WorldWideScience

Sample records for sub-50 nm particles

  1. Tailoring of Seebeck coefficient with surface roughness effects in silicon sub-50-nm films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bagga, Anjana; Neeleshwar, S

    2012-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the Seebeck coefficient in the sub-50-nm scale silicon ultra thin films is investigated theoretically using nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. For systematic studies, the surface roughness is modelled by varying thickness periodically with square wave profile characterized by two parameters: amplitude (A 0) and wavelength (λ). Since high Seebeck coefficient is obtained if the temperature difference between the ends of device produces higher currents and higher induced voltages, we investigate how the generated current and induced voltage is affected with increasing A 0 and λ. The theoretical investigations show that pseudoperiodicity of the device structure gives rise to two effects: firstly the threshold energy at which the transmission of current starts is shifted towards higher energy sides and secondly transmission spectra of current possess pseudobands and pseudogaps. The width of the pseudobands and their occupancies determine the total generated current. It is found that current decreases with increasing A 0 but shows a complicated trend with λ. The trends of threshold energy determine the trends of Seebeck voltage with roughness parameters. The increase in threshold energy makes the current flow in higher energy levels. Thus, the Seebeck voltage, i.e. voltage required to nullify this current, increases. Increase in Seebeck voltage results in increase in Seebeck coefficient. We find that threshold energy increases with increasing A 0 and frequency (1/λ). Hence, Seebeck voltage and Seebeck coefficient increase vice versa. It is observed that Seebeck coefficient is tuneable with surface roughness parameters.

  2. Sub-50 fs pulses around 2070 nm from a synchronously-pumped, degenerate OPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Charles W; Marandi, Alireza; Ingold, Kirk A; Wolf, Stephen J; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L; Byer, Robert L; Yang, Lihmei; Wan, Peng; Liu, Jian

    2012-12-03

    We report generation of 48 fs pulses at a center wavelength of 2070 nm using a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) synchronously-pumped with a commercially available 36-MHz, femtosecond, mode-locked, Yb-doped fiber laser. The spectral bandwidth of the output is ~137 nm, corresponding to a theoretical, transform-limited pulse width of 33 fs. The threshold of the OPO is less than 10 mW of average pump power. By tuning the cavity length, the output spectrum covers a spectral width of more than 400 nm, limited only by the bandwidth of the cavity mirrors.

  3. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jian-Wei; Wee, Qixun; Dumond, Jarrett; Tay, Andrew; Chua, Soo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production.

  4. Sub-50 nm metrology on extreme ultra violet chemically amplified resist--A systematic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, D J; Fliervoet, T; Herfst, R; van Veldhoven, E; Meessen, J; Vaenkatesan, V; Sadeghian, H

    2015-10-01

    With lithographic patterning dimensions decreasing well below 50 nm, it is of high importance to understand metrology at such small scales. This paper presents results obtained from dense arrays of contact holes (CHs) with various Critical Dimension (CD) between 15 and 50 nm, as patterned in a chemically amplified resist using an ASML EUV scanner and measured at ASML and TNO. To determine the differences between various (local) CD metrology techniques, we conducted an experiment using optical scatterometry, CD-Scanning Electron Microscopy (CD-SEM), Helium ion Microscopy (HIM), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). CD-SEM requires advanced beam scan strategies to mitigate sample charging; the other tools did not need that. We discuss the observed main similarities and differences between the various techniques. To this end, we assessed the spatial frequency content in the raw images for SEM, HIM, and AFM. HIM and AFM resolve the highest spatial frequencies, which are attributed to the more localized probe-sample interaction for these techniques. Furthermore, the SEM, HIM, and AFM waveforms are analyzed in detail. All techniques show good mutual correlation, albeit the reported CD values systematically differ significantly. HIM systematically reports a 25% higher CD uniformity number than CD-SEM for the same arrays of CHs, probably because HIM has a higher resolution than the CD-SEM used in this assessment. A significant speed boost for HIM and AFM is required before these techniques are to serve the demanding industrial metrology applications like optical critical dimension and CD-SEM do nowadays.

  5. Chemical synthesis, characterizations and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalavi, Shankar B.; Panda, Rabi Narayan, E-mail: rnp@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, BITS-Pilani, K. K. Birla Goa Campus, Zuarinagar, Goa-403726 (India); Raja, M. Manivel [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad-500058 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Nanocrystalline Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} alloy has been synthesized successfully by chemical reduction route using superhydride as reducing agent and oleic acid and oleylamine as capping agents. Phase purity, crystallite size and lattice parameters of the synthesized NPs are determined by X-ray powder diffraction method. FeCo alloy crystallizes in body centered cubic (bcc) structure having crystallite size equal to 29 nm and lattice parameters equal to 2.8546 Å. The size and shape morphologies of the material were studied by SEM analysis. SEM micrograph study shows the average particle size to be 60 nm and indicates the appearance of agglomerates of the nano-particles consisting of several crystallites. The room temperature magnetic hysteresis studies indicate ferromagnetic behavior of the materials. The values of saturation magnetization and coercivity were 65 emu/g and 460 Oe, respectively. Magnetic properties of the material were interpreted on the basis of fine particle magnetism.

  6. Evolution of structure, microstructure and hyperfine properties of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} powders prepared by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkouche, K. [LMMC, M' hamed Bougara University, Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria); Guittoum, A., E-mail: guittoum@yahoo.fr [Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, BP399 Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria); Boukherroub, N. [LMMC, M' hamed Bougara University, Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria); Souami, N. [Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, BP399 Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria)

    2011-11-15

    Nanostructured Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} powders were prepared by mechanical alloying of Fe and Co elements in a vario-planetary high-energy ball mill. The structural properties, morphology changes and local iron environment variations were investigated as a function of milling time (in the 0-200 h range) by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The complete formation of bcc Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} solid solution is observed after 100 h milling. As the milling time increases from 0 to 200 h, the lattice parameter decreases from 0.28655 nm for pure Fe to 0.28523 nm, the grain size decreases from 150 to 14 nm, while the meal level of strain increases from 0.0069% to 1.36%. The powder particle morphology at different stages of formation was observed by SEM. The parameters derived from the Moessbauer spectra confirm the beginning of the formation of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} phase at 43 h of milling. After 200 h of milling the average hyperfine magnetic field of 35 T suggests that a disordered bcc Fe-Co solid solution is formed. - Highlights: > Nanostructured Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} powders were successfully prepared by mechanical alloying process. > Final average grain size value achieved after 200 h of milling was 14 nm. > For the longest milling time the majority of particle grains observed by SEM exhibits a round shape with small diameter.

  7. Magnetic hardening of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} by rotary swaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gröb, T., E-mail: t.groeb@phm.tu-darmstadt.de [Division Physical Metallurgy, Alarich-Weiß-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Wießner, L. [Institute for Production Engineering and Forming Machines, Otto-Berndt-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Bruder, E. [Division Physical Metallurgy, Alarich-Weiß-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Faske, T.; Donner, W. [Divison Structure Research, Alarich-Weiß-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Groche, P. [Institute for Production Engineering and Forming Machines, Otto-Berndt-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Müller, C. [Division Physical Metallurgy, Alarich-Weiß-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} was subjected to incremental forming by rotary swaging with the aim of tailoring the coercivity by changing the microstructure. The challenging part of a deformation of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} is an ordering phase present at room temperature, leading to low formability. To increase the formability of the alloy the presence of the ordering phase was supressed by two different concepts. The first concept consists of a heat treatment above the phase transition followed by rapid cooling and deformation at room temperature. The second concept was rotary swaging at temperatures above the phase transition temperature. A comparison in terms of resulting microstructure and magnetic properties shows that both concepts have a potential for tailoring the coercivity of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50}. - Highlights: • Magnetic hardening of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} was achieved by rotary swaging with two different concepts. • The influences of the microstructural changes during the rotary swaging process have been linked to magnetic hardening. • Increase in coercivity for Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} by rotary swaging at elevated temperature is limited by the dynamic restoration. • Coercivity of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} can be tailored by the induced plastic strain.

