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Sample records for sub-component scores ranging

  1. Distribution of ACTFL Ratings by TOEFL Score Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, R. F.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to align verbal descriptions of test takers' language performance with distributions of the numerical scores they received on the three sections (Listening Comprehension, Structure and Written Expression, and Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary) of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The descriptors of…

  2. How the range effect contaminates control scores in studies of visual illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotopf, W H; Brown, S A

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between mean control scores and mean experimental scores in 23 experiments on alignment illusions has been examined. Evidence is presented to show that, through the operation of the range effect, control scores are biased to a significant degree in the direction of experimental scores. The implications of this are considered, not only as regards the value of control scores in psychophysical studies, but also as further evidence of the dangers of within-subjects experimental designs when issues depend upon the values of extreme points in a range of values.

  3. Stability of scores for the Slosson Full-Range Intelligence Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas O; Eaves, Ronald C; Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Mariano, Gina

    2007-08-01

    The test-retest stability of the Slosson Full-Range Intelligence Test by Algozzine, Eaves, Mann, and Vance was investigated with test scores from a sample of 103 students. With a mean interval of 13.7 mo. and different examiners for each of the two test administrations, the test-retest reliability coefficients for the Full-Range IQ, Verbal Reasoning, Abstract Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Memory were .93, .85, .80, .80, and .83, respectively. Mean differences from the test-retest scores were not statistically significantly different for any of the scales. Results suggest that Slosson scores are stable over time even when different examiners administer the test.

  4. The range of the Oxford Shoulder Score in the asymptomatic population: a marker for post-operative improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, F; Sultan, J; Dix, S; Hughes, P J

    2011-11-01

    The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a validated scoring system used to assess the degree of pain and disability caused by shoulder pathology. To date there is no knowledge of the range of the OSS in the healthy adult population. This study aimed to establish the range in asymptomatic individuals. The OSS of 100 asymptomatic volunteers was compared with the pre-operative OSS of 100 symptomatic individuals who had had elective shoulder surgery performed at the Royal Preston hospital. The difference in mean scores in the operated group (36.7) and the asymptomatic group (15.3) was statistically significant (pSymptom scores can only be used effectively when the range in the asymptomatic population is known. This is so that disease severity can be gauged in the context of the normal population and post-operative improvements can be forecast more accurately.

  5. Establishing the cut-off score for remission and severity-ranges on the Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren D; Rothschild, Anthony J; Flint, Alastair J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS) is a rating scale dedicated to the measurement of severity in psychotic depression (PD). The aim of this study was to establish the PDAS cut-off for remission of PD as well as PDAS score-ranges for mild, moderate, and severe PD. The sec...

  6. Parallel ICA identifies sub-components of resting state networks that covary with behavioral indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Timothy B; Wildenberg, Joseph C; Liu, Jingyu; Chen, Jiayu; Calhoun, Vince D; Biswal, Bharat B; Meyerand, Mary E; Birn, Rasmus M; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Parallel Independent Component Analysis (para-ICA) is a multivariate method that can identify complex relationships between different data modalities by simultaneously performing Independent Component Analysis on each data set while finding mutual information between the two data sets. We use para-ICA to test the hypothesis that spatial sub-components of common resting state networks (RSNs) covary with specific behavioral measures. Resting state scans and a battery of behavioral indices were collected from 24 younger adults. Group ICA was performed and common RSNs were identified by spatial correlation to publically available templates. Nine RSNs were identified and para-ICA was run on each network with a matrix of behavioral measures serving as the second data type. Five networks had spatial sub-components that significantly correlated with behavioral components. These included a sub-component of the temporo-parietal attention network that differentially covaried with different trial-types of a sustained attention task, sub-components of default mode networks that covaried with attention and working memory tasks, and a sub-component of the bilateral frontal network that split the left inferior frontal gyrus into three clusters according to its cytoarchitecture that differentially covaried with working memory performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the validity of para-ICA in cases with unbalanced dimensions using simulated data.

  7. Range of motion, postural alignment, and LESS score differences of those with and without excessive medial knee displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, Mikel R; Pennuto, Anthony P; Smith, Mason D; Olson, Matt E; Bell, David R

    2015-01-01

    To determine range of motion (ROM), postural alignment, and dynamic motion differences between those with and without medial knee displacement (MKD) during the overhead squat (OHS). We hypothesized those with MKD would have restricted ROM, differing postural alignment, and poorer quality dynamic motion than those without MKD. Observational. University Research Laboratory. Ninety-seven healthy recreationally active college-aged individuals. Groups were determined by the presence (MKD group) or absence (control group) of MKD during an OHS. Range of motion measures were active and passive ankle dorsiflexion with the knee straight and bent, hip internal and external rotation, and hip abduction. Postural alignment measures were Q angle, navicular drop, and genu recurvatum. Quality of dynamic motion was measured using total Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) score. The MKD group had significantly less active (P = 0.017) and passive (P = 0.045) ankle dorsiflexion with the knee straight, as well as significantly increased Q angle (P = 0.004) and decreased navicular drop (P = 0.009). There were no significant differences in total LESS score or the other outcome measures. There is select ROM, such as ankle dorsiflexion, and postural measures clinicians can screen for that may be related to increased MKD and theoretically elevated risk of injury.

  8. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion influences Lateral Step Down Test scores in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindstaff, Terry L; Dolan, Nadyne; Morton, Sam K

    2017-01-01

    To determine differences in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) between three groups of individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) based on Lateral Step Down Test quality of movement. The secondary purpose was to quantify the relationship between ankle dorsiflexion ROM and Lateral Step Down Test scores. Descriptive laboratory study. University research laboratory. Fifty-nine participants with CAI. Differences in ankle dorsiflexion ROM between three Lateral Step Down Test movement quality groups (good, moderate, poor) was determined using an analysis of variance. The relationship between outcome variables was determined using a Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Significantly less ankle dorsiflexion ROM was observed in individuals with poor movement quality (36.0 ± 6.6°) compared to good (42.3 ± 6.4°). Individuals with moderate movement quality did not have ankle dorsiflexion ROM (39.1 ± 6.2°) that was significantly different from either group. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.39) between ankle dorsiflexion ROM and Lateral Step Down Test scores. Participants in the poor movement quality group had 6° less ankle dorsiflexion ROM than participants in the good movement quality group. While ankle dorsiflexion ROM is associated with Lateral Step Down Test scores additional factors likely contribute to movement dysfunction in individuals with CAI. This trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01438905). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlation Between Ankle-Dorsiflexion and Hip-Flexion Range of Motion and the Functional Movement Screen Hurdle-Step Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Jacob J; Switzler, Craig L; Hayes, Bradley T; Hicks-Little, Charlie A

    2017-01-01

    Functional movement screening (FMS) has been gaining popularity in the fields of sports medicine and performance. Currently, limited research has examined whether FMS screening that identifies low FMS scores is attributed primarily to limits in range of motion (ROM). To compare scores from the FMS hurdle-step movement with ROM measurements for ankle dorsiflexion and hip flexion (HF). Correlational research design. Sports medicine research laboratory. 20 healthy active male (age 21.2 ± 2.4 y, weight 77.8 ± 10.2 kg, height 180.8 ± 6.8 cm) and 20 healthy active female (21.3 ± 2.0 y, 67.3 ± 8.9 kg, 167.4 ± 6.6 cm) volunteers. All 40 participants completed 3 trials of the hurdle-step exercise bilaterally and goniometric ROM measurements for active ankle dorsiflexion and HF. Correlations were determined between ROM and FMS scores for right and left legs. In addition, mean data were compared between FMS scores, gender, and dominant and nondominant limbs. There were no significant correlations present when all participants were grouped. However, when separated by gender significant correlations were identified. There was a weak correlation with HF and both hurdle-step (HS) and average hurdle-step (AHS) scores on both left (r = .536, P = .015 and r = .512, P = .012) and right (r = .445, P = .049 and r = .565, P = .009) legs for women. For men, there was a poor negative correlation of HF and both HS and AHS on the left leg (r = -.452, P = .045 and r = .451, P = .046). Our findings suggest that although hip and ankle ROMs do not have a strong relationship with FMS hurdle-step scores, they are a contributing factor. More research should be conducted to identify other biomechanical factors that contribute to individual FMS test scores.

  10. SAMe-TT2R2 Score in the Outpatient Anticoagulation Clinic to Predict Time in Therapeutic Range and Adverse Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pivatto Júnior

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The SAMe-TT2R2 score was developed to predict which patients on oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs will reach an adequate time in therapeutic range (TTR (> 65%-70%. Studies have reported a relationship between this score and the occurrence of adverse events. Objective: To describe the TTR according to the score, in addition to relating the score obtained with the occurrence of adverse events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF on oral anticoagulation with VKAs. Methods: Retrospective cohort study including patients with nonvalvular AF attending an outpatient anticoagulation clinic of a tertiary hospital. Visits to the outpatient clinic and emergency, as well as hospital admissions to the institution, during 2014 were evaluated. The TTR was calculated through the Rosendaal´s method. Results: We analyzed 263 patients (median TTR, 62.5%. The low-risk group (score 0-1 had a better median TTR as compared with the high-risk group (score ≥ 2: 69.2% vs. 56.3%, p = 0.002. Similarly, the percentage of patients with TTR ≥ 60%, 65% or 70% was higher in the low-risk group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively. The high-risk group had a higher percentage of adverse events (11.2% vs. 7.2%, although not significant (p = 0.369. Conclusions: The SAMe-TT2R2 score proved to be effective to predict patients with a better TTR, but was not associated with adverse events.

  11. Insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows across a range of body condition scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Hostens, M; Van Eetvelde, M; Hermans, K; Moerman, S; Bogaert, H; Depreester, E; Van den Broeck, W; Opsomer, G

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present research was to determine the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS). Ten pregnant Holstein Friesian dairy cows (upcoming parity 2 to 5) were selected based on BCS at the beginning of the study (2mo before expected parturition date). During the study, animals were monitored weekly for BCS and backfat thickness and in the last 2wk, blood samples were taken for determination of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration. Animals underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test in the third week before the expected parturition date. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test consisted of 4 consecutive insulin infusions with increasing insulin doses: 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 5mIU/kg per minute. For each insulin infusion period, a steady state was defined as a period of 30min where no or minor changes of the glucose infusion were necessary to keep the blood glucose concentration constant and near basal levels. During the steady state, the glucose infusion rate [steady state glucose infusion rate (SSGIR) in µmol/kg per minute] and NEFA concentration [steady state NEFA concentration (SSNEFA) in mmol/L] were determined and reflect the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Dose response curves were created based on the insulin concentrations during the steady state and the SSGIR or SSNEFA. The shape of the dose response curves is determined by the concentration of insulin needed to elicit the half maximal effect (EC50) and the maximal SSGIR or the minimal SSNEFA for the glucose or fatty acid metabolism, respectively. The maximal SSGIR was negatively associated with variables reflecting adiposity of the cows (BCS, backfat thickness, NEFA concentration during the dry period, and absolute weight of the different adipose depots determined after euthanasia and dissection of the different depots), whereas the EC50 of the glucose metabolism was

  12. The immediate effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape on ankle active range of motion and performance in the Balance Error Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the changes in ankle active range of motion (AROM) and performance on the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) in cases in which no tape, placebo taping or ankle balance taping (ABT) with kinesiology tape was used. Randomized cross-over trial. University laboratory. Fifteen physically active individuals (7 men, 8 women). Postural control was assessed based on performances on the BESS. Active ankle flexibility was assessed by measuring the ankle AROM of both ankles under each taping condition in a random order at 1-week intervals. The ankle AROM among the taping conditions were not significantly different. There were no significant differences in the error scores of single-leg and tandem stances on a firm surface among the taping conditions. Compared to those obtained in the absence of taping, the error scores of the single-leg and tandem stances on a foam surface were significantly lower with ABT, but they did not significantly differ from the placebo taping scores. This study showed that ABT with kinesiology tape immediately improved postural control on unstable surfaces without changes in ankle AROM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SAMe-TT2R2 Score in the Outpatient Anticoagulation Clinic to Predict Time in Therapeutic Range and Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivatto Junior, Fernando; Scheffel, Rafael Selbach; Ries, Lucas; Wolkind, Ricardo Roitman; Marobin, Roberta; Barkan, Sabrina Sigal; Amon, Luís Carlos; Biolo, Andréia

    2017-04-01

    The SAMe-TT2R2 score was developed to predict which patients on oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) will reach an adequate time in therapeutic range (TTR) (> 65%-70%). Studies have reported a relationship between this score and the occurrence of adverse events. To describe the TTR according to the score, in addition to relating the score obtained with the occurrence of adverse events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) on oral anticoagulation with VKAs. Retrospective cohort study including patients with nonvalvular AF attending an outpatient anticoagulation clinic of a tertiary hospital. Visits to the outpatient clinic and emergency, as well as hospital admissions to the institution, during 2014 were evaluated. The TTR was calculated through the Rosendaal´s method. We analyzed 263 patients (median TTR, 62.5%). The low-risk group (score 0-1) had a better median TTR as compared with the high-risk group (score ≥ 2): 69.2% vs. 56.3%, p = 0.002. Similarly, the percentage of patients with TTR ≥ 60%, 65% or 70% was higher in the low-risk group (p vitamina K (AVKs) atingirão um tempo na faixa terapêutica (TFT) adequado (> 65%-70%) no seguimento. Estudos também o relacionaram com a ocorrência de eventos adversos. Descrever o TFT de acordo com o escore, além de relacionar a pontuação obtida com a ocorrência de eventos adversos adversos em pacientes com fibrilação atrial (FA) não valvar em anticoagulação oral com AVKs. Estudo de coorte retrospectivo incluindo pacientes com FA não valvar em acompanhamento em ambulatório de anticoagulação de um hospital terciário. Foi realizada uma avaliação retrospectiva de consultas ambulatoriais, visitas a emergência e internações hospitalares na instituição no período de janeiro-dezembro/2014. O TFT foi calculado aplicando-se o método de Rosendaal. Foram analisados 263 pacientes com TFT mediano de 62,5%. O grupo de baixo risco (0-1 ponto) obteve um TFT mediano maior em

  14. Test and Analysis of Sub-Components of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Waddy T.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Hilburger, Mark W.; Smith, Russell W.

    2012-01-01

    Integrally machined blade-stiffened panels subjected to an axial compressive load were tested and analyzed to observe the buckling, crippling, and postcrippling response of the panels. The panels were fabricated from aluminum-lithium alloys 2195 and 2050, and both alloys have reduced material properties in the short transverse material direction. The tests were designed to capture a failure mode characterized by the stiffener separating from the panel in the postbuckling range. This failure mode is attributed to the reduced properties in the short transverse direction. Full-field measurements of displacements and strains using three-dimensional digital image correlation systems and local measurements using strain gages were used to capture the deformation of the panel leading up to the failure of the panel for specimens fabricated from 2195. High-speed cameras were used to capture the initiation of the failure. Finite element models were developed using an isotropic strain-hardening material model. Good agreement was observed between the measured and predicted responses for both alloys.

  15. Apgar Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Apgar Scores Page Content Article Body As soon as ... baby's general condition at birth. What Does the Apgar Test Measure? The test measures your baby's: Heart ...

  16. Pavement scores synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this synthesis was to summarize the use of pavement scores by the states, including the : rating methods used, the score scales, and descriptions; if the scores are used for recommending pavement : maintenance and rehabilitation action...

  17. An objective fluctuation score for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm K Horne

    Full Text Available Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson's Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system.The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm.This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations.The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges.

  18. Scoring nail psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, K.M.G.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Bastiaens, M.T.; Plusje, L.G.; Baran, R.L.; Pasch, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scoring systems are indispensable in evaluating the severity of disease and monitoring treatment response. OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the competence of various nail psoriasis severity scoring systems and to develop a new scoring system. METHODS: The authors conducted a prospective,

  19. The HiSCORE Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tluczykont

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A central question of Astroparticle Physics, the origin of cosmic rays, still remains unsolved. HiSCORE (Hundred*i Square-km Cosmic ORigin Explorer is a concept for a large-area wide-angle non-imaging air shower detector, addressing this question by searching for cosmic ray pevatrons in the energy range from 10TeV to few PeV and cosmic rays in the energy range above 100TeV. In the framework of the Tunka-HiSCORE project, first prototypes have been deployed on the site of the Tunka-133 experiment, where we plan to install an engineering array covering an area of the order of 1km2. On the same site, also imaging and particle detectors are planned, potentially allowing a future hybrid detector system. Here we present the HiSCORE detector principle, its potential for cosmic ray origin search and the status of ongoing activities in the framework of the Tunka-HiSCORE experiment.

  20. SCORE - A DESCRIPTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLACK, CHARLES W.

    REINFORCEMENT AND ROLE-REVERSAL TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN THE SCORE PROJECT, A LOW-COST PROGRAM OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FOR HARD-CORE TEENAGE STREET CORNER BOYS. COMMITTED TO THE BELIEF THAT THE BOYS HAVE THE POTENTIAL FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR, THE SCORE WORKER FOLLOWS B.F. SKINNER'S THEORY OF OPERANT CONDITIONING AND REINFORCES THE DELINQUENT'S GOOD…

  1. The Apgar Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered as evidence of, or a consequence of, asphyxia; does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome; and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. The Bandim tuberculosis score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Joaquim, Luis Carlos; Vieira, Cesaltina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out in Guinea-Bissau ’ s capital Bissau among inpatients and outpatients attending for tuberculosis (TB) treatment within the study area of the Bandim Health Project, a Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Our aim was to assess the variability between 2...... physicians in performing the Bandim tuberculosis score (TBscore), a clinical severity score for pulmonary TB (PTB), and to compare it to the Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Method : From December 2008 to July 2009 we assessed the TBscore and the KPS of 100 PTB patients at inclusion in the TB cohort and...

  3. Volleyball Scoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, William; Dargahi-Noubary, G. R.; Shi, Yixun

    2002-01-01

    The widespread interest in sports in our culture provides an excellent opportunity to catch students' attention in mathematics and statistics classes. One mathematically interesting aspect of volleyball, which can be used to motivate students, is the scoring system. (MM)

  4. Early warning scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    A free app available from the Apple App Store is aimed at supporting health professionals in Wales to use the National Early Warning Score (NEWS). The tool helps staff identify patients who are developing serious illness.

  5. Does Field Reliability for Static-99 Scores Decrease as Scores Increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amanda K.; Boccaccini, Marcus T.; Harris, Paige B.; Hawes, Samuel W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the field reliability of Static-99 (Hanson & Thornton, 2000) scores among 21,983 sex offenders and focused on whether rater agreement decreased as scores increased. As expected, agreement was lowest for high-scoring offenders. Initial and most recent Static-99 scores were identical for only about 40% of offenders who had been assigned a score of 6 during their initial evaluations, but for more than 60% of offenders who had been assigned a score of 2 or lower. In addition, the size of the difference between scores increased as scores increased, with pairs of scores differing by 2 or more points for about 30% of offenders scoring in the high-risk range. Because evaluators and systems use high Static-99 scores to identify sexual offenders who may require intensive supervision or even postrelease civil commitment, it is important to recognize that there may be more measurement error for high scores than low scores and to consider adopting procedures for minimizing or accounting for measurement error. PMID:24932647

  6. Instant MuseScore

    CERN Document Server

    Shinn, Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Instant MuseScore is written in an easy-to follow format, packed with illustrations that will help you get started with this music composition software.This book is for musicians who would like to learn how to notate music digitally with MuseScore. Readers should already have some knowledge about musical terminology; however, no prior experience with music notation software is necessary.

  7. The lod score method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J P; Saccone, N L; Corbett, J

    2001-01-01

    The lod score method originated in a seminal article by Newton Morton in 1955. The method is broadly concerned with issues of power and the posterior probability of linkage, ensuring that a reported linkage has a high probability of being a true linkage. In addition, the method is sequential, so that pedigrees or lod curves may be combined from published reports to pool data for analysis. This approach has been remarkably successful for 50 years in identifying disease genes for Mendelian disorders. After discussing these issues, we consider the situation for complex disorders, where the maximum lod score (MLS) statistic shares some of the advantages of the traditional lod score approach but is limited by unknown power and the lack of sharing of the primary data needed to optimally combine analytic results. We may still learn from the lod score method as we explore new methods in molecular biology and genetic analysis to utilize the complete human DNA sequence and the cataloging of all human genes.

  8. Nursing activities score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda, DR; Nap, R; de Rijk, A; Schaufeli, W; Lapichino, G

    Objectives. The instruments used for measuring nursing workload in the intensive care unit (e.g., Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-28) are based on therapeutic interventions related to severity of illness. Many nursing activities are not necessarily related to severity of illness, and

  9. Syncopation and the score.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyang Song

    Full Text Available The score is a symbolic encoding that describes a piece of music, written according to the conventions of music theory, which must be rendered as sound (e.g., by a performer before it may be perceived as music by the listener. In this paper we provide a step towards unifying music theory with music perception in terms of the relationship between notated rhythm (i.e., the score and perceived syncopation. In our experiments we evaluated this relationship by manipulating the score, rendering it as sound and eliciting subjective judgments of syncopation. We used a metronome to provide explicit cues to the prevailing rhythmic structure (as defined in the time signature. Three-bar scores with time signatures of 4/4 and 6/8 were constructed using repeated one-bar rhythm-patterns, with each pattern built from basic half-bar rhythm-components. Our manipulations gave rise to various rhythmic structures, including polyrhythms and rhythms with missing strong- and/or down-beats. Listeners (N = 10 were asked to rate the degree of syncopation they perceived in response to a rendering of each score. We observed higher degrees of syncopation in time signatures of 6/8, for polyrhythms, and for rhythms featuring a missing down-beat. We also found that the location of a rhythm-component within the bar has a significant effect on perceived syncopation. Our findings provide new insight into models of syncopation and point the way towards areas in which the models may be improved.

  10. Arteriovenous malformation embocure score: AVMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Demetrius K; Moftakhar, Roham; Straus, David; Munich, Stephan A; Chaus, Fahad; Kaszuba, Megan C

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (CAVMs) may be treated with microsurgery, radiosurgery, endovascular surgery, or a combination of these modalities. Grading scales are available to aid the assessment of curative risk for microsurgery and radiosurgery. No grading system has been developed to assess the curative risk of endovascular surgery. To report our retrospective application of the AVM embocure score to patients treated at our institution between 2005 and 2011 METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 39 patients with CAVM treated at our institution between 2005 and 2011 with the primary aim of achieving a curative embolization. After reviewing all the different variables associated with the conventional Onyx embolization technique for CAVMs, we identified the following as the most relevant characteristics influencing the chances for complete angiographic embolization and complication risk: the number of arterial pedicles and draining veins, size of AVM nidus, and vascular eloquence. We sought to develop a scoring system to assess the complication risk for a curative embolization of CAVM with liquid embolic Onyx (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA). We developed the AVM embocure score (AVMES). This scoring system ranges from 3 to 10 and is the arithmetic sum of the number of arterial pedicles feeding the AVM (≤3, 4-6, >6), the number of draining veins (≤3, 4-6, >6), the size of the AVM nidus in centimeters (≤3, 4-6, >6), and the vascular eloquence (0-1). We applied AVMES to the same cohort of patients and validated the predictability of complete angiographic embolization and expected clinical risk of complication. In lesions with an AVMES of 3 (n=8), there was a 100% rate of complete AVM obliteration and 0% rate of major complications. In AVMES 4 (n=12) lesions, there was 75% complete obliteration rate, with 8% major morbidity. In AVMES 5 (n=9) lesions, there was 78% complete obliteration and 11% major morbidity. In AVMES >5 (n=10) there was 20

  11. Score test variable screening

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Sihai Dave; Li, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Variable screening has emerged as a crucial first step in the analysis of high-throughput data, but existing procedures can be computationally cumbersome, difficult to justify theoretically, or inapplicable to certain types of analyses. Motivated by a high-dimensional censored quantile regression problem in multiple myeloma genomics, this paper makes three contributions. First, we establish a score test-based screening framework, which is widely applicable, extremely computationally efficient...

  12. Your Criminal Fico Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Scores.” Journal of Applied Psychology 97(2012): 469–478. Chan, Janet, and Lyria Bennett Moses, “Is Big Data Challenging Criminology?” Theoretical...release. Distribution is unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) One of the more contentious uses of big data ...analytics in homeland security is predictive policing, which harnesses big data to allocate police resources, decrease crime, and increase public safety

  13. Score test variable screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sihai Dave; Li, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Variable screening has emerged as a crucial first step in the analysis of high-throughput data, but existing procedures can be computationally cumbersome, difficult to justify theoretically, or inapplicable to certain types of analyses. Motivated by a high-dimensional censored quantile regression problem in multiple myeloma genomics, this article makes three contributions. First, we establish a score test-based screening framework, which is widely applicable, extremely computationally efficient, and relatively simple to justify. Secondly, we propose a resampling-based procedure for selecting the number of variables to retain after screening according to the principle of reproducibility. Finally, we propose a new iterative score test screening method which is closely related to sparse regression. In simulations we apply our methods to four different regression models and show that they can outperform existing procedures. We also apply score test screening to an analysis of gene expression data from multiple myeloma patients using a censored quantile regression model to identify high-risk genes. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  14. Prognostic value of TIMI score versus GRACE score in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Luis C L; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Carvalhal, Manuela; Oliveira, Ruan; Silva, André; Vasconcelos, Isis; Henri, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia

    2014-08-01

    The TIMI Score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was created and validated specifically for this clinical scenario, while the GRACE score is generic to any type of acute coronary syndrome. Between TIMI and GRACE scores, identify the one of better prognostic performance in patients with STEMI. We included 152 individuals consecutively admitted for STEMI. The TIMI and GRACE scores were tested for their discriminatory ability (C-statistics) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow) in relation to hospital death. The TIMI score showed equal distribution of patients in the ranges of low, intermediate and high risk (39 %, 27 % and 34 %, respectively), as opposed to the GRACE Score that showed predominant distribution at low risk (80 %, 13 % and 7%, respectively). Case-fatality was 11%. The C-statistics of the TIMI score was 0.87 (95%CI = 0.76 to 0.98), similar to GRACE (0.87, 95%CI = 0.75 to 0.99) - p = 0.71. The TIMI score showed satisfactory calibration represented by χ2 = 1.4 (p = 0.92), well above the calibration of the GRACE score, which showed χ2 = 14 (p = 0.08). This calibration is reflected in the expected incidence ranges for low, intermediate and high risk, according to the TIMI score (0 %, 4.9 % and 25 %, respectively), differently to GRACE (2.4%, 25% and 73%), which featured middle range incidence inappropriately. Although the scores show similar discriminatory capacity for hospital death, the TIMI score had better calibration than GRACE. These findings need to be validated populations of different risk profiles.

  15. Prognostic Value of TIMI Score versus GRACE Score in ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. L. Correia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The TIMI Score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI was created and validated specifically for this clinical scenario, while the GRACE score is generic to any type of acute coronary syndrome. Objective: Between TIMI and GRACE scores, identify the one of better prognostic performance in patients with STEMI. Methods: We included 152 individuals consecutively admitted for STEMI. The TIMI and GRACE scores were tested for their discriminatory ability (C-statistics and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow in relation to hospital death. Results: The TIMI score showed equal distribution of patients in the ranges of low, intermediate and high risk (39 %, 27 % and 34 %, respectively, as opposed to the GRACE Score that showed predominant distribution at low risk (80 %, 13 % and 7%, respectively. Case-fatality was 11%. The C-statistics of the TIMI score was 0.87 (95%CI = 0.76 to 0.98, similar to GRACE (0.87, 95%CI = 0.75 to 0.99 - p = 0.71. The TIMI score showed satisfactory calibration represented by χ2 = 1.4 (p = 0.92, well above the calibration of the GRACE score, which showed χ2 = 14 (p = 0.08. This calibration is reflected in the expected incidence ranges for low, intermediate and high risk, according to the TIMI score (0 %, 4.9 % and 25 %, respectively, differently to GRACE (2.4%, 25% and 73%, which featured middle range incidence inappropriately. Conclusion: Although the scores show similar discriminatory capacity for hospital death, the TIMI score had better calibration than GRACE. These findings need to be validated populations of different risk profiles.

  16. The Relationship of Scores on Elizur's Hostility System on the Rorschach to the Acting-Out Score on the Hand Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between Elizur's Hostility Scoring on the Rorschach Test and the Acting-Out Score on the Hand Test was examined. Correlations between the two measures (using several scoring procedures) ranged from .40 to .64. (JKS)

  17. Maxillofacial trauma scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    The changing complexity of maxillofacial fractures in recent years has created a situation where classical systems of classification of maxillofacial injuries fall short of defining trauma particularly that observed with high-velocity collisions where more than one region of the maxillofacial skeleton is affected. Trauma scoring systems designed specifically for the maxillofacial region are aimed to provide a more accurate assessment of the injury, its prognosis, the possible treatment outcomes, economics, length of hospital stay, and triage. The evolution and logic of such systems along with their merits and demerits are discussed. The author also proposes a new system to aid users in quickly and methodically choosing the system best suited to their needs without having to study a plethora of literature available in order to isolate their choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fingerprinting of music scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Jonathan; Schmucker, Martin

    2004-06-01

    Publishers of sheet music are generally reluctant in distributing their content via the Internet. Although online sheet music distribution's advantages are numerous the potential risk of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) infringement, e.g. illegal online distributions, disables any innovation propensity. While active protection techniques only deter external risk factors, additional technology is necessary to adequately treat further risk factors. For several media types including music scores watermarking technology has been developed, which ebeds information in data by suitable data modifications. Furthermore, fingerprinting or perceptual hasing methods have been developed and are being applied especially for audio. These methods allow the identification of content without prior modifications. In this article we motivate the development of watermarking and fingerprinting technologies for sheet music. Outgoing from potential limitations of watermarking methods we explain why fingerprinting methods are important for sheet music and address potential applications. Finally we introduce a condept for fingerprinting of sheet music.

  19. Relationship of Apgar Scores and Bayley Mental and Motor Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serunian, Sally A.; Broman, Sarah H.

    1975-01-01

    Examined the relationship of newborns' 1-minute Apgar scores to their 8-month Bayley mental and motor scores and to 8-month classifications of their development as normal, suspect, or abnormal. Also investigated relationships between Apgar scores and race, longevity, and birth weight. (JMB)

  20. Credit Scoring Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siana Halim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally easier to predict defaults accurately if a large data set (including defaults is available for estimating the prediction model. This puts not only small banks, which tend to have smaller data sets, at disadvantage. It can also pose a problem for large banks that began to collect their own historical data only recently, or banks that recently introduced a new rating system. We used a Bayesian methodology that enables banks with small data sets to improve their default probability. Another advantage of the Bayesian method is that it provides a natural way for dealing with structural differences between a bank’s internal data and additional, external data. In practice, the true scoring function may differ across the data sets, the small internal data set may contain information that is missing in the larger external data set, or the variables in the two data sets are not exactly the same but related. Bayesian method can handle such kind of problem.

  1. Do Test Scores Buy Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Neal

    2017-01-01

    Since at least the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, standardized test scores have served as the primary measures of public school effectiveness. Yet, such scores fail to measure the ultimate goal of education: maximizing happiness. This exploratory analysis assesses nation level associations between test scores and happiness, controlling…

  2. What Is the Apgar Score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids What Is the Apgar Score? KidsHealth > For Parents > What Is the Apgar ... Qué es la puntuación de Apgar? About the Apgar Score The Apgar score, the very first test ...

  3. Scoring biosecurity in European conventional broiler production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Limbergen, T; Dewulf, J; Klinkenberg, M; Ducatelle, R; Gelaude, P; Méndez, J; Heinola, K; Papasolomontos, S; Szeleszczuk, P; Maes, D

    2018-01-01

    Good biosecurity procedures are crucial for healthy animal production. The aim of this study was to quantify the level of biosecurity on conventional broiler farms in Europe, following a standardized procedure, thereby trying to identify factors that are amenable to improvement. The current study used a risk-based weighted scoring system (biocheck.ugent ®) to assess the level of biosecurity on 399 conventional broiler farms in 5 EU member states. The scoring system consisted of 2 main categories, namely external and internal biosecurity, which had 8 and 3 subcategories, respectively. Biosecurity was quantified by converting the answers to 97 questions into a score from 0 to 100. The minimum score, "0," represents total absence of any biosecurity measure on the broiler farm, whereas the maximum score, "100," means full application of all investigated biosecurity measures. A possible correlation between biosecurity and farm characteristics was investigated by multivariate linear regression analysis. The participating broiler farms scored better for internal biosecurity (mean score of 76.6) than for external biosecurity (mean 68.4). There was variation between the mean biosecurity scores for the different member states, ranging from 59.8 to 78.0 for external biosecurity and from 63.0 to 85.6 for internal biosecurity. Within the category of external biosecurity, the subcategory related to "infrastructure and vectors" had the highest mean score (82.4), while the subcategory with the lowest score related to biosecurity procedures for "visitors and staff" (mean 51.5). Within the category of internal biosecurity, the subcategory "disease management" had the highest mean score (65.8). In the multivariate regression model a significant negative correlation was found between internal biosecurity and the number of employees and farm size. These findings indicate that there is a lot of variation for external and internal biosecurity on the participating broiler farms

  4. Predicting occupational personality test scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, A; Drakeley, R

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between students' actual test scores and their self-estimated scores on the Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI; R. Hogan & J. Hogan, 1992), an omnibus personality questionnaire, was examined. Despite being given descriptive statistics and explanations of each of the dimensions measured, the students tended to overestimate their scores; yet all correlations between actual and estimated scores were positive and significant. Correlations between self-estimates and actual test scores were highest for sociability, ambition, and adjustment (r = .62 to r = .67). The results are discussed in terms of employers' use and abuse of personality assessment for job recruitment.

  5. An ultrasound score for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B F; Christensen, R.; Torp-Pedersen, S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop standardized musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) procedures and scoring for detecting knee osteoarthritis (OA) and test the MUS score's ability to discern various degrees of knee OA, in comparison with plain radiography and the 'Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score' (KOOS......) domains as comparators. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of MUS examinations in 45 patients with knee OA. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility were evaluated. RESULTS: MUS examination for knee OA consists of five separate domains assessing (1) predominantly morphological changes in the medial...... coefficients ranging from 0.75 to 0.97 for the five domains. Construct validity was confirmed with statistically significant correlation coefficients (0.47-0.81, P knee OA. In comparison with standing radiographs...

  6. The power and robustness of maximum LOD score statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y J; Mendell, N R

    2008-07-01

    The maximum LOD score statistic is extremely powerful for gene mapping when calculated using the correct genetic parameter value. When the mode of genetic transmission is unknown, the maximum of the LOD scores obtained using several genetic parameter values is reported. This latter statistic requires higher critical value than the maximum LOD score statistic calculated from a single genetic parameter value. In this paper, we compare the power of maximum LOD scores based on three fixed sets of genetic parameter values with the power of the LOD score obtained after maximizing over the entire range of genetic parameter values. We simulate family data under nine generating models. For generating models with non-zero phenocopy rates, LOD scores maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters yielded greater power than maximum LOD scores for fixed sets of parameter values with zero phenocopy rates. No maximum LOD score was consistently more powerful than the others for generating models with a zero phenocopy rate. The power loss of the LOD score maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters, relative to the maximum LOD score calculated using the correct genetic parameter value, appeared to be robust to the generating models.

  7. [Propensity score matching in SPSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fuqiang; DU, Chunlin; Sun, Menghui; Ning, Bing; Luo, Ying; An, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    To realize propensity score matching in PS Matching module of SPSS and interpret the analysis results. The R software and plug-in that could link with the corresponding versions of SPSS and propensity score matching package were installed. A PS matching module was added in the SPSS interface, and its use was demonstrated with test data. Score estimation and nearest neighbor matching was achieved with the PS matching module, and the results of qualitative and quantitative statistical description and evaluation were presented in the form of a graph matching. Propensity score matching can be accomplished conveniently using SPSS software.

  8. [Overview of regulatory aspects guiding tablet scoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Maíra Teles; Sá-Barreto, Lívia Cristina Lira; Silva, Dayde Lane Mendonça; Cunha-Filho, Marcílio Sergio Soares

    2016-06-01

    Tablet scoring is a controversial but common practice used to adjust doses, facilitate drug intake, or lower the cost of drug treatment, especially in children and the elderly. The risks of tablet scoring are mainly related to inaccuracies in the resulting dose and stability problems. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of worldwide guidelines regarding tablet scoring. We found that regulatory health agencies in Mercosur countries as well as other South American countries do not have published standards addressing tablet splitting. Among the surveyed health agencies, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States is the only one to present standards, ranging from splitting instructions to regulation of the manufacturing process. The concept of functional scoring implemented by the FDA has introduced some level of guarantee as to the ability of tablets to be split. In conclusion, technical and scientific bases are still insufficient to guide health rules on this subject, making the decision on scoring, in certain situations, random and highly risky to public health. The need for more detailed regulation is vital to ensure the safety of tablet medications.

  9. Gambling scores for earthquake predictions and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiancang

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new method, namely the gambling score, for scoring the performance earthquake forecasts or predictions. Unlike most other scoring procedures that require a regular scheme of forecast and treat each earthquake equally, regardless their magnitude, this new scoring method compensates the risk that the forecaster has taken. Starting with a certain number of reputation points, once a forecaster makes a prediction or forecast, he is assumed to have betted some points of his reputation. The reference model, which plays the role of the house, determines how many reputation points the forecaster can gain if he succeeds, according to a fair rule, and also takes away the reputation points betted by the forecaster if he loses. This method is also extended to the continuous case of point process models, where the reputation points betted by the forecaster become a continuous mass on the space-time-magnitude range of interest. We also calculate the upper bound of the gambling score when the true model is a renewal process, the stress release model or the ETAS model and when the reference model is the Poisson model.

  10. D-score: a search engine independent MD-score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudel, Marc; Breiter, Daniela; Beck, Florian; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Martens, Lennart; Zahedi, René P

    2013-03-01

    While peptides carrying PTMs are routinely identified in gel-free MS, the localization of the PTMs onto the peptide sequences remains challenging. Search engine scores of secondary peptide matches have been used in different approaches in order to infer the quality of site inference, by penalizing the localization whenever the search engine similarly scored two candidate peptides with different site assignments. In the present work, we show how the estimation of posterior error probabilities for peptide candidates allows the estimation of a PTM score called the D-score, for multiple search engine studies. We demonstrate the applicability of this score to three popular search engines: Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem, and evaluate its performance using an already published high resolution data set of synthetic phosphopeptides. For those peptides with phosphorylation site inference uncertainty, the number of spectrum matches with correctly localized phosphorylation increased by up to 25.7% when compared to using Mascot alone, although the actual increase depended on the fragmentation method used. Since this method relies only on search engine scores, it can be readily applied to the scoring of the localization of virtually any modification at no additional experimental or in silico cost. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The Machine Scoring of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Doug

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the kind of computer software that is used to score student writing in some high stakes testing programs, and that is being promoted as a teaching and learning tool to schools. It sketches the state of play with machines for the scoring of writing, and describes how these machines work and what they do.…

  12. Skyrocketing Scores: An Urban Legend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A new urban legend claims, "As a result of the state dropping bilingual education, test scores in California skyrocketed." Krashen disputes this theory, pointing out that other factors offer more logical explanations of California's recent improvements in SAT-9 scores. He discusses research on the effects of California's Proposition 227,…

  13. Interpreting Linked Psychomotor Performance Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Given that equating/linking applications are now appearing in kinesiology literature, this article provides an overview of the different types of linked test scores: equated, concordant, and predicted. It also addresses the different types of evidence required to determine whether the scores from two different field tests (measuring the same…

  14. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  15. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  16. Quadratic prediction of factor scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansbeek, T

    1999-01-01

    Factor scores are naturally predicted by means of their conditional expectation given the indicators y. Under normality this expectation is linear in y but in general it is an unknown function of y. II is discussed that under nonnormality factor scores can be more precisely predicted by a quadratic

  17. Expanding the scoring system for the Dynamic Gait Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway-Cook, Anne; Taylor, Catherine S; Matsuda, Patricia Noritake; Studer, Michael T; Whetten, Brady K

    2013-11-01

    The Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) measures the capacity to adapt gait to complex tasks. The current scoring system combining gait pattern (GP) and level of assistance (LOA) lacks clarity, and the test has a limited range of measurement. This study developed a new scoring system based on 3 facets of performance (LOA, GP, and time) and examined the psychometric properties of the modified DGI (mDGI). A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted. Nine hundred ninety-five participants (855 patients with neurologic pathology and mobility impairments [MI group] and 140 patients without neurological impairment [control group]) were tested. Interrater reliability was calculated using kappa coefficients. Internal consistency was computed using the Cronbach alpha coefficient. Factor analysis and Rasch analysis investigated unidimensionality and range of difficulty. Internal validity was determined by comparing groups using multiple t tests. Minimal detectable change (MDC) was calculated for total score and 3 facet scores using the reliability estimate for the alpha coefficients. Interrater agreement was strong, with kappa coefficients ranging from 90% to 98% for time scores, 59% to 88% for GP scores, and 84% to 100% for LOA scores. Test-retest correlations (r) for time, GP, and LOA were .91, .91, and .87, respectively. Three factors (time, LOA, GP) had eigenvalues greater than 1.3 and explained 79% of the variance in scores. All group differences were significant, with moderate to large effect sizes. The 95% minimal detectable change (MDC95) was 4 for the mDGI total score, 2 for the time and GP total scores, and 1 for the LOA total score. The limitations included uneven sample sizes in the 2 groups. The MI group were patients receiving physical therapy; therefore, they may not be representative of this population. The mDGI, with its expanded scoring system, improves the range, discrimination, and facets of measurement related to walking function. The strength of the

  18. Extension of the lod score: the mod score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerget-Darpoux, F

    2001-01-01

    In 1955 Morton proposed the lod score method both for testing linkage between loci and for estimating the recombination fraction between them. If a disease is controlled by a gene at one of these loci, the lod score computation requires the prior specification of an underlying model that assigns the probabilities of genotypes from the observed phenotypes. To address the case of linkage studies for diseases with unknown mode of inheritance, we suggested (Clerget-Darpoux et al., 1986) extending the lod score function to a so-called mod score function. In this function, the variables are both the recombination fraction and the disease model parameters. Maximizing the mod score function over all these parameters amounts to maximizing the probability of marker data conditional on the disease status. Under the absence of linkage, the mod score conforms to a chi-square distribution, with extra degrees of freedom in comparison to the lod score function (MacLean et al., 1993). The mod score is asymptotically maximum for the true disease model (Clerget-Darpoux and Bonaïti-Pellié, 1992; Hodge and Elston, 1994). Consequently, the power to detect linkage through mod score will be highest when the space of models where the maximization is performed includes the true model. On the other hand, one must avoid overparametrization of the model space. For example, when the approach is applied to affected sibpairs, only two constrained disease model parameters should be used (Knapp et al., 1994) for the mod score maximization. It is also important to emphasize the existence of a strong correlation between the disease gene location and the disease model. Consequently, there is poor resolution of the location of the susceptibility locus when the disease model at this locus is unknown. Of course, this is true regardless of the statistics used. The mod score may also be applied in a candidate gene strategy to model the potential effect of this gene in the disease. Since, however, it

  19. PROCAM-, FRAMINGHAM-, SCORE- and SMART-risk score for predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with overt atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthoff, H; Staub, D; Socrates, T; Meyerhans, A; Bundi, B; Schmid, H P; Frauchiger, B

    2010-11-01

    The predictive value of PROCAM, FRAMINGHAM, SCORE and SMART-score to estimate the cardiovascular risk in patients with overt atherosclerosis had never been assessed. 96 consecutive patients with clinically evident atherosclerosis (coronary, cerebrovascular, peripheral artery and renovascular disease) were enrolled in this preliminary observational study. At baseline, medical history and blood chemistry were obtained. Sonographic measurement of the intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery was performed and risk estimations according to the above listed risk scores were calculated. During a 6 year follow-up the occurrence of cardiovascular death, acute coronary syndrome and stroke was assessed. Mean (±SD) risk-scores were 10.9±2.5, range 6-17 (SMART); 18.9±18.2%; range 0.2-94.1% (PROCAM); 21.4±13.1%, range 4-56% (FRAMINGHAM); and 4.8±3.9%, range 0.4-15.3% (SCORE). Mean IMT was 0.84±0.14 mm, range 0.51-1.20 mm. All scores correlate significantly with each other (r>0.321; pcardiovascular endpoint was observed in 36 (42%) patients. The AUC (95% confidence interval) for SMART-risk-score predicting a cardiovascular event was 0.67 (0.54-0.77; pcardiovascular event per additional SMART score point of 1.15 (95% CI 1.01-1.30 p=0.03). PROCAM-, FRAMINGHAM- and SCORE-risk score seem to be barely useful in a secondary prevention setting. In patients with overt atherosclerosis, the cardiovascular risk seems to be better assessed by means of the SMART score.

  20. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  1. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-26

    This software (Asset Scoring Tool) is designed to help building owners and managers to gain insight into the as-built efficiency of their buildings. It is a web tool where users can enter their building information and obtain an asset score report. The asset score report consists of modeled building energy use (by end use and by fuel type), building systems (envelope, lighting, heating, cooling, service hot water) evaluations, and recommended energy efficiency measures. The intended users are building owners and operators who have limited knowledge of building energy efficiency. The scoring tool collects minimum building data (~20 data entries) from users and build a full-scale energy model using the inference functionalities from Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS). The scoring tool runs real-time building energy simulation using EnergyPlus and performs life-cycle cost analysis using FEDS. An API is also under development to allow the third-party applications to exchange data with the web service of the scoring tool.

  2. Genetic Interaction Score (S-Score) Calculation, Clustering, and Visualization of Genetic Interaction Profiles for Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguev, Assen; Ryan, Colm J; Xu, Jiewei; Colson, Isabelle; Hartsuiker, Edgar; Krogan, Nevan

    2017-07-21

    This protocol describes computational analysis of genetic interaction screens, ranging from data capture (plate imaging) to downstream analyses. Plate imaging approaches using both digital camera and office flatbed scanners are included, along with a protocol for the extraction of colony size measurements from the resulting images. A commonly used genetic interaction scoring method, calculation of the S-score, is discussed. These methods require minimal computer skills, but some familiarity with MATLAB and Linux/Unix is a plus. Finally, an outline for using clustering and visualization software for analysis of resulting data sets is provided. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Right tail increasing dependence between scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M.; García, Jesús E.; González-López, V. A.; Romano, N.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the behavior of the conditional probability Prob(U > u|V > v) of two records coming from students of an undergraduate course, where U is the score of calculus I, scaled in [0, 1] and V is the score of physics scaled in [0, 1], the physics subject is part of the admission test of the university. For purposes of comparison, we consider two different undergraduate courses, electrical engineering and mechanical engineering, during nine years, from 2003 to 2011. Through a Bayesian perspective we estimate Prob(U > u|V > v) year by year and course by course. We conclude that U is right tail increasing in V, in both courses and for all the years. Moreover, over these nine years, we observe different ranges of variability for the estimated probabilities of electrical engineering when compared to the estimated probabilities of mechanical engineering.

  4. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    excellent for both binary and semiquantitative (SQ) grading but GS showed greater variability for both scoring systems (κ ranges: -0.05 to 1 and 0.59 to 0.92, respectively). In patient-based exercise, both intraobserver and interobserver reliability were variable and the mean κ coefficients did not reach 0...... and appearance of SH. CONCLUSION: A multistep consensus-based process has produced a standardised US definition and quantification system for RA synovitis including combined and individual SH and PD components. Further evaluation is required to understand its performance before application in clinical trials.......OBJECTIVES: To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice...

  5. Normative adductor squeeze tests scores in rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Lisa; Hignett, Tom; Edwards, Kim

    2015-05-01

    Groin pain is a common problem. Adductor squeeze tests are used to diagnose, monitor and prophylactically determine the risk of developing groin pain. This study defines normative adductor squeeze scores in professional rugby that will facilitate strength monitoring during screening. Using a sphygnamometer, squeeze scores were collected, at one professional rugby club as part of the pre-season screening for two seasons. Scores were collected in four positions. For all positions mean strength and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Data were collected for 81 athletes. Mean strength for adduction at 60° was 220.1 (212.2-228.1); 0° 211.1 (201.7-220.5); 90°90° 198.8 (190.0-207.7); 90°90° supported 224.9 (214.9-234.9). Backs had lower squeeze scores than forwards for 0°, 90°:90° and 90°:90° supported (p > 0.05 for all four tests); older players had lower scores, as did shorter and lighter players (p > 0.05 except for height with test 60° p = 0.048 and test 90°:90° supported p = 0.035). This study establishes references ranges for adductor squeeze tests for normative pre-season data in non-injured rugby players. This information will enable evaluation and inform return to play judgements following adductor related injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Confidence scores for prediction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; van de Wiel, MA

    2011-01-01

    modelling strategy is applied to different training sets. For each modelling strategy we estimate a confidence score based on the same repeated bootstraps. A new decomposition of the expected Brier score is obtained, as well as the estimates of population average confidence scores. The latter can be used......In medical statistics, many alternative strategies are available for building a prediction model based on training data. Prediction models are routinely compared by means of their prediction performance in independent validation data. If only one data set is available for training and validation......, then rival strategies can still be compared based on repeated bootstraps of the same data. Often, however, the overall performance of rival strategies is similar and it is thus difficult to decide for one model. Here, we investigate the variability of the prediction models that results when the same...

  7. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  8. From Rasch scores to regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karl Bang

    2006-01-01

    Rasch models provide a framework for measurement and modelling latent variables. Having measured a latent variable in a population a comparison of groups will often be of interest. For this purpose the use of observed raw scores will often be inadequate because these lack interval scale propertie...

  9. Developing Scoring Algorithms (Earlier Methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed scoring procedures to convert screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for fruits and vegetables, dairy, added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium using the What We Eat in America 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2003-2006 NHANES.

  10. The persistence of depression score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, J.; de Graaf, R.; Ormel, J.; Nolen, W. A.; Grobbee, D. E.; Burger, H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To construct a score that allows prediction of major depressive episode (MDE) persistence in individuals with MDE using determinants of persistence identified in previous research. Method: Data were derived from 250 subjects from the general population with new MDE according to DSM-III-R.

  11. Haemophilia Joint Health Score in healthy adults playing sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluiter, D; Foppen, W; de Kleijn, P; Fischer, K

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate outcome of prophylactic clotting factor replacement in children with haemophilia, the Haemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) was developed aiming at scoring early joint changes in children aged 4-18. The HJHS has been used for adults on long-term prophylaxis but interpretation of small changes remains difficult. Some changes in these patients may be due to sports-related injuries. Evaluation of HJHS score in healthy adults playing sports could improve the interpretation of this score in haemophilic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the HJHS scores in a cohort of young, healthy men participating in sports. Concomitant with a project collecting MRI images of ankles and knees in normal young adults, HJHS scores were assessed in 30 healthy men aged 18-26, participating in sports one to three times per week. One physiotherapist assessed their clinical function using the HJHS 2.1. History of joint injuries was documented. MRI images were scored by a single radiologist, using the International Prophylaxis Study Group additive MRI score. Median age of the study group was 24.3 years (range 19.0-26.4) and median frequency of sports activities was three times per week (range 1-4). Six joints (five knees, one ankle) had a history of sports-related injury. The median overall HJHS score was 0 out of 124 (range 0-3), with 60% of subjects showing no abnormalities on HJHS. All joints were normal on MRI. These results suggest that frequent sports participation and related injuries are not related with abnormalities in HJHS scores. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Re-Scoring the Game’s Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasselseder, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    -temporal alignment in the resulting emotional congruency of nondiegetic music. Whereas imaginary aspects of immersive presence are systemically affected by the presentation of dynamic music, sensory spatial aspects show higher sensitivity towards the arousal potential of the music score. It is argued......This study explores immersive presence as well as emotional valence and arousal in the context of dynamic and non-dynamic music scores in the 3rd person action-adventure video game genre while also considering relevant personality traits of the player. 60 subjects answered self......-report questionnaires of experiential states each time after playing the game 'Batman: Arkham City' in one of three randomized conditions accounting for [1] dynamic music, [2] non-dynamic music/low arousal potential and [3] non-dynamic music/high arousal potential, aiming to manipulate emotional arousal and structural...

  13. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  14. Stability of cooperation under image scoring in group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nax, Heinrich H.; Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-07-01

    Image scoring sustains cooperation in the repeated two-player prisoner’s dilemma through indirect reciprocity, even though defection is the uniquely dominant selfish behaviour in the one-shot game. Many real-world dilemma situations, however, firstly, take place in groups and, secondly, lack the necessary transparency to inform subjects reliably of others’ individual past actions. Instead, there is revelation of information regarding groups, which allows for ‘group scoring’ but not for image scoring. Here, we study how sensitive the positive results related to image scoring are to information based on group scoring. We combine analytic results and computer simulations to specify the conditions for the emergence of cooperation. We show that under pure group scoring, that is, under the complete absence of image-scoring information, cooperation is unsustainable. Away from this extreme case, however, the necessary degree of image scoring relative to group scoring depends on the population size and is generally very small. We thus conclude that the positive results based on image scoring apply to a much broader range of informational settings that are relevant in the real world than previously assumed.

  15. Professionalism score and academic performance in osteopathic medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Karen T; Johnson, Jane C

    2014-11-01

    During the first 2 years of osteopathic medical school, osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) courses use an objective professionalism score to measure student timeliness and appropriate dress for learning activities. To assess for correlations between this score and the numeric course grades of all first- and second-year basic science and clinical courses at a single osteopathic medical school. The professionalism scores obtained for each of the 7 quarters of the OMM course (2007-2012) were compared with the students' numeric final course grades and combined grade point average (GPA) of all courses in the corresponding quarter. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to determine the strength of the relationship between the professionalism score and the final course grades and the combined GPA. The mean (SD) professionalism score was 98.6% (3.3%), and scores ranged from 23.1% to 100%. Excluding the OMM course, the professionalism score was positively correlated with 29% of first-year course grades and 65% of second-year course grades. The professionalism score was predictive of academic performance in 16 of 23 clinical courses with the highest correlation for Principles of Medicine and Dermatology (ρ=0.28 and ρ=0.25, respectively). The OMM professionalism score was positively associated with GPA for quarters 1, 6, and 7 (P=.006, Posteopathic medical school courses, particularly clinical courses in the second-year curriculum. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  16. Developing and scoring essay tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, M

    1999-01-01

    The need to prepare nursing students for the licensing examination has resulted in a predominance of multiple-choice testing in nursing courses. But what about evaluating students' ability to present ideas in their own words and develop creative responses to questions posed by the teacher? Essay items provide an effective means of assessing higher levels of learning and ability to organize and present ideas in writing. The author describes how to develop essay items and score responses.

