real-Time Monitoring System for a Utility-Scale Photovoltaic Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Moreno-Garcia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is, at present, considerable interest in the storage and dispatchability of photovoltaic (PV energy, together with the need to manage power flows in real-time. This paper presents a new system, PV-on time, which has been developed to supervise the operating mode of a Grid-Connected Utility-Scale PV Power Plant in order to ensure the reliability and continuity of its supply. This system presents an architecture of acquisition devices, including wireless sensors distributed around the plant, which measure the required information. It is also equipped with a high-precision protocol for synchronizing all data acquisition equipment, something that is necessary for correctly establishing relationships among events in the plant. Moreover, a system for monitoring and supervising all of the distributed devices, as well as for the real-time treatment of all the registered information, is presented. Performances were analyzed in a 400 kW transformation center belonging to a 6.1 MW Utility-Scale PV Power Plant. In addition to monitoring the performance of all of the PV plant’s components and detecting any failures or deviations in production, this system enables users to control the power quality of the signal injected and the influence of the installation on the distribution grid.

  15. Dynamics analysis of the fast-slow hydro-turbine governing system with different time-scale coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Chen, Diyi; Wu, Changzhi; Wang, Xiangyu

    2018-01-01

    Multi-time scales modeling of hydro-turbine governing system is crucial in precise modeling of hydropower plant and provides support for the stability analysis of the system. Considering the inertia and response time of the hydraulic servo system, the hydro-turbine governing system is transformed into the fast-slow hydro-turbine governing system. The effects of the time-scale on the dynamical behavior of the system are analyzed and the fast-slow dynamical behaviors of the system are investigated with different time-scale. Furthermore, the theoretical analysis of the stable regions is presented. The influences of the time-scale on the stable region are analyzed by simulation. The simulation results prove the correctness of the theoretical analysis. More importantly, the methods and results of this paper provide a perspective to multi-time scales modeling of hydro-turbine governing system and contribute to the optimization analysis and control of the system.

  16. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis: selective filters and signal mismatch on two time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Michael Rothbart

    Full Text Available In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as "Gryllus assimilis", the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2-3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems.

  17. Versatile synchronized real-time MEG hardware controller for large-scale fast data acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Limin; Han, Menglai; Pratt, Kevin; Paulson, Douglas; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2017-05-01

    Versatile controllers for accurate, fast, and real-time synchronized acquisition of large-scale data are useful in many areas of science, engineering, and technology. Here, we describe the development of a controller software based on a technique called queued state machine for controlling the data acquisition (DAQ) hardware, continuously acquiring a large amount of data synchronized across a large number of channels (>400) at a fast rate (up to 20 kHz/channel) in real time, and interfacing with applications for real-time data analysis and display of electrophysiological data. This DAQ controller was developed specifically for a 384-channel pediatric whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, but its architecture is useful for wide applications. This controller running in a LabVIEW environment interfaces with microprocessors in the MEG sensor electronics to control their real-time operation. It also interfaces with a real-time MEG analysis software via transmission control protocol/internet protocol, to control the synchronous acquisition and transfer of the data in real time from >400 channels to acquisition and analysis workstations. The successful implementation of this controller for an MEG system with a large number of channels demonstrates the feasibility of employing the present architecture in several other applications.

  18. Versatile synchronized real-time MEG hardware controller for large-scale fast data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Limin; Han, Menglai; Pratt, Kevin; Paulson, Douglas; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2017-05-01

    Versatile controllers for accurate, fast, and real-time synchronized acquisition of large-scale data are useful in many areas of science, engineering, and technology. Here, we describe the development of a controller software based on a technique called queued state machine for controlling the data acquisition (DAQ) hardware, continuously acquiring a large amount of data synchronized across a large number of channels (>400) at a fast rate (up to 20 kHz/channel) in real time, and interfacing with applications for real-time data analysis and display of electrophysiological data. This DAQ controller was developed specifically for a 384-channel pediatric whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, but its architecture is useful for wide applications. This controller running in a LabVIEW environment interfaces with microprocessors in the MEG sensor electronics to control their real-time operation. It also interfaces with a real-time MEG analysis software via transmission control protocol/internet protocol, to control the synchronous acquisition and transfer of the data in real time from >400 channels to acquisition and analysis workstations. The successful implementation of this controller for an MEG system with a large number of channels demonstrates the feasibility of employing the present architecture in several other applications.

  19. Method for Hot Real-Time Analysis of Pyrolysis Vapors at Pilot Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, Marc D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Pyrolysis oils contain more than 400 compounds, up to 60% of which do not re-volatilize for subsequent chemical analysis. Vapor chemical composition is also complicated as additional condensation reactions occur during quenching and collection of the product. Due to the complexity of the pyrolysis oil, and a desire to catalytically upgrade the vapor composition before condensation, online real-time analytical techniques such as Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) are of great use. However, in order to properly sample hot pyrolysis vapors at the pilot scale, many challenges must be overcome.

  20. Control of modular multilevel converters based on time-scale analysis and orthogonal functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarri, L.; Tani, A.; Mengoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    Modular multilevel converter (MMC) is a promising multilevel topology for high-voltage applications that has been developed in recent years. The control of MMCs has been analyzed in detail in many papers, showing that the converter capacitors can be kept charged and balanced by controlling...... current is still a complex task and cannot be fully tackled with traditional linear control techniques. In this paper a multiple time-scale analysis is proposed to determine an approximated model of the MMC that can be used to solve the control problem of the capacitor voltages. In addition, it is shown...

  1. Epidemic mitigation via awareness propagation in communication networks: the role of time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijuan; Chen, Chuyi; Qu, Bo; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2017-07-01

    The participation of individuals in multi-layer networks allows for feedback between network layers, opening new possibilities to mitigate epidemic spreading. For instance, the spread of a biological disease such as Ebola in a physical contact network may trigger the propagation of the information related to this disease in a communication network, e.g. an online social network. The information propagated in the communication network may increase the awareness of some individuals, resulting in them avoiding contact with their infected neighbors in the physical contact network, which might protect the population from the infection. In this work, we aim to understand how the time scale γ of the information propagation (speed that information is spread and forgotten) in the communication network relative to that of the epidemic spread (speed that an epidemic is spread and cured) in the physical contact network influences such mitigation using awareness information. We begin by proposing a model of the interaction between information propagation and epidemic spread, taking into account the relative time scale γ. We analytically derive the average fraction of infected nodes in the meta-stable state for this model (i) by developing an individual-based mean-field approximation (IBMFA) method and (ii) by extending the microscopic Markov chain approach (MMCA). We show that when the time scale γ of the information spread relative to the epidemic spread is large, our IBMFA approximation is better compared to MMCA near the epidemic threshold, whereas MMCA performs better when the prevalence of the epidemic is high. Furthermore, we find that an optimal mitigation exists that leads to a minimal fraction of infected nodes. The optimal mitigation is achieved at a non-trivial relative time scale γ, which depends on the rate at which an infected individual becomes aware. Contrary to our intuition, information spread too fast in the communication network could reduce the

  2. Linear Scaling Solution of the Time-Dependent Self-Consistent-Field Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Challacombe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to solving the Time-Dependent Self-Consistent-Field equations is developed based on the double quotient formulation of Tsiper 2001 (J. Phys. B. Dual channel, quasi-independent non-linear optimization of these quotients is found to yield convergence rates approaching those of the best case (single channel Tamm-Dancoff approximation. This formulation is variational with respect to matrix truncation, admitting linear scaling solution of the matrix-eigenvalue problem, which is demonstrated for bulk excitons in the polyphenylene vinylene oligomer and the (4,3 carbon nanotube segment.

  3. Hybrid approximations via second order combined dynamic derivatives on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the approximation of conventional second order derivative via the combined (diamond-$\\alpha$ dynamic derivative on time scales with necessary smoothness conditions embedded. We will show the constraints under which the second order dynamic derivative provides a consistent approximation to the conventional second derivative; the cases where the dynamic derivative approximates the derivative only via a proper modification of the existing formula; and the situations in which the dynamic derivative can never approximate consistently even with the help of available structure correction methods. Constructive error analysis will be given via asymptotic expansions for practical hybrid modeling and computational applications.

  4. Mechanisms of the global electric circuit and lightning variability on the ENSO time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareev, Evgeny; Volodin, Evgeny; Slyunyaev, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    Many studies of lightning activity on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) time scale show increased activity over tropical land areas during the warm El Niño phase (e.g., Satori et al., 2009; Price, 2009). The mechanisms of this variability—particularly in terms of its role in the global electric circuit (GEC)—are still under debate (e.g., Williams and Mareev, 2014). In this study a general circulation model of the atmosphere and ocean INMCM4.0 (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Coupled Model) is used for modelling the GEC variability on the ENSO time scale. The ionospheric potential (IP) and the lightning flash rate are calculated to study regional peculiarities and possible mechanisms of lightning variation. The IP parameterisation is used (Mareev and Volodin, 2014) which takes into account quasi-stationary currents of electrified clouds (including thunderstorms) as principal contributors into the DC global circuit. The account of conductivity variation in the IP parameterisation is suggested based on the approach realised in (Slyunyaev et al., 2014). Comparison of simulation results with the observational data on lightning activity on the ENSO time scale is discussed. Numerical simulations suggest that the inter-annual IP variability is low and does not exceed 1% of the mean value, being tightly correlated with the mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific Ocean (180W-100W, 5S-5N—El Niño area). The IP maximum corresponds to the SST minimum. This result can be explained taking into account that during El Niño (positive temperature anomaly) precipitations in the equatorial part of the Pacific increase while in other tropic zones including the land areas they decrease. Comparison of simulation results with the observational data on lightning activity on the ENSO time scale is discussed. During the El Niño period in the model, the mean aerosol content in the atmosphere decrease, which is caused by the weakening of the winds over Sahara and

  5. Circadian clock and cardiac vulnerability: A time stamp on multi-scale neuroautonomic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2005-03-01

    Cardiovascular vulnerability displays a 24-hour pattern with a peak between 9AM and 11AM. This daily pattern in cardiac risk is traditionally attributed to external factors including activity levels and sleep-wake cycles. However,influences from the endogenous circadian pacemaker independent from behaviors may also affect cardiac control. We investigate heartbeat dynamics in healthy subjects recorded throughout a 10-day protocol wherein the sleep/wake and behavior cycles are desynchronized from the endogenous circadian cycle,enabling assessment of circadian factors while controlling for behavior-related factors. We demonstrate that the scaling exponent characterizing temporal correlations in heartbeat dynamics over multiple time scales does exhibit a significant circadian rhythm with a sharp peak at the circadian phase corresponding to the period 9-11AM, and that this rhythm is independent from scheduled behaviors and mean heart rate. Our findings of strong circadian rhythms in the multi-scale heartbeat dynamics of healthy young subjects indicate that the underlying mechanism of cardiac regulation is strongly influenced by the endogenous circadian pacemaker. A similar circadian effect in vulnerable individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease would contribute to the morning peak of adverse cardiac events observed in epidemiological studies.

  6. Limited-memory scaled gradient projection methods for real-time image deconvolution in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, F.; Zanella, R.; Zanghirati, G.; Zanni, L.

    2015-04-01

    Gradient projection methods have given rise to effective tools for image deconvolution in several relevant areas, such as microscopy, medical imaging and astronomy. Due to the large scale of the optimization problems arising in nowadays imaging applications and to the growing request of real-time reconstructions, an interesting challenge to be faced consists in designing new acceleration techniques for the gradient schemes, able to preserve their simplicity and low computational cost of each iteration. In this work we propose an acceleration strategy for a state-of-the-art scaled gradient projection method for image deconvolution in microscopy. The acceleration idea is derived by adapting a step-length selection rule, recently introduced for limited-memory steepest descent methods in unconstrained optimization, to the special constrained optimization framework arising in image reconstruction. We describe how important issues related to the generalization of the step-length rule to the imaging optimization problem have been faced and we evaluate the improvements due to the acceleration strategy by numerical experiments on large-scale image deconvolution problems.

  7. Variability of scaling time series in the Arctic sea-ice drift dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The motion of an individual ice floe in the Arctic Ocean was monitored at the Russian research station North Pole 35 established on the ice pack in 2008. The ice floe speed (V was found to be correlated with wind speed (v in main features, such as the positions of maxima and minima of V and v. However, the fine structure of the V-variation cannot be explained by the wind forcing alone. There were periods of time when the floe drift was affected by the interactions of ice floes between each other or by the periodical forcing due to either the Coriolis inertia effect or the tidal activity. These data were compared with the "waiting times" statistics that are the distributions of time intervals between subsequent, sufficiently strong changes in the kinetic energy of drifting ice floe. These distributions were measured in several time windows differing in the average wind speed and wind direction, and/or in the mechanical state of the ice pack. The distribution functions N (t>τ, where N is the number of successive events of energy change separated by the time interval t that exceeds τ, constructed in different time windows demonstrate fractal or a multifractal nature of the time series during motion in the consolidated ice pack but were truly random when the ice floe drifted in the highly fragmented sea ice. The latter result shows the existence of a relationship between the long-range mechanical interactions in the pack and long-term memory (time scaling behaviour of the sea-ice motion.

  8. Multi-scale Visualization of Molecular Architecture Using Real-Time Ambient Occlusion in Sculptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Manuel; Wriggers, Willy

    2015-10-01

    The modeling of large biomolecular assemblies relies on an efficient rendering of their hierarchical architecture across a wide range of spatial level of detail. We describe a paradigm shift currently under way in computer graphics towards the use of more realistic global illumination models, and we apply the so-called ambient occlusion approach to our open-source multi-scale modeling program, Sculptor. While there are many other higher quality global illumination approaches going all the way up to full GPU-accelerated ray tracing, they do not provide size-specificity of the features they shade. Ambient occlusion is an aspect of global lighting that offers great visual benefits and powerful user customization. By estimating how other molecular shape features affect the reception of light at some surface point, it effectively simulates indirect shadowing. This effect occurs between molecular surfaces that are close to each other, or in pockets such as protein or ligand binding sites. By adding ambient occlusion, large macromolecular systems look much more natural, and the perception of characteristic surface features is strongly enhanced. In this work, we present a real-time implementation of screen space ambient occlusion that delivers realistic cues about tunable spatial scale characteristics of macromolecular architecture. Heretofore, the visualization of large biomolecular systems, comprising e.g. hundreds of thousands of atoms or Mega-Dalton size electron microscopy maps, did not take into account the length scales of interest or the spatial resolution of the data. Our approach has been uniquely customized with shading that is tuned for pockets and cavities of a user-defined size, making it useful for visualizing molecular features at multiple scales of interest. This is a feature that none of the conventional ambient occlusion approaches provide. Actual Sculptor screen shots illustrate how our implementation supports the size-dependent rendering of molecular

  9. Time scale for energy equipartition in a two-dimensional FPU model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benettin, Giancarlo

    2005-03-01

    The FPU problem, i.e., the problem of energy equipartition among normal modes in a weakly nonlinear lattice, is here studied in dimension two, more precisely in a model with triangular cell and nearest-neighbors Lennard-Jones interaction. The number n of degrees of freedom ranges from 182 to 6338. Energy is initially equidistributed among a small number n(0) of low frequency modes, with n(0) proportional to n. We study numerically the time evolution of the so-called spectral entropy and the related "effective number" n(eff) of degrees of freedom involved in the dynamics; in this (rather typical) way we can estimate, for each n and each specific energy (energy per degree of freedom) epsilon, the time scale T(n)(epsilon) for energy equipartition. Numerical results indicate that in the thermodynamic limit the equipartition times are short: more precisely, for large n at fixed epsilon we find a limit curve T(infinity)(epsilon), and T(infinity) grows only as epsilon(-1) for small epsilon. Larger equipartition times are obtained by lowering epsilon, at fixed n, below a crossover value epsilon(c)(n). However, epsilon(c) appears to vanish by increasing n (faster than 1n), and the total energy E=nepsilon, rather than epsilon, appears to be the relevant variable when n is large and epsilonmodel and this kind of initial conditions, the FPU phenomenon, namely the lack of energy equipartition in physically reasonable times, practically disappears.

  10. Time lags in watershed-scale nutrient transport: an exploration of dominant controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2017-08-01

    Unprecedented decreases in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition together with increases in agricultural N-use efficiency have led to decreases in net anthropogenic N inputs in many eastern US and Canadian watersheds as well as in Europe. Despite such decreases, N concentrations in streams and rivers continue to increase, and problems of coastal eutrophication remain acute. Such a mismatch between N inputs and outputs can arise due to legacy N accumulation and subsequent lag times between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. In the present study, we quantified such lag times by pairing long-term N input trajectories with stream nitrate concentration data for 16 nested subwatersheds in a 6800 km2, Southern Ontario watershed. Our results show significant nonlinearity between N inputs and outputs, with a strong hysteresis effect indicative of decadal-scale lag times. The mean annual lag time was found to be 24.5 years, with lags varying seasonally, likely due to differences in N-delivery pathways. Lag times were found to be negatively correlated with both tile drainage and watershed slope, with tile drainage being a dominant control in fall and watershed slope being significant during the spring snowmelt period. Quantification of such lags will be crucial to policy-makers as they struggle to set appropriate goals for water quality improvement in human-impacted watersheds.

  11. Wake losses from averaged and time-resolved power measurements at full scale wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Mana, Matteo; Becchetti, Matteo; Segalini, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    This work deals with the experimental analysis of wake losses fluctuations at full-scale wind turbines. The test case is a wind farm sited on a moderately complex terrain: 4 turbines are installed, having 2 MW of rated power each. The sources of information are the time-resolved data, as collected from the OPC server, and the 10-minutes averaged SCADA data. The objective is to compare the statistical distributions of wake losses for far and middle wakes, as can be observed through the “fast” lens of time-resolved data, for certain selected test-case time series, and through the “slow” lens of SCADA data, on a much longer time basis that allow to set the standards of the mean wake losses along the wind farm. Further, time-resolved data are used for an insight into the spectral properties of wake fluctuations, highlighting the role of the wind turbine as low-pass filter. Summarizing, the wind rose, the layout of the site and the structure of the data sets at disposal allow to study middle and far wake behavior, with a “slow” and “fast” perspective.

  12. Parallel Motion Simulation of Large-Scale Real-Time Crowd in a Hierarchical Environmental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a parallel real-time crowd simulation method based on a hierarchical environmental model. A dynamical model of the complex environment should be constructed to simulate the state transition and propagation of individual motions. By modeling of a virtual environment where virtual crowds reside, we employ different parallel methods on a topological layer, a path layer and a perceptual layer. We propose a parallel motion path matching method based on the path layer and a parallel crowd simulation method based on the perceptual layer. The large-scale real-time crowd simulation becomes possible with these methods. Numerical experiments are carried out to demonstrate the methods and results.

  13. Multi-time scale energy management of wind farms based on comprehensive evaluation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. P.; Huang, Y. H.; Liu, Z. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Li, Z. Y.; Guo, L.

    2017-11-01

    A novel energy management of wind farms is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a novel comprehensive evaluation system is proposed to quantify economic properties of each wind farm to make the energy management more economical and reasonable. Then, a combination of multi time-scale schedule method is proposed to develop a novel energy management. The day-ahead schedule optimizes unit commitment of thermal power generators. The intraday schedule is established to optimize power generation plan for all thermal power generating units, hydroelectric generating sets and wind power plants. At last, the power generation plan can be timely revised in the process of on-line schedule. The paper concludes with simulations conducted on a real provincial integrated energy system in northeast China. Simulation results have validated the proposed model and corresponding solving algorithms.

  14. Boreal Forests Sequester Large Amounts of Mercury over Millennial Time Scales in the Absence of Wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, Reiner; Clemmensen, Karina E; Wardle, David A; Klaminder, Jonatan; Bindler, Richard

    2017-03-07

    Alterations in fire activity due to climate change and fire suppression may have profound effects on the balance between storage and release of carbon (C) and associated volatile elements. Stored soil mercury (Hg) is known to volatilize due to wildfires and this could substantially affect the land-air exchange of Hg; conversely the absence of fires and human disturbance may increase the time period over which Hg is sequestered. Here we show for a wildfire chronosequence spanning over more than 5000 years in boreal forest in northern Sweden that belowground inventories of total Hg are strongly related to soil humus C accumulation (R 2 = 0.94, p millennial time scales in the prolonged absence of fire.

  15. Quantum-limited measurement of space-time curvature with scaling beyond the conventional Heisenberg limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, S. P.; Ralph, T. C.

    2017-10-01

    We study the problem of estimating the phase shift due to the general relativistic time dilation in the interference of photons using a nonlinear Mach-Zender interferometer setup. By introducing two nonlinear Kerr materials, one in the bottom and one in the top arm, we can measure the nonlinear phase ϕNL produced by the space-time curvature and achieve a scaling of the standard deviation with photon number (N ) of 1 /Nβ where β >1 , which exceeds the conventional Heisenberg limit of a linear interferometer (1 /N ). The nonlinear phase shift is an effect that is amplified by the intensity of the probe field. In a regime of high photon number, this effect can dominate over the linear phase shift.

  16. Hawking evaporation time scale of topological black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Yen Chin, E-mail: yenchin.ong@nordita.org

    2016-02-15

    It was recently pointed out that if an absorbing boundary condition is imposed at infinity, an asymptotically anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black hole with a spherical horizon takes only a finite amount of time to evaporate away even if its initial mass is arbitrarily large. We show that this is a rather generic property in AdS spacetimes: regardless of their horizon topologies, neutral AdS black holes in general relativity take about the same amount of time to evaporate down to the same size of order L, the AdS length scale. Our discussion focuses on the case in which the black hole has toral event horizon. A brief comment is made on the hyperbolic case, i.e. for black holes with negatively curved horizons.

  17. Real-world-time simulation of memory consolidation in a large-scale cerebellar model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eGosui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report development of a large-scale spiking network model of thecerebellum composed of more than 1 million neurons. The model isimplemented on graphics processing units (GPUs, which are dedicatedhardware for parallel computing. Using 4 GPUs simultaneously, we achieve realtime simulation, in which computer simulation ofcerebellar activity for 1 sec completes within 1 sec in thereal-world time, with temporal resolution of 1 msec.This allows us to carry out a very long-term computer simulationof cerebellar activity in a practical time with millisecond temporalresolution. Using the model, we carry out computer simulationof long-term gain adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR eye movementsfor 5 days aimed to study the neural mechanisms of posttraining memoryconsolidation. The simulation results are consistent with animal experimentsand our theory of posttraining memory consolidation. These resultssuggest that realtime computing provides a useful means to studya very slow neural process such as memory consolidation in the brain.

  18. Time-Efficient Cloning Attacks Identification in Large-Scale RFID Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-min Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio Frequency Identification (RFID is an emerging technology for electronic labeling of objects for the purpose of automatically identifying, categorizing, locating, and tracking the objects. But in their current form RFID systems are susceptible to cloning attacks that seriously threaten RFID applications but are hard to prevent. Existing protocols aimed at detecting whether there are cloning attacks in single-reader RFID systems. In this paper, we investigate the cloning attacks identification in the multireader scenario and first propose a time-efficient protocol, called the time-efficient Cloning Attacks Identification Protocol (CAIP to identify all cloned tags in multireaders RFID systems. We evaluate the performance of CAIP through extensive simulations. The results show that CAIP can identify all the cloned tags in large-scale RFID systems fairly fast with required accuracy.

  19. Hawking evaporation time scale of topological black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Chin Ong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It was recently pointed out that if an absorbing boundary condition is imposed at infinity, an asymptotically anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black hole with a spherical horizon takes only a finite amount of time to evaporate away even if its initial mass is arbitrarily large. We show that this is a rather generic property in AdS spacetimes: regardless of their horizon topologies, neutral AdS black holes in general relativity take about the same amount of time to evaporate down to the same size of order L, the AdS length scale. Our discussion focuses on the case in which the black hole has toral event horizon. A brief comment is made on the hyperbolic case, i.e. for black holes with negatively curved horizons.