  8. Removal of 10-nm contaminant particles from Si wafers using CO2 bullet particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inho; Hwang, Kwangseok; Lee, JinWon

    2012-04-01

    Removal of nanometer-sized contaminant particles (CPs) from substrates is essential in successful fabrication of nanoscale devices. The particle beam technique that uses nanometer-sized bullet particles (BPs) moving at supersonic velocity was improved by operating it at room temperature to achieve higher velocity and size uniformity of BPs and was successfully used to remove CPs as small as 10 nm. CO2 BPs were generated by gas-phase nucleation and growth in a supersonic nozzle; appropriate size and velocity of the BPs were obtained by optimizing the nozzle contours and CO2/He mixture fraction. Cleaning efficiency greater than 95% was attained. BP velocity was the most important parameter affecting removal of CPs in the 10-nm size range. Compared to cryogenic Ar or N2 particles, CO2 BPs were more uniform in size and had higher velocity and, therefore, cleaned CPs more effectively.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of mechanically alloyed Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Do Khanh [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay Distr., Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Manh, Do Hung, E-mail: manhdh@ims.vast.ac.vn [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay Distr., Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Phong, P.T. [Nha Trang Pedagogic College, Khanh Hoa Province (Viet Nam); Phong, L.T.H.; Dai, N.V.; Nam, D.N.H.; Phuc, N.X. [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay Distr., Ha Noi (Viet Nam)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} nanoparticles were prepared by MA in air combined with annealing. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase was observed by the XRD and SAED measurements. • M{sub S} is dependent both the annealing temperature and the milling time. • M{sub S}(T) of Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} nanoparticles is well described by a Bloch’s T{sup 3/2} law below T{sub C}. - Abstract: Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} nanoparticles were prepared by mechanical alloying method in air and subsequently annealing at various temperatures (773 K, 873 K, and 973 K). X-ray diffraction and selective area electron diffraction measurements on the powder sample milled for 10 h showed the Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} coexisting with a minor secondary phase of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. It was found that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase decreased gradually with increasing annealing temperature and disappeared at 973 K. Moreover, the saturation magnetization of annealed samples was found not only depend on the annealing temperature but also the milling time. Finally, we showed that the temperature dependence of the saturation magnetization of sample after annealing at 973 K could be well descried by the Bloch’s law.

  10. Methods for determining particle size distribution and growth rates between 1 and 3 nm using the Particle Size Magnifier

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kontkanen, Jenni; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Wimmer, Daniela; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sipilä, Mikko; Mikkilä, Jyri; Vanhanen, Joonas; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    The most important parameters describing the atmospheric new particle formation process are the particle formation and growth rates. These together determine the amount of cloud condensation nuclei attributed to secondary particle formation. Due to difficulties in detecting small neutral particles, it has previously not been possible to derive these directly from measurements in the size range below about 3 nm. The Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier has been used at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, southern Finland, and during nucleation experiments in the CLOUD chamber at CERN for measuring particles as small as about 1 nm in mobility diameter. We developed several methods to determine the particle size distribution and growth rates in the size range of 1–3 nm from these data sets. Here we introduce the appearance-time method for calculating initial growth rates. The validity of the method was tested by simulations with the Ion-UHMA aerosol dynamic model.

  11. Sub-3 nm particles observed at the coastal and continental sites in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan; Gannet Hallar, A.; You, Yi; Sedlacek, Arthur; Springston, Stephen; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Lee, Yin-Nan; Wang, Jian; Kuang, Chongai; McGraw, Robert L.; McCubbin, Ian; Mikkila, Jyri; Lee, Shan-Hu

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurements of atmospheric sub-3 nm particles are crucial for understanding the new particle formation mechanisms, but such measurements are very limited at present. We report measurements of sub-3nm particles at Brookhaven, New York (a coastal site in summer) and Kent, Ohio (a continental site in winter). During daytime, in approximately 80% of the observation days at both sites, sub-3nm particle events were observed with concentrations of 2800 ± 1600 cm-3, and they appeared with the elevated sulfuric acid concentrations. During the nighttime at the coastal site under the marine air mass influences, there were also substantial concentrations of sub-3nm particles (1500 ± 400 cm-3), but they did not grow larger. On the other hand, at the coastal Brookhaven site under the continental air mass influences and at the inland Kent site during the night, the sub-3nm particles were significantly lower (190 ± 130 cm-3). Our results indicate that sub-3nm particles were not always present, and their presence was rather closely associated with specific aerosol nucleation precursors: sulfuric acid and other unknown condensable chemical species likely present in the marine air masses. These findings are thus different from other studies conducted in the Finland boreal forest, which showed a persistent presence of high concentrations of sub-2nm particles and that these sub-2nm particles were more correlated to monoterpene oxidation products than to sulfuric acid. Therefore, different nucleation mechanisms, as opposed on to a universal mechanism, involving different nucleation precursors dominate in different atmospheric environments with different emissions and transported trace gases.

  12. Magnetic properties and configuration of Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50*x}Rh{sub x} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, Jochen; Lott, Dieter; Schreyer, Andreas [Helmholt-Zentrum, Geesthacht (Germany); Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schmalzl, Karin [IFF Forschungszentrum, Juelich (Germany); JCNS at ILL (France); Mankey, Gary J. [MINT Center, University of Alabama (United States); Klose, Frank [Ansto, Bragg Institute (Australia); Tartakowskaya, Helena [Institute for Magnetism, National Accademy of Scinece (Ukraine)

    2011-07-01

    Ordered FePt alloys with L1{sub 0} structure are known as materials with FM order and a high magnetic moment of Fe providing a large magnetization. The large atomic number of Pt on the other hand results in a high magnetic anisotropy. If grown in thin films, the high anisotropy often results in perpendicular magnetization which is the preferred orientation for current magnetic recording media. One way to control the magnetic properties in these materials is through the introduction of a third element into the crystal matrix e.g. Rh. When Rh is added to replace Pt in the equiatomic alloy, new magnetic phases emerge. Here we present neutron diffraction studies on the magnetic properties of different 200nm thick Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50*x}Rh{sub x} films in dependence of the temperature and external magnetic fields. Additional resonant x-ray measurements on the Fe and Pt absorption edges provide additional information about the magnetic moments on these sites.

  13. Vectorial magnetometry and anisotropy studies on thin Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films using MOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschel, Timo; Wollschlaeger, Joachim [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastr. 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany); Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir [Department of Physics, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Bosu, Subrojati; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Magnetooptical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a powerful tool to determine magnetic properties of thin magnetic films. In some cases this technique is only applied to detect magnetization curves qualitatively. In order to perform a quantitative analysis we present MOKE measurements with s- and p-polarized incident light, using an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the plane of incidence of light and different orientations of the crystalline substrate. The processing of the data includes vectorial magnetometry as well as studies of the anisotropy constants and magnetic axes. The investigated Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films o f 50 nm thickness on MgO(001) are prepared with different annealing temperatures (RT up to 400 C). On the one hand the films with lower annealing tempe ratures show typical magnetic reversal processes of samples with four-fold symmetry as expected for cubic crystal structures. On the other hand the film annealed at 400 C presents an additional strong in-plane anisotropy, which is discussed in context of a classical free energy approach.

  14. Performance of diethylene glycol-based particle counters in the sub-3 nm size range

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, D; Franchin, A; Kangasluoma, J; Kreissl, F; Kürten, A; Kupc, A; Metzger, A; Mikkilä, J; Petäjä, J; Riccobono, F; Vanhanen, J; Kulmala, M; Curtius, J

    2013-01-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using condensation particle counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1–2 nm). Recently, CPCs able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. Using these instruments, the corrections needed for calculating nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous-flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The desig...