  17. Angle Closure Scoring System (ACSS-A Scoring System for Stratification of Angle Closure Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Rao

    Full Text Available To evaluate the angle closure scoring system (ACSS for stratifying primary angle course disease.This observational cross sectional institutional study included patients with primary open angle glaucoma suspects (n = 21 and primary angle closure disease (primary angle closure, PAC, n = 63 and primary angle course glaucoma, PACG, n = 58 (defined by International society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology, ISGEO. Two independent examiners blinded to clinical details, graded good quality pre-laser goniophotographs of the patients incorporating quadrants of peripheral anterior synechieae (PAS, non-visibility of posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM and blotchy pigments (ranging from 1-4 quadrants, iris configuration, angle recess (sum of above depicting ACSSg and lens thickness/axial length ratio (LT/AL, cup disc ratio and baseline intraocular pressure (IOP to give total score (ACSSt.There were significant differences in ACSSg scores within the same ISGEO stage of PAC and PACG between eyes that required nil or >1medicines after laser iridotomy, p1 medicines in both PAC and PACG eyes, p12 and 14 in PAC (odds ratio = 2.7(95% CI-1.7-5.9 and PACG (Odds ratio = 1.6(95%CI-1.19-2.2 predicted need for single medicines while ACSSg scores >14 and 19 predicted need for ≥2 medicines in PAC and PACG eyes, respectively. The LT/Al ratio, IOP score or cup disc score did not influence the need for medical treatment independently.The ACSS can be a useful clinical adjunct to the ISGEO system to predict need for medicines and prognosticate each stage more accurately.

  18. Angle Closure Scoring System (ACSS)-A Scoring System for Stratification of Angle Closure Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Aparna; Padhy, Debananda; Sarangi, Sarada; Das, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the angle closure scoring system (ACSS) for stratifying primary angle course disease. Methods This observational cross sectional institutional study included patients with primary open angle glaucoma suspects (n = 21) and primary angle closure disease (primary angle closure, PAC, n = 63 and primary angle course glaucoma, PACG, n = 58 (defined by International society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology, ISGEO). Two independent examiners blinded to clinical details, graded good quality pre-laser goniophotographs of the patients incorporating quadrants of peripheral anterior synechieae (PAS), non-visibility of posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM) and blotchy pigments (ranging from 1–4 quadrants), iris configuration, angle recess (sum of above depicting ACSSg) and lens thickness/axial length ratio (LT/AL), cup disc ratio and baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) to give total score (ACSSt). Result There were significant differences in ACSSg scores within the same ISGEO stage of PAC and PACG between eyes that required nil or >1medicines after laser iridotomy, p1 medicines in both PAC and PACG eyes, p12 and 14 in PAC (odds ratio = 2.7(95% CI-1.7–5.9) and PACG (Odds ratio = 1.6(95%CI-1.19–2.2) predicted need for single medicines while ACSSg scores >14 and 19 predicted need for ≥2 medicines in PAC and PACG eyes, respectively. The LT/Al ratio, IOP score or cup disc score did not influence the need for medical treatment independently. Conclusion The ACSS can be a useful clinical adjunct to the ISGEO system to predict need for medicines and prognosticate each stage more accurately. PMID:27788183

  19. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent P. Coletta

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292, and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations (r=0.57 and r=0.46, respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  20. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Steinert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292 , and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations ( r=0.57 and r=0.46 , respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  1. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  2. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  3. The Thoracolumbar AOSpine Injury Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Christopher K.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Koerner, John D.; Vialle, Luiz R.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens R.; Kandziora, Frank; Schnake, Klaus J.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Reinhold, Max; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Survey of 100 worldwide spine surgeons. Objective To develop a spine injury score for the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. Methods Each respondent was asked to numerically grade the severity of each variable of the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. Using the results, as well as limited input from the AOSpine Trauma Knowledge Forum, the Thoracolumbar AOSpine Injury Score was developed. Results Beginning with 1 point for A1, groups A, B, and C were consecutively awarded an additional point (A1, 1 point; A2, 2 points; A3, 3 points); however, because of a significant increase in the severity between A3 and A4 and because the severity of A4 and B1 was similar, both A4 and B1 were awarded 5 points. An uneven stepwise increase in severity moving from N0 to N4, with a substantial increase in severity between N2 (nerve root injury with radicular symptoms) and N3 (incomplete spinal cord injury) injuries, was identified. Hence, each grade of neurologic injury was progressively given an additional point starting with 0 points for N0, and the substantial difference in severity between N2 and N3 injuries was recognized by elevating N3 to 4 points. Finally, 1 point was awarded to the M1 modifier (indeterminate posterolateral ligamentous complex injury). Conclusion The Thoracolumbar AOSpine Injury Score is an easy-to-use, data-driven metric that will allow for the development of a surgical algorithm to accompany the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. PMID:27190734

  4. Myelodysplastic syndromes: a scoring system with prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufti, G J; Stevens, J R; Oscier, D G; Hamblin, T J; Machin, D

    1985-03-01

    141 patients with MDS were classified according to the FAB criteria and followed up for a period of 4-192 months. It was recognized that patients with RAEBT had a uniformly poor prognosis. However, there was a wide variation in survival among the other subgroups. A score of 1 was assigned to each of the following presenting haematological features: bone marrow blasts greater than or equal to 5%, platelets less than or equal to 100 X 10(9)/l, neutrophils less than or equal to 2.5 X 10(9)/l and Hb less than or equal to 10.0 g/dl. Therefore the score for each patient ranged between 0 and 4. There were no statistically significant differences between those patients who scored 0 or 1, or between those who scored 2 and 3. Therefore patients were put into three groups: Group A (score 0 or 1), Group B (score 2 or 3), Group C (score 4). The differences in survival between each of the three groups are highly significant (P less than 0.00001). This system further separates patients with RA, RAS, RAEB into good and bad prognostic groups. This study also confirms that deaths due to cytopenias are more common than those due to transformation to AML. The use of this scoring system in conjunction with the FAB criteria for MDS should serve as a prognostic tool on which to base treatment.

  5. Pain Scores Are Not Predictive of Pain Medication Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Galloway

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare Visual Analogue Scale (VAS scores with overall postoperative pain medication requirements including cumulative dose and patterns of medication utilization and to determine whether VAS scores predict pain medication utilization. Methods. VAS scores and pain medication data were collected from participants in a randomized trial of the utility of phenazopyridine for improved pain control following gynecologic surgery. Results. The mean age of the 219 participants was 54 (range19 to 94. We did not detect any association between VAS and pain medication utilization for patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA or RN administered (intravenous or oral medications. We also did not detect any association between the number of VAS scores recorded and mean pain scores. Conclusion. Postoperative VAS scores do not predict pain medication use in catheterized women inpatients following gynecologic surgery. Increased pain severity, as reflected by higher VAS scores, is not associated with an increase in pain assessment. Our findings suggest that VAS scores are of limited utility for optimal pain control. Alternative or complimentary methods may improve pain management.

  6. Score lists in multipartite hypertournaments

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzada, Shariefuddin; Iványi, Antal

    2010-01-01

    Given non-negative integers $n_{i}$ and $\\alpha_{i}$ with $0 \\leq \\alpha_{i} \\leq n_i$ $(i=1,2,...,k)$, an $[\\alpha_{1},\\alpha_{2},...,\\alpha_{k}]$-$k$-partite hypertournament on $\\sum_{1}^{k}n_{i}$ vertices is a $(k+1)$-tuple $(U_{1},U_{2},...,U_{k},E)$, where $U_{i}$ are $k$ vertex sets with $|U_{i}|=n_{i}$, and $E$ is a set of $\\sum_{1}^{k}\\alpha_{i}$-tuples of vertices, called arcs, with exactly $\\alpha_{i}$ vertices from $U_{i}$, such that any $\\sum_{1}^{k}\\alpha_{i}$ subset $\\cup_{1}^{k}U_{i}^{\\prime}$ of $\\cup_{1}^{k}U_{i}$, $E$ contains exactly one of the $(\\sum_{1}^{k} \\alpha_{i})!$ $\\sum_{1}^{k}\\alpha_{i}$-tuples whose entries belong to $\\cup_{1}^{k}U_{i}^{\\prime}$. We obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for $k$ lists of non-negative integers in non-decreasing order to be the losing score lists and to be the score lists of some $k$-partite hypertournament.

  7. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO, 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html.

  8. Timing of Emergency Medicine Student Evaluation Does Not Affect Scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Katherine M; Waterbrook, Anna; Waters, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    Evaluation of medical students rotating through the emergency department (ED) is an important formative and summative assessment method. Intuitively, delaying evaluation should affect the reliability of this assessment method, however, the effect of evaluation timing on scoring is unknown. A quality-improvement project evaluating the timing of end-of-shift ED evaluations at the University of Arizona was performed to determine whether delay in evaluation affected the score. End-of-shift ED evaluations completed on behalf of fourth-year medical students from July 2012 to March 2013 were reviewed. Forty-seven students were evaluated 547 times by 46 residents and attendings. Evaluation scores were means of anchored Likert scales (1-5) for the domains of energy/interest, fund of knowledge, judgment/problem-solving ability, clinical skills, personal effectiveness, and systems-based practice. Date of shift, date of evaluation, and score were collected. Linear regression was performed to determine whether timing of the evaluation had an effect on evaluation score. Data were complete for 477 of 547 evaluations (87.2%). Mean evaluation score was 4.1 (range 2.3-5, standard deviation 0.62). Evaluations took a mean of 8.5 days (median 4 days, range 0-59 days, standard deviation 9.77 days) to complete. Delay in evaluation had no significant effect on score (p = 0.983). The evaluation score was not affected by timing of the evaluation. Variance in scores was similar for both immediate and delayed evaluations. Considerable amounts of time and energy are expended tracking down delayed evaluations. This activity does not impact a student's final grade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TS-Chemscore, a Target-Specific Scoring Function, Significantly Improves the Performance of Scoring in Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Huang, Qi; Zou, Jun; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Most of the scoring functions currently used in structure-based drug design belong to 'universal' scoring functions, which often give a poor correlation between the calculated scores and experimental binding affinities. In this investigation, we proposed a simple strategy to construct target-specific scoring functions based on known 'universal' scoring functions. This strategy was applied to Chemscore, a widely used empirical scoring function, which led to a new scoring function, termed TS-Chemscore. TS-Chemscore was validated on 14 protein targets, which cover a wide range of biological target categories. The results showed that TS-Chemscore significantly improved the correlation between the calculated scores and experimental binding affinities compared with the original Chemscore. TS-Chemscore was then applied in virtual screening to retrieve novel JAK3 and YopH inhibitors. Top 30 compounds for each target were selected for experimental validation. Six active compounds for JAK3 and four for YopH were obtained. These compounds were out of the lists of top 30 compounds sorted by Chemscore. Collectively, TS-Chemscore established in this study showed a better performance in virtual screening than its counterpart Chemscore. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. [Establishment of "Anaphylaxis Scoring Aichi (ASCA)," a new symptom scoring system to be used in an oral food challenge (OFC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Asuka; Maeda, Toru; Haneda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Takae; Yasui, Masahiro; Kando, Naoyuki; Ito, Komei

    2013-08-01

    An original symptom score sheet named "Anaphylaxis Scoring Aichi (ASCA)" was created to quantitatively determine the severity of allergic symptoms provoked in an oral food challenge. ASCA lists and sorts subjective and objective symptoms into five organs (respiratory, skin-mucosal, gastrointestinal, psycho-neurological and cardiovascular). The organ scores were given (0 to 60 points) in accordance with the severity of each symptom. The total score was defined as the sum of the highest 5 organ scores (maximum 240 points) observed throughout the course of an OFC. This study evaluated the ASCA score in 253 cases of a positive food challenge (age 1-16 years, mean 5.3±3.2 years) conducted from April to August 2011 in our institute. The results were compared to the modified anaphylaxis grading presented in the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for Oral Food Challenge Test in Food Allergy 2009. At the same time, we evaluated the indications of symptomatic treatment using ASCA score. The total score closely correlated with the anaphylaxis grading, but there was a wide range of overlap between grade 2 and grade 3. All cases with a total score≥60 points were equivalent to grade 4 or 5, and that were consisted of three or more organ symptoms. These severe cases contained respiratory or skin/mucosal symptoms, and despite the early induction of initial therapy, the symptoms became worse. ASCA is therefore considered to be a useful tool for use in an oral food challenge test.

  11. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  12. A new high-flexion knee scoring system to eliminate the ceiling effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sang-Eun; Ha, Chul-Won; Lee, Choong-Hee

    2012-02-01

    Various scoring systems document improvement after TKA, but most are associated with a ceiling effect that may fail to distinguish between patients having different levels of knee function after TKA. We therefore developed a new scoring system for patients with higher levels of flexion to eliminate ceiling effects observed with current systems. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine whether the high-flexion knee score eliminates the ceiling effect, (2) to assess the validity and responsiveness of the high-flexion knee score, and (3) to determine whether the high-flexion knee score can aid in differentiation of the knee status of patients at the ceiling level. We prospectively studied 165 patients with 201 well-functioning knees who had undergone primary TKA. We obtained Knee Society scores, WOMAC scores, Feller scores, SF-36 scores, and high-flexion knee scores for all patients. The high-flexion knee score includes items that reflect knee function in the high functional range, such as sitting on or rising from the floor, squatting, or kneeling. We determined the ceiling effects and score distributions of various scoring systems. We performed a convergent validity test of the high-flexion knee score by correlation analysis with these various scoring systems. Responsiveness of the high-flexion knee score was assessed by correlation analysis of changes in various scoring systems. To determine whether the high-flexion knee score can aid in differentiation of knee status of patients at the ceiling level, relative responsiveness of the various scores in the ceiling versus below the ceiling range was determined. The high-flexion knee score showed no ceiling effect, whereas the other systems did. Addition of the high-flexion knee score to the other scoring systems eliminated these ceiling effects and resulted in more normalized score distributions. The high-flexion knee score correlated (r = -0.77) with WOMAC in postoperative scores, and it also correlated with

  13. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  14. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  15. A simplified score to quantify comorbidity in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Putcha

    Full Text Available Comorbidities are common in COPD, but quantifying their burden is difficult. Currently there is a COPD-specific comorbidity index to predict mortality and another to predict general quality of life. We sought to develop and validate a COPD-specific comorbidity score that reflects comorbidity burden on patient-centered outcomes.Using the COPDGene study (GOLD II-IV COPD, we developed comorbidity scores to describe patient-centered outcomes employing three techniques: 1 simple count, 2 weighted score, and 3 weighted score based upon statistical selection procedure. We tested associations, area under the Curve (AUC and calibration statistics to validate scores internally with outcomes of respiratory disease-specific quality of life (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, SGRQ, six minute walk distance (6MWD, modified Medical Research Council (mMRC dyspnea score and exacerbation risk, ultimately choosing one score for external validation in SPIROMICS.Associations between comorbidities and all outcomes were comparable across the three scores. All scores added predictive ability to models including age, gender, race, current smoking status, pack-years smoked and FEV1 (p<0.001 for all comparisons. Area under the curve (AUC was similar between all three scores across outcomes: SGRQ (range 0·7624-0·7676, MMRC (0·7590-0·7644, 6MWD (0·7531-0·7560 and exacerbation risk (0·6831-0·6919. Because of similar performance, the comorbidity count was used for external validation. In the SPIROMICS cohort, the comorbidity count performed well to predict SGRQ (AUC 0·7891, MMRC (AUC 0·7611, 6MWD (AUC 0·7086, and exacerbation risk (AUC 0·7341.Quantifying comorbidity provides a more thorough understanding of the risk for patient-centered outcomes in COPD. A comorbidity count performs well to quantify comorbidity in a diverse population with COPD.

  16. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  17. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  18. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  19. Evaluation of a Lameness Scoring System for Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, P T; Munksgaard, L; Tøgersen, F A

    2008-01-01

    Lameness is a major problem in dairy production both in terms of reduced production and compromised animal welfare. A 5-point lameness scoring system was developed based on previously published systems, but optimized for use under field conditions. The scoring system included the words "in most...... cases" in the descriptions of the clinical signs evaluated. This was done to avoid a situation in which cows might not fit into any of the categories. Additionally, a number of clinical signs used in other lameness scoring systems, considered of less importance in relation to lameness, were not included....... Only clinical signs were included that could easily be assessed within a few seconds from a distance. The scoring system was evaluated with intra-and interobserver agreement using kappa statistics. The evaluation was done before and after training 5 observers. Weighted kappa values ranged from 0...

  20. Acoustic and Visual Monitoring for Marine Mammals at the Southern California Off-Shore Range (SCORE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-28

    S) Office of Naval Research ONR Ballston Centre Tower One 800 N. Quincy Street 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Arlington, VA 22217 NUMBER(S) Dr. Ellen...Washington sea grant program. Seattle, pp. 166-184. McGowan, J. A., Cayan , R. C., Dorman, L. M., 1998. Climate-ocean variability and ecosystem response in

  1. Haemophilic magnetic resonance imaging score in healthy controls playing sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppen, W; Sluiter, D; Witkamp, T D; Mali, W P T M; Fischer, K

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive imaging modality to assess joint lesions, but the clinical relevance of subtle joint changes in haemophilic patients playing sports is unknown. A haemophilia specific MRI score is available, but was never evaluated in physically active healthy controls. It is not known if unexpected MRI changes in young active haemophilic patients are due to sports participation. The aim of this study was to evaluate knees and ankles in a cohort of young active healthy men using a haemophilia specific MRI score to provide context for joint evaluation by MRI in young haemophilic patients. Three Tesla MRI of knees and ankles were performed in 30 healthy men aged 18-26 years, regularly active in sports. MR images were scored by a single independent radiologist, using the International Prophylaxis Study Group additive MRI score. One physiotherapist assessed clinical function using the Haemophilia joint health scores (HJHS). History of complaints or injuries affecting knees and/or ankles, very intensive sports and current sports activities were documented. Median age was 24.3 years (range 19.0-26.4) and median number of sports activities per week was 3 (range 1-4). Six joints (five knees, one ankle) had a history of a sports-related injury. The median HJHS per joint was 0 out of 20 (range 0-1). All joints had a MRI score of 0. These results suggest that regular sports participation or very low HJHS scores are not associated with haemophilia specific MRI changes in knees and ankles. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  3. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  4. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  5. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  6. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  7. A Diet Score Assessing Norwegian Adolescents' Adherence to Dietary Recommendations-Development and Test-Retest Reproducibility of the Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handeland, Katina; Kjellevold, Marian; Wik Markhus, Maria; Eide Graff, Ingvild; Frøyland, Livar; Lie, Øyvind; Skotheim, Siv; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Dahl, Lisbeth; Øyen, Jannike

    2016-07-29

    Assessment of adolescents' dietary habits is challenging. Reliable instruments to monitor dietary trends are required to promote healthier behaviours in this group. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess adolescents' adherence to Norwegian dietary recommendations with a diet score and to report results from, and test-retest reliability of, the score. The diet score involved seven food groups and one physical activity indicator, and was applied to answers from a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered twice. Reproducibility of the score was assessed with Cohen's Kappa (κ statistics) at an interval of three months. The setting was eight lower-secondary schools in Hordaland County, Norway, and subjects were adolescents (n = 472) aged 14-15 years and their caregivers. Results showed that the proportion of adolescents consistently classified by the diet score was 87.6% (κ = 0.465). For food groups, proportions ranged from 74.0% to 91.6% (κ = 0.249 to κ = 0.573). Less than 40% of the participants were found to adhere to recommendations for frequencies of eating fruits, vegetables, added sugar, and fish. Highest compliance to recommendations was seen for choosing water as beverage and limit the intake of red meat. The score was associated with parental socioeconomic status. The diet score was found to be reproducible at an acceptable level. Health promoting work targeting adolescents should emphasize to increase the intake of recommended foods to approach nutritional guidelines.

  8. A Diet Score Assessing Norwegian Adolescents’ Adherence to Dietary Recommendations—Development and Test-Retest Reproducibility of the Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handeland, Katina; Kjellevold, Marian; Wik Markhus, Maria; Eide Graff, Ingvild; Frøyland, Livar; Lie, Øyvind; Skotheim, Siv; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Dahl, Lisbeth; Øyen, Jannike

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of adolescents’ dietary habits is challenging. Reliable instruments to monitor dietary trends are required to promote healthier behaviours in this group. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess adolescents’ adherence to Norwegian dietary recommendations with a diet score and to report results from, and test-retest reliability of, the score. The diet score involved seven food groups and one physical activity indicator, and was applied to answers from a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered twice. Reproducibility of the score was assessed with Cohen’s Kappa (κ statistics) at an interval of three months. The setting was eight lower-secondary schools in Hordaland County, Norway, and subjects were adolescents (n = 472) aged 14–15 years and their caregivers. Results showed that the proportion of adolescents consistently classified by the diet score was 87.6% (κ = 0.465). For food groups, proportions ranged from 74.0% to 91.6% (κ = 0.249 to κ = 0.573). Less than 40% of the participants were found to adhere to recommendations for frequencies of eating fruits, vegetables, added sugar, and fish. Highest compliance to recommendations was seen for choosing water as beverage and limit the intake of red meat. The score was associated with parental socioeconomic status. The diet score was found to be reproducible at an acceptable level. Health promoting work targeting adolescents should emphasize to increase the intake of recommended foods to approach nutritional guidelines. PMID:27483312

  9. Dose Uniformity of Scored and Unscored Tablets: Application of the FDA Tablet Scoring Guidance for Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, Anthony B; Khan, Mansoor A; Gupta, Abhay; Faustino, Patrick J

    This U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) laboratory study examines the impact of tablet splitting, the effect of tablet splitters, and the presence of a tablet score on the dose uniformity of two model drugs. Whole tablets were purchased from five manufacturers for amlodipine and six for gabapentin. Two splitters were used for each drug product, and the gabapentin tablets were also split by hand. Whole and split amlodipine tablets were tested for content uniformity following the general chapter of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Uniformity of Dosage Units , which is a requirement of the new FDA Guidance for Industry on tablet scoring. The USP weight variation method was used for gabapentin split tablets based on the recommendation of the guidance. All whole tablets met the USP acceptance criteria for the Uniformity of Dosage Units. Variation in whole tablet content ranged from 0.5 to 2.1 standard deviation (SD) of the percent label claim. Splitting the unscored amlodipine tablets resulted in a significant increase in dose variability of 6.5-25.4 SD when compared to whole tablets. Split tablets from all amlodipine drug products did not meet the USP acceptance criteria for content uniformity. Variation in the weight for gabapentin split tablets was greater than the whole tablets, ranging from 1.3 to 9.3 SD. All fully scored gabapentin products met the USP acceptance criteria for weight variation. Size, shape, and the presence or absence of a tablet score can affect the content uniformity and weight variation of amlodipine and gabapentin tablets. Tablet splitting produced higher variability. Differences in dose variability and fragmentation were observed between tablet splitters and hand splitting. These results are consistent with the FDA's concerns that tablet splitting can have an effect on the amount of drug present in a split tablet and available for absorption. Tablet splitting has become a very common practice in the United States and throughout the

  10. Prediction of outcome in critically ill elderly patients using APACHE II and SOFA scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Q; Lu, G; Li, M; Shen, Y; Xu, D

    2012-01-01

    Performances of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score were assessed in predicting mortality outcome in critically ill elderly patients. Mean APACHE II and SOFA scores were compared in 106 intensive care unit patients aged > 65 years classified as survivors or deaths. The discriminatory ability of the scores was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Calibration was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Mean APACHE II and SOFA scores in survivors were lower than in those who died. There was a positive correlation between the APACHE II and SOFA scores. The area under the ROC curve was 0.76 for the APACHE II score and ranged from 0.74 for the initial SOFA score to 0.98 for the maximum SOFA score. Hosmer-Lemeshow values for the APACHE II score and various SOFA scores indicated that predictions based on these scores closely fit the observed outcomes. APACHE II and SOFA scores can accurately predict mortality outcome in critically ill elderly patients, especially the maximum SOFA score and the difference between the maximum and initial SOFA scores.

  11. PRSice: Polygenic Risk Score software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euesden, Jack; Lewis, Cathryn M; O'Reilly, Paul F

    2015-05-01

    A polygenic risk score (PRS) is a sum of trait-associated alleles across many genetic loci, typically weighted by effect sizes estimated from a genome-wide association study. The application of PRS has grown in recent years as their utility for detecting shared genetic aetiology among traits has become appreciated; PRS can also be used to establish the presence of a genetic signal in underpowered studies, to infer the genetic architecture of a trait, for screening in clinical trials, and can act as a biomarker for a phenotype. Here we present the first dedicated PRS software, PRSice ('precise'), for calculating, applying, evaluating and plotting the results of PRS. PRSice can calculate PRS at a large number of thresholds ("high resolution") to provide the best-fit PRS, as well as provide results calculated at broad P-value thresholds, can thin Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) according to linkage disequilibrium and P-value or use all SNPs, handles genotyped and imputed data, can calculate and incorporate ancestry-informative variables, and can apply PRS across multiple traits in a single run. We exemplify the use of PRSice via application to data on schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and smoking, illustrate the importance of identifying the best-fit PRS and estimate a P-value significance threshold for high-resolution PRS studies. PRSice is written in R, including wrappers for bash data management scripts and PLINK-1.9 to minimize computational time. PRSice runs as a command-line program with a variety of user-options, and is freely available for download from http://PRSice.info jack.euesden@kcl.ac.uk or paul.oreilly@kcl.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Towards a contemporary, comprehensive scoring system for determining technical outcomes of hybrid percutaneous chronic total occlusion treatment: The RECHARGE score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeremans, Joren; Spratt, James C; Knaapen, Paul; Walsh, Simon; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Wilson, William; Avran, Alexandre; Faurie, Benjamin; Bressollette, Erwan; Kayaert, Peter; Bagnall, Alan J; Smith, Dave; McEntegart, Margaret B; Smith, William H T; Kelly, Paul; Irving, John; Smith, Elliot J; Strange, Julian W; Dens, Jo

    2018-02-01

    This study sought to create a contemporary scoring tool to predict technical outcomes of chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from patients treated by hybrid operators with differing experience levels. Current scoring systems need regular updating to cope with the positive evolutions regarding materials, techniques, and outcomes, while at the same time being applicable for a broad range of operators. Clinical and angiographic characteristics from 880 CTO-PCIs included in the REgistry of CrossBoss and Hybrid procedures in FrAnce, the NetheRlands, BelGium and UnitEd Kingdom (RECHARGE) were analyzed by using a derivation and validation set (2:1 ratio). Variables significantly associated with technical failure in the multivariable analysis were incorporated in the score. Subsequently, the discriminatory capacity was assessed and the validation set was used to compare with the J-CTO score and PROGRESS scores. Technical success in the derivation and validation sets was 83% and 85%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified six parameters associated with technical failure: blunt stump (beta coefficient (b) = 1.014); calcification (b = 0.908); tortuosity ≥45° (b = 0.964); lesion length 20 mm (b = 0.556); diseased distal landing zone (b = 0.794), and previous bypass graft on CTO vessel (b = 0.833). Score variables remained significant after bootstrapping. The RECHARGE score showed better discriminatory capacity in both sets (area-under-the-curve (AUC) = 0.783 and 0.711), compared to the J-CTO (AUC = 0.676) and PROGRESS (AUC = 0.608) scores. The RECHARGE score is a novel, easy-to-use tool for assessing the risk for technical failure in hybrid CTO-PCI and has the potential to perform well for a broad community of operators. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Scoring of Writing Portfolios: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Edward M.

    2005-01-01

    Although most portfolio evaluation currently uses some adaptation of holistic scoring, the problems with scoring portfolios holistically are many, much more than for essays, and the problems are not readily resolvable. Indeed, many aspects of holistic scoring work against the principles behind portfolio assessment. We have from the start needed a…

  14. Surgical Apgar Score predicts postoperative complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Predicting complications in neurotrauma patients by using an effective scoring system can reduce morbidity and mortality while facilitating objective clinical decision making during recovery. Compared to existing morbidity and mortality predictive scores, the Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is simple and effective.

  15. Combining Teacher Assessment Scores with External Examination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated four statistical models for combining teacher assessment scores with external examination scores for certifying secondary school graduates in Ghana in terms of validity of the composite scores. The models studied were (1) external examination moderation with nominal weights, (2) reference school ...

  16. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  17. Breaking of scored tablets : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, E; Barends, D M; Frijlink, H W

    The literature was reviewed regarding advantages, problems and performance indicators of score lines. Scored tablets provide dose flexibility, ease of swallowing and may reduce the costs of medication. However, many patients are confronted with scored tablets that are broken unequally and with

  18. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  19. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  20. Continuous equilibrium scores: factoring in the time before a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J; Reschke, Millard F; Owen Black, F

    2012-07-01

    The equilibrium (EQ) score commonly used in computerized dynamic posturography is normalized between 0 and 100, with falls assigned a score of 0. The resulting mixed discrete-continuous distribution limits certain statistical analyses and treats all trials with falls equally. We propose a simple modification of the formula in which peak-to-peak sway data from trials with falls is scaled according the percent of the trial completed to derive a continuous equilibrium (cEQ) score. The cEQ scores for trials without falls remain unchanged from the original methodology. The cEQ factors in the time before a fall and results in a continuous variable retaining the central tendencies of the original EQ distribution. A random set of 5315 Sensory Organization Test trials were pooled that included 81 falls. A comparison of the original and cEQ distributions and their rank ordering demonstrated that trials with falls continue to constitute the lower range of scores with the cEQ methodology. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.997) demonstrates that the cEQ retained near-perfect discrimination between trials with and without falls. We conclude that the cEQ score provides the ability to discriminate between ballistic falls from falls that occur later in the trial. This approach of incorporating time and sway magnitude can be easily extended to enhance other balance tests that include fall data or incomplete trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Committee Opinion No. 644: The Apgar Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered to be evidence of or a consequence of asphyxia, does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome, and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during a resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions.

  2. Comparison of the Wells score with the revised Geneva score for assessing suspected pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun-Hua; Chen, Hong-Lin; Chen, Jian-Rong; Xing, Jia-Li; Gu, Peng; Zhu, Bao-Feng

    2016-04-01

    The Wells score and the revised Geneva score are two most commonly used clinical rules for excluding pulmonary embolism (PE). In this study, we aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these two rules; we also compared the diagnostic accuracy between them. We searched PubMed and Web of science up to April 2015. Studies assessed Wells score and revised Geneva score for diagnosis suspected PE were included. The summary area under the curve (AUC) and the 95 % confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Eleven studies were included in this meta-analysis. For Wells score, the sensitivity ranged from 63.8 to 79.3 %, and the specificity ranged from 48.8 to 90.0 %. The overall weighted AUC was 0.778 (95 % CI 0.740-0.818; Z = 9.88, P Geneva score, the sensitivity ranged from 55.3 to 73.6 %. The overall weighted AUC was 0.693 (95 % CI 0.653-0.736; Z = 11.96, P Geneva score for predicting PE in suspected patients. Meta-regression showed diagnostic accuracy of these two rules was not related with PE prevalence. Sensitivity analysis by only included prospective studies showed the results were robust. Our results showed the Wells score was more effective than the revised Geneva score in discriminate PE in suspected patients.

  3. Importance of Wells score and Geneva score for the evaluation of patients suspected of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Walter, Thomas; Lang, Siegfried; Meyer, Michael; Apfaltrer, Paul; Henzler, Thomas; Viergutz, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology guidelines for pulmonary embolism (PE) published in 2008 and updated in 2014 recommend a risk stratification including risk scores like Wells and the Geneva score. The utility and practicability of these scores are controversially discussed. Recently, in a trauma cohort and in spinal surgery patients, no correlation between Wells Score and PE diagnosis was found. The aim of the study was the evaluation of Wells and Geneva scores in patients presenting with chest pain, dyspnoea or syncope in an emergency department. We retrospectively examined 326 patients suspected of PE, including assessment, according to Wells and Geneva scores. PE was detected in 13.5 %. The average Wells score was 1.0, the average Geneva score 3.9. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses showed for both scores a high significant area under the curve (Wells score 0.68; Geneva score 0.64). The association between the scores and the diagnosis of PE was calculated with logistic regression analysis and showed high significant odds ratios (OR) for both scores (Wells score 1.38; Geneva score 1.24). There was no significant difference between the area under the curve (AUC) of Wells score and Geneva score. The utility of Wells and Geneva scores for the evaluation of patients suspected of PE in an emergency patient cohort. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Performance of polygenic scores for predicting phobic anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Stefan; Glymour, M Maria; Koenen, Karestan; Liang, Liming; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Cornelis, Marilyn; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Rimm, Eric; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common, with a lifetime prevalence of 20% in the U.S., and are responsible for substantial burdens of disability, missed work days and health care utilization. To date, no causal genetic variants have been identified for anxiety, anxiety disorders, or related traits. To investigate whether a phobic anxiety symptom score was associated with 3 alternative polygenic risk scores, derived from external genome-wide association studies of anxiety, an internally estimated agnostic polygenic score, or previously identified candidate genes. Longitudinal follow-up study. Using linear and logistic regression we investigated whether phobic anxiety was associated with polygenic risk scores derived from internal, leave-one out genome-wide association studies, from 31 candidate genes, and from out-of-sample genome-wide association weights previously shown to predict depression and anxiety in another cohort. Study participants (n = 11,127) were individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Anxiety symptoms were assessed via the 8-item phobic anxiety scale of the Crown Crisp Index at two time points, from which a continuous phenotype score was derived. We found no genome-wide significant associations with phobic anxiety. Phobic anxiety was also not associated with a polygenic risk score derived from the genome-wide association study beta weights using liberal p-value thresholds; with a previously published genome-wide polygenic score; or with a candidate gene risk score based on 31 genes previously hypothesized to predict anxiety. There is a substantial gap between twin-study heritability estimates of anxiety disorders ranging between 20-40% and heritability explained by genome-wide association results. New approaches such as improved genome imputations, application of gene expression and biological pathways information, and incorporating social or environmental modifiers of genetic risks may be necessary to identify

  5. Performance of polygenic scores for predicting phobic anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Walter

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Anxiety disorders are common, with a lifetime prevalence of 20% in the U.S., and are responsible for substantial burdens of disability, missed work days and health care utilization. To date, no causal genetic variants have been identified for anxiety, anxiety disorders, or related traits. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a phobic anxiety symptom score was associated with 3 alternative polygenic risk scores, derived from external genome-wide association studies of anxiety, an internally estimated agnostic polygenic score, or previously identified candidate genes. DESIGN: Longitudinal follow-up study. Using linear and logistic regression we investigated whether phobic anxiety was associated with polygenic risk scores derived from internal, leave-one out genome-wide association studies, from 31 candidate genes, and from out-of-sample genome-wide association weights previously shown to predict depression and anxiety in another cohort. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Study participants (n = 11,127 were individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Anxiety symptoms were assessed via the 8-item phobic anxiety scale of the Crown Crisp Index at two time points, from which a continuous phenotype score was derived. RESULTS: We found no genome-wide significant associations with phobic anxiety. Phobic anxiety was also not associated with a polygenic risk score derived from the genome-wide association study beta weights using liberal p-value thresholds; with a previously published genome-wide polygenic score; or with a candidate gene risk score based on 31 genes previously hypothesized to predict anxiety. CONCLUSION: There is a substantial gap between twin-study heritability estimates of anxiety disorders ranging between 20-40% and heritability explained by genome-wide association results. New approaches such as improved genome imputations, application of gene expression and biological

  6. High Activity Arthroplasty Score has a lower ceiling effect than standard scores after knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Louis, Pascal; Diesinger, Yann

    2014-04-01

    The tested hypothesis was following: the High Activity Arthroplasty Score has a significant lower ceiling effect than American Knee Society Score and Oxford Knee Score after total knee arthroplasty. One hundred patients operated on for total knee arthroplasty with more than one-year follow-up have been included. The ceiling effect was 53% for the American Knee Society Score, 33% for the Oxford Knee Score, and 0% for the High Activity Arthroplasty Score. High Activity Arthroplasty Score had a significantly lower ceiling effect than American Knee Society Score and Oxford Knee Score. High Activity Arthroplasty Score has the potential to detect more subtle differences in level of function than standard scoring systems among a non-selected total knee arthroplasty population. © 2014.

  7. Validity Assessment of Low-risk SCORE Function and SCORE Function Calibrated to the Spanish Population in the FRESCO Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Subirana, Isaac; Ramos, Rafael; Gómez de la Cámara, Agustín; Elosua, Roberto; Vila, Joan; Marín-Ibáñez, Alejandro; Guembe, María Jesús; Rigo, Fernando; Tormo-Díaz, María José; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Cabré, Joan Josep; Segura, Antonio; Lapetra, José; Quesada, Miquel; Medrano, María José; González-Diego, Paulino; Frontera, Guillem; Gavrila, Diana; Ardanaz, Eva; Basora, Josep; García, José María; García-Lareo, Manel; Gutiérrez-Fuentes, José Antonio; Mayoral, Eduardo; Sala, Joan; R Degano, Irene; Francès, Albert; Castell, Conxa; Grau, María; Marrugat, Jaume

    2017-05-26

    To assess the validity of the original low-risk SCORE function without and with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and SCORE calibrated to the Spanish population. Pooled analysis with individual data from 12 Spanish population-based cohort studies. We included 30 919 individuals aged 40 to 64 years with no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline, who were followed up for 10 years for the causes of death included in the SCORE project. The validity of the risk functions was analyzed with the area under the ROC curve (discrimination) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test (calibration), respectively. Follow-up comprised 286 105 persons/y. Ten-year cardiovascular mortality was 0.6%. The ratio between estimated/observed cases ranged from 9.1, 6.5, and 9.1 in men and 3.3, 1.3, and 1.9 in women with original low-risk SCORE risk function without and with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and calibrated SCORE, respectively; differences were statistically significant with the Hosmer-Lemeshow test between predicted and observed mortality with SCORE (P < .001 in both sexes and with all functions). The area under the ROC curve with the original SCORE was 0.68 in men and 0.69 in women. All versions of the SCORE functions available in Spain significantly overestimate the cardiovascular mortality observed in the Spanish population. Despite the acceptable discrimination capacity, prediction of the number of fatal cardiovascular events (calibration) was significantly inaccurate. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Forecasting the value of credit scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Shakila; Ahmad, Noryati; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, credit scoring system plays an important role in banking sector. This process is important in assessing the creditworthiness of customers requesting credit from banks or other financial institutions. Usually, the credit scoring is used when customers send the application for credit facilities. Based on the score from credit scoring, bank will be able to segregate the "good" clients from "bad" clients. However, in most cases the score is useful at that specific time only and cannot be used to forecast the credit worthiness of the same applicant after that. Hence, bank will not know if "good" clients will always be good all the time or "bad" clients may become "good" clients after certain time. To fill up the gap, this study proposes an equation to forecast the credit scoring of the potential borrowers at a certain time by using the historical score related to the assumption. The Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) is used to measure the accuracy of the forecast scoring. Result shows the forecast scoring is highly accurate as compared to actual credit scoring.

  9. Proposal of a Mediterranean Diet Serving Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, Celia; Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel; Rivas, Ana; Lorenzo-Tovar, María Luisa; Tur, Josep A.; Olea-Serrano, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Numerous studies have demonstrated a relationship between Mediterranean Diet (MD) adherence and the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and diabetes, etc. The study aim was to validate a novel instrument to measure MD adherence based on the consumption of food servings and food groups, and apply it in a female population from southern Spain and determining influential factors. Methods and Results The study included 1,155 women aged 12-83 yrs, classified as adolescents, adults, and over-60-yr-olds. All completed a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The Mediterranean Dietary Serving Score (MDSS) is based on the latest update of the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, using the recommended consumption frequency of foods and food groups; the MDSS ranges from 0 to 24. The discriminative power or correct subject classification capacity of the MDSS was analyzed with the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, using the MDS as reference method. Predictive factors for higher MDSS adherence were determined with a logistic regression model, adjusting for age. According to ROC curve analysis, MDSS evidenced a significant discriminative capacity between adherents and non-adherents to the MD pattern (optimal cutoff point=13.50; sensitivity=74%; specificity=48%). The mean MDSS was 12.45 (2.69) and was significantly higher with older age (pfoods and food groups per meal, day, and week. It may be useful in future nutritional education programs to prevent the early onset of chronic non-transmittable diseases in younger populations. PMID:26035442

  10. Automated essay scoring and the future of educational assessment in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J; Latifi, Syed; Lai, Hollis; Boulais, André-Philippe; De Champlain, André

    2014-10-01

    Constructed-response tasks, which range from short-answer tests to essay questions, are included in assessments of medical knowledge because they allow educators to measure students' ability to think, reason, solve complex problems, communicate and collaborate through their use of writing. However, constructed-response tasks are also costly to administer and challenging to score because they rely on human raters. One alternative to the manual scoring process is to integrate computer technology with writing assessment. The process of scoring written responses using computer programs is known as 'automated essay scoring' (AES). An AES system uses a computer program that builds a scoring model by extracting linguistic features from a constructed-response prompt that has been pre-scored by human raters and then, using machine learning algorithms, maps the linguistic features to the human scores so that the computer can be used to classify (i.e. score or grade) the responses of a new group of students. The accuracy of the score classification can be evaluated using different measures of agreement. Automated essay scoring provides a method for scoring constructed-response tests that complements the current use of selected-response testing in medical education. The method can serve medical educators by providing the summative scores required for high-stakes testing. It can also serve medical students by providing them with detailed feedback as part of a formative assessment process. Automated essay scoring systems yield scores that consistently agree with those of human raters at a level as high, if not higher, as the level of agreement among human raters themselves. The system offers medical educators many benefits for scoring constructed-response tasks, such as improving the consistency of scoring, reducing the time required for scoring and reporting, minimising the costs of scoring, and providing students with immediate feedback on constructed-response tasks. © 2014

  11. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  12. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries...... in optimal O(k) time. The structure uses O(n) words of space and can be constructed in O(n logn) time. The data structure can be extended to solve the online version of the problem, where the elements in A[i..j] are reported one-by-one in sorted order, in O(1) worst-case time per element. The problem...... is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  13. Random Walk Picture of Basketball Scoring

    CERN Document Server

    Gabel, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence, based on play-by-play data from all 6087 games from the 2006/07--2009/10 seasons of the National Basketball Association (NBA), that basketball scoring is well described by a weakly-biased continuous-time random walk. The time between successive scoring events follows an exponential distribution, with little memory between different scoring intervals. Using this random-walk picture that is augmented by features idiosyncratic to basketball, we account for a wide variety of statistical properties of scoring, such as the distribution of the score difference between opponents and the fraction of game time that one team is in the lead. By further including the heterogeneity of team strengths, we build a computational model that accounts for essentially all statistical features of game scoring data and season win/loss records of each team.

  14. Personalized video summarization based on group scoring

    OpenAIRE

    Darabi, K; G. Ghinea

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an expert-based model for generation of personalized video summaries is suggested. The video frames are initially scored and annotated by multiple video experts. Thereafter, the scores for the video segments that have been assigned the higher priorities by end users will be upgraded. Considering the required summary length, the highest scored video frames will be inserted into a personalized final summary. For evaluation purposes, the video summaries generated by our system have...

  15. TIMI Risk Score predicts early readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soiza, Roy L; Hughes, Niall J; Leslie, Stephen J; Peden, Norman R; Hargreaves, Allister D

    2006-08-10

    To assess if the TIMI Risk Score could predict early readmission. 869 consecutive admissions to a Scottish district general hospital with suspected acute coronary syndrome. A computerised clinical information system was interrogated to verify readmission. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve and chi-square test for trend between TIMI Risk Score and readmission rate were calculated. Median follow up was 73 days. There was a strong association between TIMI Risk Score and readmission rate (chi-square test for trend, pTIMI Risk Score can predict readmission. This study reinforces its utility as a tool for identifying patients more likely to benefit from aggressive intervention.

  16. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...... an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the localization...

  17. Coronary artery calcium score: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry

    2017-01-01

    The coronary artery calcium score plays an Important role In cardiovascular risk stratification, showing a significant association with the medium- or long-term occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Here, we discuss the following: protocols for the acquisition and quantification of the coronary artery calcium score by multidetector computed tomography; the role of the coronary artery calcium score in coronary risk stratification and its comparison with other clinical scores; its indications, interpretation, and prognosis in asymptomatic patients; and its use in patients who are symptomatic or have diabetes. PMID:28670030

  18. A clinical predictive score for postoperative myasthenic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Tetsuya; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Sato, Yasunori; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Himuro, Keiichi; Oda, Fumiko; Ozawa, Yukiko; Nakahara, Jin; Suzuki, Norihiro; Takahashi, Yuko K; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yokota, Takanori; Ogawa, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Izaki, Shoko; Oji, Satoru; Nomura, Kyoichi; Kaneko, Juntaro; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2017-10-30

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mostly caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) associated with thymus abnormalities. Thymectomy has been proven to be an efficacious treatment for patients with MG, but postoperative myasthenic crisis often occurs and is a major complication. We aimed to develop and validate a simple scoring system based on clinical characteristics in the preoperative status to predict the risk of postoperative myasthenic crisis. We studied 393 patients with MG who underwent thymectomy at six tertiary centers in Japan (275 patients for derivation and 118 for validation). Clinical characteristics, such as gender, age at onset and operation, body mass index, disease duration, MG subtype, severity, symptoms, preoperative therapy, operative data, and laboratory data, were reviewed retrospectively. A multivariate logistic regression with LASSO penalties was used to determine the factors associated with postoperative myasthenic crisis and score was assigned. Finally, the predictive score was evaluated using bootstrapping technique in the derivation and validation group. Multivariate logistic regression identified three clinical factors for predicting postoperative myasthenic crisis risk: (1) vital capacity crisis predictive score, ranging from 0 to 6 points, had areas under the curve of 0.84 (0.66 - 0.96) in the derivation group and 0.80 (0.62 - 0.95) in the validation group. A simple scoring system based on three preoperative clinical characteristics can predict the possibility of postoperative myasthenic crisis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  19. Lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, C. L.; Poehler, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    A lightning detector and ranging (LDAR) system developed at the Kennedy Space Center and recently transferred to Wallops Island is described. The system detects pulsed VHF signals due to electrical discharges occurring in a thunderstorm by means of 56-75 MHz receivers located at the hub and at the tips of 8 km radial lines. Incoming signals are transmitted by wideband links to a central computing facility which processes the times of arrival, using two independent calculations to determine position in order to guard against false data. The results are plotted on a CRT display, and an example of a thunderstorm lightning strike detection near Kennedy Space Center is outlined. The LDAR correctly identified potential ground strike zones and additionally provided a high correlation between updrafts and ground strikes.

  20. Semiparametric Copula Models for Biometric Score Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In biometric recognition systems, biometric samples (images of faces, finger- prints, voices, gaits, etc.) of people are compared and classifiers (matchers) indicate the level of similarity between any pair of samples by a score. If two samples of the same person are compared, a genuine score is

  1. What do educational test scores really measure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture, attitudes......, and possible incentive problems make it more difficult to elicit true values of what the tests measure....

  2. Comparability of IQ scores over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Must, O.; te Nijenhuis, J.; Must, A.; van Vianen, A.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the comparability of IQ scores. Three cohorts (1933/36, 1997/98, 2006) of Estonian students (N = 2173) are compared using the Estonian National Intelligence Test. After 72 years the secular rise of the IQ test scores is.79 SD. The mean .16 SD increase in the last 8 years

  3. Observed Score Linear Equating with Covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branberg, Kenny; Wiberg, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined observed score linear equating in two different data collection designs, the equivalent groups design and the nonequivalent groups design, when information from covariates (i.e., background variables correlated with the test scores) was included. The main purpose of the study was to examine the effect (i.e., bias, variance, and…

  4. Quality scores for 32,000 genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Miriam L.; Hyatt, Doug; Jun, Se-Ran

    2014-01-01

    public databases, and assigned quality scores for more than 30,000 prokaryotic genome sequences. Results Scores were assigned using four categories: the completeness of the assembly, the presence of full-length rRNA genes, tRNA composition and the presence of a set of 102 conserved genes in prokaryotes...

  5. The AASM scoring manual: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M

    2009-11-01

    Summarize recently published studies and critiques evaluating the effects of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) Sleep Scoring Manual. Only a few retrospective studies have been published evaluating the new AASM Scoring Manual. These have shown that when scoring polysomnograms (PSGs) using the AASM rules compared to previous standards and guidelines: increased amount and percentage of sleep time in Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREM) 1 (N1) and N3 sleep, and decreased NREM 2 (N2) sleep; improved interscorer reliability when scoring sleep stages in adults; large differences in apnea-hypopnea indexes (AHIs) using different hypopnea scoring definitions; and PSGs scored using the 'recommended' hypopnea definition in the new manual identified no significant sleep disordered breathing in 40% of lean individuals with symptomatic OSA (AHI ≥5/h by 1999 'Chicago' criteria) and a favorable response to treatment. Two years have passed since the AASM Scoring Manual was published, garnering less criticism than was feared by those who developed it. The improvement in interscorer reliability using the Manual is heartening since this goal shaped many of the choices made. The alternative hypopnea rule should be endorsed as a recommended option. The AASM Scoring Manual provides a foundation upon which we all can build rules and methods that quantify the complexity of sleep and its disorders. Multicenter validation and refinement of the Manual is encouraged.

  6. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Post- Laparatomy Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Surgical Apgar score (SAS) presents a simple, immediate and an objective means of determining surgical outcomes. The score has not been widely validated in low resource settings where it would be most valuable. This study aimed to evaluate its accuracy and applicability for patients undergoing ...

  7. On k-hypertournament losing scores

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzada, Shariefuddin

    2010-01-01

    We give a new and short proof of a theorem on k-hypertournament losing scores due to Zhou et al. [G. Zhou, T. Yao, K. Zhang, On score sequences of k-tournaments, European J. Comb., 21, 8 (2000) 993-1000.

  8. Validation of Three Scoring Risk Stratification Models for Thyroid Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Su Min; Ahn, Hye Shin; Baek, Jung Hwan; Ahn, Hwa Young; Chung, Yun Jae; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Sung Bin

    2017-11-06

    To minimize potential harm from overuse of fine-needle aspiration, Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (TIRADSs) were developed for thyroid nodule risk stratification. The purpose of this study was to perform validation of three scoring risk stratification models for thyroid nodules using ultrasonography features, a web-based malignancy risk stratification system at website (http://www.gap.pe.kr/thyroidnodule.php) and those developed by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology (KSThR) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). Using ultrasonography images, radiologists assessed thyroid nodules according to the following criteria: internal content, echogenicity of the solid portion, shape, margin, and calcifications. 954 patients (mean age, 50.8 years; range, 13-86 years) with 1112 nodules were evaluated in our institute from January 2013 to December 2014. The discrimination ability of the three models was assessed by estimating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Additionally, Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistics (calibration ability) were used to evaluate the agreement between the observed and expected number of nodules that were benign or malignant. Thyroid malignancy was present in 37.2% of nodules (414/1112). According to the 14-point web-based scoring risk stratification system, malignancy risk ranged from 4.5% to 100.0% and was positively associated with an increase in risk scores. The areas under the ROC curve of the validation set were 0.884 in the web-based, 0.891 in the KSThR, and 0.875 in the ACR scoring risk stratification models. The Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test indicated that the web-based scoring system showed the best-calibrated result with a p value of 0.078. The three scoring risk stratification models using the ultrasonography features of thyroid nodules to stratify malignancy risk showed acceptable predictive accuracy and similar areas under the curve. The web-based scoring system demonstrated

  9. Martial arts intervention decreases pain scores in children with malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Martin H; Thomas, Ronald; Cohen, Cindy; Bluth, Amanda C; Goldberg, Elimelech

    2016-01-01

    Martial arts intervention in disease has been mostly limited to adult inflammatory, musculoskeletal, or motor diseases, where a mechanical intervention effects positive change. However, the application and benefit to pain management in childhood malignancy are not well described. Here, we assess the effects of defined martial arts intervention in children with cancer with respect to their pain perception and management. Sixty-four children with childhood malignancies were enrolled in a martial arts program, which encompassed both meditation and movement modalities. Pain scores (0-10) were recorded pre- and post- 1-hour session intervention. Pain scores were crossed by total visits and tabulated by whether participant pain reduced at least 1 unit, stayed the same, or increased in intensity immediately after (post) participation session. Differences in pain scores were further compared by age and sex. Prepain and postpain scale data were measured for 64 participants, 43 males (67.2%) and 21 females (32.8%), ranging from 3 years to 19 years. Preintervention and postintervention data were obtained for 223 individual session visits. Mean number of patient participation visits was 1.8±1.6 (range one to nine visits). Of 116 individual measured sessions where the participants began with a pain score of at least 1, pain intensity reduced ≥1 unit in 85.3% (99/116) of visits, remained the same in 7.8% (9/116), and increased in 6.9% (8/116). For the majority (96.3%; 77/80) of sessions, participants began with a prepain intensity score of at least 5-10 with reduction in pain intensity following the session. The overall mean pain score presession visit was reduced bŷ40% (pre: 5.95±2.64 and post: 3.03±2.45 [95% CI: 2.34-3.50]; P ≤0.001). Median pain intensity scores had greater reductions with increased age of participants (3-6 years [-1], 7-10 years [-2], 11-14 years [-3], and 15-19 years [-4]). Martial arts intervention can provide a useful modality to decrease pain in

  10. Variability of word discrimination scores in clinical practice and consequences on their sensitivity to hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Annie; Bernard, André; Tordella, Laurent; Vergne, Judith; Gisbert, Annie; Martin, Christian; Richard, Céline

    2017-05-01

    Speech perception scores are widely used to assess patient's functional hearing, yet most linguistic material used in these audiometric tests dates to before the availability of large computerized linguistic databases. In an ENT clinic population of 120 patients with median hearing loss of 43-dB HL, we quantified the variability and the sensitivity of speech perception scores to hearing loss, measured using disyllabic word lists, as a function of both the number of ten-word lists and type of scoring used (word, syllables or phonemes). The mean word recognition scores varied significantly across lists from 54 to 68%. The median of the variability of the word recognition score ranged from 30% for one ten-word list down to 20% for three ten-word lists. Syllabic and phonemic scores showed much less variability with standard deviations decreasing by 1.15 with the use of syllabic scores and by 1.45 with phonemic scores. The sensitivity of each list to hearing loss and distortions varied significantly. There was an increase in the minimum effect size that could be seen for syllabic scores compared to word scores, with no significant further improvement with phonemic scores. The use of at least two ten-word lists, quoted in syllables rather than in whole words, contributed to a large decrease in variability and an increase in sensitivity to hearing loss. However, those results emphasize the need of using updated linguistic material for clinical speech score assessments.