  20. Multi-scale modeling of Earth's gravity field in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Since 2002, the GRACE mission has been providing an unprecedented view of the Earth's gravity field spatial and temporal variations. The gravity field models built from these satellite data are essential in order to study the mass redistributions within the Earth system. Often, they are modelled using spatial functions, such as spherical harmonics, averaged over a fixed time window. However, the satellite sampling naturally leads to a trade-off between the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, the gravity variations are made of local components in space and time, reflecting the superimposition of sources. With the final aim to better estimate gravity variations related to local processes at different spatial and temporal scales, and adapt the temporal resolution of the model to its spatial resolution, we present an attempt at 4D gravity field modelling using localized functions in space and time. For that, we develop a four-dimensional wavelet basis, well localized in space and time and orthogonal in time. We then analyze the inverse problem of 4D gravity field estimation from GRACE synthetic inter-satellites potential differences along the orbit, and its regularization in a Bayesian framework, using a prior knowledge on the mass sources. We then test our approach in a simplified synthetic test setting, where only one mass source is present: hydrological mass variations over Africa during the year 2005. Applying a purely regional approach, we are able to reconstruct, regionally, the water height signal with a ≈2.5 cm accuracy at 450 km, 21 days resolution. We test the influence of the geophysical prior on this result, and conclude that it cannot explain alone the residuals between original and reconstructed mass signal. redIn contrast, an ideal test case with a perfect adequacy between the 4D basis and the synthetic data, without approximations nor regularization in solving the normal system, leads to a significantly improved reconstruction of

  1. Cross-Cultural Scaling Studies in the Development of Probabilistic Teaching Performance Criteria Anchored to Utility and Time Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Mark G.; And Others

    Previous cross-cultural scaling studies are incorporated into a training and performance model of the classroom teaching job of the college professor. The model, based on German and American data, describes and sets a norm for the improvement of classroom performance. Eight teaching performance factors and a set of seven continua (six predictors…

  2. Multi-scale visual analysis of time-varying electrocorticography data via clustering of brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Sugeerth; Bouchard, Kristofer; Chang, Edward; Dougherty, Max; Hamann, Bernd; Weber, Gunther H

    2017-06-06

    There exists a need for effective and easy-to-use software tools supporting the analysis of complex Electrocorticography (ECoG) data. Understanding how epileptic seizures develop or identifying diagnostic indicators for neurological diseases require the in-depth analysis of neural activity data from ECoG. Such data is multi-scale and is of high spatio-temporal resolution. Comprehensive analysis of this data should be supported by interactive visual analysis methods that allow a scientist to understand functional patterns at varying levels of granularity and comprehend its time-varying behavior. We introduce a novel multi-scale visual analysis system, ECoG ClusterFlow, for the detailed exploration of ECoG data. Our system detects and visualizes dynamic high-level structures, such as communities, derived from the time-varying connectivity network. The system supports two major views: 1) an overview summarizing the evolution of clusters over time and 2) an electrode view using hierarchical glyph-based design to visualize the propagation of clusters in their spatial, anatomical context. We present case studies that were performed in collaboration with neuroscientists and neurosurgeons using simulated and recorded epileptic seizure data to demonstrate our system's effectiveness. ECoG ClusterFlow supports the comparison of spatio-temporal patterns for specific time intervals and allows a user to utilize various clustering algorithms. Neuroscientists can identify the site of seizure genesis and its spatial progression during various the stages of a seizure. Our system serves as a fast and powerful means for the generation of preliminary hypotheses that can be used as a basis for subsequent application of rigorous statistical methods, with the ultimate goal being the clinical treatment of epileptogenic zones.

  3. Sensitivity of the simulated precipitation to changes in convective relaxation time scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mishra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the sensitivity of the simulated precipitation to changes in convective relaxation time scale (TAU of Zhang and McFarlane (ZM cumulus parameterization, in NCAR-Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3. In the default configuration of the model, the prescribed value of TAU, a characteristic time scale with which convective available potential energy (CAPE is removed at an exponential rate by convection, is assumed to be 1 h. However, some recent observational findings suggest that, it is larger by around one order of magnitude. In order to explore the sensitivity of the model simulation to TAU, two model frameworks have been used, namely, aqua-planet and actual-planet configurations. Numerical integrations have been carried out by using different values of TAU, and its effect on simulated precipitation has been analyzed. The aqua-planet simulations reveal that when TAU increases, rate of deep convective precipitation (DCP decreases and this leads to an accumulation of convective instability in the atmosphere. Consequently, the moisture content in the lower- and mid- troposphere increases. On the other hand, the shallow convective precipitation (SCP and large-scale precipitation (LSP intensify, predominantly the SCP, and thus capping the accumulation of convective instability in the atmosphere. The total precipitation (TP remains approximately constant, but the proportion of the three components changes significantly, which in turn alters the vertical distribution of total precipitation production. The vertical structure of moist heating changes from a vertically extended profile to a bottom heavy profile, with the increase of TAU. Altitude of the maximum vertical velocity shifts from upper troposphere to lower troposphere. Similar response was seen in the actual-planet simulations. With an increase in TAU from 1 h to 8 h, there was a significant improvement in the simulation of the seasonal mean precipitation. The fraction

  4. Interactive exploration of large-scale time-varying data using dynamic tracking graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Widanagamaachchi, W.

    2012-10-01

    Exploring and analyzing the temporal evolution of features in large-scale time-varying datasets is a common problem in many areas of science and engineering. One natural representation of such data is tracking graphs, i.e., constrained graph layouts that use one spatial dimension to indicate time and show the "tracks" of each feature as it evolves, merges or disappears. However, for practical data sets creating the corresponding optimal graph layouts that minimize the number of intersections can take hours to compute with existing techniques. Furthermore, the resulting graphs are often unmanageably large and complex even with an ideal layout. Finally, due to the cost of the layout, changing the feature definition, e.g. by changing an iso-value, or analyzing properly adjusted sub-graphs is infeasible. To address these challenges, this paper presents a new framework that couples hierarchical feature definitions with progressive graph layout algorithms to provide an interactive exploration of dynamically constructed tracking graphs. Our system enables users to change feature definitions on-the-fly and filter features using arbitrary attributes while providing an interactive view of the resulting tracking graphs. Furthermore, the graph display is integrated into a linked view system that provides a traditional 3D view of the current set of features and allows a cross-linked selection to enable a fully flexible spatio-temporal exploration of data. We demonstrate the utility of our approach with several large-scale scientific simulations from combustion science. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. Stochastic reduction method for biological chemical kinetics using time-scale separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlajani, Chetan D; Atzberger, Paul J; Khammash, Mustafa

    2011-03-07

    Many processes in cell biology encode and process information and enact responses by modulating the concentrations of biological molecules. Such modulations serve functions ranging from encoding and transmitting information about external stimuli to regulating internal metabolic states. To understand how such processes operate requires gaining insights into the basic mechanisms by which biochemical species interact and respond to internal and external perturbations. One approach is to model the biochemical species concentrations through the van Kampen Linear Noise Equations, which account for the change in biochemical concentrations from reactions and account for fluctuations in concentrations. For many systems, the Linear Noise Equations exhibit stiffness as a consequence of the chemical reactions occurring at significantly different rates. This presents challenges in the analysis of the kinetics and in performing efficient numerical simulations. To deal with this source of stiffness and to obtain reduced models more amenable to analysis, we present a systematic procedure for obtaining effective stochastic dynamics for the chemical species having relatively slow characteristic time scales while eliminating representations of the chemical species having relatively fast characteristic time scales. To demonstrate the applicability of this multiscale technique in the context of Linear Noise Equations, the reduction is applied to models of gene regulatory networks. Results are presented which compare numerical results for the full system to the reduced descriptions. The presented stochastic reduction procedure provides a potentially versatile tool for systematically obtaining reduced approximations of Linear Noise Equations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A study of residence time distribution using radiotracer technique in the large scale plant facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetchagarun, S.; Tippayakul, C.; Petchrak, A.; Sukrod, K.; Khoonkamjorn, P.

    2017-06-01

    As the demand for troubleshooting of large industrial plants increases, radiotracer techniques, which have capability to provide fast, online and effective detections to plant problems, have been continually developed. One of the good potential applications of the radiotracer for troubleshooting in a process plant is the analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD). In this paper, the study of RTD in a large scale plant facility using radiotracer technique was presented. The objective of this work is to gain experience on the RTD analysis using radiotracer technique in a “larger than laboratory” scale plant setup which can be comparable to the real industrial application. The experiment was carried out at the sedimentation tank in the water treatment facility of Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (Public Organization). Br-82 was selected to use in this work due to its chemical property, its suitable half-life and its on-site availability. NH4Br in the form of aqueous solution was injected into the system as the radiotracer. Six NaI detectors were placed along the pipelines and at the tank in order to determine the RTD of the system. The RTD and the Mean Residence Time (MRT) of the tank was analysed and calculated from the measured data. The experience and knowledge attained from this study is important for extending this technique to be applied to industrial facilities in the future.

  7. Characterization of Microbial Fuel Cells at Microbially and Electrochemically Meaningful Time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Zhiyong

    2011-03-15

    The variable biocatalyst density in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode biofilm is a unique feature of MFCs relative to other electrochemical systems, yet performance characterizations of MFCs typically involve analyses at electrochemically relevant time scales that are insufficient to account for these variable biocatalyst effects. This study investigated the electrochemical performance and the development of anode biofilm architecture under different external loadings, with duplicate acetate-fed singlechamber MFCs stabilized at each resistance for microbially relevant time scales. Power density curves from these steady-state reactors generally showed comparable profiles despite the fact that anode biofilm architectures and communities varied considerably, showing that steady-state biofilm differences had little influence on electrochemical performance until the steady-state external loading was much larger than the reactor internal resistance. Filamentous bacteria were dominant on the anodes under high external resistances (1000 and 5000 Ω), while more diverse rod-shaped cells formed dense biofilms under lower resistances (10, 50, and 265 Ω). Anode charge transfer resistance decreased with decreasing fixed external resistances, but was consistently 2 orders of magnitude higher than the resistance at the cathode. Cell counting showed an inverse exponential correlation between cell numbers and external resistances. This direct link ofMFCanode biofilm evolution with external resistance and electricity production offers several operational strategies for system optimization. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Robust linear equation dwell time model compatible with large scale discrete surface error matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2015-04-01

    The linear equation dwell time model can translate the 2D convolution process of material removal during subaperture polishing into a more intuitional expression, and may provide relatively fast and reliable results. However, the accurate solution of this ill-posed equation is not so easy, and its practicability for a large scale surface error matrix is still limited. This study first solves this ill-posed equation by Tikhonov regularization and the least square QR decomposition (LSQR) method, and automatically determines an optional interval and a typical value for the damped factor of regularization, which are dependent on the peak removal rate of tool influence functions. Then, a constrained LSQR method is presented to increase the robustness of the damped factor, which can provide more consistent dwell time maps than traditional LSQR. Finally, a matrix segmentation and stitching method is used to cope with large scale surface error matrices. Using these proposed methods, the linear equation model becomes more reliable and efficient in practical engineering.

  9. Recognising Axionic Dark Matter by Compton and de-Broglie Scale Modulation of Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Ivan; Broadhurst, Tom; Tye, S.-H. Henry; Chiueh, Tzihong; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2017-11-01

    Light Axionic Dark Matter, motivated by string theory, is increasingly favored for the "no-WIMP era". Galaxy formation is suppressed below a Jeans scale, of ≃ 10^8 M_⊙ by setting the axion mass to, m_B ˜ 10^{-22}eV, and the large dark cores of dwarf galaxies are explained as solitons on the de-Broglie scale. This is persuasive, but detection of the inherent scalar field oscillation at the Compton frequency, ω_B= (2.5 months)^{-1}(m_B/10^{-22}eV), would be definitive. By evolving the coupled Schrödinger-Poisson equation for a Bose-Einstein condensate, we predict the dark matter is fully modulated by de-Broglie interference, with a dense soliton core of size ≃ 150pc, at the Galactic center. The oscillating field pressure induces General Relativistic time dilation in proportion to the local dark matter density and pulsars within this dense core have detectably large timing residuals, of ≃ 400nsec/(m_B/10^{-22}eV). This is encouraging as many new pulsars should be discovered near the Galactic center with planned radio surveys. More generally, over the whole Galaxy, differences in dark matter density between pairs of pulsars imprints a pairwise Galactocentric signature that can be distinguished from an isotropic gravitational wave background.

  10. a Strained Space-Time to Explain the Large Scale Properties of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2011-06-01

    Space-time can be treated as a four-dimensional material continuum. The corresponding generally curved manifold can be thought of as having been obtained, by continuous deformation, from a flat four-dimensional Euclidean manifold. In a three-dimensional ordinary situation such a deformation process would lead to strain in the manifold. Strain in turn may be read as half the difference between the actual metric tensor and the Euclidean metric tensor of the initial unstrained manifold. On the other side we know that an ordinary material would react to the attempt to introduce strain giving rise to internal stresses and one would have correspondingly a deformation energy term. Assuming the conditions of linear elasticity hold, the deformation energy is easily written in terms of the strain tensor. The Einstein-Hilbert action is generalized to include the new deformation energy term. The new action for space-time has been applied to a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe filled with dust and radiation. The accelerated expansion is recovered, then the theory has been put through four cosmological tests: primordial isotopic abundances from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis; Acoustic Scale of the CMB; Large Scale Structure formation; luminosity/redshift relation for type Ia supernovae. The result is satisfying and has allowed to evaluate the parameters of the theory.

  11. Recognizing Axionic Dark Matter by Compton and de Broglie Scale Modulation of Pulsar Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Ivan; Broadhurst, Tom; Tye, S-H Henry; Chiueh, Tzihong; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2017-12-01

    Light axionic dark matter, motivated by string theory, is increasingly favored for the "no weakly interacting massive particle era". Galaxy formation is suppressed below a Jeans scale of ≃10^{8}  M_{⊙} by setting the axion mass to m_{B}∼10^{-22}  eV, and the large dark cores of dwarf galaxies are explained as solitons on the de Broglie scale. This is persuasive, but detection of the inherent scalar field oscillation at the Compton frequency ω_{B}=(2.5  months)^{-1}(m_{B}/10^{-22}  eV) would be definitive. By evolving the coupled Schrödinger-Poisson equation for a Bose-Einstein condensate, we predict the dark matter is fully modulated by de Broglie interference, with a dense soliton core of size ≃150  pc, at the Galactic center. The oscillating field pressure induces general relativistic time dilation in proportion to the local dark matter density and pulsars within this dense core have detectably large timing residuals of ≃400  nsec/(m_{B}/10^{-22}  eV). This is encouraging as many new pulsars should be discovered near the Galactic center with planned radio surveys. More generally, over the whole Galaxy, differences in dark matter density between pairs of pulsars imprints a pairwise Galactocentric signature that can be distinguished from an isotropic gravitational wave background.

  12. Using time scales to characterize phytoplankton assemblages in a deep subalpine lake during the thermal stratification period: Lake Iseo, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Clelia Luisa; Imberger, Jörg; Garibaldi, Letizia; Leoni, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    A combination of field observations and 3-D hydrodynamic simulations were used to identify the phytoplankton species and to estimate the various time scales of the dominant physical and biological processes in Lake Iseo, a deep subalpine lake located in northern Italy, during a stratified period (July 2010). By ordering the rate processes time scales, we derive a phytoplankton patch categorization and growth interpretation that provides a general framework for the spatial distribution of phytoplankton concentration in Lake Iseo and illuminates the characteristics of their ecological niches. The results show that the diurnal surface layer was well mixed, received strong diurnal radiation, had low phosphorus concentrations and the phytoplankton biomass was sustained by the green alga Sphaerocystis schroeterii. The vertical mixing time scales were much shorter than horizontal mixing time scales causing a depth-uniform chlorophyll a concentration. The horizontal patch scale was determined by horizontal dispersion balancing the phytoplankton growth time scale, dictating the success of the observed green algae. The strongly stratified nutrient-rich metalimnion had mild light conditions and Diatoma elongatum and Planktothrix rubescens made up the largest proportions of the total phytoplankton biomass at the intermediate and deeper metalimnetic layers. The vertical transport time scales were much shorter than horizontal transport and vertical dispersion leading to growth niche for the observed phytoplankton. The study showed that time-scale hierarchy mandates the essential phytoplankton attributes or traits for success in a particular section of the water column and/or water body.

  13. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; Borany, J von; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Scales of Time Where the Quantum Discord Allows an Efficient Execution of the DQC1 Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ávila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of one qubit deterministic quantum processor (DQC1 (Knill and Laflamme (1998 generates a nonclassical correlation known as quantum discord. The DQC1 algorithm executes in an efficient way with a characteristic time given by τ=Tr[Un]/2n, where Un is an n qubit unitary gate. For pure states, quantum discord means entanglement while for mixed states such a quantity is more than entanglement. Quantum discord can be thought of as the mutual information between two systems. Within the quantum discord approach the role of time in an efficient evaluation of τ is discussed. It is found that the smaller the value of t/T is, where t is the time of execution of the DQC1 algorithm and T is the scale of time where the nonclassical correlations prevail, the more efficient the calculation of τ is. A Mösbauer nucleus might be a good processor of the DQC1 algorithm while a nuclear spin chain would not be efficient for the calculation of τ.

  15. Real-time micro-scale temperature imaging at low cost based on fluorescent intensity ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jianghao; Zhao, Mingshu; Han, Xiaotian; Cao, Zhongmin; Wei, Xiantao; Chen, Yonghu; Duan, Changkui; Yin, Min

    2017-02-01

    Real-time temperature imaging with high spatial resolution has been a challenging task but also one with wide potential applications. To achieve this task, temperature sensor is critical. Fluorescent materials stand out to be promising candidates due to their quick response and strong temperature dependence. However, former reported temperature imaging techniques with fluorescent materials are mainly based on point by point scanning, which cannot fulfill the requirement of real-time monitoring. Based on fluorescent intensity ratio (FIR) of two emission bands of SrB4O7:Sm2+, whose spatial distributions were simultaneously recorded by two cameras with special filters separately, real-time temperature imaging with high spatial resolution has been realized with low cost. The temperature resolution can reach about 2 °C in the temperature range from 120 to 280 °C the spatial resolution is about 2.4 μm and the imaging time is as fast as one second. Adopting this system, we observed the dynamic change of a micro-scale thermal distribution on a printed circuit board (PCB). Different applications and better performance could also be achieved on this system with appropriate fluorescent materials and high sensitive CCD detectors according to the experimental environment.

  16. Extracting surface waves, hum and normal modes: time-scale phase-weighted stack and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, Sergi; Schimmel, Martin; Stutzmann, Eleonore

    2017-10-01

    Stacks of ambient noise correlations are routinely used to extract empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between station pairs. The time-frequency phase-weighted stack (tf-PWS) is a physically intuitive nonlinear denoising method that uses the phase coherence to improve EGF convergence when the performance of conventional linear averaging methods is not sufficient. The high computational cost of a continuous approach to the time-frequency transformation is currently a main limitation in ambient noise studies. We introduce the time-scale phase-weighted stack (ts-PWS) as an alternative extension of the phase-weighted stack that uses complex frames of wavelets to build a time-frequency representation that is much more efficient and fast to compute and that preserve the performance and flexibility of the tf-PWS. In addition, we propose two strategies: the unbiased phase coherence and the two-stage ts-PWS methods to further improve noise attenuation, quality of the extracted signals and convergence speed. We demonstrate that these approaches enable to extract minor- and major-arc Rayleigh waves (up to the sixth Rayleigh wave train) from many years of data from the GEOSCOPE global network. Finally we also show that fundamental spheroidal modes can be extracted from these EGF.

  17. An architecture for distributed real-time large-scale information processing for intelligence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eugene, Jr.; Santos, Eunice E.; Santos, Eugene S.

    2004-04-01

    Given a massive and dynamic space of information (nuggets) and a query to be answered, how can the correct (answer) nuggets be retrieved in an effective and efficient manner? We present a large-scale distributed real-time architecture based on anytime intelligent foraging, gathering, and matching (I-FGM) on massive and dynamic information spaces. Simply put, we envision that when given a search query, large numbers of computational processes are alerted or activated in parallel to begin identifying and retrieving the appro-priate information nuggets. In particular, our approach aims to provide an anytime capa-bility which functions as follows: Given finite computational resources, I-FGM will pro-ceed to explore the information space and, over time, continuously identify and update promising candidate nugget, thus, good candidates will be available at anytime on re-quest. With the computational costs of evaluating the relevance of a candidate nugget, the anytime nature of I-FGM will provide increasing confidence on nugget selections over time by providing admissible partial evaluations. When a new promising candidate is identified, the current set of selected nuggets is re-evaluated and updated appropriately. Essentially, I-FGM will guide its finite computational resources in locating the target in-formation nuggets quickly and iteratively over time. In addition, the goal of I-FGM is to naturally handle new nuggets as they appear. A central element of our framework is to provide a formal computational model of this massive data-intensive problem.

  18. A new time-space accounting scheme to predict stream water residence time and hydrograph source components at the watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahiro Sayama; Jeffrey J. McDonnell

    2009-01-01

    Hydrograph source components and stream water residence time are fundamental behavioral descriptors of watersheds but, as yet, are poorly represented in most rainfall-runoff models. We present a new time-space accounting scheme (T-SAS) to simulate the pre-event and event water fractions, mean residence time, and spatial source of streamflow at the watershed scale. We...

  19. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  20. A new look at ocean ventilation time scales and their uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Rana A.; Peacock, Synte; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Bryan, Frank O.

    2017-05-01

    A suite of eddy-resolving ocean transient tracer model simulations are first compared to observations. Observational and model pCFC-11 ages agree quite well, with the eddy-resolving model adding detail. The CFC ages show that the thermocline is a barrier to interior ocean exchange with the atmosphere on time scales of 45 years, the measureable CFC transient, although there are exceptions. Next, model simulations are used to quantify effects on tracer ages of the spatial dependence of internal ocean tracer variability due to stirring from eddies and biases from nonstationarity of the atmospheric transient when there is mixing. These add to tracer age uncertainties and biases, which are large in frontal boundary regions, and small in subtropical gyre interiors. These uncertainties and biases are used to reinterpret observed temporal trends in tracer-derived ventilation time scales taken from observations more than a decade apart, and to assess whether interpretations of changes in tracer ages being due to changes in ocean ventilation hold water. For the southern hemisphere subtropical gyres, we infer that the rate of ocean ventilation 26-27.2 σθ increased between the mid-1990s and the decade of the 2000s. However, between the mid-1990s and the decade of the 2010s, there is no significant trend—perhaps except for South Atlantic. Observed age/AOU/ventilation changes are linked to a combination of natural cycles and climate change, and there is regional variability. Thus, for the future it is not clear how strong or steady in space and time ocean ventilation changes will be.

  1. Space-time variability of Indonesian rainfall at inter-annual and multi-decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanto; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Zagona, Edith

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the space-time variability of wet (Nov-Apr) and dry (May-Oct) season rainfall over Indonesia, using monthly gridded rainfall data from the University of East Anglia Climatic Research Unit covering the period 1901-2012. Three complimentary techniques were employed—(1) principal component analysis to identify the dominant modes of variability, (2) wavelet spectral analysis to identify the spectral characteristics of the leading modes and their coherence with large scale climate variables and (3) Bayesian Dynamical Linear Model (BDLM) to quantify the temporal variability of the association between rainfall modes and climate variables. In the dry season when the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is to the north of the equator the leading two principal components (PCs) explain close to 50 % of the rainfall. In the wet season the ITCZ moves to the south and the leading PCs explain close to 30 % of the variance. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the driver of the leading modes of rainfall variability during both seasons. We find asymmetry in the teleconnections of ENSO to high and low rainfall years in the dry season. Furthermore, ENSO and the leading PCs of rainfall have spectral coherence in the inter-annual band (2-8 years) over the entire period of record and in the multi-decadal (8-16 years) band in post-1980 years. In addition, during the 1950-1980 period the second mode of variability in both seasons has a strong relationship with Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The association between ENSO and the leading mode of Indonesian rainfall has strengthened in recent decades, more so during dry season. These inter-annual and multi-decadal variability of Indonesian rainfall modulated by Pacific climate drivers has implications for rainfall and hydrologic predictability important for water resources management.