  15. Sub 2 nm Particle Characterization in Systems with Aerosol Formation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang

    Aerosol science and technology enable continual advances in material synthesis and atmospheric pollutant control. Among these advances, one important frontier is characterizing the initial stages of particle formation by real time measurement of particles below 2 nm in size. Sub 2 nm particles play important roles by acting as seeds for particle growth, ultimately determining the final properties of the generated particles. Tailoring nanoparticle properties requires a thorough understanding and precise control of the particle formation processes, which in turn requires characterizing nanoparticle formation from the initial stages. The knowledge on particle formation in early stages can also be applied in quantum dot synthesis and material doping. This dissertation pursued two approaches in investigating incipient particle characterization in systems with aerosol formation and growth: (1) using a high-resolution differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to measure the size distributions of sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, and (2) analyzing the physical and chemical pathways of aerosol formation during combustion. Part. 1. Particle size distributions reveal important information about particle formation dynamics. DMAs are widely utilized to measure particle size distributions. However, our knowledge of the initial stages of particle formation is incomplete, due to the Brownian broadening effects in conventional DMAs. The first part of this dissertation studied the applicability of high-resolution DMAs in characterizing sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, including a flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) and a furnace aerosol reactor (FUAR). Comparison against a conventional DMA (Nano DMA, Model 3085, TSI Inc.) demonstrated that the increased sheath flow rates and shortened residence time indeed greatly suppressed the diffusion broadening effect in a high-resolution DMA (half mini type). The incipient particle

  16. RapidNano: towards 20nm Particle Detection on EUV Mask Blanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donck, J.C.J. van der; Bussink, P.G.W.; Fritz, E.C.; Walle, P. van der

    2016-01-01

    Cleanliness is a prerequisite for obtaining economically feasible yield levels in the semiconductor industry. For the next generation of lithographic equipment, EUV lithography, the size of yield-loss inducing particles for the masks will be smaller than 20 nm. Consequently, equipment for handling

  17. Testicular biodistribution of 450 nm fluorescent latex particles after intramuscular injection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jean-Philippe; Boudard, Delphine; Cadusseau, Josette; Palle, Sabine; Forest, Valérie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Cottier, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    The significant expansion in the use of nanoparticles and submicron particles during the last 20 years has led to increasing concern about their potential toxicity to humans and particularly their impact on male fertility. Currently, an insufficient number of studies have focused on the testicular biodistribution of particles. The aim of our study was to assess the distribution of 450 nm fluorescent particles in mouse testes after intramuscular injection. To this end, testes were removed from 5 groups of 3 mice each at 1 h (H1), 4 days (D4), 21 days (D21), 45 days (D45) and 90 days (D90) after the injection of 7.28 × 109 particles in the tibialis anterior muscles of each mouse. We examined histological sections from these samples by epifluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy and identified testicular biodistribution of a small number of particles in groups H1, D4, D21, D45 and D90. Using CD11b immunostaining, we showed that particles were not carried into the testis by macrophages. The intratesticular repartition of particles mainly followed testicular vascularization. Finally, we found some particles in seminiferous tubules but could not determine if the blood–testis barrier was crossed. PMID:23329290

  18. Particle control challenges in process chemicals and ultra-pure water for sub-10nm technology nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Abbas; Samayoa, Martin; House, Matthew; Kurtuldu, Hüseyin; Eah, Sang-Kee; Morse, Lauren; Harris-Jones, Jenah

    2014-04-01

    Particle contamination in ultra-pure water (UPW) and chemicals will eventually end up on the surface of a wafer and may result in killer defects. To improve the semiconductor processing yield in sub-10 nm half pitch nodes, it is necessary to control particle defectivity. In a systematic study of all major techniques for particle detection, counting, and sizing in solutions, we have shown that there is a gap in the required particle metrology which needs to be addressed by the industry. To reduce particles in solutions and improve filter retention for sub-10 nm particles with very low densities (<10 particles/mL), liquid particle counters that are able to detect small particles at low densities are required. Non-volatile residues in chemicals and UPW can result in nanoparticles. Measuring absolute non-volatile residues in UPW with concentrations in the ppb range is a challenge. However, by using energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of non-volatile residues we found silica both in dissolved and colloidal particle form which is present in one of the cleanest UPW that we tested. A particle capture/release technique was developed at SEMATECH which is able to collect particles from UPW and release them in a controlled manner. Using this system we showed sub-10 nm particles are present in UPW. In addition to colloidal silica, agglomerated carbon containing particles were also found in UPW.

  19. A distinct atomic structure-catalytic activity relationship in 3-10 nm supported Au particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Shan, Shiyao; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-01-07

    Bulk Au is very inert but Au nanoparticles less than 5 nm in size have been found to be catalytically active for several reactions, in particular for low-temperature oxidation of CO. Using high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled with atomic pair distribution function analysis and computer simulations we determine the structure of 3 nm and 10 nm Au particles supported on titania and silica as typical representatives of reducible and irreducible supports, respectively. We find that the synthesis protocol adopted in our work affects strongly and differently the structure of the Au nanoparticles on the different supports. This leads to clearly distinct dependences of the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles on their size. In the case of the silica support the catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles increases and in the case of the titania support it decreases with decreasing nanoparticle size. The experimental results are considered in terms of current theoretical predictions and found to be in good accord with them.

  20. An ABCA1-independent pathway for recycling a poorly lipidated 8.1 nm apolipoprotein E particle from glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianjia; Stukas, Sophie; Wong, Charmaine; Chan, Jennifer; May, Sharon; DeValle, Nicole; Hirsch-Reinshagen, Veronica; Wilkinson, Anna; Oda, Michael N.; Wellington, Cheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid transport in the brain is coordinated by glial-derived lipoproteins that contain apolipoprotein E (apoE) as their primary protein. Here we show that apoE is secreted from wild-type (WT) primary murine mixed glia as nascent lipoprotein subspecies ranging from 7.5 to 17 nm in diameter. Negative-staining electron microscropy (EM) revealed rouleaux, suggesting a discoidal structure. Potassium bromide (KBr) density gradient ultracentrifugation showed that all subspecies, except an 8.1 nm particle, were lipidated. Glia lacking the cholesterol transporter ABCA1 secreted only 8.1 nm particles, which were poorly lipidated and nondiscoidal but could accept lipids to form the full repertoire of WT apoE particles. Receptor-associated-protein (RAP)-mediated inhibition of apoE receptor function blocked appearance of the 8.1 nm species, suggesting that this particle may arise through apoE recycling. Selective deletion of the LDL receptor (LDLR) reduced the level of 8.1 nm particle production by approximately 90%, suggesting that apoE is preferentially recycled through the LDLR. Finally, apoA-I stimulated secretion of 8.1 nm particles in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that nascent glial apoE lipoproteins are secreted through multiple pathways and that a greater understanding of these mechanisms may be relevant to several neurological disorders. PMID:21705806

  1. Experimental and simulated scattering matrices of small calcite particles at 647nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, D. D.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Nousiainen, T.; Zubko, E.; Marra, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    We present measurements of the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of a sample of calcite particles. The measurements are performed at 647nm in the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. To facilitate the use of the experimental data we present a synthetic scattering matrix based on the measurements and defined in the full range from 0° to 180°. The scattering matrix of the calcite sample is modeled using the discrete-dipole approximation. Two sets of shapes, flake-like and rhomboid-like particles giving a total of 15 different targets are considered since both types of shapes have been found in our calcite sample. In our computations we use the measured size distribution of the calcite sample truncated at 1.2μm. We present a theoretical study of the impact of birefringence on the computed scattering matrix elements for both sets of shapes. Four different cases regarding the composition of the calcite particles are considered: two isotropic cases corresponding to the ordinary and extraordinary refractive index of calcite, respectively; one equivalent isotropic case analogous to internal mixing; and birefringence fully accounted for. Numerical simulations are compared with the experimental data. We find that birefringence has little impact on the calculated phase functions but it has a significant effect on the polarization-related elements of the scattering matrix. Moreover, we conclude that the shape of the targets (flakes or irregular rhomboids) has a much stronger effect on the computed scattering matrix elements than birefringence.