  11. Relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Radnor, John M; Rhodes, Benjamin C; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players. Thirty males (11-16 years) were assessed for maturation, functional movement screen scores and a range of physical performance tests (squat jump, reactive strength index protocol and reactive agility cut). Older players significantly outperformed younger participants in all tests (P functional movement screen scores and maturation.

  12. Proposal of a Mediterranean Diet Serving Score.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Monteagudo

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated a relationship between Mediterranean Diet (MD adherence and the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and diabetes, etc. The study aim was to validate a novel instrument to measure MD adherence based on the consumption of food servings and food groups, and apply it in a female population from southern Spain and determining influential factors.The study included 1,155 women aged 12-83 yrs, classified as adolescents, adults, and over-60-yr-olds. All completed a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. The Mediterranean Dietary Serving Score (MDSS is based on the latest update of the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, using the recommended consumption frequency of foods and food groups; the MDSS ranges from 0 to 24. The discriminative power or correct subject classification capacity of the MDSS was analyzed with the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve, using the MDS as reference method. Predictive factors for higher MDSS adherence were determined with a logistic regression model, adjusting for age. According to ROC curve analysis, MDSS evidenced a significant discriminative capacity between adherents and non-adherents to the MD pattern (optimal cutoff point=13.50; sensitivity=74%; specificity=48%. The mean MDSS was 12.45 (2.69 and was significantly higher with older age (p<0.001. Logistic regression analysis showed highest MD adherence by over 60-year-olds with low BMI and no habit of eating between meals.The MDSS is an updated, easy, valid, and accurate instrument to assess MD adherence based on the consumption of foods and food groups per meal, day, and week. It may be useful in future nutritional education programs to prevent the early onset of chronic non-transmittable diseases in younger populations.

  13. Gambling score in earthquake prediction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchan, G.; Romashkova, L.

    2011-03-01

    The number of successes and the space-time alarm rate are commonly used to characterize the strength of an earthquake prediction method and the significance of prediction results. It has been recently suggested to use a new characteristic to evaluate the forecaster's skill, the gambling score (GS), which incorporates the difficulty of guessing each target event by using different weights for different alarms. We expand parametrization of the GS and use the M8 prediction algorithm to illustrate difficulties of the new approach in the analysis of the prediction significance. We show that the level of significance strongly depends (1) on the choice of alarm weights, (2) on the partitioning of the entire alarm volume into component parts and (3) on the accuracy of the spatial rate measure of target events. These tools are at the disposal of the researcher and can affect the significance estimate. Formally, all reasonable GSs discussed here corroborate that the M8 method is non-trivial in the prediction of 8.0 ≤M < 8.5 events because the point estimates of the significance are in the range 0.5-5 per cent. However, the conservative estimate 3.7 per cent based on the number of successes seems preferable owing to two circumstances: (1) it is based on relative values of the spatial rate and hence is more stable and (2) the statistic of successes enables us to construct analytically an upper estimate of the significance taking into account the uncertainty of the spatial rate measure.

  14. Validity of the FOUR Score Coma Scale in the Medical Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vivek N.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Danielson, Richard D.; Zubkov, Alexander Y.; Elmer, Jennifer L.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the validity of the FOUR (Full Outline of UnResponsiveness) score (ranging from 0 to 16), a new coma scale consisting of 4 components (eye response, motor response, brainstem reflexes, and respiration pattern), when used by the staff members of a medical intensive care unit (ICU). PATIENTS AND METHODS: This interobserver agreement study prospectively evaluated the use of the FOUR score to describe the condition of 100 critically ill patients from May 1, 2007, to April 30, 2008. We compared the FOUR score to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. For each patient, the FOUR score and the GCS score were determined by a randomly selected staff pair (nurse/fellow, nurse/consultant, fellow/fellow, or fellow/consultant). Pair wise weighted κ values were calculated for both scores for each observer pair. RESULTS: The interrater agreement with the FOUR score was excellent (weighted κ: eye response, 0.96; motor response, 0.97; brainstem reflex, 0.98; respiration pattern, 1.00) and similar to that obtained with the GCS (weighted κ: eye response, 0.96; motor response, 0.97; verbal response, 0.98). In terms of the predictive power for poor neurologic outcome (Modified Rankin Scale score, 3-6), the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75 for the FOUR score and 0.76 for the GCS score. The mortality rate for patients with the lowest FOUR score of 0 (89%) was higher than that for patients with the lowest GCS score of 3 (71%). CONCLUSION: The interrater agreement of FOUR score results was excellent among medical intensivists. In contrast to the GCS, all components of the FOUR score can be rated even when patients have undergone intubation. The FOUR score is a good predictor of the prognosis of critically ill patients and has important advantages over the GCS in the ICU setting. PMID:19648386

  15. Comparative study of four maxillofacial trauma scoring systems and expert score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yi; An, Jin-gang; He, Yang; Gong, Xi

    2014-11-01

    To select a scoring system suitable for the scoring of maxillofacial trauma by comparing 4 commonly used scoring systems according to expert scoring. Twenty-eight subjects who had experienced maxillofacial trauma constituted the study cohort. Four commonly used systems were selected: New Injury Severity Score (NISS), Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS), Maxillofacial Injury Severity Score (MFISS), and Maxillofacial Injury Severity Score (MISS). Each patient was graded using these 4 systems. From the experience of our trauma center, an expert scoring table was created. After the purpose and scheme of the study had been explained, 35 experts in maxillofacial surgery were invited to grade the injury of the 28 patients using the expert scoring table according to their clinical experience. The results of the 4 scoring systems and expert score were compared. The results of the 4 scoring systems and expert score demonstrated a normal distribution. All results demonstrated significant differences (P maxillofacial injuries. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Examining the Predictive Validity of NIH Peer Review Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Mark D; Nakamura, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    The predictive validity of peer review at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has not yet been demonstrated empirically. It might be assumed that the most efficient and expedient test of the predictive validity of NIH peer review would be an examination of the correlation between percentile scores from peer review and bibliometric indices of the publications produced from funded projects. The present study used a large dataset to examine the rationale for such a study, to determine if it would satisfy the requirements for a test of predictive validity. The results show significant restriction of range in the applications selected for funding. Furthermore, those few applications that are funded with slightly worse peer review scores are not selected at random or representative of other applications in the same range. The funding institutes also negotiate with applicants to address issues identified during peer review. Therefore, the peer review scores assigned to the submitted applications, especially for those few funded applications with slightly worse peer review scores, do not reflect the changed and improved projects that are eventually funded. In addition, citation metrics by themselves are not valid or appropriate measures of scientific impact. The use of bibliometric indices on their own to measure scientific impact would likely increase the inefficiencies and problems with replicability already largely attributed to the current over-emphasis on bibliometric indices. Therefore, retrospective analyses of the correlation between percentile scores from peer review and bibliometric indices of the publications resulting from funded grant applications are not valid tests of the predictive validity of peer review at the NIH.

  17. Comparison of functional outcome scores in radial polydactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Robert R; van Nieuwenhoven, Christianne A; Selles, Ruud W; Hovius, Steven E R

    2014-03-19

    A wide range of outcome assessment systems have been used to describe the results and evaluate residual impairment after surgery for radial polydactyly. We conducted a study to determine which of these assessment systems should be considered superior for the most common types of radial polydactyly (types II and IV). Ten outcome assessment systems were selected. Three examiners independently evaluated thirty-seven patients, aged four to twenty-two years, with radial polydactyly. Patients completed two manual activity questionnaires. Interobserver reliability was determined with use of an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Validity was assessed by correlating the results derived with the outcome assessment systems with functional visual analog scale (VAS), aesthetic VAS, and manual activity questionnaire scores. Thirty-seven patients (forty-one hands with radial polydactyly) were evaluated. All patients were assessed by at least two examiners. Reliability was highest for the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand (JSSH), Cheng et al., and Tada et al. assessment systems (overall ICCs ≥ 0.70). The JSSH system had the highest overall correlations (rs ranging from 0.48 to 0.80 and 0.45 to 0.63) with functional and aesthetic VAS scores. No significant correlations were found between the outcome scores and the results of the manual activity questionnaires after an average follow-up time of 112 months. Interobserver reliability was highest for the JSSH classification, which also showed superior correlations with both examiner-rated and patient-rated VAS scores for functional and aesthetic outcome compared with the other nine assessment systems. The finding of a poor correlation between the outcome scores and the results of manual activity questionnaires is in agreement with findings in published literature. We recommend the JSSH assessment method for the scientific evaluation of the outcomes, in terms of body structure and function, of the treatment of radial

  18. SwissScoring--a nationwide survey of NEMS assessing practices and its accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, A; Cerutti, B; Merlani, P; Perren, I; Previsdomini, M; Massarotto, P; Kaufmann, M; Rothen, H U

    2014-04-01

    The nine equivalents of nursing manpower use score (NEMS) is used to evaluate critical care nursing workload and occasionally to define hospital reimbursements. Little is known about the caregivers' accuracy in scoring, about factors affecting this accuracy and how validity of scoring is assured. Accuracy in NEMS scoring of Swiss critical care nurses was assessed using case vignettes. An online survey was performed to assess training and quality control of NEMS scoring and to collect structural and organizational data of participating intensive care units (ICUs). Aggregated structural and procedural data of the Swiss ICU Minimal Data Set were used for matching. Nursing staff from 64 (82%) of the 78 certified adult ICUs participated in this survey. Training and quality control of scoring shows large variability between ICUs. A total of 1378 nurses scored one out of 20 case vignettes: accuracy ranged from 63.7% (intravenous medications) to 99.1% (basic monitoring). Erroneous scoring (8.7% of all items) was more frequent than omitted scoring (3.2%). Mean NEMS per case was 28.0 ± 11.8 points (reference score: 25.7 ± 14.2 points). Mean bias was 2.8 points (95% confidence interval: 1.0-4.7); scores below 37.1 points were generally overestimated. Data from units with a greater nursing management staff showed a higher bias. Overall, nurses assess the NEMS score within a clinically acceptable range. Lower scores are generally overestimated. Inaccurate assessment was associated with a greater size of the nursing management staff. Swiss head nurses consider themselves motivated to assure appropriate scoring and its validation. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ORIGINAL AR TICLE Évaluation ofAlvarado Score as an Admission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    right iliac fossa pain and suspected diagnosis of acute appendicitis between J anuary 2004 and December 2004. They were assessed using Alvarado score. Main outcome measures in relation to these scores were, patient's admission, patient's discharge, and whether patient had appendicitis or not. RESULTS: The range ...

  20. Investigation of bias of hedonic scores when co-eliciting product attribute information using CATA questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Sara R.; Giacalone, Davide; Roigard, Cristina M.

    2013-01-01

    questions. The use of CATA concurrently with hedonic was benchmarked against concurrent attribute liking scores, attribute intensity scores and just-about-right scaling. Across a range of product categories (beer, fresh fruit, tea, flavoured water, crackers, savoury dips), only weak and transient evidence...

  1. The apgar score and infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Wu, Ting; Lei, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hao; Mao, Meng; Zhang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate if the Apgar score remains pertinent in contemporary practice after more than 50 years of wide use, and to assess the value of the Apgar score in predicting infant survival, expanding from the neonatal to the post-neonatal period. The U.S. linked live birth and infant death dataset was used, which included 25,168,052 singleton births and 768,305 twin births. The outcome of interest was infant death within 1 year after birth. Cox proportional hazard-model was used to estimate risk ratio of infant mortality with different Apgar scores. Among births with a very low Apgar score at five minutes (1-3), the neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rates remained high until term (≥ 37 weeks). On the other hand, among births with a high Apgar score (≥7), neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rate decreased progressively with gestational age. Non-Hispanic White had a consistently higher neonatal mortality than non-Hispanic Black in both preterm and term births. However, for post-neonatal mortality, Black had significantly higher rate than White. The pattern of changes in neonatal and post-neonatal mortality by Apgar score in twin births is essentially the same as that in singleton births. The Apgar score system has continuing value for predicting neonatal and post-neonatal adverse outcomes in term as well as preterm infants, and is applicable to twins and in various race/ethnic groups.

  2. THE EFFICIENCY OF TENNIS DOUBLES SCORING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Pollard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a family of scoring systems for tennis doubles for testing the hypothesis that pair A is better than pair B versus the alternative hypothesis that pair B is better than A, is established. This family or benchmark of scoring systems can be used as a benchmark against which the efficiency of any doubles scoring system can be assessed. Thus, the formula for the efficiency of any doubles scoring system is derived. As in tennis singles, one scoring system based on the play-the-loser structure is shown to be more efficient than the benchmark systems. An expression for the relative efficiency of two doubles scoring systems is derived. Thus, the relative efficiency of the various scoring systems presently used in doubles can be assessed. The methods of this paper can be extended to a match between two teams of 2, 4, 8, …doubles pairs, so that it is possible to establish a measure for the relative efficiency of the various systems used for tennis contests between teams of players.

  3. The apgar score and infant mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if the Apgar score remains pertinent in contemporary practice after more than 50 years of wide use, and to assess the value of the Apgar score in predicting infant survival, expanding from the neonatal to the post-neonatal period. METHODS: The U.S. linked live birth and infant death dataset was used, which included 25,168,052 singleton births and 768,305 twin births. The outcome of interest was infant death within 1 year after birth. Cox proportional hazard-model was used to estimate risk ratio of infant mortality with different Apgar scores. RESULTS: Among births with a very low Apgar score at five minutes (1-3, the neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rates remained high until term (≥ 37 weeks. On the other hand, among births with a high Apgar score (≥7, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rate decreased progressively with gestational age. Non-Hispanic White had a consistently higher neonatal mortality than non-Hispanic Black in both preterm and term births. However, for post-neonatal mortality, Black had significantly higher rate than White. The pattern of changes in neonatal and post-neonatal mortality by Apgar score in twin births is essentially the same as that in singleton births. CONCLUSIONS: The Apgar score system has continuing value for predicting neonatal and post-neonatal adverse outcomes in term as well as preterm infants, and is applicable to twins and in various race/ethnic groups.

  4. Sonographic Scoring for Operating Room Triage in Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendran, Krishnan MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST exam is a routine diagnostic adjunct in the initial assessment of blunt trauma victims but lacks the ability to reliably predict which patients require laparotomy. Physiologic data play a major role in decision making regarding the need for emergent laparotomy versus further diagnostic testing or observation. The need for laparotomy often influences the decision to transfer the patient to a trauma center. We set out to derive a simple scoring system using both ultrasound findings and immediately available physiologic data that would predict which patients require laparotomy.Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of victims of blunt trauma who presented to a Level 1 Trauma Center. We collected FAST findings, physiologic data, and lab values. A previously-developed ultrasound scoring system was applied to the FAST findings. Patients were followed to determine if they underwent laparotomy. We used logistic regression analysis to determine which variables correlated with laparotomy and developed a new scoring system.Results: We enrolled a convenience sample of 1,393 patients. A simple scoring system (range 0-6 was developed that included both FAST findings and vital signs (heart rate and blood pressure. Patients with a score of 0 or 1 had a less than 1% chance of requiring laparotomy.Conclusion: The combination of FAST findings with vital signs in our scoring system predicted which victims of blunt trauma did not undergo laparotomy. Applying this to trauma patients who present to non-trauma centers could help prevent unnecessary patient transfers. This derivation set must be validated prior to use in patient care. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:138-143.

  5. A comparison between modified Alvarado score and RIPASA score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Anand; Singla, Satpaul; Singh, Mohinder; Singla, Deeksha

    2016-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common but elusive surgical condition and remains a diagnostic dilemma. It has many clinical mimickers and diagnosis is primarily made on clinical grounds, leading to the evolution of clinical scoring systems for pin pointing the right diagnosis. The modified Alvarado and RIPASA scoring systems are two important scoring systems, for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We prospectively compared the two scoring systems for diagnosing acute appendicitis in 50 patients presenting with right iliac fossa pain. The RIPASA score correctly classified 88 % of patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis compared with 48.0 % with modified Alvarado score, indicating that RIPASA score is more superior to Modified Alvarado score in our clinical settings.

  6. Performance of an Automated Polysomnography Scoring System Versus Computer-Assisted Manual Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Atul; Younes, Magdy; Kuna, Samuel T.; Benca, Ruth; Kushida, Clete A.; Walsh, James; Hanlon, Alexandra; Staley, Bethany; Pack, Allan I.; Pien, Grace W.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Manual scoring of polysomnograms (PSG) is labor intensive and has considerable variance between scorers. Automation of scoring could reduce cost and improve reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to compare a new automated scoring system (YST-Limited, Winnipeg, Canada) with computer-assisted manual scoring. Design: Technical assessment. Setting: Five academic medical centers. Participants: N/A. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Seventy PSG files were selected at University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and distributed to five US academic sleep centers. Two blinded technologists from each center scored each file. Automatic scoring was performed at Penn by a YST Limited technician using a laptop containing the software. Variables examined were sleep stages, arousals, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) using three methods of identifying hypopneas. Automatic scores were not edited and were compared to the average scores of the 10 technologists. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was obtained for the 70 pairs and compared to across-sites ICCs for manually scored results. ICCs for automatic versus manual scoring were > 0.8 for total sleep time, stage N2, and nonrapid eye movement arousals and > 0.9 for AHI scored by primary and secondary American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. ICCs for other variables were not as high but were comparable to the across-site ICCs for manually scored results. Conclusion: The automatic system yielded results that were similar to those obtained by experienced technologists. Very good ICCs were obtained for many primary PSG outcome measures. This automated scoring software, particularly if supplemented with manual editing, may increase laboratory efficiency and standardize PSG scoring results within and across sleep centers. Citation: Malhotra A; Younes M; Kuna ST; Benca R; Kushida CA; Walsh J; Hanlon A; Staley B; Pack AI; Pien GW. Performance of an automated polysomnography scoring system versus computer

  7. Prognostic Value of TIMI Score versus GRACE Score in ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Luis C. L.; Guilherme Garcia; Felipe Kalil; Felipe Ferreira; Manuela Carvalhal; Ruan Oliveira; André Silva; Isis Vasconcelos; Caio Henri; Márcia Noya-Rabelo

    2014-01-01

    Background: The TIMI Score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was created and validated specifically for this clinical scenario, while the GRACE score is generic to any type of acute coronary syndrome. Objective: Between TIMI and GRACE scores, identify the one of better prognostic performance in patients with STEMI. Methods: We included 152 individuals consecutively admitted for STEMI. The TIMI and GRACE scores were tested for their discriminatory ability (C-stati...

  8. Multicentre validation of the bedside paediatric early warning system score: a severity of illness score to detect evolving critical illness in hospitalised children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The timely provision of critical care to hospitalised patients at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest is contingent upon identification and referral by frontline providers. Current approaches require improvement. In a single-centre study, we developed the Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (Bedside PEWS) score to identify patients at risk. The objective of this study was to validate the Bedside PEWS score in a large patient population at multiple hospitals. Methods We performed an international, multicentre, case-control study of children admitted to hospital inpatient units with no limitations on care. Case patients had experienced a clinical deterioration event involving either an immediate call to a resuscitation team or urgent admission to a paediatric intensive care unit. Control patients had no events. The scores ranged from 0 to 26 and were assessed in the 24 hours prior to the clinical deterioration event. Score performance was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUCROC) curve by comparison with the retrospective rating of nurses and the temporal progression of scores in case patients. Results A total of 2,074 patients were evaluated at 4 participating hospitals. The median (interquartile range) maximum Bedside PEWS scores for the 12 hours ending 1 hour before the clinical deterioration event were 8 (5 to 12) in case patients and 2 (1 to 4) in control patients (P scores were 5.3 at 20 to 24 hours and 8.4 at 0 to 4 hours before the event (P score (P score identified children at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest. Scores were elevated and continued to increase in the 24 hours before the clinical deterioration event. Prospective clinical evaluation is needed to determine whether this score will improve the quality of care and patient outcomes. PMID:21812993

  9. Facilitating the Interpretation of English Language Proficiency Scores: Combining Scale Anchoring and Test Score Mapping Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald; Schedl, Mary; Papageorgiou, Spiros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, for the benefit of both test takers and test score users, enhanced "TOEFL ITP"® test score reports that go beyond the simple numerical scores that are currently reported. To do so, we applied traditional scale anchoring (proficiency scaling) to item difficulty data in order to develop performance…

  10. Score-based likelihood ratios for handwriting evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, Amanda B; Saunders, Christopher P; Davis, Linda J; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2012-06-10

    samples from over 400 writers. We found that, when provided with the same two items of evidence, the three methods often would lead to differing conclusions (with rates of disagreement ranging from 0.005 to 0.48). Rates of misleading evidence and Tippet plots are both used to characterize the range of behavior for the methods over varying sized questioned documents. The appendix shows that the three score-based likelihood ratios are theoretically very different not only from each other, but also from the likelihood ratio, and as a consequence each display drastically different behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microphone sensitivity as a source of variation in nasalance scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, D J; Lutz, R; Mayo, R

    1996-12-01

    A two-part study was conducted to determine the sources of variation in nasalance scores derived from the Nasometer. In Study #1, a function generator was used as a signal source to calibrate and input sine and square waves directly into the Nasometer. Ten stimuli ranging from 105 to 330 Hz in 25 Hz increments were evaluated. In Study #2, the same signal source and an amplified loudspeaker were used to calibrate and present square waves to the nasometer via five different sets of microphones. The sound pressure level of all stimuli was maintained at 88 dB. Each microphone set was calibrated using the 105 Hz signals. Results from Study #1 indicated consistent nasalance scores across all frequencies (i.e., all scores were within 2% of calibration). Results from Study #2 demonstrated deviations greater than 2% from calibration as a function of frequency for all five sets of microphones. The smallest deviation was 5%, whereas the largest deviation was 14%. We suggest that the variation in nasalance as a function of stimulus frequency may be due to a mismatch in the sensitivity of microphones (i.e., different frequency response characteristics). It is further suggested (a) that individual investigators determine the response characteristics of their microphones and (b) that relatively small variations in nasalance scores (i.e., 5-14%) either within or across speakers be interpreted with caution.

  12. Diffusion abnormality maps in demyelinating disease: correlations with clinical scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Roceanu, Adina; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Bendic, Robert; Tarta, Eugen; Preoteasa, Florentin; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as a noninvasive tool to assess pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the correlation between classical MRI measures and physical disability is modest in MS. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI technique holds particular promise in this regard. The present study shows brain regions where FA and individual diffusivities abnormalities are present and check their correlations with physical disability clinical scores. Eight patients and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR-DTI acquisitions, a Genesis Signa 1.5 T MR system, an EP/SE scanning sequence, 25 gradient directions were used. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) group comparisons showed reduced FA and increased individual diffusivities in several brain regions in patients. Significant correlations were found between FA and: EDSS, 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score; between λ2 and: P100 (r&l), 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW; between λ3 and: 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score. Fractional anisotropy and individual radial diffusivities proved to be important markers of motor disabilities in MS patients when the disease duration mean and the disability scores values range are relatively high. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Climiate Resilience Screening Index and Domain Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CRSI and related-domain scores for all 50 states and 3135 counties in the U.S. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: They are already available within the...

  14. GMAT Scores of Undergraduate Economics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Paul A.; Monson, Terry D.

    2008-01-01

    The average score of economics majors on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) exceeds those of nearly all humanities and arts, social sciences, and business undergraduate majors but not those of most science, engineering, and mathematics majors. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. (IPSS) and Visual Prostate Symptoms Score

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.O. Abiola

    2016-01-12

    VPSS) and International Prostate. Symptoms Score (IPSS) questionnaires for the assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in. Nigerian men, with special emphasis on the ease of administration and the time needed ...

  16. Reliability of a Scoring System for Qualitative Evaluation of Lymphoscintigraphy of the Lower Extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Mojgan; Savitcheva, Irina; Axelsson, Rimma

    2017-09-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy is an imaging technique to diagnose and characterize the severity of edema in the upper and lower extremities. In lymphoscintigraphy, a scoring system can increase the ability to differentiate between diagnoses, but the use of any scoring system requires sufficient reliability. Our aim was to determine the inter- and intraobserver reliability of a proposed scoring system for visual interpretation of lymphoscintigrams of the lower extremities. Methods: The lymphoscintigrams of 81 persons were randomly selected from our database for retrospective evaluation. Two nuclear medicine physicians scored these scans according to the 8 criteria of a proposed scoring system for visual interpretation of lymphoscintigrams of the lower extremities. Each scan was scored twice 3 mo apart. The total score was the sum of the scores for all criteria, with a potential range of 0 (normal lymphatic drainage) to 58 (severe lymphatic impairment). The intra- and interobserver reliability of the scoring system was determined using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, percentage of agreement, weighted κ, and intraclass correlation coefficient with 95% confidence interval. In addition, for 7 categories, differences in total scores between and within observers were determined. Results: We found some insignificant differences between observers. Percentage agreement was high or very high, at 82.7%-99.4% between observers and 84.6%-99.4% within observers. For each criterion of the scoring system, the κ-correlations showed moderate to very good inter- or intraobserver reliability. The total scores for all criteria had good inter- and intraobserver reliability. Regarding the interobserver comparison, 66% and 64% of the difference in total scores were within ±1 scale point (-1, +1), and regarding the intraobserver comparison, 68% and 72% of the difference in total scores were within ±1 scale point. Conclusion: The proposed scoring system is a reliable tool for visual qualitative

  17. Gleason score 5 + 3 = 8 prostate cancer: much more like Gleason score 9?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahal, Brandon A; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Chen, Yu-Wei; Choueiri, Toni K; Hoffman, Karen E; Hu, Jim C; Sweeney, Christopher J; Yu, James B; Feng, Felix Y; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether patients with Gleason score 5 + 3 = 8 prostate cancer have outcomes more similar to other patients with Gleason score 8 disease or to patients with Gleason score 9 disease. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to study 40 533 men diagnosed with N0M0 Gleason score 8 or 9 prostate cancer from 2004 to 2011. Using Gleason score 4 + 4 = 8 as the referent, Fine and Gray competing risks regression analyses modelled the association between Gleason score and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). The 5-year PCSM rates for patients with Gleason score 4 + 4 = 8, 3 + 5 = 8, 5 + 3 = 8, and 9 disease were 6.3%, 6.6%, 13.5%, and 13.9%, respectively (P Gleason score 5 + 3 = 8 or 9 disease had up to a two-fold increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.50-2.38, P Gleason score 4 + 4 = 8). There was no difference in PCSM between patients with Gleason score 5 + 3 = 8 vs 9 disease (P = 0.25). Gleason score 8 disease represents a heterogeneous entity with PCSM outcomes distinguishable by the primary Gleason pattern. The PCSM of Gleason score 3 + 5 = 8 and Gleason 4 + 4 = 8 disease are similar, but patients with Gleason score 5 + 3 = 8 have a risk of PCSM that is twice as high as other patients with Gleason score 8 disease and should be considered to have a similar poor prognosis as patients with Gleason score 9 disease. Such patients should be allowed onto trials seeking the highest-risk patients in which to test novel aggressive treatment strategies. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. AN AUTOMATED SCORING APPROACH FOR ESSAY QUESTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alzahrani, Ahmed; Alzahrani, Abdulkareem; Alarfaj, Fawaz; Almohammadi, Khalid; Alrashidi, Malek

    2014-01-01

    Theautomated scoring or evaluation for written student responses have been, andare still a highly interesting topic for both education and natural languageprocessing, NLP, researchers alike. With the obvious motivation of thedifficulties teachers face when marking or correcting open essay questions; thedevelopment of automatic scoring methods have recently received much attention.In this paper, we developed and compared number of NLP techniques thataccomplish this task. The baseline for this ...

  19. Prehospital severity scoring at major rock concert events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, T B; Koenigsberg, M; Bunney, E B; Schurgin, B; Levy, P; Willens, J; Tanner, L

    1997-01-01

    Rock and contemporary music concerts are popular, recurrent events requiring on-site medical staffing. To describe a novel severity score used to stratify the level of acuity of patients presenting to first-aid stations at these events. Retrospective review of charts generated at the first-aid stations of five major rock concerts within a 60,000 spectator capacity, outdoor, professional sports stadium. Participants included all concert patrons presenting to the stadium's first-aid stations as patients. Data were collected on patient demographics, history of drug or ethanol usage while at the concert event, first-aid station time, treatment rendered, diagnosis, and disposition. All patients evaluated were retrospectively assigned a "DRUG-ROCK" Injury Severity Score (DRISS) to stratify their level of acuity. Individual concert events and patient dispositions were compared statistically using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and the ANOVA Mean tests. Approximately 250,000 spectators attended the five concert events. First-aid stations evaluated 308 patients (utilization rate of 1.2 per 1,000 patrons). The most common diagnosis was minor trauma (130; 42%), followed in frequency by ethanol/illicit drug intoxication (98; 32%). The average time in the first-aid station was 23.5 +/- 22.5 minutes (+/- standard deviation; range: 5-150 minutes). Disposition of patients included 100 (32.5%) who were treated and released; 98 (32%) were transported by paramedics to emergency departments (EDs); and 110 (35.5%) signed-out against medical advise (AMA), refusing transport. The mean DRISS was 4.1 (+/- 2.65). Two-thirds (67%) of the study population were ranked as mild by DRISS criteria (score = 1-4), with 27% rated as moderate (score = 5-9), and 6% severe (score > 10). The average of severity scores was highest (6.5) for patients transported to hospitals, and statistically different from the scores of the average of the treated and released and AMA groups (p < 0.005). The DRISS was useful

  20. Model for predicting the injury severity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Shuichi; Oshima, Kiyohiro; Murata, Masato; Kaneko, Minoru; Aoki, Makoto; Kanbe, Masahiko; Nakamura, Takuro; Ohyama, Yoshio; Tamura, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    To determine the formula that predicts the injury severity score from parameters that are obtained in the emergency department at arrival. We reviewed the medical records of trauma patients who were transferred to the emergency department of Gunma University Hospital between January 2010 and December 2010. The injury severity score, age, mean blood pressure, heart rate, Glasgow coma scale, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, platelet count, fibrinogen, international normalized ratio of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrin degradation products, were examined in those patients on arrival. To determine the formula that predicts the injury severity score, multiple linear regression analysis was carried out. The injury severity score was set as the dependent variable, and the other parameters were set as candidate objective variables. IBM spss Statistics 20 was used for the statistical analysis. Statistical significance was set at P  Watson ratio was 2.200. A formula for predicting the injury severity score in trauma patients was developed with ordinary parameters such as fibrin degradation products and mean blood pressure. This formula is useful because we can predict the injury severity score easily in the emergency department.

  1. Pharmacophore-based similarity scoring for DOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingling; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-01-22

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein-ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK.

  2. The longitudinal reliability and responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System (HOAMRIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, Ida K.; Eshed, Iris; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the interreader reliability of change scores and the responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis (OA) Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Scoring System (HOAMRIS). Methods. Paired MRI (baseline and 5-yr followup) from 20 patients with hand OA were scored with known time.......24-0.73). Conclusion. Good to very good interreader ICC values were found for cross-sectional readings, whereas the longitudinal reliability was lower because of a smaller range of change scores. All features, except cysts and BML, showed good responsiveness....

  3. Introducing the SKIN score: a validated scoring system to assess severity of mastectomy skin flap necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaine, Valerie; Hoskin, Tanya L; Farley, David R; Grant, Clive S; Boughey, Judy C; Torstenson, Tiffany A; Jacobson, Steven R; Jakub, James W; Degnim, Amy C

    2015-09-01

    With increasing use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR), mastectomy skin flap necrosis (MSFN) is a clinical problem that deserves further study. We propose a validated scoring system to discriminate MSFN severity and standardize its assessment. Women who underwent skin-sparing (SSM) or nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and IBR from November 2009 to October 2010 were studied retrospectively. A workgroup of breast and plastic surgeons scored postoperative photographs using the skin ischemia necrosis (SKIN) score to assess depth and surface area of MSFN. We evaluated correlation of the SKIN score with reoperation for MSFN and its reproducibility in an external sample of surgeons. We identified 106 subjects (175 operated breasts: 103 SSM, 72 NSM) who had ≥1 postoperative photograph within 60 days. SKIN scores correlated strongly with need for reoperation for MSFN, with an AUC of 0.96 for SSM and 0.89 for NSM. External scores agreed well with the gold standard scores for the breast mound photographs with weighted kappa values of 0.82 (depth), 0.56 (surface area), and 0.79 (composite score). The agreement was similar for the nipple-areolar complex photographs: 0.75 (depth), 0.63 (surface area), and 0.79 (composite score). A simple scoring system to assess the severity of MSFN is proposed, incorporating both depth and surface area of MSFN. The SKIN score correlates strongly with the need for reoperation to manage MSFN and is reproducible among breast and plastic surgeons.

  4. Factors associated with self-reported pain scores among ED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A; Nagel, Jacqueline; Klink, Ellen; Baehren, David

    2012-02-01

    Pain is a common presenting complaint among emergency department (ED) patients. The verbal numeric pain scale is commonly used in the ED to assess self-reported pain. This study was undertaken to describe and compare pain scores in a variety of painful conditions and identify factors associated with self-reported pain scores. The study was a prospective, observational, descriptive survey study conducted at an urban university hospital ED. Eligible participants included consenting adults 18 years and older, with an acute painful condition, who spoke English, and were not in severe distress. Through a structured interview, collected data included pain score; diagnosis; medical history; previous painful experiences; and demographic information including age, insurance status, and highest level of education completed. Among 268 eligible participants, 263 (98%) consented and completed the study protocol. Seventy-one percent of participants were 50 years old or younger; 55%, women; and 68%, white. Fifty-four percent had private insurance, and 81%, high school education or higher. The most common chief complaints were soft tissue injury (33%), abdominal pain (18%), and chest pain (13%). The median self-reported pain score was 7/10 (mean, 6.7; interquartile range, 6-9; range, 0-10). The most common previous painful experiences were childbirth (21%), major trauma (18%), and surgery (14%). Participants cited reasons for self-reported pain scores, including current feeling of pain (62%), comparison to previous pain (31%), and comparison to hypothetical pain (12%). The number of previous ED visits was positively correlated with current pain score (Spearman correlation R = 0.28; P associated with the highest pain scores included dental pain (mean pain score, 8.5) and back pain (mean pain score, 7.6). Chief complaints associated with the lowest pain scores included chest pain (mean pain score, 5.2) and other medical conditions (mean pain score, 5.3). Factors associated with

  5. The development and evaluation of a new shoulder scoring system based on the view of patients and physicians: the Fudan University shoulder score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yunshen; Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Jiwu; Hua, Yinghui; Li, Yunxia

    2013-04-01

    Existing patient self-reported shoulder scoring systems fail to express physicians' points of view, and understanding the wording can sometimes lead to confusion in Easterners. We sought to develop a valid, reliable, and responsive shoulder scoring system that combines the points of view of physicians and patients and is easily understood for worldwide applicability. Six steps were followed to develop the scale: (1) investigation, identification of a specific population, and patient and physician interviews; (2) item generation, according to existing shoulder scales, a literature review, and patient and physician interviews; (3) item reduction, by combining and adjusting items; (4) formatting of the questionnaire, designed using both subjective and objective scales, with a 100-point score range; (5) pretesting, to eliminate confusion and misunderstanding of items, and (6) preliminary evaluation. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess validity (compared with American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Constant-Murley, and University of California, Los Angeles scores), intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to assess reliability (with a 2-week test-retest interval), and the standardized response mean was calculated to assess responsiveness (comparing preoperative and postoperative scores in patients). The final scoring system was designed to have a 100-point score range, with higher scores indicating better function. It consisted of self-report assessment by patients (61 points in total) and objective assessment by physicians (39 points in total). Updated scales, including a night pain subscale, patient-physician satisfaction, and 2-dimensional visual analog scale tool, were incorporated in our system. Compared with the other 3 scoring systems (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Constant-Murley, and University of California, Los Angeles scores), the new scoring system has shown favorable validity, with a Pearson correlation coefficient

  6. Genetic evaluation of elbow scores and the relationship with hip scores in UK Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T W; Ilska, J J; Blott, S C; Woolliams, J A

    2011-08-01

    A linear mixed model analysis of elbow and hip score data from UK Labrador retrievers was used to estimate the heritability of elbow score (0.16-0.19) and to determine a moderate and beneficial genetic correlation with hip score (0.40). A small improvement in the genetic trend of elbow score was observed during the years 2000-2008, equivalent to avoiding only the worst 3-4% of scored dogs for breeding, but close to what may have been anticipated if the current British Veterinary Association-approved guidelines were followed. Calculations suggested that a correlated response to indirect selection on hip score may elicit a greater response than direct selection on elbow score and that the genetic trend in elbow score may be explained as a consequence of the stronger selection pressure that has been placed on hip score. Increases in the accuracy of estimated breeding values for elbow score of 4-7% for dogs with elbow data only and 7-11% for dogs with both hip and elbow score were observed from bivariate analysis of elbow and hip data. A selection index confirmed the benefits of bivariate analysis of elbow and hip score data by identifying increases in accuracy (directly related to the response to selection) of 14% from the use of optimum coefficients compared to use of hip data only. The quantified genetic correlation means that hip score effectively acts as a 'secondary indicator' of elbow score in this breed and the preponderance of hip data means that it acts as a major source of information that may be used to improve the accuracy of estimates of genetic risk for elbow dysplasia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome score generated from definite mitochondrial disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finsterer J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Josef Finsterer,1 Sinda Zarrouk-Mahjoub2 1Municipal Hospital Rudolfstiftung, Vienna, Austria; 2Genomics Platform, Pasteur Institute of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia Objectives: Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs frequently present as mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome (MIMODS at onset or evolve into MIMODS during the course. This study aimed to find which organs and/or tissues are most frequently affected by MIMODS, which are the most frequent abnormalities within an affected organ, whether there are typical MIMODS patterns, and to generate an MIMODS score to assess the diagnostic probability for an MID.Methods: This is a retrospective evaluation of clinical, biochemical, and genetic investigations of adult patients with definite MIDs. A total of 36 definite MID patients, 19 men and 17 women, aged 29–82 years were included in this study. The diagnosis was based on genetic testing (n=21, on biochemical investigations (n=17, or on both (n=2.Results: The number of organs most frequently affected was 4 ranging from 1 to 9. MIMODS was diagnosed in 97% of patients. The organs most frequently affected were the muscle (97%, central nervous system (CNS; 72%, endocrine glands (69%, heart (58%, intestines (55%, and peripheral nerves (50%. The most frequent CNS abnormalities were leukoencephalopathy, prolonged visually evoked potentials, and atrophy. The most frequent endocrine abnormalities included thyroid dysfunction, short stature, and diabetes. The most frequent cardiac abnormalities included arrhythmias, systolic dysfunction, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The most frequent MIMODS patterns were encephalomyopathy, encephalo-myo-endocrinopathy, and encepalo-myo-endocrino-cardiopathy. The mean ± 2SD MIMODS score was 35.97±27.6 (range =11–71. An MIMODS score >10 was regarded as indicative of an MID.Conclusion: Adult MIDs manifest as MIMODS in the vast majority of the cases. The organs most frequently affected in MIMODS are muscles, CNS, endocrine

  8. Mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome score generated from definite mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) frequently present as mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome (MIMODS) at onset or evolve into MIMODS during the course. This study aimed to find which organs and/or tissues are most frequently affected by MIMODS, which are the most frequent abnormalities within an affected organ, whether there are typical MIMODS patterns, and to generate an MIMODS score to assess the diagnostic probability for an MID. This is a retrospective evaluation of clinical, biochemical, and genetic investigations of adult patients with definite MIDs. A total of 36 definite MID patients, 19 men and 17 women, aged 29-82 years were included in this study. The diagnosis was based on genetic testing (n=21), on biochemical investigations (n=17), or on both (n=2). The number of organs most frequently affected was 4 ranging from 1 to 9. MIMODS was diagnosed in 97% of patients. The organs most frequently affected were the muscle (97%), central nervous system (CNS; 72%), endocrine glands (69%), heart (58%), intestines (55%), and peripheral nerves (50%). The most frequent CNS abnormalities were leukoencephalopathy, prolonged visually evoked potentials, and atrophy. The most frequent endocrine abnormalities included thyroid dysfunction, short stature, and diabetes. The most frequent cardiac abnormalities included arrhythmias, systolic dysfunction, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The most frequent MIMODS patterns were encephalomyopathy, encephalo-myo-endocrinopathy, and encepalo-myo-endocrino-cardiopathy. The mean ± 2SD MIMODS score was 35.97±27.6 (range =11-71). An MIMODS score >10 was regarded as indicative of an MID. Adult MIDs manifest as MIMODS in the vast majority of the cases. The organs most frequently affected in MIMODS are muscles, CNS, endocrine glands, and heart. An MIMODS score >10 suggests an MID.

  9. Nasalance score variation in normal adult Japanese speakers of Mid-West Japanese dialect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachimura, T; Mori, C; Hirata, S I; Wada, T

    2000-09-01

    The aims of this study were to examine nasalance score variation for normal adult Japanese speakers of Mid-West dialect and the gender difference in average mean nasalance score. Nasalance scores were obtained using a nasometer model 6200. The sample stimulus "Kitsutsuki passage," constructed of four sentences containing no Japanese nasal sounds, was used three times by each subject. One hundred normal adult speakers (50 women and 50 men) of Japanese served as subjects. The subjects ranged in age from 19 to 35 years of age (24.0 +/- 3.2). A mean nasalance score as well as an overall average nasalance value across speakers was calculated for each subject. The average mean nasalance scores between men and women were compared. The average mean nasalance score for the normal Japanese speakers was 9.1% (+/- 3.9). There was no statistically significant sex difference (p nasometer.

  10. Optimizing Scoring and Sampling Methods for Assessing Built Neighborhood Environment Quality in Residential Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Brimpong, Joel; Coffey, Nathan; Ayers, Colby; Berrigan, David; Yingling, Leah R; Thomas, Samantha; Mitchell, Valerie; Ahuja, Chaarushi; Rivers, Joshua; Hartz, Jacob; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M

    2017-03-08

    Optimization of existing measurement tools is necessary to explore links between aspects of the neighborhood built environment and health behaviors or outcomes. We evaluate a scoring method for virtual neighborhood audits utilizing the Active Neighborhood Checklist (the Checklist), a neighborhood audit measure, and assess street segment representativeness in low-income neighborhoods. Eighty-two home neighborhoods of Washington, D.C. Cardiovascular Health/Needs Assessment (NCT01927783) participants were audited using Google Street View imagery and the Checklist (five sections with 89 total questions). Twelve street segments per home address were assessed for (1) Land-Use Type; (2) Public Transportation Availability; (3) Street Characteristics; (4) Environment Quality and (5) Sidewalks/Walking/Biking features. Checklist items were scored 0-2 points/question. A combinations algorithm was developed to assess street segments' representativeness. Spearman correlations were calculated between built environment quality scores and Walk Score®, a validated neighborhood walkability measure. Street segment quality scores ranged 10-47 (Mean = 29.4 ± 6.9) and overall neighborhood quality scores, 172-475 (Mean = 352.3 ± 63.6). Walk scores® ranged 0-91 (Mean = 46.7 ± 26.3). Street segment combinations' correlation coefficients ranged 0.75-1.0. Significant positive correlations were found between overall neighborhood quality scores, four of the five Checklist subsection scores, and Walk Scores® (r = 0.62, p < 0.001). This scoring method adequately captures neighborhood features in low-income, residential areas and may aid in delineating impact of specific built environment features on health behaviors and outcomes.

  11. Optimizing Scoring and Sampling Methods for Assessing Built Neighborhood Environment Quality in Residential Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Adu-Brimpong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of existing measurement tools is necessary to explore links between aspects of the neighborhood built environment and health behaviors or outcomes. We evaluate a scoring method for virtual neighborhood audits utilizing the Active Neighborhood Checklist (the Checklist, a neighborhood audit measure, and assess street segment representativeness in low-income neighborhoods. Eighty-two home neighborhoods of Washington, D.C. Cardiovascular Health/Needs Assessment (NCT01927783 participants were audited using Google Street View imagery and the Checklist (five sections with 89 total questions. Twelve street segments per home address were assessed for (1 Land-Use Type; (2 Public Transportation Availability; (3 Street Characteristics; (4 Environment Quality and (5 Sidewalks/Walking/Biking features. Checklist items were scored 0–2 points/question. A combinations algorithm was developed to assess street segments’ representativeness. Spearman correlations were calculated between built environment quality scores and Walk Score®, a validated neighborhood walkability measure. Street segment quality scores ranged 10–47 (Mean = 29.4 ± 6.9 and overall neighborhood quality scores, 172–475 (Mean = 352.3 ± 63.6. Walk scores® ranged 0–91 (Mean = 46.7 ± 26.3. Street segment combinations’ correlation coefficients ranged 0.75–1.0. Significant positive correlations were found between overall neighborhood quality scores, four of the five Checklist subsection scores, and Walk Scores® (r = 0.62, p < 0.001. This scoring method adequately captures neighborhood features in low-income, residential areas and may aid in delineating impact of specific built environment features on health behaviors and outcomes.

  12. Comparison of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Prognostic Scoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş, Özlen; Üner, Ayşegül; Eliaçık, Eylem; Uz, Burak; Işık, Ayşe; Etgül, Sezgin; Bozkurt, Süreyya; Haznedaroğlu, İbrahim Celalettin; Göker, Hakan; Sayınalp, Nilgün; Aksu, Salih; Demiroğlu, Haluk; Özcebe, Osman İlhami; Büyükaşık, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disease. Patients are at risk of developing cytopenias or progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Different classifications and prognostic scoring systems have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare the different prognostic scoring systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one patients who were diagnosed with primary MDS in 2003-2011 in a tertiary care university hospital’s hematology department were included in the study. Results: As the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), World Health Organization Classification-Based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS), MD Anderson Prognostic Scoring System (MPSS), and revised IPSS (IPSS-R) risk categories increased, leukemia-free survival and overall survival decreased (p<0.001). When the IPSS, WPSS, MPSS, and IPSS-R prognostic systems were compared by Cox regression analysis, the WPSS was the best in predicting leukemia-free survival (p<0.001), and the WPSS (p<0.001) and IPSS-R (p=0.037) were better in predicting overall survival. Conclusion: All 4 prognostic systems were successful in predicting overall survival and leukemia-free survival (p<0.001). The WPSS was found to be the best predictor for leukemia-free survival, while the WPSS and IPSS-R were found to be the best predictors for overall survival. PMID:26376664

  13. Dynamic TIMI risk score for STEMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sameer T; Morrow, David A; Braunwald, Eugene; Sloan, Sarah; Contant, Charles; Murphy, Sabina; Antman, Elliott M

    2013-01-29

    Although there are multiple methods of risk stratification for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), this study presents a prospectively validated method for reclassification of patients based on in-hospital events. A dynamic risk score provides an initial risk stratification and reassessment at discharge. The dynamic TIMI risk score for STEMI was derived in ExTRACT-TIMI 25 and validated in TRITON-TIMI 38. Baseline variables were from the original TIMI risk score for STEMI. New variables were major clinical events occurring during the index hospitalization. Each variable was tested individually in a univariate Cox proportional hazards regression. Variables with PTIMI risk score. In the validation database, the C-statistic was 0.81, with a NRI of 0.35 (P=0.01). This score is a prospectively derived, validated means of estimating 1-year mortality of STEMI at hospital discharge and can serve as a clinically useful tool. By incorporating events during the index hospitalization, it can better define risk and help to guide treatment decisions.

  14. Disease severity scoring systems in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Bilaç

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoring systems have been developed to interpret the disease severity objectively by evaluating the parameters of the disease. Body surface area, visual analogue scale, and physician global assessment are the most frequently used scoring systems for evaluating the clinical severity of the dermatological diseases. Apart from these scoring systems, many specific scoring systems for many dermatological diseases, including acne (acne vulgaris, acne scars, alopecia (androgenetic alopecia, tractional alopecia, bullous diseases (autoimmune bullous diseases, toxic epidermal necrolysis, dermatitis (atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrotic eczema, hidradenitis suppurativa, hirsutismus, connective tissue diseases (dermatomyositis, skin involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (LE, discoid LE, scleroderma, lichen planoplaris, mastocytosis, melanocytic lesions, melasma, onychomycosis, oral lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis, nail psoriasis, sarcoidosis, urticaria, and vitiligo, have also been developed. Disease severity scoring methods are ever more extensively used in the field of dermatology for clinical practice to form an opinion about the prognosis by determining the disease severity; to decide on the most suitable treatment modality for the patient; to evaluate the efficacy of the applied medication; and to compare the efficiency of different treatment methods in clinical studies.

  15. Comparison of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Prognostic Scoring Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlen Bektaş

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disease. Patients are at risk of developing cytopenias or progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Different classifications and prognostic scoring systems have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare the different prognostic scoring systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one patients who were diagnosed with primary MDS in 2003-2011 in a tertiary care university hospital’s hematology department were included in the study. Results: As the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS, World Health Organization Classification-Based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS, MD Anderson Prognostic Scoring System (MPSS, and revised IPSS (IPSS-R risk categories increased, leukemia-free survival and overall survival decreased (p<0.001. When the IPSS, WPSS, MPSS, and IPSS-R prognostic systems were compared by Cox regression analysis, the WPSS was the best in predicting leukemia-free survival (p<0.001, and the WPSS (p<0.001 and IPSS-R (p=0.037 were better in predicting overall survival. Conclusion: All 4 prognostic systems were successful in predicting overall survival and leukemia-free survival (p<0.001. The WPSS was found to be the best predictor for leukemia-free survival, while the WPSS and IPSS-R were found to be the best predictors for overall survival.

  16. Normal range MMPI-A profiles among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilts, Darolyn; Moore, James M

    2003-09-01

    The present study examined the base rates of normal range Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) profiles in an inpatient sample and examined the differences between adolescents with apparently valid normal range profiles (all clinical scale T-scores MMPI-A validity scale scores and other indexes of underreporting. Normal range profiles cannot be adequately explained by a less pathological history prior to hospitalization or by defensiveness. Thirty percent of male and 25% of female adolescents produced valid MMPI-A profiles in which none of the clinical scales were elevated. Both male and female adolescents with normal range profiles were generally less likely to report internalizing symptoms than those with elevated profiles, but both groups report externalizing symptoms. Neither the standard MMPI-A validity scales nor additional validity scales discriminated between profile groups. Clinicians should not assume that normal range profiles indicate an absence of problems.

  17. Impact of Moodle-Based Online Curriculum on Thoracic Surgery In-Training Examination Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoff, Mara B; Verrier, Edward D; Allen, Mark S; Aloia, Lauren; Baker, Craig; Fann, James I; Iannettoni, Mark D; Yang, Stephen C; Vaporciyan, Ara A

    2016-10-01

    The feasibility and efficacy of a web-based curriculum in supplementing thoracic surgical training was previously shown. However, the impact of curricular participation on validated knowledge tests remains unknown. We compared in-service training examination (ITE) results among trainees, stratified by curricular use. The national online curriculum was implemented in August 2013. We retrospectively reviewed trainees who participated in thoracic surgical training programs in both 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. Scores from the 2013 and 2014 ITEs were obtained, and curricular usage data were collected from site analytics. Trainees were separated into three groups according to 2013 ITE scores; within each group, changes in score for high- versus low-volume users were compared. 187 trainees took the ITE both years, with exposure to the online curriculum during only the second year. High-volume users' scores trended toward greater improvement than scores of low-volume users (+18.2% versus +13.0%, p = 0.199). When stratified by 2013 score, the lowest scoring quartile improved substantially, and the highest scoring quartile improved modestly, regardless of curricular use. However, for those individuals who achieved mid-range scores in 2013, there was a trend toward much greater improvement in score with heavier use of the curriculum (+17.0% versus +7.0%, p = 0.094). Among trainees who had access to the novel online curriculum during the second of 2 consecutive years, we evaluated the impact of curricular participation on ITE scores. The effect appears to be most pronounced in individuals with mid-range scores, in whom high curricular use led to the greatest improvement. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and Validation of a Teaching Module for Echocardiographic Scoring of Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehouwer, Nathan; Okello, Emmy; Gupta, Vedant; Bailey, Alison L; Josephson, Richard; Madan Mohan, Sri Krishna; Osman, Mohammed N; Longenecker, Chris T

    2017-08-31

    The Wilkins score and commissural calcification scores predict outcomes after percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty. However, many cardiologists are inadequately trained in their application-both in the United States where the incidence of rheumatic heart disease has fallen and in rheumatic heart disease endemic countries where training infrastructure is weak. This study sought to develop a computer-based educational module teaching 2 scoring systems for rheumatic mitral stenosis and to validate the module among cardiology fellows in the United States and Uganda. We developed a module organized into 3 sets of 10 echocardiograms each. The module was completed by 13 cardiology fellows from 2 academic centers in the United States and 1 in Uganda. Subject answers were compared with a score assigned by 2 experts in echocardiography. The primary outcome was change in subjects' accuracy from set 1 to set 3, measured by mean absolute deviation from expert scores. Secondary outcomes included change in interoperator variability and individual subject bias from set 1 to set 3. The mean absolute deviations from expert scores in sets 1 and 3 were 2.09 and 1.82 for the Wilkins score (possible score range 0 to 16) and 1.13 and 0.94 for the commissural calcification score (possible score range 0 to 4). The change from set 1 to set 3 was statistically significant only for 1 of the Wilkins component scores (leaflet calcification, p < 0.001.) No change was seen in the interoperator variability. Individual subject bias in assigning the total Wilkins score was reduced from set 1 to set 3. Use of this module has the potential to enhance the training of cardiologists in the echocardiographic assessment of mitral stenosis. Modified versions of this module or similar ones should be tested in targeted populations of cardiology trainees with the most exposure to mitral stenosis interventions. Copyright © 2017 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Correlation Between Students' Dental Admission Test Scores and Performance on a Dental School's Competency Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Alexander M; Schuster, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a statistically significant positive correlation between dental students' Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores, particularly on the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), and their performance on a dental school's competency exam. Scores from the written and clinical competency exam administered in the fall quarter of the fourth year of the curriculum at Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona were compared to DAT scores of all 216 members of the graduating classes of 2012 and 2013. It was hypothesized that students who performed highly on one or more sections of the DAT would perform highly on the competency exam. Backward stepwise regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the PAT scores were most strongly correlated with the competency exam scores and were a positive predictor for all three clinical sections of the exam (operative dentistry, periodontics, and endodontics). Positive predictors for the written portion of the exam were total DAT score for patient assessment and treatment planning and the DAT reading comprehension score for prosthodontics; there were no predictors for periodontics. The total variance explained by the results ranged from 4% to 15%. While statistically significant relationships were found between the students' PAT scores and clinical performance, DAT scores explained relatively little variance in the competency exam scores. According to these findings, neither the PAT nor any of the DAT components contributed to predicting these students' clinical performance.