  2. Anomalous scaling of a passive scalar advected by a turbulent velocity field with finite correlation time and uniaxial small-scale anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcisinová, E; Jurcisin, M

    2008-01-01

    The influence of uniaxial small-scale anisotropy on the stability of the scaling regimes and on the anomalous scaling of the structure functions of a passive scalar advected by a Gaussian solenoidal velocity field with finite correlation time is investigated by the field theoretic renormalization group and operator product expansion within one-loop approximation. Possible scaling regimes are found and classified in the plane of exponents epsilon-eta , where epsilon characterizes the energy spectrum of the velocity field in the inertial range E proportional, variantk;{1-2epsilon} , and eta is related to the correlation time of the velocity field at the wave number k which is scaled as k;{-2+eta} . It is shown that the presence of anisotropy does not disturb the stability of the infrared fixed points of the renormalization group equations, which are directly related to the corresponding scaling regimes. The influence of anisotropy on the anomalous scaling of the structure functions of the passive scalar field is studied as a function of the fixed point value of the parameter u , which represents the ratio of turnover time of scalar field and velocity correlation time. It is shown that the corresponding one-loop anomalous dimensions, which are the same (universal) for all particular models with a concrete value of u in the isotropic case, are different (nonuniversal) in the case with the presence of small-scale anisotropy and they are continuous functions of the anisotropy parameters, as well as the parameter u . The dependence of the anomalous dimensions on the anisotropy parameters of two special limits of the general model, namely, the rapid-change model and the frozen velocity field model, are found when u-->infinity and u-->0 , respectively.

  3. Empirical behavior of a world stock index from intra-day to monthly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, W.; Lüthi, D. R.; Platen, E.

    2009-10-01

    Most of the papers that study the distributional and fractal properties of financial instruments focus on stock prices or foreign exchange rates. This typically leads to mixed results concerning the distributions of log-returns and some multi-fractal properties of exchange rates, stock prices, and regional indices. This paper uses a well diversified world stock index as the central object of analysis. Such index approximates the growth optimal portfolio, which is demonstrated under the benchmark approach, it is the ideal reference unit for studying basic securities. When denominating this world index in units of a given currency, one measures the movements of the currency against the entire market. This provides a least disturbed observation of the currency dynamics. In this manner, one can expect to disentangle, e.g., the superposition of the two currencies involved in an exchange rate. This benchmark approach to the empirical analysis of financial data allows us to establish remarkable stylized facts. Most important is the observation that the repeatedly documented multi-fractal appearance of financial time series is very weak and much less pronounced than the deviation of the mono-scaling properties from Brownian-motion type scaling. The generalized Hurst exponent H(2) assumes typical values between 0.55 and 0.6. Accordingly, autocorrelations of log-returns decay according to a power law, and the quadratic variation vanishes when going to vanishing observation time step size. Furthermore, one can identify the Student t distribution as the log-return distribution of a well-diversified world stock index for long time horizons when a long enough data series is used for estimation. The study of dependence properties, finally, reveals that jumps at daily horizon originate primarily in the stock market while at 5min horizon they originate in the foreign exchange market. The principal message of the empirical analysis is that there is evidence that a diffusion model

  4. Atmospheric CO2 variations on orbital time scale during the Paleocene and Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeebe, R. E.; Westerhold, T.; Littler, K.; Zachos, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-million-year proxy records (d13C, d18O, %CaCO3, Fe, etc.) show prominent variations on orbital time scale during the Paleocene and Eocene. The cycles have been identified at various sites across the globe and preferentially concentrate spectral power at eccentricity and precessional frequencies. It is almost certain that these cycles are an expression of changes in global climate and carbon cycling paced by orbital variations. However, little is currently known about (1) the driving mechanism linking orbital forcing to changes in climate and carbon cycling and (2) the amplitude of atmospheric CO2 variations associated with these cycles. We have used simple and complex carbon cycle models to explore the basic effect of different orbital forcing schemes and noise on the carbon cycle by forcing different carbon cycle parameters. For direct insolation forcing (opposed to eccentricity - tilt - precession), one major challenge is understanding how the system transfers spectral power from high to low frequencies. We will discuss feasible solutions to this problem, including insolation transformations analogous to electronic AC-DC conversion (DC'ing). Our results show that high-latitude mechanisms are unlikely drivers of orbitally paced changes in the Paleocene-Eocene Earth system. Based on a synthesis of modeling and proxy data analysis, we present the first estimates of orbital-scale variations in atmospheric CO2 during the Paleocene and Eocene.

  5. Cochlea-scaled entropy, not consonants, vowels, or time, best predicts speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilp, Christian E; Kluender, Keith R

    2010-07-06

    Speech sounds are traditionally divided into consonants and vowels. When only vowels or only consonants are replaced by noise, listeners are more accurate understanding sentences in which consonants are replaced but vowels remain. From such data, vowels have been suggested to be more important for understanding sentences; however, such conclusions are mitigated by the fact that replaced consonant segments were roughly one-third shorter than vowels. We report two experiments that demonstrate listener performance to be better predicted by simple psychoacoustic measures of cochlea-scaled spectral change across time. First, listeners identified sentences in which portions of consonants (C), vowels (V), CV transitions, or VC transitions were replaced by noise. Relative intelligibility was not well accounted for on the basis of Cs, Vs, or their transitions. In a second experiment, distinctions between Cs and Vs were abandoned. Instead, portions of sentences were replaced on the basis of cochlea-scaled spectral entropy (CSE). Sentence segments having relatively high, medium, or low entropy were replaced with noise. Intelligibility decreased linearly as the amount of replaced CSE increased. Duration of signal replaced and proportion of consonants/vowels replaced fail to account for listener data. CSE corresponds closely with the linguistic construct of sonority (or vowel-likeness) that is useful for describing phonological systematicity, especially syllable composition. Results challenge traditional distinctions between consonants and vowels. Speech intelligibility is better predicted by nonlinguistic sensory measures of uncertainty (potential information) than by orthodox physical acoustic measures or linguistic constructs.

  6. Arabic versions of the sleep timing questionnaire and the composite scale of morningness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hader; Tobar, Salwa; Fathi, Warda; Ibrahim, Ibtihal; Wood, Joel; Elassy, Mai; Elsayed, Hanan; Yassin, Amal; Salah, Hala; Eissa, Ahmed; El-Boraie, Hala; El-Boraie, Osama; Dobea, Ahmed; Osama, Haitham; Gomaa, Zeinab; El-Bahaei, Wafaa; Monk, Timothy H; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2015-02-01

    To develop Arabic versions of English language questionnaires to estimate morningness/eveningness and sleep variables. We translated the Composite scale of morningness (CSM) and the sleep timing questionnaire (STQ) [with added siesta questions] into Arabic; the Arabic versions were then back translated. The revised Arabic and the original English versions were next administered to bi-lingual Egyptians using a crossover design (n=25). The Arabic versions of both scales were subsequently administered to an independent Egyptian sample (n=79) and the siesta variables examined in relation to the CSM. Satisfactory correlations were present between the English and Arabic versions for total CSM scores (Spearman's ρ=0.90, pArabic version, the frequency of siesta naps per week was significantly correlated with the total CSM score, with evening types taking more naps (Spearman's ρ=-0.23, p≤0.05). Arabic versions of the STQ and CSM have been developed in Egypt, and are freely available. They can be used for behavioral research related to sleep and circadian function and can be adapted for use in other Arab speaking populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-time scale stream flow predictions: The support vector machines approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefa, Tirusew; Kemblowski, Mariush; McKee, Mac; Khalil, Abedalrazq

    2006-03-01

    Effective lead-time stream flow forecast is one of the key aspects of successful water resources management in arid regions. In this research, we present new data-driven models based on Statistical Learning Theory that were used to forecast flows at two time scales: seasonal flow volumes and hourly stream flows. The models, known as Support Vector Machines, are learning systems that use a hypothesis space of linear functions in a Kernel induced higher dimensional feature space, and are trained with a learning algorithm from optimization theory. They are based on a principle that aims at minimizing the generalized model error (risk), rather than just the mean square error over a training set. Due to Mercer's condition on the kernels the corresponding optimization problems are convex and hence have no local minima. Empirical results from these models showed a promising performance in solving site-specific, real-time water resources management problems. Stream flow was forecasted using local-climatological data and requiring far less input than physical models. In addition, seasonal flow volume predictions were improved by incorporating atmospheric circulation indicators. Specifically, use of the North-Pacific Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies (SSTA) improved flow volume predictions.

  8. Multi-Time Scale Control of Demand Flexibility in Smart Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Bhattarai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-timescale control strategy to deploy electric vehicle (EV demand flexibility for simultaneously providing power balancing, grid congestion management, and economic benefits to participating actors. First, an EV charging problem is investigated from consumer, aggregator, and distribution system operator’s perspectives. A hierarchical control architecture (HCA comprising scheduling, coordinative, and adaptive layers is then designed to realize their coordinative goal. This is realized by integrating multi-time scale controls that work from a day-ahead scheduling up to real-time adaptive control. The performance of the developed method is investigated with high EV penetration in a typical residential distribution grid. The simulation results demonstrate that HCA efficiently utilizes demand flexibility stemming from EVs to solve grid unbalancing and congestions with simultaneous maximization of economic benefits to the participating actors. This is ensured by enabling EV participation in day-ahead, balancing, and regulation markets. For the given network configuration and pricing structure, HCA ensures the EV owners to get paid up to five times the cost they were paying without control.

  9. Validated real-time energy models for small-scale grid-connected PV-systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayompe, L.M.; Duffy, A. [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, School of Civil and Building Services, Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); McCormack, S.J. [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Conlon, M. [School of Electrical Engineering Systems, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents validated real-time energy models for small-scale grid-connected PV-systems suitable for domestic application. The models were used to predict real-time AC power output from a PV-system in Dublin, Ireland using 30-min intervals of measured performance data between April 2009 and March 2010. Statistical analysis of the predicted results and measured data highlight possible sources of errors and the limitations and/or adequacy of existing models, to describe the temperature and efficiency of PV-cells and consequently, the accuracy of power prediction models. PV-system AC output power predictions using empirical models for PV-cell temperature and efficiency prediction showed lower percentage mean absolute errors (PMAEs) of 7.9-11.7% while non-empirical models had errors of 10.0-12.4%. Cumulative errors for PV-system AC output power predictions were 1.3% for empirical models and 3.3% for non-empirical models. The proposed models are suitable for predicting PV-system AC output power at time intervals suitable for smart metering. (author)

  10. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-07-21

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference dataset indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Large-Scale Timing Distribution and RF-Synchronization for FEL Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jung Won; Kaertner, Franz X; Muecke, Oliver; Perrott, Michael

    2004-01-01

    For future advances in accelerator physics in general and seeding of FELs in particular, precise synchronization between seed radiation, low-level RF-systems and photo-injector laser is required. Typical synchronization methods based on direct photodetection are limited by the detector nonlinearities, which lead to amplitude-to-phase conversion and introduce timing jitter. A new synchronization scheme for extraction of low jitter RF-signals from optical pulse trains distributed by mode-locked lasers is proposed. It is robust against photodetector nonlinearities. The scheme is based on a transfer of timing information into an intensity imbalance between the two output beams from a Sagnac-loop interferometer. As a first experimental demonstration, sub-100 fs timing jitter between the extracted 2 GHz RF-signal and the 100 MHz optical pulse train from a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is demonstrated. Numerical simulations show that scaling to sub-femtosecond precision is possible. Together with mode-locked fiber l...

  12. Satellite quenching time-scales in clusters from projected phase space measurements matched to simulated orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    We measure the star formation quenching efficiency and time-scale in cluster environments. Our method uses N-body simulations to estimate the probability distribution of possible orbits for a sample of observed Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in and around clusters based on their position and velocity offsets from their host cluster. We study the relationship between their star formation rates and their likely orbital histories via a simple model in which star formation is quenched once a delay time after infall has elapsed. Our orbit library method is designed to isolate the environmental effect on the star formation rate due to a galaxy's present-day host cluster from `pre-processing' in previous group hosts. We find that quenching of satellite galaxies of all stellar masses in our sample (109-10^{11.5}M_{⊙}) by massive (> 10^{13} M_{⊙}) clusters is essentially 100 per cent efficient. Our fits show that all galaxies quench on their first infall, approximately at or within a Gyr of their first pericentric passage. There is little variation in the onset of quenching from galaxy-to-galaxy: the spread in this time is at most ˜2 Gyr at fixed M*. Higher mass satellites quench earlier, with very little dependence on host cluster mass in the range probed by our sample.

  13. Scaling symmetry, renormalization, and time series modeling: the case of financial assets dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamparo, Marco; Baldovin, Fulvio; Caraglio, Michele; Stella, Attilio L

    2013-12-01

    We present and discuss a stochastic model of financial assets dynamics based on the idea of an inverse renormalization group strategy. With this strategy we construct the multivariate distributions of elementary returns based on the scaling with time of the probability density of their aggregates. In its simplest version the model is the product of an endogenous autoregressive component and a random rescaling factor designed to embody also exogenous influences. Mathematical properties like increments' stationarity and ergodicity can be proven. Thanks to the relatively low number of parameters, model calibration can be conveniently based on a method of moments, as exemplified in the case of historical data of the S&P500 index. The calibrated model accounts very well for many stylized facts, like volatility clustering, power-law decay of the volatility autocorrelation function, and multiscaling with time of the aggregated return distribution. In agreement with empirical evidence in finance, the dynamics is not invariant under time reversal, and, with suitable generalizations, skewness of the return distribution and leverage effects can be included. The analytical tractability of the model opens interesting perspectives for applications, for instance, in terms of obtaining closed formulas for derivative pricing. Further important features are the possibility of making contact, in certain limits, with autoregressive models widely used in finance and the possibility of partially resolving the long- and short-memory components of the volatility, with consistent results when applied to historical series.

  14. Cyclization of Rouse chains at long- and short-time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Chuck; Friedman, Barry

    2005-06-01

    We have investigated cyclization of a Rouse chain at long and short times by a Langevin dynamics simulation method. We measure St, the fraction of nonreacted chains, for polymerizations ranging from Z=5 to Z=800 and capture distances ranging from a=0.1b to a=8b where b is the bond length. Comparison is made with two theoretical approaches. The first is a decoupling approximation used by Wilemski and Fixman to close the relevant master equation [J. Chem. Phys. 58, 4009 (1973); 60, 866 (1974)]. The second approach is the renormalization group arguments of Friedman and O'Shaughnessy [Phys. Rev. Lett 60, 64 (1988); J. Phys. II 1, 471 (1991)]. We find that at long times St decays as a single exponential with rate k(infinity). The scaled decay rate K=k(infinity)tauR appears to approach a constant value independent of the capture distance for very large chains consistent with the predictions of both the renormalization group (RG) and Wilemski-Fixman closure approximation. We extract K*, the long chain limit of K, from the fixed point a=a* where K is independent of Z. K* is larger than both the RG and closure predictions but much closer to the RG result. More convincing evidence for the RG analysis is obtained by comparing the short-time decay of St to long-time results. The RG analysis predicts that dSdt should decay as a power law at early times and that the exponent in the power law is related to K by a simple expression with no free parameters. Our simulations find remarkable agreement with this parameter-free prediction even for relatively short chains. We discuss possible experimental consequences of our result.

  15. Time-scale characteristics of Kasai river hydrological regime variability for 1940-1999

    CERN Document Server

    Mbuebue, Jean-Marie Tshitenge; Mwamba, Vincent Lukanda; Phuati, Edmond Phuku; Bantu, Albert Kazadi Mukenga; Keto, Franck Tondozi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with the aim of contributing to the characterization of the nonstationary variability of the hydrological regime of the Kasai River using the wavelet analysis for 1940-1999. The rainfalls and discharge over Kasai Basin have marked fluctuations with a perceptible downward trend and some shift around 1950, 1960, 1970, 1983 and 1994. The results show that rainfalls over Kasai basin and the discharge at Ilebo station patterns exhibit a strong annual oscillation and some intermittent oscillations in 2-8 years (1950-1975, 1983-1995) and 8-16 years (1970-1999) time scales. The wavelet coherence analysis reveals a weak possible connection between hydrological variables (rainfalls, discharge) and climate indices relative to sea surface temperature and atmospheric circulation over Atlantic tropical, Indian and Pacific Oceans (coherence less than 0.55).

  16. Time Discounting and Credit Market Access in a Large-Scale Cash Transfer Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Sudhanshu; Martorano, Bruno; Halpern, Carolyn; Pettifor, Audrey; Thirumurthy, Harsha

    2017-01-01

    Summary Time discounting is thought to influence decision-making in almost every sphere of life, including personal finances, diet, exercise and sexual behavior. In this article we provide evidence on whether a national poverty alleviation program in Kenya can affect inter-temporal decisions. We administered a preferences module as part of a large-scale impact evaluation of the Kenyan Government’s Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children. Four years into the program we find that individuals in the treatment group are only marginally more likely to wait for future money, due in part to the erosion of the value of the transfer by inflation. However among the poorest households for whom the value of transfer is still relatively large we find significant program effects on the propensity to wait. We also find strong program effects among those who have access to credit markets though the program itself does not improve access to credit. PMID:28260842

  17. Time scale analysis of a closed-loop discrete optimal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, D. S.; Price, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A two-time scale discrete control system is considered. The closed-loop optimal linear quadratic (LQ) regulator for the system requires the solution of a full-order algebraic matrix Riccati equation. Alternatively, the original system is decomposed into reduced-order slow and fast subsystems. The closed-loop optimal control of the subsystems requires the solution of two algebraic matrix Riccati equations of order lower than that required for the full-order system. A composite, closed-loop suboptimal control is created from the sum of the slow and fast feedback optimal controls. Numerical results obtained for an aircraft model show a very close agreement between the exact (optimal) solutions and computationally simpler composite (suboptimal) solutions. The main advantage of the method is the considerable reduction in the overall computational requirements for the closed-loop optimal control of digital flight systems.

  18. On simulating flow with multiple time scales using a method of averages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author presents a new computational method based on averaging to efficiently simulate certain systems with multiple time scales. He first develops the method in a simple one-dimensional setting and employs linear stability analysis to demonstrate numerical stability. He then extends the method to multidimensional fluid flow. His method of averages does not depend on explicit splitting of the equations nor on modal decomposition. Rather he combines low order and high order algorithms in a generalized predictor-corrector framework. He illustrates the methodology in the context of a shallow fluid approximation to an ocean basin circulation. He finds that his new method reproduces the accuracy of a fully explicit second-order accurate scheme, while costing less than a first-order accurate scheme.

  19. Tropical entrainment time scales inferred from stratospheric N2O and CH4 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R. L.; Scott, D. C.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Moyer, E. J.; Salawitch, R. J.; Yung, Y. L.; Toon, G. C.; Sen, B.; Margitan, J. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Michelsen, H. A.; Elkins, J. W.

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of N2O and CH4 were made with a tunable diode laser spectrometer (ALIAS II) aboard the Observations from the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) balloon platform from New Mexico, Alaska, and Brazil during 1996 and 1997. We find different compact relationships of CH4 with N2O in the tropics and extra-tropics because mixing is slow between these regions. Transport into the extra-tropics from the tropics or the polar vortex leads to deviations from the normal compact relationship. We use measured N2O and CH4 and a simple model to quantify entrainment of mid-latitude stratospheric air into the tropics. The entrainment time scale is estimated to be 16 (+17, -8) months for altitudes between 20 and 28 km. The fraction of tropical air entrained from the extra-tropical stratosphere is 50% (+18%, -30%) at 20 km, increasing to 78% (+11%, -19%) at 28 km.

  20. Experimental investigation of atomic collisions in time scales varying from nanosecond to microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, R D; Laban, D E; Matherson, K J; Wallace, W; Sang, R T, E-mail: R.Sang@griffith.edu.a [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

    2010-02-01

    We present the results from two experiments investigating collisions that differ in time scale by three orders of magnitude. The first experiment enables the determination of absolute total collision cross sections using a technique that measures a change in the loss rate of trapped atoms from a magneto optical trap (MOT). We also investigate light assisted collision processes between cold metastable neon atoms in the {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable state within the MOT. A catalysis laser is scanned in frequency across the {sup 3}P{sub 2} - {sup 3}D{sub 3} cooling transition and the ionization rate was observed. Ionization spectra are obtained which demonstrate a dependence on the magnetic sublevels of the transition that the catalysis laser is exciting.

  1. Existence of positive solutions for semipositone dynamic system on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Wei Zhang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the following semipositone dynamic system on time scales $$displaylines{ -x^{DeltaDelta}(t=f(t,y+p(t, quad tin(0,T_{mathbb{T}},cr -y^{DeltaDelta}(t=g(t,x, quad tin(0,T_{mathbb{T}},cr x(0=x(sigma^{2}(T=0, cr alpha{y(0}-eta{y^{Delta}{(0}}= gamma{y(sigma(T}+delta{y^{Delta}(sigma(T}=0. }$$ Using fixed point index theory, we show the existence of at least one positive solution. The interesting point is the that nonlinear term is allowed to change sign and may tend to negative infinity.

  2. Effects of demographic stochasticity on biological community assembly on evolutionary time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Murase, Yohsuke

    2010-04-13

    We study the effects of demographic stochasticity on the long-term dynamics of biological coevolution models of community assembly. The noise is induced in order to check the validity of deterministic population dynamics. While mutualistic communities show little dependence on the stochastic population fluctuations, predator-prey models show strong dependence on the stochasticity, indicating the relevance of the finiteness of the populations. For a predator-prey model, the noise causes drastic decreases in diversity and total population size. The communities that emerge under influence of the noise consist of species strongly coupled with each other and have stronger linear stability around the fixed-point populations than the corresponding noiseless model. The dynamics on evolutionary time scales for the predator-prey model are also altered by the noise. Approximate 1/f fluctuations are observed with noise, while 1/ f2 fluctuations are found for the model without demographic noise. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  3. Second-scale nuclear spin coherence time of ultracold 23Na40K molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe Z.; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian A.; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-07-01

    Coherence, the stability of the relative phase between quantum states, is central to quantum mechanics and its applications. For ultracold dipolar molecules at sub-microkelvin temperatures, internal states with robust coherence are predicted to offer rich prospects for quantum many-body physics and quantum information processing. We report the observation of stable coherence between nuclear spin states of ultracold fermionic sodium-potassium (NaK) molecules in the singlet rovibrational ground state. Ramsey spectroscopy reveals coherence times on the scale of 1 second; this enables high-resolution spectroscopy of the molecular gas. Collisional shifts are shown to be absent down to the 100-millihertz level. This work opens the door to the use of molecules as a versatile quantum memory and for precision measurements on dipolar quantum matter.

  4. Stochastic models for structured populations scaling limits and long time behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Meleard, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, several probabilistic tools to study population dynamics are developed. The focus is on scaling limits of qualitatively different stochastic individual based models and the long time behavior of some classes of limiting processes. Structured population dynamics are modeled by measure-valued processes describing the individual behaviors and taking into account the demographic and mutational parameters, and possible interactions between individuals. Many quantitative parameters appear in these models and several relevant normalizations are considered, leading  to infinite-dimensional deterministic or stochastic large-population approximations. Biologically relevant questions are considered, such as extinction criteria, the effect of large birth events, the impact of  environmental catastrophes, the mutation-selection trade-off, recovery criteria in parasite infections, genealogical properties of a sample of individuals. These notes originated from a lecture series on Structured P...

  5. Intrinsic dynamics of heart regulatory systems on short time-scales: from experiment to modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Khovanov, I A; McClintock, P V E; Stefanovska, A

    2009-01-01

    We discuss open problems related to the stochastic modeling of cardiac function. The work is based on an experimental investigation of the dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) in the absence of respiratory perturbations. We consider first the cardiac control system on short time scales via an analysis of HRV within the framework of a random walk approach. Our experiments show that HRV on timescales of less than a minute takes the form of free diffusion, close to Brownian motion, which can be described as a non-stationary process with stationary increments. Secondly, we consider the inverse problem of modeling the state of the control system so as to reproduce the experimentally observed HRV statistics of. We discuss some simple toy models and identify open problems for the modelling of heart dynamics.