  2. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  3. Sub-50 nm Scale to Micrometer Scale Soft Lithographic Patterning of Functional Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis addresses two major issues: 1) Fabricating nanometer-scale patterns of functional materials, 2) Extending the applicability of soft lithographic processes to a wide range of functional materials on conventional silicon substrates and flexible plastic substrates. This thesis describes

  4. Ostwald-ripening and particle size focussing of sub-10 nm NaYF4 upconversion nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkel, Thorben; Nordmann, Jörg; Raj, Athira Naduviledathu; Haase, Markus

    2014-11-01

    We have studied the growth behaviour of sub-10 nm NaYF4 upconversion nanocrystals of the hexagonal β-phase and the cubic α-phase. Ostwald-ripening of such particles in oleic acid/octadecene solvent results in broadening of the particle size distribution if the colloid contains particles of one crystal phase only. Narrow size distributions are formed only if β-phase particles grow in the presence of an excess of α-phase particles. Such binary mixtures of α-phase and β-phase particles form intrinsically when colloids of α-phase particles are heated for a sufficiently long time, because seeds of the β-phase nucleate in the solution after some time at high temperatures. Since the number of seeds determines the final size of the β-phase product, control of the nucleation is crucial for controlling the final particle size. We show that the number of β-phase seeds strongly depends on the composition of the α-phase known to form solid solutions Na1-xYF4-x in the range from x = 0 to x = 4/9. Sodium-deficient α-phase particles form a negligible number of β-phase seeds whereas α-phase particles with high sodium content yield a very large number of seeds. By taking advantage of this dependence and modifying the synthesis of the α-phase particles accordingly, small phase-pure β-NaYF4:Yb,Er particles with a size smaller than 6 nm can be prepared in oleic acid/octadecene just as well as much larger particles.We have studied the growth behaviour of sub-10 nm NaYF4 upconversion nanocrystals of the hexagonal β-phase and the cubic α-phase. Ostwald-ripening of such particles in oleic acid/octadecene solvent results in broadening of the particle size distribution if the colloid contains particles of one crystal phase only. Narrow size distributions are formed only if β-phase particles grow in the presence of an excess of α-phase particles. Such binary mixtures of α-phase and β-phase particles form intrinsically when colloids of α-phase particles are heated for a

  5. Effect of amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} on hydriding and dehydriding behavior of Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, D., E-mail: danny.guzman@uda.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Atacama y Centro Regional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Sustentable de Atacama (CRIDESAT), Av. Copayapu 485, Copiapo (Chile); Ordonez, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Santiago (Chile); Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Serafini, D. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Materials, CIMAT, Av. Lib. Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Santiago (Chile); Rojas, P.A. [Escuela de Ingenieria Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Av. Los Carrera 01567, Quilpue, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, PUCV (Chile); Aguilar, C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica y Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Av. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Tapia, P. [Departamento de Ingenieria en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Atacama, Av. Copayapu 485, Copiapo (Chile)

    2011-04-15

    Composite Mg{sub 2}Ni (25 wt.%) amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} was prepared by mechanical milling starting with nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni and amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} powders, by using a SPEX 8000 D mill. The morphological and microstructural characterization of the powders was performed via scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hydriding characterization of the composite was performed via a solid gas reaction method in a Sievert's-type apparatus at 363 K under an initial hydrogen pressure of 2 MPa. The dehydriding behavior was studied by differential thermogravimetry. On the basis of the results, it is possible to conclude that amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} improved the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics of Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy upon cycling. A tentative rationalization of experimental observations is proposed. - Research Highlights: {yields} First study of the hydriding behavior of composite Mg{sub 2}Ni (25 wt.%) amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50}. {yields} Microstructural characterization of composite material using XRD and SEM was obtained. {yields} An improved effect of Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} on the Mg{sub 2}Ni hydriding behavior was verified. {yields} The apparent activation energy for the hydrogen desorption of composite was obtained.

  6. Studies on dielectric properties, opto-electrical parameters and electronic polarizability of thermally evaporated amorphous Cd{sub 50}S{sub 50−x}Se{sub x} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanien, Ahmed Saeed, E-mail: a.s.hassanien@gmail.com [Engineering Mathematics and Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering (Shoubra), Benha University (Egypt); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Humanities in Ad-Dawadmi, Shaqra University, 11911 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-25

    The objective of this work is to study the influence of the addition of more Se on dielectric properties, opto-electrical parameters and electronic polarizability of amorphous chalcogenide Cd{sub 50}S{sub 50−x}Se{sub x} thin films (30 ≤ x ≤ 50 at%). Thin films of thickness 200 nm were synthesized by vacuum deposition at ≈8.2 × 10{sup −4} Pa. Both refractive index and extinction coefficient were used to obtain all the studied parameters. The high frequency dielectric constant, real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant were discussed. Drude theory was applied to investigate opto-electrical parameters, like optical carrier concentration, optical mobility and optical resistivity. Moreover, other parameters were investigated and studied, e.g. Drude parameters, volume and surface energy loss functions, dielectric loss factor, dielectric relaxation time, complex optical conductivity and electronic polarizability as well as optical electronegativity and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility. Values of electronic polarizability and nonlinear optical susceptibility were found to be decreased while optical electronegativity increased as Se-content was increased. Increment of Se-content in amorphous Cd{sub 50}S{sub 50−x}Se{sub x} thin films has also led to minimize the energy losses when electromagnetic waves propagate through films as well as optical conductivity and the speed of light increased. The other studied properties and parameters of Cd{sub 50}S{sub 50−x}Se{sub x} films were found to be strongly dependent upon Se-content. - Highlights: • Thermally evaporated amorphous Cd{sub 50}S{sub 50−x}Se{sub x} (30 ≤ x ≤ 50) thin films were deposited. • Refractive index and absorption index were used to determine almost all properties. • Dielectric properties, Drude parameters and electronic polarizability were studied. • Addition of more Se to CdSSe matrix led to improve the opto-electrical properties. • New data were obtained and

  7. The optical parameters of γ-irradiated and annealed thin films of Ge{sub 15}Se{sub 50}Te{sub 35}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, M., E-mail: m.mohamed@aun.edu.eg; Moustafa, S.; Abd-Elnaiem, A.M.; Abdel-Rahim, M.A.

    2015-10-25

    The influence of annealing and γ-irradiation on the optical and structural parameters of Ge{sub 15}Se{sub 50}Te{sub 35} films synthesized by thermal evaporation technique was investigated. The samples were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) techniques. XRD analysis showed that the as-prepared films are amorphous, while the annealed ones are polycrystalline. The presence of the crystalline particles in the annealed films is attributed to Se and GeSe{sub 2} phases, which have a monoclinic and an orthorhombic lattice structure, respectively. The observation of glass transition, at 465 ± 1 K, and crystallization peaks, at 625 ± 1 K, in DSC curve confirms the glassy as well as the amorphous nature of the studied composition. On the other side, the analysis of the absorption spectra in the wavelength range (200–900 nm) of annealed and γ-irradiated Ge{sub 15}Se{sub 50}Te{sub 35} thin films reveals that the allowed indirect transitions are responsible for inter-band transitions. The indirect band gap of Ge{sub 15}Se{sub 50}Te{sub 35} films was found to decrease from 1.44 to 1.21 eV and from 1.44 to 1.27 eV with increasing the annealing temperature and irradiation dose, respectively. Other optical parameters such as the extinction coefficient and the refractive index were calculated, which depend on thermal annealing and γ-irradiation. These results are interpreted in terms of the structure defects formed in the investigated annealed and irradiated films. - Highlights: • The Ge{sub 15}Se{sub 50}Te{sub 35} thin films were prepared by thermal evaporation technique. • The amorphous state of investigated thin films was confirmed by XRD. • XRD and SEM analysis of annealed films reveal the appearance of crystallites. • The heat treatment as well as the irradiation affected the optical parameters. • The γ-irradiation resulted in a

  8. Fiber-coupled high-speed asynchronous optical sampling with sub-50 fs time resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, N; Nast, A; Heinecke, D C; Kölbl, C; Barros, H G; Dekorsy, T

    2015-02-09

    We present a fiber-coupled pump-probe system with a sub-50 fs time resolution and a nanosecond time window, based on high-speed asynchronous optical sampling. By use of a transmission grism pulse compressor, we achieve pump pulses with a pulse duration of 42 fs, an average power of 300 mW and a peak power exceeding 5 kW at a pulse repetition rate of 1 GHz after 6 m of optical fiber. With this system we demonstrate thickness mapping of soft X-ray mirrors at a sub-nm thickness resolution on a cm(2) scan area. In addition, terahertz field generation with resolved spectral components of up to 3.5 THz at a GHz frequency resolution is demonstrated.