  20. Five-minute Apgar score as a marker for developmental vulnerability at 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaz, Neda; Boyce, W Thomas; Brownell, Marni; Jutte, Douglas; Tremlett, Helen; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Joseph, K S

    2016-03-01

    To assess the relationship between the 5 min Apgar score and developmental vulnerability at 5 years of age. Population-based retrospective cohort study. Manitoba, Canada. All children born between 1999 and 2006 at term gestation, with a documented 5 min Apgar score. 5 min Apgar score. Childhood development at 5 years of age, expressed as vulnerability (absent vs present) on five domains of the Early Development Instrument: physical health, social competence, emotional maturity, language and cognitive development, and communication skills. Of the 33,883 children in the study, most (82%) had an Apgar score of 9; 1% of children had a score Apgar scores Apgar 9=1.23, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.44). Similarly, children with Apgar scores of Apgar 9=1.20, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.41). Nevertheless, the Apgar-based prognostic model had a poor sensitivity for physical vulnerability (19%, 95% CI 18% to 20%). Although the Apgar score-based prognostic model had reasonable calibration ability and risk-stratification accuracy for identifying developmentally vulnerable children, classification accuracy was poor. The risk of developmental vulnerability at 5 years of age is inversely associated with the 5 min Apgar score across its entire range, and the score can serve as a population-level indicator of developmental risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Cooperation through image scoring in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, C; Milinski, M

    2000-05-05

    The "tragedy of the commons," that is, the selfish exploitation of resources in the public domain, is a reason for many of our everyday social conflicts. However, humans are often more helpful to others than evolutionary theory would predict, unless indirect reciprocity takes place and is based on image scoring (which reflects the way an individual is viewed by a group), as recently shown by game theorists. We tested this idea under conditions that control for confounding factors. Donations were more frequent to receivers who had been generous to others in earlier interactions. This shows that image scoring promotes cooperative behavior in situations where direct reciprocity is unlikely.

  2. Assigning Numerical Scores to Linguistic Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Campión

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study different methods of scoring linguistic expressions defined on a finite set, in the search for a linear order that ranks all those possible expressions. Among them, particular attention is paid to the canonical extension, and its representability through distances in a graph plus some suitable penalization of imprecision. The relationship between this setting and the classical problems of numerical representability of orderings, as well as extension of orderings from a set to a superset is also explored. Finally, aggregation procedures of qualitative rankings and scorings are also analyzed.

  3. [Prognostic value of GRACE scores versus TIMI score in acute coronary syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Luis C L; Freitas, Rafael; Bittencourt, Ana P; Souza, Alexandre C; Almeida, Maria C; Leal, Jamile; Esteves, José Péricles

    2010-05-01

    Although the TIMI score is the one most frequently used in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) without ST-segment elevation, the GRACE score has potential prognostic superiority, as it was created based on an observational registry, part of the variables is treated in a semi-quantitative form and renal function is taken into account in its calculation. To test the hypothesis that the GRACE risk score has superior in-hospital prognostic value, when compared to the TIMI score in patients admitted with ACS. Individuals with unstable angina or myocardial infarction without ST-segment elevation, consecutively admitted at the Coronary Unit between August 2007 and January 2009, were included in the study. A total of 154 patients aged 71 +/- 13 years, of which 56% were females, with a GRACE median of 117 and a TIMI median of 3 were studied. During the hospitalization period, the incidence of events was 8.4% (12 deaths and 1 non-fatal infarction). The Hosmer-Lemeshow test applied to the GRACE score presented an chi2 of 5.3 (P = 0.72), whereas the TIMI score presented an chi2 of 1.85 (P = 0.60). Therefore, both scores presented good calibration. As for the analysis of discrimination, the GRACE score presented a C-statistics of 0.91 (95%CI= 0.86 - 0.97), significantly superior to the C-statistics of 0.69 of the TIMI score (95%CI = 0.55 - 0.84) - P = 0.02 for the difference between the scores. Regarding the prediction of hospital events in patients with ACS, the GRACE score has superior prognostic capacity when compared to the TIMI score.

  4. Algorithm Improvement Program Nuclide Identification Algorithm Scoring Criteria And Scoring Application - DNDO.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghauser, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  5. Algorithm improvement program nuclide identification algorithm scoring criteria and scoring application.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghauser, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  6. NCACO-score: An effective main-chain dependent scoring function for structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiaoxi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of effective scoring functions is a critical component to the success of protein structure modeling. Previously, many efforts have been dedicated to the development of scoring functions. Despite these efforts, development of an effective scoring function that can achieve both good accuracy and fast speed still presents a grand challenge. Results Based on a coarse-grained representation of a protein structure by using only four main-chain atoms: N, Cα, C and O, we develop a knowledge-based scoring function, called NCACO-score, that integrates different structural information to rapidly model protein structure from sequence. In testing on the Decoys'R'Us sets, we found that NCACO-score can effectively recognize native conformers from their decoys. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NCACO-score can effectively guide fragment assembly for protein structure prediction, which has achieved a good performance in building the structure models for hard targets from CASP8 in terms of both accuracy and speed. Conclusions Although NCACO-score is developed based on a coarse-grained model, it is able to discriminate native conformers from decoy conformers with high accuracy. NCACO is a very effective scoring function for structure modeling.

  7. Screening applicants for risk of poor academic performance: a novel scoring system using preadmission grade point averages and graduate record examination scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, David

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an effective screening tool for identifying physician assistant (PA) program applicants at highest risk for poor academic performance. Prior to reviewing applications for the class of 2009, a retrospective analysis of preadmission data took place for the classes of 2006, 2007, and 2008. A single composite score was calculated for each student who matriculated (number of subjects, N=228) incorporating the total undergraduate grade point average (UGPA), the science GPA (SGPA), and the three component Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores: verbal (GRE-V), quantitative (GRE-Q), analytical (GRE-A). Individual applicant scores for each of the five parameters were ranked in descending quintiles. Each applicant's five quintile scores were then added, yielding a total quintile score ranging from 25, which indicated an excellent performance, to 5, which indicated poorer performance. Thirteen of the 228 students had academic difficulty (dismissal, suspension, or one-quarter on academic warning or probation). Twelve of the 13 students having academic difficulty had a preadmission total quintile score 12 (range, 6-14). In response to this descriptive analysis, when selecting applicants for the class of 2009, the admissions committee used the total quintile score for screening applicants for interviews. Analysis of correlations in preadmission, graduate, and postgraduate performance data for the classes of 2009-2013 will continue and may help identify those applicants at risk for academic difficulty. Establishing a threshold total quintile score of applicant GPA and GRE scores may significantly decrease the number of entering PA students at risk for poor academic performance.

  8. Selvester scoring in patients with strict LBBB using the QUARESS software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaojuan; Chaudhry, Uzma; Wieslander, Björn; Borgquist, Rasmus; Wagner, Galen S; Strauss, David G; Platonov, Pyotr; Ugander, Martin; Couderc, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the infarct size from body-surface ECGs in post-myocardial infarction patients has become possible using the Selvester scoring method. Automation of this scoring has been proposed in order to speed-up the measurement of the score and improving the inter-observer variability in computing a score that requires strong expertise in electrocardiography. In this work, we evaluated the quality of the QuAReSS software for delivering correct Selvester scoring in a set of standard 12-lead ECGs. Standard 12-lead ECGs were recorded in 105 post-MI patients prescribed implantation of an implantable cardiodefibrillator (ICD). Amongst the 105 patients with standard clinical left bundle branch block (LBBB) patterns, 67 had a LBBB pattern meeting the strict criteria. The QuAReSS software was applied to these 67 tracings by two independent groups of cardiologists (from a clinical group and an ECG core laboratory) to measure the Selvester score semi-automatically. Using various level of agreement metrics, we compared the scores between groups and when automatically measured by the software. The average of the absolute difference in Selvester scores measured by the two independent groups was 1.4±1.5 score points, whereas the difference between automatic method and the two manual adjudications were 1.2±1.2 and 1.3±1.2 points. Eighty-two percent score agreement was observed between the two independent measurements when the difference of score was within two point ranges, while 90% and 84% score agreements were reached using the automatic method compared to the two manual adjudications. The study confirms that the QuAReSS software provides valid measurements of the Selvester score in patients with strict LBBB with minimal correction from cardiologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Novel Prognostic Scoring System Using Inflammatory Response Biomarkers for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, Noriyuki; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tetsu; Hyakudomi, Ryoji; Hirayama, Takanori; Taniura, Takahito; Ishitobi, Kazunari; Kidani, Akihiko; Kawabata, Yasunari

    2017-07-25

    We describe a novel scoring system, namely the inflammatory response biomarker (IRB) score. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical value of IRB score in patients undergoing curative resection for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent curative esophagectomy. We evaluated IRB score in both non-elderly (4), a high neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (>1.6), and a low platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) (<147) were each scored as 1, and the remaining values were scored as 0; the individual scores were then summed to produce the IRB score (range 0-3). Univariate analyses demonstrated that the TNM pStage (p < 0.0001), tumor size (p = 0.002), LMR (p = 0.0057), PLR (p = 0.0328) and IRB score (p = 0.0003) were significant risk factors for a worse prognosis. On multivariate analysis, the TNM pStage (p < 0.0001) and IRB score (p = 0.0227) were independently associated with worse prognosis in overall patients. Among non-elderly patients, multivariate analyses demonstrated that the pStage (p = 0.0015) and IRB score (p = 0.0356) were independent risk factors for a worse prognosis. Among elderly patients, multivariate analysis demonstrated that the pStage (p = 0.0016), and IRB score (p = 0.0102) were independent risk factors for a worse prognosis. The present study provides evidence that the preoperative IRB score can be considered a promising independent prognostic factor of cancer-specific survival in patients undergoing curative resection for SCC, and that its predictive ability is useful in both non-elderly and elderly patients.

  10. Propensity Score Matching within Prognostic Strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelcey, Ben

    2013-01-01

    A central issue in nonexperimental studies is identifying comparable individuals to remove selection bias. One common way to address this selection bias is through propensity score (PS) matching. PS methods use a model of the treatment assignment to reduce the dimensionality of the covariate space and identify comparable individuals. parallel to…

  11. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Post- Laparatomy Complications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications following laparatomy in our setting with good predictive accuracy. Introduction. Peri-operative risk stratification of mortality and morbidity is important in the provision of health care to ensure appropriate resource allocation and informed decision making (1). Many risk-scoring systems are not easily calculated at ...

  12. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Postoperative Complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measure of the operative care provided (1). A simple surgical outcome score, ... Quality Improvement Program (6). Patients were subsequently ... Table 1: Prevalence of major complications in postoperative period. Complications. Frequency. Percent. (N=334). Intensive unit care. 50. 15.0%. Neurological deficit. 45. 13.5%.

  13. AVERAGE SCORE OF THE UNIFIED STATE EXAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Nurieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Summing up the results of the Unified State Exam (USE is traditionally based on comparing the average scores for institutions or territories, without taking into account what the indicator of the quality of education really represents.The aim of the article is to clarify the content «average score» on the example of the Mathematics federal testing results.Methodology and research methods. The methodology of comprehensive analysis is used, including the methods of comparative and statistical data analysis published following the exam results. As well, the parallel analysis of data used in the researches of the National Research University «The Higher School of Economics» (HSE was conducted.Results and scientific novelty. It is found out that the average score in the Unified State Exam in mathematics largely depends on peculiarities of testing and assessment materials, a scoring system of leveling nature and results of training students for solving simple problems.Practical significance. The authors suppose that the study findings will contribute to the improvement of methods and technologies of carrying the Unified State Exam. 

  14. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  15. Small business credit scoring and credit availability

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Allen N.; Frame, W. Scott; Berger, Allen N.; Frame, W. Scott

    2005-01-01

    U.S. commercial banks are increasingly using credit scoring models to underwrite small business credits. This paper discusses this technology, evaluates the research findings on the effects of this technology on small business credit availability, and links these findings to a number of research and public policy issues.

  16. Score Matrix for HWBI Forecast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-2010 Annual State-Scale Service and Domain scores used to support the approach for forecasting EPA's Human Well-Being Index. A modeling approach was developed based relationship function equations derived from select economic, social and ecosystem final goods and service scores and calculated human well-being index and related domain scores. These data are being used in a secondary capacity. The foundational data and scoring techniques were originally described in: a) U.S. EPA. 2012. Indicators and Methods for Constructing a U.S. Human Well-being Index (HWBI) for Ecosystem Services Research. Report. EPA/600/R-12/023. pp. 121; and b) U.S. EPA. 2014. Indicators and Methods for Evaluating Economic, Ecosystem and Social Services Provisioning. Report. EPA/600/R-14/184. pp. 174. Mode Smith, L. M., Harwell, L. C., Summers, J. K., Smith, H. M., Wade, C. M., Straub, K. R. and J.L. Case (2014).This dataset is associated with the following publication:Summers , K., L. Harwell , and L. Smith. A Model For Change: An Approach for Forecasting Well-Being From Service-Based Decisions. ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 69: 295-309, (2016).

  17. Correlation between international prostate symptom score and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the correlation between severity of symptoms using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and uroflowmetry in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms-benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). Patients and Methods: We prospectively collected data from 51 consecutive men, who ...

  18. Normalization of the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share ... encephalopathy score (PHES) and evaluate the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) among .... that can affect cognitive function; (3) diabetes mellitus;. (4) significant comorbid illness ...

  19. How helpful are early warning scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Martin; Clements, Pauline; Headley, Elaine

    This article discusses a literature review examining UK practice and the origins, benefits and limitations of early warning scores. An accompanying article (page 15) discusses the introduction of clinical-based trigger questions to help ward-based nurses to identify patients whose condition is deteriorating.

  20. Incorporating Quality Scores in Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soyeon; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of quality-score weights in meta-analysis. A simulation examines the roles of study characteristics such as population effect size (ES) and its variance on the bias and mean square errors (MSEs) of the estimators for several patterns of relationship between quality and ES, and for specific patterns of systematic…

  1. Effects of heterogeneity on bank efficiency scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. W. B.; Koetter, M.; Kolari, J. W.; Kool, C. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bank efficiency estimates often serve as a proxy of managerial skill since they quantify sub-optimal production choices. But such deviations can also be due to omitted systematic differences among banks. In this study, we examine the effects of heterogeneity on bank efficiency scores. We compare

  2. [Intraoperative crisis and surgical Apgar score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Masakatsu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Intraoperative crisis is an inevitable event to anesthesiologists. The crisis requires effective and coordinated management once it happened but it is difficult to manage the crises properly under extreme stressful situation. Recently, it is reported that the use of surgical crisis checklists is associated with significant improvement in the management of operating-room crises in a high-fidelity simulation study. Careful preoperative evaluation, proper intraoperative management and using intraoperative crisis checklists will be needed for safer perioperative care in the future. Postoperative complication is a serious public health problem. It reduces the quality of life of patients and raises medical cost. Careful management of surgical patients is required according to their postoperative condition for preventing postoperative complications. A 10-point surgical Apgar score, calculated from intraoperative estimated blood loss, lowest mean arterial pressure, and lowest heart rate, is a simple and available scoring system for predicting postoperative complications. It undoubtedly predicts higher than average risk of postoperative complications and death within 30 days of surgery. Surgical Apgar score is a bridge between proper intraoperative and postoperative care. Anesthesiologists should make effort to reduce the postoperative complication and this score is a tool for it.

  3. HEART score to further risk stratify patients with low TIMI scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoon, Shannon; Chang, Anna Marie; Lee, Betsy; Salhi, Rama; Hollander, Judd E

    2013-03-01

    The ability to risk stratify patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with potential acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is critical. The thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score can risk stratify ED patients with potential ACS but cannot identify patients safe for ED discharge. The symptom-based HEART score identifies very low-risk patients. Our hypothesis was that patients with a TIMI score of 0 or 1 may be stratified further with the HEART score to identify a group of patients at less than 1% risk of 30-day cardiovascular events. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study in a tertiary care hospital ED. Patients with potential ACS who were >30 years of age were included. Data collected included demographics, history, electrocardiogram, laboratories, and components of the TIMI and HEART scores. Follow-up was conducted by structured record review and phone. The main outcome was a composite of death, acute myocardial infarction, or revascularization at 30 days. There were 8815 patients enrolled (mean age, 52.8 ± 15.1 years; 57% women, and 69% black). At 30 days, the composite event rate was 8.0% (660 patients): 108 deaths, 410 acute myocardial infarction, and 301 revascularizations. Of the 485 patients with both a TIMI score of 0 and a HEART score of 0, there were no cardiovascular events (95% confidence interval, 0-0.8%); but no other score combination had an upper limit confidence interval less than 1%. At all levels of TIMI score, the HEART score was able to further substratify patients with respect to 30-day risk. A HEART score of 0 in a patient with a TIMI of 0 identified a group of patients at less than 1% risk for 30-day adverse events.

  4. Low Apgar score and mortality in extremely preterm neonates born in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Henry Chong; Subeh, Mohammad; Gould, Jeffrey B

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between low Apgar score and neonatal mortality in preterm neonates. Infant birth and death certificate data from the US National Center for Health Statistics for 2001-2002 were analysed. Primary outcome was 28-day mortality for 690, 933 neonates at gestational ages 24-36 weeks. Mortality rates were calculated for each combination of gestational age and 5-min Apgar score. Relative risks of mortality, by high vs. low Apgar score, were calculated for each age. Distribution of Apgar scores depended on gestational age, the youngest gestational ages having higher proportions of low Apgar scores. Median Apgar score ranged from 6 at 24 weeks, to 9 at 30-36 weeks gestation. The relative risk of death was significantly higher at Apgar scores 0-3 vs. 7-10, including at the youngest gestational ages, ranging from 3.1 (95% confidence interval 2.9, 3.4) at 24 weeks to 18.5 (95% confidence interval 15.7, 21.8) at 28 weeks.   Low Apgar score was associated with increased mortality in premature neonates, including those at 24-28 weeks gestational age, and may be a useful tool for clinicians in assessing prognosis and for researchers as a risk prediction variable. © 2010 The Author(s)/Journal Compilation © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  5. Comparison of nasalance scores obtained from the Nasometer and the NasalView.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kerry E; Watterson, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Nasalance scores obtained from the Nasometer and the NasalView were compared for five different sentences. Vowel content was controlled in the design of the five stimulus sentences. One sentence was loaded with high-front vowels, one with high-back vowels, one with low-front vowels, one with low-back vowels, and one contained a mixture of vowel types. The subjects were 50 elementary school children ranging from kindergarten to sixth grade. Each subject was a native speaker of English, had no history of adenoidectomy, and was not currently enrolled in speech therapy services. The main outcome measures were the nasalance scores obtained from the Nasometer and the NasalView for each of the five sentences. There was a significant difference in the nasalance scores between the Nasometer and the NasalView for four of the five stimuli, but not all differences were in the same direction. For two stimuli, the Nasometer scores were significantly higher, and for two stimuli the NasalView scores were higher. Bivariate correlations between nasalance scores for individual stimuli were in the good range for the Nasometer but poor for the NasalView. Speech stimuli weighted with different vowel types are differentially affected by the different acoustical filtering used in the Nasometer versus the NasalView. Nasalance scores obtained with the NasalView were qualitatively and quantitatively different from those obtained with the Nasometer. This suggests that the two machines provide different information, and the scores are not interchangeable.

  6. Morphologic and functional scoring of cystic fibrosis lung disease using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Monika; Optazaite, Daiva-Elzbieta; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Hintze, Christian; Biederer, Jürgen; Niemann, Anne; Mall, Marcus A; Wielpütz, Mark O; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Puderbach, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains increasing importance in the assessment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The aim of this study was to develop a morpho-functional MR-scoring-system and to evaluate its intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and clinical practicability to monitor CF lung disease over a broad severity range from infancy to adulthood. 35 CF patients with broad age range (mean 15.3 years; range 0.5-42) were examined by morphological and functional MRI. Lobe based analysis was performed for parameters bronchiectasis/bronchial-wall-thickening, mucus plugging, abscesses/sacculations, consolidations, special findings and perfusion defects. The maximum global score was 72. Two experienced radiologists scored the images at two time points (interval 10 weeks). Upper and lower limits of agreement, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), total deviation index and coverage probability were calculated for global, morphology, function, component and lobar scores. Global scores ranged from 6 to 47. Intra- and inter-reader agreement for global scores were good (CCC: 0.98 (R1), 0.94 (R2), 0.97 (R1/R2)) and were comparable between high and low scores. Our results indicate that the proposed morpho-functional MR-scoring-system is reproducible and applicable for semi-quantitative evaluation of a large spectrum of CF lung disease severity. This scoring-system can be applied for the routine assessment of CF lung disease and maybe as endpoint for clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Alternative pay-for-performance scoring methods: implications for quality improvement and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Seth W; Boulding, William; Roos, Jason M T; Staelin, Richard; Peterson, Eric D; Schulman, Kevin A

    2009-10-01

    Pay-for-performance programs typically rate hospitals using a composite summary score in which process measures are weighted by the total number of treatment opportunities. Alternative methods that weight process measures according to how hospitals organize care and the range for possible improvement may be more closely related to patient outcomes. To develop a hospital-level summary process measure adherence score that reflects how hospitals organize cardiac care and the range for possible improvement; and to compare associations of hospital adherence to this score and adherence to a composite score based on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services scoring system with inpatient mortality. Hospital-level analysis of 7 process measures for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 4 process measures for heart failure at 4226 hospitals, and inpatient mortality after AMI at 1351 hospitals in the United States. Data are from the Hospital Compare and Joint Commission Core Measures databases for October 2004 through September 2006. Associations between composite scores based on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services methodology and alternative adherence scores with inpatient survival after AMI. In principal components analysis, hospital cardiac care varied between hospitals largely along the lines of "clinical" (ie, pharmacologic interventions) and "administrative" (ie, patient instructions or counseling) activities. A scoring system reflecting this organization was strongly associated with inpatient survival and fit the mortality data better than the composite score. Higher administrative activities scores, holding the clinical activities score fixed, were associated with lower survival. In-hospital cardiac care is organized by clinical and administrative processes of care. Pay-for-performance schemes that incentivize hospitals to focus on administrative process measures may be associated with decreased adherence to clinical processes. A pay-for-performance scheme

  8. Genetic Evaluation of the Nine Component Features of Hip Score in UK Labrador Retrievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Thomas W.; Woolliams, John A.; Blott, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the genetic relationship between the nine component traits comprising the British Veterinary Association (BVA) total hip score in UK registered Labrador Retrievers. Data consisted of 11,928 single records of trait scores of dogs aged between one and four years (365–1459 days) old, from radiographs evaluated between 2000 and 2007. Pedigree information was provided by the UK Kennel Club. The distribution of trait scores showed only small numbers of dogs with visible malformation in the six traits that were scored according to the severity of osteoarthritis. Linear mixed models were fitted using ASREML. Estimates of heritability ranged from 0.15 to 0.38, and litter effects from 0.04 to 0.10. Genetic correlations between all nine traits were extremely high ranging from 0.71 to 1.0, implying considerable genetic similarity. The decomposition demonstrated that aggregate scores of only the 3 traits indicative of laxity in one year old dogs was predictive of the phenotype of the remaining six scored on osteoarthritic severity in dogs at 4+ years old. The application of selection index methodology in selecting against hip dysplasia using the trait scores was explored and potential improvements in accuracy (directly related to response to selection) of over 10% are reported compared to the current total hip score. This study demonstrates that traits descriptive of joint laxity are valuable early-age predictors of osteoarthritis and shows that there is scope for improvement in the way data from the UK hip score scheme are used for selection against hip dysplasia in Labradors. This was verified via use of selection indices, which identified substantial increases in accuracy, not only via optimum coefficients, but also through an easily applicable aggregate of scores of just two or three traits only compared with the current total hip score. PMID:21042594

  9. Genetic evaluation of the nine component features of hip score in UK Labrador Retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Lewis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the genetic relationship between the nine component traits comprising the British Veterinary Association (BVA total hip score in UK registered Labrador Retrievers. Data consisted of 11,928 single records of trait scores of dogs aged between one and four years (365-1459 days old, from radiographs evaluated between 2000 and 2007. Pedigree information was provided by the UK Kennel Club. The distribution of trait scores showed only small numbers of dogs with visible malformation in the six traits that were scored according to the severity of osteoarthritis. Linear mixed models were fitted using ASREML. Estimates of heritability ranged from 0.15 to 0.38, and litter effects from 0.04 to 0.10. Genetic correlations between all nine traits were extremely high ranging from 0.71 to 1.0, implying considerable genetic similarity. The decomposition demonstrated that aggregate scores of only the 3 traits indicative of laxity in one year old dogs was predictive of the phenotype of the remaining six scored on osteoarthritic severity in dogs at 4+ years old. The application of selection index methodology in selecting against hip dysplasia using the trait scores was explored and potential improvements in accuracy (directly related to response to selection of over 10% are reported compared to the current total hip score. This study demonstrates that traits descriptive of joint laxity are valuable early-age predictors of osteoarthritis and shows that there is scope for improvement in the way data from the UK hip score scheme are used for selection against hip dysplasia in Labradors. This was verified via use of selection indices, which identified substantial increases in accuracy, not only via optimum coefficients, but also through an easily applicable aggregate of scores of just two or three traits only compared with the current total hip score.

  10. Investigating the Written Exam Scores' Prediction Power of TEOG Exam Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontas, Hakki; Özpolat, Esen Turan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate exam scores' predicting Transition from Primary to Secondary Education (TEOG) exam scores. The research data were obtained from the records of 1035 students studying at the first term of eighth grade in 2015-2016 academic year in e-school system. The research was on relational screening model. Linear…

  11. Relationship between Students' Scores on Research Methods and Statistics, and Undergraduate Project Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossai, Peter Agbadobi Uloku

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between students' scores on Research Methods and statistics, and undergraduate project at the final year. The purpose was to find out whether students matched knowledge of research with project-writing skill. The study adopted an expost facto correlational design. Scores on Research Methods and Statistics for…

  12. Development of the Crohn's disease digestive damage score, the Lémann score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pariente, Benjamin; Cosnes, Jacques; Danese, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    is to outline the methods to develop an instrument that can measure cumulative bowel damage. The project is being conducted by the International Program to develop New Indexes in Crohn's disease (IPNIC) group. This instrument, called the Crohn's Disease Digestive Damage Score (the Lémann score), should take...

  13. Martial arts intervention decreases pain scores in children with malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bluth MH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin H Bluth,1,2 Ronald Thomas,3,4 Cindy Cohen,2 Amanda C Bluth,5 Elimelech Goldberg,2,4 1Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, 2Kids Kicking Cancer, Southfield, MI, 3Children’s Research Center of Michigan at Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit MI, 4Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, 5Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Background: Martial arts intervention in disease has been mostly limited to adult inflammatory, musculoskeletal, or motor diseases, where a mechanical intervention effects positive change. However, the application and benefit to pain management in childhood malignancy are not well described. Here, we assess the effects of defined martial arts intervention in children with cancer with respect to their pain perception and management. Methods: Sixty-four children with childhood malignancies were enrolled in a martial arts program, which encompassed both meditation and movement modalities. Pain scores (0–10 were recorded pre- and post- 1-hour session intervention. Pain scores were crossed by total visits and tabulated by whether participant pain reduced at least 1 unit, stayed the same, or increased in intensity immediately after (post participation session. Differences in pain scores were further compared by age and sex. Results: Prepain and postpain scale data were measured for 64 participants, 43 males (67.2% and 21 females (32.8%, ranging from 3 years to 19 years. Preintervention and postintervention data were obtained for 223 individual session visits. Mean number of patient participation visits was 1.8±1.6 (range one to nine visits. Of 116 individual measured sessions where the participants began with a pain score of at least 1, pain intensity reduced ≥1 unit in 85.3% (99/116 of visits, remained the same in 7.8% (9/116, and increased in 6.9% (8/116. For the majority (96.3%; 77/80 of sessions, participants began

  14. New clinical score to diagnose nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulzi Fernanda BU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent disease associated with abnormal liver tests that is characterized by a wide spectrum of liver damage, ranging from simple macro vesicular steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH, cirrhosis or liver carcinoma. Liver biopsy is the most precise test to differentiate NASH from other stages of NAFLD, but it is an invasive and expensive method. This study aimed to create a clinical laboratory score capable of identify individual with NASH in severely obese patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods The medical records from 66 patients submitted to gastroplasty were reviewed. Their chemistry profile, abdominal ultrasound (US and liver biopsy done during the surgical procedure were analyzed. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to liver biopsy: Non-NASH group - those patients without NAFLD or with grade I, II or III steatosis; and NASH group - those with steatohepatitis or fibrosis. The t-test was used to compare each variable with normal distribution between NASH and Non-NASH groups. When comparing proportions of categorical variables, we used chi-square or z-test, where appropriate. A p-value Results 83% of patients with obesity grades II or III showed NAFLD, and the majority was asymptomatic. Total Cholesterol (TC≥200 mg/dL, alanine aminotransferase (ALT ≥30, AST/ALT ratio (AAR≤ 1, gammaglutaril-transferase (γGT≥30 U/L and abdominal US, compatible with steatosis, showed association with NASH group. We proposed 2 scores: Complete score (TC, ALT, AAR, γGT and US and the simplified score, where US was not included. The combination of biochemical and imaging results improved accuracy to 84.4% the recognition of NASH (sensitivity 70%, specificity 88.6%, NPV 91.2%, PPV 63. 6%. Conclusion Alterations in TC, ALT, AAR, γGT and US are related to the most risk for NASH. The combination of biochemical and imaging results improved accuracy to 84.4% the

  15. Statin use and kidney cancer outcomes: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, Madhur; Finelli, Antonio; Jewett, Michael A S; Juurlink, David N; Austin, Peter C; Kulkarni, Girish S; Hamilton, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Studies evaluating the association between statin use and survival outcomes in renal cell carcinoma have demonstrated conflicting results. Our objective was to evaluate this association in a large clinical cohort by using propensity score methods to reduce confounding from measured covariates. We performed a retrospective review of 893 patients undergoing nephrectomy for unilateral, M0 renal cell carcinoma between 2000 and 2014 at a tertiary academic center. Inverse probability of treatment weights were derived from a propensity score model based on clinical, surgical, and pathological characteristics. We used Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the association between statin use and disease-free survival, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival in the sample weighted by the inverse probability of treatment weights. A secondary analysis was performed matching statin users 1:1 to statin nonusers on the propensity score. Of the 893 patients, 259 (29%) were on statins at the time of surgery. Median follow-up was 47 months (interquartile range: 20-80). Statin use was not significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.65-1.81), cancer-specific survival (HR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.40-2.01), or overall survival (HR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.55-1.44). Similar results were observed when using propensity score matching. The present study found no significant association between statin use and kidney cancer outcomes. Population-based studies are needed to further evaluate the role of statins in kidney cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A score for measuring health risk perception in environmental surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro; Nguyen, Giang; Rava, Marta; Braggion, Marco; Grassi, Mario; Zanolin, Maria Elisabetta

    2015-09-15

    In environmental surveys, risk perception may be a source of bias when information on health outcomes is reported using questionnaires. Using the data from a survey carried out in the largest chipboard industrial district in Italy (Viadana, Mantova), we devised a score of health risk perception and described its determinants in an adult population. In 2006, 3697 parents of children were administered a questionnaire that included ratings on 7 environmental issues. Items dimensionality was studied by factor analysis. After testing equidistance across response options by homogeneity analysis, a risk perception score was devised by summing up item ratings. Factor analysis identified one latent factor, which we interpreted as health risk perception, that explained 65.4% of the variance of five items retained after scaling. The scale (range 0-10, mean ± SD 9.3 ± 1.9) had a good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.87). Most subjects (80.6%) expressed maximum risk perception (score = 10). Italian mothers showed significantly higher risk perception than foreign fathers. Risk perception was higher for parents of young children, and for older parents with a higher education, than for their counterparts. Actual distance to major roads was not associated with the score, while self-reported intense traffic and frequent air refreshing at home predicted higher risk perception. When investigating health effects of environmental hazards using questionnaires, care should be taken to reduce the possibility of awareness bias at the stage of study planning and data analysis. Including appropriate items in study questionnaires can be useful to derive a measure of health risk perception, which can help to identify confounding of association estimates by risk perception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Simple new risk score model for adult cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: simple cardiac ECMO score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigh, Graham; Cavarocchi, Nicholas; Keith, Scott W; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    Although the use of cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasing in adult patients, the field lacks understanding of associated risk factors. While standard intensive care unit risk scores such as SAPS II (simplified acute physiology score II), SOFA (sequential organ failure assessment), and APACHE II (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II), or disease-specific scores such as MELD (model for end-stage liver disease) and RIFLE (kidney risk, injury, failure, loss of function, ESRD) exist, they may not apply to adult cardiac ECMO patients as their risk factors differ from variables used in these scores. Between 2010 and 2014, 73 ECMOs were performed for cardiac support at our institution. Patient demographics and survival were retrospectively analyzed. A new easily calculated score for predicting ECMO mortality was created using identified risk factors from univariate and multivariate analyses, and model discrimination was compared with other scoring systems. Cardiac ECMO was performed on 73 patients (47 males and 26 females) with a mean age of 48 ± 14 y. Sixty-four percent of patients (47/73) survived ECMO support. Pre-ECMO SAPS II, SOFA, APACHE II, MELD, RIFLE, PRESERVE, and ECMOnet scores, were not correlated with survival. Univariate analysis of pre-ECMO risk factors demonstrated that increased lactate, renal dysfunction, and postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock were risk factors for death. Applying these data into a new simplified cardiac ECMO score (minimal risk = 0, maximal = 5) predicted patient survival. Survivors had a lower risk score (1.8 ± 1.2) versus the nonsurvivors (3.0 ± 0.99), P ECMO patients did not correlate with ECMO survival, whereas a new simplified cardiac ECMO score provides survival predictability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The RIPASA score for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: A comparison with the modified Alvarado score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barrientos, C Z; Aquino-González, A; Heredia-Montaño, M; Navarro-Tovar, F; Pineda-Espinosa, M A; Espinosa de Santillana, I A

    2018-02-06

    Acute appendicitis is the first cause of surgical emergencies. It is still a difficult diagnosis to make, especially in young persons, the elderly, and in reproductive-age women, in whom a series of inflammatory conditions can have signs and symptoms similar to those of acute appendicitis. Different scoring systems have been created to increase diagnostic accuracy, and they are inexpensive, noninvasive, and easy to use and reproduce. The modified Alvarado score is probably the most widely used and accepted in emergency services worldwide. On the other hand, the RIPASA score was formulated in 2010 and has greater sensitivity and specificity. There are very few studies conducted in Mexico that compare the different scoring systems for appendicitis. The aim of our article was to compare the modified Alvarado score and the RIPASA score in the diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain and suspected acute appendicitis. An observational, analytic, and prolective study was conducted within the time frame of July 2002 and February 2014 at the Hospital Universitario de Puebla. The questionnaires used for the evaluation process were applied to the patients suspected of having appendicitis. The RIPASA score with 8.5 as the optimal cutoff value: ROC curve (area .595), sensitivity (93.3%), specificity (8.3%), PPV (91.8%), NPV (10.1%). Modified Alvarado score with 6 as the optimal cutoff value: ROC curve (area .719), sensitivity (75%), specificity (41.6%), PPV (93.7%), NPV (12.5%). The RIPASA score showed no advantages over the modified Alvarado score when applied to patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. CS-SCORE: Rapid identification and removal of human genome contaminants from metagenomic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Reddy, Chennareddy Venkata Siva Kumar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-08-01

    Metagenomic sequencing data, obtained from host-associated microbial communities, are usually contaminated with host genome sequence fragments. Prior to performing any downstream analyses, it is necessary to identify and remove such contaminating sequence fragments. The time and memory requirements of available host-contamination detection techniques are enormous. Thus, processing of large metagenomic datasets is a challenging task. This study presents CS-SCORE--a novel algorithm that can rapidly identify host sequences contaminating metagenomic datasets. Validation results indicate that CS-SCORE is 2-6 times faster than the current state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, the memory footprint of CS-SCORE is in the range of 2-2.5GB, which is significantly lower than other available tools. CS-SCORE achieves this efficiency by incorporating (1) a heuristic pre-filtering mechanism and (2) a directed-mapping approach that utilizes a novel sequence composition metric (cs-score). CS-SCORE is expected to be a handy 'pre-processing' utility for researchers analyzing metagenomic datasets. For academic users, an implementation of CS-SCORE is freely available at: http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/cs-score (or) https://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/preprocessing/cs-score. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Nasalance scores obtained with the Nasometer 6200 and the Nasometer II 6400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Thomas; Lewis, Kerry; Brancamp, Tami

    2005-09-01

    This study was designed to compare nasalance scores obtained with the old Nasometer 6200 and the new Nasometer II 6400, and to evaluate test-retest reliability of nasalance scores on each machine. Nasalance scores were obtained for 60 subjects reading each of two stimuli. Each subject read each stimulus two times on one machine; the headgear was removed and replaced and each stimulus was read a third time. The same procedure was then repeated with the second machine. Within machines, nasalance scores were compared for repeated stimuli with and without headgear change. The first reading of each stimulus with each machine was used to compare nasalance scores across machines. The subjects were 60 adults with normal speech ranging in age from 19 to 59 years. The main outcome measures were the 12 nasalance scores obtained for each of 60 subjects. For both passages, there was a significant difference in nasalance scores between the old Nasometer and the Nasometer II; however, the actual variability that could be attributed to a difference between machines was small. Most of the variability between machines could be explained as within-subject performance variability and variability associated with headgear change. There was no significant difference in repeated scores within machines with or without headgear change. For clinical purposes, care should be exercised when comparing nasalance scores between the old Nasometer and the Nasometer II.

  1. Integrated Test Scoring, Performance Rating and Assessment Records Keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Gerald J.; And Others

    The Objective Test Scoring and Performance Rating (OTS-PR) system is a fully integrated set of 70 modular FORTRAN programs run on a VAX-8530 computer. Even with no knowledge of computers, the user can implement OTS-PR to score multiple-choice tests, include scores from external sources such as hand-scored essays or scores from nationally…

  2. Vascular calcification and subendocardial ischemia in hemodialysis patients: a new morpho-functional score to assess cardiovascular risk: the Solofra score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirico, Maria L; Di Micco, Lucia; De Blasio, Antonella; Di Iorio, Biagio

    2014-01-01

    ESRD (end-stage renal disease) patients have a high cardiovascular mortality risk. A morphofunctional approach of vascular calcifications and myocardial perfusion is needed for the management of ESRD patients. We used SEVR (sub-endocardial viability ratio) and Kauppila score from the dialysis population of the Independent study to create a new morpho-functional score to assess cardiovascular risk in this population (the Solofra score). 184 patients were followed-up for 36 months. A side lumbar X-ray was performed to assess vascular calcifications of lumbar aorta using the Kauppila score. Central aortic pressure and pulse velocity wave (PWV) were assessed at the carotid artery site. Myocardial perfusion was estimated with SEVR. Independent risk mortality factors were identified with univariate regression analysis (p<0.01); significance was defined as p<0.05. Kauppila score was 13±10(range 0-24); PWV was 9.5±4 m/sec; basal SEVR was 1.3±0.9. We observed an improvement of ROC curves for SEVR and Kauppila score together compared to the ones for SEVR or Kauppila score alone. A quantitative analysis of vascular calcifications should be associated to a qualitative evaluation of arterial damage to better estimate cardiovascular mortality risk of ESRD patients. Further studies are needed to verify our hypothesis.

  3. Early warning scores: unravelling detection and escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gary B; Prytherch, David R; Meredith, Paul; Schmidt, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of how patient deterioration is detected and how clinical care escalates when early warning score (EWS) systems are used. The authors critically review a recent National Early Warning Score paper published in IJHCQA using personal experience and EWS-related publications, and debate the difference between detection and escalation. Incorrect EWS choice or poorly understood EWS escalation may result in unnecessary workloads forward and responding staff. EWS system implementers may need to revisit their guidance materials; medical and nurse educators may need to expand the curriculum to improve EWS system understanding and use. The paper raises the EWS debate and alerts EWS users that scrutiny is required.

  4. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Ikenna Chielo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources. These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments; enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided; and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture. Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range

  5. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  6. Augmented Interactive Scores for Music Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Fober, Dominique; Orlarey, Yann; Letz, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This article addresses music representation issues in the context of the contemporary music creation and performance. It exposes the main challenges in terms of music notation and representation, in regard of the new forms of music and with an emphasis on interactive music issues. It presents INScore, an environment for the design of augmented, interactive music scores that has been developed in response to current artistic evolutions. It gives an overview of the syste...

  7. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Uk Chae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE. Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%. NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  8. Gender, Stereotype Threat and Mathematics Test Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Tsui; Xu, Xiao Y.; Edmond Venator

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Stereotype threat has repeatedly been shown to depress womens scores on difficult math tests. An attempt to replicate these findings in China found no support for the stereotype threat hypothesis. Our math test was characterized as being personally important for the student participants, an atypical condition in most stereotype threat laboratory research. Approach: To evaluate the effects of this personal demand, we conducted three experiments. Results: ...

  9. Score matching estimators for directional distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Mardia, Kanti V.; Kent, John T.; Laha, Arnab K

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems for maximum likelihood estimation in the well-established directional models is that the normalising constants can be difficult to evaluate. A new general method of "score matching estimation" is presented here on a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Important applications include von Mises-Fisher, Bingham and joint models on the sphere and related spaces. The estimator is consistent and asymptotically normally distributed under mild regularity conditions. Further...

  10. Modelling the predictive performance of credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Shen

    2013-07-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this empirical paper was to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems in Taiwan. Motivation for the study: Corporate lending remains a major business line for financial institutions. However, in light of the recent global financial crises, it has become extremely important for financial institutions to implement rigorous means of assessing clients seeking access to credit facilities. Research design, approach and method: Using a data sample of 10 349 observations drawn between 1992 and 2010, logistic regression models were utilised to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems. Main findings: A test of Goodness of fit demonstrated that credit scoring models that incorporated the Taiwan Corporate Credit Risk Index (TCRI, micro- and also macroeconomic variables possessed greater predictive power. This suggests that macroeconomic variables do have explanatory power for default credit risk. Practical/managerial implications: The originality in the study was that three models were developed to predict corporate firms’ defaults based on different microeconomic and macroeconomic factors such as the TCRI, asset growth rates, stock index and gross domestic product. Contribution/value-add: The study utilises different goodness of fits and receiver operator characteristics during the examination of the robustness of the predictive power of these factors.

  11. Modelling the predictive performance of credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Shen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The article discussed the importance of rigour in credit risk assessment.Research purpose: The purpose of this empirical paper was to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems in Taiwan.Motivation for the study: Corporate lending remains a major business line for financial institutions. However, in light of the recent global financial crises, it has become extremely important for financial institutions to implement rigorous means of assessing clients seeking access to credit facilities.Research design, approach and method: Using a data sample of 10 349 observations drawn between 1992 and 2010, logistic regression models were utilised to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems.Main findings: A test of Goodness of fit demonstrated that credit scoring models that incorporated the Taiwan Corporate Credit Risk Index (TCRI, micro- and also macroeconomic variables possessed greater predictive power. This suggests that macroeconomic variables do have explanatory power for default credit risk.Practical/managerial implications: The originality in the study was that three models were developed to predict corporate firms’ defaults based on different microeconomic and macroeconomic factors such as the TCRI, asset growth rates, stock index and gross domestic product.Contribution/value-add: The study utilises different goodness of fits and receiver operator characteristics during the examination of the robustness of the predictive power of these factors.

  12. Resiliency scoring for business continuity plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Anna; Anderson, Jamie

    Through this paper readers will learn of a scoring methodology, referred to as resiliency scoring, which enables the evaluation of business continuity plans based upon analysis of their alignment with a predefined set of criteria that can be customised and are adaptable to the needs of any organisation. This patent pending tool has been successful in driving engagement and is a powerful resource to improve reporting capabilities, identify risks and gauge organisational resilience. The role of business continuity professionals is to aid their organisations in planning and preparedness activities aimed at mitigating the impacts of potential disruptions and ensuring critical business functions can continue in the event of unforeseen circumstances. This may seem like a daunting task for what can typically be a small team of individuals. For this reason, it is important to be able to leverage industry standards, documented best practices and effective tools to streamline and support your continuity programme. The resiliency scoring methodology developed and implemented at Target has proven to be a valuable tool in taking the organisation's continuity programme to the next level. This paper will detail how the tool was developed and provide guidance on how it can be customised to fit your organisation's unique needs.

  13. Validation of Photograph-Based Toxicity Score for Topical 5-Fluorouracil Cream Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Hyemin; Korgavkar, Kaveri; Lee, Kachiu C; Lew, Robert; Weinstock, Martin A

    2016-09-01

    An objective tool quantifying the toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) from photographs was recently reported, and its reliability was confirmed. The aim of this study was to validate the photograph-based toxicity score. Photograph-based toxicity scores of participants assigned to the 5-FU arm of a randomized placebo-controlled trial were tested for correlations with their patient-reported symptom scores and baseline characteristics. Each pair of individual and overall scores of patient-reported symptoms and photograph-based toxicity was correlated at 2 and 4 weeks (correlation coefficient range, 0.34-0.95; P photograph-based 5-FU toxicity score. The tool can be used to objectively measure 5-FU toxicity in clinical or research setting, and it can be a prototype for toxicity measurements of other topical medications. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Scoring inflammatory activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis: a multireader experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Cédric; Braun, Jürgen; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2007-01-01

    of 3 different scoring methods for MRI activity and change in activity of the spine in patients with AS. METHODS: Thirty sets of spinal MRI at baseline and after 24 weeks of followup, derived from a randomized clinical trial comparing a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking drug (n = 20) with placebo (n...... = 10) and selected to cover a wide range of activity at baseline and change in activity, were presented electronically in a partial latin-square design to 9 experienced readers from different countries (Europe, Canada). Readers scored each set of MRI 3 times, using 3 different methods including...... by the reader as the most abnormal, with additional scores for "depth" and "intensity." Both the order of the methods used by each reader and the timepoints (before/after treatment) were randomized. Feasibility of each scoring system was evaluated by measuring the mean time needed to score each set of MRI...

  15. Soetomo score: score model in early identification of acute haemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Hasan Machfoed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: On financial or facility constraints of brain imaging, score model is used to predict the occurrence of acute haemorrhagic stroke. Accordingly, this study attempts to develop a new score model, called Soetomo score. Material and methods: The researchers performed a cross-sectional study of 176 acute stroke patients with onset of ≤24 hours who visited emergency unit of Dr. Soetomo Hospital from July 14th to December 14th, 2014. The diagnosis of haemorrhagic stroke was confirmed by head computed tomography scan. There were seven predictors of haemorrhagic stroke which were analysed by using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, a multiple discriminant analysis resulted in an equation of Soetomo score model. The receiver operating characteristic procedure resulted in the values of area under curve and intersection point identifying haemorrhagic stroke. Afterward, the diagnostic test value was determined. Results: The equation of Soetomo score model was (3 × loss of consciousness + (3.5 × headache + (4 × vomiting − 4.5. Area under curve value of this score was 88.5% (95% confidence interval = 83.3–93.7%. In the Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75, the score reached the sensitivity of 82.9%, specificity of 83%, positive predictive value of 78.8%, negative predictive value of 86.5%, positive likelihood ratio of 4.88, negative likelihood ratio of 0.21, false negative of 17.1%, false positive of 17%, and accuracy of 83%. Conclusions: The Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75 can identify acute haemorrhagic stroke properly on the financial or facility constrains of brain imaging.

  16. Osprey Range - CWHR [ds601

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  17. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  18. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges

  19. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  20. Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS)-Italian version: regression based norms and equivalent scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Mattia; Trojano, Luigi; Trojsi, Francesca; Greco, Roberta; Santoro, Manuela; Basile, Giuseppe; Piscopo, Fausta; D'Iorio, Alfonsina; Patrone, Manila; Femiano, Cinzia; Monsurrò, Mariarosaria; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Santangelo, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Cognitive assessment for individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) can be difficult because of frequent occurrence of difficulties with speech, writing, and drawing. The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) is a recent multi-domain neuropsychological screening tool specifically devised for this purpose, and it assesses the following domains: executive functions, social cognition, verbal fluency and language (ALS-specific), but also memory and visuospatial abilities (Non-ALS specific). ECAS total score ranges from 0 (worst performance) to 136 (best performance). Moreover, a brief caregiver interview provides an assessment of behaviour changes and psychotic symptoms usually associated with ALS patients. The aim of the present study was to provide normative values for ECAS total score and sub-scores in a sample of Italian healthy subjects. Two hundred and seventy-seven Italian healthy subjects (151 women and 126 men; age range 30-79 years; educational level from primary school to university) underwent ECAS and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and education significantly influenced performance on ECAS total score and sub-scale scores. From the derived linear equation, a correction grid for raw scores was built. Inferential cut-off scores were estimated using a non-parametric technique and equivalent scores (ES) were computed. Correlation analysis showed a good significant correlation between adjusted ECAS total scores with adjusted MoCA total scores (r rho  = 0.669, p study provided normative data for the ECAS in an Italian population useful for both clinical and research purposes.

  1. Desert Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Entries qualify for inclusion if they were conducted in whole or part at the Desert Experimental Range (DER, also known as the Desert Range Experiment Station) or were based on DER research in whole or part. They do not qualify merely by the author having worked at the DER when the research was performed or prepared. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or...

  2. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Woods Scoring Record Number 381

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry

    2005-01-01

    ... (UXO) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Woods. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  3. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls Scoring Record Number 665

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George; Banta, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  4. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls Scoring Record Number 451

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  5. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Moguls Scoring Record Number 572

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mogul. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  6. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Woods Scoring Record Number 499

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Woods. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  7. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Moguls Scoring Record Number 545

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Robitaille, George; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mogul. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  8. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mine Grid Scoring Record #837

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teefy, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mine Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  9. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls Scoring Record No. 669

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Boutin, Matthew; Archiable, Robert; McClug, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  10. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Woods Scoring Record Number 494

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitialle, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Woods. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  11. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Woods Scoring Record No. 457

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Robitaille, George; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  12. Standardized UXO Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 690

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Archiable, Robert; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Scoring Committee...

  13. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mogul Scoring Record Number 642

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mogul. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  14. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Moguls Scoring Record Number 587

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  15. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Moguls Scoring Record Number 602

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  16. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record #833

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Burch, William; McDonnell, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Dennis Teefy and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  17. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls Scoring Record Number 571

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the YPO Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Mogul. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  18. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Moguls Scoring Record Number 573

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overlook, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  19. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  20. New Ballard Score, expanded to include extremely premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, J L; Khoury, J C; Wedig, K; Wang, L; Eilers-Walsman, B L; Lipp, R

    1991-09-01

    The Ballard Maturational Score was refined and expanded to achieve greater accuracy and to include extremely premature neonates. To test validity, accuracy, interrater reliability, and optimal postnatal age at examination, the resulting New Ballard Score (NBS) was assessed for 578 newly born infants and the results were analyzed. Gestational ages ranged from 20 to 44 weeks and postnatal ages at examination ranged from birth to 96 hours. In 530 infants, gestational age by last menstrual period was confirmed by agreement within 2 weeks with gestational age by prenatal ultrasonography (C-GLMP). For these infants, correlation between gestational age by NBS and C-GLMP was 0.97. Mean differences between gestational age by NBS and C-GLMP were 0.32 +/- 1.58 weeks and 0.15 +/- 1.46 weeks among the extremely premature infants (less than 26 weeks) and among the total population, respectively. Correlations between the individual criteria and C-GLMP ranged from 0.72 to 0.82. Interrater reliability of NBS, as determined by correlation between raters who rated the same subgroup of infants, ws 0.95. For infants less than 26 weeks of gestational age, the greatest validity (97% within 2 weeks of C-GLMP) was seen when the examination was performed before 12 hours of postnatal age. For infants at least 26 weeks of gestational age, percentages of agreement with C-GLMP remained constant, averaging 92% for all postnatal age categories up to 96 hours. The NBS is a valid and accurate gestational assessment tool for extremely premature infants and remains valid for the entire newborn infant population.