  6. Simulating the Thermal Response of High Explosives on Time Scales of Days to Microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A

    2003-07-16

    We present an overview of computational techniques for simulating the thermal cookoff of high explosives using a multi-physics hydrodynamics code, ALE3D. Recent improvements to the code have aided our computational capability in modeling the response of energetic materials systems exposed to extreme thermal environments, such as fires. We consider an idealized model process for a confined explosive involving the transition from slow heating to rapid deflagration in which the time scale changes from days to hundreds of microseconds. The heating stage involves thermal expansion and decomposition according to an Arrhenius kinetics model while a pressure-dependent burn model is employed during the explosive phase. We describe and demonstrate the numerical strategies employed to make the transition from slow to fast dynamics.

  7. Absolute calibration of optical streak cameras on picosecond time scales using supercontinuum generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, S; Gumbrell, E T; Robinson, T S; Floyd, E; Stuart, N H; Moore, A S; Skidmore, J W; Smith, R A

    2017-08-20

    We report a new method using high-stability, laser-driven supercontinuum generation in a liquid cell to calibrate the absolute photon response of fast optical streak cameras as a function of wavelength when operating at fastest sweep speeds. A stable, pulsed white light source based around the use of self-phase modulation in a salt solution was developed to provide the required brightness on picosecond time scales, enabling streak camera calibration in fully dynamic operation. The measured spectral brightness allowed for absolute photon response calibration over a broad spectral range (425-650 nm). Calibrations performed with two Axis Photonique streak cameras using the Photonis P820PSU streak tube demonstrated responses that qualitatively follow the photocathode response. Peak sensitivities were one photon/count above background. The absolute dynamic sensitivity is less than the static by up to an order of magnitude. We attribute this to the dynamic response of the phosphor being lower.

  8. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B; Yin, George

    2016-05-07

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766-1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794-1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence.

  9. Validity and Reliability Study for Studio Work Course Time Management Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci BULUT KILIÇ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a data collection tool to be used in determining the time management skill levels of visual arts teacher candidates in their studio work courses. After a review of the literature, a pool of items was created and arranged upon expert recommendation and a pilot study for intelligibility of the expressions was conducted. The researcher contacted a total of 288 visual arts teacher candidates who all agreed to volunteer to take part in this research. As a result of exploratory (EFA and confirmatory (CFA factor analyses, the scale determined to have four factors and 26 items. Variance ration explained by all four factors is 47.23%. Factor loadings were valued from 0.48 to 0.80. Goodness of fit values calculated by CFA were found to be χ2/sd rate 1.94 (χ2/sd=567.17/291. The other goodness of fit values calculated by CFA were RMSEA=0.05, NNFI=0.92, CFI=0.93, IFI=0.93, and RMR=0.06. All fitness indexes obtained were found to be sufficient for model fitness, and accordingly it was decided that this structure was validated. As a result of the difference between item average scores of the 27% subgroup and super group, distinctiveness of all items were found to be significant at p<0.001 level and Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients of the factors were calculated to range from 0.73 to 0.82. Cronbach’s Alpha of the total scale was calculated as 0.83. The results indicate that the questionnaire provides opportunity to make meaningful interpretations on the time management skills of visual arts teacher candidates for studio work courses.

  10. Implementing large-scale quality improvement: lessons from The Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Elizabeth; Robert, Glenn; Maben, Jill; Griffiths, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to focus on facilitating large-scale quality improvement in health care, and specifically understanding more about the known challenges associated with implementation of lean innovations: receptivity, the complexity of adoption processes, evidence of the innovation, and embedding change. Lessons are drawn from the implementation of The Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care programme in English hospitals. The study upon which the paper draws was a mixed-method evaluation that aimed to capture the perceptions of three main stakeholder groups: national-level policymakers (15 semi-structured interviews); senior hospital managers (a national web-based survey of 150 staff); and healthcare practitioners (case studies within five hospitals involving 58 members of staff). The views of these stakeholder groups were analysed using a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework to examine aspects of the innovation, the organisation, the wider context and linkages. Although The Productive Ward was widely supported, stakeholders at different levels identified varying facilitators and challenges to implementation. Key issues for all stakeholders were staff time to work on the programme and showing evidence of the impact on staff, patients and ward environments. To support implementation, policymakers should focus on expressing what can be gained locally using success stories and guidance from "early adopters". Service managers, clinical educators and professional bodies can help to spread good practice and encourage professional leadership and support. Further research could help to secure support for the programme by generating evidence about the innovation, and specifically its clinical effectiveness and broader links to public expectations and experiences of healthcare. This paper draws lessons from the implementation of The Productive Ward programme in England, which can inform the implementation of other large-scale programmes of quality improvement in

  11. Climate scenarios for Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 120,000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenoff, N.; Venaelaeinen, A.; Jaervinen, H. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Posiva Oy is planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository, to be constructed at a depth of 400 m in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, Finland. Planning the storage requires careful consideration of many aspects, including an assessment of long-term repository safety. For estimating possible climate states at Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 120,000 years, we analyze climate simulations of an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (CLIMBER-2) coupled with an ice sheet model (SICOPOLIS). The simulations into the future clearly show that the onset of the next glaciation is strongly dependent on the Earth's orbital variations and the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. It is evident that due to global warming, the climate of the next centuries will be warmer and wetter than at present. Most likely, due to global warming and low variations in the Earth's orbit around the sun, the present interglacial will last for at least the next 30,000 years. Further, the future simulations showed that the insolation minima on the Northern Hemisphere 50,000-60,000 and 90,000-100,000 years after the present hold a potential for the onset of the next glaciation. Hence, on a time-scale of 120,000 years, one must take into account climate periods lasting several thousand years having the following features: an interglacial climate, a periglacial climate, a climate with an ice sheet margin near Olkiluoto, a glacial climate with an ice sheet covering Olkiluoto, and a climate with Olkiluoto being depressed below sea level after glaciation due to isostatic depression. Due to the uncertainties related to the evolution of the future climate, it is recommended the simulations into the far future to be used only qualitatively. Quantitative information about glacial climate is achieved from the reconstructions and simulations of the past climate. (orig.)

  12. A General Systems Theory for Chaos, Quantum Mechanics and Gravity for Dynamical Systems of all Space-Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-local connections, i. e. long-range space-time correlations intrinsic to the observed subatomic dynamics of quantum systems is also exhibited by macro-scale dynamical systems as selfsimilar fractal space-time fluctuations and is identified as self-organized criticality. The author has developed a general systems theory for the observed self-organized criticality applicable to dynamical systems of all space-time scales based on the concept that spatial integration of enclosed small-scale f...

  13. Estimating Unsaturated Zone N Fluxes and Travel Times to Groundwater at Watershed Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Green, C. T.; Harter, T.; Nolan, B. T.; Juckem, P. F.; Shope, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate concentrations in groundwater vary at spatial and temporal scales. Local variability depends on soil properties, unsaturated zone properties, hydrology, reactivity, and other factors. For example, the travel time in the unsaturated zone can cause contaminant responses in aquifers to lag behind changes in N inputs at the land surface, and variable leaching-fractions of applied N fertilizer to groundwater can elevate (or reduce) concentrations in groundwater. In this study, we apply the vertical flux model (VFM) (Liao et al., 2012) to address the importance of travel time of N in the unsaturated zone and its fraction leached from the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The Fox-Wolf-Peshtigo basins, including 34 out of 72 counties in Wisconsin, were selected as the study area. Simulated concentrations of NO3-, N2 from denitrification, O2, and environmental tracers of groundwater age were matched to observations by adjusting parameters for recharge rate, unsaturated zone travel time, fractions of N inputs leached to groundwater, O2 reduction rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, denitrification rate, and dispersivity. Correlations between calibrated parameters and GIS parameters (land use, drainage class and soil properties etc.) were evaluated. Model results revealed a median of recharge rate of 0.11 m/yr, which is comparable with results from three independent estimates of recharge rates in the study area. The unsaturated travel times ranged from 0.2 yr to 25 yr with median of 6.8 yr. The correlation analysis revealed that relationships between VFM parameters and landscape characteristics (GIS parameters) were consistent with expected relationships. Fraction N leached was lower in the vicinity of wetlands and greater in the vicinity of crop lands. Faster unsaturated zone transport in forested areas was consistent with results of studies showing rapid vertical transport in forested soils. Reaction rate coefficients correlated with chemical indicators such as Fe

  14. Time-scale calibration by U-Pb geochronology: Examples from the Triassic Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundil, R.

    2009-05-01

    U-Pb zircon geochronology, pioneered by Tom Krogh, is a cornerstone for the calibration of the time scale. Before Krogh's innovations, U-Pb geochronology was essentially limited by laboratory blank Pb (typically hundreds of nanograms) inherent in the then existing zircon dissolution and purification methods. The introduction of high pressure HF dissolution combined with miniature ion exchange columns (1) reduced the blank by orders of magnitude and allowed mass-spectrometric analyses of minute amounts of material (picograms of Pb and U). Krogh also recognized the need for minimizing the effects of Pb loss, and the introduction of the air-abrasion technique was the method of choice for two decades (2), until the development of the combined annealing and chemical abrasion technique resulted in essentially closed system zircons (3). These are the prerequisite for obtaining precise (permil-level) and accurate radio-isotopic ages of individual zircons contained in primary volcanic ash deposits, which are primary targets for the calibration of the time scale if they occur within fossil bearing sediments. A prime example is the calibration of the Triassic time scale which improved significantly using these techniques. The ages for the base and the top of the Triassic are constrained by U-Pb ages to 252.3 (4) and 201.5 Ma (5), respectively. These dates also constrain the ages of major extinction events at the Permian-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic boundaries, and are statistically indistinguishable from ages obtained for the Siberian Traps and volcanic products from the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, respectively, suggesting a causal link. Ages for these continental volcanics, however, are mostly from the K-Ar (40Ar/39Ar) system which requires accounting and correcting for a systematic bias of ca 1 % between U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar isotopic ages (the 40Ar/39Ar ages being younger) (6). Robust U-Pb age constraints also exist for the Induan- Olenekian boundary (251.2 Ma, (7

  15. On the Distribution of Earthquake Interevent Times and the Impact of Spatial Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of earthquake interevent times is a subject that has attracted much attention in the statistical physics literature [1-3]. A recent paper proposes that the distribution of earthquake interevent times follows from the the interplay of the crustal strength distribution and the loading function (stress versus time) of the Earth's crust locally [4]. It was also shown that the Weibull distribution describes earthquake interevent times provided that the crustal strength also follows the Weibull distribution and that the loading function follows a power-law during the loading cycle. I will discuss the implications of this work and will present supporting evidence based on the analysis of data from seismic catalogs. I will also discuss the theoretical evidence in support of the Weibull distribution based on models of statistical physics [5]. Since other-than-Weibull interevent times distributions are not excluded in [4], I will illustrate the use of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test in order to determine which probability distributions are not rejected by the data. Finally, we propose a modification of the Weibull distribution if the size of the system under investigation (i.e., the area over which the earthquake activity occurs) is finite with respect to a critical link size. keywords: hypothesis testing, modified Weibull, hazard rate, finite size References [1] Corral, A., 2004. Long-term clustering, scaling, and universality in the temporal occurrence of earthquakes, Phys. Rev. Lett., 9210) art. no. 108501. [2] Saichev, A., Sornette, D. 2007. Theory of earthquake recurrence times, J. Geophys. Res., Ser. B 112, B04313/1-26. [3] Touati, S., Naylor, M., Main, I.G., 2009. Origin and nonuniversality of the earthquake interevent time distribution Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (16), art. no. 168501. [4] Hristopulos, D.T., 2003. Spartan Gibbs random field models for geostatistical applications, SIAM Jour. Sci. Comput., 24, 2125-2162. [5] I. Eliazar and J. Klafter, 2006

  16. Tracing time scales of fluid residence and migration in the crust (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokochi, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Purtschert, R.; Jiang, W.; Lu, Z.; Müller, P.; Yang, G.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal fluids (water, gas and oil) mediate chemical reactions, and they may transport, concentrate or disperse elements in the crust; the fluids are often valuable resources in their own right. In this context, determining the time scales of fluid transport and residence time is essential for understanding geochemical cycle of elements, as well as risk and resource management. Crustal fluids contain stable and radioactive noble gases indigenous to the fluid, which may be of magmatic or atmospheric origin of various ages. In addition, radiogenic and nucleogenic noble gases (both stable and radioactive) are continuously produced by the decay of U, Th and K and related nuclear reactions in the crust at known rates and in known relative proportions. They may be released from their production sites and incorporated into the fluid, acting as natural spikes to trace fluid flow. The concentrations of a noble gas isotope in a crustal fluid in a system devoid of phase separation or mixing varies as a function of decay time and supply from the production sites into the fluids. The release rate of noble gases from the production sites in minerals to the fluid phase may be determined uniquely through the studies of noble gas radionuclides (Yokochi et al., 2012), which is fundamental to the behavior of volatile elements in geochemistry. A pilot study of noble gas radionuclides in an active geothermal system was performed at Yellowstone National Park (Yokochi et al., 2013). Prior studies of the Yellowstone system using stable noble gas isotopes show that the thermal fluids contain a mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and crustal components. Noble gas radionuclide measurements provide new chronometric constraints regarding the subsurface residence times of Yellowstone thermal fluids. Upper limits on deep thermal fluid mean residence times, estimated from 39Ar/40Ar* ratios, range from 118 to 137 kyr for features in the Gibbon and Norris Geyser Basin areas, and are about 16 kyr in

  17. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  18. 211 Cortical Oscillations During Memory Encoding Are Reinstated on a Faster Time Scale During Memory Recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Yaffe, Robert; Inati, Sara; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2016-08-01

    Previous work has shown that successful recall of prior experiences is associated with reactivation of the same brain regions that were active during the encoding of these experiences. Here we quantify the time scale of the neural activity reinstatement and show that the brain replays its encoding dynamical activity on a faster time scale during recall. We collected data from 34 subjects with medication-resistant epilepsy who underwent intracranial electroencephalography while they participated in a verbal paired-associates memory task. The average spectral power for each brain region was computed in the theta and high gamma bands yielding an average encoding and retrieval power trace. A time-warping algorithm was then applied to the retrieval trace to best fit it to the encoding trace. For each region, we tabulated the time-scaling factor that led to the best correlation between the 2 traces. For each subject, the average scale factor was computed for all the regions that achieved a significant correlation. For theta and high gamma, the mean time-scaling factors of recall activity with encoding activity across subjects were 0.92 ± 0.03 and 0.95 ± 0.02. The mean scale factors for theta and high gamma were significantly smaller than 1, indicating that the brain replays its encoding activity during recall at a significantly faster scale. While this was true for the average data across all regions and subjects, few regions exhibited reversal of this pattern. Our results demonstrate that, on average, spectral dynamics are replayed on a faster time scale during memory retrieval. This complements previous animal work. However, further investigation is needed to explore the differences between replay time scale in different brain regions as well as its behavioral correlates.

  19. Mineral-enhanced hydrothermal oligopeptide formation at the second time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments.

  20. Time Scale for Adiabaticity Breakdown in Driven Many-Body Systems and Orthogonality Catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychkovskiy, Oleg; Gamayun, Oleksandr; Cheianov, Vadim

    2017-11-01

    The adiabatic theorem is a fundamental result in quantum mechanics, which states that a system can be kept arbitrarily close to the instantaneous ground state of its Hamiltonian if the latter varies in time slowly enough. The theorem has an impressive record of applications ranging from foundations of quantum field theory to computational molecular dynamics. In light of this success it is remarkable that a practicable quantitative understanding of what "slowly enough" means is limited to a modest set of systems mostly having a small Hilbert space. Here we show how this gap can be bridged for a broad natural class of physical systems, namely, many-body systems where a small move in the parameter space induces an orthogonality catastrophe. In this class, the conditions for adiabaticity are derived from the scaling properties of the parameter-dependent ground state without a reference to the excitation spectrum. This finding constitutes a major simplification of a complex problem, which otherwise requires solving nonautonomous time evolution in a large Hilbert space.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Leisure Time Satisfaction Scale in family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Silvia; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Gómez-Marroquin, Ignacio; Carrasco, María; Ortiz-Marqués, Nuria; Stevens, Alan B

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence of the numerous benefits of leisure to health and well-being appropriate tools to assess this construct are lacking. The purpose of this work was to analyse the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Leisure Time Satisfaction (LTS). The sample was made up of 1048 primary family caregivers of dependent people. Scale structure was subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent and convergent validity were assessed by correlation with validated questionnaires for measuring burden (Zarit Burden Inventory - ZBI) and health (SF-36 Health Survey). The results show a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = .938) suitable fit of the dimensional model tested via confirmatory factor analysis (GFI = .925, BBNNFI= .996; IFI= .998, RMSEA= .043), and appropriate convergent validity with similar constructs (r = -.44 with ZBI; and r-values between .226 and .440 with SF-36 dimensions). Psychometric results obtained from the LTS are promising and the results enable us to draw the conclusion that it is a suitable tool for assessing caregivers’ leisure time satisfaction.

  2. Differential time scales of change to learning frequency structures of isometric force tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenka, Breanna E; King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple processes support the persistent (learning) and transient (adaptive) change in behavior over time. We investigated whether practice and rest influence similarly the learning and adaptation of slow and fast frequency structures in isometric force tracking of pathways that varied in their regularity. Participants practiced 25 trials on each of 5 days in either a constant force target or 1 with the 1/f distributional properties of brown or pink noise. There was a reduction in root mean squared error (RMSE) as well as an increasing positive correlation between force output and the target pathway for all noise conditions over days. The spectral frequency analysis of force output and RMSE revealed task dependent outcomes of learning and adaptation as a function of the relatively slow (0-4 Hz) and fast (8-12 Hz) oscillatory time scales. These contrasting findings show that the persistent and transient properties of learning occur across different timescales and dimensions of behavior (force output and outcome-RMSE).

  3. Study of Volcanic Activity at Different Time Scales Using Hypertemporal Land Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidou, Efthymia; Hecker, Christoph; van der Werff, Harald; van der Meijde, Mark

    2017-10-01

    We apply a method for detecting subtle spatiotemporal signal fluctuations to monitor volcanic activity. Whereas midwave infrared data are commonly used for volcanic hot spot detection, our approach utilizes hypertemporal longwave infrared-based land surface temperature (LST) data. Using LST data of the second-generation European Meteorological Satellites, we study (a) a paroxysmal, 1 day long eruption of Mount Etna (Italy); (b) a prolonged, 6 month period of effusive and lateral lava flows of the Nyamuragira volcano (Democratic Republic of Congo); and (c) intermittent activity in the permanent lava lake of Nyiragongo (Democratic Republic of Congo) over a period of 2 years (2011-2012). We compare our analysis with published ground-based observations and satellite-based alert systems; results agree on the periods of increased volcanic activity and quiescence. We further apply our analysis on mid-infrared and long-infrared brightness temperatures and compare the results. We conclude that our study enables the use of LST data for monitoring volcanic dynamics at different time scales, can complement existing methodologies, and allows for use of long time series from older sensors that do not provide midwave infrared data.

  4. On the effects of small scale space-time variability of rainfall on basin flood response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Athanasios; Fatichi, Simone; Molnar, Peter; Rimkus, Stefan; Burlando, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of rainfall, especially at fine temporal and spatial scales can significantly affect flood generation, leading to a large variability in the flood response and uncertainty in its prediction. In this study we quantify the impact of rainfall spatial and temporal structure on the catchment hydrological response based on a numerical experiment. Rainfall ensembles generated using a state-of-the-art space-time stochastic model are used as input into a distributed process-based hydrological model. The sensitivity of the hydrograph to several structural characteristics of storm rainfall for three soil moisture initial conditions is numerically assessed at the basin outlet of an Alpine catchment in central Switzerland. The results highlight that the flood response is strongly affected by the temporal correlation of rainfall and to a lesser extent by its spatial variability. Initial soil moisture conditions play a paramount role in mediating the response. We identify the underlying mechanistic explanations in terms of runoff generation and connectivity of saturated areas that determine the sensitivity of flood response to the spatio-temporal variability of rainfall. We show that the element that mostly influences both the flood peak and the time of peak occurrence is the clustering of saturated areas in the catchment which leads to local enhanced runoff.

  5. Estimating the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratti, E.; Montanari, A.; Castellarin, A.; Salinas, J. L.; Viglione, A.; Bezzi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We propose an original approach to infer the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale. Our purpose is to estimate the peak flow that is expected for an assigned return period T, independently of the season in which it occurs (i.e. annual flood frequency regime), as well as in different selected sub-yearly periods (i.e. seasonal flood frequency regime). While a huge literature exists on annual flood frequency analysis, few studies have focused on the estimation of seasonal flood frequencies despite the relevance of the issue, for instance when scheduling along the months of the year the construction phases of river engineering works directly interacting with the active river bed, like for instance dams. An approximate method for joint frequency analysis is presented here that guarantees consistency between fitted annual and seasonal distributions, i.e. the annual cumulative distribution is the product of the seasonal cumulative distribution functions, under the assumption of independence among floods in different seasons. In our method the parameters of the seasonal frequency distributions are fitted by maximising an objective function that accounts for the likelihoods of both seasonal and annual peaks. In contrast to previous studies, our procedure is conceived to allow the users to introduce subjective weights to the components of the objective function in order to emphasize the fitting of specific seasons or of the annual peak flow distribution. An application to the time series of the Blue Nile daily flows at the Sudan-Ethiopia border is presented.

  6. Estimating the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratti, E.; Montanari, A.; Castellarin, A.; Salinas, J. L.; Viglione, A.; Bezzi, A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an original approach to infer the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale. Our purpose is to estimate the peak flow that is expected for an assigned return period T, independently of the season in which it occurs (i.e. annual flood frequency regime), as well as in different selected sub-yearly periods (i.e. seasonal flood frequency regime). While a huge literature exists on annual flood frequency analysis, few studies have focused on the estimation of seasonal flood frequencies despite the relevance of the issue, for instance when scheduling along the months of the year the construction phases of river engineering works directly interacting with the active river bed, like for instance dams. An approximate method for joint frequency analysis is presented here that guarantees consistency between fitted annual and seasonal distributions, i.e. the annual cumulative distribution is the product of the seasonal cumulative distribution functions, under the assumption of independence among floods in different seasons. In our method the parameters of the seasonal frequency distributions are fitted by maximising an objective function that accounts for the likelihoods of both seasonal and annual peaks. Differently from previous studies, our procedure is conceived to allow the users to introduce subjective weights to the components of the objective function in order to emphasize the fitting of specific seasons or of the annual peak flow distribution. An application to the time series of the Blue Nile daily flows at Sudan-Ethiopia border is presented.

  7. Real-time monitoring of emissions from monoethanolamine-based industrial scale carbon capture facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Schade, Gunnar Wolfgang; Nielsen, Claus Jørgen

    2013-12-17

    We demonstrate the capabilities and properties of using Proton Transfer Reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) to real-time monitor gaseous emissions from industrial scale amine-based carbon capture processes. The benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) was used as an example of amines needing to be monitored from carbon capture facilities, and to describe how the measurements may be influenced by potentially interfering species in CO2 absorber stack discharges. On the basis of known or expected emission compositions, we investigated the PTR-ToF-MS MEA response as a function of sample flow humidity, ammonia, and CO2 abundances, and show that all can exhibit interferences, thus making accurate amine measurements difficult. This warrants a proper sample pretreatment, and we show an example using a dilution with bottled zero air of 1:20 to 1:10 to monitor stack gas concentrations at the CO2 Technology Center Mongstad (TCM), Norway. Observed emissions included many expected chemical species, dominantly ammonia and acetaldehyde, but also two new species previously not reported but emitted in significant quantities. With respect to concerns regarding amine emissions, we show that accurate amine quantifications in the presence of water vapor, ammonia, and CO2 become feasible after proper sample dilution, thus making PTR-ToF-MS a viable technique to monitor future carbon capture facility emissions, without conventional laborious sample pretreatment.