  9. Nucleation and growth of sub-3 nm particles in the polluted urban atmosphere of a megacity in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distribution down to 1.4 nm was measured in the urban atmosphere of Nanjing, China, in spring, summer, and winter during 2014–2015. Sub-3 nm particle event, which is equivalent to nucleation event, occurred on 42 out of total 90 observation days, but new particles could grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN-active sizes on only 9 days. In summer, infrequent nucleation was limited by both unfavorable meteorological conditions (high temperature and relative humidity – RH and reduced anthropogenic precursor availability due to strict emission control measures during the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing. The limiting factors for nucleation in winter and spring were meteorological conditions (radiation, temperature, and RH and condensation sink, but for the further growth of sub-3 nm particles to CCN-active sizes, anthropogenic precursors again became limiting factors. Nucleation events were strong in the polluted urban atmosphere. Initial J1.4 at the onset and peak J1.4 at the noontime could be up to 2.1 × 102 and 2.5 × 103 cm−3 s−1, respectively, during the eight nucleation events selected from different seasons. Time-dependent J1.4 usually showed good linear correlations with a sulfuric acid proxy for every single event (R2 = 0.56–0.86, excluding a day with significant nocturnal nucleation, but the correlation among all eight events deteriorated (R2 =  0.17 due to temperature or season change. We observed that new particle growth rate (GR did not increase monotonically with particle size, but had a local maximum up to 25 nm h−1 between 1 and 3 nm. The existence of local maxima GR in sub-3 nm size range, though sensitive to measurement uncertainties, gives new insight into cluster dynamics in polluted environments. In this study such growth rate behavior was interpreted as the solvation effect of organic activating vapor in newly formed inorganic nuclei.

  10. On the High Sensitivity of the Electronic States of 1 nm Gold Particles to Pretreatments and Modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana Martynyuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of modifiers and pretreatments on the electronic states of 1 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs supported on silica was systematically studied. AuNPs deposited on silica (particle size of 2–4 nm modified with Ce, La and Fe oxides, were studied by FTIR of adsorbed CO after different redox treatments at 100, 300 and 500 °C. This study was conducted at room temperature to allow detecting the electronic states of gold, which is more likely involved in CO oxidation at the same temperature. AuNP size distribution was measured by HRTEM. It is shown that the electronic state of gold species (Aunδ−, Au0, Aunδ+, Au+ in 1 nm AuNPs is sensitive to the modifier as well as to the temperatures of redox pretreatments. Supports modified with the same additives but containing larger AuNPs (~3, 4, 5, and 7 nm were also studied. They showed that Au0 remains stable irrespective of additives and redox pretreatments, indicating no significant effect of such treatments on the electronic properties of larger AuNPs. Samples with a predominant AuNP size of 2 nm are an intermediate case between these two groups of materials.

  11. Angular distributions of emitted particles by laser ablation of silver at 355 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver in vacuum has been measured in situ with an array of quartz-crystal microbalances. The silver surface was irradiated by ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 355 nm for fluences ranging from 0.7 J/cm2 to 8 J/cm2. The distribution is strongly...... peaked in the forward direction corresponding to cosp/, where p varies from 5 to 12 for the largest beam spot, but is less peaked for the smallest beam spots. The total collected yield of ablated atoms is about 221015 Ag atoms per pulse for the highest pulse energies....

  12. Synthesis of highly ordered 30 nm NiFe2O4 particles by the microwave-combustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, M. H.; Elshahawy, A. M.; Makhlouf, Salah A.; Hamdeh, H. H.

    2014-11-01

    NiFe2O4 of 30 nm average size was synthesized by microwave combustion and subsequent solid state reaction at 1273 K. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, TEM, vibrating sample magnetometery and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The microwave combustion produced materials were comprised chemically of ferrites and a smaller amount of hematite. The NiFe2O4 particles have the cubic spinel structure with crystallites of sizes less than 10 nm, and were found to have low magnetization, and essentially no hysteresis loop; characteristics of superparamagnetism. Upon annealing at temperatures 973 K and below, crystallite growth was accompanied by increase in both coercive field and magnetization. The coercive field was a maximum for the sample annealed at 973 K. On the other hand, crystallite growth at higher annealing temperatures yielded mainly ferrites and improvement in soft magnetic properties. Mössbauer and magnetization measurements indicate that the fine NiFe2O4 particles produced at the annealing temperature of 1273 K are in good chemical and magnetic order, excluding the spins arrangement at the surface of the particles which show spin glass-like behavior.

  13. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  14. Appearance of metastable B2 phase during solidification of Ni <sub>50 Zr <sub>50 alloy: electrostatic levitation and molecular dynamics simulation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirinale, D. G. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States). Div. of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Rustan, G. E. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States). Div. of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Wilson, S. R. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States). Div. of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Kramer, M. J. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States). Div. of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Goldman, A. I. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States). Div. of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mendelev, M. I. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States). Div. of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2015-02-04

    High-energy x-ray diffraction measurements of undercooled, electrostatically levitated Ni<sub>50Zr<sub>50 liquid droplets were performed. The observed solidification pathway proceeded through the nucleation and growth of the metastable B2 phase, which persisted for several seconds before the rapid appearance of the stable B33 phase. This sequence is shown to be consistent with predictions from classical nucleation theory using data obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A plausible mechanism for the B2–B33 transformation is proposed and investigated through further MD simulations.

  15. Using a SMALP platform to determine a sub-nm single particle cryo-EM membrane protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben; Rawson, Shaun; Scarff, Charlotte A; Goldman, Adrian; Dafforn, Timothy R; Muench, Stephen P; Postis, Vincent L G

    2018-02-01

    The field of membrane protein structural biology has been revolutionized over the last few years with a number of high profile structures being solved using cryo-EM including Piezo, Ryanodine receptor, TRPV1 and the Glutamate receptor. Further developments in the EM field hold the promise of even greater progress in terms of greater resolution, which for membrane proteins is still typically within the 4-7Å range. One advantage of a cryo-EM approach is the ability to study membrane proteins in more "native" like environments for example proteoliposomes, amphipols and nanodiscs. Recently, styrene maleic acid co-polymers (SMA) have been used to extract membrane proteins surrounded by native lipids (SMALPs) maintaining a more natural environment. We report here the structure of the Escherichia coli multidrug efflux transporter AcrB in a SMALP scaffold to sub-nm resolution, with the resulting map being consistent with high resolution crystal structures and other EM derived maps. However, both the C-terminal helix (TM12) and TM7 are poorly defined in the map. These helices are at the exterior of the helical bundle and form the greater interaction with the native lipids and SMA polymer and may represent a more dynamic region of the protein. This work shows the promise of using an SMA approach for single particle cryo-EM studies to provide sub-nm structures. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of decreasing activated carbon particle diameter from 30 μm to 140 nm on equilibrium adsorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Long; Nishimura, Yuki; Takaesu, Hideki; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2017-11-01

    The capacity of activated carbon particles with median diameters (D50s) of >∼1 μm for adsorption of hydrophobic micropollutants such as 2-methylisolborneol (MIB) increases with decreasing particle size because the pollutants are adsorbed mostly on the exterior (shell) of the particles owing to the limited diffusion penetration depth. However, particles with D50s of adsorption capacities for MIB and several other environmentally relevant adsorbates. The adsorption capacities for low-molecular-weight adsorbates, including MIB, deceased with decreasing particle size for D50s of less than a few micrometers, whereas adsorption capacities increased with decreasing particle size for larger particles. The oxygen content of the particles increased substantially with decreasing particle size for D50s of less than a few micrometers, and oxygen content was negatively correlated with adsorption capacity. The decrease in adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size for the smaller particles was due to particle oxidation during the micromilling procedure used to decrease D50 to ∼140 nm. When oxidation was partially inhibited, the MIB adsorption capacity decrease was attenuated. For high-molecular-weight adsorbates, adsorption capacity increased with decreasing particle size over the entire range of tested particle sizes, even though particle oxygen content increased with decreasing particle size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative study of cylindrical and parallel-plate electrophoretic separations for the removal of ions and sub-23 nm particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tongzhu; Yang, Yixin; Liu, Jianguo; Gui, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jiaoshi; Cheng, Yin; Wang, Wenyu; Du, Peng; Wang, Jie; Wang, Huanqin

    2017-12-01

    Cylindrical and parallel-plate electrophoretic separations for the removal of ions and sub-23 nm particles were compared in this study. First, COMSOL Multiphysics® software was utilized to simulate the ion and particle trajectories inside both electrophoretic separations. The results show that ions and sub-23 nm particles are removed simultaneously and that all particles can pass through both electrophoretic separations smoothly at a trap voltage of 25 V. The experimental results show that ion losses become smaller with increasing ion flow rates, and ion losses of the cylindrical and parallel-plate electrophoretic separations range from 56.2 to 71.6% and from 43.8 to 59.6%, respectively, at ion flow rates ranging from 1-3 L/min. For the removal of ions and sub-23 nm particles, the collection efficiency of both electrophoretic separations can reach 100%, but the parallel-plate electrophoretic separation requires a lower trap voltage. The particle loss of the parallel-plate electrophoretic separation is under approximately 10%, which is lower than that of the cylindrical electrophoretic separation. In particular, for large particles (800-2500 nm), the particle losses inside the cylindrical electrophoretic separation are approximately two times higher than those inside the parallel-plate electrophoretic separation. The parallel-plate electrophoretic separation is beneficial for the removal of ions and sub-23 nm particles. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  19. Origin of the strain glass transition in Ti{sub 50}(Ni{sub 50−x} D{sub x}) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Shang, Jia-Xiang, E-mail: shangjx@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Wang, Fu-He [Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing, 100048 (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: yuechen@hku.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2016-09-05