  1. Scoring system development for prediction of extravesical bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prelević Rade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Staging of bladder cancer is crucial for optimal management of the disease. However, clinical staging is not perfectly accurate. The aim of this study was to derive a simple scoring system in prediction of pathological advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC. Methods. Logistic regression and bootstrap methods were used to create an integer score for estimating the risk in prediction of pathological advanced MIBC using precystectomy clinicopathological data: demographic, initial transurethral resection (TUR [grade, stage, multiplicity of tumors, lymphovascular invasion (LVI], hydronephrosis, abdominal and pelvic CT radiography (size of the tumor, tumor base width, and pathological stage after radical cystectomy (RC. Advanced MIBC in surgical specimen was defined as pT3-4 tumor. Receiving operating characteristic (ROC curve quantified the area under curve (AUC as predictive accuracy. Clinical usefulness was assessed by using decision curve analysis. Results. This single-center retrospective study included 233 adult patients with BC undergoing RC at the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade. Organ confined disease was observed in 101 (43.3% patients, and 132 (56.7% had advanced MIBC. In multivariable analysis, 3 risk factors most strongly associated with advanced MIBC: grade of initial TUR [odds ratio (OR = 4.7], LVI (OR = 2, and hydronephrosis (OR = 3.9. The resultant total possible score ranged from 0 to 15, with the cut-off value of > 8 points, the AUC was 0.795, showing good discriminatory ability. The model showed excellent calibration. Decision curve analysis showed a net benefit across all threshold probabilities and clinical usefulness of the model. Conclusion. We developed a unique scoring system which could assist in predicting advanced MIBC in patients before RC. The scoring system showed good performance characteristics and introducing of such a tool into daily clinical decision-making may lead to more appropriate

  2. Evaluation of the Danish footpad lesion surveillance in conventional and organic broilers: Misclassification of scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, V P; Nielsen, L R; Oliveira, A R S; Christensen, J P

    2017-07-01

    Danish legislation prescribes surveillance of footpad dermatitis (FPD) at slaughter as an indicator of on-farm broiler welfare. The 3-point scale being used was originally developed in Sweden to score feet from conventional broilers, but the extent and causes of misclassifications have not been investigated, neither in conventional nor organic broilers. Hence, we investigated the performance of the official Danish FPD scoring system in conventional and organic broilers by assessing agreement between official scores from the slaughterhouse and consecutive scoring of the same feet by a reference method. We also investigated the impact of performing an incision of the footpad during scoring. In total, 902 conventional and 897 organic broiler feet (∼100 per flock from 18 flocks) were collected at a large Danish slaughterhouse for the official FPD surveillance system. Laboratory scoring, according to predefined criteria for visual and invasive investigations of the feet derived from the official system, was compared to the official scores assigned at slaughter. Footpad lesions were primarily chronic, representing a wide range of severity. Marked differences in color, shape, and degree of papillary hypertrophy and hyperkeratosis of organic and conventional feet were observed. Low agreement primarily regarding score 2 lesions was observed when comparing official and reference foot scores in conventional (0.31) and organic (0.05) broilers. Variation in agreement when comparing flock scores suggested a non-systematic bias, which might be attributed to differences among official raters. The very low agreement in feet from organic broilers shows that these were more difficult to score than conventional. This might be due to a mismatch between lesion characteristics and scoring criteria, or because the lesions were less severe. Strictly visual examination detected 3 out of 4 score 2 lesions identified by the reference method. This study indicated that a large proportion of

  3. Best waveform score for diagnosing keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Luz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test whether corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF can discriminate between keratoconus and normal eyes and to evaluate whether the averages of two consecutive measurements perform differently from the one with the best waveform score (WS for diagnosing keratoconus. METHODS: ORA measurements for one eye per individual were selected randomly from 53 normal patients and from 27 patients with keratoconus. Two groups were considered the average (CH-Avg, CRF-Avg and best waveform score (CH-WS, CRF-WS groups. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate whether the variables had similar distributions in the Normal and Keratoconus groups. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were calculated for each parameter to assess the efficacy for diagnosing keratoconus and the same obtained for each variable were compared pairwise using the Hanley-McNeil test. RESULTS: The CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS and CRF-WS differed significantly between the normal and keratoconus groups (p<0.001. The areas under the ROC curve (AUROC for CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS, and CRF-WS were 0.824, 0.873, 0.891, and 0.931, respectively. CH-WS and CRF-WS had significantly better AUROCs than CH-Avg and CRF-Avg, respectively (p=0.001 and 0.002. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the biomechanical properties of the cornea through the ORA method has proved to be an important aid in the diagnosis of keratoconus, regardless of the method used. The best waveform score (WS measurements were superior to the average of consecutive ORA measurements for diagnosing keratoconus.

  4. Apgar Score Components at 5 Minutes: Risks and Prediction of Neonatal Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnattingius, Sven; Norman, Mikael; Granath, Fredrik; Petersson, Gunnar; Stephansson, Olof; Frisell, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The Apgar score consists of five components: heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and colour. Although the Apgar score has been used for 60 years, the specific contribution of the Apgar score components with respect to risks and prediction of neonatal mortality remains unknown. Likewise, the value of reduced scores (including less than five Apgar score components) has rarely been investigated. In a population-based cohort study of 148 765 liveborn singleton infants in Sweden 2008-2013, we investigated components of Apgar score at 5 min with respect to relative risks and prediction (using ROC curves, sensitivity, and positive predictive values) of neonatal mortality. Reduced values (0-1) of heart rate, respiratory effort, and colour were independently associated with increased relative risks of neonatal mortality. For the full Apgar score, the sensitivity and positive predictive values of neonatal mortality (cut-off ≤3) were by gestational age: ≤31 weeks: 56.1% and 49.2%; 32-36 weeks: 25.0% and 18.2%; and ≥37 weeks: 35.2% and 9.3%, respectively. When only heart rate and respiratory effort were considered (range 0-4; cut-off ≤2), corresponding values were 66.7% and 34.9%; 37.5% and 13.0%; and 46.3% and 7.6%, respectively. A reduced Apgar score has generally the same predictability of neonatal mortality as the full Apgar score. The full Apgar score or reduced scores may be better predictors of neonatal mortality in very preterm infants (≤31 weeks) than in infants with longer gestations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The score statistic of the LD-lod analysis: detecting linkage adaptive to linkage disequilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Jiang, Y

    2001-01-01

    We study the properties of a modified lod score method for testing linkage that incorporates linkage disequilibrium (LD-lod). By examination of its score statistic, we show that the LD-lod score method adaptively combines two sources of information: (a) the IBD sharing score which is informative for linkage regardless of the existence of LD and (b) the contrast between allele-specific IBD sharing scores which is informative for linkage only in the presence of LD. We also consider the connection between the LD-lod score method and the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) for triad data and the mean test for affected sib pair (ASP) data. We show that, for triad data, the recessive LD-lod test is asymptotically equivalent to the TDT; and for ASP data, it is an adaptive combination of the TDT and the ASP mean test. We demonstrate that the LD-lod score method has relatively good statistical efficiency in comparison with the ASP mean test and the TDT for a broad range of LD and the genetic models considered in this report. Therefore, the LD-lod score method is an interesting approach for detecting linkage when the extent of LD is unknown, such as in a genome-wide screen with a dense set of genetic markers. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. CALCULATION AND COMPARISON OF NUTRIENT DENSITY/QUALITY SCORES FOR COMMONLY CONSUMED FRESH FRUIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail RAMPERSAUD

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of methods have been developed to quantitatively describe the nutrient density/quality (ND/Q of foods and beverages. Seventeen commonly consumed fresh fruits were evaluated using six published ND/Q methods. Nutrient data for each fruit were obtained from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23. Numerical scores were produced and ranked for each fruit and method. The resulting ND/Q scores varied in range and magnitude but there was good to strong correlation among methods. The relative scores indicated that cantaloupe, strawberries, oranges, and grapefruit generally had the highest ND/Q scores across all methods. Further analysis indicated that vitamins C and A, nutrients common to all six methods, affected ND/Q scores substantially for some but not all fruits, suggesting that high values for specific nutrients may influence relative scoring and higher scores may not necessarily reflect a greater variety or balance of nutrients. Fresh fruits vary in their ND/Q as defined by several quantitative scoring systems. In this analysis, consistent results in how the fruits were ranked were obtained when using six different methods to quantify ND/Q for select fresh fruit.

  7. Is the ABCD score useful for risk stratification of patients with acute transient ischemic attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Brett L; Messe, Steve R; Taylor, Robert A; Pacelli, James; Maus, Douglas; Shah, Qaisar; Kasner, Scott E

    2006-07-01

    A 6-point scoring system (ABCD) was described recently for stratifying risk after transient ischemic attack (TIA). This score incorporates age (A), blood pressure (B), clinical features (C), and duration (D) of TIA. A score or =50% stenosis in a relevant artery, or a cardioembolic source warranting anticoagulation. All others were classified as low risk. Findings on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) were also evaluated when performed and patients classified as DWI+ or DWI-. Over 3 years, 117 patients were enrolled. Median time from symptom onset to enrollment was 25.2 hours (interquartile range 19.8 to 30.2). Overall, 26 patients (22%) were classified as high risk, including 2 strokes, 2 deaths, 15 with > or =50% stenosis, and 10 with cardioembolic source. The frequency of high-risk patients increased with ABCD score (0 to 1 13%; 2 8%; 3 17%; 4 27%; 5 26%; 6 30%; P for trend=0.11). ABCD scores in the 2 patients with stroke were 3 and 6. Of those who underwent MRI, 15 of 61 (25%) were DWI+, but this correlated poorly with ABCD score (0 to 1 17%; 2 10%; 3 36%; 4 24%; 5 13%; 6 60%; P for trend=0.24). Although the ABCD score has some predictive value, patients with a score <4 still have a substantial probability of having a high-risk cause of cerebral ischemia or radiographic evidence of acute infarction despite transient symptoms.

  8. Scores of typically developing children on the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales: infancy to preschool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Johanna; Magill-Evans, Joyce; Volden, Joanne; Hodge, Megan; Kembhavi, Gayatri

    2007-01-01

    Norms for the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales (PDMS) and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, second edition (PDMS-2) are based on cross-sectional data that do not provide information on how the scores of individual children vary over time. This study examined intra-individual variability of PDMS fine and gross motor scores of 77 typically developing children at 9, 11, 13, 16, and 21 months of age and PDMS and PDMS-2 fine and gross motor scores at 4 years. Correlations between scores over time ranged from .13 to .45. PDMS and PDMS-2 scores were correlated at .71 and .75 with significantly different means, indicating that the two versions are not equivalent for 4-year-old children. Most children scored above the 16th percentile, the suggested cut-off on the PDMS, at both 21-month and 4-year assessments, but their percentile ranks fluctuated considerably. Use of confidence intervals contributes to accurate interpretation of scores by differentiating true change in a child's score from change due to measurement error.

  9. Do efficiency scores depend on input mix?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Kronborg, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine the possibility of using the standard Kruskal-Wallis (KW) rank test in order to evaluate whether the distribution of efficiency scores resulting from Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is independent of the input (or output) mix of the observations. Since the DEA frontier...... is estimated, many standard assumptions for evaluating the KW test statistic are violated. Therefore, we propose to explore its statistical properties by the use of simulation studies. The simulations are performed conditional on the observed input mixes. The method, unlike existing approaches...

  10. Early warning scores: a health warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challen, Kirsty; Roland, Damian

    2016-11-01

    Early warning scores are frequently used in UK adult emergency departments (EDs) and are gaining traction in paediatric emergency care. Like many innovations with inherent face validity, they have great appeal to clinicians, managers and commissioners. However, it is important to ensure unintended consequences and balancing measures are mitigated. We review the background to their development and introduction in the ED, the evidence for their usefulness, their limitations in our field and areas for further research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Score Bounded Monte-Carlo Tree Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, Tristan; Saffidine, Abdallah

    Monte-Carlo Tree Search (MCTS) is a successful algorithm used in many state of the art game engines. We propose to improve a MCTS solver when a game has more than two outcomes. It is for example the case in games that can end in draw positions. In this case it improves significantly a MCTS solver to take into account bounds on the possible scores of a node in order to select the nodes to explore. We apply our algorithm to solving Seki in the game of Go and to Connect Four.

  12. A novel respiratory symptom scoring system for CF pulmonary exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarad, N A; Sequeiros, I M

    2012-02-01

    There is currently no simple scoring system to evaluate change in symptoms during a pulmonary exacerbation (PEx) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We evaluated 265 episodes in 58 adult CF patients. A simple symptom score was administered at the start and the end of each PEx. The score evaluated four symptoms: cough, sputum, breathlessness and fatigue. Each symptom was scored from one (mild symptoms) to four (severe symptoms). The total symptom score was the summation of all the four symptoms. The total symptom score was compared with CF Respiratory Questionnaire (CFRQ) and with spirometry. There was significant internal correlation between scores for each pair of symptoms. The total symptom score correlated with the functional activity score and the respiratory score domains and with the summary score for CFRQ. The total symptom score correlated with spirometry values. Symptom score improved after 2-week treatment with intravenous (IV) antibiotics in 88.3%, remained unchanged in 7.3% and worsened in 4.4% of all episodes. Changes in symptom score after IV treatment correlated with changes of all main spirometry measurements. This new symptom score is simple and sensitive to change over a short period. It correlates with established quality-of-life questionnaires and with spirometry. The changes of symptom score over a short period correlate with changes in spirometry. This score can be used as an added tool to assess the outcome of CF PExs.

  13. Reference Ranges & What They Mean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chains Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle ... If you're trying to follow a healthy lifestyle, take test results that are within range as ...

  14. Kenai National Moose Range Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This book presents a summary of the history, wildlife, recreational opportunities, economic uses, and future plans for Kenai National Moose Range.

  15. Development of a severity score for CRPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, R Norman; Bruehl, Stephen; Perez, Roberto S G M; Birklein, Frank; Marinus, Johan; Maihofner, Christian; Lubenow, Timothy; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Mackey, Sean; Graciosa, Joseph; Mogilevski, Mila; Ramsden, Christopher; Schlereth, Tanja; Chont, Melissa; Vatine, Jean-Jacques

    2010-12-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a dichotomous (yes/no) categorization necessary for clinical decision-making. However, such dichotomous diagnostic categories do not convey an individual's subtle and temporal gradations in severity of the condition, and have poor statistical power when used as an outcome measure in research. This study evaluated the validity and potential utility of a continuous type score to index severity of CRPS. Psychometric and medical evaluations were conducted in 114 CRPS patients and 41 non-CRPS neuropathic pain patients. Based on the presence/absence of 17 clinically-assessed signs and symptoms of CRPS, an overall CRPS Severity Score (CSS) was derived. The CSS discriminated well between CRPS and non-CRPS patients (pCRPS diagnoses using both IASP diagnostic criteria (Eta=0.69) and proposed revised criteria (Eta=0.77-0.88). Higher CSS was associated with significantly higher clinical pain intensity, distress, and functional impairments, as well as greater bilateral temperature asymmetry and thermal perception abnormalities (p'sCRPS, and support its validity as an index of CRPS severity. Its utility as an outcome measure in research studies is also suggested, with potential statistical advantages over dichotomous diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Literature in focus: How to Score

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    What is the perfect way to take a free kick? Which players are under more stress: attackers, midfielders or defenders? How do we know when a ball has crossed the goal-line? And how can teams win a penalty shoot out? From international team formations to the psychology of the pitch and the changing room... The World Cup might be a time to forget about physics for a while, but not for Ken Bray, a theoretical physicist and visiting Fellow of the Sport and Exercise Science Group at the University of Bath who specializes in the science of football. Dr Bray will visit CERN to talk exclusively about his book: How to Score. As a well-seasoned speaker and advisor to professional football teams, this presentation promises to be a fascinating and timely insight into the secret science that lies behind 'the beautiful game'. If you play or just watch football, don't miss this event! Ken Bray - How to Score Thursday 22 June at 3 p.m. (earlier than usual to avoid clashes with World Cup matches!) Central Library reading ...

  17. Nasalance scores in pediatric patients after adenoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzuner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Akkoc, Ahmet; Arslan, Erhan; Arslan, Necmi; Samim, Etem Erdal

    2014-04-01

    Adenoidectomy is one of the most frequently performed operations in childhood. Nasal obstruction and chronic infection are the basic indications for surgery. Nasometer measures both oral and nasal air pressure during loud speech, and calculates their ratio. The aim of this study was to compare the mean nasal values in patients who had adenoidectomy at different ages against a control group. Eighty children between the ages of three and sixteen that had adenoidectomy in our clinic between 2006 and 2010 were compared against eighty age-matched controls who had not had nasal obstruction in their lifetime and were proven to have open nasal airways on physical examination. Statistical analysis of the data showed that mean nasalance scores were significantly lower in patients who had adenoidectomy before 6 years of age when compared to the ones who had the operation after the age of six. In addition, when we compared the children who had adenoidectomy before 5 years of age and between 5 and 6 years of age, we found that their nasalance scores were significantly lower when compared to those who had adenoidectomy after the age of six (p = 0.017 and p = 0.019, respectively). This study has shown that, even when adenoidectomy is performed, hyponasality may continue in clinically symptomatic patients under the age of six, and that there are no determined risk factors other than the early age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, N J; Prinsen, C A C; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties in partici......OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties...... in participants with knee injuries and/or osteoarthritis (OA). Methodological quality was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Where possible, meta-analysis of extracted data was conducted for all studies and stratified by age and knee condition; otherwise narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: KOOS has...... adequate internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity in young and old adults with knee injuries and/or OA. The ADL subscale has better content validity for older patients and Sport/Rec for younger patients with knee injuries, while the Pain subscale is more relevant for painful...

  19. THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN (FMS™) IN ELITE YOUNG SOCCER PLAYERS BETWEEN 14 AND 20 YEARS: COMPOSITE SCORE, INDIVIDUAL-TEST SCORES AND ASYMMETRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Vanessa Bernardes; Medeiros, Thales Menezes; de Souza Stigger, Felipe; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2017-11-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS™) is a widely used seven-test battery used by practitioners working in sport medicine. The FMS™ composite score (sum of seven tests) in soccer athletes from different competitive levels has been well explored in literature, but the specific movement deficits presented by young high competitive level players remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to provide a detailed description of the performance of elite young soccer players (age 14-20 years) on the FMS™ testing battery. Cross-sectional observational study. One-hundred and three young soccer players (14-20 years) from a premier league club were assessed by two experienced raters using the FMS™ testing battery. FMS™ composite score, individual-test scores and asymmetries were considered for analysis, and comparisons between age categories were performed. FMS™ composite scores ranged from 9 to 16 points (median=13 points). 82% of the athletes had a composite score ≤14 points, and 91% were classified into the "Fail" group (score 0 or 1 in at least one test). Almost half of athletes (48%) had poor performance (i.e., individual score functional deficits, especially in tasks involving deep squat and trunk stability, as well as high prevalence of asymmetry between right and left body side. 3a.

  20. Association Between Older Age and Increasing Gleason Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, Vinayak; Ziehr, David R; Mahal, Brandon A; Chen, Yu-Wei; Nezolosky, Michelle D; Viswanathan, Vidya B; Choueiri, Toni K; Sweeney, Christopher J; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L

    2015-12-01

    In order to help inform the discussion about the risks versus benefits of prostate cancer screening among older men, we determined whether advanced age is associated with a higher probability of harboring high-grade or high-risk disease. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify 383,039 men diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2004-2011. The percentage of patients diagnosed with low-, intermediate-, or high-risk disease or a Gleason score of 6, 7, or 8 to 10 was calculated by age range. As a secondary analysis, we examined whether this relationship was different in 2010-2011 versus 2007-2008 (before and after the 2009 publication of screening trials). The probability of Gleason score 8 to 10 or high-risk disease increased significantly with increasing age. The percentage of Gleason score 8 to 10 disease among men ages 50 to 54, 70 to 74, and 80 to 84 years was 8.9%, 16.2%, and 28.5%, respectively, and the percentage of high-risk disease was 14.3%, 22.4%, and 38.7% (P < .001). There were similar relationships among men with stage T1c disease. In addition, older men experienced a significant increase in the relative probability of high-risk or high-grade disease from 2007-2008 to 2010-2011. In this large US-based cohort, older men had a much higher probability of high-grade or high-risk prostate cancer. Physicians and patients should take into account the higher risk of more aggressive or advanced disease in older men when discussing the risks and benefits of prostate-specific antigen screening with healthy older men with a substantial life expectancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lowering the 'floor' of the SF-6D scoring algorithm using a lottery equivalent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Perpiñán, José María; Sánchez Martínez, Fernando Ignacio; Martínez Pérez, Jorge Eduardo; Méndez, Ildefonso

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a new scoring algorithm for the SF-6D, one of the most popular preference-based health status measures. Previous SF-6D value sets have a minimum (a floor), which is substantially higher than the lowest value generated by the EQ-5D model. Our algorithm expands the range of SF-6D utility scores in such a way that the floor is significantly lowered. We obtain the wider range because of the use of a lottery equivalent method through which preferences from a representative sample of Spanish general population are elicited. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Disease-specific death and metastasis do not occur in patients with Gleason score ≤6 at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweldam, Charlotte F; Wildhagen, Mark F; Bangma, Chris H; van Leenders, Geert J L H

    2015-08-01

    To assess the metastasis-free survival (MFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in men with Gleason score ≤6 prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy (RP). We included 1101 consecutive RP patients operated between March 1985 to July 2013 at a single institution. The outcome variables were MFS and DSS. The postoperative survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Gleason score distribution of the study population (1101 patients) was Gleason score ≤6 (449, 41%), Gleason score 3 + 4 = 7 (436, 40%), Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 (99, 9%) and Gleason score 8-10 (117, 11%). The median (interquartile range) postoperative follow-up was 100 (48-150) months. During follow-up 197 men (18%) died, of whom 42 (3.8%) died from prostate cancer-related causes. In all, 19/1101 patients (1.7%) had documented lymph node metastasis at the time of RP: none with Gleason score ≤6, seven with Gleason score 3 + 4 = 7 (1.6%), six with Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 (6.1%) and six with Gleason score 8-10 (5.1%). Distant metastasis occurred in 56/1101 patients (5.1%): none with Gleason score ≤6, 23 with Gleason score 3 + 4 = 7 (5.3%), 17 with Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 (17%) and 16 with Gleason score 8-10 (14%). Disease-specific death, stratified per Gleason-score group was: none in ≤6, 16 (3.7%) in 3 + 4 = 7, 16 (16%) in 4 + 3 = 7 and 10 (8.5%) in 8-10 group. No metastasis or disease-specific death were seen in men with Gleason score ≤6 prostate cancer at RP, showing the negligible potential to metastasise in this large subgroup of patients with prostate cancer. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Reliability of the mangled extremity severity score in combat-related upper and lower extremity injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Ege

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decision of limb salvage or amputation is generally aided with several trauma scoring systems such as the mangled extremity severity score (MESS. However, the reliability of the injury scores in the settling of open fractures due to explosives and missiles is challenging. Mortality and morbidity of the extremity trauma due to firearms are generally associated with time delay in revascularization, injury mechanism, anatomy of the injured site, associated injuries, age and the environmental circumstance. The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the extent of extremity injuries due to ballistic missiles and to detect the reliability of mangled extremity severity score (MESS in both upper and lower extremities. Materials and Methods: Between 2004 and 2014, 139 Gustillo Anderson Type III open fractures of both the upper and lower extremities were enrolled in the study. Data for patient age, fire arm type, transporting time from the field to the hospital (and the method, injury severity scores, MESS scores, fracture types, amputation levels, bone fixation methods and postoperative infections and complications retrieved from the two level-2 trauma center's data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the MESS were calculated to detect the ability in deciding amputation in the mangled limb. Results: Amputation was performed in 39 extremities and limb salvage attempted in 100 extremities. The mean followup time was 14.6 months (range 6–32 months. In the amputated group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremity were 8.8 (range 6–11 and 9.24 (range 6–11, respectively. In the limb salvage group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremities were 5.29 (range 4–7 and 5.19 (range 3–8, respectively. Sensitivity of MESS in upper and lower extremities were calculated as 80% and 79.4% and positive predictive values detected as 55.55% and 83.3%, respectively. Specificity of MESS

  4. Reliability of the mangled extremity severity score in combat-related upper and lower extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ege, Tolga; Unlu, Aytekin; Tas, Huseyin; Bek, Dogan; Turkan, Selim; Cetinkaya, Aytac

    2015-01-01

    Decision of limb salvage or amputation is generally aided with several trauma scoring systems such as the mangled extremity severity score (MESS). However, the reliability of the injury scores in the settling of open fractures due to explosives and missiles is challenging. Mortality and morbidity of the extremity trauma due to firearms are generally associated with time delay in revascularization, injury mechanism, anatomy of the injured site, associated injuries, age and the environmental circumstance. The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the extent of extremity injuries due to ballistic missiles and to detect the reliability of mangled extremity severity score (MESS) in both upper and lower extremities. Between 2004 and 2014, 139 Gustillo Anderson Type III open fractures of both the upper and lower extremities were enrolled in the study. Data for patient age, fire arm type, transporting time from the field to the hospital (and the method), injury severity scores, MESS scores, fracture types, amputation levels, bone fixation methods and postoperative infections and complications retrieved from the two level-2 trauma center's data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the MESS were calculated to detect the ability in deciding amputation in the mangled limb. Amputation was performed in 39 extremities and limb salvage attempted in 100 extremities. The mean followup time was 14.6 months (range 6-32 months). In the amputated group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremity were 8.8 (range 6-11) and 9.24 (range 6-11), respectively. In the limb salvage group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremities were 5.29 (range 4-7) and 5.19 (range 3-8), respectively. Sensitivity of MESS in upper and lower extremities were calculated as 80% and 79.4% and positive predictive values detected as 55.55% and 83.3%, respectively. Specificity of MESS score for upper and lower extremities was 84% and 86.6%; negative

  5. Further Simplification of the Simple Erosion Narrowing Score With Item Response Theory Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Schenk, Olga; Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Bernelot Moens, Hein J; Boers, Maarten; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2016-08-01

    To further simplify the simple erosion narrowing score (SENS) by removing scored areas that contribute the least to its measurement precision according to analysis based on item response theory (IRT) and to compare the measurement performance of the simplified version to the original. Baseline and 18-month data of the Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial were modeled using longitudinal IRT methodology. Measurement precision was evaluated across different levels of structural damage. SENS was further simplified by omitting the least reliably scored areas. Discriminant validity of SENS and its simplification were studied by comparing their ability to differentiate between the COBRA and sulfasalazine arms. Responsiveness was studied by comparing standardized change scores between versions. SENS data showed good fit to the IRT model. Carpal and feet joints contributed the least statistical information to both erosion and joint space narrowing scores. Omitting the joints of the foot reduced measurement precision for the erosion score in cases with below-average levels of structural damage (relative efficiency compared with the original version ranged 35-59%). Omitting the carpal joints had minimal effect on precision (relative efficiency range 77-88%). Responsiveness of a simplified SENS without carpal joints closely approximated the original version (i.e., all Δ standardized change scores were ≤0.06). Discriminant validity was also similar between versions for both the erosion score (relative efficiency = 97%) and the SENS total score (relative efficiency = 84%). Our results show that the carpal joints may be omitted from the SENS without notable repercussion for its measurement performance. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Renal nephrometry score is associated with urine leak after partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Bryan; Breau, Rodney H; Lohse, Christine M; Leibovich, Bradley C; Blute, Michael L

    2011-07-01

    • To determine if the RENAL nephrometry score is associated with urine leak after partial nephrectomy for tumours ≤ 7 cm. • Thirty-one patients who developed urine leak after partial nephrectomy between 1998 and 2006 were identified. Each patient was individually matched (1 : 4 by age, gender and surgery date) to 124 patients who had undergone partial nephrectomy but without urine leak. • Associations of RENAL nephrometry scores and each component of the score (Radius; Endophytic; Nearness to collecting system; and Location) with urine leak were evaluated using conditional logistic regression. • Mean tumour size for the 31 patients who developed urine leak was 3.4 cm (median 3.5; range 1.5-5.9). Mean RENAL score was 8 (median 8; range 5-11). • Each unit increase in RENAL score was associated with a 35% increased odds of urine leak (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.08-1.69; P= 0.009). • On multivariable analysis, tumours that were pole (OR 4.34; 95% CI 1.30-14.53; P= 0.017) were associated with urine leak. • If the score attributed to tumour location was reversed (polar location given a higher score), each unit increase in RENAL score was associated with an 89% increased odds of urine leak (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.40-2.55; P reversal of the score attributed to tumour location may improve risk prediction. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  7. 24 CFR 902.45 - Management operations scoring and thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management operations scoring and... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM PHAS Indicator #3: Management Operations § 902.45 Management operations scoring and thresholds. (a) Scoring. The Management Operations Indicator score provides...

  8. State-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) scores during pregnancy following intervention with complementary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newham, James J; Westwood, Melissa; Aplin, John D; Wittkowski, Anja

    2012-12-15

    We review intervention trials that have used the State-Trait Anxiety inventory (STAI) as a measure of maternal anxiety in pregnancy in order to provide ranges in scores before and after participation in complementary therapy-based interventions to highlight the expected ranges of scores in pregnancy and determine whether anxiety in pregnancy is amenable to change when measured by the STAI. Combinations of the key words "STAI", "state anxiety", "pregnancy", "anxiety", "maternal", "stress", "outcome" and "intervention" were used to search publications between January 1970 and January 2011. Studies eligible for inclusion recruited low risk, adult women to a non-pharmacological intervention or a comparator group, and measured anxiety at baseline and post-intervention. Ten studies were eligible. Scores were routinely high compared to expected ranges in non-pregnant populations. Studies examining the immediate effects of an intervention consistently reported significantly lowered STAI scores after a single session. Likewise, studies examining the effect of interventions consisting of multiple sessions over the course of pregnancy found that those in the intervention group were more likely to show an improvement in STAI scores. Heterogeneity in type and duration of intervention prevent drawing conclusions on which were most effective in reducing anxiety. Scores on the STAI appear amenable to change during pregnancy, both after a single session and multiple sessions of interventions designed to reduce maternal anxiety. This review offers a guideline for the expected range of scores for future studies examining the efficacy of interventions in pregnancy when using the STAI. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Validation of a diagnostic scoring system (Ohmann score) in acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, A; Sitter, H; Rampp, T A; Schäfer, E; Hasse, C; Lorenz, W; Rothmund, M

    1999-07-01

    A diagnostic scoring system, recently published by Ohmann et al. in this journal, was validated by analyzing the clinicopathological data of a consecutive series of 2,359 patients, admitted for suspicion of acute appendicitis. The results of the scoring system were compared to the results of clinical evaluation by junior (provisional) and senior surgeons (final clinical diagnosis). To assess the diagnostic ability of the score, the accuracy and positive predictive value were defined as the major diagnostic performance parameters; the rate of theoretical negative laparotomies and that of diagnostic errors served as the major procedural performance parameters. Of 2,359 patients admitted for suspected acute appendicitis, 662 were proven to have acute appendicitis by histology, for a prevalence of 28%. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the provisional clinical diagnosis were 0.50, 0.94, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.82; 0.93, for the score 0.63, 0.93, 0.77, 0.86 and 0.84, and for the final clinical diagnosis 0.90, 0.94, 0.85, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Of the main diagnostic performance parameter, the accuracy of the score was significantly better than that of provisional clinical diagnosis (P apendicitis, the score demonstrated a superior performance, with only 6 cases missed (0.9%). However, the number of patients with acute appendicitis, including those with perforated disease, who were not identified by the score, was almost four times that of the final clinical diagnosis (245 vs 63). With regard to the main procedural performance parameter, the score resulted in a significantly smaller number of diagnostic errors than the provisional clinical investigator (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The results of this study indicate that the diagnostic scoring system might be helpful when experienced investigators or additional diagnostic modalities such as ultrasonography are not available. It may therefore be of value

  10. Deriving modified Rankin scores from medical case-records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence J; Ray, Gautamananda; Atula, Sari; Walters, Matthew R; Dawson, Jesse; Lees, Kennedy R

    2008-12-01

    Modified Rankin score (mRS) is traditionally graded using a face-to-face or telephone interview. Certain stroke assessment scales can be derived from a review of a patient's case-record alone. We hypothesized that mRS could be successfully derived from the narrative within patient case-records. Sequential patients attending our cerebrovascular outpatient clinic were included. Two independent, blinded clinicians, trained in mRS, assessed case-records to derive mRS. They scored "certainty" of their grading on a 5-point Likert scale. Agreement between derived and traditional face-to-face mRS was calculated using attribute agreement analysis. Fifty patients with a range of disabilities were included. Case-record appraisers were poor at deriving mRS (k=0.34 against standard). Derived mRS grades showed poor agreement between observers (k=0.33). There was no relationship between certainty of derived mRS and proportion of correct grades (P=0.727). Accurate mRS cannot be derived from standard hospital records. Direct mRS interview is still required for clinical trials.

  11. Environmental Assessment for the Joint Advanced Weapons Scoring System Installation in the Oklahoma Range, Donnelly West Training Area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Glacier can be found about 22 miles south of the existing mock airfield site. Bedrock of the Northern Foothills consists of Precambrian and JOINT...US Army Engineering and Research and Development Center Cold Region Research and Engineering Laboratory. The survey found that approximately 68...Wildlife Studies at Fort Wainwright and Fort Greely, Central Alaska, 1998. Final Report, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

  12. Validity of the Danish Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Objective – To determine the content and face validity of the Danish Prostate Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire in stroke patients. Materials and methods – Content validity was judged among an expert panel in neuro-urology. The judgement was measured by the content validity index (CVI). Face...... validity was indicated in a clinical sample of 482 stroke patients in a hospital-based, cross-sectional survey. Results – I-CVI was rated >0.78 (range 0.94–1.00) for 75% of symptom and bother items corresponding to adequate content validity. The expert panel rated the entire DAN-PSS-1 questionnaire highly...... questionnaire appears to be content and face valid for measuring lower urinary tract symptoms after stroke....

  13. Single Interface for Music Score Searching and Analysis (SIMSSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Ichiro Fujinaga; Andrew Hankinson

    2015-01-01

    Single Interface for Music Score Searching and Analysis (SIMSSA) project targets digitized music scores to de-sign a global infrastructure for searching and analyzing music scores. Specifically, we seek to provide research-ers, musicians, and others to access the contents and metadata of a large number of scores in a searchable, digital format. In this project, we are developing proto-types for processing and accessing the scores by consult-ing closely music researchers, musicians, and librar...

  14. Factors predicting Gleason score 6 upgrading after radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Milonas, Daimantas; Grybas, Aivaras; Auskalnis, Stasys; Gudinaviciene, Inga; Baltrimavicius, Ruslanas; Kincius, Marius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Prostate cancer Gleason score 6 is the most common score detected on prostatic biopsy. We analyzed the clinical parameters that predict the likelihood of Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy. Methods The study population consisted of 241 patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy between Feb 2002 and Dec 2007 for Gleason score 6 adenocarcinoma. The influence of preoperative parameters on the probability of a Gleason score upgrading after surgery was eval...

  15. Discrepancy between coronary artery calcium score and HeartScore in middle-aged Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Sand, Niels Peter; Nørgaard, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is an independent and incremental risk marker. This marker has previously not been compared to the HeartScore risk model. Design: A random sample of 1825 citizens (men and women, 50 or 60 years of age) was invited for screening. Methods: Using the H...... the HeartScore model, the 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular events based on gender, age, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol was estimated. A low risk was defined as......Background: Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is an independent and incremental risk marker. This marker has previously not been compared to the HeartScore risk model. Design: A random sample of 1825 citizens (men and women, 50 or 60 years of age) was invited for screening. Methods: Using...

  16. Reproducibility of scoring emphysema by HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinen, A.; Partanen, K.; Rytkoenen, H.; Vanninen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Erkinjuntti-Pekkanen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the reproducibility of three visual scoring methods of emphysema and compared these methods with pulmonary function tests (VC, DLCO, FEV1 and FEV%) among farmer's lung patients and farmers. Material and Methods: Three radiologists examined high-resolution CT images of farmer's lung patients and their matched controls (n=70) for chronic interstitial lung diseases. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver variability were assessed for three methods: severity, Sanders' (extent) and Sakai. Pulmonary function tests as spirometry and diffusing capacity were measured. Results: Intraobserver -values for all three methods were good (0.51-0.74). Interobserver varied from 0.35 to 0.72. The Sanders' and the severity methods correlated strongly with pulmonary function tests, especially DLCO and FEV1. Conclusion: The Sanders' method proved to be reliable in evaluating emphysema, in terms of good consistency of interpretation and good correlation with pulmonary function tests.

  17. ABOUT PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES IN APPLICATION SCORING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Rogers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of psychological variables and scales suggested by Economic Psychology in predicting individuals’ default. Therefore, a sample of 555 individuals completed a self-completion questionnaire, which was composed of psychological variables and scales. By adopting the methodology of the logistic regression, the following psychological and behavioral characteristics were found associated with the group of individuals in default: a negative dimensions related to money (suffering, inequality and conflict; b high scores on the self-efficacy scale, probably indicating a greater degree of optimism and over-confidence; c buyers classified as compulsive; d individuals who consider it necessary to give gifts to children and friends on special dates, even though many people consider this a luxury; e problems of self-control identified by individuals who drink an average of more than four glasses of alcoholic beverage a day.

  18. Assessing calibration of prognostic risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowson, Cynthia S; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Therneau, Terry M

    2016-08-01

    Current methods used to assess calibration are limited, particularly in the assessment of prognostic models. Methods for testing and visualizing calibration (e.g. the Hosmer-Lemeshow test and calibration slope) have been well thought out in the binary regression setting. However, extension of these methods to Cox models is less well known and could be improved. We describe a model-based framework for the assessment of calibration in the binary setting that provides natural extensions to the survival data setting. We show that Poisson regression models can be used to easily assess calibration in prognostic models. In addition, we show that a calibration test suggested for use in survival data has poor performance. Finally, we apply these methods to the problem of external validation of a risk score developed for the general population when assessed in a special patient population (i.e. patients with particular comorbidities, such as rheumatoid arthritis). © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. An assessment of the test–retest reliability of the New Nordic Diet score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Birgit Bjørnarå

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a growing interest in the New Nordic Diet (NND as a potentially health promoting, environmentally friendly, and palatable regional diet. Also, dietary scores are gaining ground as a complementary approach for examining relations between dietary patterns and various health outcomes. A score assessing adherence to the NND has earlier been published, yet not tested for reliability. Objective: To assess the test–retest reliability of the NND score in a sample of parents of toddlers, residing in Southern Norway. Design: A questionnaire survey was completed on two occasions, approximately 14 days apart, by 67 parents of toddlers [85% females, mean age 34 years (SD=5.3 years]. The NND score was constructed from 24 items and comprised 10 subscales that summarize meal pattern and intake of typical Nordic foods. Each subscale was dichotomized by the median and assigned values of ‘0’ or ‘1’. Adding the subscales yielded a score ranging from 0 to 10, which was further trichotomized. Test–retest reliability of the final NND score and individual subscales was assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, respectively. Additionally, cross tabulation and kappa measure of agreement (k were used to assess the test–retest agreement of classification into the NND score, and the subscales. Results: Test–retest correlations of the NND score and subscales were r=0.80 (Pearson and r=0.54–0.84 (Spearman, respectively, all p<0.001. There were 69% (k=0.52 and 67–88% (k=0.32–0.76 test–retest correct classification of the trichotomized score and the dichotomized subscales, respectively. Conclusion: The NND score and the 10 subscales appear to have acceptable test–retest reliability when tested in a sample of parents of toddlers.

  20. Prediction of true test scores from observed item scores and ancillary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Shelby J; Yao, Lili; Sinharay, Sandip

    2015-05-01

    In many educational tests which involve constructed responses, a traditional test score is obtained by adding together item scores obtained through holistic scoring by trained human raters. For example, this practice was used until 2008 in the case of GRE(®) General Analytical Writing and until 2009 in the case of TOEFL(®) iBT Writing. With use of natural language processing, it is possible to obtain additional information concerning item responses from computer programs such as e-rater(®). In addition, available information relevant to examinee performance may include scores on related tests. We suggest application of standard results from classical test theory to the available data to obtain best linear predictors of true traditional test scores. In performing such analysis, we require estimation of variances and covariances of measurement errors, a task which can be quite difficult in the case of tests with limited numbers of items and with multiple measurements per item. As a consequence, a new estimation method is suggested based on samples of examinees who have taken an assessment more than once. Such samples are typically not random samples of the general population of examinees, so that we apply statistical adjustment methods to obtain the needed estimated variances and covariances of measurement errors. To examine practical implications of the suggested methods of analysis, applications are made to GRE General Analytical Writing and TOEFL iBT Writing. Results obtained indicate that substantial improvements are possible both in terms of reliability of scoring and in terms of assessment reliability. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Wide Operational Range Thermal Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, John H. (Inventor); McMurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bolometer system and method for detecting, at BLIP levels, presence of radiation over a broad range of wavelengths in an infrared spectrum and in a temperature range from 20 K to as high as room temperature. The radiation is received by a Si crystal having a region that is doped with one or more of In, Ga, S, Se, Te, B, Al, P, As and Sb in a concentration ratio in a range such as 5 x 10(exp -11) to 5 x 10(exp -6). Change in electrical resistance delta R due to receipt of the radiation is measured through a change in voltage difference or current within the crystal, and the quantity delta R is converted to an estimate of the amount of radiation received. Optionally, incident radiation having an energy high enough to promote photoconductivity is removed before detection.

  2. The PERS(2) ON score for systemic assessment of symptomatology in palliative care: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, E K; Berghoff, A S; Schur, S; Maehr, B; Schrank, B; Simanek, R; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Watzke, H H

    2016-07-01

    The comprehensive assessment of symptoms is the basis for effective, individualised palliative treatment. Established scoring systems provide in-depth information but are often lengthy and hence unsuitable. We introduce the PERS(2) ON score as a short and practically feasible score to evaluate symptom burden. Fifty patients admitted to a Palliative Care Unit rated seven items, i.e. pain, eating (loss of appetite/weight loss), rehabilitation (physical impairment), social situation (possibility for home care), suffering (anxiety/burden of disease/depression), O2 (dyspnoea) and nausea/emesis, on a scale ranging from 0 (absence) to 10 (worst imaginable), resulting in a score ranging from 0 to 70. Assessments were performed at admission, 7 days after admission and at the day of discharge. Symptom intensity scores were calculated, and change over time was evaluated. A significant improvement was observed from the PERS²ON score between admission and 7 days (P palliative care. It may be useful in clinical practice to direct palliative treatment strategies and provide targeted symptom management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF THE RIPASA SCORE OVER ALVARADO SCORE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinnet P. R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Comparing the diagnostic accuracy of RIPASA score over Alvarado score in diagnosing acute appendicitis. The accuracy of Alvarado score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is disappointingly low in Asian population and RIPASA scoring has been designed for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the Asian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study of 109 patients diagnosed to have acute appendicitis with the aim of comparing RIPASA and Alvarado scoring. A score of 7.5 is the optimal cut off threshold for RIPASA and 7 for Alvarado scoring system. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive for RIPASA and Alvarado system were done. RESULTS The sensitivity and specificity of RIPASA score were 95.5% and 65%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of Alvarado score were 65.16% and 90%, respectively. The positive predictive value of RIPASA was 92.39% and negative predictive value 76.47%. The positive predictive value for Alvarado was 96.6% and negative predictive value was 36.73%. RIPASA score correctly classified 89.9% of all patients confirmed with histological acute appendicitis to the high probability group (RIPASA score greater than 7.5 compared with 69.73% with Alvarado score (Alvarado score greater than 7.0; p-value is 0.002. CONCLUSION RIPASA scoring system is more convenient, accurate and specific scoring system for Indian population than Alvarado scoring system

  4. The Potential Dual Effect of Context Effects and Score Level Effects on the Assignment of Scores to Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, Patricia A.

    Two factors which may affect the ratings assigned to an essay test are investigated: (1) context effects; and (2) score level effects. Context effects exist in essay scoring if an essay is rated higher when preceded by poor quality essays than when preceded by high quality essays. A score level effect is defined as a change in the score (value)…

  5. Prediction of IOI-HA Scores Using Speech Reception Thresholds and Speech Discrimination Scores in Quiet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, K Jonas; Lantz, Johannes; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2014-01-01

    ), and speech discrimination scores (SDSs) in quiet or in noise are common assessments made prior to hearing aid (HA) fittings. It is not known whether SRT and SDS in quiet relate to HA outcome measured with the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). PURPOSE: The aim of the present study...... COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The psychometric properties were evaluated and compared to previous studies using the IOI-HA. The associations and differences between the outcome scores and a number of descriptive variables (age, gender, fitted monaurally/binaurally with HA, first-time/experienced HA users, years...

  6. Gait Deviation Index, Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg; Pedersen, Niels Wisbech

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and Gait Profile Score (GPS) are the most used summary measures of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the reliability and agreement of these indices have not been investigated, limiting their clinimetric quality for research and clinical...... practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the intra-rater reliability and agreement of summary measures of gait (GDI; GPS; and the Gait Variable Score (GVS) derived from the GPS). The intra-rater reliability and agreement were investigated across two repeated sessions in 18 children aged 5...

  7. An Early Warning Scoring System to Identify Septic Patients in the Prehospital Setting: The PRESEP Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ole; Schwarzkopf, Daniel; Stumme, Christoph; Stacke, Angelika; Hartog, Christiane S; Hohenstein, Christian; Kabisch, Björn; Reichel, Jens; Reinhart, Konrad; Winning, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The objective was to develop and evaluate an early sepsis detection score for the prehospital setting. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who were admitted by emergency medical services (EMS) to the emergency department of the Jena University Hospital was performed. Because potential predictors for sepsis should be based on consensus criteria, the following parameters were extracted from the EMS protocol for further analysis: temperature, heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), oxygen saturation (SaO2 ), Glasgow Coma Scale score, blood glucose, and systolic blood pressure (sBP). Potential predictors were stratified based on inspection of Loess graphs. Backward model selection was performed to select risk factors for the final model. The Prehospital Early Sepsis Detection (PRESEP) score was calculated as the sum of simplified regression weights. Its predictive validity was compared to the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), the Robson screening tool, and the BAS 90-30-90. A total of 375 patients were included in the derivation sample; 93 (24.8%) of these had sepsis, including 60 patients with severe sepsis and 12 patients with septic shock. Backward model selection identified temperature, HR, RR, SaO2 , and sBP for inclusion in the PRESEP score. Simplified weights were as follows: temperature > 38°C = 4, temperature 90 beats/min = 2, RR > 22 breaths/min = 1, SaO2 < 92% = 2, and sBP < 90 mm Hg = 2. The cutoff value for a possible existing septic disease based on maximum Youden's index was ≥4 (sensitivity 0.85, specificity 0.86, positive predictive value [PPV] 0.66, and negative predictive value [NPV] 0.95). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the PRESEP score was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89 to 0.96) and was larger than the AUC of the MEWS (0.93 vs. 0.77, p < 0.001). The PRESEP score surpassed MEWS and BAS 90-60-90 for sensitivity (0.74 and 0.62, respectively), specificity (0.75 and 0.83), PPV (0.45 and 0

  8. GEA CRDA Range Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-28

    E1, July-August 1998 18 3.3. Example 3: SatMex, Solidaridad 2, May-June 1998 27 3.4. Example 4: PanAmSat, Galaxy IV, May-June 1998 33 3.5...17 Millstone measurements residuals for Telstar 401 on Days 181-263. 26 3-18 Millstone measurement residuals for Solidaridad 1 on Days 141-153...with 29 SatMex range data. 3-19 Hermosillo B-- Solidaridad 1 range residuals through Days 135-144 with bias 30 removed. 3-20 Iztapalapa D

  9. Radio pill antenna range test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, W. F.; Kane, R. J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to investigate the potential of a proposed 'radio pill' beacon transmitter, a range test experiment was devised and carried out in the VHF frequency range. Calculations and previous work indicated that optimum sensitivity and, thus, distance would be obtained in this frequency range provided body radio-frequency (RF) absorption was not too great. A ferrite-core loop antenna is compatible with a pill geometry and has better radiation efficiency than an air core loop. The ferrite core may be a hollow cylinder with the electronics and batteries placed inside. However, this range test was only concerned with experimentally developing test range data on the ferrite core antenna itself. A one turn strap loop was placed around a 9.5 mm diameter by 18.3 mm long stack of ferrite cores. This was coupled to a 50 Omega transmission line by 76 mm of twisted pair line and a capacitive matching section. This assembly was excited by a signal generator at output levels of -10 to +10 dBm. Signals were received on a VHF receiver and tape recorder coupled to a 14 element, circularly polarized Yagi antenna at a height of 2.5 m. Field strength measurements taken at ranges of 440, 1100, and 1714 m. Maximum field strengths referenced to 0 dBm transmitter level were -107 to -110 dB at 440 m, -124 to -127 dBm at 1100 m, and -116 to -119 dBm at 1714 m when the antenna cylinder was horizontal. Field strengths with a vertical antenna were about 6 dB below these values. The latter transmit site was elevated and had a clear line-of-site path to the receiving site. The performance of this test antenna was better than that expected from method-of-moment field calculations. When this performance data is scaled to a narrow bandwidth receiving system, ground level receiving ranges of a few to 10 km can be expected. Clear line-of-sight ranges where either or both the transmitter and receiver are elevated could vary from several km to 100 km.