  8. Linear time algorithms to construct populations fitting multiple constraint distributions at genomic scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siragusa, Enrico; Haiminen, Niina; Utro, Filippo; Parida, Laxmi

    2017-10-09

    Computer simulations can be used to study population genetic methods, models and parameters, as well as to predict potential outcomes. For example, in plant populations, predicting the outcome of breeding operations can be studied using simulations. In-silico construction of populations with pre-specified characteristics is an important task in breeding optimization and other population genetic studies. We present two linear time Simulation using Best-fit Algorithms (SimBA) for two classes of problems where each co-fits two distributions: SimBA-LD fits linkage disequilibrium and minimum allele frequency distributions, while SimBA-hap fits founder-haplotype and polyploid allele dosage distributions. An incremental gap-filling version of previously introduced SimBA-LD is here demonstrated to accurately fit the target distributions, allowing efficient large scale simulations. SimBA-hap accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated by simulating tetraploid populations with varying numbers of founder haplotypes, we evaluate both a linear time greedy algoritm and an optimal solution based on mixed-integer programming. SimBA is available on http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/project/5669.

  9. Incorporating tree-thinking and evolutionary time scale into developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Feiner, Nathalie; Keeley, Sean D; Hara, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic approaches are indispensable in any comparative molecular study involving multiple species. These approaches are in increasing demand as the amount and availability of DNA sequence information continues to increase exponentially, even for organisms that were previously not extensively studied. Without the sound application of phylogenetic concepts and knowledge, one can be misled when attempting to infer ancestral character states as well as the timing and order of evolutionary events, both of which are frequently exerted in evolutionary developmental biology. The ignorance of phylogenetic approaches can also impact non-evolutionary studies and cause misidentification of the target gene or protein to be examined in functional characterization. This review aims to promote tree-thinking in evolutionary conjecture and stress the importance of a sense of time scale in cross-species comparisons, in order to enhance the understanding of phylogenetics in all biological fields including developmental biology. To this end, molecular phylogenies of several developmental regulatory genes, including those denoted as "cryptic pan-vertebrate genes", are introduced as examples. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. Saharan Dust Deposition May Affect Phytoplankton Growth in the Mediterranean Sea at Ecological Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallisai, Rachele; Peters, Francesc; Volpe, Gianluca; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    The surface waters of the Mediterranean Sea are extremely poor in the nutrients necessary for plankton growth. At the same time, the Mediterranean Sea borders with the largest and most active desert areas in the world and the atmosphere over the basin is subject to frequent injections of mineral dust particles. We describe statistical correlations between dust deposition over the Mediterranean Sea and surface chlorophyll concentrations at ecological time scales. Aerosol deposition of Saharan origin may explain 1 to 10% (average 5%) of seasonally detrended chlorophyll variability in the low nutrient-low chlorophyll Mediterranean. Most of the statistically significant correlations are positive with main effects in spring over the Eastern and Central Mediterranean, conforming to a view of dust events fueling needed nutrients to the planktonic community. Some areas show negative effects of dust deposition on chlorophyll, coinciding with regions under a large influence of aerosols from European origin. The influence of dust deposition on chlorophyll dynamics may become larger in future scenarios of increased aridity and shallowing of the mixed layer. PMID:25333783

  11. Time scales of representation in the human brain: weighing past information to predict future events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lee M; Bestmann, Sven; Rosa, Maria Joao; Penny, William; Green, Gary G R

    2011-01-01

    The estimates that humans make of statistical dependencies in the environment and therefore their representation of uncertainty crucially depend on the integration of data over time. As such, the extent to which past events are used to represent uncertainty has been postulated to vary over the cortex. For example, primary visual cortex responds to rapid perturbations in the environment, while frontal cortices involved in executive control encode the longer term contexts within which these perturbations occur. Here we tested whether primary and executive regions can be distinguished by the number of past observations they represent. This was based on a decay-dependent model that weights past observations from a Markov process and Bayesian Model Selection to test the prediction that neuronal responses are characterized by different decay half-lives depending on location in the brain. We show distributions of brain responses for short and long term decay functions in primary and secondary visual and frontal cortices, respectively. We found that visual and parietal responses are released from the burden of the past, enabling an agile response to fluctuations in events as they unfold. In contrast, frontal regions are more concerned with average trends over longer time scales within which local variations are embedded. Specifically, we provide evidence for a temporal gradient for representing context within the prefrontal cortex and possibly beyond to include primary sensory and association areas.

  12. Time scales of representation in the human brain: weighing past information to predict future events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eHarrison

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The estimates that humans make of statistical dependencies in the environment and therefore their representation of uncertainty crucially depend on the integration of data over time. As such, the extent to which past events are used to represent uncertainty has been postulated to vary over the cortex. For example, primary visual cortex responds to rapid perturbations in the environment, while frontal cortices involved in executive control encode the longer term contexts within which these perturbations occur. Here we tested whether primary and executive regions can be distinguished by the number of past observations they represent. This was based on a decay-dependent model that weights past observations from a Markov process and Bayesian Model Selection (BMS to test the prediction that neuronal responses are characterised by different decay half-lives depending on location in the brain. We show distributions of brain responses for short and long term decay functions in primary and secondary visual and frontal cortices, respectively. We found that visual and parietal responses are released from the burden of the past, enabling an agile response to fluctuations in events as they unfold. In contrast, frontal regions are more concerned with average trends over longer time scales within which local variations are embedded. Specifically, we provide evidence for a temporal gradient for representing context within the prefrontal cortex and possibly beyond to include primary sensory and association areas.

  13. Time-Varying, Multi-Scale Adaptive System Reliability Analysis of Lifeline Infrastructure Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kurtz, Nolan Scot [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The majority of current societal and economic needs world-wide are met by the existing networked, civil infrastructure. Because the cost of managing such infrastructure is high and increases with time, risk-informed decision making is essential for those with management responsibilities for these systems. To address such concerns, a methodology that accounts for new information, deterioration, component models, component importance, group importance, network reliability, hierarchical structure organization, and efficiency concerns has been developed. This methodology analyzes the use of new information through the lens of adaptive Importance Sampling for structural reliability problems. Deterioration, multi-scale bridge models, and time-variant component importance are investigated for a specific network. Furthermore, both bridge and pipeline networks are studied for group and component importance, as well as for hierarchical structures in the context of specific networks. Efficiency is the primary driver throughout this study. With this risk-informed approach, those responsible for management can address deteriorating infrastructure networks in an organized manner.

  14. The time scales of the climate-economy feedback and the climatic cost of growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallegatte, Stephane [CIRED - CNRM, Nogent-sur-Marne (France)

    2005-04-01

    This paper is based on the perception that the inertia of climate and socio-economic systems are key parameters in the climate change issue. In a first part, it develops and implements a new approach based on a simple integrated model with a particular focus on an innovative transient impact and adaptation modelling. In a second part, a climate-economy feedback is defined and characterized. It is found that: (i) it has a 70-year characteristic time, which is long when compared to the system's other time-scales, and it cannot act as a natural damping process of climate change; (ii) mitigation has to be anticipated since the feedback of an emission reduction on the economy is significant only after a 20-year delay and really efficient after a one-century delay; (iii) the IPCC methodology, that neglects the feedback from impacts to emissions, is acceptable up to 2100, whatever is the level of impacts. This analysis allows also to define a climatic cost of growth as the additional climate change damages due to the additional emissions linked to economic growth. Usefully, this metric for climate change damages is particularly independent of the baseline scenario. (orig.)

  15. From dinosaurs to modern bird diversity: extending the time scale of adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Daniel; Morlon, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    What explains why some groups of organisms, like birds, are so species rich? And what explains their extraordinary ecological diversity, ranging from large, flightless birds to small migratory species that fly thousand of kilometers every year? These and similar questions have spurred great interest in adaptive radiation, the diversification of ecological traits in a rapidly speciating group of organisms. Although the initial formulation of modern concepts of adaptive radiation arose from consideration of the fossil record, rigorous attempts to identify adaptive radiation in the fossil record are still uncommon. Moreover, most studies of adaptive radiation concern groups that are less than 50 million years old. Thus, it is unclear how important adaptive radiation is over temporal scales that span much larger portions of the history of life. In this issue, Benson et al. test the idea of a "deep-time" adaptive radiation in dinosaurs, compiling and using one of the most comprehensive phylogenetic and body-size datasets for fossils. Using recent phylogenetic statistical methods, they find that in most clades of dinosaurs there is a strong signal of an "early burst" in body-size evolution, a predicted pattern of adaptive radiation in which rapid trait evolution happens early in a group's history and then slows down. They also find that body-size evolution did not slow down in the lineage leading to birds, hinting at why birds survived to the present day and diversified. This paper represents one of the most convincing attempts at understanding deep-time adaptive radiations.

  16. Optimal sludge retention time for a bench scale MBR treating municipal sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollice, A; Laera, G; Saturno, D; Giordano, C; Sandulli, R

    2008-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors allow for higher sludge concentrations and improved degradation efficiencies with respect to conventional activated sludge. However, in the current practice these systems are often operated under sub-optimal conditions, since so far no precise indications have yet been issued on the optimal operating conditions of MBR for municipal wastewater treatment. This paper reports some results of four years of operation of a bench scale membrane bioreactor where steady state conditions were investigated under different sludge retention times. The whole experimental campaign was oriented towards the investigation of optimal process conditions in terms of COD removal and nitrification, biomass activity and growth, and sludge characteristics. The membrane bioreactor treated real municipal sewage, and four different sludge ages were tested (20, 40, 60, and 80 days) and compared with previous data on complete sludge retention. The results showed that the the biology of the system, as assessed by the oxygen uptake rate, is less affected than the sludge physical parameters. In particular, although the growth yield was observed to dramatically drop for SRT higher than 80 days, the biological activity was maintained under all the tested conditions. These considerations suggest that high SRT are convenient in terms of limited excess sludge production without losses of the treatment capacity. Physical characteristics such as the viscosity and the filterability appear to be negatively affected by prolonged sludge retention times, but their values remain within the ranges normally reported for conventional activated sludge.

  17. A web-based modular framework for real-time monitoring of large scale sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R. L.; Lindquist, K. G.; Vernon, F. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Antelope Real Time System (ARTS) is an integrated combination of protocols, acquisition systems and applications designed for real-time data collection and analysis from an array of deployed field sensors. Historically these were seismic sensors, however the open architecture of the ARTS facilitated development of acquisition protocols for a diverse group of sensors, including data streams from hf radar, meteorological instrumentation and cameras. In parallel with the expansion of data-type ingestion, a web-based interface to the ARTS was developed in PHP, a popular HTML embedded scripting language. The application-driven development of web-based software to Antelope-stored data has risen exponentially over the last four years, from simple database interactions to web-based AJAX applications similar in look and feel to desktop software. As the web-based applications have grown in complexity, the architecture around their development has matured into an extensible framework with "plug'n'play" capabilities. Their modular design has allowed multiple institutions to deploy the same web-based applications, tailored for their specific requirements. Examples include the NSF Earthscope USArray Transportable Array, ROADNet's Realtime Imagebank, the broadband seismic network monitoring of the University of Nevada Reno and University of California San Diego, and monitoring of the downhole arrays maintained by the University of California Santa Barbara. The success of these deployments suggest that such a framework could be applicable to other large scale sensor networks, including the developing Ocean Observatories project.

  18. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels van Kessenich, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal.

  19. Systematic reduction of complex tropospheric chemical mechanisms, Part I: sensitivity and time-scale analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Whitehouse

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Explicit mechanisms describing the complex degradation pathways of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs are important, since they allow the study of the contribution of individual VOCS to secondary pollutant formation. They are computationally expensive to solve however, since they contain large numbers of species and a wide range of time-scales causing stiffness in the resulting equation systems. This paper and the following companion paper describe the application of systematic and automated methods for reducing such complex mechanisms, whilst maintaining the accuracy of the model with respect to important species and features. The methods are demonstrated via application to version 2 of the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism. The methods of Jacobian analysis and overall rate sensitivity analysis proved to be efficient and capable of removing the majority of redundant reactions and species in the scheme across a wide range of conditions relevant to the polluted troposphere. The application of principal component analysis of the rate sensitivity matrix was computationally expensive due to its use of the decomposition of very large matrices, and did not produce significant reduction over and above the other sensitivity methods. The use of the quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA proved to be an extremely successful method of removing the fast time-scales within the system, as demonstrated by a local perturbation analysis at each stage of reduction. QSSA species were automatically selected via the calculation of instantaneous QSSA errors based on user-selected tolerances. The application of the QSSA led to the removal of a large number of alkoxy radicals and excited Criegee bi-radicals via reaction lumping. The resulting reduced mechanism was shown to reproduce the concentration profiles of the important species selected from the full mechanism over a wide range of conditions, including those outside of which the reduced mechanism was

  20. The spatially resolved star formation history of CALIFA galaxies. Cosmic time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R. M.; Pérez, E.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; López Fernández, R.; de Amorim, A. L.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the mass assembly time scales of nearby galaxies observed by CALIFA at the 3.5 m telescope in Calar Alto. We apply the fossil record method of the stellar populations to the complete sample of the 3rd CALIFA data release, with a total of 661 galaxies, covering stellar masses from 108.4 to 1012M⊙ and a wide range of Hubble types. We apply spectral synthesis techniques to the datacubes and process the results to produce the mass growth time scales and mass weighted ages, from which we obtain temporal and spatially resolved information in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sc, and Sd) and six bins of stellar mass and stellar mass surface density. We use three different tracers of the spatially resolved star formation history (mass assembly curves, ratio of half mass to half light radii, and mass-weighted age gradients) to test if galaxies grow inside-out, and its dependence with galaxy stellar mass, stellar mass surface density, and morphology. Our main results are as follows: (a) the innermost regions of galaxies assemble their mass at an earlier time than regions located in the outer parts; this happens at any given stellar mass (M⋆), stellar mass surface density (Σ⋆), or Hubble type, including the lowest mass systems in our sample. (b) Galaxies present a significant diversity in their characteristic formation epochs for lower-mass systems. This diversity shows a strong dependence of the mass assembly time scales on Σ⋆ and Hubble type in the lower-mass range (108.4 to 1010.4), but a very mild dependence in higher-mass bins. (c) The lowest half mass radius (HMR) to half light radius (HLR) ratio is found for galaxies between 1010.4 and 1011.1M⊙, where galaxies are 25% smaller in mass than in light. Low-mass galaxies show the largest ratio with HMR/HLR 0.89. Sb and Sbc galaxies present the lowest HMR/HLR ratio (0.74). The ratio HMR/HLR is always, on average, below 1, indicating that galaxies grow faster in mass than in light

  1. Time Lags in Watershed-Scale Nutrient Transport: An Exploration of Dominant Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, N. B.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    With agricultural intensification, rivers and streams flowing through managed catchments have become delivery channels for excess nutrients, leading to problems of eutrophication and posing risks to drinking water safety. In watersheds around the world, major policy goals have been set to improve water quality, including those in the Water Framework Directive in Europe and the Clean Water Act in the United States. Location-specific water quality goals have also been set by regional working groups, including the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, the Chesapeake Bay Program, and the Great Lakes Commission. In almost all cases, however, deadlines for achieving water quality goals have been missed, and insufficient improvements have been observed in receiving water bodies. Such apparent failures can be blamed on a variety of factors, including institutional inertia and a lack of funding for needed changes in management. It is our hypothesis, however, that repeated failures to meet water quality-related policy goals are in many cases due to sometimes long lag times between changes in nutrient management and improvements in water quality, and that these lag times can be attributed to the presence of biogeochemical and hydrologic nutrient legacies within the landscape. In the present work we have used the Grand River Watershed (GRW), a heavily agricultural 6800 km2 watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada, as a case study to explore long-term N dynamics and the potential impact of N legacies on water quality. In this work, we developed a 70-year dataset of nitrogen (N) inputs to the GRW and use it to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of legacy nutrient accumulation within the catchment. We then link these patterns of accumulation with 3 decades of stream nutrient concentration data at multiple scales. Results demonstrate a clear decoupling between nutrient inputs and outputs that is suggestive of watershed lag times. A statistical approach

  2. A Robust Computational Technique for Model Order Reduction of Two-Time-Scale Discrete Systems via Genetic Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Alsmadi, Othman M.K.; Zaer S. Abo-Hammour

    2015-01-01

    A robust computational technique for model order reduction (MOR) of multi-time-scale discrete systems (single input single output (SISO) and multi-input multioutput (MIMO)) is presented in this paper. This work is motivated by the singular perturbation of multi-time-scale systems where some specific dynamics may not have significant influence on the overall system behavior. The new approach is proposed using genetic algorithms (GA) with the advantage of obtaining a reduced order model, maint...

  3. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Tao Zhou; Xiang Zhao; Kaicheng Huang; Shan Gao; Hao Wu; Hui Luo

    2015-01-01

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated ...

  4. Bifurcation from Interval and Positive Solutions of a Nonlinear Second-Order Dynamic Boundary Value Problem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a time scale with 0,T∈. We give a global description of the branches of positive solutions to the nonlinear boundary value problem of second-order dynamic equation on a time scale , uΔΔ(t+f(t,uσ(t=0,  t∈[0,T],  u(0=u(σ2(T=0, which is not necessarily linearizable. Our approaches are based on topological degree theory and global bifurcation techniques.

  5. Development and validation of brief scales to measure collectivism, religiosity, racial pride, and time orientation in urban African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukwago, S N; Kreuter, M W; Bucholtz, D C; Holt, C L; Clark, E M

    2001-10-01

    This article describes the development and pilot-testing of brief scales to measure four cultural constructs prevalent in urban African American women. Internal consistency and temporal stability were assessed in two convenience samples (n=47 and n=25) of primarily lower-income African American women. All scales performed well: collectivism alpha=.93, r=.85, ppride (alpha=.84, r=.52, p<.001); present time orientation (alpha=.73, r=.52, p<.01) and future time orientation (alpha=.72, r=.54, p=.07).

  6. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  7. Is there a connection between Earth's core and climate at multidecadal time scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Sébastien; Marcus, Steven; de Viron, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The length-of-day (LOD) undergoes multidecadal variations of several milliseconds (ms) attributed to changes in the fluid outer core angular momentum. These variations resemble a quasi-periodic oscillation of duration 60 to 70 years, although the periodicity (and its accurate length) are disputable because of the relatively short observational time span and the lower quality of the observations before the 20th century. Interestingly, similar variations show up in various measured or reconstructed climate indices including the sea surface (SST) and surface air (SAT) temperatures. It has been shown in several studies that LOD variations lead SST and SAT variations by a few years. No clear scenarios have been raised so far to explain the link between external, astronomical forcing (e.g., Solar wind), Earth's rotation (core-driven torsional) oscillations, and Earth's surface processes (climate variations) at these time scales. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests the centrifugal tides generated by multidecadal LOD variations as a 'valve' to control the transfer of thermal energy from the lithosphere to the surface via geothermal fluxes. This hypothesis is supported by recent studies reporting significant correlations between tidal and rotational excitation and seafloor and surface volcanism. In this study, we extend recent works from us and other independent authors by re-assessing the correlations between multidecadal LOD, climate indices, Solar and magnetic activities, as well as gridded data including SST, SAT, and cloud cover. We pay a special attention to the time lags: when a significant correlation is found, the value of the lag may help to discriminate between various possible scenarios. We locate some `hot spots', particularly in the Atlantic ocean and along the trajectory of the upper branch of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), where the 70-yr oscillation is strongly marked. In addition, we discuss the possibility for centrifugal

  8. Influence of time scale wind speed data on sustainability analysis for irrigating greenhouse crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Méndez, Rodrigo; García Llaneza, Joaquín; Peillón, Manuel; Perdigones, Alicia; Sanchez, Raul; Tarquis, Ana M.; Garcia, Jose Luis

    2014-05-01

    Appropriate water supply at crop/farm level, with suitable costs, is becoming more and more important. Energy management is closely related to water supply in this context, being wind energy one of the options to be considered, using wind pumps for irrigation water supply. Therefore, it is important to characterize the wind speed frequency distribution to study the technical feasibility to use its energy for irrigation management purpose. The general objective of this present research is to analyze the impact of time scale recorded wind speed data in the sustainability for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) grown under greenhouse at Cuban conditions using drip irrigation system. For this porpoise, a daily estimation balance between water needs and water availability was used to evaluate the feasibility of the most economic windmill irrigation system. Several factors were included: wind velocity (W, m/s) in function of the time scale averaged, flow supplied by the wind pump as a function of the elevation height (H, m) and daily greenhouse evapotranspiration. Monthly volumes of water required for irrigation (Dr, m3/ha) and in the water tank (Vd, m3), as well as the monthly irrigable area (Ar, ha), were estimated by cumulative deficit water budgeting taking in account these factors. Three-hourly wind velocity (W3h, m/s) data from 1992 till 2008 was available for this study. The original data was grouped in six and twelve hourly data (W6h and W12h respectively) as well as daily data (W24h). For each time scale the daily estimation balance was applied. A comparison of the results points out a need for at least three-hourly data to be used mainly in the months in which mean wind speed are close or below the pumps threshold speed to start-up functioning. References Manuel Esteban Peillon Mesa, Ana Maria Tarquis Alfonso, José Luis García Fernández, and Raúl Sánchez Calvo. The use of wind pumps for irrigating greenhouse tomato crops: a case study in Cuba. Geophysical

  9. Extracting the scaling exponents of a self-affine, non-Gaussian process from a finite-length time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2006-11-01

    We address the generic problem of extracting the scaling exponents of a stationary, self-affine process realized by a time series of finite length, where information about the process is not known a priori. Estimating the scaling exponents relies upon estimating the moments, or more typically structure functions, of the probability density of the differenced time series. If the probability density is heavy tailed, outliers strongly influence the scaling behavior of the moments. From an operational point of view, we wish to recover the scaling exponents of the underlying process by excluding a minimal population of these outliers. We test these ideas on a synthetically generated symmetric α -stable Lévy process and show that the Lévy exponent is recovered in up to the 6th order moment after only ˜0.1-0.5% of the data are excluded. The scaling properties of the excluded outliers can then be tested to provide additional information about the system.

  10. A rainfall disaggregation scheme for sub-hourly time scales: Coupling a Bartlett-Lewis based model with adjusting procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossieris, Panagiotis; Makropoulos, Christos; Onof, Christian; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2018-01-01

    Many hydrological applications, such as flood studies, require the use of long rainfall data at fine time scales varying from daily down to 1 min time step. However, in the real world there is limited availability of data at sub-hourly scales. To cope with this issue, stochastic disaggregation techniques are typically employed to produce possible, statistically consistent, rainfall events that aggregate up to the field data collected at coarser scales. A methodology for the stochastic disaggregation of rainfall at fine time scales was recently introduced, combining the Bartlett-Lewis process to generate rainfall events along with adjusting procedures to modify the lower-level variables (i.e., hourly) so as to be consistent with the higher-level one (i.e., daily). In the present paper, we extend the aforementioned scheme, initially designed and tested for the disaggregation of daily rainfall into hourly depths, for any sub-hourly time scale. In addition, we take advantage of the recent developments in Poisson-cluster processes incorporating in the methodology a Bartlett-Lewis model variant that introduces dependence between cell intensity and duration in order to capture the variability of rainfall at sub-hourly time scales. The disaggregation scheme is implemented in an R package, named HyetosMinute, to support disaggregation from daily down to 1-min time scale. The applicability of the methodology was assessed on a 5-min rainfall records collected in Bochum, Germany, comparing the performance of the above mentioned model variant against the original Bartlett-Lewis process (non-random with 5 parameters). The analysis shows that the disaggregation process reproduces adequately the most important statistical characteristics of rainfall at wide range of time scales, while the introduction of the model with dependent intensity-duration results in a better performance in terms of skewness, rainfall extremes and dry proportions.