    Direct evidence was recently discovered for the unique strain glass (STG) transition, which breaks the local symmetries (PRL 112, 025701 (2014)). To understand the origin of the STG transition, the effects of doping point defects on Ti{sub 50}(Ni{sub 50−x} D{sub x}) are investigated using first-principle calculations. The experimental observation that STG only exists in a limited range of chemical composition x is successfully rationalized. The mechanisms that correspond to the division of a system into domains with distinctly different compositions are found to be directly related to a dip in the defect formation energy. - Highlights: • The strain glass transition phenomenon in Ti−Ni-based alloys is rationalized. • The electronic-structure origins of the strain glass transition are uncovered. • The separation of domains with different compositions is explained.

  20. Influence of physical properties and chemical composition of sample on formation of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond laser ablation at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa, E-mail: mhola@sci.muni.c [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Konecna, Veronika [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of sample properties and composition on the size and concentration of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser ablation at 213 nm was investigated for three sets of different materials, each containing five specimens with a similar matrix (Co-cemented carbides with a variable content of W and Co, steel samples with minor differences in elemental content and silica glasses with various colors). The concentration of ablated particles (particle number concentration, PNC) was measured in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 mum) using an optical aerosol spectrometer. The shapes and volumes of the ablation craters were obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by an optical profilometer, respectively. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using SEM. The results of particle concentration measurements showed a significant dominance of particles smaller than 250 nm in comparison with larger particles, irrespective of the kind of material. Even if the number of particles larger than 0.25 mum is negligible (up to 0.1%), the volume of large particles that left the ablation cell can reach 50% of the whole particle volume depending on the material. Study of the ablation craters and the laser-generated particles showed a various number of particles produced by different ablation mechanisms (particle splashing or condensation), but the similar character of released particles for all materials was observed by SEM after particle collection on the membrane filter. The created aerosol always consisted of two main structures - spherical particles with diameters from tenths to units of micrometers originally ejected from the molten surface layer and mum-sized 'fibres' composed of primary agglomerates with diameters in the range between tens and hundreds of nanometers. The shape and structure of ablation craters were in good agreement with particle concentration

  1. Efecto del tiempo de molienda sobre la estabilidad termica del amorfo Mg<sub>50Ni<sub>50 producido mediante aleado mecánico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán, D.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the relationship between the milling time used in the production of Mg<sub>50Ni<sub>50 amorphous alloy and its thermal stability, seven amorphous alloys were produced by milling for 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 and 60 h each sample. The obtained powders were morphological and structurally characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Xray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, respectively. The thermal stability of amorphous alloys was study by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that the increase in the added energy when milling for longer time causes the homogenization of the microstructure with an increase in amorphous phase, which dissolves a larger amount of nickel in its structure. Therefore, the simultaneous crystallization of the Mg2Ni and MgNi2 intermetallic compounds at 345 °C can be explained.

    Para estudiar la relación entre el tiempo de molienda aplicado en la obtención de una aleación amorfa Mg<sub>50Ni<sub>50 producida por aleado mecánico (AM y su estabilidad térmica, se fabricaron siete aleaciones amorfas con tiempos de molienda de 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 y 60 h. Los polvos se caracterizaron morfológica y microestructuralmente mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido (MEB y pruebas conjuntas de difracción de rayos-X (DRX y microscopía electrónica de transmisión (MET, respectivamente. La estabilidad térmica de las aleaciones fue estudiada por calorimetría diferencial de barrido (CDB. Con base en los resultados obtenidos se determinó que el aumento en la cantidad de energía adicionada a los polvos mediante tiempos prolongados de AM, homogeneiza la microestructura de éstos, produciendo un aumento de la cantidad de fase amorfa, la cual posee una mayor cantidad de níquel en su estructura, lo que facilita la cristalización simultanea del Mg2Ni y MgNi2

  2. Evidence of magnetic dipolar interaction in micrometric powders of the Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} system: Melted alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Alcazar, G.A., E-mail: gpgeperez@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Unidad Asociada ICMM-IMA, Apdo. 155, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain); Zamora, L.E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Unidad Asociada ICMM-IMA, Apdo. 155, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain); Tabares, J.A.; Piamba, J.F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Gonzalez, J.M. [Unidad Asociada ICMM-IMA, Apdo. 155, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain); Greneche, J.M. [LUNAM, Universite du Maine, Institut des Molecules et Materiaux du Mans, UMR CNRS 6283, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Martinez, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, P.O. Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Romero, J.J. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Marco, J.F. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    Powders of melted disordered Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} alloy were separated at different mean particle sizes as well as magnetically and structurally characterized. All the samples are BCC and show the same nanostructure. Particles larger than 250 {mu}m showed a lamellar shape compared to smaller particles, which exhibited a more regular form. All the samples are ferromagnetic at room temperature and showed reentrant spin-glass (RSG) and superparamagnetic (SP)-like behaviors between 30 and 60 K and 265 and > 280 K, respectively, as a function of frequency and particle size. The freezing temperature increases with increasing particle size while the blocking one decreases with particle size. The origin of these magnetic phenomena relies in the internal disordered character of samples and the competitive interaction of Fe and Mn atoms. The increase of their critical freezing temperature with increasing mean particle size is due to the increase of the magnetic dipolar interaction between the magnetic moment of each particle with the field produced by the other magnetic moments of their surrounding particles. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of particle size in microsized powders of Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} melted disordered alloy is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dipolar magnetic interaction between particles exists and this changes with the particle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For all the particle sizes the reentrant spin- glass and the superparamagnetic-like phases exist. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RSG and SP critical temperatures increase with increasing the dipolar magnetic interaction (the mean particle size).

  3. Microwave absorption properties of lightweight absorber based on Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50}-coated poly(acrylonitrile) microspheres and reduced graphene oxide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin [School of Material Science And Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: wgdfrp@whut.edu.cn [School of Material Science And Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Junpeng; Huo, Siqi [School of Material Science And Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Bin [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Tang, Yushan [School of Material Science And Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we proposed a facile method to obtain the lightweight composites consisting of surface modified Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50}-coated poly(acrylonitrile) microspheres (PANS@SMF), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and epoxy resin. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Impedance matching condition and electromagnetic wave attenuation characteristic were used for the reflection loss (RL) performance of the composites. Compared with pure PANS@SMF and RGO composites, the −10 dB absorption bandwidth and the minimum RL of the hybrid composites were enhanced. The bandwidth less than −10 dB was almost 4.5 GHz in the range of 10 GHz to 14.5 GHz, with a matching thickness of 2.5 mm. The density of the hybrid composites was in the range of 0.25–0.34 g/cm{sup 3}. Therefore, the hybrid composite can be considered as a potential lightweight microwave absorber. - Highlights: • PANS@SMF – RGO epoxy composite was fabricated by a facile method. • The absorption bandwidth less than −10 dB can reach up to 4.5 GHz with layer thickness of 2.5 mm. • The density of the composites is in the range of 0.25–0.34 g/cm{sup 3} and can be considered as a lightweight microwave absorber.

  4. Effect of W additions on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50−x}W{sub x} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}W{sub x} systems obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jara, Angelica; Arjona, Jose David; Bautista, Pedro; Gonzalez, Gema, E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.gob.ve

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • W additions strongly affect the magnetic and structural properties of Ni-Ti. • The saturation magnetization and magnetic remanence decreases with W addition. • W additions induces amophization of Ni-Ti. - Abstract: The effect of tungsten (W{sub x}) additions (x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 at.%), on the structural and magnetic properties of the binary systems Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50−x} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x} obtained by mechanical alloying was studied. The elementary powders were milled in a Spex 8000 horizontal mill, under N{sub 2} atmosphere, for 5 and 20 h. After 20 h of milling a homogenous microstructure was observed, particularly for small W additions. For this milling time a mixed of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure was obtained. As W concentration increases (1, 1.5 and 2 at.%), in both systems, the presence of small β-W reflections and the presence of very small peaks corresponding to the formation of an incipient new phase, identified as a NiTi(W) solid solution was observed, especially evident for 2 at.%W. The saturation magnetization and magnetic remanence decreases with the addition of W down to a minimum value at 1.5 at.%W, for both systems. The samples were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD and magnetic measurements by VSM. The structural and magnetic behavior for both ternary alloys was very similar with the W additions.