  10. APACHE III score is superior to King's College Hospital criteria, MELD score and APACHE II score to predict outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikatas, P; Lee, J-E; Sauer, I M; Schmidt, S C; Seehofer, D; Puhl, G; Guckelberger, O

    2013-01-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and King's College Hospital (KCH) criteria are accepted prognostic models acute liver failure (ALF), while the use of (APACHE) scores predict to outcomes of emergency liver transplantation is rare. The present study included 87 patients with ALF who underwent liver transplantation. We calculated (KCH) criteria, as well as MELD, APACHE II, and APACHE III scores at the listing date for comparison with 3-month outcomes. According to the Youden-Index, the best cut-off value for the APACHE II score was 8.5 with 100% sensitivity, 49% specificity, 24% positive predictive value (PPV), and 100% negative predictive value (NPV). Patients with APACHE III cut-off was 80. The APACHE III score demonstrated the highest specificity and PPV (90% specificity, 50% PPV). The NPV was 92%. With a 90-point threshold the specificity increased to 98% with 75% PPV and 89% NPV. Only 1 of 4 patients with a score >90 survived transplantation (P = .001). MELD score and KCH criteria were not significant (P > .05). According to the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, only the APACHE III score adequately describe the data. The APACHE III score was superior to KCH criteria, MELD score, and APACHE II score to predict outcomes after transplantation for ALF. It is a valuable parameter for pretransplantation patient selection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A scoping review of disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand scores for hand and wrist conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Heather; Novak, Christine B; McCabe, Steven J

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the variability of reported baseline Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores for non-acute hand and wrist conditions. We hypothesized that DASH scores for evaluation of hand and wrist pathology would provide a map of scores that would correspond to severity. In addition to providing a catalog of DASH scores for various upper extremity pathologies, we hypothesized that this review would support the validity of the DASH instrument. A literature search was performed using 3 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from the earliest available date through January 1, 2013. Search terms included "DASH" and "hand" and combinations of conditions found in the initial search. The search was restricted to studies with baseline DASH scores and DASH scores for isolated conditions, and written in the English language. Our search identified 1,770 citations; 136 full-text articles were reviewed and 85 studies were included in the scoping review. This provided 100 DASH scores mapped for 24 different diagnoses. Most articles (67%) included chronic conditions for inflammatory or degenerative pathologies rather than posttraumatic disorders. Posttraumatic DASH score reporting ranged from 4 months to 11 years after injury, and final outcome scores varied among studies assessing the same pathology. The greatest variation and highest scores were for de Quervain tendinitis (range, 29-93) and scapholunate advance collapse (range, 17-89). These scores indicated higher disability in de Quervain tendinitis and wrist osteoarthritis compared with conditions such as thumb amputation and upper extremity replantation. Substantial variation in the DASH scores and methodology was found and indicates a need for further study of the DASH to allow for standardized interpretation. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Technical note: Assessing lameness in tie-stalls using live stall lameness scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, S; Peignier, L; Pachoud, C; Nash, C; Adam, S; Bergeron, R; Pellerin, D; de Passillé, A M; Rushen, J; Haley, D; DeVries, T J; Vasseur, E

    2017-08-01

    Video stall lameness scoring (SLS) has been shown to be comparable to video locomotion scoring for evaluating lameness in dairy cows housed in tie-stalls and may be a more practical and easier method to measure lameness in a herd. We compared live SLS to video SLS and to live locomotion scoring. A total of 685 lactating cows subsampled from 27 commercial dairy herds were examined for lameness through live and video SLS. Cows scored with the live or video SLS system were scored for 4 behavioral indicators while still in their stall: weight shifting (shift), standing on the edge of the stall (edge), uneven weight bearing while standing (rest), and uneven weight bearing while moving from side to side (uneven). Two observers live scored and video scored for SLS. Lameness prevalence from video SLS and live SLS were similar (31 vs. 30%, respectively). Prevalence of the behavioral indicators varied from 0.59 to 58.2%. Sensitivity and specificity of live SLS was calculated using video SLS as the gold standard for lameness detection in tie-stalls. Sensitivity of live SLS was 0.83 and specificity was 0.94. False positives and false negatives for lameness were 14.4 and 16.8%, respectively. When comparing the prevalence of lameness measured through video or live SLS at the herd level, live SLS for lameness was correlated to video SLS (r = 0.91) with a Cohen's kappa coefficient of 0.79 (95% confidence limit = 0.73-0.84). Average exact agreement in the behavior indicators observed ranged from 80 to 100%. A subsample of 250 cows from 5 herds were scored for live SLS and live locomotion by a third observer. Intra- and interobserver reliability for live SLS and live locomotion scoring were found to have a kappa coefficient of 0.53 (95% confidence limit = 0.43-0.64) when determining a cow as lame through SLS or locomotion scoring. Live SLS was correlated with live locomotion scoring (r = 0.92). However, lameness prevalence was lower when using live SLS (28.4%) compared with

  13. Interobserver variability in Pirani clubfoot severity scoring system between the orthopedic surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot is one of the most common congenital pediatric orthopedic foot deformity, which varies in severity and clinical course. Assessment of severity of the club foot deformity is essential to assess the initial severity of deformity, to monitor the progress of treatment, to prognosticate, and to identify early relapse. Pirani′s scoring system is most acceptable and popular for club foot deformity assessment because it is simple, quick, cost effective, and easy. Since the scoring system is subjective in nature it has inter- and intra-observer variability, it is widely used. Hence, the interobserver variability between orthopedic surgeons in assessing the club foot severity by Pirani scoring system. Materials and Methods: We assessed the interobserver variability between five orthopedic surgeons of comparable skills, in assessing the club foot severity by Pirani scoring system in 80 feet of 60 children (20 bilateral and 40 unilateral with club foot deformity. All the five different orthopedic surgeons were familiar with Pirani clubfoot severity scoring and Ponseti cast manipulation, as they had already worked in CTEV clinics for at least 2 months. Each of them independently scored, each foot as per the Pirani clubfoot scoring system and recorded total score (TS, Midfoot score (MFS, Hind foot score (HFS, posterior crease (PC, emptiness of heel (EH, rigidity of equnius (RE, medial crease (MC, curvature of lateral border (CLB, and lateral head of talus (LHT. Interobserver variability was calculated using kappa statistic for each of these signs and was judged as poor (0.00-0.20, fair (0.21-0.40, moderate (0.41-0.60, substantial (0.61-0.80, or almost perfect (0.81-1.00. Results: The mean age was 137 days (range 21-335 days. The mean Pirani score was 3.86. We found the overall consistency to be substantial for overall score (total score kappa - 0.71 and also for midfoot (0.68 and hindfoot (0.66 separately

  14. What Can SCORE Web Portal Usage Analytics Tell Us About How Surgical Residents Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit R T; Salami, Aitua; Hickey, Mark; Barrett, Kerry B; Klingensmith, Mary E; Malangoni, Mark A

    The Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) was established in 2004 with 2 goals: to develop a standardized, competency-based curriculum for general surgery residency training; and to develop a web portal to deliver this content. By 2012, 96% of general surgery residency programs subscribed to the SCORE web portal. Surgical educators have previously described the myriad ways they have incorporated SCORE into their curricula. The aim of this study was to analyze user data to describe how and when residents use SCORE. Using analytic software, we measured SCORE usage from July, 2013 to June, 2016. Data such as IP addresses, geo-tagging coordinates, and operating system platforms were collected. The primary outcome was the median duration of SCORE use. Secondary outcomes were the time of day and the operating system used when accessing SCORE. Descriptive statistics were performed, and a p < 0.05 was deemed statistically significant. There were 42,743 total SCORE subscribers during the study period (75% resident and 25% faculty) with a mean of 14,248 subscribers per year. The overall median duration of SCORE use was 11.9minute/session (interquartile range [IQR]: 6.8). Additionally, there was a significant increase in session length over the 3 academic years; 10.1 (IQR: 6.4), 11.9 (IQR: 7.2), and 13.2minute/session (IQR: 5.4) in 2013 to 2014, 2014 to 2015, and 2015 to 2016, respectively (p < 0.001). SCORE usage was highest in November to February at 21.0minute/session (14.2) compared to July to October and March to June (12.3 [IQR: 3.2] and 9.6minute/session [IQR: 2.2]), respectively (p < 0.001). This seasonal trend continued for all 3 years. We observed an increased number of sessions per day over the 3 years: median of 1500 sessions/d (IQR: 1115) vs 1706 (IQR: 1334) vs 1728 (IQR: 1352), p < 0.001. (Fig.). Most SCORE sessions occurred at night: 38,011 (IQR: 4532) vs 17,529 (IQR: 19,850) during the day (p < 0.001). Windows was the most frequently used operating

  15. Dengue fever mortality score: A novel decision rule to predict death from dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Guo, How-Ran; Su, Shih-Bin; Lin, Hung-Jung

    2017-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is still a major challenge for public health, especially during massive outbreaks. We developed a novel prediction score to help decision making, which has not been performed till date. We conducted a retrospective case-control study to recruit all the DF patients who visited a medical center during the 2015 DF outbreak. Demographic data, vital signs, symptoms/signs, chronic comorbidities, laboratory data, and 30-day mortality rates were included in the study. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to identify the independent mortality predictors, which further formed the components of a DF mortality (DFM) score. Bootstrapping method was used to validate the DFM score. In total, a sample of 2358 DF patients was included in this study, which also consisted of 34 deaths (1.44%). Five independent mortality predictors were identified: elderly age (≥65 years), hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg), hemoptysis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic bedridden. After assigning each predictor a score of "1", we developed a DFM score (range: 0-5), which showed that the mortality risk ratios for scores 0, 1, 2, and ≥3 were 0.2%, 2.3%, 6.0%, and 45.5%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.849 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.785-0.914), and Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit was 0.642. Compared with score 0, the odds ratios for mortality were 12.73 (95% CI: 3.58-45.30) for score 1, 34.21 (95% CI: 9.75-119.99) for score 2, and 443.89 (95% CI: 86.06-2289.60) for score ≥3, with significant differences (all p values <0.001). The score ≥1 had a sensitivity of 91.2% for mortality and score ≥3 had a specificity of 99.7% for mortality. DFM score was a simple and easy method to help decision making, especially in the massive outbreak. Further studies in other hospitals or nations are warranted to validate this score. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The performance quality rating scale (PQRS): reliability, convergent validity, and internal responsiveness for two scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Rose; Rios, Jorge; Polatajko, Helene; Wolf, Timothy; McEwen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The performance quality rating scale (PQRS) is an observational measure of performance quality of client-selected, personally meaningful activities. It has been used inconsistently with different scoring systems, and there have been no formal publications on its psychometric properties. The purpose of this study was to test and compare the psychometric properties of two PQRS scoring systems in two populations. A secondary analysis of video recorded participant-selected activities from previous studies involving either adults living with stroke or children diagnosed with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) was conducted. Three pairs of raters scored the video recorded performances with PQRS operational definitions (PQRS-OD) and a generic rating system (PQRS-G). For inter-rater reliability, PQRS-OD ICCs were substantial, ranging from 0.83 to 0.93; while the PQRS-G ICCs were moderate, ranging from 0.71 to 0.77. Test-retest reliability was substantial, >0.80 (ICC), for both rating systems across all rater pairs. Internal responsiveness was high for both rating systems. Convergent validity with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was inconsistent, with scores ranging from low to moderate. Both scoring systems have demonstrated they are reliable and have good internal responsiveness. The PQRS-OD demonstrated greater consistency across raters and is more sensitive to clinically important change than the PQRS-G and should be used when greater accuracy is required. Further exploration of validity with actual rather than perceived performance measures is required.

  17. Automatic Algorithm for the Determination of the Anderson-wilkins Acuteness Score In Patients With St Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhri, Yama; Sejersten, Maria; Schoos, Mikkel Malby

    2016-01-01

    aimed to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for the AW-score. Methods: The AW-score (obtained from presenting ECG), assesses changes in ST-T-segments, T-waves and Q-waves. Each lead is designated an acuteness phase (1A, 1B, 2A or 2B) and the overall score is calculated. AW-score ranges from 1...... (late ischemia/least acute) to 4 (early ischemia/most acute) and is calculated from the formula: AW-score = [(4 × (#leads 1A) + 3 × (#leads 1B) + 2 × (#leads 2A) + 1 × (#leads 2B))/(∑#leads with 1A, 1B, 2A or 2B)]. We developed an algorithm to automatically determine AW-score. The algorithm was designed...... for measurement of AW-score. The preliminary test result was near acceptable for the inter-rater reliability between manual Adj-score and auto-score. More adjustments are needed to improve the measure of agreements between manual score and automatic algorithm for AW-score....

  18. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, Esperanza; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability of new ultrasound (US) definitions and quantification of synovial hypertrophy (SH) and power Doppler (PD) signal, separately and in combination, in a range of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the European League Against Rheumatisms...

  19. Improving Scores on the IELTS Speaking Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issitt, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This article presents three strategies for teaching students who are taking the IELTS speaking test. The first strategy is aimed at improving confidence and uses a variety of self-help materials from the field of popular psychology. The second encourages students to think critically and invokes a range of academic perspectives. The third strategy…

  20. Conceptual scoring of receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in simultaneous and sequential bilingual children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana; Kaushanskaya, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    The authors examined the effects of conceptual scoring on the performance of simultaneous and sequential bilinguals on standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and Spanish. Participants included 40 English-speaking monolingual children, 39 simultaneous Spanish-English bilingual children, and 19 sequential bilingual children, ages 5-7. The children completed standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and also in Spanish for those who were bilingual. After the standardized administration, bilingual children were given the opportunity to respond to missed items in their other language to obtain a conceptual score. Controlling for group differences in socioeconomic status (SES), both simultaneous and sequential bilingual children scored significantly below monolingual children on single-language measures of English receptive and expressive vocabulary. Conceptual scoring removed the significant difference between monolingual and simultaneous bilingual children in the receptive modality but not in the expressive modality; differences remained between monolingual and sequential bilingual children in both modalities. However, in both bilingual groups, conceptual scoring increased the proportion of children with vocabulary scores within the average range. Conceptual scoring does not fully ameliorate the bias inherent in single-language standardized vocabulary measures for bilingual children, but the procedures employed here may assist in ruling out vocabulary deficits, particularly in typically developing simultaneous bilingual children.

  1. An assessment of the new "SCORE" index as a predictor of osteoporosis in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, A S; Morrison, R T

    2001-01-01

    The study was done to determine whether the new SCORE (Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation) index might reduce the utilization of bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. 989 consecutive patients who were referred by a range of physicians for BMD assessments at one of two clinics had a SCORE index constructed. Approximately 95% of the subjects were Caucasian. The index is based on only 6 factors: age, previous fractures, rheumatoid arthritis, estrogen use, weight, and race. All but 1 (0.1%) of those with a femoral neck BMD T-score of -2.5. One percent false negatives were also seen in the lumbar spine. The SCORE index correctly predicted those individuals who did not have an osteoporotic T-score. It was of the most value in the assessment and management of individuals possibly at risk for osteoporosis remains controversial. Our results suggest that the prior use of the SCORE index by the referring physicians to screen the patients sent for BMD measurement would have allowed them to exclude over 20% of the patients referred for assessment, and therefore reduce the need and cost of BMD measurement. The proportion of individuals who had a normal SCORE index, and would have been screened out, was 43% in the under 60 year age group, but in the 65 and over age group it provided no additional information to help with, for example, the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) guidelines.

  2. Conceptual scoring of receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in simultaneous and sequential bilingual children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana; Kaushanskaya, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the effects of conceptual scoring on the performance of simultaneous and sequential bilinguals on standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and Spanish. Method Participants included 40 English-speaking monolingual children, 39 simultaneous Spanish-English bilingual children, and 19 sequential bilinguals, ages 5–7. The children completed standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and also in Spanish for bilinguals. After the standardized administration, bilinguals were given the opportunity to respond to missed items in their other language to obtain a conceptual score. Results Controlling for group differences in socioeconomic status (SES), both simultaneous and sequential bilinguals scored significantly below monolinguals on single-language measures of English receptive and expressive vocabulary. Conceptual scoring removed the significant difference between monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals in the receptive modality, but not in the expressive modality; differences remained between monolinguals and sequential bilinguals in both modalities. However, in both bilingual groups conceptual scoring increased the proportion of children with vocabulary scores within the average range. Conclusions Conceptual scoring does not fully ameliorate the bias inherent in single-language standardized vocabulary measures for bilinguals, but the procedures employed here may assist in ruling out vocabulary deficits, particularly in typically-developing simultaneous bilingual children. PMID:24811415

  3. [Multiple linear regression analysis of X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores of knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Feng; Wang, Qing-Fu; Chen, Zhao-Jun; Du, Chun-Lin; Li, Jun-Hai; Huang, Hu; Shi, Zong-Ting; Yin, Yue-Shan; Zhang, Lei; A-Di, Li-Jiang; Dong, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ji

    2012-05-01

    To perform Multiple Linear Regression analysis of X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores of knee osteoarthritis, and to analyze their relationship with clinical and biomechanical concepts. From March 2011 to July 2011, 140 patients (250 knees) were reviewed, including 132 knees in the left and 118 knees in the right; ranging in age from 40 to 71 years, with an average of 54.68 years. The MB-RULER measurement software was applied to measure femoral angle, tibial angle, femorotibial angle, joint gap angle from antero-posterir and lateral position of X-rays. The WOMAC scores were also collected. Then multiple regression equations was applied for the linear regression analysis of correlation between the X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores. There was statistical significance in the regression equation of AP X-rays value and WOMAC scores (Pregression equation of lateral X-ray value and WOMAC scores (P>0.05). 1) X-ray measurement of knee joint can reflect the WOMAC scores to a certain extent. 2) It is necessary to measure the X-ray mechanical axis of knee, which is important for diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis. 3) The correlation between tibial angle,joint gap angle on antero-posterior X-ray and WOMAC scores is significant, which can be used to assess the functional recovery of patients before and after treatment.

  4. High inter-tester reliability of the new mobility score in patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Bandholm, Thomas; Foss, Nicolai Bang; Ekdahl, Charlotte; Kehlet, Henrik

    2008-07-01

    To assess the inter-tester reliability of the New Mobility Score in patients with acute hip fracture. An inter-tester reliability study. Forty-eight consecutive patients with acute hip fracture at a median age of 84 (interquartile range, 76-89) years; 40 admitted from their own home and 8 from nursing homes to an acute orthopaedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. The New Mobility Score, which evaluates the prefracture functional level with a score from 0 (not able to walk at all) to 9 (fully independent), was assessed by 2 independent physiotherapists at the orthopaedic ward. Inter-tester reliability was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1.1) and the standard error of measurement (SEM). The ICC between the 2 physiotherapists was 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-0.99 and the SEM was 0.42, 95% CI -0.40-1.24 New Mobility Score points. No systematic between-rater bias was observed (p>0.05). Patients who were scored differently by the 2 physiotherapists had significantly lower mental scores (p=0.02). The inter-tester reliability of the New Mobility Score is very high and can be recommended to evaluate the prefracture functional level in patients with acute hip fracture.

  5. NASALANCE SCORES IN LEBANESE ENGLISH-SPEAKING ADULTS USING NASOMETRIC ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul Latif; Ziade, Georges; Jabbour, Jad; Khneizer, Gebran; Kutkut, Issa

    2015-01-01

    To obtain normative data for nasalance scores in Middle Eastern English-speaking adult population. Cross-sectional study. A total of 102 subjects were recruited in the study, 26 were excluded, thus, 77 Middle Eastern English-speaking adults (mean age = 23.77 ± 4.295; 39 males, 38 females) with normal speech and no hearing problems participated in the study. Using Nasometer II 6450, nasalance scores were obtained for each participant's readings of 3 passages: Zoo and Rainbow passages and nasal sentences. Mean nasalance score, standard deviation and range. Mean nasalance scores for Zoo passage, Rainbow passage and nasal sentences were 25.21 ± 11.07, 34.04 ± 9.30 and 41.29 ± 9.87 respectively. Mean scores didn't differ significantly between males and females, though scores for the Zoo passage were slightly higher among males (26.51 ± 11.66) than females (23.87 ± 10.42). In within-session reliability testing, 86% of retests for all three passages fell within 5 nasalance points of the previous test. In across-session reliability testing, 93% of retests for all 3 passages were within 5 points of initial test. This study provides normative data for nasalance scores among Middle-Eastern adults, which can help make nasometer and determination of nasalance more clinically useful in this population.

  6. Can the Free/Total PSA Ratio Predict the Gleason Score Before Prostate Biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Cavit; Gazel, Eymen; Keleş, İbrahim; Doluoğlu, Ömer; Yığman, Metin

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between high Gleason score and free/total (f/t) prostate specific antigen (PSA) in patients newly diagnosed with prostate carcinoma. The study included 272 prostate biopsy patients whose total PSA value ranged from 4-10 ng/ml. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the f/t PSA ratio: Group 1 ≤ 15% and Group 2 > 15%. Furthermore, the groups were also compared to each other in terms of mild (≤ 6), moderate (= 7), and high (≥ 8) Gleason score. Group 1 consisted of 135 (49.6%) patients and Group 2 consisted of 137 (50.4%) patients. While 27 (20%) patients had a high Gleason score in Group 1, only 10 (7.3%) patients had a high Gleason score in Group 2 (p = 0.008). Using Spearman's correlation test, we found that the f/t PSA ratios were observed to decrease significantly in all patients with increased Gleason scores (p = 0.002, r = -0.185). According to our study, there is a relationship between higher Gleason score and decreased f/t PSA ratio. Therefore, f/t PSA can be an indicator for predicting the Gleason score.

  7. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...

  8. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  9. Mobile Lunar Laser Ranging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Harlan Smith, chairman of the University of Texas's Astronomy Department, discusses a mobile lunar laser ranging station which could help determine the exact rates of movement between continents and help geophysicists understand earthquakes. He also discusses its application for studying fundamental concepts of cosmology and physics. (Editor/RK)

  10. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    step 1. This image can be obtained through any digital holography processing technique and contains no range information. Since the penny has a... digital holography, laser, active imaging , remote sensing, laser imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 8...30 15. Digital Hologram Image

  11. Mandibular movement range in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2009-01-01

    identification of the mandibular movement range is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. However, there are few studies in children that focus on normal parameters or abnormalities. to determine the average range of mandibular movements in Brazilian children aged 6 to 12 years; to verify the difference between genders, in each age group, and between the different age groups: 6-8 years; 8.1-10 years; and 10.1-12 years. participants of the study were 240 healthy children selected among regular students from local schools of São Paulo State. The maximum mandibular opening, lateral excursion and protrusive movements, and deviation of the medium line, if present, were measured using a digital caliper. Student T test, Analysis of variance and Tukey test were considered significant for p mandibular opening; 7.71mm for lateral excursion to the right; 7.92mm for lateral excursion to the left; 7.45mm for protrusive movements. No statistical difference was observed between genders. There was a gradual increase in the range of mandibular movements, with significant differences mainly between the ages of 6-8 years and 10.1-12 years. during childhood the range of mandibular movements increases. Age should be considered in this analysis for a greater precision in the diagnosis.

  12. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 3: an international multicenter reliability study using the RA-MRI Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassere, M; McQueen, F; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2003-01-01

    detectable difference (SDD). The sICC were moderate to good (between 0.60 and 0.91) for half of the joint sites for the 2 synovitis scoring methods, and for bone erosions and bone edema. After adjusting for 6 readers, the avICC was very good to excellent (0.80-0.98) for two-thirds of the joint sites...... by lesion, excluding bone defects that performed relatively poorly, primarily because few readers scored these lesions. The aggregated scores with the best reliability were those with a wide range of scores, high ICC, low SDD, and low percentage SDD (

  13. Proportional Distribution of Patient Satisfaction Scores by Clinical Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Leonard MD, MS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Proportional Responsibility for Integrated Metrics by Encounter (PRIME model is a novel means of allocating patient experience scores based on the proportion of each physician's involvement in care. Secondary analysis was performed on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys from a tertiary care academic institution. The PRIME model was used to calculate specialty-level scores based on encounters during a hospitalization. Standard and PRIME scores for services with the most inpatient encounters were calculated. Hospital medicine had the most discharges and encounters. The standard model generated a score of 74.6, while the PRIME model yielded a score of 74.9. The standard model could not generate a score for anesthesiology due to the lack of returned surveys, but the PRIME model yielded a score of 84.2. The PRIME model provides a more equitable method for distributing satisfaction scores and can generate scores for specialties that the standard model cannot.

  14. Dichotomous versus semi-quantitative scoring of ultrasound joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis using novel individualized joint selection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, York Kiat; Allen, John C; Lye, Weng Kit; Conaghan, Philip G; Chew, Li-Ching; Thumboo, Julian

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study is to compare the responsiveness of two joint inflammation scoring systems (dichotomous scoring (DS) versus semi-quantitative scoring (SQS)) using novel individualized ultrasound joint selection methods and existing ultrasound joint selection methods. Responsiveness measured by the standardized response means (SRMs) using the DS and the SQS system (for both the novel and existing ultrasound joint selection methods) was derived using the baseline and the 3-month total inflammatory scores from 20 rheumatoid arthritis patients. The relative SRM gain ratios (SRM-Gains) for both scoring system (DS and SQS) comparing the novel to the existing methods were computed. Both scoring systems (DS and SQS) demonstrated substantial SRM-Gains (ranged from 3.31 to 5.67 for the DS system and ranged from 1.82 to 3.26 for the SQS system). The SRMs using the novel methods ranged from 0.94 to 1.36 for the DS system and ranged from 0.89 to 1.11 for the SQS system. The SRMs using the existing methods ranged from 0.24 to 0.32 for the DS system and ranged from 0.34 to 0.49 for the SQS system. The DS system appears to achieve high responsiveness comparable to SQS for the novel individualized ultrasound joint selection methods.

  15. ITC Guidelines on Quality Control in Scoring, Test Analysis, and Reporting of Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allalouf, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The Quality Control (QC) Guidelines are intended to increase the efficiency, precision, and accuracy of the scoring, analysis, and reporting process of testing. The QC Guidelines focus on large-scale testing operations where multiple forms of tests are created for use on set dates. However, they may also be used for a wide variety of other testing…

  16. What Do Test Scores Really Mean? A Latent Class Analysis of Danish Test Score Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; McIntosh, James

    2014-01-01

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55, tested in 1968, and followed until 2011. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. We show that the test scor...

  17. Factors Affecting Variance in Classroom Assessment Scoring System Scores: Season, Context, and Classroom Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Martha; Han, Myae; Vukelich, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Early care and education programme quality is usually assessed at the classroom level. One such measure of classroom quality is the classroom assessment scoring system (CLASS). In an effort to ensure higher quality programming, the CLASS is being used to direct teacher professional development. However, there has been relatively little research on…

  18. Novel Computed Tomography Scoring System for Sinus Disease in Adults With Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Shahid I; Handly, Brian; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Hayes, Don; Kirkby, Stephen E; McCoy, Karen S; Lind, Meredith

    2016-10-01

    There is no easy to use scoring system for computed tomography (CT) scans of the sinuses that is specific to cystic fibrosis (CF). We propose a simple and easily implemented scoring system to quantify severity of sinus disease in adults with CF. Case series with chart review. Academic tertiary-care referral center. Sixty-nine adult patients with CF and 50 age-matched controls. We validated a scoring system for CF sinus disease. The CT scans were interpreted by 3 physicians on 2 separate sittings. Parameters include maxillary opacification, nasal obstruction, lateral nasal wall displacement, uncinate process absence/demineralization, and presence/absence of mucocele. Patients with CF aged 21 to 30 years (mean = 24.7 ± 2.49). In CF cohort (n = 69), intrarater reliability for the 10 CT categories ranged from .70 to 1.00. Twenty-six (87%) were in the excellent range, and the remaining 4 (13%) were evaluated as good. In the non-CF cohort (n = 50), reliabilities ranged from .44 to 1.00. Twenty-seven (90%) were in the excellent range. For interrater reliability, in the CF cohort, 10 CT categories across the 3 raters ranged from .55 to 1.00. Excellent reliability was achieved in 15 (50%) of the observations. In the non-CF cohort, reliabilities ranged from .44 to 1.00. A novel and easy to use CT scoring system for CF sinus disease in adults was validated with inter- and intrarater reliability. This new CF sinus disease-specific scoring system can be used by clinicians, surgeons, and radiologists. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Calcified carotid plaques show double symptomatic peaks according to agatston calcium score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Hiroyuki; Mase, Mitsuhito; Nishikawa, Yusuke; Yamada, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    The precise mechanism of carotid calcification formation and its clinical significance including the difference in outcomes compared with coronary artery have not been clearly elucidated yet. We applied the calcium score for analyzing carotid plaque calcification in focus on its relationship with symptoms and discuss the difference in transitional patterns and the clinical outcome in comparison with calcified coronary plaques. Multidetector row computed tomography angiography was performed preoperatively to determine the Agatston calcium score, volume score, and Hounsfield values for a total of 330 carotid arteries from 194 patients. Analysis focused on the relation of "the symptomatic rate" to calcium score, volume score, and Hounsfield value as well as the characteristics of calcified plaques and coexisting diseases. The symptomatic rate of carotid artery plaques in each range of the index was calculated as the percentage of the number of carotid arteries with plaques, which elicited symptoms of the contralateral limbs or the ipsilateral retina to the whole number of carotid arteries with plaques within the range. Calcified carotids with low symptomatic rate (determinant in the comparison between groups with high (600-1000) and medium calcium scores. Symptomatic rates of carotid plaque calcification were demonstrated to show double peaks with increasing calcium score and represent different features. Assessment of the 2 calcium-score parts might be helpful for appropriate comprehension of symptomatology and the complex process of carotid plaque calcification. We report a hypothesis for the mechanisms of the 2 different sections. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Scores to predict major bleeding risk during oral anticoagulation therapy: a prospective validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzé, Jacques; Rodondi, Nicolas; Waeber, Gérard; Monney, Pierre; Cornuz, Jacques; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2012-11-01

    Clinical scores may help physicians to better assess the individual risk/benefit of oral anticoagulant therapy. We aimed to externally validate and compare the prognostic performance of 7 clinical prediction scores for major bleeding events during oral anticoagulation therapy. We followed 515 adult patients taking oral anticoagulants to measure the first major bleeding event over a 12-month follow-up period. The performance of each score to predict the risk of major bleeding and the physician's subjective assessment of bleeding risk were compared with the C statistic. The cumulative incidence of a first major bleeding event during follow-up was 6.8% (35/515). According to the 7 scoring systems, the proportions of major bleeding ranged from 3.0% to 5.7% for low-risk, 6.7% to 9.9% for intermediate-risk, and 7.4% to 15.4% for high-risk patients. The overall predictive accuracy of the scores was poor, with the C statistic ranging from 0.54 to 0.61 and not significantly different from each other (P=.84). Only the Anticoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation score performed slightly better than would be expected by chance (C statistic, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.70). The performance of the scores was not statistically better than physicians' subjective risk assessments (C statistic, 0.55; P=.94). The performance of 7 clinical scoring systems in predicting major bleeding events in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy was poor and not better than physicians' subjective assessments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictive value of clinical scoring and simplified gait analysis for acetabulum fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Benedikt J; Wrona, Julian; Veith, Nils T; Rollman, Mika; Orth, Marcel; Herath, Steven C; Holstein, Jörg H; Pohlemann, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Fractures of the acetabulum show a high, long-term complication rate. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive value of clinical scoring and standardized, simplified gait analysis on the outcome after these fractures. Forty-one patients with acetabular fractures treated between 2008 and 2013 and available, standardized video recorded aftercare were identified from a prospective database. A visual gait score was used to determine the patients walking abilities 6-m postoperatively. Clinical (Merle d'Aubigne and Postel score, visual analogue scale pain, EQ5d) and radiological scoring (Kellgren-Lawrence score, postoperative computed tomography, and Matta classification) were used to perform correlation and multivariate regression analysis. The average patient age was 48 y (range, 15-82 y), six female patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up was 1.6 y (range, 1-2 y). Moderate correlation between the gait score and outcome (versus EQ5d: r s  = 0.477; versus Merle d'Aubigne: r s  = 0.444; versus Kellgren-Lawrence: r s  = -0.533), as well as high correlation between the Merle d'Aubigne score and outcome were seen (versus EQ5d: r s  = 0.575; versus Merle d'Aubigne: r s  = 0.776; versus Kellgren-Lawrence: r s  = -0.419). Using a multivariate regression model, the 6 m gait score (B = -0.299; P fractures with sufficient accuracy. Decisions on further treatment and interventions could be based on simplified gait analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Regression coefficient-based scoring system should be used to assign weights to the risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Mehta, Vinay; Girman, Cynthia J; Adhikari, Deepak; Johnson, Michael L

    2016-11-01

    Some previously developed risk scores contained a mathematical error in their construction: risk ratios were added to derive weights to construct a summary risk score. This study demonstrates the mathematical error and derived different versions of the Charlson comorbidity score (CCS) using regression coefficient-based and risk ratio-based scoring systems to further demonstrate the effects of incorrect weighting on performance in predicting mortality. This retrospective cohort study included elderly people from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cox proportional hazards regression models were constructed for time to 1-year mortality. Weights were assigned to 17 comorbidities using regression coefficient-based and risk ratio-based scoring systems. Different versions of CCS were compared using Akaike information criteria (AIC), McFadden's adjusted R(2), and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Regression coefficient-based models (Beta, Beta10/integer, Beta/Schneeweiss, Beta/Sullivan) had lower AIC and higher R(2) compared to risk ratio-based models (HR/Charlson, HR/Johnson). Regression coefficient-based CCS reclassified more number of people into the correct strata (NRI range, 9.02-10.04) compared to risk ratio-based CCS (NRI range, 8.14-8.22). Previously developed risk scores contained an error in their construction adding ratios instead of multiplying them. Furthermore, as demonstrated here, adding ratios fail to even work adequately from a practical standpoint. CCS derived using regression coefficients performed slightly better than in fitting the data compared to risk ratio-based scoring systems. Researchers should use a regression coefficient-based scoring system to develop a risk index, which is theoretically correct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psoriasis and the Framingham risk score in a Danish hospital cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Jensen, Peter; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-01-01

    -2011. Median psoriasis area and severity index score was 5.8 (range 0.0-39.8), and 10% of the patients received systemic antipsoriatic treatment. Body mass index (26.2 vs. 25.2 kg/m(2) , P = 0.005), waist circumference (96.0 vs. 88.0 cm, P

  4. Evaluation of a Pediatric Early Warning Score Across Different Subspecialty Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Nathan P; Fenix, J B; Spaeder, Michael; Levin, Amanda

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the ability of a Pediatric Early Warning Score to predict deterioration in different subspecialty patient populations. Single center, retrospective cohort study. Patients were classified into five groups: 1) cardiac; 2) hematology/oncology/bone marrow transplant; 3) surgical; 4) neurologic; and 5) general medical. The relationship between the Pediatric Early Warning Score and unplanned ICU transfer requiring initiation of specific ICU therapies (intubation, high-flow nasal cannula, noninvasive ventilation, inotropes, or aggressive fluid hydration within 12 hr of transfer) was evaluated. Tertiary care, free-standing, academic children's hospital. All hospitalized acute care patients admitted over a 6-month time period (September 2012 to March 2013). None. During the study time period, 33,800 patient-days and 136 deteriorations were evaluated. Area under the curve ranged from 0.88 (surgical) to 0.94 (cardiac). Sensitivities for a Pediatric Early Warning Score greater than or equal to 3 ranged from 75% (surgical) to 94% (cardiology) and number needed to evaluate to find one deterioration was 11.5 (neurologic) to 43 patients (surgical). Sensitivities for a Pediatric Early Warning Score greater than or equal to 4 ranged from 54% (general medical) to 79% (hematology/oncology/bone marrow transplant) and number needed to evaluate of 5.5 (neurologic) to 12 patients (general medical). Sensitivities for a Pediatric Early Warning Score of greater than or equal to 5 ranged from 25% (surgical) to 58% (hematology/oncology/bone marrow transplant) and number needed to evaluate of 3.5 (cardiac, hematology/oncology/bone marrow transplant, neurologic) to eight patients (surgical). An elevated Pediatric Early Warning Score is associated with ICU transfer and receipt of ICU-specific interventions in patients across different pediatric subspecialty patient populations.

  5. Prenatal screening with evaluated high risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiernik, E; Grangé, G

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of the French approach of using risk scoring for evaluating the risk of preterm delivery. This approach, which was developed in 1969 and spread to obstetricians and midwives throughout France in the early 1970s, includes systematic information about the recognition of uterine contractions, advice about reduction of physical exercise, and the prescription of work-leave for women with heavy or physically demanding work loads. The effectiveness of this prevention strategy is assessed using three different data sets: an evaluation of a preterm prevention program in the Alsace Region of France, five successive French national sample surveys which collected data on pregnant women, and a study of the effectiveness of a prevention program for twins in the district of Haut de Seine near Paris. The authors show that the rate of preterm birth in France declined substantially, but that the decline was concentrated among singleton spontaneous births. Since the 1970s induced preterm births have increased, and, interventions have not reduced the high rates of preterm birth among twins.

  6. Essays on probability elicitation scoring rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmino, Paulo Renato A.; dos Santos Neto, Ademir B.

    2012-10-01

    In probability elicitation exercises it has been usual to considerer scoring rules (SRs) to measure the performance of experts when inferring about a given unknown, Θ, for which the true value, θ*, is (or will shortly be) known to the experimenter. Mathematically, SRs quantify the discrepancy between f(θ) (the distribution reflecting the expert's uncertainty about Θ) and d(θ), a zero-one indicator function of the observation θ*. Thus, a remarkable characteristic of SRs is to contrast expert's beliefs with the observation θ*. The present work aims at extending SRs concepts and formulas for the cases where Θ is aleatory, highlighting advantages of goodness-of-fit and entropy-like measures. Conceptually, it is argued that besides of evaluating the personal performance of the expert, SRs may also play a role when comparing the elicitation processes adopted to obtain f(θ). Mathematically, it is proposed to replace d(θ) by g(θ), the distribution that model the randomness of Θ, and do also considerer goodness-of-fit and entropylike metrics, leading to SRs that measure the adherence of f(θ) to g(θ). The implications of this alternative perspective are discussed and illustrated by means of case studies based on the simulation of controlled experiments. The usefulness of the proposed approach for evaluating the performance of experts and elicitation processes is investigated.

  7. Short-range communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  8. Countering short range ballistic missiles

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, George W.; Ehiers, Mark A.; Marshall, Kneale T.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Concepts commonly found in ASW search are used to model the flow and detection of mobile launchers for short range ballistic missiles. Emphasis is on detection and destruction of the launcher before launch. The benefit of pre-hostility intelligence and pre-missile-launch prosecution, the backbone of successful ASW, is revealed through the analysis of a circulation model which reflects the standard operations of a third world mobile mi...

  9. Association Between Patient Review of Systems Score and Somatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okland, Tyler Stephen; Gonzalez, Joseph Robert; Ferber, Alexander Thomas; Mann, Scott Edward

    2017-09-01

    Somatization is a condition in which psychological distress is manifested by medically unexplained symptoms, and it is prevalent in all medical specialties, including otolaryngology. Recognition of somatization can be difficult, and there are limited methods available. To determine whether patients with somatization respond differently to the review of systems (ROS) portion of the patient interview and whether the ROS can be used to identify patients with somatization. A retrospective review of medical records of 2120 consecutive consultations of English- or Spanish-speaking patients aged 18 to 89 years who presented to the otolaryngology clinic from January 1, 2014, to November 10, 2015, was conducted to compare how the ROS of patients with chief complaints associated with somatization (group B: globus sensation, dizziness, and tinnitus) differs from those with symptoms more often associated with objective findings (group A: nasal obstruction, hoarseness, and hearing loss); a total of 605 patients were included. Objective clinical findings after physical examination and related testing were reviewed and classified as either significant, marginal, or absent. Current or past psychiatric comorbidities were also examined. Number of affirmative responses on a standardized, 69-point ROS was recorded as a ROS score (ROSS). Objective clinical findings, symptoms, and psychiatric comorbidities were recorded. Of the 605 patients included in the analysis, 346 (57.2%) were women, and the mean (SD) age was 51.6 (15.7) years. Among patients with medically unexplained symptoms (median, 11; range, 0-39), the ROSS was higher compared with those with objective clinical findings (median, 6; range, 0-31) (median difference, 4; 95% CI, 3 to 6). Group A (hoarseness, nasal obstruction, and hearing loss: median ROSS, 6, range, 0-41) exhibited lower ROSS than group B (dizziness, globus sensation, and tinnitus: median ROSS, 9; range, 0-39) (median difference, -2; 95% CI -3 to -1

  10. Health care index score and risk of death following tuberculosis diagnosis in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlekareva, D N; Grint, D; Post, F A; Mocroft, A; Panteleev, A M; Miller, R F; Miro, J M; Bruyand, M; Furrer, H; Riekstina, V; Girardi, E; Losso, M H; Caylá, J A; Malashenkov, E A; Obel, N; Skrahina, A M; Lundgren, J D; Kirk, O

    2013-02-01

    To assess health care utilisation for patients co-infected with TB and HIV (TB-HIV), and to develop a weighted health care index (HCI) score based on commonly used interventions and compare it with patient outcome. A total of 1061 HIV patients diagnosed with TB in four regions, Central/Northern, Southern and Eastern Europe and Argentina, between January 2004 and December 2006 were enrolled in the TB-HIV study. A weighted HCI score (range 0-5), based on independent prognostic factors identified in multivariable Cox models and the final score, included performance of TB drug susceptibility testing (DST), an initial TB regimen containing a rifamycin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide, and start of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). The mean HCI score was highest in Central/Northern Europe (3.2, 95%CI 3.1-3.3) and lowest in Eastern Europe (1.6, 95%CI 1.5-1.7). The cumulative probability of death 1 year after TB diagnosis decreased from 39% (95%CI 31-48) among patients with an HCI score of 0, to 9% (95%CI 6-13) among those with a score of ≥4. In an adjusted Cox model, a 1-unit increase in the HCI score was associated with 27% reduced mortality (relative hazard 0.73, 95%CI 0.64-0.84). Our results suggest that DST, standard anti-tuberculosis treatment and early cART may improve outcome for TB-HIV patients. The proposed HCI score provides a tool for future research and monitoring of the management of TB-HIV patients. The highest HCI score may serve as a benchmark to assess TB-HIV management, encouraging continuous health care improvement.

  11. Development and initial validation of the Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System score

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Adverse outcomes following clinical deterioration in children admitted to hospital wards is frequently preventable. Identification of children for referral to critical care experts remains problematic. Our objective was to develop and validate a simple bedside score to quantify severity of illness in hospitalized children. Methods A case-control design was used to evaluate 11 candidate items and identify a pragmatic score for routine bedside use. Case-patients were urgently admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Control-patients had no 'code blue', ICU admission or care restrictions. Validation was performed using two prospectively collected datasets. Results Data from 60 case and 120 control-patients was obtained. Four out of eleven candidate-items were removed. The seven-item Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (PEWS) score ranges from 0–26. The mean maximum scores were 10.1 in case-patients and 3.4 in control-patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.91, compared with 0.84 for the retrospective nurse-rating of patient risk for near or actual cardiopulmonary arrest. At a score of 8 the sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 93%, respectively. The score increased over 24 hours preceding urgent paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission (P score was higher in patients admitted to the ICU than patients who were not admitted (P score. This 7-item score can quantify severity of illness in hospitalized children and identify critically ill children with at least one hours notice. Prospective validation in other populations is required before clinical application. PMID:19678924

  12. Admission ASIA motor score predicting the need for tracheostomy after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaker, Jay; Kufera, Joseph A; Glaser, Jeffrey; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory compromise and the need for tracheostomy are common after cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI). The purpose of the study was to evaluate if admission American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score is associated with the need for tracheostomy following cSCI. The trauma registry identified patients with isolated cSCI during a 3-year period. Patients with an Abbreviated Injury Scale score greater than 3 in other body regions were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, admission ASIA motor score, ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), anatomic level of injury, need for a tracheostomy, and length of stay (LOS). Logistic regression models were constructed to examine the effect of admission ASIA motor scores on the outcome of tracheostomy. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to determine risk factors for time to tracheostomy. A total of 128 patients were identified. Seventy-four patients had a tracheostomy performed on mean (SD) hospital Day 9 (4). Median admission ASIA motor score was 22.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 8-54). Median anatomic level of injury was 5 (IQR, 4-6). Patients requiring tracheostomy had significantly lower median admission ASIA motor score (9 [IQR, 3-17] vs. 57 [IQR, 30-77], p admission ASIA motor score and "complete" cSCI are significantly associated with the need for tracheostomy. Anatomic level of injury was not associated with tracheostomy after cSCI. Classification of incomplete patients by AIS indicates that ASIA motor score may be used as a surrogate for grade of injury. When looking only at patients with an "incomplete" cSCI, those with an admission ASIA score of less than 10 should have an early tracheostomy. Those with an AIS D scale should not be considered for early tracheostomy. Therapeutic/care management, level II.

  13. Bike Score®: Associations between urban bikeability and cycling behavior in 24 cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Meghan; Teschke, Kay; Brauer, Michael; Fuller, Daniel

    2016-02-11

    There is growing interest in designing cities that support not only walking, but also cycling. Bike Score® is a metric capturing environmental characteristics associated with cycling that is now available for over 160 US and Canadian cities. Our aim was to determine if Bike Score was associated with between and within-city variability in cycling behavior. We used linear regression to model associations between Bike Score and journey to work cycling mode share (US: American Community Survey, 2013 or 2012 5-year estimates; Canada: 2011 National Household Survey) for 5664 census tracts in 24 US and Canadian cities. At the city level, the correlation between mean Bike Score and mean journey to work cycling mode share was moderate (r = 0.52). At the census tract level, the correlation was 0.35; a ten-unit increase in Bike Score was associated with a 0.5% (95% CI: 0.5 to 0.6) increase in the proportion of population cycling to work, a meaningful difference given the low modal shares (mean = 1.9%) in many North American cities. Census tracts with the highest Bike Scores (>90 to 100) had mode shares 4.0 higher (β = 4.0, 95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) than the lowest Bike Score areas (0-25). City specific analyses indicated between-city variability in associations, with regression estimates between Bike Score and mode share ranging from 0.2 to 3.5%. The Bike Score metric was associated bicycle mode share between and within cities, suggesting its utility for planning bicycle infrastructure.

  14. Medium Range Forecasts Representation (and Long Range Forecasts?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, J.-C.

    2009-09-01

    The progress of the numerical forecasts urges us to interest us in more and more distant ranges. We thus supply more and more forecasts with term of some days. Nevertheless, precautions of use are necessary to give the most reliable and the most relevant possible information. Available in a TV bulletin or on quite other support (Internet, mobile phone), the interpretation and the representation of a medium range forecast (5 - 15 days) must be different from those of a short range forecast. Indeed, the "foresee-ability” of a meteorological phenomenon decreases gradually in the course of the ranges, it decreases all the more quickly that the phenomenon is of small scale. So, at the end of some days, the probability character of a forecast becomes very widely dominating. That is why in Meteo-France the forecasts of D+4 to D+7 are accompanied with a confidence index since around ten years. It is a figure between 1 and 5: the more we approach 5, the more the confidence in the supplied forecast is good. In the practice, an indication is supplied for period D+4 / D+5, the other one for period D+6 / D+7, every day being able to benefit from a different forecast, that is be represented in a independent way. We thus supply a global tendency over 24 hours with less and less precise symbols as the range goes away. Concrete examples will be presented. From now on two years, we also publish forecasts to D+8 / J+9, accompanied with a sign of confidence (" good reliability " or " to confirm "). These two days are grouped together on a single map because for us, the described tendency to this term is relevant on a duration about 48 hours with a spatial scale slightly superior to the synoptic scale. So, we avoid producing more than two zones of types of weather over France and we content with giving an evolution for the temperatures (still, in increase or in decline). Newspapers began to publish this information, it should soon be the case of televisions. It is particularly

  15. Development of the CT Syndesmophyte Score (CTSS) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: data from the SIAS cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Freek; de Koning, Anoek; van den Berg, Rosaline; Baraliakos, Xenofon; Braun, Juergen; Ramiro, Sofia; van Gaalen, Floris A; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2017-11-10

    To develop the CT Syndesmophyte Score (CTSS) for low-dose CT (ldCT) to assess structural damage in the spine of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and test its reliability. Patientswith AS in the SIAS cohort had whole spine ldCT at baseline and 2 years. Syndesmophytes were scored in coronal and sagittal planes in eight quadrants per vertebral unit (VU) as absent=0, <50% of the intervertebral disc space (IDS)=1, ≥50%=2 or bridging the IDS=3 (range 0-552). Images were scored by two readers, paired by patient, blinded to time order. Whole spine and spinal segment status and change scores were calculated. Inter-reader reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), smallest detectable change (SDC) and frequency of scores per VU. 49 patients (mean age 50 years (SD 9.8), 84% men, 88% human leucocyte antigen B27 positive) were included. Mean (SD) scores of reader 1 were: whole spine baseline status score 163 (126) and change score 16 (21), spinal segment baseline status scores 30 (41), 97 (77) and 36 (36) and change scores 2 (7), 12 (18) and 3 (4) for the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, respectively. Scores of reader 2 were similar. Whole spine status score ICC was 0.99 and 0.97-0.98 for spinal segments. Whole spine change score ICC was 0.77 and 0.32-0.75 for spinal segments. Whole-spine SDC was 14.4. Score distribution pattern per VU was similar between readers. Using the CTSS, new bone formation in the spine of patients with AS can be assessed reliably. Most progression was seen in the thoracic spine. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Development and Validation of a Morphologic Obstructive Sleep Apnea Prediction Score: The DES-OSA Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflandre, Eric; Degey, Stephanie; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Poirrier, Robert; Bonhomme, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and underdiagnosed entity that favors perioperative morbidity. Several anatomical characteristics predispose to OSA. We developed a new clinical score that would detect OSA based on the patient's morphologic characteristics only. Patients (n = 149) scheduled for an overnight polysomnography were included. Their morphologic metrics were compared, and combinations of them were tested for their ability to predict at least mild, moderate-to-severe, or severe OSA, as defined by an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5, >15, or >30 events/h. This ability was calculated using Cohen κ coefficient and prediction probability. The score with best prediction abilities (DES-OSA score) considered 5 variables: Mallampati score, distance between the thyroid and the chin, body mass index, neck circumference, and sex. Those variables were weighted by 1, 2, or 3 points. DES-OSA score >5, 6, and 7 were associated with increased probability of an AHI >5, >15, or >30 events/h, respectively, and those thresholds had the best Cohen κ coefficient, sensitivities, and specificities. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve was 0.832 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.762-0.902), 0.805 (95% CI, 0.734-0.876), and 0.834 (95% CI, 0.757-0.911) for DES-OSA at predicting an AHI >5, >15, and >30 events/h, respectively. With the aforementioned thresholds, corresponding sensitivities (95% CI) were 82.7% (74.5-88.7), 77.1% (66.9-84.9), and 75% (61.0-85.1), and specificities (95% CI) were 72.4% (54.0-85.4), 73.2% (60.3-83.1), and 76.9% (67.2-84.4). Validation of DES-OSA performance in an independent sample yielded highly similar results. DES-OSA is a simple score for detecting OSA patients. Its originality relies on its morphologic nature. Derived from a European population, it may prove useful in a preoperative setting, but it has still to be compared with other screening tools in a general surgical population and in other

  17. Multidimensional CAT Item Selection Methods for Domain Scores and Composite Scores: Theory and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2012-07-01

    Multidimensional computer adaptive testing (MCAT) can provide higher precision and reliability or reduce test length when compared with unidimensional CAT or with the paper-and-pencil test. This study compared five item selection procedures in the MCAT framework for both domain scores and overall scores through simulation by varying the structure of item pools, the population distribution of the simulees, the number of items selected, and the content area. The existing procedures such as Volume (Segall in Psychometrika, 61:331-354, 1996), Kullback-Leibler information (Veldkamp & van der Linden in Psychometrika 67:575-588, 2002), Minimize the error variance of the linear combination (van der Linden in J. Educ. Behav. Stat. 24:398-412, 1999), and Minimum Angle (Reckase in Multidimensional item response theory, Springer, New York, 2009) are compared to a new procedure, Minimize the error variance of the composite score with the optimized weight, proposed for the first time in this study. The intent is to find an item selection procedure that yields higher precisions for both the domain and composite abilities and a higher percentage of selected items from the item pool. The comparison is performed by examining the absolute bias, correlation, test reliability, time used, and item usage. Three sets of item pools are used with the item parameters estimated from real live CAT data. Results show that Volume and Minimum Angle performed similarly, balancing information for all content areas, while the other three procedures performed similarly, with a high precision for both domain and overall scores when selecting items with the required number of items for each domain. The new item selection procedure has the highest percentage of item usage. Moreover, for the overall score, it produces similar or even better results compared to those from the method that selects items favoring the general dimension using the general model (Segall in Psychometrika 66:79-97, 2001); the

  18. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, 3rd, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    ...% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals...

  19. A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scoring system in predicting mortality and length of stay at surgical intensive care unit.

  20. Endoscopic scoring of late gastrointestinal mucosal damage after adjuvant radiochemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabak, Resat; Uygur-Bayramicli, Oya; Gemici, Cengiz; Yavuzer, Dilek; Sargin, Mehmet; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate late effects of chemoradiation on gastrointestinal mucosa with an endoscopic scoring system and compare it to a clinical scoring system. METHODS: Twenty-four patients going to receive chemoradiation after gastric surgery underwent endoscopy four wk after surgery and one year after the chemoradiation finished. Upper gastrointestinal findings were recorded according to a system proposed by World Organisation for Digestive Endoscopy (OMED) and clinical scoring was done with RTOG-EORTC radiation morbidity scoring systems. RESULTS: There was no significant endoscopic difference in gastric and intestinal mucosa after chemoradiation (P > 0.05) and there was no association between endoscopic scores and clinical scores. Endoscopic changes were minimal. CONCLUSION: Late effects after chemoradiation in operated patients with gastric cancers can be evaluated with an endoscopic scoring system objectively and this system is superior to clinical scoring systems. PMID:16865788

  1. 48 CFR 1515.305-70 - Scoring plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Source Selection 1515.305-70 Scoring plans. When... solicitation, e.g., other numeric, adjectival, color rating systems, etc. Scoring Plan Value Descriptive...

  2. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Moguls Scoring Record Number 547

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Robitaille, George; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Moguls. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee Organizations on the committee include the U.S...

  3. Self-Scoring Accuracy of the Kuder General Interest Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Examines the accuracy of eighth-grade students' (N=306) self-scoring efforts on the Kuder Test. Results show that many participants were inaccurate. Recommendations are made to reduce the problem of scoring errors. (BH)

  4. Rapid Design of Knowledge-Based Scoring Potentials for Enrichment of Near-Native Geometries in Protein-Protein Docking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sasse

    Full Text Available Protein-protein docking protocols aim to predict the structures of protein-protein complexes based on the structure of individual partners. Docking protocols usually include several steps of sampling, clustering, refinement and re-scoring. The scoring step is one of the bottlenecks in the performance of many state-of-the-art protocols. The performance of scoring functions depends on the quality of the generated structures and its coupling to the sampling algorithm. A tool kit, GRADSCOPT (GRid Accelerated Directly SCoring OPTimizing, was designed to allow rapid development and optimization of different knowledge-based scoring potentials for specific objectives in protein-protein docking. Different atomistic and coarse-grained potentials can be created by a grid-accelerated directly scoring dependent Monte-Carlo annealing or by a linear regression optimization. We demonstrate that the scoring functions generated by our approach are similar to or even outperform state-of-the-art scoring functions for predicting near-native solutions. Of additional importance, we find that potentials specifically trained to identify the native bound complex perform rather poorly on identifying acceptable or medium quality (near-native solutions. In contrast, atomistic long-range contact potentials can increase the average fraction of near-native poses by up to a factor 2.5 in the best scored 1% decoys (compared to existing scoring, emphasizing the need of specific docking potentials for different steps in the docking protocol.

  5. Rapid Design of Knowledge-Based Scoring Potentials for Enrichment of Near-Native Geometries in Protein-Protein Docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Alexander; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Schindler, Christina E. M.; de Beauchêne, Isaure Chauvot

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein docking protocols aim to predict the structures of protein-protein complexes based on the structure of individual partners. Docking protocols usually include several steps of sampling, clustering, refinement and re-scoring. The scoring step is one of the bottlenecks in the performance of many state-of-the-art protocols. The performance of scoring functions depends on the quality of the generated structures and its coupling to the sampling algorithm. A tool kit, GRADSCOPT (GRid Accelerated Directly SCoring OPTimizing), was designed to allow rapid development and optimization of different knowledge-based scoring potentials for specific objectives in protein-protein docking. Different atomistic and coarse-grained potentials can be created by a grid-accelerated directly scoring dependent Monte-Carlo annealing or by a linear regression optimization. We demonstrate that the scoring functions generated by our approach are similar to or even outperform state-of-the-art scoring functions for predicting near-native solutions. Of additional importance, we find that potentials specifically trained to identify the native bound complex perform rather poorly on identifying acceptable or medium quality (near-native) solutions. In contrast, atomistic long-range contact potentials can increase the average fraction of near-native poses by up to a factor 2.5 in the best scored 1% decoys (compared to existing scoring), emphasizing the need of specific docking potentials for different steps in the docking protocol. PMID:28118389

  6. Five-minute Apgar score as a marker for developmental vulnerability at 5 years of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaz, Neda; Boyce, W Thomas; Brownell, Marni; Jutte, Douglas; Tremlett, Helen; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Joseph, K S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between the 5 min Apgar score and developmental vulnerability at 5 years of age. Design Population-based retrospective cohort study. Setting Manitoba, Canada. Participants All children born between 1999 and 2006 at term gestation, with a documented 5 min Apgar score. Exposure 5 min Apgar score. Main outcome measures Childhood development at 5 years of age, expressed as vulnerability (absent vs present) on five domains of the Early Development Instrument: physical health, social competence, emotional maturity, language and cognitive development, and communication skills. Results Of the 33 883 children in the study, most (82%) had an Apgar score of 9; 1% of children had a score Apgar scores Apgar 9=1.23, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.44). Similarly, children with Apgar scores of Apgar 9=1.20, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.41). Nevertheless, the Apgar-based prognostic model had a poor sensitivity for physical vulnerability (19%, 95% CI 18% to 20%). Although the Apgar score-based prognostic model had reasonable calibration ability and risk-stratification accuracy for identifying developmentally vulnerable children, classification accuracy was poor. Conclusions The risk of developmental vulnerability at 5 years of age is inversely associated with the 5 min Apgar score across its entire range, and the score can serve as a population-level indicator of developmental risk. PMID:26187935

  7. DRAGON score predicts functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients receiving both intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and endovascular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Arthur; Pednekar, Noorie; Lehrer, Rachel; Todo, Akira; Sahni, Ramandeep; Marks, Stephen; Stiefel, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    The DRAGON score, which includes clinical and computed tomographic (CT) scan parameters, predicts functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA). We assessed the utility of the DRAGON score in predicting functional outcome in stroke patients receiving both IV tPA and endovascular therapy. A retrospective chart review of patients treated at our institution from February 2009 to October 2015 was conducted. All patients with computed tomography angiography (CTA) proven large vessel occlusions (LVO) who underwent intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy were included. Baseline DRAGON scores and modified Rankin Score (mRS) at the time of hospital discharge was calculated. Good outcome was defined as mRS ≤3. Fifty-eight patients with LVO of the anterior circulation were studied. The mean DRAGON score of patients on admission was 5.3 (range, 3-8). All patients received IV tPA and endovascular therapy. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that DRAGON scores ≥7 was associated with higher mRS (P DRAGON scores ≤6. Patients with DRAGON scores of 7 and 8 on admission had a mortality rate of 3.8% and 40%, respectively. The DRAGON score can help predict better functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients receiving both IV tPA and endovascular therapy. This data supports the use of the DRAGON score in selecting patients who could potentially benefit from more invasive therapies such as endovascular treatment. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further validate these results.