  11. Connecting spatial and temporal scales of tropical precipitation in observations and the MetUM-GA6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gill M.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Moise, Aurel F.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses tropical rainfall variability (on a range of temporal and spatial scales) in a set of parallel Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) simulations at a range of horizontal resolutions, which are compared with two satellite-derived rainfall datasets. We focus on the shorter scales, i.e. from the native grid and time step of the model through sub-daily to seasonal, since previous studies have paid relatively little attention to sub-daily rainfall variability and how this feeds through to longer scales. We find that the behaviour of the deep convection parametrization in this model on the native grid and time step is largely independent of the grid-box size and time step length over which it operates. There is also little difference in the rainfall variability on larger/longer spatial/temporal scales. Tropical convection in the model on the native grid/time step is spatially and temporally intermittent, producing very large rainfall amounts interspersed with grid boxes/time steps of little or no rain. In contrast, switching off the deep convection parametrization, albeit at an unrealistic resolution for resolving tropical convection, results in very persistent (for limited periods), but very sporadic, rainfall. In both cases, spatial and temporal averaging smoothes out this intermittency. On the ˜ 100 km scale, for oceanic regions, the spectra of 3-hourly and daily mean rainfall in the configurations with parametrized convection agree fairly well with those from satellite-derived rainfall estimates, while at ˜ 10-day timescales the averages are overestimated, indicating a lack of intra-seasonal variability. Over tropical land the results are more varied, but the model often underestimates the daily mean rainfall (partly as a result of a poor diurnal cycle) but still lacks variability on intra-seasonal timescales. Ultimately, such work will shed light on how uncertainties in modelling small-/short-scale processes relate to uncertainty in climate change

  12. Using COSI-CORR to Quantify Earthflow Movement Rates Over Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerovski-Darriau, C.; Roering, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Large, complex earthflow systems can evolve over diverse (seasonal to millennial) timescales and thus require a range of tools to document their kinematics. In many areas, extensive archives of historical aerial photographs offer potential for quantifying decadal fluctuations, but tracking individual features has been impractical over significant temporal and spatial scales. Here, we explore recent software that automates landslide mapping and improves feasibility of tracking deformation at these scales. The Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) software allows for correlation between air photographs and LiDAR imagery, and tracks surface deformation over a sequence of aerial surveys. To analyze the efficacy for landslides, we focused on a 1km2 area riddled with active earthflows, shallow landslides, and gullying in the Waipaoa River catchment on the North Island of New Zealand. This area is dominated by Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary clay-rich mudstones and calcite-rich sandstones with highly sheared and more massive units that fail in diverse fashion. Starting in the 1900s, the area was burned and converted to pastureland, and is now heavily grazed by sheep and cattle. Slope deformation in the study area has accelerated due to this history of land use changes. We used aerial photographs from 1956, 1960, 1979, and 1982 to track slide movement. The photos were scanned at 1200 dpi (21 micron), giving a ground resolution between approximately 0.2-1m/pixel (scale of 1:16000 to 1:47000). We rectified the photos with 2010 orthophotos and a corresponding 1m LiDAR DEM and hillshade map using the COSI-Corr interface in ENVI 4.5. They were then sequentially correlated, which automatically identifies surface changes with sub-pixel resolution. Next we generated a vector field displacement map for each time step with 8m grid nodes. The resulting vector maps show velocities ranging from about 1-5m/yr. This corresponds well with previously

  13. Storm-time Large-Scale Birkeland Currents: Salient Dynamics in Grand Challenge Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of Birkeland currents on a 10 minute cadence. During geomagnetic storms, currents intensify to over 15 MA, are dynamic both in intensity and distribution, and exhibit features not discernible in statistical analyses. For all of the subject grand challenge storms, AMPERE data reveal a number of novel phenomena illustrating the profound dynamics of the storm-time system. Storm-time onsets associated with shock arrivals are often very prompt and lead to dramatic surges in total current from 1 MA to over 5 MA in less than 20 minutes. The current surges occur predominantly on the dayside at high latitudes prior to any ring current or auroral expansions, indicating that neutral density upwelling is often driven independently of ring current or auroral zone intensifications. Rapid reconfigurations of the currents with IMF BY reversals within the sheath structures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are also common. This implies that convection of ionospheric density patches over the polar cap may be quite complex, particularly during the early phase of geomagnetic storms related to the CME sheath passage. The 3 September 2012 storm exhibited intense driving with classic quasi-stable Region 1 and 2 currents spanning 55 to 70 degrees magnetic latitude for over 10 hours at the beginning of the day, corresponding to stable southward IMF prior to shock arrival at noon on that day. The shock arrival and IMF southward intensification led to further expansion of the currents below 50 degrees magnetic latitude and to episodic surges in currents on the nightside, which is unique to storms. The resulting current structure showed multiple large-scale alternations in downward-upward-downward-upward direction that often occurs during intense, sustained driving during strong storms.

  14. Photodissociation dynamics of nitromethane at 226 and 271 nm at both nanosecond and femtosecond time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y Q; Bhattacharya, A; Bernstein, E R

    2009-01-08

    Photodissociation of nitromethane has been investigated for decades both theoretically and experimentally; however, as a whole picture, the dissociation dynamics for nitromethane are still not clear, although many different mechanisms have been proposed. To make a complete interpretation of these different mechanisms, photolysis of nitromethane at 226 and 271 nm under both collisional and collisionless conditions is investigated at nanosecond and femtosecond time scales. These two laser wavelengths correspond to the pi* laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy; the CH(3)O product is only observed under collisional conditions. In femtosecond 226 nm experiments, CH(3), NO(2), and NO products are observed. These results confirm that rupture of C-N bond should be the main primary process for the photolysis of nitromethane after the pi* autocorrelation of the laser pulse, indicating the dissociation of nitromethane in the pi pi* excited state is faster than the laser pulse duration (180 fs). In nanosecond 271 nm (pi* laser experiments, the nitromethane parent ion is observed with major intensity, together with CH(3), NO(2), and NO fragment ions with only minor intensities. Pump-probe transients for both nitromethane parent and fragment ions at 271 nm excitation and 406.5 nm ionization display a fast exponential decay with a constant time of 36 fs, which we suggest to be the lifetime of the excited n pi* state of nitromethane. Combined with the 271 nm nanosecond pump-probe experiments, in which none of the CH(3), NO(2), CH(3)O, or OH fragment is observed, we suggest that all the fragment ions generated in 271 nm femtosecond laser experiments are derived from the parent ion, and dissociation of nitromethane from the n pi* excited electronic state does not occur in a supersonic molecular beam under collisionless conditions.

  15. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  16. Estimating the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baratti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original approach to infer the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale. Our purpose is to estimate the peak flow that is expected for an assigned return period T, independently of the season in which it occurs (i.e. annual flood frequency regime, as well as in different selected sub-yearly periods (i.e. seasonal flood frequency regime. While a huge literature exists on annual flood frequency analysis, few studies have focused on the estimation of seasonal flood frequencies despite the relevance of the issue, for instance when scheduling along the months of the year the construction phases of river engineering works directly interacting with the active river bed, like for instance dams. An approximate method for joint frequency analysis is presented here that guarantees consistency between fitted annual and seasonal distributions, i.e. the annual cumulative distribution is the product of the seasonal cumulative distribution functions, under the assumption of independence among floods in different seasons. In our method the parameters of the seasonal frequency distributions are fitted by maximising an objective function that accounts for the likelihoods of both seasonal and annual peaks. In contrast to previous studies, our procedure is conceived to allow the users to introduce subjective weights to the components of the objective function in order to emphasize the fitting of specific seasons or of the annual peak flow distribution. An application to the time series of the Blue Nile daily flows at the Sudan–Ethiopia border is presented.

  17. Origin of diverse time scales in the protein hydration layer solvation dynamics: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Saumyak; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-10-01

    In order to inquire the microscopic origin of observed multiple time scales in solvation dynamics, we carry out several computer experiments. We perform atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on three protein-water systems, namely, lysozyme, myoglobin, and sweet protein monellin. In these experiments, we mutate the charges of the neighbouring amino acid side chains of certain natural probes (tryptophan) and also freeze the side chain motions. In order to distinguish between different contributions, we decompose the total solvation energy response in terms of various components present in the system. This allows us to capture the interplay among different self- and cross-energy correlation terms. Freezing the protein motions removes the slowest component that results from side chain fluctuations, but a part of slowness remains. This leads to the conclusion that the slow component approximately in the 20-80 ps range arises from slow water molecules present in the hydration layer. While the more than 100 ps component has multiple origins, namely, adjacent charges in amino acid side chains, hydrogen bonded water molecules and a dynamically coupled motion between side chain and water. In addition, the charges enforce a structural ordering of nearby water molecules and helps to form a local long-lived hydrogen bonded network. Further separation of the spatial and temporal responses in solvation dynamics reveals different roles of hydration and bulk water. We find that the hydration layer water molecules are largely responsible for the slow component, whereas the initial ultrafast decay arises predominantly (approximately 80%) due to the bulk. This agrees with earlier theoretical observations. We also attempt to rationalise our results with the help of a molecular hydrodynamic theory that was developed using classical time dependent density functional theory in a semi-quantitative manner.

  18. From dinosaurs to modern bird diversity: extending the time scale of adaptive radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available What explains why some groups of organisms, like birds, are so species rich? And what explains their extraordinary ecological diversity, ranging from large, flightless birds to small migratory species that fly thousand of kilometers every year? These and similar questions have spurred great interest in adaptive radiation, the diversification of ecological traits in a rapidly speciating group of organisms. Although the initial formulation of modern concepts of adaptive radiation arose from consideration of the fossil record, rigorous attempts to identify adaptive radiation in the fossil record are still uncommon. Moreover, most studies of adaptive radiation concern groups that are less than 50 million years old. Thus, it is unclear how important adaptive radiation is over temporal scales that span much larger portions of the history of life. In this issue, Benson et al. test the idea of a "deep-time" adaptive radiation in dinosaurs, compiling and using one of the most comprehensive phylogenetic and body-size datasets for fossils. Using recent phylogenetic statistical methods, they find that in most clades of dinosaurs there is a strong signal of an "early burst" in body-size evolution, a predicted pattern of adaptive radiation in which rapid trait evolution happens early in a group's history and then slows down. They also find that body-size evolution did not slow down in the lineage leading to birds, hinting at why birds survived to the present day and diversified. This paper represents one of the most convincing attempts at understanding deep-time adaptive radiations.

  19. Climate change-driven cliff and beach evolution at decadal to centennial time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Li; O'Neill, Andrea; Barnard, Patrick; Vitousek, Sean; Limber, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Here we develop a computationally efficient method that evolves cross-shore profiles of sand beaches with or without cliffs along natural and urban coastal environments and across expansive geographic areas at decadal to centennial time-scales driven by 21st century climate change projections. The model requires projected sea level rise rates, extrema of nearshore wave conditions, bluff recession and shoreline change rates, and cross-shore profiles representing present-day conditions. The model is applied to the ~470-km long coast of the Southern California Bight, USA, using recently available projected nearshore waves and bluff recession and shoreline change rates. The results indicate that eroded cliff material, from unarmored cliffs, contribute 11% to 26% to the total sediment budget. Historical beach nourishment rates will need to increase by more than 30% for a 0.25 m sea level rise (~2044) and by at least 75% by the year 2100 for a 1 m sea level rise, if evolution of the shoreline is to keep pace with rising sea levels.

  20. Real-time device-scale imaging of conducting filament dynamics in resistive switching materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keundong; Tchoe, Youngbin; Yoon, Hosang; Baek, Hyeonjun; Chung, Kunook; Lee, Sangik; Yoon, Chansoo; Park, Bae Ho; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2016-06-01

    ReRAM is a compelling candidate for next-generation non-volatile memory owing to its various advantages. However, fluctuation of operation parameters are critical weakness occurring failures in ‘reading’ and ‘writing’ operations. To enhance the stability, it is important to understand the mechanism of the devices. Although numerous studies have been conducted using AFM or TEM, the understanding of the device operation is still limited due to the destructive nature and/or limited imaging range of the previous methods. Here, we propose a new hybrid device composed of ReRAM and LED enabling us to monitor the conducting filament (CF) configuration on the device scale during resistive switching. We directly observe the change in CF configuration across the whole device area through light emission from our hybrid device. In contrast to former studies, we found that minor CFs were formed earlier than major CF contributing to the resistive switching. Moreover, we investigated the substitution of a stressed major CF with a fresh minor CF when large fluctuation of operation voltage appeared after more than 50 times of resistive switching in atmospheric condition. Our results present an advancement in the understanding of ReRAM operation mechanism, and a step toward stabilizing the fluctuations in ReRAM switching parameters.

  1. Genome-Wide Motif Statistics are Shaped by DNA Binding Proteins over Evolutionary Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of a genome with respect to all possible short DNA motifs impacts the ability of DNA binding proteins to locate and bind their target sites. Since nonfunctional DNA binding can be detrimental to cellular functions and ultimately to organismal fitness, organisms could benefit from reducing the number of nonfunctional DNA binding sites genome wide. Using in vitro measurements of binding affinities for a large collection of DNA binding proteins, in multiple species, we detect a significant global avoidance of weak binding sites in genomes. We demonstrate that the underlying evolutionary process leaves a distinct genomic hallmark in that similar words have correlated frequencies, a signal that we detect in all species across domains of life. We consider the possibility that natural selection against weak binding sites contributes to this process, and using an evolutionary model we show that the strength of selection needed to maintain global word compositions is on the order of point mutation rates. Likewise, we show that evolutionary mechanisms based on interference of protein-DNA binding with replication and mutational repair processes could yield similar results and operate with similar rates. On the basis of these modeling and bioinformatic results, we conclude that genome-wide word compositions have been molded by DNA binding proteins acting through tiny evolutionary steps over time scales spanning millions of generations.

  2. Minimum spanning tree filtering of correlations for varying time scales and size of fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kwapien, Jaroslaw; Forczek, Marcin; Drozdz, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    Based on a recently proposed $q$-dependent detrended cross-correlation coefficient $\\rho_q$ (J.~Kwapie\\'n, P.~O\\'swi\\k{e}cimka, S.~Dro\\.zd\\.z, Phys. Rev.~E 92, 052815 (2015)), we introduce a family of $q$-dependent minimum spanning trees ($q$MST) that are selective to cross-correlations between different fluctuation amplitudes and different time scales of multivariate data. They inherit this ability directly from the coefficients $\\rho_q$ that are processed here to construct a distance matrix being the input to the MST-constructing Kruskal's algorithm. In order to illustrate their performance, we apply the $q$MSTs to sample empirical data from the American stock market and discuss the results. We show that the $q$MST graphs can complement $\\rho_q$ in detection of "hidden" correlations that cannot be observed by the MST graphs based on $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ and, therefore, they can be useful in many areas where the multivariate cross-correlations are of interest (e.g., in portfolio analysis).

  3. Characterization of discontinuities in the Stripa granite. Time-scale heater experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorpe, R.

    1979-07-01

    The report describes the methodology and results of a detailed study of geologic discontinuities associated with the time-scale heater test at the Stripa mine in Sweden. Mapping of the floor of the experiment tunnel coupled with observation of core samples from beneath the drift indicate that four N-striking shear fractures dip steeply through the 6 x 10 x 25-m rock mass. Oblique-thrust faulting has produced displacements of up to 2 m on one of the surfaces, and its inferred 3-D configuration is consistent with observed slickensiding. Resolution of locally measured principal stresses on the shear plane yields a theoretical shear direction that also coincides with the slickensiding. Four distinct joint sets exist locally, one of which coincides with the shear fractures. Another lies nearly horizontal, and two others are steeply inclined. Fracture length and spacing distributions for the four joint sets are shown to be lognormal. Two of the sets lie perpendicular to principal stress directions. The fact that one of these two joint sets apparently post-dates other fracturing and is normal to the minimum principal stress suggests that it is due to isostatic rebound.

  4. Field Experience with and Potential for Multi-time Scale Grid Transactions from Responsive Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-08-01

    The need for and concepts behind demand response are evolving. As the electric system changes with more intermittent renewable electric supply systems, there is a need to allow buildings to provide more flexible demand. This paper presents results from field studies and pilots, as well as engineering estimates of the potential capabilities of fast load responsiveness in commercial buildings. We present a sector wide analysis of flexible loads in commercial buildings, which was conducted to improve resource planning and determine which loads to evaluate in future demonstrations. These systems provide important capabilities for future transactional systems. The field analysis is based on results from California, plus projects in the northwest and east coast. End-uses considered include heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. The timescales of control include day-ahead, as well as day-of, 10-minute ahead and even faster response. This technology can provide DR signals on different times scales to interact with responsive building loads. We describe the latency of the control systems in the building and the round trip communications with the wholesale grid operators.

  5. Robust Stability of Scaled-Four-Channel Teleoperation with Internet Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Delgado

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe the application of a generic stability framework for a teleoperation system under time-varying delay conditions, as addressed in a previous work, to a scaled-four-channel (γ-4C control scheme. Described is how varying delays are dealt with by means of dynamic encapsulation, giving rise to mu-test conditions for robust stability and offering an appealing frequency technique to deal with the stability robustness of the architecture. We discuss ideal transparency problems and we adapt classical solutions so that controllers are proper, without single or double differentiators, and thus avoid the negative effects of noise. The control scheme was fine-tuned and tested for complete stability to zero of the whole state, while seeking a practical solution to the trade-off between stability and transparency in the Internet-based teleoperation. These ideas were tested on an Internet-based application with two Omni devices at remote laboratory locations via simulations and real remote experiments that achieved robust stability, while performing well in terms of position synchronization and force transparency.

  6. Rats Synchronize Locomotion with Ultrasonic Vocalizations at the Subsecond Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplagne, Diego A.; Elías Costa, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signals have the potential for transmitting information fast across distances. Rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations of two distinct classes: “22-kHz” or “alarm” calls and “50-kHz” calls. The latter comprises brief sounds in the 30–80-kHz range, whose ethological role is not fully understood. We recorded ultrasonic vocalizations from pairs of rats freely behaving in neighboring but separated arenas. 50-kHz vocalizations in this condition were tightly linked to the locomotion of the emitter at the subsecond time scale, their rate sharply increasing and decreasing prior to the onset and offset of movement respectively. This locomotion-linked vocalization behavior showed a clear “audience effect,” as rats recorded alone displayed lower vocal production than rats in social settings for equivalent speeds of locomotion. Furthermore, calls from different categories across the 50 and 22-kHz families displayed markedly different correlations with locomotor activity. Our results show that rat vocalizations in the high ultrasonic range are social signals carrying spatial information about the emitter and highlight the possibility that they may play a role in the social coordination of spatial behaviors. PMID:27746726

  7. Spatial, temporal, and hybrid decompositions for large-scale vehicle routing with time windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the use of decomposition techniques to quickly find high-quality solutions to large-scale vehicle routing problems with time windows. It considers an adaptive decomposition scheme which iteratively decouples a routing problem based on the current solution. Earlier work considered vehicle-based decompositions that partitions the vehicles across the subproblems. The subproblems can then be optimized independently and merged easily. This paper argues that vehicle-based decompositions, although very effective on various problem classes also have limitations. In particular, they do not accommodate temporal decompositions and may produce spatial decompositions that are not focused enough. This paper then proposes customer-based decompositions which generalize vehicle-based decouplings and allows for focused spatial and temporal decompositions. Experimental results on class R2 of the extended Solomon benchmarks demonstrates the benefits of the customer-based adaptive decomposition scheme and its spatial, temporal, and hybrid instantiations. In particular, they show that customer-based decompositions bring significant benefits over large neighborhood search in contrast to vehicle-based decompositions.

  8. A SKOS-based multilingual thesaurus of geological time scale for interoperability of online geological maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaogang; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Wu, Chonglong; van der Meer, Freek D.; Liu, Gang

    2011-10-01

    The usefulness of online geological maps is hindered by linguistic barriers. Multilingual geoscience thesauri alleviate linguistic barriers of geological maps. However, the benefits of multilingual geoscience thesauri for online geological maps are less studied. In this regard, we developed a multilingual thesaurus of geological time scale (GTS) to alleviate linguistic barriers of GTS records among online geological maps. We extended the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) model to represent the ordinal hierarchical structure of GTS terms. We collected GTS terms in seven languages and encoded them into a thesaurus by using the extended SKOS model. We implemented methods of characteristic-oriented term retrieval in JavaScript programs for accessing Web Map Services (WMS), recognizing GTS terms, and making translations. With the developed thesaurus and programs, we set up a pilot system to test recognitions and translations of GTS terms in online geological maps. Results of this pilot system proved the accuracy of the developed thesaurus and the functionality of the developed programs. Therefore, with proper deployments, SKOS-based multilingual geoscience thesauri can be functional for alleviating linguistic barriers among online geological maps and, thus, improving their interoperability.

  9. Organic carbon in topsoil - first time fully harmonised at a European scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Vibeke; Baritz, Reiner; Reiman, Clemens; Gemas Project Team

    2013-04-01

    The organic fraction of soils often accounts for an only small but variable proportion of the total soil mass. Nevertheless the organic fraction profoundly influences e.g., soil properties, ecosystem functioning, and the magnitude of various ecosystem processes. In the cooperative project of Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and grazing land Soil (GEMAS) a total of 2018 samples of agricultural (ploughed land, 0-20 cm) and 2023 samples of grazing land (0-10 cm) soil were collected at a density of 1 site per 2500 km2 each from 33 European countries, covering an area of 5,600,000 km2. All soil samples were sampled following a jointly agreed field protocol. The contents of TOC show large local differences with the highest concentrations of TOC in Finland, Ireland and Norway but also in other countries like e.g., Sweden, United Kingdom, and Germany distinctively high concentrations were measured. The distribution of TOC can be related to other measured soil properties like CEC, pH (CaCl2) and e.g., 52 chemical elements following an agua regia extraction. The GEMAS project has provided for the first time a fully harmonised data on TOC (and many other parameters) at a European scale.

  10. Visual assessment of breast density using Visual Analogue Scales: observer variability, reader attributes and reading time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Teri; Harkness, Elaine F.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Lim, Yit Y.; Emsley, Richard; Howell, Anthony; Evans, D. Gareth; Astley, Susan; Gadde, Soujanya

    2017-03-01

    Breast density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer and has potential use in breast cancer risk prediction, with subjective methods of density assessment providing a strong relationship with the development of breast cancer. This study aims to assess intra- and inter-observer variability in visual density assessment recorded on Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) among trained readers, and examine whether reader age, gender and experience are associated with assessed density. Eleven readers estimated the breast density of 120 mammograms on two occasions 3 years apart using VAS. Intra- and inter-observer agreement was assessed with Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and variation between readers visualised on Bland-Altman plots. The mean scores of all mammograms per reader were used to analyse the effect of reader attributes on assessed density. Excellent intra-observer agreement (ICC>0.80) was found in the majority of the readers. All but one reader had a mean difference of gender, or with reading time. Overall, the readers were consistent in their scores, although some large variations were observed. Reader evaluation and targeted training may alleviate this problem.

  11. A linear framework for time-scale separation in nonlinear biochemical systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Gunawardena

    Full Text Available Cellular physiology is implemented by formidably complex biochemical systems with highly nonlinear dynamics, presenting a challenge for both experiment and theory. Time-scale separation has been one of the few theoretical methods for distilling general principles from such complexity. It has provided essential insights in areas such as enzyme kinetics, allosteric enzymes, G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, gene regulation and post-translational modification. In each case, internal molecular complexity has been eliminated, leading to rational algebraic expressions among the remaining components. This has yielded familiar formulas such as those of Michaelis-Menten in enzyme kinetics, Monod-Wyman-Changeux in allostery and Ackers-Johnson-Shea in gene regulation. Here we show that these calculations are all instances of a single graph-theoretic framework. Despite the biochemical nonlinearity to which it is applied, this framework is entirely linear, yet requires no approximation. We show that elimination of internal complexity is feasible when the relevant graph is strongly connected. The framework provides a new methodology with the potential to subdue combinatorial explosion at the molecular level.