  5. EUV blank defect and particle inspection with high throughput immersion AFM with 1nm 3D resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, M.H. van; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2016-01-01

    Inspection of EUV mask substrates and blanks is demanding. We envision this is a good target application for massively parallel Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We envision to do a full surface characterization of EUV masks with AFM enabling 1nm true 3D resolution over the entire surface. The limiting

  6. Analysis of Individual Carbonaceous Particles Emitted from the Las Conchas Wildfire, Los Alamos, NM, in June-July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Flowers, B. A.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol emitted from biomass burning contributes significantly to atmospheric aerosol loadings regionally and globally. The net direct radiative forcing of biomass burning aerosol can be positive and/or negative and this depends on its composition, morphology and mixing state. Biomass burning aerosols can also change the cloud properties as they can act as cloud condensation nuclei. In this study we investigated biomass burning particles emitted from the Las Conchas wildfire in northern New Mexico that started on June 26, 2011 and burned an area of 245 square miles. Aerosol samples were collected on nucleopore filters at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the third week of the wildfire event. Individual particles (~4000) were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to distinguish different carbonaceous particles and their shape, size, elemental composition and mixing state. A thermo-denuder was used to remove compounds that are volatile at temperatures up to 200 C, leaving behind the black carbon and any compounds that did not volatize completely. Smoke particles consisted of a) tar balls, which are amorphous spherical carbonaceous organic aerosols; b) organic particles with inorganic inclusions, c) soot particles and (d) soot with various inclusions. Two distinct kinds of tar balls, "electronically" dark and bright, were found using the field-emission scanning electron microscopy and were characterized for ambient and denuded conditions to understand coating effects and aging. It was found that dark tar balls are generally larger in size than the bright ones. Additionally, the difference between the size of ambient-bright and the size of denuded-bright tar balls was larger than the difference between the size of ambient-dark and the size of denuded-dark tar balls. EDS analysis showed that 70% of the dark tar balls had higher (~60%) relative oxygen content than in the bright

  7. Surface areas of turbostratic graphitic carbons prepared from a resin using nickel particles, 20 nm, as graphitization catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, A.; Inoue, E.; Otani, S.; Marsh, H.

    1981-11-01

    Nickel particles were used to graphitize catalytically a non-graphitizing carbon to create a turbostratic graphitic material called the T/SUB/s-component. This method was examined by X-ray diffraction. Coals on heat treatment to temperatures >1270 K form T/SUB/s-component carbons. Therefore, considerations of the properties of the T/SUB/s-component carbon may have relevance to considerations of the operational performances of blast furnace coke. (22 refs.)

  8. LC/sub 50/ test results in polychlorinated biphenyl-fed mink: age, season, and diet comparisons. [Mustela vison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornshaw, T.C.; Safronoff, J.; Ringer, R.K.; Aulerich, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    The toxicity of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture to mink (Mustela vison) was evaluated through three dietary LC/sub 50/ tests. These test were designed to assess the effects of age of the test animals, composition of the diet, and season and year on the results of 28-day dietary LC/sub 50/ tests. A dose-dependent weight loss was noted for animals in all tests and similar dietary LC/sub 50/s were calculated for all three trials, both at the end of the 28-day exposure period (83, 84, and 79 ppm) and after a 7-day withdrawal period (58, 47, and 49 ppm). Based on all test criteria, age, dietary composition, season, and year had little effect on the outcome of the LC/sub 50/ tests. The withdrawal period was important in determining the toxicity of Aroclor 1254 and should be considered in assessing the toxicity of other slow-acting, lipophilic compounds.

  9. Heat treatment and thickness-dependent electrical study of Se{sub 50}Te{sub 20}S{sub 30} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-Elrahman, M.I.; Hafiz, M.M.; Qasem, Ammar; Abdel-Rahim, M.A. [Assiut University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Chalcogenide Se{sub 50}Te{sub 20}S{sub 30} thin film of different thickness was deposited using thermal evaporation technique. The thermogram of the chalcogenide bulk Se{sub 50}Te{sub 20}S{sub 30} was obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with heating rate of 7.5 K/min. The glass transition temperature T{sub g}, crystallization temperature T{sub c} and peak crystallization temperature T{sub p} were identified. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) examination indicates the amorphous nature of the as-deposited film and polycrystalline structure of the thermal annealed ones. The dark electrical resistivity (ρ) measurements were taken in temperature range (300-500 K) and thickness range (200-450 nm). Analysis of the electrical resistivity results revealed two types of conduction mechanisms: conduction due to extended states in the temperature range (T > T{sub c}) and variable range hopping in the temperature range (T < T{sub c}). The effect of the heat treatment and thickness on the density of localized states at the Fermi level N(E{sub F}) and hopping parameters were studied. (orig.)

  10. Gamma {sup 60} Co D L {sub 50/30} of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Elaine Barros da Costa; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonca de Albuquerque; Motta, Mauricy Alves da [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia

    1999-12-01

    The variation of resistance to {sup 60} Co gamma-rays of Biomphalaria glabrata was studied. A population of 480 mollusks was observed during 30 days - distributed in 8 groups of snails isolated and 8 groups of snails in colonies - after exposure (30 snails per group per dose) to increasing doses of gamma radiation. Doses of 10, 20 40, 60, 80, 160, 320 and 640 Gy from a Gamma-cell {sup 60} Co irradiator, were applied to the test groups and two groups control (non-irradiated) of snails - isolated and colony - were kept apart. After have been exposed, the snails were drew back to the aquaria where they were maintained before. The survival was estimated on a daily score of the alive animals in each group-dose, starting after the irradiation exposure day. As a result, the survival self-fertilization forms (DL{sub 50/30}=218.2 Gy) was found greater than in cross-fecundation forms. These data point to allow radio-resistance on the cross-fertilization forms - the sexual reproductive form - which is most found in nature. The lower radio-resistance of the cross-fertilization forms suggests the presence of some sex-linked hormonal factor related to this phenomenon. (author)

  11. Determination of gamma radiation lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) and resveratrol cytotoxicity level in tumor cells line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP) Secao de Culturas Celulares, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with high incidence and it is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a polyphenol occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. This polyphenol possesses a pharmacological activity of carcinogenesis inhibition in multiple levels. It also protects cells by scavenging the free radicals which are considered toxic products. These free radicals are formed of natural process of cell aging and also by incidence of ionizing radiation in the organism. Thus, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol may be considered as a radiosensitizing. The aim of this work was the determination of radiation lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) and also verifies the cytotoxicity level of resveratrol in tumor cells line: muco epidermoid pulmonary carcinoma cells (NCI-H292) and rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD). The cytotoxicity test was performed by neutral red uptake assay. The results of resveratrol IC{sub 50%} in NCI-H292 cells was 192{mu}M and in RD cells was 128{mu}M; and RD cells gamma radiation LD{sub 50} was 435Gy. (author)

  12. Low temperature study of micrometric powder of melted Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Ligia E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Perez Alcazar, G.A., E-mail: gpgeperez@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Tabares, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Romero, J.J. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, P.O. Box 155, Las Rozas, 28230 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, J.M. [Unidad Asociada ICMM-IMA, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Marco, J.F. [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, c/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-06-15

    Melted Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} alloy powder with particle size less than 40 {mu}m was characterized at room temperature by XRD, SEM and XPS; and at low temperatures by Moessbauer spectrometry, ac susceptibility, and magnetization analysis. The results show that the sample is BCC ferromagnetic but with a big contribution of paramagnetic sites, and presents super-paramagnetic and re-entrant spin-glass phases with critical temperatures of 265 and 35 K, respectively. The presence of the different phases detected is due to the disordered character of the sample and the competitive magnetic interactions. The obtained values of the saturation magnetization and the coercive field as a function of temperature present a behavior which indicates a ferromagnetic phase. However, the behavior of the FC curve and that of the coercive field as a function of temperature suggest that the dipolar magnetic interaction between particles contributes to the internal magnetic field in the same way as was reported for nanoparticulate powders.