  8. Understanding and Using Factor Scores: Considerations for the Applied Researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine DiStefano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Following an exploratory factor analysis, factor scores may be computed and used in subsequent analyses. Factor scores are composite variables which provide information about an individual's placement on the factor(s. This article discusses popular methods to create factor scores under two different classes: refined and non-refined. Strengths and considerations of the various methods, and for using factor scores in general, are discussed.

  9. Apgar Scores: Examining the Long-term Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2000-01-01

    The Apgar scoring system was intended as an evaluative measure of a newborn's condition at birth and of the need for immediate attention. In the most recent past, individuals have unsuccessfully attempted to link Apgar scores with long-term developmental outcomes. This practice is not appropriate, as the Apgar score is currently defined. Expectant parents need to be aware of the limitations of the Apgar score and its appropriate uses.

  10. Truthful approximations to range voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsika, Aris; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    We consider the fundamental mechanism design problem of approximate social welfare maximization under general cardinal preferences on a finite number of alternatives and without money. The well-known range voting scheme can be thought of as a non-truthful mechanism for exact social welfare......-unilateral has an approximation ratio between 0.610 and 0.611, the best ordinal mechanism has an approximation ratio between 0.616 and 0.641, while the best mixed-unilateral mechanism has an approximation ratio bigger than 0.660. In particular, the best mixed-unilateral non-ordinal (i.e., cardinal) mechanism...

  11. Nonlinear dynamic range compression deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Goodhue, William; Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Kierstead, John

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a dynamic range image compression technique for nonlinear deconvolution; the impulse response of the distortion function and the noisy distorted image are jointly transformed to pump a clean reference beam in a two-beam coupling arrangement. The Fourier transform of the pumped reference beam contains the deconvolved image and its conjugate. In contrast to standard deconvolution approaches, for which noise can be a limiting factor in the performance, this approach allows the retrieval of distorted signals embedded in a very high-noise environment.

  12. Direct power comparisons between simple LOD scores and NPL scores for linkage analysis in complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, P C; Greenberg, D A; Hodge, S E

    1999-09-01

    Several methods have been proposed for linkage analysis of complex traits with unknown mode of inheritance. These methods include the LOD score maximized over disease models (MMLS) and the "nonparametric" linkage (NPL) statistic. In previous work, we evaluated the increase of type I error when maximizing over two or more genetic models, and we compared the power of MMLS to detect linkage, in a number of complex modes of inheritance, with analysis assuming the true model. In the present study, we compare MMLS and NPL directly. We simulated 100 data sets with 20 families each, using 26 generating models: (1) 4 intermediate models (penetrance of heterozygote between that of the two homozygotes); (2) 6 two-locus additive models; and (3) 16 two-locus heterogeneity models (admixture alpha = 1.0,.7,.5, and.3; alpha = 1.0 replicates simple Mendelian models). For LOD scores, we assumed dominant and recessive inheritance with 50% penetrance. We took the higher of the two maximum LOD scores and subtracted 0.3 to correct for multiple tests (MMLS-C). We compared expected maximum LOD scores and power, using MMLS-C and NPL as well as the true model. Since NPL uses only the affected family members, we also performed an affecteds-only analysis using MMLS-C. The MMLS-C was both uniformly more powerful than NPL for most cases we examined, except when linkage information was low, and close to the results for the true model under locus heterogeneity. We still found better power for the MMLS-C compared with NPL in affecteds-only analysis. The results show that use of two simple modes of inheritance at a fixed penetrance can have more power than NPL when the trait mode of inheritance is complex and when there is heterogeneity in the data set.

  13. The mangled extremity score and amputation: Time for a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loja, Melissa N; Sammann, Amanda; DuBose, Joseph; Li, Chin-Shang; Liu, Yu; Savage, Stephanie; Scalea, Thomas; Holcomb, John B; Rasmussen, Todd E; Knudson, M Margaret

    2017-03-01

    The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) was developed 25 years ago in an attempt to use the extent of skeletal and soft tissue injury, limb ischemia, shock, and age to predict the need for amputation after extremity injury. Subsequently, there have been mixed reviews as to the use of this score. We hypothesized that the MESS, when applied to a data set collected prospectively in modern times, would not correlate with the need for amputation. We applied the MESS to patient data collected in the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma PROspective Vascular Injury Treatment registry. This registry contains prospectively collected demographic, diagnostic, treatment, and outcome data. Between 2013 and 2015, 230 patients with lower extremity arterial injuries were entered into the PROspective Vascular Injury Treatment registry. Most were male with a mean age of 34 years (range, 4-92 years) and a blunt mechanism of injury at a rate of 47.4%. A MESS of 8 or greater was associated with a longer stay in the hospital (median, 22.5 (15, 29) vs 12 (6, 21); p = 0.006) and intensive care unit (median, 6 (2, 13) vs 3 (1, 6); p = 0.03). Of the patients' limbs, 81.3% were ultimately salvaged (median MESS, 4 (3, 5)), and 18.7% required primary or secondary amputation (median MESS, 6 (4, 8); p amputated limbs was no longer significantly different. Importantly, a MESS of 8 predicted in-hospital amputation in only 43.2% of patients. Therapeutic advances in the treatment of vascular, orthopedic, neurologic, and soft tissue injuries have reduced the diagnostic accuracy of the MESS in predicting the need for amputation. There remains a significant need to examine additional predictors of amputation following severe extremity injury. Prospective, prognostic study, level III.

  14. Performance of a Generic Approach in Automated Essay Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Yigal; Bridgeman, Brent; Trapani, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    A generic approach in automated essay scoring produces scores that have the same meaning across all prompts, existing or new, of a writing assessment. This is accomplished by using a single set of linguistic indicators (or features), a consistent way of combining and weighting these features into essay scores, and a focus on features that are not…

  15. A Comparison of Metrics for Scoring Beginning Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Kristen D.; Coker, David L., Jr.; McCraw, Sara B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated four spelling scoring metrics: total words correct, correct letter sequences, correct sounds, and phonological coding scoring (developed by Tangel and Blachman) across two studies with children in kindergarten. The relationships between spelling scores and measures of reading, phonological awareness, and writing skills…

  16. Validation of mangled extremity severity score in assessing the need ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different scoring systems were therefore developed to aid orthopaedic surgeons in this decision,eitherto contemplate amputation or proceed to salvage a mangled extremity. Of these scoring systems, the mangled extremity severity score (MESS) is mostly used.However,the high predictive accuracy reported by its ...

  17. Classifying snakebite in South Africa: Validating a scoring system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors predictive of ATI and the optimal cut-off score for predicting an ATI were identified. These factors were then used to develop a standard scoring system. The score was then tested prospectively for accuracy in a new validation cohort consisting of 100 patients admitted for snakebite to our unit from 1 December 2014 to ...

  18. CLINICAL RISK INDEX FOR BABIES (CRIB) II SCORE AS A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... Among them is the scoring system Clinical Risk Index for Babies also known as CRIB II score. ... specificity of 75.3%, and a predictive value of 77.7% compared to 72.5, 71.2, and 71.8% respectively for ... 56, 75 and 66% for sensitivity, specificity and predictive values respectively. Conclusion: CRIB II score ...

  19. Confidence Scoring of Speaking Performance: How Does Fuzziness become Exact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tan; Mak, Barley; Zhou, Pei

    2012-01-01

    The fuzziness of assessing second language speaking performance raises two difficulties in scoring speaking performance: "indistinction between adjacent levels" and "overlap between scales". To address these two problems, this article proposes a new approach, "confidence scoring", to deal with such fuzziness, leading to "confidence" scores between…

  20. The comparison of modified early warning score and Glasgow coma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to assess and compare the discriminatory ability of the Glasgow coma scale (GCS)‑age‑systolic blood pressure (GAP) score and modified early warning scoring system (mEWS) score for 4‑week mortality, for the patients being in the triage category 1 and 2 who refer to Emergency ...

  1. Modifying scoring system at South African University rugby level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Success in rugby is measured by winning the game and in order to do so, teams need to score more points than the opposing team. The primary aim of this study was to investigate and compare the scoring profile of the 2011 and 2012 tournaments and to determine if modifying the scoring system at South African University ...

  2. The Impact of Anonymization for Automated Essay Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shermis, Mark D.; Lottridge, Sue; Mayfield, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of anonymizing text on predicted scores made by two kinds of automated scoring engines: one that incorporates elements of natural language processing (NLP) and one that does not. Eight data sets (N = 22,029) were used to form both training and test sets in which the scoring engines had access to both text and…

  3. Validation of the Simplified Motor Score in patients with traumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. This study used data from a large prospectively entered database to assess the efficacy of the motor score (M score) component of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the Simplified Motor Score (SMS) in predicting overall outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective. To safely and reliably ...

  4. Testing Intelligently Includes Double-Checking Wechsler IQ Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuentzel, Jeffrey G.; Hetterscheidt, Lesley A.; Barnett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The rigors of standardized testing make for numerous opportunities for examiner error, including simple computational mistakes in scoring. Although experts recommend that test scoring be double-checked, the extent to which independent double-checking would reduce scoring errors is not known. A double-checking procedure was established at a…

  5. Score Gains on g-loaded Tests: No g

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Nijenhuis, J.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; van der Flier, H.

    2007-01-01

    IQ scores provide the best general predictor of success in education, job training, and work. However, there are many ways in which IQ scores can be increased, for instance by means of retesting or participation in learning potential training programs. What is the nature of these score gains? Jensen

  6. Effectiveness of Automated Chinese Sentence Scoring with Latent Semantic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen-Huei; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Pai, Kai-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Automated scoring by means of Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) has been introduced lately to improve the traditional human scoring system. The purposes of the present study were to develop a LSA-based assessment system to evaluate children's Chinese sentence construction skills and to examine the effectiveness of LSA-based automated scoring function…

  7. Automatic Dialogue Scoring for a Second Language Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin-Xia; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic dialogue scoring approach for a Dialogue-Based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (DB-CALL) system, which helps users learn language via interactive conversations. The system produces overall feedback according to dialogue scoring to help the learner know which parts should be more focused on. The scoring measures…

  8. Demystifying the GMAT: Where Do Scale Scores Comes from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2012-01-01

    GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) scaled scores convey the same level of ability over time, and GMAT percentiles convey the competitiveness of scores relative to today's GMAT test takers. In an earlier column, the author discussed the role of the GMAT scaled scores and percentiles. Here, he gets more technical and discusses how GMAT scaled…

  9. Effects of road transportation on excitability scores of pigs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... excitability scores of pigs administered ascorbic acid (AA) during the hot-dry season in Northern ... pigs (40.0 to 10%). Road transportation decreased the excitability scores and percent excitability in control pigs with high scores. In conclusion ..... temperature in large white Caribbean Creole growing pigs.

  10. A locally adapted functional outcome measurement score for total ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the Lequesne Index, used as Ouaga Score. It can be obtained easily and is reliable in a general West African patient population. We recommend the use of the Ouaga Score for functional evaluation and follow-up of THR in West Africa. Keywords: THR, Hip, Africa, Functional score, Hip replacement, Arthroscopy ...

  11. Prediction Scores as a Window into Classifier Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Katehara (Medha); E.M.A.L. Beauxis-Aussalet (Emmanuelle); B. Alsallakh (Bilal)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMost multi-class classifiers make their prediction for a test sample by scoring the classes and selecting the one with the highest score. Analyzing these prediction scores is useful to understand the classifier behavior and to assess its reliability. We present an interactive

  12. Ultrasound Doppler score correlates with OMERACT RAMRIS bone marrow oedema and synovitis score in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, M; Ellegaard, K; Boesen, L; Cimmino, M A; Jensen, P S; Terslev, L; Torp-Pedersen, S; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Bliddal, H

    2012-12-01

    MRI is considered the standard of reference for advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, in daily clinical practice ultrasound (US) imaging with Doppler information is more versatile and often used for fast and dynamic assessment of joint inflammation. The aim was to compare low-field MRI scores with the US Doppler measurements in the wrist joint of patients with RA. Fifty consecutive patients with RA (46 women & 4 men) completed both low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-scan®, Esaote) and a high-end US (Sequioa®, Siemens) imaging of the wrist before initiating either biological treatment (n = 26) or intraarticular injection of Depomedrole® (n = 24). Mean age was 56 years (range 21 - 83 years); mean disease duration 87.2 months (range 4 - 349 months), mean DAS 28 4,8 (range 2 - 7). MRI was scored according to the OMERACT RAMRIS recommendations and US Doppler colour-fractions were determined. Using Spearman's rho, we found a relatively good to moderate correlation between the US colour-fraction and the total OMERACT bone marrow oedema and synovitis scores on MRI (r = 0.6; p wrist joint. The higher correlation between US colour-fractions and MRI bone marrow oedema indicates a potential importance of US Doppler in monitoring inflammatory disease changes in RA. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Self-report measures and scoring protocols affect prevalence estimates of meeting physical activity guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkin, J A; Nichols, J F; Sallis, J F; Calfas, K J

    2000-01-01

    Prevalence estimates of meeting the guidelines for physical activity based on various self-report measures were compared, and the effects of various scoring protocols on the estimates were evaluated. A sample of 575 university students aged 24.5 +/- 1.9 yr (56% women, 54% Euro-American) completed the Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall interview (PAR), Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), and National Health Interview Survey 1991 (NHIS). To determine the prevalence of meeting the ACSM (1990) fitness and the CDC/ACSM (1995) health-related guidelines, various scoring protocols were employed that closely approximated the recommendations. Protocols varied by whether frequency and duration or duration only were considered. For the health-related guidelines, scoring protocols also varied depending on the intensity of activities considered. Depending on the scoring protocol and instrument used, the proportion meeting the fitness guidelines ranged from 32 to 59%. The NHIS, YRBS, and PAR resulted in significantly different proportions of those meeting the health-related guideline, ranging from 4 to 70%. The type of measure as well as the scoring protocol affected prevalence estimates of meeting the physical activity guidelines. This study indicates the difficulty of comparing prevalence rates across studies using different measures.

  14. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of the Kampala Trauma Score using estimated Abbreviated Injury Scale scores and physician opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew; Forson, Paa Kobina; Oduro, George; Stewart, Barclay; Dike, Nkechi; Glover, Paul; Maio, Ronald F

    2017-01-01

    The Kampala Trauma Score (KTS) has been proposed as a triage tool for use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study aimed to examine the diagnostic accuracy of KTS in predicting emergency department outcomes using timely injury estimation with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score and physician opinion to calculate KTS scores. This was a diagnostic accuracy study of KTS among injured patients presenting to Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital A&E, Ghana. South African Triage Scale (SATS); KTS component variables, including AIS scores and physician opinion for serious injury quantification; and ED disposition were collected. Agreement between estimated AIS score and physician opinion were analyzed with normal, linear weighted, and maximum kappa. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of KTS-AIS and KTS-physician opinion was performed to evaluate each measure's ability to predict A&E mortality and need for hospital admission to the ward or theatre. A total of 1053 patients were sampled. There was moderate agreement between AIS criteria and physician opinion by normal (κ=0.41), weighted (κ lin =0.47), and maximum (κ max =0.53) kappa. A&E mortality ROC area for KTS-AIS was 0.93, KTS-physician opinion 0.89, and SATS 0.88 with overlapping 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Hospital admission ROC area for KTS-AIS was 0.73, KTS-physician opinion 0.79, and SATS 0.71 with statistical similarity. When evaluating only patients with serious injuries, KTS-AIS (ROC 0.88) and KTS-physician opinion (ROC 0.88) performed similarly to SATS (ROC 0.78) in predicting A&E mortality. The ROC area for KTS-AIS (ROC 0.71; 95%CI 0.66-0.75) and KTS-physician opinion (ROC 0.74; 95%CI 0.69-0.79) was significantly greater than SATS (ROC 0.57; 0.53-0.60) with regard to need for admission. KTS predicted mortality and need for admission from the ED well when early estimation of the number of serious injuries was used, regardless of method (i.e. AIS criteria or physician opinion

  16. Optimal Transport Destination for Ischemic Stroke Patients With Unknown Vessel Status: Use of Prehospital Triage Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemm, Eckhard; Ebinger, Martin; Nolte, Christian H; Endres, Matthias; Schlemm, Ludwig

    2017-08-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and large vessel occlusion may benefit from direct transportation to an endovascular capable comprehensive stroke center (mothership approach) as opposed to direct transportation to the nearest stroke unit without endovascular therapy (drip and ship approach). The optimal transport strategy for patients with AIS and unknown vessel status is uncertain. The rapid arterial occlusion evaluation scale (RACE, scores ranging from 0 to 9, with higher scores indicating higher stroke severity) correlates with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and was developed to identify patients with large vessel occlusion in a prehospital setting. We evaluate how the RACE scale can help to inform prehospital triage decisions for AIS patients. In a model-based approach, we estimate probabilities of good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of ≤2 at 3 months) as a function of severity of stroke symptoms and transport times for the mothership approach and the drip and ship approach. We use these probabilities to obtain optimal RACE cutoff scores for different transfer time settings and combinations of treatment options (time-based eligibility for secondary transfer under the drip and ship approach, time-based eligibility for thrombolysis at the comprehensive stroke center under the mothership approach). In our model, patients with AIS are more likely to benefit from direct transportation to the comprehensive stroke center if they have more severe strokes. Values of the optimal RACE cutoff scores range from 0 (mothership for all patients) to >9 (drip and ship for all patients). Shorter transfer times and longer door-to-needle and needle-to-transfer (door out) times are associated with lower optimal RACE cutoff scores. Use of RACE cutoff scores that take into account transport times to triage AIS patients to the nearest appropriate hospital may lead to improved outcomes. Further studies should examine the feasibility of translation into

  17. Competency based training in robotic surgery: benchmark scores for virtual reality robotic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raison, Nicholas; Ahmed, Kamran; Fossati, Nicola; Buffi, Nicolò; Mottrie, Alexandre; Dasgupta, Prokar; Van Der Poel, Henk

    2017-05-01

    To develop benchmark scores of competency for use within a competency based virtual reality (VR) robotic training curriculum. This longitudinal, observational study analysed results from nine European Association of Urology hands-on-training courses in VR simulation. In all, 223 participants ranging from novice to expert robotic surgeons completed 1565 exercises. Competency was set at 75% of the mean expert score. Benchmark scores for all general performance metrics generated by the simulator were calculated. Assessment exercises were selected by expert consensus and through learning-curve analysis. Three basic skill and two advanced skill exercises were identified. Benchmark scores based on expert performance offered viable targets for novice and intermediate trainees in robotic surgery. Novice participants met the competency standards for most basic skill exercises; however, advanced exercises were significantly more challenging. Intermediate participants performed better across the seven metrics but still did not achieve the benchmark standard in the more difficult exercises. Benchmark scores derived from expert performances offer relevant and challenging scores for trainees to achieve during VR simulation training. Objective feedback allows both participants and trainers to monitor educational progress and ensures that training remains effective. Furthermore, the well-defined goals set through benchmarking offer clear targets for trainees and enable training to move to a more efficient competency based curriculum. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Color Doppler Score: A New Approach for Monitoring a Large Placental Chorioangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angelica Zoppi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed color Doppler score as an innovative approach for the prenatal diagnosis and monitoring of a large placental chorioangioma case diagnosed at 26 weeks and the subjective semiquantitative assessment of the vascularization. The blood flow was assessed by a color Doppler score based on the intensity of the color signal with the following value ranges: (1 no flow, (2 minimal flow, (3 moderate flow, and (4 high vascular flow. Weekly examinations were programmed. Initially, a color Doppler score 3 was assigned, remaining unchanged at the following two exams and decreasing to Score 2 in the following 2 exams and to Score 1 thereafter. The ultrasonographic scan showed an increase of the mass size at the second and third exams and was followed by an arrest of the growth persisting for the rest of the pregnancy. Some hyperechogenic spots inside the mass appeared at the end. Expectant management was opted for, and the delivery was at 39, 2 weeks and maternal and fetal outcomes were favourable. The color Doppler score employed for assessment of vascularization in successive examinations proved to be an important tool for the prediction of the chorioangioma involution, and this new approach of monitoring allowed effective surveillance and successful tailored management.

  19. Assessment of Musculoskeletal Function and its Correlation with Radiological Joint Score in Children with Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samriti; Garg, Kapil; Singh, Jagdish

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the functional independence of children with hemophilia A and its correlation to radiological joint score. The present cross sectional study was conducted at SPMCHI, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, India. Children in the age group of 4-18 y affected with severe, moderate and mild hemophilia A and with a history of hemarthrosis who attended the OPD, emergency or got admitted in wards of SPMCHI, SMS Medical College were examined. Musculoskeletal function was measured in 98 patients using Functional Independence Score in Hemophilia (FISH) and index joints (joints most commonly affected with repeated bleeding) were assessed radiologically with plain X rays using Pettersson score. The mean FISH score was 28.07 ± 3.90 (range 17-32) with squatting, running and step climbing as most affected tasks. The mean Pettersson score was 3.8 ± 3.2. A significant correlation was found between mean Pettersson score and FISH (r = -0.875, P hemophilia A.

  20. The medial tibial stress syndrome score: a new patient-reported outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Marinus; Moen, Maarten H; Zimmermann, Wessel O; Lindeboom, Robert; Weir, Adam; Backx, Frank Jg; Bakker, Eric Wp

    2016-10-01

    At present, there is no validated patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for patients with medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Our aim was to select and validate previously generated items and create a valid, reliable and responsive PROM for patients with MTSS: the MTSS score. A prospective cohort study was performed in multiple sports medicine, physiotherapy and military facilities in the Netherlands. Participants with MTSS filled out the previously generated items for the MTSS score on 3 occasions. From previously generated items, we selected the best items. We assessed the MTSS score for its validity, reliability and responsiveness. The MTSS score was filled out by 133 participants with MTSS. Factor analysis showed the MTSS score to exhibit a single-factor structure with acceptable internal consistency (α=0.58) and good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.81). The MTSS score ranges from 0 to 10 points. The smallest detectable change in our sample was 0.69 at the group level and 4.80 at the individual level. Construct validity analysis showed significant moderate-to-large correlations (r=0.34-0.52, ptreatment outcomes in clinical studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Impact of using different SCORE tables for estimating cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotons, Carlos; Moral, Irene; Soriano, Núria; Cuixart, Lluís; Osorio, Dimelza; Bottaro, David; Puig, Mireia; Joaniquet, Xavier; Marcos, Albert; Casasa, Albert

    2014-02-01

    In Spain, various SCORE tables are available to estimate cardiovascular risk: tables for low-risk countries, tables calibrated for the Spanish population, and tables that include high-density lipoprotein values. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of using one or another SCORE table in clinical practice. In a cross-sectional study carried out in two primary health care centers, individuals aged 40 to 65 years in whom blood pressure and total cholesterol levels were recorded between March 2010 and March 2012 were selected. Patients with diabetes or a history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using SCORE for low-risk countries, SCORE with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the calibrated SCORE. Cardiovascular risk was estimated in 3716 patients. The percentage of patients at high or very high risk was 1.24% with SCORE with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 4.73% with the low-risk SCORE, and 15.44% with the calibrated SCORE (P<.01). Treatment with lipid-lowering drugs would be recommended in 10.23% of patients using the calibrated SCORE, 3.12% of patients using the low-risk SCORE, and 0.67% of patients using SCORE with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The calibrated SCORE table classifies a larger number of patients at high or very high risk than the SCORE for low-risk countries or the SCORE with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Therefore, its use would imply treating more patients with lipid-lowering medication. Validation studies are needed to assess the most appropriate SCORE table for use in our setting. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Interobserver agreement of gleason score and modified gleason score in needle biopsy and in surgical specimen of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Veloso,Sergio G.; Lima,Mario F.; Salles,Paulo G.; Berenstein,Cynthia K.; Scalon, Joao D.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gleason score, which has a high interobserver variability, is used to classify prostate cancer. The most recent consensus valued the tertiary Gleason pattern and recommended its use in the final score of needle biopsies (modified Gleason score). This pattern is considered to be of high prognostic value in surgical specimens. This study emphasized the evaluation of the modified score agreement in needle biopsies and in surgical specimen, as well as the interobserver variability o...

  3. Effect of pain-free range exercise on shoulder pain and range of motion in an amateur skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study prescribed pain-free range exercises for a female amateur skier who complained of limitations in her shoulder range of motion, and pain caused by protective spasms; the tester evaluated the effects of such exercise on pain. [Subject and Methods] A 23-year-old female who complained of pain of 3 weeks in duration in the right glenohumoral and scapulothoracic joints was enrolled. [Results] After pain-free range exercises, the visual analog pain score was 2 and the shoulder flexion and abduction angles improved compared to the initial values. [Conclusion] Thus, this study suggests muscle-strengthening exercises within the pain-free range, rather than simple pain treatments, as therapy for acute muscle injuries in skiers.

  4. Dynamic range majority data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim; He, Meng; Munro, J. Ian

    2011-01-01

    data structure for answering range α-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where α ε (0,1). Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in O((lg n)/α) time, and updates in O((lg n)/α) amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to O......((lg n/(α lglg n)). For constant values of α, this improved query time matches an existing lower bound, for any data structure with polylogarithmic update time. We also generalize our data structure to handle sets of points in d-dimensions, for d ≥ 2, as well as dynamic arrays, in which each entry...

  5. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  6. Scoring radiographic progression in ankylosing spondylitis: should we use the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS) or the Radiographic Ankylosing Spondylitis Spinal Score (RASSS)?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramiro, Sofia; van Tubergen, Astrid; Stolwijk, Carmen; Landewé, Robert; van de Bosch, Filip; Dougados, Maxime; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Radiographic damage is one of the core outcomes in axial SpA and is usually assessed with the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) Spine Score (mSASSS). Alternatively, the Radiographic AS Spinal Score (RASSS) is proposed, which includes the lower thoracic vertebrae,

  7. Examining the Potential Use of a Novel Radiographic Scoring System for Determining Surgical Intervention in Diabetic Charcot Arthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlani, Rahul; Lomasney, Laurie M; Pinzur, Michael; Dux, Katherine

    2017-06-01

    Although Eichenholtz and the Schon systems are commonly used to evaluate foot Charcot arthropathy on radiographs, a novel system with expanded characterization may have added benefit. Patients with Charcot arthropathy and foot radiographs were grouped in nonsurgical group 1 (imaging sets at minimum 2-year interval) and surgical group 2 (imaging preceding fusion and/or amputation). Radiographs were scored with Eichenholtz and Schon systems, and a novel scoring system (summation of 0-3 rank for bone density, distention/swelling, debris, disorganization, and dislocation/subluxation). Summative scores of the 2 groups were compared. Differences in scores of each system from serial images of group 1 were compared and average scores from each of the systems for preoperative imaging sets of group 2 were compared. A total of 111 patients were included (group 1, 19 patients; group 2, 92 patients). The novel system provided a broad numerical characterization of the radiographs (range 1-15). Summative scores of the novel system for groups 1 and 2 were statistically different with lower median score in the nonsurgical group (nonsurgical median score 6 vs surgical median score 9). Individual characteristic scores from 4 (distention, debris, disorganization, and dislocation) of 5 categories for the novel system were statistically different, with lower scores for the nonoperative group. The narrower numerical scores from the Eichenholtz and Schon systems did not yield statistically significant results. The novel scoring system provides a broad numerical description of radiographic findings in Charcot arthropathy of the foot and has potential advantage for surgical predictive value. Level IV: Retrospective.

  8. A Modification to Angoff and Bookmarking Cut Scores to Account for the Imperfect Reliability of Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the Angoff and bookmarking cut scores are examples of true score equating that in the real world must be applied to observed scores. In the context of defining minimal competency, the percentage "failed" by such methods is a function of the length of the measuring instrument. It is argued that this length is largely…

  9. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry diagnostic discordance between Z-scores and T-scores in young adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, John J

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria for postmenopausal osteoporosis using central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) T-scores have been widely accepted. The validity of these criteria for other populations, including premenopausal women and young men, has not been established. The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) recommends using DXA Z-scores, not T-scores, for diagnosis in premenopausal women and men aged 20-49 yr, though studies supporting this position have not been published. We examined diagnostic agreement between DXA-generated T-scores and Z-scores in a cohort of men and women aged 20-49 yr, using 1994 World Health Organization and 2005 ISCD DXA criteria. Four thousand two hundred and seventy-five unique subjects were available for analysis. The agreement between DXA T-scores and Z-scores was moderate (Cohen\\'s kappa: 0.53-0.75). The use of Z-scores resulted in significantly fewer (McNemar\\'s p<0.001) subjects diagnosed with "osteopenia," "low bone mass for age," or "osteoporosis." Thirty-nine percent of Hologic (Hologic, Inc., Bedford, MA) subjects and 30% of Lunar (GE Lunar, GE Madison, WI) subjects diagnosed with "osteoporosis" by T-score were reclassified as either "normal" or "osteopenia" when their Z-score was used. Substitution of DXA Z-scores for T-scores results in significant diagnostic disagreement and significantly fewer persons being diagnosed with low bone mineral density.

  10. Prognostic Value of Gai′s Plaque Score and Agatston Coronary Artery Calcium Score for Functionally Significant Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Both CACS in a single artery and Gai's plaque score demonstrated a good capacity to assess functionally significant coronary artery stenosis when compared to the gold standard FFR. However, Gai's plaque score was more predictive of FFR <0.80. Gai's score can be easily calculated in daily clinical practice and could be used when considering revascularization.

  11. Score based procedures for the calculation of forensic likelihood ratios - Scores should take account of both similarity and typicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart; Enzinger, Ewald

    2018-01-01

    Score based procedures for the calculation of forensic likelihood ratios are popular across different branches of forensic science. They have two stages, first a function or model which takes measured features from known-source and questioned-source pairs as input and calculates scores as output, then a subsequent model which converts scores to likelihood ratios. We demonstrate that scores which are purely measures of similarity are not appropriate for calculating forensically interpretable likelihood ratios. In addition to taking account of similarity between the questioned-origin specimen and the known-origin sample, scores must also take account of the typicality of the questioned-origin specimen with respect to a sample of the relevant population specified by the defence hypothesis. We use Monte Carlo simulations to compare the output of three score based procedures with reference likelihood ratio values calculated directly from the fully specified Monte Carlo distributions. The three types of scores compared are: 1. non-anchored similarity-only scores; 2. non-anchored similarity and typicality scores; and 3. known-source anchored same-origin scores and questioned-source anchored different-origin scores. We also make a comparison with the performance of a procedure using a dichotomous "match"/"non-match" similarity score, and compare the performance of 1 and 2 on real data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Phoneme and Word Scoring in Speech-in-Noise Audiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Curtis J; Penman, Tina M; Ellis, Emily M; Baltzell, Lucas S; McMillan, Garnett P

    2016-03-01

    Understanding speech in background noise is difficult for many individuals; however, time constraints have limited its inclusion in the clinical audiology assessment battery. Phoneme scoring of words has been suggested as a method of reducing test time and variability. The purposes of this study were to establish a phoneme scoring rubric and use it in testing phoneme and word perception in noise in older individuals and individuals with hearing impairment. Words were presented to 3 participant groups at 80 dB in speech-shaped noise at 7 signal-to-noise ratios (-10 to 35 dB). Responses were scored for words and phonemes correct. It was not surprising to find that phoneme scores were up to about 30% better than word scores. Word scoring resulted in larger hearing loss effect sizes than phoneme scoring, whereas scoring method did not significantly modify age effect sizes. There were significant effects of hearing loss and some limited effects of age; age effect sizes of about 3 dB and hearing loss effect sizes of more than 10 dB were found. Hearing loss is the major factor affecting word and phoneme recognition with a subtle contribution of age. Phoneme scoring may provide several advantages over word scoring. A set of recommended phoneme scoring guidelines is provided.

  13. The correlation of specific orthopaedic features of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with functional outcome scores in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leet, Arabella I; Wientroub, Shlomo; Kushner, Harvey; Brillante, Beth; Kelly, Marilyn H; Robey, Pamela Gehron; Collins, Michael T

    2006-04-01

    Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia has a wide clinical spectrum, with substantial variation between patients in terms of orthopaedic manifestations, including the number of fractures, the degree of deformity of the limbs, and the presence of scoliosis. Data from bone scans, skeletal surveys, and records were correlated with the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument scales to examine whether any specific facet of orthopaedic involvement could be related to functional abilities. All patients who were sixteen years of age or younger and who were part of an ongoing natural history study of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (including McCune-Albright syndrome) were sent an age-appropriate Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument outcomes tool. The medical records and radiographs of the patients who returned forms were reviewed. Radiographic measurements of scoliosis, the femoral neck-shaft angle, and limb deformities were then performed. The extent of skeletal involvement with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (disease burden) was assessed on bone scans with use of a validated tool. A chart review was performed to determine the fracture rate, the use of bisphosphonates, and the endocrine status. These measurements were correlated with the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument scores. The outcomes tool was sent to twenty-seven patients and the completed instrument was returned by twenty patients, for a response rate of 74%. The parent-child form was filled out for twelve patients and the parent-adolescent form was filled out for eight patients. The mean standardized Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument scores for all twenty patients were lowest for sports (62; range, 14 to 100) and happiness (72; range, 25 to 100). Adolescents and parents disagreed with regard to sports (with adolescent scores being higher than parental scores) and pain (with parental scores being higher than adolescent scores). However, the overall global scores correlated well between

  14. The effect of MPOWER scores on cigarette smoking prevalence and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Anh; Cheng, Kai-Wen; Chaloupka, Frank J; Shang, Ce

    2017-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the MPOWER package to support policy implementation under the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). This study examined the effect of MPOWER policies on smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption in a global context. The MPOWER composite score was constructed by adding up the six MPOWER scores for each country and survey year 2007-2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014, with a possible range between 6 (1 in each of the six score) and 29 (4 in M score and 5 in POWER scores). MPOWER composite scores that measured policy implementation were then linked to cigarette smoking prevalence and consumption data from Euromonitor International. Fractional logit and OLS regressions were employed to examine the effect of the composite MPOWER score on adult smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption, respectively. Results indicate that a 1-unit increase in the composite score reduces smoking prevalence by 0.2 percentage points (p<0.05) among adults and 0.3 percentage points (p<0.01) among adult males; and a reduction of 23 sticks of cigarette (1 pack of cigarettes) in cigarette consumption per capita per year. At this rate, if countries had implemented the MPOWER package to the highest levels during 2007-2014, they would have experienced a reduction in smoking prevalence of 7.26% among adults and 7.87% among adult males and a reduction of 13.80% in cigarette consumption. MPOWER policies were effective in reducing cigarette smoking among adults. Parties should continue to implement MPOWER policies that have been recommended by the WHO FCTC to curb tobacco epidemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Revisiting the utility of technical performance scores following tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodin, Daud; Mavrothalassitis, Orestes; Haberer, Kim; Sunderji, Sherzana; Quek, Ruben G W; Peyvandi, Shabnam; Moon-Grady, Anita; Karamlou, Tara

    2017-08-01

    Although an important quality metric, current technical performance scores may not be generalizable and may omit operative factors that influence outcomes. We examined factors not included in current technical performance scores that may contribute to increased postoperative length of stay, major complications, and cost after primary repair of tetralogy of Fallot. This is a retrospective single site study of patients younger than age 2 years with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing complete repair between 2007 and 2015. Medical record data and discharge echocardiograms were reviewed to ascertain component and composite technical performance scores. Primary outcomes included postoperative length of stay, major complications, and total hospital costs. Multivariable logistic and linear regression identified determinants of each outcome. Patient population (n = 115) had a median postoperative length of stay of 8 days (interquartile range, 6-10 days), and a median total cost of $71,147. Major complications occurred in 33 patients (29%) with 1 death. Technical performance scores assigned were optimum in 28 patients (25%), adequate in 59 patients (52%), and inadequate in 26 patients (23%). Neither technical performance score components nor composite scores were associated with increased postoperative length of stay. Optimum or adequate repairs versus inadequate had equal risk of a complication (P = .79), and equivalent mean total cost ($100,000 vs $187,000; P = .25). Longer cardiopulmonary bypass time per 1-minute increase (P technical performance scores were not associated with selected outcomes in our postoperative population. Although returning to bypass and bypass length are not included as components in the current score, these are important factors influencing complications and resource use in our population. Revisions anticipated from a prospective trial should consider including these variables. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery

  16. Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2009-01-01

    error present when the Oswestry was scored in the same way. Methods ·         For each of 311 fully completed RMDQ23 questionnaires from people seeking primary or secondary care, a sum score was calculated and standardized to a 100-point scale. ·         Using random number generation, questions were...... Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) sum scores when one or more questions have not been answered. However, missing data are common on the RMDQ and the current options are: calculate a sum score regardless of unanswered questions, reject all data containing unanswered questions, or to impute scores. Other...... questionnaires, such as the Oswestry Disability Index (Oswestry) convert their raw score into a standardized score out of 100. An advantage of this method is that it allows missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. For example, if 17 questions had been answered ’yes’ on a RMDQ questionnaire...

  17. Scoring dynamics across professional team sports: tempo, balance and predictability

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Sears

    2013-01-01

    Despite growing interest in quantifying and modeling the scoring dynamics within professional sports games, relative little is known about what patterns or principles, if any, cut across different sports. Using a comprehensive data set of scoring events in nearly a dozen consecutive seasons of college and professional (American) football, professional hockey, and professional basketball, we identify several common patterns in scoring dynamics. Across these sports, scoring tempo---when scoring events occur---closely follows a common Poisson process, with a sport-specific rate. Similarly, scoring balance---how often a team wins an event---follows a common Bernoulli process, with a parameter that effectively varies with the size of the lead. Combining these processes within a generative model of gameplay, we find they both reproduce the observed dynamics in all four sports and accurately predict game outcomes. These results demonstrate common dynamical patterns underlying within-game scoring dynamics across prof...

  18. Scoring systems for the Clock Drawing Test: A historical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Spenciere

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Clock Drawing Test (CDT is a simple neuropsychological screening instrument that is well accepted by patients and has solid psychometric properties. Several different CDT scoring methods have been developed, but no consensus has been reached regarding which scoring method is the most accurate. This article reviews the literature on these scoring systems and the changes they have undergone over the years. Historically, different types of scoring systems emerged. Initially, the focus was on screening for dementia, and the methods were both quantitative and semi-quantitative. Later, the need for an early diagnosis called for a scoring system that can detect subtle errors, especially those related to executive function. Therefore, qualitative analyses began to be used for both differential and early diagnoses of dementia. A widely used qualitative method was proposed by Rouleau et al. (1992. Tracing the historical path of these scoring methods is important for developing additional scoring systems and furthering dementia prevention research.

  19. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: a EULAR-OMERACT ultrasound taskforce-Part 1: definition and development of a standardised, consensus-based scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe; Backhaus, Marina; Balint, Peter; Bruyn, George A; Filippucci, Emilio; Grassi, Walter; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Kane, David; Naredo, Esperanza; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Conaghan, Philip G; Wakefield, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice of different sonographers, using both grey-scale (GS) (synovial hypertrophy (SH) and effusion) and power Doppler (PD), by reading static images and scanning patients with RA and (2) evaluate the influence of both the definition and acquisition technique on reliability followed by a Delphi exercise to obtain consensus definitions for synovitis, elementary components and scoring system. Baseline reliability was highly variable but better for static than dynamic images that were directly acquired and immediately scored. Using static images, intrareader and inter-reader reliability for scoring PD were excellent for both binary and semiquantitative (SQ) grading but GS showed greater variability for both scoring systems (κ ranges: -0.05 to 1 and 0.59 to 0.92, respectively). In patient-based exercise, both intraobserver and interobserver reliability were variable and the mean κ coefficients did not reach 0.50 for any of the components. The second step resulted in refinement of the preliminary Outcome Measures in Rheumatology synovitis definition by including the presence of both hypoechoic SH and PD signal and the development of a SQ severity score, depending on both the amount of PD and the volume and appearance of SH. A multistep consensus-based process has produced a standardised US definition and quantification system for RA synovitis including combined and individual SH and PD components. Further evaluation is required to understand its performance before application in clinical trials.

  20. Association between value-based purchasing score and hospital characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borah Bijan J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicare hospital Value-based purchasing (VBP program that links Medicare payments to quality of care will become effective from 2013. It is unclear whether specific hospital characteristics are associated with a hospital’s VBP score, and consequently incentive payments. The objective of the study was to assess the association of hospital characteristics with (i the mean VBP score, and (ii specific percentiles of the VBP score distribution. The secondary objective was to quantify the associations of hospital characteristics with the VBP score components: clinical process of care (CPC score and patient satisfaction score. Methods Observational analysis that used data from three sources: Medicare Hospital Compare Database, American Hospital Association 2010 Annual Survey and Medicare Impact File. The final study sample included 2,491 U.S. acute care hospitals eligible for the VBP program. The association of hospital characteristics with the mean VBP score and specific VBP score percentiles were assessed by ordinary least square (OLS regression and quantile regression (QR, respectively. Results VBP score had substantial variations, with mean score of 30 and 60 in the first and fourth quartiles of the VBP score distribution. For-profit status (vs. non-profit, smaller bed size (vs. 100–199 beds, East South Central region (vs. New England region and the report of specific CPC measures (discharge instructions, timely provision of antibiotics and beta blockers, and serum glucose controls in cardiac surgery patients were positively associated with mean VBP scores (p Conclusions Although hospitals serving the poor and the elderly are more likely to score lower under the VBP program, the correlation appears small. Profit status, geographic regions, number and type of CPC measures reported explain the most variation among scores.

  1. My max score AP statistics maximize your score in less time

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Phd, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The only study guide to offer expert, customized study plans for every student's needs You've had a year to study...but also a year to forget. As the AP test approaches, other guides reexamine the entire year of material. But only one guide identifies your strengths and weaknesses, then points you directly to the review you need most My Max Score, a new concept developed by AP teachers and exam graders, offers separate review materials for long-term prep and last-minute cram sessions-no matter when you start studying, This is just what you need-plus str

  2. SCORING THE DEFAULT RISK OF LOCAL AUTHORITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORI Elena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Nineties, almost all public administrations were affected by a change that made municipalities more responsible in using public resources. More recently, the global crisis and the gradual cuts in funding from the State led to significant repercussions on the budgets of local authorities with an increasing number of defaults. The Italian government introduced the procedure of “financial default” to rescue local authorities in financial difficulties from 1989. However, to date, a methodology to constantly monitor the local authorities’ "health" and to prevent financial defaults has not yet been formalized. As previous studies highlighted a close link between financial condition and service delivered to citizens, the study aims to construct a set of specific indicators to judge the default risk of Italian LAs in order to prevent defaults. In this research we use a deductive method. The research was carried out in eight different steps according to a logical process of identifying the risk indicators and the consequent risk ranges. The results are significant as they clarify the situation leading potentially to default and they propose a set of specific risk indicators to evaluate and to prevent the risk of default. This logical process could easily be adopted at an international level, with the necessary modifications for specific accounting regimes.

  3. Greenness and Birth Outcomes in a Range of Pennsylvania Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan A. Casey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Living in communities with more vegetation during pregnancy has been associated with higher birth weights, but fewer studies have evaluated other birth outcomes, and only one has been conducted in the Eastern United States, in regions with a broad range, including high levels, of greenness. We evaluated associations between prenatal residential greenness and birth outcomes (term birth weight, small for gestational age, preterm birth, and low 5 min Apgar score across a range of community types using electronic health record data from 2006–2013 from the Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania. We assigned greenness based on mother’s geocoded address using the normalized difference vegetation index from satellite imagery. We used propensity scores to restrict the study population to comparable groups among those living in green vs. less-green areas. Analyses were adjusted for demographic, clinical, and environmental covariates, and stratified by community type (city, borough, and township. In cities, higher greenness (tertiles 2–3 vs. 1 was protective for both preterm (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99 and small for gestational age birth (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.58–0.97, but not birth weight or Apgar score. We did not observe associations between greenness and birth outcomes in adjusted models in boroughs or townships. These results add to the evidence that greener cities might be healthier cities.

  4. New reliable scoring system, Toyama mouse score, to evaluate locomotor function following spinal cord injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigyo, Michiko; Tanabe, Norio; Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Choi, Song-Hyen; Tohda, Chihiro

    2014-06-03

    Among the variety of methods used to evaluate locomotor function following a spinal cord injury (SCI), the Basso Mouse Scale score (BMS) has been widely used for mice. However, the BMS mainly focuses on hindlimb movement rather than on graded changes in body support ability. In addition, some of the scoring methods include double or triple criteria within a single score, which likely leads to an increase in the deviation within the data. Therefore we aimed to establish a new scoring method reliable and easy to perform in mice with SCI. Our Toyama Mouse Score (TMS) was established by rearranging and simplifying the BMS score and combining it with the Body Support Scale score (BSS). The TMS reflects changes in both body support ability and hindlimb movement. The definition of single score is made by combing multiple criteria in the BMS. The ambiguity was improved in the TMS. Using contusive SCI mice, hindlimb function was measured using the TMS, BMS and BSS systems. The TMS could distinguish changes in hindlimb movements that were evaluated as the same score by the BMS. An analysis of the coefficient of variation (CV) of score points recorded for 11 days revealed that the CV for the TMS was significantly lower than the CV obtained using the BMS. A variation in intra evaluators was lower in the TMS than in the BMS. These results suggest that the TMS may be useful as a new reliable method for scoring locomotor function for SCI models.

  5. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-02

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions.

  6. Computer scoring of the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchard, Kimberly A; Bajgar, Jane; Leaf, Duncan Ermini; Lane, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    The Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS; Lane, Quinlan, Schwartz, Walker, & Zeitlan, 1990) is the most commonly used measure of differentiation and complexity in the use of emotion words and is associated with important clinical outcomes. Hand scoring the LEAS is time consuming. Existing programs for scoring open-ended responses cannot mimic LEAS hand scoring. Therefore, Leaf and Barchard (2006) developed the Program for Open-Ended Scoring (POES) to score the LEAS. In this article, we report a study in which the reliability and validity of POES scoring were examined. In the study, we used three participant types (adult community members, university students, children), three LEAS versions (paper based, computer based, and the LEAS for children), and a diverse set of criterion variables. Across this variety of conditions, the four POES scoring methods had internal consistencies and validities that were comparable to hand scoring, indicating that POES scoring can be used in clinical practice and other applied settings in which hand scoring is impractical.

  7. Can total cardiac calcium predict the coronary calcium score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Gregg S; Crudu, Vitalie; Parameswaran-Chandrika, Anoop; Romero-Corral, Abel; Purushottam, Bhaskar; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2011-01-21

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) shares the same risk factors as atherosclerosis and is associated with coronary artery disease as well as cardiovascular events. However, sensitivity and positive predictive value are low. We hypothesized that a global echocardiographic calcium score would better predict coronary atherosclerotic burden, as assessed by coronary artery calcium score (CAC), than MAC alone. An echocardiographic score was devised to measure global cardiac calcification in a semi-quantitative manner; this included calcification in the aortic valve and root, the mitral valve and annulus, and the sub-mitral apparatus. This score, and a simplified version, were compared with a similar calcification score by CT scan, as well as the CAC. There was a good correlation between the two global calcification scores; the echocardiographic score also correlated with CAC. Using CAC >400 as a measure of severe coronary atherosclerosis, an echocardiographic score ≥5 had a positive predictive value of 60%. Importantly, the simplified score performed equally well (≥3 had a positive predictive value of 62%). Global cardiac calcification, assessed by CT scan or echocardiography, correlates with the extent of coronary calcium. A semi-quantitative calcium score can be easily applied during routine echocardiographic interpretation and can alert the reader to the possibility of severe coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of vacuum operator's experience on Apgar scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirapornsawan, Umawan; Suwanrath, Chitkasaem; Pinjaroen, Sutham

    2012-12-01

    To determine the effect of a vacuum operator's experience on Apgar scores. A historical cohort study was conducted. All women who delivered by vacuum extraction between January 2003 and December 2007 at Songklanagarind Hospital were recruited. Vacuum operators were divided into two groups: staff doctors and residents. Comparisons of Apgar scores and rates of low Apgar scores (≤7) between the two groups were studied. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to control confounding variables for low Apgar scores. The percentages for the procedure performed by the staff doctors and residents were 76.9 and 23.1%. At 1 min, the rates of low Apgar scores in the staff and resident groups were 6.7 and 24.1% (pApgar scores were 0.6 and 5.2% (pApgar scores. The residents had a 2.9-fold increased risk of low Apgar scores at 1 min compared with the staff doctors (adjusted odds ratio 2.9; 95% confidence interval 1.7-6.8). In the resident group, the third year residents had the lowest risk of low Apgar scores. The vacuum operator's experience was an independent risk factor for low Apgar scores. Improvement of the residency training program is mandatory.

  9. Relationship between framingham risk score and coronary artery calcium score in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Seong, Su Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We explored the association between Framingham risk score (FRS) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in asymptomatic Korean individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 2216 participants who underwent routine health screening and CACS using the 64-slice multidetector computed tomography between January 2010 and June 2014. Relationship between CACS and FRS, and factors associated with discrepancy between CACS and FRS were analyzed. CACS and FRS were positively correlated (p < 0.0001). However, in 3.7% of participants with low coronary event risk and high CACS, age, male gender, smoker, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI; ≥ 35) were associated with the discrepancy. In the diagnostic prediction model for discrepancy, the receiver operating characteristic curve including factors associated with FRS, diastolic blood pressure (≥ 75 mm Hg), diabetes mellitus, and BMI (≥ 35) showed that the area under the curve was 0.854 (95% confidence interval, 0.819–0.890), indicating good sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus or obesity (BMI ≥ 35) compensate for the weakness of FRS and may be potential indicators for application of CACS in asymptomatic Koreans with low coronary event risk.

  10. Evaluation of Voice Acoustics as Predictors of Clinical Depression Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Nik Wahidah; Wilkes, Mitch; Salomon, Ronald; Meggs, Jared; France, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if acoustic measures of voice, characterizing specific spectral and timing properties, predict clinical ratings of depression severity measured in a sample of patients using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). This is a prospective study. Voice samples and clinical depression scores were collected prospectively from consenting adult patients who were referred to psychiatry from the adult emergency department or primary care clinics. The patients were audio-recorded as they read a standardized passage in a nearly closed-room environment. Mean Absolute Error (MAE) between actual and predicted depression scores was used as the primary outcome measure. The average MAE between predicted and actual HAMD scores was approximately two scores for both men and women, and the MAE for the BDI-II scores was approximately one score for men and eight scores for women. Timing features were predictive of HAMD scores in female patients while a combination of timing features and spectral features was predictive of scores in male patients. Timing features were predictive of BDI-II scores in male patients. Voice acoustic features extracted from read speech demonstrated variable effectiveness in predicting clinical depression scores in men and women. Voice features were highly predictive of HAMD scores in men and women, and BDI-II scores in men, respectively. The methodology is feasible for diagnostic applications in diverse clinical settings as it can be implemented during a standard clinical interview in a normal closed room and without strict control on the recording environment. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome prediction in gastroschisis - The gastroschisis prognostic score (GPS) revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligandla, Pramod S; Baird, Robert; Skarsgard, Eric D; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2017-05-01

    The GPS enables risk stratification for gastroschisis and helps discriminate low from high morbidity groups. The purpose of this study was to revalidate GPS's characterization of a high morbidity group and to quantify relationships between the GPS and outcomes. With REB approval, complete survivor data from a national gastroschisis registry was collected. GPS bowel injury scoring was revalidated excluding the initial inception/validation cohorts (>2011). Length of stay (LOS), 1st enteral feed days (dFPO), TPN days (dTPN), and aggregate complications (COMP) were compared between low and high morbidity risk groups. Mathematical relationships between outcomes and integer increases in GPS were explored using the entire cohort (2005-present). Median (range) LOS, dPO, and dTPN for the entire cohort (n=849) was 36 (26,62), 13 (9,18), and 27 (20,46) days, respectively. High-risk patients (GPS≥2; n=80) experienced significantly worse outcomes than low risk patients (n=263). Each integer increase in GPS was associated with increases in LOS and dTPN by 16.9 and 12.7days, respectively (pGPS effectively discriminates low from high morbidity risk groups. Within the high risk group, integer increases in GPS produce quantitatively differentiated outcomes which may guide initial counseling and resource allocation. IIb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI: A Hazard-Based Scoring and Ranking Tool for Chemicals and Products Used in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Verslycke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A large portfolio of chemicals and products is needed to meet the wide range of performance requirements of the oil and gas industry. The oil and gas industry is under increased scrutiny from regulators, environmental groups, the public, and other stakeholders for use of their chemicals. In response, industry is increasingly incorporating “greener” products and practices but is struggling to define and quantify what exactly constitutes “green” in the absence of a universally accepted definition. We recently developed the Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI which is ultimately intended to be a globally implementable tool that comprehensively scores and ranks hazards to human health, safety, and the environment for products used in oil and gas operations. CSI scores are assigned to products designed for the same use (e.g., surfactants, catalysts on the basis of product composition as well as intrinsic hazard properties and data availability for each product component. As such, products with a lower CSI score within a product use group are considered to have a lower intrinsic hazard compared to other products within the same use group. The CSI provides a powerful tool to evaluate relative product hazards; to review and assess product portfolios; and to aid in the formulation of products.