  12. Scale Development for Measuring and Predicting Adolescents’ Leisure Time Physical Activity Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Francis; Romero Granados, Santiago; Arribas Galarraga, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a scale for assessing and predicting adolescents’ physical activity behavior in Spain and Luxembourg using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a framework. The sample was comprised of 613 Spanish (boys = 309, girls = 304; M age =15.28, SD =1.127) and 752 Luxembourgish adolescents (boys = 343, girls = 409; M age = 14.92, SD = 1.198), selected from students of two secondary schools in both countries, with a similar socio-economic status. The initial 43-items were all scored on a 4-point response format using the structured alternative format and translated into Spanish, French and German. In order to ensure the accuracy of the translation, standardized parallel back-translation techniques were employed. Following two pilot tests and subsequent revisions, a second order exploratory factor analysis with oblimin direct rotation was used for factor extraction. Internal consistency and test-retest reliabilities were also tested. The 4-week test-retest correlations confirmed the items’ time stability. The same five factors were obtained, explaining 63.76% and 63.64% of the total variance in both samples. Internal consistency for the five factors ranged from α = 0.759 to α = 0. 949 in the Spanish sample and from α = 0.735 to α = 0.952 in the Luxembourgish sample. For both samples, inter-factor correlations were all reported significant and positive, except for Factor 5 where they were significant but negative. The high internal consistency of the subscales, the reported item test-retest reliabilities and the identical factor structure confirm the adequacy of the elaborated questionnaire for assessing the TPB-based constructs when used with a population of adolescents in Spain and Luxembourg. The results give some indication that they may have value in measuring the hypothesized TPB constructs for PA behavior in a cross-cultural context. Key points When using the structured alternative format, weak internal consistency was obtained

  13. Late Miocene climate and orbital time scale reconciliation from a deep-sea perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Anna Joy; Westerhold, Thomas; Frederichs, Thomas; Tian, Jun; Wilkens, Roy; Channell, James E. T.; Evans, Helen; John, Cédric M.; Lyle, Mitch; Röhl, Ursula

    2017-04-01

    The late Tortonian to early Messinian (8-6 Ma) is characterised by a long-term reduction in benthic foraminiferal δ18O, with distinctive short-term δ18O cycles superimposed. Coevally, a permanent -1‰ change in oceanic δ13CDIC, the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (LMCIS), marks the last major permanent shift in the carbon cycle expressed in all oceanic basins, after which near-modern δ13C gradients are established around 6.7 Ma. Accurate age control is crucial to ascertain the origin of the δ18O cyclicity and the LMCIS, as constraining the precise timing of such events can allow temporal and causal relationships to be established between the deep-sea, terrestrial and cryosphere records. Here, we present the first independent high-resolution chemo-, magneto-, and cyclostratigraphy for the interval between 8.3-6.0 Ma from a single deep-sea site. Generated at equatorial Pacific Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1337, our integrated astronomically tuned benthic stable isotope stratigraphy (1.5 kyr resolution) and magnetostratigraphy is suitable to test the current Tortonian-Messinian Geological Time Scale (GTS2012), currently based on astronomically calibrated Mediterranean sections. Between 7.7-6.9 Ma, the new benthic δ18O and δ13C data from IODP U1337 show distinctive obliquity-driven saw-tooth patterns suggesting that high-latitude forcing dominated late Miocene climate dynamics. For the first time, the LMCIS is astronomically calibrated and anchored to the GPTS between Chrons C4n.1n and C3An.2n. Anchoring the LMCIS facilitates comparison with terrestrial records of the C3/C4 vegetation shift, which has been linked to the LMCIS. The astronomically calibrated Site U1337 magnetostratigraphy additionally provides robust ages for polarity Chrons C3An.1n to C4r.1r, with ages changing by 2-50 kyr relative to the GTS2012. The new integrated deep-sea stratigraphy from Site U1337 has potential as a new stable isotope and magnetic polarity reference

  14. Effects of TimeSlips on Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia scores of senile dementia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ying Chen

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: TimeSlips is beneficial to relieve depressive symptoms and ameliorate the emotions of mild or moderate senile dementia patients, thus improving their life quality and reducing the burden of their caregivers. A large-scale experimental research on TimeSlips with rigorous design is proposed for further studies.

  15. Glottal closure instant and voice source analysis using time-scale ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of psychological scale, such as third-octave, Bark, Mel or Equivalent Rectangular Bandwidth. (ERB) scales. The filtering ... The top panel displays only positive part of the filter outputs. 'We hear' spoken by female .... This shows that lines of positive amplitudes are converging to the peak position. The lines cor- responding to ...

  16. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylaska, Eric J., E-mail: Eric.Bylaska@pnnl.gov [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Weare, Jonathan Q., E-mail: weare@uchicago.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Weare, John H., E-mail: jweare@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time t{sub i} (trajectory positions and velocities x{sub i} = (r{sub i}, v{sub i})) to time t{sub i+1} (x{sub i+1}) by x{sub i+1} = f{sub i}(x{sub i}), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t{sub 0}…t{sub M} can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [x{sub i} − f(x{sub (i−1})]{sub i} {sub =1,M} = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H{sub 2}O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup ((serial execution time)/(parallel execution time) ) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up

  17. SCALE DEVELOPMENT FOR MEASURING AND PREDICTING ADOLESCENTS' LEISURE TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arribas Galarraga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a scale for assessing and predicting adolescents' physical activity behavior in Spain and Luxembourg using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a framework. The sample was comprised of 613 Spanish (boys = 309, girls = 304; M age =15.28, SD =1.127 and 752 Luxembourgish adolescents (boys = 343, girls = 409; M age = 14.92, SD = 1.198, selected from students of two secondary schools in both countries, with a similar socio-economic status. The initial 43-items were all scored on a 4-point response format using the structured alternative format and translated into Spanish, French and German. In order to ensure the accuracy of the translation, standardized parallel back-translation techniques were employed. Following two pilot tests and subsequent revisions, a second order exploratory factor analysis with oblimin direct rotation was used for factor extraction. Internal consistency and test-retest reliabilities were also tested. The 4-week test-retest correlations confirmed the items' time stability. The same five factors were obtained, explaining 63.76% and 63.64% of the total variance in both samples. Internal consistency for the five factors ranged from α = 0.759 to α = 0. 949 in the Spanish sample and from α = 0.735 to α = 0.952 in the Luxembourgish sample. For both samples, inter-factor correlations were all reported significant and positive, except for Factor 5 where they were significant but negative. The high internal consistency of the subscales, the reported item test-retest reliabilities and the identical factor structure confirm the adequacy of the elaborated questionnaire for assessing the TPB-based constructs when used with a population of adolescents in Spain and Luxembourg. The results give some indication that they may have value in measuring the hypothesized TPB constructs for PA behavior in a cross-cultural context

  18. Teleconnections, Midlatitude Cyclones and Aegean Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Variability on Daily Through Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanski, Joy; Romanou, Anastasia; Bauer, Michael; Tselioudis, George

    2013-01-01

    We analyze daily wintertime cyclone variability in the central and eastern Mediterranean during 1958-2001, and identify four distinct cyclone states, corresponding to the presence or absence of cyclones in each basin. Each cyclone state is associated with wind flows that induce characteristic patterns of cooling via turbulent (sensible and latent) heat fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean basin and Aegean Sea. The relative frequency of occurrence of each state determines the heat loss from the Aegean Sea during that winter, with largest heat losses occurring when there is a storm in the eastern but not central Mediterranean (eNOTc), and the smallest occurring when there is a storm in the central but not eastern Mediterranean (cNOTe). Time series of daily cyclone states for each winter allow us to infer Aegean Sea cooling for winters prior to 1985, the earliest year for which we have daily heat flux observations. We show that cyclone states conducive to Aegean Sea convection occurred in 1991/1992 and 1992/1993, the winters during which deep water formation was observed in the Aegean Sea, and also during the mid-1970s and the winters of 1963/1964 and 1968/1969. We find that the eNOTc cyclone state is anticorrelated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) prior to 1977/1978. After 1977/1978, the cNOTe state is anticorrelated with both the NAO and the North Caspian Pattern (NCP), showing that the area of influence of large scale atmospheric teleconnections on regional cyclone activity shifted from the eastern to the central Mediterranean during the late 1970s. A trend toward more frequent occurrence of the positive phase of the NAO produced less frequent cNOTe states since the late 1970s, increasing the number of days with strong cooling of the Aegean Sea surface waters.

  19. A search for long-time-scale, low-frequency radio transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Tara; Kaplan, David L.; Croft, Steve; Lynch, Christene; Callingham, J. R.; Bannister, Keith; Bell, Martin E.; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Hancock, Paul; Line, Jack; Rowlinson, Antonia; Lenc, Emil; Intema, H. T.; Jagannathan, P.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Tingay, Steven; Yuan, Fang; Wolf, Christian; Onken, Christopher A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-04-01

    We present a search for transient and highly variable sources at low radio frequencies (150-200 MHz) that explores long time-scales of 1-3 yr. We conducted this search by comparing the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey Alternative Data Release 1 (TGSS ADR1) and the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey catalogues. To account for the different completeness thresholds in the individual surveys, we searched for compact GLEAM sources above a flux density limit of 100 mJy that were not present in the TGSS ADR1; and also for compact TGSS ADR1 sources above a flux density limit of 200 mJy that had no counterpart in GLEAM. From a total sample of 234 333 GLEAM sources and 275 612 TGSS ADR1 sources in the overlap region between the two surveys, there were 99 658 GLEAM sources and 38 978 TGSS ADR sources that passed our flux density cut-off and compactness criteria. Analysis of these sources resulted in three candidate transient sources. Further analysis ruled out two candidates as imaging artefacts. We analyse the third candidate and show it is likely to be real, with a flux density of 182 ± 26 mJy at 147.5 MHz. This gives a transient surface density of ρ = (6.2 ± 6) × 10-5 deg-2. We present initial follow-up observations and discuss possible causes for this candidate. The small number of spurious sources from this search demonstrates the high reliability of these two new low-frequency radio catalogues.

  20. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f , (e.g. Verlet algorithm) is available to propagate the system from time ti (trajectory positions and velocities xi = (ri; vi)) to time ti+1 (xi+1) by xi+1 = fi(xi), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t0 : : : tM can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [xi - f (x(i-1)]i=1;M = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of optimization techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton optimization schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem are tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl+4H2O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow TCP/IP networks. Scripts

  1. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in relation to climate: a cross-biome analysis across multiple time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Montagnani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE varies at time scales from seconds to years and longer via the response of its components, gross ecosystem productivity (GEP and ecosystem respiration (RE, to physical and biological drivers. Quantifying the relationship between flux and climate at multiple time scales is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the role of climate in the terrestrial carbon cycle. Orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT can quantify the strength of the interactions between gappy eddy covariance flux and micrometeorological measurements at multiple frequencies while expressing time series variance in few energetic wavelet coefficients, offering a low-dimensional view of the response of terrestrial carbon flux to climatic variability. The variability of NEE, GEP and RE, and their co-variability with dominant climatic drivers, are explored with nearly one thousand site-years of data from the FLUXNET global dataset consisting of 253 eddy covariance research sites. The NEE and GEP wavelet spectra were similar among plant functional types (PFT at weekly and shorter time scales, but significant divergence appeared among PFT at the biweekly and longer time scales, at which NEE and GEP were relatively less variable than climate. The RE spectra rarely differed among PFT across time scales as expected. On average, RE spectra had greater low frequency (monthly to interannual variability than NEE, GEP and climate. CANOAK ecosystem model simulations demonstrate that "multi-annual" spectral peaks in flux may emerge at low (4+ years time scales. Biological responses to climate and other internal system dynamics, rather than direct ecosystem response to climate, provide the likely explanation for observed multi-annual variability, but data records must be lengthened and measurements of ecosystem state must be made, and made available, to disentangle the mechanisms responsible for low frequency patterns in ecosystem CO2 exchange.

  2. Scaling in Free-Swimming Fish and Implications for Measuring Size-at-Time in the Wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broell, Franziska; Taggart, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    This study was motivated by the need to measure size-at-age, and thus growth rate, in fish in the wild. We postulated that this could be achieved using accelerometer tags based first on early isometric scaling models that hypothesize that similar animals should move at the same speed with a stroke frequency that scales with length-1, and second on observations that the speed of primarily air-breathing free-swimming animals, presumably swimming ‘efficiently’, is independent of size, confirming that stroke frequency scales as length-1. However, such scaling relations between size and swimming parameters for fish remain mostly theoretical. Based on free-swimming saithe and sturgeon tagged with accelerometers, we introduce a species-specific scaling relationship between dominant tail beat frequency (TBF) and fork length. Dominant TBF was proportional to length-1 (r2 = 0.73, n = 40), and estimated swimming speed within species was independent of length. Similar scaling relations accrued in relation to body mass-0.29. We demonstrate that the dominant TBF can be used to estimate size-at-time and that accelerometer tags with onboard processing may be able to provide size-at-time estimates among free-swimming fish and thus the estimation of growth rate (change in size-at-time) in the wild. PMID:26673777

  3. Multi-time-scale hydroclimate dynamics of a regional watershed and links to large-scale atmospheric circulation: Application to the Seine river catchment, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massei, N.; Dieppois, B.; Hannah, D. M.; Lavers, D. A.; Fossa, M.; Laignel, B.; Debret, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the present context of global changes, considerable efforts have been deployed by the hydrological scientific community to improve our understanding of the impacts of climate fluctuations on water resources. Both observational and modeling studies have been extensively employed to characterize hydrological changes and trends, assess the impact of climate variability or provide future scenarios of water resources. In the aim of a better understanding of hydrological changes, it is of crucial importance to determine how and to what extent trends and long-term oscillations detectable in hydrological variables are linked to global climate oscillations. In this work, we develop an approach associating correlation between large and local scales, empirical statistical downscaling and wavelet multiresolution decomposition of monthly precipitation and streamflow over the Seine river watershed, and the North Atlantic sea level pressure (SLP) in order to gain additional insights on the atmospheric patterns associated with the regional hydrology. We hypothesized that: (i) atmospheric patterns may change according to the different temporal wavelengths defining the variability of the signals; and (ii) definition of those hydrological/circulation relationships for each temporal wavelength may improve the determination of large-scale predictors of local variations. The results showed that the links between large and local scales were not necessarily constant according to time-scale (i.e. for the different frequencies characterizing the signals), resulting in changing spatial patterns across scales. This was then taken into account by developing an empirical statistical downscaling (ESD) modeling approach, which integrated discrete wavelet multiresolution analysis for reconstructing monthly regional hydrometeorological processes (predictand: precipitation and streamflow on the Seine river catchment) based on a large-scale predictor (SLP over the Euro-Atlantic sector). This

  4. Scale appropriate modelling to represent dominant pollution processes in agricultural catchments, to underpin management and policy decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Russell; Quinn, Paul

    2014-05-01

    We present the development of scale appropriate modelling techniques to represent dominant pollution processes in agricultural catchments to underpin catchment management and its implications on policy. A quasi-physically based, spatially lumped macro-model (CRAFT), has been developed to assess mitigation options for nitrogen and phosphorus. CRAFT has been developed to use daily time series data of rainfall, stream flow and nutrient concentration data, and can be applied to catchments varying in size from a few hectares to 100s of square kilometres. If stream flow routing is added to the model then potentially larger catchments and sub-daily time steps could be represented. There are two key issues addressed here. Firstly, the model can be used to assess the usefulness of monitoring data collected at a high temporal resolution at considerable expense compared to routine grab sampling. An earlier study in the Frome catchment in southern England collected sub-daily water quality data for more than 12 months at the catchment outlet, comprising: total oxidised nitrogen (TON); soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations. The three data sets have quite different temporal signals relating to flow pathways with different residence times and the importance of runoff events in generating acute pollution. The flexible model structure was therefore developed to include different sources of runoff including overland flow from impervious areas in the catchment, where pollution hotspots will be located (e.g. farmyards). The model has been used to assess the value of collecting high resolution monitoring data, in this case by resampling the Frome sub-daily data to a daily timestep, and comparing these model simulations against those calibrated using all the samples. The usefulness of the high resolution data can be assessed on whether a daily model would undepredict (for example) high nutrient concentrations that can be identified in the sub-daily

  5. Positive Solution to a Singular p-Laplacian BVP with Sign-Changing Nonlinearity Involving Derivative on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can-Yun Huang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Let T be a time scale such that 0,T∈T. By using a monotone iterative method, we present some existence criteria for positive solution of a multiple point general Dirichlet-Robin BVP on time scales with the singular sign-changing nonlinearity. These results are even new for the corresponding differential (T=ℝ and difference equation (T=ℤ as well as in general time scales setting. As an application, an example is given to illustrate the results. The interesting point here is that the sign-changing nonlinear term is involved with the first-order derivative explicitly, and the singularity may occur at u=0, t=0, and t=T.

  6. Quality of mixing in a stired bioreactor used for animal cells culture: heterogeneities in a lab scale bioreactor and evolution of mixing time with scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collignon, ML.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal cells are industrially cultivated inside stirred bioreactors to produce proteinic compounds. Due to the use of mild agitation conditions in order to limit mechanical constraints, the homogeneity of the culture medium can be far from perfect. This study has therefore two objectives: the global characterization of the mixing via the mixing time and the local description of concentration fields. The mixing time is measured by conductimetry inside 20 l, 80 l, 600 l tanks. The Grenville correlation is adjusted on these experimental measurements to improve the prediction of the mixing time during the scale-up of the process. The concentration fields are visualized by the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (P.L.I.F. technique in the 20 l tank. This part of the study is focused on the time evolution of the maximum value of the tracer concentration inside measurement planes and of the numerical distribution of theses concentration fields.

  7. Multi-scale variability and long-range memory in indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios; Barbosa, Susana

    2014-05-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in the variations of indoor Radon concentrations has recently attracted considerable interest. As a radioactive gas naturally emitted from the ground in certain geological settings, understanding environmental factors controlling Radon concentrations and their dynamics is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we re-analyze two high-resolution records of indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several months of continuous measurements. In order to evaluate the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling, we utilize a multiplicity of complementary methods, including power spectral analysis, ARFIMA modeling, classical and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis, and two different estimators of the signals' fractal dimensions. Power spectra and fluctuation functions reveal some complex behavior with qualitatively different properties on different time-scales: white noise in the high-frequency part, indications of some long-range correlated process dominating time scales of several hours to days, and pronounced low-frequency variability associated with tidal and/or meteorological forcing. In order to further decompose these different scales of variability, we apply two different approaches. On the one hand, applying multi-resolution analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform allows separately studying contributions on different time scales and characterize their specific correlation and scaling properties. On the other hand, singular system analysis (SSA) provides a reconstruction of the essential modes of variability. Specifically, by considering only the first leading SSA modes, we achieve an efficient de-noising of our environmental signals, highlighting the low-frequency variations together with some distinct scaling on sub-daily time-scales resembling

  8. Delta-Nabla Type Maximum Principles for Second-Order Dynamic Equations on Time Scales and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some delta-nabla type maximum principles for second-order dynamic equations on time scales are proved. By using these maximum principles, the uniqueness theorems of the solutions, the approximation theorems of the solutions, the existence theorem, and construction techniques of the lower and upper solutions for second-order linear and nonlinear initial value problems and boundary value problems on time scales are proved, the oscillation of second-order mixed delat-nabla differential equations is discussed and, some maximum principles for second order mixed forward and backward difference dynamic system are proved.

  9. Positive solutions to a generalized second-order three-point boundary-value problem on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Luo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Let $mathbb{T}$ be a time scale with $0,T in mathbb{T}$. We investigate the existence and multiplicity of positive solutions to the nonlinear second-order three-point boundary-value problem $$displaylines{ u^{Delta abla}(t+a(tf(u(t=0,quad tin[0, T]subset mathbb{T},cr u(0=eta u(eta,quad u(T=alpha u(eta }$$ on time scales $mathbb{T}$, where 0, 0less than $alpha$ less than $frac{T}{eta}$, 0 less than $eta$ less than $frac{T-alphaeta}{T-eta}$ are given constants.

  10. Plutonium in wildlife and soils at the Maralinga legacy site: persistence over decadal time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, M P; Child, D P; Davis, E; Doering, C; Harrison, J J; Hotchkis, M A C; Payne, T E; Thiruvoth, S; Twining, J R; Wood, M D

    2014-05-01

    The mobility of plutonium (Pu) in soils, and its uptake into a range of wildlife, were examined using recent and ∼25 year old data from the Taranaki area of the former Maralinga weapons test site, Australia. Since its initial deposition in the early 1960s, the dispersed Pu has been incorporated into the soil profile and food chain through natural processes, allowing for the study of Pu sequestration and dynamics in relatively undisturbed semi-arid conditions. The data indicate downward mobility of Pu in soil at rates of ∼0.2-0.3 cm per year for the most mobile fraction. As a result, while all of the Pu was initially deposited on the ground surface, approximately 93% and 62% remained in the top 0-2 cm depth after 25- and 50-years respectively. No large-scale lateral spreading of the Taranaki plume was observed. Pu activity concentrations in 0-1 cm soils with biotic crusts were not elevated when compared with nearby bare soils, although a small number of individual data suggest retention of Pu-containing particles may be occurring in some biotic crusts. Soil-to-animal transfer, as measured by concentration ratios (CRwo-soil), was 4.1E-04 (Geometric Mean (GM)) in mammals, which aligns well with those from similar species and conditions (such as the Nevada Test Site, US), but are lower than the GM of the international mammal data reported in the Wildlife Transfer Database (WTD). These lower values are likely due to the presence of a low-soluble, particulate form of the Pu in Maralinga soils. Arthropod concentration ratios (3.1E-03 GM), were similar to those from Rocky Flats, US, while values for reptiles (2.0E-02 GM) were higher than the WTD GM value which was dominated by data from Chernobyl. Comparison of uptake data spanning approximately 30 years indicates no decrease over time for mammals, and a potential increase for reptiles. The results confirm the persistence of bioavailable Pu after more than 50 years since deposition, and also the presence of larger

  11. Late Miocene climate and time scale reconciliation: Accurate orbital calibration from a deep-sea perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Anna Joy; Westerhold, Thomas; Frederichs, Thomas; Tian, Jun; Wilkens, Roy; Channell, James E. T.; Evans, Helen; John, Cédric M.; Lyle, Mitch; Röhl, Ursula

    2017-10-01

    Accurate age control of the late Tortonian to early Messinian (8.3-6.0 Ma) is essential to ascertain the origin of benthic foraminiferal δ18O trends and the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (LMCIS), and to examine temporal relationships between the deep-sea, terrasphere and cryosphere. The current Tortonian-Messinian Geological Time Scale (GTS2012) is based on astronomically calibrated Mediterranean sections; however, no comparable non-Mediterranean stratigraphies exist for 8-6 Ma suitable for testing the GTS2012. Here, we present the first high-resolution, astronomically tuned benthic stable isotope stratigraphy (1.5 kyr resolution) and magnetostratigraphy from a single deep-sea location (IODP Site U1337, equatorial Pacific Ocean), which provides unprecedented insight into climate evolution from 8.3-6.0 Ma. The astronomically calibrated magnetostratigraphy provides robust ages, which differ by 2-50 kyr relative to the GTS2012 for polarity Chrons C3An.1n to C4r.1r, and eliminates the exceptionally high South Atlantic spreading rates based on the GTS2012 during Chron C3Bn. We show that the LMCIS was globally synchronous within 2 kyr, and provide astronomically calibrated ages anchored to the GPTS for its onset (7.537 Ma; 50% from base Chron C4n.1n) and termination (6.727 Ma; 11% from base Chron C3An.2n), confirming that the terrestrial C3:C4 shift could not have driven the LMCIS. The benthic records show that the transition into the 41-kyr world, when obliquity strongly influenced climate variability, already occurred at 7.7 Ma and further strengthened at 6.4 Ma. Previously unseen, distinctive, asymmetric saw-tooth patterns in benthic δ18O imply that high-latitude forcing played an important role in late Miocene climate dynamics from 7.7-6.9 Ma. This new integrated deep-sea stratigraphy from Site U1337 can act as a new stable isotope and magnetic polarity reference section for the 8.3-6.0 Ma interval.

  12. Minimum spanning tree filtering of correlations for varying time scales and size of fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświecimka, Paweł; Forczek, Marcin; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2017-05-01

    Based on a recently proposed q -dependent detrended cross-correlation coefficient, ρq [J. Kwapień, P. Oświęcimka, and S. Drożdż, Phys. Rev. E 92, 052815 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.052815], we generalize the concept of the minimum spanning tree (MST) by introducing a family of q -dependent minimum spanning trees (q MST s ) that are selective to cross-correlations between different fluctuation amplitudes and different time scales of multivariate data. They inherit this ability directly from the coefficients ρq, which are processed here to construct a distance matrix being the input to the MST-constructing Kruskal's algorithm. The conventional MST with detrending corresponds in this context to q =2 . In order to illustrate their performance, we apply the q MSTs to sample empirical data from the American stock market and discuss the results. We show that the q MST graphs can complement ρq in disentangling "hidden" correlations that cannot be observed in the MST graphs based on ρDCCA, and therefore, they can be useful in many areas where the multivariate cross-correlations are of interest. As an example, we apply this method to empirical data from the stock market and show that by constructing the q MSTs for a spectrum of q values we obtain more information about the correlation structure of the data than by using q =2 only. More specifically, we show that two sets of signals that differ from each other statistically can give comparable trees for q =2 , while only by using the trees for q ≠2 do we become able to distinguish between these sets. We also show that a family of q MSTs for a range of q expresses the diversity of correlations in a manner resembling the multifractal analysis, where one computes a spectrum of the generalized fractal dimensions, the generalized Hurst exponents, or the multifractal singularity spectra: the more diverse the correlations are, the more variable the tree topology is for different q 's. As regards the correlation structure

  13. The Rhine Delta - a record of sediment trapping over time scales from millennia to decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelkoop, Hans; Erkens, Gilles; van der Perk, Marcel

    2010-05-01

    At the land-ocean interface, large river deltas are major sinks of sediments and associated matter. Over the past decennia, many studies have been conducted on the palaeogeographic, historic and sub-recent overbank deposition on the Rhine floodplains. In this study these research results are synthesises with special focus on the amounts and changes of overbank fines trapped in the Rhine delta at different time scales in the past, present, and future. This contribution forms an update of the results presented at the EGU 2009 in session HS11.3 (Sediment response to catchment disturbances). Sediment trapping in the Rhine delta throughout the Holocene was quantified using a detailed database of the Holocene delta architecture. Additional historic data allowed the reconstruction of the development of the river floodplains during the period of direct human interference on the river. Using heavy metals as tracers, overbank deposition rates over the past century were determined. Measurements of overbank deposition and channel bed sediment transport in recent years, together with modelling studies of sediment transport and deposition have provided detailed insight in the present-day sediment deposition on the floodplains, as well as their controls. Estimated annual suspended sediment delivery rates were about 1.4 Mton (million tons) yr-1 between 6000-3000 yr BP and increased to about 2.1 Mton yr-1 between 3000-1000 yr BP. After embankment between 1100 and 1350 AD the amount of sediment trapped in the floodplains reduced to about 0.92 Mton yr-1. However, when accounting for sediment reworking, the actual sediment trapping of the embanked floodplains was about 1.6 Mton yr-1. Downstream of the lower Waal branch an inland delta developed that trapped another 0.4 Mton yr-1 of overbank fines. Since channel normalisation around 1850, the average deposition amounts on the embanked floodplains have been 1.15 Mton yr-1. Scenario studies show that the future sediment trapping in the

  14. Investigating catchment-scale hysteretic behaviour of nutrients at annual and individual storm time-resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Charlotte; Freer, Jim; Johnes, Penny; Collins, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires that all water bodies should be maintained at, or raised to, good ecological status, driven by improved integrated catchment management. Therefore, it is necessary to implement cost-effective mitigation strategies to reduce pollution from nutrients and improve overall water quality. If successful mitigation strategies are to be designed then it is imperative that catchment scale responses to environmental and anthropogenic changes are better understood. Against this background, this presentation investigates changes in hysteretic behaviours of nutrients in response to different environmental drivers using high resolution monitoring techniques. Observations of hysteretic behaviour can provide insights into the dominant flow pathways of pollutants. Therefore, monitoring changes in nutrient hysteresis can provide a useful tool for detecting regime differences or changes within and between catchments. In the UK, the Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) project has been set up to monitor evidence for improving water quality problems arising specifically from diffuse pollution from agriculture using targeted mitigation experiments and high resolution monitoring. This research platform provides an opportunity to compare storm-driven nutrient behaviour between catchments which have differing geologies, as well as how these behaviours evolve on a seasonal and annual basis. The monitoring to date has included a period of drought, directly followed by extreme wet conditions in the UK and therefore offers opportunities to assess the effect of differences in antecedent conditions on monitored nutrient response to rainfall events. The study compares the hysteretic behaviour of nutrients, including nitrogen and phosphorus species as well as sediment from a number of storm events of varying magnitudes throughout the 2011-2012 monitoring period in the Hampshire Avon catchment as part of the DTC programme. The investigation focuses

  15. Simulating Flash Floods at Hourly Time-Step Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Boithias

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flash floods are natural phenomena with environmental, social and economic impacts. To date, few numerical models are able to simulate hydrological processes at catchment scale at a reasonable time scale to describe flash events with accurate details. Considering a ~810 km2 Mediterranean river coastal basin (southwestern France as a study case, the objective of the present study was to assess the ability of the sub-daily module of the lumped Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT to simulate discharge (1 time-continuously, by testing two sub-basin delineation schemes, two catchment sizes, and two output time-steps; and (2 at flood time-scale, by comparing the performances of SWAT to the performances of the event-based fully distributed MARINE model when simulating flash flood events. We showed that there was no benefit of decreasing the size of the minimum drainage area (e.g., from ~15 km2 down to ~1 km2 when delineating sub-basins in SWAT. We also showed that both the MARINE and SWAT models were equally able to reproduce peak discharge, flood timing and volume, and that they were both limited by rainfall and soil data. Hence, the SWAT model appears to be a reliable modelling tool to predict discharge over long periods of time in large flash-flood-prone basins.

  16. FOREWORD: IV International Time-Scale Algorithms Symposium, BIPM, Sèvres, 18-19 March 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschiutta, Sigfrido

    2003-06-01

    Time-scale formation, along with atomic time/frequency standards and time comparison techniques, is one of the three basic ingredients of Time Metrology. Before summarizing this Symposium and the relevant outcomes, let me make a couple of very general remarks. Clocks and comparison methods have today reached a very high level of accuracy: the nanosecond level. Some applications in the real word are now challenging the capacity of the National Metrological Laboratories. It is therefore essential that the algorithms dealing with clocks and comparison techniques should be such as to make the most of existing technologies. The comfortable margin of accuracy we were used to, between Laboratories and the Field, is gone forever. While clock makers and time-comparison experts meet regularly (FCS, PTTI, EFTF, CPEM, URSI, UIT, etc), the somewhat secluded community of experts in time-scale formation lacks a similar point of contact, with the exception of the CCTF meeting. This venue must consequently be welcomed. Let me recall some highlights from this Symposium: there were about 60 attendees from 15 nations, plus international institutions, such as the host BIPM, and a supranational one, ESA. About 30 papers, prepared in some 20 laboratories, were received: among these papers, four tutorials were offered; descriptions of local time scales including the local algorithms were presented; four papers considered the algorithms applied to the results of time-comparison methods; and six papers covered the special requirements of some specialized time-scale 'users'. The four basic ingredients of time-scale formation: models, noise, filtering and steering, received attention and were also discussed, not just during the sessions. The most demanding applications for time scales now come from Global Navigation Satellite systems; in six papers the progress of some programmes was described and the present and future needs were presented and documented. The lively discussion on future

  17. Scalings for unsteady natural convection boundary layers on an evenly heated plate with time-dependent heating flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    It is of fundamental significance, especially with regard to application, to fully understand the flow behavior of unsteady natural convection boundary layers on a vertical plate heated by a time-dependent heat flux. Such an understanding is currently scarce. In this paper, the scaling analysis by Lin et al. [Phys. Rev. E 79, 066313 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.066313] using a simple three-region structure for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with Pr >1 under isothermal heating was substantially extended for the case when the heating is due to a time-varying sinusoidal heat flux. A series of scalings was developed for the thermal boundary thickness, the plate temperature, the viscous boundary thicknesses, and the maximum vertical velocity within the boundary layer, which are the major parameters representing the flow behavior, in terms of the governing parameters of the flow, i.e., the Rayleigh number Ra, the Prandtl number Pr, and the dimensionless natural frequency fn of the time-varying sinusoidal heat flux, at the start-up stage, at the transition time scale which represents the ending of the start-up stage and the beginning of the transitional stage of the boundary-layer development, and at the quasi-steady stage. These scalings were validated by comparison to 10 full numerical solutions of the governing equations with Ra, Pr, and fn in the ranges 106≤Ra≤109, 3≤Pr≤100, and 0.01≤fn≤0.1 and were shown in general to provide an accurate description of the flow at different development stages, except for high-Pr runs in which a further, although weak, Pr dependence is present, which cannot be accurately predicted by the current scaling analysis using the simple three-region structure, attributed to the non-boundary-layer nature of the velocity field with high-Pr fluids. Some scalings at the transition time scale and at the quasi-steady stage also produce noticeable deviations from the numerical results when

  18. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  19. Back to the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale: Time to Reconsider?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Rappange (David); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); N.J.A. van Exel (Job)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT: The Consideration of Future Consequences (CFC) Scale is a measure of the extent to which individuals consider and are influenced by the distant outcomes of current behavior. In this study, the authors conducted factor analysis to investigate the factor structure of the 12-item

  20. Data scaling and temperature calibration in time-resolved photocrystallographic experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Kaminski, Radoslaw; Benedict, Jason B.

    2010-01-01

    -steady-state experiments conducted at conventional sources, but not negligible in synchrotron studies in which very short laser exposures may be adequate. The relative scaling of the light-ON and light-OFF data and the correction for temperature differences between the two sets are discussed....

  1. A reference time scale for Site U1385 (Shackleton Site) on the SW Iberian Margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodell, D.; Lourens, L.; Crowhurst, S.; Konijnendijk, T.; Tjallingii, R.; Jiménez-Espejo, F.; Skinner, L.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Abrantes, Fatima; Acton, Gary D.; Zarikian, Carlos A Alvarez; Bahr, André; Balestra, Barbara; Barranco, Estefanìa Llave; Carrara, Gabriela; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Flood, Roger D.; José-Abel Flores, Flores; Furota, Satoshi; Grimalt, Joan; Grunert, Patrick; Hernández-Molina, Javier; Kim, Jin Kyoung; Krissek, Lawrence A.; Kuroda, Junichiro; Li, Baohua; Lofi, Johanna; Margari, Vasiliki; Martrat, Belen; Miller, Madeline D.; Nanayama, Futoshi; Nishida, Naohisa; Richter, Carl; Rodrigues, Teresa; Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.; Roque, Ana Cristina Freixo; Goñi, Maria F Sanchez; Sánchez, Francisco J Sierro; Singh, Arun D.; Sloss, Craig R.; Stow, Dorrik A V; Takashimizu, Yasuhiro; Tzanova, Alexandrina; Voelker, Antje; Xuan, Chuang; Williams, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    We produced a composite depth scale and chronology for Site U1385 on the SW Iberian Margin. Using log(Ca/Ti) measured by core scanning XRF at 1-cm resolution in all holes, a composite section was constructed to 166.5meter composite depth (mcd) that corrects for stretching and squeezing in each core.

  2. Evolution and scaling of atrioventricular conduction time in mammals. [Pt. 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Strackee, J.

    2006-01-01

    Changes of the PR interval (atrioventricular delay) in relation to changes of heart size in mammalian species (scaling) confront us with a perplexing lack of understanding of an essential funetion of the heart. The PR interval controls the duration of late diastolic blood flow from the atria to the

  3. A Prioritized Multi-Channel Multi-Time slot MAC Protocol For Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Sliman, Jamila; Song, Ye-Qiong; Koubâa, Anis

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper addresses a new prioritized multichannel multi-time slot MAC protocol (PMCMTP) for large-scale WSNs especially for Ultra-Wide Band (UWB) based networks. To reduce the complexity of resource sharing, the global network is composed of a set of Personal Area Networks (PANs) or cells. According to available resource and PANs duty cycle, PMCMTP can dynamically assign several data channels per PAN and efficiently allocate time slots to each PAN's members. This sig...

  4. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI. We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months. When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation’s responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April–October. The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages.

  5. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Kaicheng; Gao, Shan; Wu, Hao; Luo, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months). When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation’s responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April–October). The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages. PMID:26184243

  6. Quantum information density scaling and qubit operation time constraints of CMOS silicon-based quantum computer architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotta, Davide; Sebastiano, F.; Charbon, E.E.E.; Prati, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Even the quantum simulation of an apparently simple molecule such as Fe2S2 requires a considerable number of qubits of the order of 106, while more complex molecules such as alanine (C3H7NO2) require about a hundred times more. In order to assess such a multimillion scale of identical qubits and

  7. Even number of positive solutions for 3nth order three-point boundary value problem on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Prasad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We establish the existence of at least two positive solutions for the 3nth order three-point boundary value problem on time scales by using Avery-Henderson fixed point theorem. We also establish the existence of at least 2m positive solutions for an arbitrary positive integer m.

  8. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Kaicheng; Gao, Shan; Wu, Hao; Luo, Hui

    2015-07-08

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months). When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation's responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April-October). The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages.

  9. Measuring Depression Over Time . . . or not? : Lack of Unidimensionality and Longitudinal Measurement Invariance in Four Common Rating Scales of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, Eiko I.; van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Epskamp, Sacha; Schoevers, Robert A.; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression

  10. Ontology-aided annotation, visualization and generalization of geological time scale information from online geological map services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Marshal; Ma, X.; Carranza, E.J.M; Wu, C.; van der Meer, F.D.

    2012-01-01

    Geological maps are increasingly published and shared online, whereas tools and services supporting information retrieval and knowledge discovery are underdeveloped. In this study, we developed an ontology of geological time scale by using a Resource Description Framework model to represent the

  11. Ontology-aided annotation, visualization and generalization of geological time-scale information from online geological map services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, X.; Carranza, E.J.M.; Wu, C.; Meer, F.D. van der

    2012-01-01

    Geological maps are increasingly published and shared online, whereas tools and services supporting information retrieval and knowledge discovery are underdeveloped. In this study, we developed an ontology of geological time scale by using a RDF (Resource Description Framework) model to represent

  12. Flourishing in the now : Initial validation of a present-eudaimonic time perspective scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vowinckel, Jonte C.; Westerhof, Gerben J.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.; Webster, Jeffrey D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A positive focus on the present, the only time zone which we experience directly and permanently, is at least as relevant as perspectives on the past and future in a balanced time perspective and its relation to wellbeing. Yet, few instruments examining a positive present time

  13. The WACMOS-ET project – Part 1: Tower-scale evaluation of four remote sensing-based evapotranspiration algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Michel, D.

    2015-10-20

    The WACMOS-ET project has compiled a forcing data set covering the period 2005–2007 that aims to maximize the exploitation of European Earth Observations data sets for evapotranspiration (ET) estimation. The data set was used to run 4 established ET algorithms: the Priestley–Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory model (PT-JPL), the Penman–Monteith algorithm from the MODIS evaporation product (PM-MOD), the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). In addition, in-situ meteorological data from 24 FLUXNET towers was used to force the models, with results from both forcing sets compared to tower-based flux observations. Model performance was assessed across several time scales using both sub-daily and daily forcings. The PT-JPL model and GLEAM provide the best performance for both satellite- and tower-based forcing as well as for the considered temporal resolutions. Simulations using the PM-MOD were mostly underestimated, while the SEBS performance was characterized by a systematic overestimation. In general, all four algorithms produce the best results in wet and moderately wet climate regimes. In dry regimes, the correlation and the absolute agreement to the reference tower ET observations were consistently lower. While ET derived with in situ forcing data agrees best with the tower measurements (R2 = 0.67), the agreement of the satellite-based ET estimates is only marginally lower (R2 = 0.58). Results also show similar model performance at daily and sub-daily (3-hourly) resolutions. Overall, our validation experiments against in situ measurements indicate that there is no single best-performing algorithm across all biome and forcing types. An extension of the evaluation to a larger selection of 85 towers (model inputs re-sampled to a common grid to facilitate global estimates) confirmed the original findings.

  14. Characterizing multi-scale self-similar behavior and non-statistical properties of fluctuations in financial time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sayantan; Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2011-11-01

    We make use of wavelet transform to study the multi-scale, self-similar behavior and deviations thereof, in the stock prices of large companies, belonging to different economic sectors. The stock market returns exhibit multi-fractal characteristics, with some of the companies showing deviations at small and large scales. The fact that, the wavelets belonging to the Daubechies’ (Db) basis enables one to isolate local polynomial trends of different degrees, plays the key role in isolating fluctuations at different scales. One of the primary motivations of this work is to study the emergence of the k-3 behavior [X. Gabaix, P. Gopikrishnan, V. Plerou, H. Stanley, A theory of power law distributions in financial market fluctuations, Nature 423 (2003) 267-270] of the fluctuations starting with high frequency fluctuations. We make use of Db4 and Db6 basis sets to respectively isolate local linear and quadratic trends at different scales in order to study the statistical characteristics of these financial time series. The fluctuations reveal fat tail non-Gaussian behavior, unstable periodic modulations, at finer scales, from which the characteristic k-3 power law behavior emerges at sufficiently large scales. We further identify stable periodic behavior through the continuous Morlet wavelet.

  15. Scaling Task Management in Space and Time: Reducing User Overhead in Ubiquitous-Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-28

    limitation of this approach is that it does not easily scale to large numbers of tasks over extended periods. Busy users may intermittently touch on...RETSINA framework, with applications in domains such as financial portfolio management, ecommerce and military logistics [88]; and more recently Carnegie...complex tasks. Examples can be found in the workflow modeling of business processes, and in some agent-based systems, where the description of the

  16. Criteria for the determination of time dependent scalings in the Fock quantization of scalar fields with a time dependent mass in ultrastatic spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Jerónimo; Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.; Olmedo, Javier; Velhinho, José M.

    2012-11-01

    We consider the quantization of scalar fields in spacetimes such that, by means of a suitable scaling of the field by a time dependent function, the field equation can be regarded as that of a field with a time dependent mass propagating in an auxiliary ultrastatic static background. For Klein-Gordon fields, it is well known that there exist an infinite number of nonequivalent Fock representations of the canonical commutation relations and, therefore, of inequivalent quantum theories. A context in which this kind of ambiguities arises and prevents the derivation of robust results is, e.g., in the quantum analysis of cosmological perturbations. In these situations, typically, a suitable scaling of the field by a time dependent function leads to a description in an auxiliary static background, though the nonstationarity still shows up in a time dependent mass. For such a field description, and assuming the compactness of the spatial sections, we recently proved in three or less spatial dimensions that the criteria of a natural implementation of the spatial symmetries and of a unitary time evolution are able to select a unique class of unitarily equivalent vacua, and hence of Fock representations. In this work, we succeed to extend our uniqueness result to the consideration of all possible field descriptions that can be reached by a time dependent canonical transformation which, in particular, involves a scaling of the field by a function of time. These kinds of canonical transformations modify the dynamics of the system and introduce a further ambiguity in its quantum description, exceeding the choice of a Fock representation. Remarkably, for any compact spatial manifold in less than four dimensions, we show that our criteria eliminate any possible nontrivial scaling of the field other than that leading to the description in an auxiliary static background. Besides, we show that either no time dependent redefinition of the field momentum is allowed or, if this may

  17. Time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis: Exact DFA and DMA frequency responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Ken; Tsujimoto, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general framework to study the time and frequency domain characteristics of detrending-operation-based scaling analysis methods, such as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrending moving average (DMA) analysis. In this framework, using either the time or frequency domain approach, the frequency responses of detrending operations are calculated analytically. Although the frequency domain approach based on conventional linear analysis techniques is only applicable to linear detrending operations, the time domain approach presented here is applicable to both linear and nonlinear detrending operations. Furthermore, using the relationship between the time and frequency domain representations of the frequency responses, the frequency domain characteristics of nonlinear detrending operations can be obtained. Based on the calculated frequency responses, it is possible to establish a direct connection between the root-mean-square deviation of the detrending-operation-based scaling analysis and the power spectrum for linear stochastic processes. Here, by applying our methods to DFA and DMA, including higher-order cases, exact frequency responses are calculated. In addition, we analytically investigate the cutoff frequencies of DFA and DMA detrending operations and show that these frequencies are not optimally adjusted to coincide with the corresponding time scale.

  18. A real-time control method-based simulation for high-speed trains on large-scale rail network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yutong; Cao, Chengxuan; Zhou, Yaling; Feng, Ziyan

    In this paper, an improved real-time control model based on the discrete-time method is constructed to control and simulate the movement of high-speed trains on large-scale rail network. The constraints of acceleration and deceleration are introduced in this model, and a more reasonable definition of the minimal headway is also presented. Considering the complicated rail traffic environment in practice, we propose a set of sound operational strategies to excellently control traffic flow on rail network under various conditions. Several simulation experiments with different parameter combinations are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the control simulation method. The experimental results are similar to realistic environment and some characteristics of rail traffic flow are also investigated, especially the impact of stochastic disturbances and the minimal headway on the rail traffic flow on large-scale rail network, which can better assist dispatchers in analysis and decision-making. Meanwhile, experimental results also demonstrate that the proposed control simulation method can be in real-time control of traffic flow for high-speed trains not only on the simple rail line, but also on the complicated large-scale network such as China’s high-speed rail network and serve as a tool of simulating the traffic flow on large-scale rail network to study the characteristics of rail traffic flow.

  19. Solving the puzzle of discrepant quasar variability on monthly time-scales implied by SDSS and CRTS data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suberlak, Krzysztof; Ivezić, Željko; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Graham, Matthew; Sesar, Branimir

    2017-12-01

    We present an improved photometric error analysis for the 7 100 CRTS (Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey) optical light curves for quasars from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 catalogue. The SDSS imaging survey has provided a time-resolved photometric data set, which greatly improved our understanding of the quasar optical continuum variability: Data for monthly and longer time-scales are consistent with a damped random walk (DRW). Recently, newer data obtained by CRTS provided puzzling evidence for enhanced variability, compared to SDSS results, on monthly time-scales. Quantitatively, SDSS results predict about 0.06 mag root-mean-square (rms) variability for monthly time-scales, while CRTS data show about a factor of 2 larger rms, for spectroscopically confirmed SDSS quasars. Our analysis has successfully resolved this discrepancy as due to slightly underestimated photometric uncertainties from the CRTS image processing pipelines. As a result, the correction for observational noise is too small and the implied quasar variability is too large. The CRTS photometric error correction factors, derived from detailed analysis of non-variable SDSS standard stars that were re-observed by CRTS, are about 20-30 per cent, and result in reconciling quasar variability behaviour implied by the CRTS data with earlier SDSS results. An additional analysis based on independent light curve data for the same objects obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory provides further support for this conclusion. In summary, the quasar variability constraints on weekly and monthly time-scales from SDSS, CRTS and PTF surveys are mutually compatible, as well as consistent with DRW model.

  20. Evaluating the assumption of power-law late time scaling of breakthrough curves in highly heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Power-law (PL) distributions are widely adopted to define the late-time scaling of solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) during transport experiments in highly heterogeneous media. However, from a statistical perspective, distinguishing between a PL distribution and another tailed distribution is difficult, particularly when a qualitative assessment based on visual analysis of double-logarithmic plotting is used. This presentation aims to discuss the results from a recent analysis where a suite of statistical tools was applied to evaluate rigorously the scaling of BTCs from experiments that genera