  13. [The diagnostic values of Wells score and modified Geneva score for pretesting acute pulmonary embolism: a prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan-ping; Li, Yan-yan; Chen, Jin; Zheng, Guang; Ma, Xin; Peng, Xiao-xia; Yang, Yuan-hua

    2012-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic predictive value of Wells score and modified Geneva score for acute pulmonary embolism by prospective case series and to explore a more suitable scoring system for Chinese population. All the patients suspected of pulmonary embolism (PE) and received CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) were enrolled consecutively in Fuxing Hospital, Capital Medical University, China, from June 2009 to August 2011. Before CTPA test or on condition that test results were unknown, clinical scoring was assessed prospectively by the Wells score and the modified Geneva score. The probability of PE in each patient was assessed and the patients were divided into low, moderate and high probability groups according to the clinical scores. The result of CTPA was used as the diagnostic gold standard for PE. Diagnostic accuracy in each group was analyzed. The predictive accuracy of both scores was compared by AUC(ROC) curve. A total of 139 patients met our enrollment criteria and 117 eligible patients entered our study at last. PE was diagnosed in 47 patients by CTPA with an overall prevalence of 40.2%.Prevalence of PE in the low, moderate and high pretest probability groups assessed by the Wells score and by the simplified modified Geneva score were 7.1% (3/42), 42.9% (21/49), 88.5% (23/26) and 10.0% (3/30), 48.1% (37/77), 7/10, respectively. AUC(ROC) curves for the Wells score and the simplified modified Geneva score were 0.872 (95%CI 0.810 - 0.933) and 0.734 (95%CI 0.643 - 0.825) respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.005). The Wells score is more accurate for clinical predicting acute PE than the modified Geneva score.

  14. Development and external validation of a clinical prognostic score for death in visceral leishmaniasis patients in a high HIV co-infection burden area in Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Abongomera

    Full Text Available In Ethiopia, case fatality rates among subgroups of visceral leishmaniasis (VL patients are high. A clinical prognostic score for death in VL patients could contribute to optimal management and reduction of these case fatality rates. We aimed to identify predictors of death from VL, and to develop and externally validate a clinical prognostic score for death in VL patients, in a high HIV co-infection burden area in Ethiopia.We conducted a retrospective cohort study in north west Ethiopia. Predictors with an adjusted likelihood ratio ≥1.5 or ≤0.67 were retained to calculate the predictor score. The derivation cohort consisted of 1686 VL patients treated at an upgraded health center and the external validation cohort consisted of 404 VL patients treated in hospital. There were 99 deaths in the derivation cohort and 53 deaths in the external validation cohort. The predictors of death were: age >40 years (score +1; HIV seropositive (score +1; HIV seronegative (score -1; hemoglobin ≤6.5 g/dl (score +1; bleeding (score +1; jaundice (score +1; edema (score +1; ascites (score +2 and tuberculosis (score +1. The total predictor score per patient ranged from -1 to +5. A score of -1, indicated a low risk of death (1.0%, a score of 0 an intermediate risk of death (3.8% and a score of +1 to +5, a high risk of death (10.4-85.7%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.79-0.87 in derivation, and 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.72-0.83 in external validation.The overall performance of the score was good. The score can enable the early detection of VL cases at high risk of death, which can inform operational, clinical management guidelines, and VL program management. Implementation of focused strategies could contribute to optimal management and reduction of the case fatality rates.

  15. Estimation of Body Weight from Body Size Measurements and Body Condition Scores in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Kristensen, T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hip height and width, body condition score, and relevant demographic information to predict body weight (BW) of dairy cows. Seven regression models were developed from data from 972 observations of 554 cows. Parity, hip height, hip width......, and body condition score were consistently associated with BW. The coefficients of multiple determination varied from 80 to 89%. The number of significant terms and the parameter estimates of the models differed markedly among groups of cows. Apparently, these differences were due to breed and feeding...... regimen. Results from this study indicate that a reliable model for estimating BW of very different dairy cows maintained in a wide range of environments can be developed using body condition score, demographic information, and measurements of hip height and hip width. However, for management purposes...

  16. Linking physical function outcomes in rheumatology: performance of a crosswalk for converting Health Assessment Questionnaire scores to Short Form 36 physical functioning scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Ten Klooster, Peter M; Taal, Erik; Wolfe, Frederick; Vonkeman, Harald; Glas, Cees A W; Van De Laar, Mart A F J

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the reliability of a crosswalk, developed in The Netherlands, between the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) disability index (DI) and the Short Form 36 physical functioning scale (PF-10) in a sample of patients with various rheumatic diseases in the US. Baseline data from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 29,020), fibromyalgia (FM; n = 3,776), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 1,609) participating in the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases were analyzed. Reliability of the crosswalk was evaluated by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and agreement between observed and predicted scores was evaluated using the Bland-Altman approach. RESULTS. The crosswalk produced reliable conversions for both the HAQ DI (ICC range 0.70-0.77) and PF-10 (ICC range 0.73-0.78) in all 3 disease groups. The mean difference between observed and expected scores was close to zero in US patients with RA. For all 3 disease groups, the limits of agreement were fairly wide and conversion at the level of individual patients is not recommended. The crosswalk produced reliable conversions at the group level in a crosscultural setting and can be used to convert HAQ DI to PF-10 scores and vice versa in US patients with RA, FM, or SLE.

  17. Calculation of cut-off values based on the Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS) and Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI) pemphigus scoring systems for defining moderate, significant and extensive types of pemphigus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, C; Duvert Lehembre, S; Picard-Dahan, C; Kern, J S; Zambruno, G; Feliciani, C; Marinovic, B; Vabres, P; Borradori, L; Prost-Squarcioni, C; Labeille, B; Richard, M A; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Houivet, E; Werth, V P; Murrell, D F; Hertl, M; Benichou, J; Joly, P

    2016-07-01

    Two pemphigus severity scores, Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS) and Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI), have been proposed to provide an objective measure of disease activity. However, the use of these scores in clinical practice is limited by the absence of cut-off values that allow differentiation between moderate, significant and extensive types of pemphigus. To calculate cut-off values defining moderate, significant and extensive pemphigus based on the ABSIS and PDAI scores. In 31 dermatology departments in six countries, consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pemphigus were assessed for pemphigus severity, using ABSIS, PDAI, Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores. Cut-off values defining moderate, significant and extensive subgroups were calculated based on the 25th and 75th percentiles of the ABSIS and PDAI scores. The median ABSIS, PDAI, PGA and DLQI scores of the three severity subgroups were compared in order to validate these subgroups. Ninety-six patients with pemphigus vulgaris (n = 77) or pemphigus foliaceus (n = 19) were included. The median PDAI activity and ABSIS total scores were 27·5 (range 3-84) and 34·8 points (range 0·5-90·5), respectively. The respective cut-off values corresponding to the first and third quartiles of the scores were 15 and 45 for the PDAI, and 17 and 53 for ABSIS. The moderate, significant and extensive subgroups were thus defined, and had distinguishing median ABSIS (P < 0·001), PDAI (P < 0·001), PGA (P < 0·001) and DLQI (P = 0·03) scores. This study suggests cut-off values of 15 and 45 for PDAI and 17 and 53 for ABSIS, to distinguish moderate, significant and extensive pemphigus forms. Identifying these pemphigus activity subgroups should help physicians to classify and manage patients with pemphigus. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Scoring the SF-36 in Orthopaedics: A Brief Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laucis, Nicholas C; Hays, Ron D; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2015-10-07

    The Short Form-36 (SF-36) is the most widely used health-related quality-of-life measure in research to date. There are currently two sources for the SF-36 and scoring instructions: licensing them from Optum, Inc., or obtaining them from publicly available documentation from the RAND Corporation. The SF-36 yields eight scale scores and two summary scores. The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores were derived using an orthogonal-factor analytic model that forced the PCS and MCS to be uncorrelated, and it has been shown to contribute to an inflation of the MCS in patients with substantial physical disability. Oblique scoring can reduce this inflation of the MCS in orthopaedic studies. Spreadsheets to score the SF-36, along with a copy of the questionnaire, are provided. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  19. Optical Music Recognition for Scores Written in White Mensural Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An Optical Music Recognition (OMR system especially adapted for handwritten musical scores of the XVII-th and the early XVIII-th centuries written in white mensural notation is presented. The system performs a complete sequence of analysis stages: the input is the RGB image of the score to be analyzed and, after a preprocessing that returns a black and white image with corrected rotation, the staves are processed to return a score without staff lines; then, a music symbol processing stage isolates the music symbols contained in the score and, finally, the classification process starts to obtain the transcription in a suitable electronic format so that it can be stored or played. This work will help to preserve our cultural heritage keeping the musical information of the scores in a digital format that also gives the possibility to perform and distribute the original music contained in those scores.

  20. A study on text-score disagreement in online reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Fazzolari, Michela; Cozza, Vittoria; Petrocchi, Marinella; Spognardi, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on online reviews and employ artificial intelligence tools, taken from the cognitive computing field, to help understanding the relationships between the textual part of the review and the assigned numerical score. We move from the intuitions that 1) a set of textual reviews expressing different sentiments may feature the same score (and vice-versa); and 2) detecting and analyzing the mismatches between the review content and the actual score may benefit both service p...

  1. Musiplectics: Computational Assessment of the Complexity of Music Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Holder, Ethan Graham

    2015-01-01

    In the Western classical tradition, musicians play music from notated sheet music, called a score. When playing music from a score, a musician translates its visual symbols into sequences of instrument-specific physical motions. Hence, a music score's overall complexity represents a sum of the cognitive and mechanical acuity required for its performance. For a given instrument, different notes, intervals, articulations, dynamics, key signatures, and tempo represent dissimilar levels of diffic...

  2. The Alvarado score for predicting acute appendicitis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Alvarado score can be used to stratify patients with symptoms of suspected appendicitis; the validity of the score in certain patient groups and at different cut points is still unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the discrimination (diagnostic accuracy) and calibration performance of the Alvarado score. Methods A systematic search of validation studies in Medline, Embase, DARE and The Cochrane library was performed up to April 2011. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the score at the two cut-off points: score of 5 (1 to 4 vs. 5 to 10) and score of 7 (1 to 6 vs. 7 to 10). Calibration was analysed across low (1 to 4), intermediate (5 to 6) and high (7 to 10) risk strata. The analysis focused on three sub-groups: men, women and children. Results Forty-two studies were included in the review. In terms of diagnostic accuracy, the cut-point of 5 was good at 'ruling out' admission for appendicitis (sensitivity 99% overall, 96% men, 99% woman, 99% children). At the cut-point of 7, recommended for 'ruling in' appendicitis and progression to surgery, the score performed poorly in each subgroup (specificity overall 81%, men 57%, woman 73%, children 76%). The Alvarado score is well calibrated in men across all risk strata (low RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.28; intermediate 1.09, 0.86 to 1.37 and high 1.02, 0.97 to 1.08). The score over-predicts the probability of appendicitis in children in the intermediate and high risk groups and in women across all risk strata. Conclusions The Alvarado score is a useful diagnostic 'rule out' score at a cut point of 5 for all patient groups. The score is well calibrated in men, inconsistent in children and over-predicts the probability of appendicitis in women across all strata of risk. PMID:22204638

  3. Score-informed transcription for automatic piano tutoring

    OpenAIRE

    Benetos, E; Klapuri, A; Dixon, S

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a score-informed transcription method for automatic piano tutoring is proposed. The method takes as input a recording made by a student which may contain mistakes, along with a reference score. The recording and the aligned synthesized score are automatically transcribed using the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm for multi-pitch estimation and hidden Markov models for note tracking. By comparing the two transcribed recordings, common errors occurring in transcription...

  4. The Utility of Scoring Systems in Predicting Early and Late Mortality in Alcoholic Hepatitis: Whose Score Is It Anyway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naaventhan Palaniyappan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH is a distinct clinical entity in the spectrum of alcoholic liver disease with a high short-term mortality. Several scoring systems are being used to assess the severity of AH but the ability of these scores to predict long-term survival in these patients is largely unknown. Aims. We aim to assess the utility of five different scoring systems Child Pugh (CP, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD, Maddrey’s discriminant function (mDF, Glasgow AH score (GAHS, and age-bilirubin-INR-creatinine (ABIC score in predicting shot-term and long-term survival in patients with AH. Methods. Patients with histological evidence of AH were identified from our database. The clinical and biochemical parameters were used to calculate the 5 different scores. The prognostic utility of these scores was determined by generating an ROC curve for survival at 30 days, 90 days, 6 months, and 1 year. Results and Conclusions. All 5 scores with the exception of CP score have a similar accuracy in predicting the short-term prognosis. However, they are uniformly poor in predicting longer-term survival with AUROC not exceeding 0.74. CP score is a very poor predictor of survival in both short and long term. Abstinence from alcohol was significantly (<0.05 associated with survival at 1 year.

  5. Prognostic Value of Gai's Plaque Score and Agatston Coronary Artery Calcium Score for Functionally Significant Coronary Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yang, Shuang; Gai, Lu-Yue; Han, Zhi-Qi; Xin, Qian; Yang, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Jun-Jie; Jin, Qin-Hua

    2016-12-05

    The prognostic values of the coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) score for predicting future cardiovascular events have been previously demonstrated in numerous studies. However, few studies have used the rich information available from CCTA to detect functionally significant coronary lesions. We sought to compare the prognostic values of Gai's plaque score and the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) of CCTA for predicting functionally significant coronary lesions, using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the gold standard. We retrospectively analyzed 107 visually assessed significant coronary lesions in 88 patients (mean age, 59.6 ± 10.2 years; 76.14% of males) who underwent CCTA, invasive coronary angiography, and invasive FFR measurement. An FFR significant coronary stenosis. Lesions were divided into two groups using an FFR cutoff value of 0.80. We compared Gai's plaque scores and CACS between the two groups and evaluated the correlations of these scores with FFR. The statistical methods included unpaired t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Spearman's correlation coefficients. Coronary lesions with FFR Gai's scores than those with FFR ≥0.80. Gai's score had the strongest correlation with FFR (r = -0.48, P arteries and a single artery. Both CACS in a single artery and Gai's plaque score demonstrated a good capacity to assess functionally significant coronary artery stenosis when compared to the gold standard FFR. However, Gai's plaque score was more predictive of FFR Gai's score can be easily calculated in daily clinical practice and could be used when considering revascularization.

  6. Less is more: the design of early-warning scoring systems affects the speed and accuracy of scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofidis, Melany J; Hill, Andrew; Horswill, Mark S; Watson, Marcus O

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of early-warning scoring system design on the speed and accuracy of scoring. Despite the widespread implementation of early-warning scoring systems in hospitals, the speed and accuracy with which chart-users determine patients' early-warning scores has received minimal research attention. Within-subjects, with scoring-system design as the independent variable. Forty-seven novice chart-users were presented with realistic vital sign observations recorded on charts with three different scoring-system designs. The rows for recording individual vital sign scores were either: (1) grouped together beneath all of the vital sign rows; (2) separated, with each row presented immediately below the corresponding vital sign row; or (3) excluded altogether. Participants' response times and error rates for determining the overall scores were measured for 54 time-points per design. Data were collected in December 2012-January 2013. Contrary to predictions, participants responded fastest and made the fewest errors when using the chart design without individual vital sign scoring-rows. For the other two designs, participants were faster when the rows for scoring individual vital signs were separated (vs. grouped), but accuracy did not differ. For both of these designs, significantly more time-points were affected by scoring errors compared with adding errors. Finally, data for patients with more serious derangements yielded greater response times and error rates on all three charts. Early-warning scoring systems may be more effective without individual vital sign scoring-rows. Even when charts are designed by multi-disciplinary teams of human factors specialists and clinicians, empirical evaluations are essential. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparison of the Wells score with the simplified revised Geneva score for assessing pretest probability of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza, Andrea; Melot, Christian; Motte, Serge

    2011-02-01

    The Wells score is widely used in the assessment of pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE). The revised Geneva score is a fully standardized clinical decision rule that was recently validated and further simplified. We compared the predictive accuracy of these two scores. Data from 339 patients clinically suspected of PE from two prospective management studies were used and combined. Pretest probability of PE was assessed prospectively by the Wells score. The simplified revised (SR) Geneva score was calculated retrospectively. The predictive accuracy of both scores was compared by area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The overall prevalence of PE was 19%. Prevalence of PE in the low, moderate and high pretest probability groups assessed by the Wells score and by the simplified revised Geneva score was respectively 2%(95% CI (CI) 1-6) and 4% (CI 2-10), 28% (CI 22-35) and 25% (CI 20-32), 93% (CI 70-99) and 56% (CI 27-81). The Wells score performed better than the simplified revised Geneva score in patients with a high suspicion of PE (pGeneva score was 0.85 (CI: 0.81 to 0.89) and 0.76 (CI: 0.71 to 0.80) respectively. The difference between the AUCs was statistically significant (p=0.005). In our population the Wells score appeared to be more accurate than the simplified revised Geneva score. The impact of this finding in terms of patient outcomes should be investigated in a prospective study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Walk Score® and Transit Score® and walking in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jana A; Moore, Kari A; Evenson, Kelly R; Rodriguez, Daniel A; Diez Roux, Ana V

    2013-08-01

    Walk Score® and Transit Score® are open-source measures of the neighborhood built environment to support walking ("walkability") and access to transportation. To investigate associations of Street Smart Walk Score and Transit Score with self-reported transport and leisure walking using data from a large multicity and diverse population-based sample of adults. Data from a sample of 4552 residents of Baltimore MD, Chicago IL, Forsyth County NC, Los Angeles CA, New York NY, and St. Paul MN from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2010-2012) were linked to Walk Score and Transit Score (collected in 2012). Logistic and linear regression models estimated ORs of not walking and mean differences in minutes walked, respectively, associated with continuous and categoric Walk Score and Transit Score. All analyses were conducted in 2012. After adjustment for site, key sociodemographic, and health variables, a higher Walk Score was associated with lower odds of not walking for transport and more minutes/week of transport walking. Compared to those in a "walker's paradise," lower categories of Walk Score were associated with a linear increase in odds of not transport walking and a decline in minutes of leisure walking. An increase in Transit Score was associated with lower odds of not transport walking or leisure walking, and additional minutes/week of leisure walking. Walk Score and Transit Score appear to be useful as measures of walkability in analyses of neighborhood effects. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Addiction Severity Index (ASI) summary scores: comparison of the Recent Status Scores of the ASI-6 and the Composite Scores of the ASI-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Cécile M; Cacciola, John S; Alterman, Arthur I

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics and the validity of the Recent Status Scores (RSSs), the new summary scores generated by the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6), are compared to the fifth version of the ASI summary scores, the Composite Scores (CSs). A sample of 82 randomly selected patients from substance abuse treatment programs were interviewed with the ASI-6, the ASI-5 and were administered a validity battery of questionnaires that included measures corresponding to each of the ASI domains. Each ASI-6 RSS was significantly correlated with its corresponding ASI-5 CS. The intercorrelations among the RSSs are low and none of these correlations were statistically different from the intercorrelations among CSs. In five of the seven areas, the ASI-6 RSSs were more highly correlated to the corresponding validity measures than were the ASI-5 CSs. The ASI-6 offers more comprehensive content in its scales than do those derived with earlier ASIs. © 2013.

  10. Degree of Dependence and Independence of the (SubComponents of Fuzzy Set and Neutrosophic Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentin Smarandache

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have introduced for the first time the degree of dependence (and consequently the degree of independence between the components of the fuzzy set, and also between the components of the neutrosophic set in our 2006 book’s fifth edition. Now we extend it for the first time to the refined neutrosophic set considering the degree of dependence or independence of subcomponets.

  11. Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    Background and purpose: It is likely that the most common method for calculating a Roland Morris Disability Index (RMDQ) sum score is to simply ignore any unanswered questions. In contrast, the raw sum score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is converted to a 0-100 scale, with the advantage...... of allowing missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. The aim of this study was to quantify the calculation error in RMDQ scores when one or more questions were unanswered and compare this with the error present when the ODI was scored in the same way. Methods and results: The prevalence...

  12. Improving personality facet scores with multidimensional computer adaptive testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Glas, Cees A W

    2013-01-01

    personality tests contain many highly correlated facets. This article investigates the possibility of increasing the precision of the NEO PI-R facet scores by scoring items with multidimensional item response theory and by efficiently administering and scoring items with multidimensional computer adaptive...... testing (MCAT). The increase in the precision of personality facet scores is obtained from exploiting the correlations between the facets. Results indicate that the NEO PI-R could be substantially shorter without attenuating precision when the MCAT methodology is used. Furthermore, the study shows...

  13. Prognostic factors and scoring system for survival in colonic perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Shimomatsuya, Takumi; Nakajima, Masayuki; Amaya, Hirokazu; Kobuchi, Taketsune; Shiraishi, Susumu; Konishi, Sayuri; Ono, Susumu; Maruhashi, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    No ideal and generally accepted prognostic factors and scoring systems exist to determine the prognosis of peritonitis associated with colonic perforation. This study was designed to investigate prognostic factors and evaluate the various scoring systems to allow identification of high-risk patients. Between 1996 and 2003, excluding iatrogenic and trauma cases, 26 consecutive patients underwent emergency operations for colorectal perforation and were selected for this retrospective study. Several clinical factors were analyzed as possible predictive factors, and APACHE II, SOFA, MPI, and MOF scores were calculated. The overall mortality was 26.9%. Compared with the survivors, non-survivors were found more frequently in Hinchey's stage III-IV, a low preoperative marker of pH, base excess (BE), and a low postoperative marker of white blood cell count, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and renal output (24h). According to the logistic regression model, BE was a significant independent variable. Concerning the prognostic scoring systems, an APACHE II score of 19, a SOFA score of 8, an MPI score of 30, and an MOF score of 7 or more were significantly related to poor prognosis. Preoperative BE and postoperative white blood cell count were reliable prognostic factors and early classification using prognostic scoring systems at specific points in the disease process are useful to improve our understanding of the problems involved.

  14. Building a Scoring Model for Small and Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Constantin CARACOTA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to produce a scoring model for small and medium enterprises seeking financing through a bank loan. To analyze the loan application, scoring system developed for companies is as follows: scoring quantitative factors and scoring qualitative factors. We have estimated the probability of default using logistic regression. Regression coefficients determination was made with a solver in Excel using five ratios as input data. Analyses and simulations were conducted on a sample of 113 companies, all accepted for funding. Based on financial information obtained over two years, 2007 and 2008, we could establishe and appreciate the default value.

  15. Inpatient nursing care and early warning scores: a workflow mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne; Skipper, Chantel; Steury, Rachel; Walsh, Heather; Levin, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Early warning scores calculated by registered nurses (RNs) are used in hospitals to enhance the recognition of and communication about patient deterioration. This study evaluated workflow variables surrounding calculation and documentation of one pediatric hospital's use of an early warning score. Results indicated that there were significant delays in documentation of early warning scores by RNs and inconsistencies between the early warning scores and vital signs collected and documented by non-RN personnel. These findings reflected information obtained from the RNs about how they prioritize tasks and use work-arounds to specific systems issues regarding assessment and documentation in the electronic medical record.

  16. Risk scores-the modern Oracle of Delphi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Florian; Schwaiger, Johannes P

    2017-03-01

    Recently, 4 new risk scores for the prediction of mortality and cardiovascular events were especially tailored for hemodialysis patients; these scores performed much better than previous scores. Tripepi et al. found that these risk scores were even more predictive for all-cause and cardiovascular death than the measurement of the left ventricular mass index was. Nevertheless, the investigation of left ventricular mass and function has its own place for other reasons. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors predicting Gleason score 6 upgrading after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milonas, Daimantas; Grybas, Aivaras; Auskalnis, Stasys; Gudinaviciene, Inga; Baltrimavicius, Ruslanas; Kincius, Marius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer Gleason score 6 is the most common score detected on prostatic biopsy. We analyzed the clinical parameters that predict the likelihood of Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy. The study population consisted of 241 patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy between Feb 2002 and Dec 2007 for Gleason score 6 adenocarcinoma. The influence of preoperative parameters on the probability of a Gleason score upgrading after surgery was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression and ROC curves. Gleason score upgrade was found in 92 of 241 patients (38.2%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only percentage of cancer in dominant lobe and prostate weight were significant predictors for Gleason score upgrading (p = 0.043 and p = 0.006, respectively). ROC curves showed that prostate weight and PSA density were only two independent significant parameters for prediction of upgrade (AUC - 0.634, p Gleason score upgrading was observed to be accompanied by significantly higher rates of extra prostatic extension (p Gleason 6 at biopsy are Gleason 7 at surgery. Upgraded tumors significantly associated with adverse pathological features. The probability of Gleason score upgrade can be predicted using prostate weight and PSA density as independent parameters.

  18. River Discharge and Local Scale Habitat Influence LIFE Score Macroinvertebrate LIFE Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunbar, Michael J.; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Cadman, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Midlands of the U.K., we describe how local-scale habitat features (indexed through River Habitat Survey or Danish Habitat Quality Survey) and changing river flow (discharge) influence the response of a macroinvertebrate community index. The approach has broad applicability in developing regional flow......-ecological response models. 2. We analysed the data using multilevel linear regression, combining sample-level and site-level characteristics as predictors. We focused on the potential for common responses across sites; hence for each sample, the macroinvertebrate community was summarised into an index, Lotic...... Invertebrate index for Flow Evaluation (LIFE), an average of abundance-weighted flow groups which indicate the microhabitat preferences of each taxon for higher velocities and clean gravel/cobble substrata or slow/still velocities and finer substrata. 3. For the Danish fauna, the LIFE score responded to three...

  19. Which clinical scoring system should we use for the evaluation of chest pain in the Emergency Department? A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Parenti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many clinical prediction rules and scoring systems have been developed to predict Acute Coronary Syndrome in-patient with chest pain (CP in Emergency Department. In this review we check and compare the level of validity and reliability of the TIMI (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction; HEART (history, ECG, age, risk factors, troponin; GRACE (global registry of acute coronary events. We used as eligibility criteria: all studies, reviews and meta-analysis on validity and reliability of clinical score systems for CP conducted on all ages of patients in all languages. The selection of articles included in the review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. We collected one systematic review, one meta-analysis and eleven studies. The HEART score showed the best validity in predicting the outcomes tested with a mean AUROC value of 0.86 (range 0.83- 0.88; the GRACE score showed a good validity: mean AUROC value=0.78 (range 0.70-0.82; the TIMI a moderate validity: mean AUROC=0.67 (range 0.42-0.79. The only included study on the reliability showed that the TIMI score had a poor to moderate reliability: weighted kappa range=k= 0.30-0.43. In conclusion, in this review the HEART and GRACE scores showed the best validity in predicting acute coronary syndromes and major cardiac events. To our knowledge there is only one study on the reliability of TIMI score that showed a poor to moderate inter-rater reliability. There are no studies on the reliability of other score systems.

  20. Determining the optimal cut-off scores for the Workplace Bullying Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Marie; Bradbury, Joanne; Browne, Graeme; Hurley, John

    2017-12-18

    Over the past two decades, there has been considerable research into workplace bullying. One area that remains poorly developed is a tool with the capacity to accurately differentiate between exposed and unexposed employees. To determine optimal cut-off scores for the Workplace Bullying Inventory (WBI) that accurately classify cases of exposure to workplace bullying. Secondary analysis of data collected from Australian public sector employees ( n =2,197) was conducted. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used with a minimum sensitivity of 80%, to determine those scores on the WBI that corresponded with the highest accuracy of the tool to distinguish cases from non-cases. The results suggest using a cut score of 29 from the total score on the WBI (possible range: 18-90). When compared to a sum-score from a single dichotomous self-report variable, the cut-off score estimated a more conservative bullying rate. The single-item rate was potentially inflated by misconceptions about what constitutes bullying in the workplace. Employing validated cut-off points for exposure provides an objective threshold for establishing exposure to workplace bullying. The results of the analysis provide a more rigorous approach to quantifying exposure to workplace bullying, in a tool that has been designed and tested in the nursing workforce. This is the first such tool with empirically-derived, discriminant accuracy. It is common for nurse researchers to employ sum-scores from single items to identify exposure to workplace bullying. By providing reliable cut-off points for exposure, this study offers standardised, diagnostic accuracy for researchers, clinicians and managers. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  1. A new score predicting the survival of patients with spinal cord compression from myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to create and validate a scoring system for the survival of patients with malignant spinal cord compression (SCC from myeloma. Methods Of the entire cohort (N = 216, 108 patients were assigned to a test group and 108 patients to a validation group. In the test group, nine pre-treatment factors including age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status prior to radiotherapy, other bone lesions, extraosseous lesions, interval from first diagnosis of myeloma to radiotherapy of SCC, and the time developing motor deficits were retrospectively analyzed. Results On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with ECOG-PS 1–2 (p = 0.006, being ambulatory (p = 0.005, and absence of other bone lesions (p = 0.019. On multivariate analysis, ECOG-PS (p = 0.036 and ambulatory status (p = 0.037 were significant; other bone lesions showed a strong trend (p = 0.06. These factors were included in the score. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 12-month survival rate (in% by 10. The total risk score was the sum of the three factor scores and ranged from 19 to 24 points. Three prognostic groups were designed with the following 12-month survival rates: 49% for 19–20 points, 74% for 21–23 points, and 93% for 24 points (p = 0.002. In the validation group, the 12-month survival rates were 51%, 80%, and 90%, respectively (p  Conclusions This score appears reproducible, because the 12-month survival rates of both the test and the validation group were very similar. This new survival score can help personalize the treatment of patients with SCC from myeloma and can be of benefit when counseling patients.

  2. The reliability and validity of qualitative scores for the Controlled Oral Word Association Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Thomas P; Calhoun, Emily; Cox, Tara; Wenner, Carolyn; Kono, Whitney; Pleasant, Morgan

    2007-05-01

    The reliability and validity of two qualitative scoring systems for the Controlled Oral Word Association Test [Benton, A. L., Hamsher, de S. K., & Sivan, A. B. (1983). Multilingual aplasia examination (2nd ed.). Iowa City, IA: AJA Associates] were examined in 108 healthy young adults. The scoring systems developed by Troyer et al. [Troyer, A. K., Moscovich, M., & Winocur, G. (1997). Clustering and switching as two components of verbal fluency: Evidence from younger and older healthy adults. Neuropsychology, 11, 138-146] and by Abwender et al. [Abwender, D. A., Swan, J. G., Bowerman, J. T., & Connolly, S. W. (2001a). Qualitative analysis of verbal fluency output: Review and comparison of several scoring methods. Assessment, 8, 323-336] each demonstrated excellent interrater reliability (all indices at or above r(icc)=.9). Consistent with previous research [e.g., Ross, T. P. (2003). The reliability of cluster and switch scores for the COWAT. Archives of Clinical Psychology, 18, 153-164), test-retest reliability coefficients (N=53; M interval 44.6 days) for the qualitative scores were modest to poor (r(icc)=.6 to .4 range). Correlations among COWAT scores, measures of executive functioning, verbal learning, working memory, and vocabulary were examined. The idea that qualitative scores represent distinct executive functions such as cognitive flexibility or strategy utilization was not supported. We offer the interpretation that COWAT performance may require the ability to retrieve words in a non-routine manner while suppressing habitual responses and associated processing interference, presumably due to a spread of activation across semantic or lexical networks. This interpretation, though speculative at present, implies that clustering and switching on the COWAT may not be entirely deliberate, but rather an artifact of a passive (i.e., state-dependent) process. Ideas for future research, most noticeably experimental studies using cognitive methods (e.g., priming), are

  3. Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk score in an observation unit setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Jean; Srinivasan, Amudan; Ely, Sora; Drake, Weiying; Freeman, Debra; Borawski, Joseph; Chandra, Abhinav; Limkakeng, Alexander T

    2013-09-01

    The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) score is a validated tool for risk stratification of acute coronary syndrome. We hypothesized that the TIMI risk score would be able to risk stratify patients in observation unit for acute coronary syndrome. Retrospective cohort study of consecutive adult patients placed in an urban academic hospital emergency department observation unit with an average annual census of 65,000 between 2004 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included elevated initial cardiac biomarkers, ST segment changes on ECG, unstable vital signs, or unstable arrhythmias. A composite of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) indicators, including diagnosis of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass surgery, or death within 30 days and 1 year, were abstracted via chart review and financial record query. The entire cohort was stratified by TIMI risk scores (0-7) and composite event rates with 95% confidence interval were calculated. In total 2228 patients were analyzed. Average age was 54.5 years, 42.0% were male. The overall median TIMI risk score was 1. Eighty (3.6%) patients had 30-day and 119 (5.3%) had 1-year CAD indicators. There was a trend toward increasing rate of composite CAD indicators at 30 days and 1 year with increasing TIMI score, ranging from a 1.2% event rate at 30 days and 1.9% at 1 year for TIMI score of 0 and 12.5% at 30 days and 21.4% at 1 year for TIMI ≥ 4. In an observation unit cohort, the TIMI risk score is able to risk stratify patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups.

  4. SDS, a structural disruption score for assessment of missense variant deleteriousness

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    Thanawadee ePreeprem

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel structure-based evaluation for missense variants that explicitly models protein structure and amino acid properties to predict the likelihood that a variant disrupts protein function. A structural disruption score (SDS is introduced as a measure to depict the likelihood that a case variant is functional. The score is constructed using characteristics that distinguish between causal and neutral variants within a group of proteins. The SDS score is correlated with standard sequence-based deleteriousness, but shows promise for improving discrimination between neutral and causal variants at less conserved sites.The prediction was performed on 3-dimentional structures of 57 gene products whose homozygous SNPs were identified as case-exclusive variants in an exome sequencing study of epilepsy disorders. We contrasted the candidate epilepsy variants with scores for likely benign variants found in the EVS database, and for positive control variants in the same genes that are suspected to promote a range of diseases. To derive a characteristic profile of damaging SNPs, we transformed continuous scores into categorical variables based on the score distribution of each measurement, collected from all possible SNPs in this protein set, where extreme measures were assumed to be deleterious. A second epilepsy dataset was used to replicate the findings. Causal variants tend to receive higher sequence-based deleterious scores, induce larger physico-chemical changes between amino acid pairs, locate in protein domains, buried sites or on conserved protein surface clusters, and cause protein destabilization, relative to negative controls. These measures were agglomerated for each variant. A list of nine high-priority putative functional variants for epilepsy was generated. Our newly developed SDS protocol facilitates SNP prioritization for experimental validation.

  5. Associations between the probabilities of frequency-specific hearing loss and unaided APHAB scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhler, J; Wollenberg, B; Schlattmann, P; Hoang, N; Schönweiler, R

    2017-03-01

    The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) questionnaire reports subjective hearing impairments in four typical conditions. We investigated the association between the frequency-specific probability of hearing loss and scores from the unaided APHAB (APHABu) to determine whether the APHABu could be useful in primary diagnoses of hearing loss, in addition to pure tone and speech audiometry. This retrospective study included database records from 6558 patients (average age 69.0 years). We employed a multivariate generalised linear mixed model to analyse the probabilities of hearing losses (severity range 20-75 dB, evaluated in 5-dB steps), measured at different frequencies (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 kHz), for nearly all combinations of APHABu subscale scores (subscale scores from 20 to 80%, evaluated in steps of 5%). We calculated the probability of hearing loss for 28,561 different combinations of APHABu subscale scores (results available online). In general, the probability of hearing loss was positively associated with the combined APHABu score (i.e. increasing probability with increasing scores). However, this association was negative at one frequency (8 kHz). The highest probabilities were for a hearing loss of 45 dB at test frequency 2.0 kHz, but with a wide spreading. We showed that the APHABu subscale scores were associated with the probability of hearing loss measured with audiometry. This information could enrich the expert's evaluation of the subject's hearing loss, and it might help resolve suspicious cases of aggravation. The 0.5 and 8.0 kHz frequencies influenced hearing loss less than the frequencies in-between, and 2.0 kHz was most influential on intermediate degree hearing loss (around 45 dB), which corresponded to the frequency-dependence of speech intelligibility measured with speech audiometry.

  6. Forecast skill score assessment of a relocatable ocean prediction system, using a simplified objective analysis method

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    Onken, Reiner

    2017-11-01

    A relocatable ocean prediction system (ROPS) was employed to an observational data set which was collected in June 2014 in the waters to the west of Sardinia (western Mediterranean) in the framework of the REP14-MED experiment. The observational data, comprising more than 6000 temperature and salinity profiles from a fleet of underwater gliders and shipborne probes, were assimilated in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), which is the heart of ROPS, and verified against independent observations from ScanFish tows by means of the forecast skill score as defined by Murphy(1993). A simplified objective analysis (OA) method was utilised for assimilation, taking account of only those profiles which were located within a predetermined time window W. As a result of a sensitivity study, the highest skill score was obtained for a correlation length scale C = 12.5 km, W = 24 h, and r = 1, where r is the ratio between the error of the observations and the background error, both for temperature and salinity. Additional ROPS runs showed that (i) the skill score of assimilation runs was mostly higher than the score of a control run without assimilation, (i) the skill score increased with increasing forecast range, and (iii) the skill score for temperature was higher than the score for salinity in the majority of cases. Further on, it is demonstrated that the vast number of observations can be managed by the applied OA method without data reduction, enabling timely operational forecasts even on a commercially available personal computer or a laptop.

  7. Does PET reconstruction method affect Deauville scoring in lymphoma patients?

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    Enilorac, Blandine; Lasnon, Charline; Nganoa, Cathy; Fruchart, Christophe; Gac, Anne Claire; Damaj, Gandhi; Aide, Nicolas

    2017-12-14

    Background: When scoring 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with the Deauville scale (DS), the quantification of tumor and reference organs limits the problem of optical misinterpretation. Compared to conventional reconstruction algorithms, point spread function (PSF) modeling significantly increases standardized uptake values (SUVs) in tumors but only moderately in the liver, which could affect the DS. We investigated whether the choice of the reconstruction algorithm affects the DS and whether discordances affect the capability of FDG PET to stratify lymphoma patients. Materials and Methods: Overall, 126 diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) patients were included (56 females, 70 males, median (range) age: 65 (20-88) years). PET data were reconstructed with unfiltered PSF reconstruction. Additionally, a 6-mm filter was applied to PSF images to meet the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)/European Association Research Ltd (EARL) requirements (PSFEARL). One hundred interim PET (i-PET) and 95 end-of-treatment PET (EoT-PET) studies were analyzed. SUVmax in the liver and aorta were determined using automatic volumes of interest (VOIs) and compared to SUVmax of the residual mass with the highest FDG uptake. Results: For i-PET, using PSF and PSFEARL, patients were classified as responders and non-responders in 60 and 40 cases versus 63 and 37 cases, respectively. Five (5.0%) major discordances (i.e., changes from responder to non-responder) occurred. For Eot-PET, patients were classified using PSF and PSFEARL as responders and non-responders in 69 and 26 cases versus 72 and 23 cases, respectively. Three (3.2%) major discordances occurred. Concordance (Cohen's unweighted Kappa) between PSF and the PSFEARL Deauville scoring was 0.82 (95%CI: 0.73-0.91) for i-PET and 0.89 (95%CI: 0.81-0.96) for EoT-PET. The median follow-up periods were 28.4 and 27.4 months for i-PET and EoT-PET, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed

  8. Reducing Inter-Laboratory Differences between Semen Analyses Using Z Score and Regression Transformations

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    Esther Leushuis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standardization of the semen analysis may improve reproducibility. We assessed variability between laboratories in semen analyses and evaluated whether a transformation using Z scores and regression statistics was able to reduce this variability. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study. We calculated between-laboratory coefficients of variation (CVB for sperm concentration and for morphology. Subsequently, we standardized the semen analysis results by calculating laboratory specific Z scores, and by using regression. We used analysis of variance for four semen parameters to assess systematic differences between laboratories before and after the transformations, both in the circulation samples and in the samples obtained in the prospective cohort study in the Netherlands between January 2002 and February 2004. Results: The mean CVB was 7% for sperm concentration (range 3 to 13% and 32% for sperm morphology (range 18 to 51%. The differences between the laboratories were statistically significant for all semen parameters (all P<0.001. Standardization using Z scores did not reduce the differences in semen analysis results between the laboratories (all P<0.001. Conclusion: There exists large between-laboratory variability for sperm morphology and small, but statistically significant, between-laboratory variation for sperm concentration. Standardization using Z scores does not eliminate between-laboratory variability.

  9. Primary Spinal Tumor Mortality Score (PSTMS): a novel scoring system for predicting poor survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szövérfi, Zsolt; Lazary, Aron; Bozsódi, Árpád; Klemencsics, István; Éltes, Péter E; Varga, Péter Pál

    2014-11-01

    Although the surgical and oncological therapies of primary spinal tumors (PSTs) have changed significantly over the last few decades, the prognosis of this rare disease is still poor. The decision-making process in the multidisciplinary management is handicapped by the lack of large-scale population-based prognostic studies. The objective of the present study was to investigate preoperative factors associated with PST mortality and to develop a predictive scoring system of poor survival. This is a large-scale ambispective cohort study. The study included 323 consecutive patients with PSTs, treated surgically over an 18-year period at a tertiary care spine referral center for a population of 10 million. Survival was the outcome measure. Patients were randomly divided into a training cohort (n=273) and a validation cohort (n=50). In the training cohort, 12 preoperative factors were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models. Based on the mortality-related variables, a simple scoring system of mortality was created, and three groups of patients were identified. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were used to compare the survival in the three groups. The model performance was assessed by measuring the discriminative ability (c-index) of the model and by applying a pseudo-R(2) goodness-of-fit test (Nagelkerke R(2), RN(2)). Internal validation was performed using bootstrapping in the training cohort and assessing the discrimination and explained variation of the model in the validation cohort. Patient age, spinal region, tumor grade, spinal pain, motor deficit, and myelopathy/cauda equina syndrome were significantly associated with poor survival in the multivariate analysis (psurvival (psurvival in all types of PST patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Circulating levels of GH predict mortality and complement prognostic scores in critically ill medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Müller, Beat; Nusbaumer, Charly; Wieland, Melanie; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2009-02-01

    Circulating levels of GH are increased during critical illness and correlate with outcome in children with meningococcal sepsis. We assessed the prognostic implications of GH on admission and during follow-up in critically ill adult patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit. We measured GH, IGF1 and IGF-binding protein3 (IGFBP-3) plasma concentrations in 103 consecutive critically ill patients and compared it with two clinical severity scores (APACHE II, SAPS II). Median GH levels on admission were similar in septic (n=53) and non-septic (n=50) patients and about 7-fold increased in the 24 non-survivors as compared with survivors (9.50 (interquartile ranges (IQR) 3.53-18.40) vs 1.4 (IQR 0.63-5.04), PAPACHE II: AUC 0.71 (95% CI, 0.58-0.83), P=0.16, SAPS II: AUC 0.75 (95% CI, 0.63-0.86, P=0.36)). GH improved the prognostic accuracy of the APACHE II score to an AUC of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.66-090, P=0.04) and tended to improve the SAPS II score to an AUC of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90, P=0.09). GH plasma concentrations on admission are independent predictors for mortality in adult critically ill patients and may complement existing risk prediction scores, namely the APACHE II and the SAPS II score.

  11. Modified PADSS (Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System) for monitoring outpatients discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Tellan, Guglielmo; Perotti, Bruno; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Vietri, Francesco; Illuminati, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    The decision to discharge a patient undergoing day surgery is a major step in the hospitalization pathway, because it must be achieved without compromising the quality of care, thus ensuring the same assistance and wellbeing as for a long-term stay. Therefore, the use of an objective assessment for the management of a fair and safe discharge is essential. The authors propose the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System (PADSS), which considers six criteria: vital signs, ambulation, nausea/vomiting, pain, bleeding and voiding. Each criterion is given a score ranging from 0 to 2. Only patients who achieve a score of 9 or more are considered ready for discharge. Furthermore, PADSS has been modified to ensure a higher level of safety, thus the "vital signs" criteria must never score lower than 2, and none of the other five criteria must ever be equal to 0, even if the total score reaches 9. The effectiveness of PADSS was analyzed on 2432 patients, by recording the incidence of postoperative complications and the readmission to hospital. So far PADDS has proved to be an efficient system that guarantees safe discharge.

  12. B-type natriuretic peptide not TIMI risk score predicts death after acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesukumal, Kanit; Pratumvinit, Busadee

    2012-01-01

    The TIMI risk score is a clinical scoring system used to predict mortality in patients following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has also been found to be useful in this setting. 80 patients (35 men, 45 women) mean (SD) age 70.68 (9.90) years with ACS were studied. Blood was drawn within 12 hours after the onset of ACS and the blood level of BNP was measured using Biosite Triage Cardioprofiler Panel (Biosite Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Patient's TIMI risk score was recorded and patients were stratified into low (0 - 2), intermediate (3 - 4), and high-risk (5 - 7) groups. Overall mortality at 18 months was 20% and was related to BNP levels but not the higher TIMI risk scores. Higher BNP levels were related to decreased survival (median (range) ng/mL, survivors: 166 (5 - 4,710) vs. deceased: 1,093.5 (71.3 - 4,840), p risk score at predicting long term mortality.

  13. Paediatric Northern Score centile charts for the chest radiograph in cystic fibrosis

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    McCormick, J. [Respiratory Unit, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill NHS Trust, Glasgow (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jdmccormick@btinternet.com; Conway, S.P. [Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Unit, St James' University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mehta, A. [United Kingdom Cystic Fibrosis Database (UK CF Database), Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To create the first national centile charts for the chest radiograph Northern Score using the UK Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Database (UKCFD). Materials and methods: All active patients for 2002 from the UKCFD were analysed in 1-year cohorts from 0 to 18 years. Northern Score results from the annual review forms were used to construct centile lines for the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 95th centiles. Results: There were 1806 patients with recorded Northern Score data for 2002 (927 male patients, male:female ratio 1.05). The centile chart demonstrates a quasi-linear rise throughout childhood. A Northern Score in excess of age in years equates to >95th centile in school-aged CF patients. Conclusion: This centile chart provides a disease-specific reference range for monitoring individual patients or for evaluating therapeutic change using the dominant chest radiograph scoring system in the UK. Patients, parents and clinicians may find these useful during the annual review process.

  14. A simple alopecia scoring system for use in colony management of laboratory-housed primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanca, Rita U; Lee, Grace H; Vogel, Keith; Ahrens, Joel; Kroeker, Rose; Thom, Jinhee P; Worlein, Julie M

    2014-06-01

    Alopecia in captive primates continues to receive attention from animal care personnel and regulatory agencies. However, a method that enables personnel to reliably score alopecia over time and under various conditions has proven difficult to achieve. The scoring system developed by the behavioral and veterinary staffs at the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) uses the rule of 9s to estimate the percentage of the body affected with alopecia (severity) and how the alopecia presents itself (pattern). Training and scoring can conveniently be managed using photographic images, cage-side observations, and/or physical examinations. Personnel with varying degrees of experience were quickly trained with reliability scores ranging from 0.82 to 0.96 for severity and 0.82 to 0.89 for pattern using Cohen's κ. This system allows for reliable and consistent scoring across species, sex, age, housing condition, seasons, clinical or behavioral treatments, and level of personnel experience. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Blood test values and Community Periodontal Index scores in medical checkup recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yuko; Nakagaki, Haruo; Morita, Ichizo; Tsuboi, Shinji; Takami, Shuji; Suzuki, Noriko; Niwa, Hisae; Ogura, Yukio

    2003-12-01

    We examined the blood test values of people who received general medical checkups and their Community Periodontal Index (CPI) score. A total of 7,452 persons (5,742 males and 1,710 females), who had general medical and dental checkups, were the subjects of the study. Many were people who worked for companies in and around Nagoya and their family members, ranging in age from 16 to 80 years. The blood test in our study consisted of 37 items used in general blood tests. Partial-mouth recordings were used to measure CPI scores. The highest CPI score for each subject was used for analysis. Odds ratios and confidence interval values were obtained using the Mantel-Haenszel method to analyze the results. CPI scores of 3 and 4 were related to the test values of high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, serum iron, white blood cell count, fasting blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin A1, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, and C-reactive protein. Blood test values tended to show correlations with CPI scores, more clearly seen in males than in females.

  16. Nasalance scores of Brazilian Portuguese speakers at 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Débora Natália de; Sampaio-Teixeira, Ana Claudia Martins; Alvarenga, Bianca Gonçalves; Fukushiro, Ana Paula; Yamashita, Renata Paciello; Trindade, Inge Elly Kiemle

    2017-05-22

    To determine nasalance scores of Brazilian Portuguese speaking children without evident speech disorders, language delay and orofacial deformities, at age 5 years, and analyze differences between types of speech samples and genders. Twenty children were analyzed, 11 males, age ranging from 4 years and 10 months to 5 years and 11 months. The Nasometer II 6450 (KayPENTAX) was used for nasalance assessment. Speech samples were eight consonant-vowel syllables and one sequence of nine words. The significance of differences between speech samples and genders were assessed by the Tukey test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively, at a significance level of 5%. Mean nasalance scores were: /pa/= 10±4%, /pi/= 22±7%, /sa/= 11±5%, /si/= 24±11%, /ma/= 57±11%, /mi/= 73±13%, /la/= 14±9%, /li/= 25±11%, words (pipa, bis, burro, tatu, pilha, cuca, gui, fila, luz)= 20±6%. Nasalance scores of nasal syllables were significantly higher than those of oral syllables (with high or neutral vowels) and nasalance scores of oral syllables with high vowels were significantly higher than those of oral syllables with neutral vowels, for the majority of comparisons. There was no difference between genders. Normative nasalance scores for 5-year-old Brazilian children were determined. The methodology can serve as a standard for the early diagnosis of nasality deviations, such as hypernasality observed in cleft palate speech.

  17. Gleason score stratification according to age at diagnosis in 1028 men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Pietro; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Gleason score stratification according to age at diagnosis has been retrospectively evaluated in 1028 men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer (PCa). From January 2006 to December 2014, 2435 Caucasian men aged between 37 and 92 years underwent transperineal prostate biopsy for suspicion of PCa. The indications were as follows: abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE), PSA values > 10 ng/ml or between 4.1-10 or 2.6-4 ng/ml, with free/total PSA Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-10). The Gleason score progressively increased with the age of the patients at diagnosis, and a significantly correlation between Gleason score ≥ 8 and men older than 80 years was demonstrated (p = 0.0001). The detection rate of aggressiveness of PCa progressively increased with the age at diagnosis; Gleason score ≥ 8 was more frequently diagnosed in men older than 80 years with PSA values > 10 ng/ml (about 80% of the cases) and abnormal DRE (about 60% of the cases).

  18. The association of reproductive and lifestyle factors with a score of multiple endogenous hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafrir, Amy L; Zhang, Xuehong; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2014-10-01

    We recently reported that high levels of multiple sex and growth hormones were associated with increased postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Limited research has explored the relationship between reproductive, anthropometric, and lifestyle factors and levels of multiple hormones simultaneously. This cross-sectional analysis included 738 postmenopausal Nurses' Health Study participants who were controls in a breast cancer nested case-control study and had measured levels of estrone, estradiol, estrone sulfate, testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, prolactin, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). A score was created by summing the number of hormones a woman had above (below for SHBG) each hormone's age-adjusted geometric mean. The association between lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive exposures and the score was assessed using generalized linear models. The hormone score ranged from 0 to 8 with a mean of 4.0 (standard deviation = 2.2). Body mass index (BMI) and alcohol consumption at blood draw were positively associated with the hormone score: a 5 unit increase in BMI was associated with a 0.79 (95%CI: 0.63, 0.95) unit increase in the score (p hormones, whereas anthropometric and lifestyle factors, particularly BMI and alcohol consumption, tended to be associated with higher levels of multiple hormones.

  19. Score distributions of gapped multiple sequence alignments down to the low-probability tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieth, Pascal; Hartmann, Alexander K.

    2016-08-01

    Assessing the significance of alignment scores of optimally aligned DNA or amino acid sequences can be achieved via the knowledge of the score distribution of random sequences. But this requires obtaining the distribution in the biologically relevant high-scoring region, where the probabilities are exponentially small. For gapless local alignments of infinitely long sequences this distribution is known analytically to follow a Gumbel distribution. Distributions for gapped local alignments and global alignments of finite lengths can only be obtained numerically. To obtain result for the small-probability region, specific statistical mechanics-based rare-event algorithms can be applied. In previous studies, this was achieved for pairwise alignments. They showed that, contrary to results from previous simple sampling studies, strong deviations from the Gumbel distribution occur in case of finite sequence lengths. Here we extend the studies to multiple sequence alignments with gaps, which are much more relevant for practical applications in molecular biology. We study the distributions of scores over a large range of the support, reaching probabilities as small as 10-160, for global and local (sum-of-pair scores) multiple alignments. We find that even after suitable rescaling, eliminating the sequence-length dependence, the distributions for multiple alignment differ from the pairwise alignment case. Furthermore, we also show that the previously discussed Gaussian correction to the Gumbel distribution needs to be refined, also for the case of pairwise alignments.

  20. Overall and worst gleason scores are equally good predictors of prostate cancer progression

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    Tuominen Vilppu J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gleason scoring has experienced several modifications during the past decade. So far, only one study has compared the prognostic abilities of worst (WGS and overall (OGS modified Gleason scores after the ISUP 2005 conference. Prostatic needle biopsies are individually paraffin-embedded in 57% of European pathology laboratories, whereas the rest of laboratories embed multiple (2 - 6 biopsies per one paraffin-block. Differences in the processing method can have a far-reaching effect, because reporting of the Gleason score (GS is different for individually embedded and pooled biopsies, and GS is one of the most important factors when selecting treatment for patients. Methods The study material consisted of needle biopsies from 236 prostate cancer patients that were endocrine-treated in 1999-2003. Biopsies from left side and right side were embedded separately. Haematoxylin-eosin-stained slides were scanned and analyzed on web-based virtual microscopy. Worst and overall Gleason scores were assessed according to the modified Gleason score schema after analyzing each biopsy separately. The compound Gleason scores (CGS were obtained from the original pathology reports. Two different grade groupings were used: GS 6 or less vs. 7 vs. 8 or above; and GS 7(3 + 4 or less vs. 7(4 + 3 and 8 vs. 9-10. The prognostic ability of the three scoring methods to predict biochemical progression was compared with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results The median follow-up time of the patients was 64.5 months (range 0-118. The modified GS criteria led to upgrading of the Gleason sums compared to the original CGS from the pathology reports 1999-2003 (mean 7.0 for CGS, 7.5 for OGS, 7.6 for WGS. In 43 cases WGS was > OGS. In a univariate analysis the relative risks were 2.1 (95%-confidence interval 1.8-2.4 for CGS, 2.5 (2.1-2.8 for OGS, and 2.6 (2.2-2.9 for WGS. In a multivariate analysis, OGS was