  13. AFM visualization of sub-50nm polyplex disposition to the nuclear pore complex without compromising the integrity of the nuclear envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helene; Parhamifar, Ladan; Hunter, A Christy

    2016-01-01

    It has been questioned as to whether polyplexes in the cytoplasm can reach the nuclear compartment and if so in what form. By applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complexes, we demonstrate that disposition of polyethylenimine (PEI)/DNA polyplexes...

  14. On-state and RF performance investigation of sub-50 nm L-DUMGAC MOSFET design for high-speed logic and switching applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaujar, Rishu; Kaur, Ravneet; Saxena, Manoj; Gupta, Mridula; Gupta, R. S.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, an extensive study on the on-state, switching and RF performance of a laterally amalgamated dual material gate concave (L-DUMGAC) MOSFET and the influence of technology variations such as gate length, negative junction depth (NJD) and gate bias on the device's behavior is performed using an ATLAS device simulator. Simulations reveal that the L-DUMGAC design exhibits a significant enhancement in the device's switching characteristics in terms of reduced on-resistance and, hence, the reduced conduction power loss, switching loss and enhanced on-current, ION. Further, the L-DUMGAC design is studied for the RF application circuit design by examining the stability, cut-off frequency, power gains and the parasitic capacitances. The results are, thus, useful for optimizing the performance and reliability of nanoscale L-DUMGAC MOSFETs for high-speed logic, switching and RF applications.

  15. Sub-50 fs excited state dynamics of 6-chloroguanine upon deep ultraviolet excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayan; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2016-05-18

    The photophysical properties of natural nucleobases and their respective nucleotides are ascribed to the sub-picosecond lifetime of their first singlet states in the UV-B region (260-350 nm). Electronic transitions of the ππ* type, which are stronger than those in the UV-B region, lie at the red edge of the UV-C range (100-260 nm) in all isolated nucleobases. The lowest energetic excited states in the UV-B region of nucleobases have been investigated using a plethora of experimental and theoretical methods in gas and solution phases. The sub-picosecond lifetime of these molecules is not a general attribute of all nucleobases but specific to the five primary nucleobases and a few xanthine and methylated derivatives. To determine the overall UV photostability, we aim to understand the effect of more energetic photons lying in the UV-C region on nucleobases. To determine the UV-C initiated photophysics of a nucleobase system, we chose a halogen substituted purine, 6-chloroguanine (6-ClG), that we had investigated previously using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have performed quantitative measurements of the resonance Raman cross-section across the Bb absorption band (210-230 nm) and constructed the Raman excitation profiles. We modeled the excitation profiles using Lee and Heller's time-dependent theory of resonance Raman intensities to extract the initial excited state dynamics of 6-ClG within 30-50 fs after photoexcitation. We found that imidazole and pyrimidine rings of 6-ClG undergo expansion and contraction, respectively, following photoexcitation to the Bb state. The amount of distortions of the excited state structure from that of the ground state structure is reflected by the total internal reorganization energy that is determined at 112 cm(-1). The contribution of the inertial component of the solvent response towards the total reorganization energy was obtained at 1220 cm(-1). In addition, our simulation also yields an instantaneous response of the first

  16. Pulmonary toxicity and fate of agglomerated 10 and 40 nm aluminum oxyhydroxides following 4-week inhalation exposure of rats: toxic effects are determined by agglomerated, not primary particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    Inhaled polydisperse micronsized agglomerated particulates composed of nanosized primary particles may exert their pulmonary toxicity in either form, depending on whether these tightly associated structures are disintegrated within the biological system or not. This hypothesis was tested in a rat bioassay using two calcined aluminum oxyhydroxides (AlOOH) consisting of primary particles in the range of 10-40 nm. Male Wistar rats were nose-only exposed to 0.4, 3, and 28 mg/m(3) in two 4-week (6 h/day, 5 days/week) inhalation studies followed by a 3-month postexposure period. The respective mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of agglomerated particles in inhalation chambers was 1.7 and 0.6 mum. At serial sacrifices, pulmonary toxicity was characterized by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. The retention kinetics of aluminum (Al) was determined in lung tissue, BAL cells, and selected extrapulmonary organs, including lung-associated lymph nodes (LALNs). Significant changes in BAL, lung, and LALN weights occurred at 28 mg/m(3). Histopathology revealed alveolar macrophages with enlarged and foamy appearance, increased epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and focal septal thickening. The determination of aluminum in lung tissue shows that the cumulative lung dose was higher following exposure to AlOOH-40 nm/MMAD-0.6 mum than to AlOOH-10 nm/MMAD-1.7 mum, despite identical exposure concentrations. The associated pulmonary inflammatory response appears to be principally dependent on the agglomerated rather than primary particle size. Despite high lung burdens, conclusively increased extrapulmonary organ burdens did not occur at any exposure concentration and postexposure time point. Particle-induced pulmonary inflammation was restricted to cumulative doses exceeding approximately 1 mg AlOOH/g lung following 4-week exposure at 28 mg/m(3). It is concluded that the pulmonary toxicity of nanosized, agglomerated AlOOH particles appears to be determined by the

  17. Particle emission from polymer-doped water ice matrices induced by non-linear absorption of laser light at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, A.; Schou, Jørgen; Dinescu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Emission of PEG (polyethylene glycol) molecules and ions from an ice target induced by laser irradiation in the infrared (IR) regime at 1064 nm was studied. Matrices of 1 wt% PEG flash-frozen solutions were used for polymer deposition with MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation). Even...... though linear absorption in defect-free water ice is two orders of magnitude larger at 1064 ran than 355 nm, the deposition rate and ion current density are much smaller for IR than for ultraviolet laser light. The similarity of results for both wavelengths indicates that non-linear absorption...

  18. Acute toxicity of metals and reference toxicants to a freshwater ostracod, Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 and correlation to EC{sub 50} values of other test models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangarot, B.S., E-mail: bkhangarot@hotmail.com [Ecotoxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly: Industrial Toxicology Research Centre), Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Das, Sangita [Ecotoxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly: Industrial Toxicology Research Centre), Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2009-12-30

    The ostracod Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 static bioassay test on the basis of a 48 h of 50% of immobilization (EC{sub 50}) has been used to measure the toxicity of 36 metals and metalloids and 12 reference toxicants. Among the 36 metals and metalloids, osmium (Os) was found to be the most toxic in the test while boron (B), the least toxic. The EC{sub 50} values of this study revealed positive linear relationship with the established test models of cladoceran (Daphnia magna), sludge worm (Tubifex tubifex), chironomid larvae (Chironomus tentans), protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and aquatic macrophyte duckweed (Lemna minor). Correlation coefficients (r{sup 2}) for 17 physicochemical properties of metals or metal ions and EC{sub 50}s (as pM) were examined by linear regression analysis. The electronegativity, ionization potential, melting point, solubility product of metal sulfides (pK{sub sp}), softness parameter and some other physicochemical characteristics were significantly correlated with EC{sub 50}s of metals to C. subglobosa. The reproducibility of toxicity test was determined using 12 reference toxicants. The coefficient of variability of the EC{sub 50}s ranged from 6.95% to 55.37% and variability was comparable to that noticed for D. magna and other aquatic test models. The study demonstrated the need to include crustacean ostracods in a battery of biotests to detect the presence of hazardous chemicals in soils, sewage sludges, sediments and aquatic systems.

  19. Superimposition of carbon dioxide on acute isobaric hypoxia: plasma erythropoietin, acid-base status, and P/sub 50/ in the unanesthetized rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf-Priessnitz, J.

    1978-06-01

    Major factors affecting changes of the arterial Hb--O/sub 2/ affinity (P/sub 50/) were examined in relation to the initiation of erythropoietin (ESF) production in unanesthetized New Zealand white male rabbits. They were exposed to an isobaric hypoxic environment (8.8 percent O/sub 2/) with and without CO/sub 2/ (5.6 percent or 10 percent). During 5 hrs exposure, samples of arterial blood were collected for measurements of plasma ESF titers; whole-blood pH, P/sub CO2/, S/sub O2/, lactate, pyruvate, and P/sub 50/; and intraerythrocytic 2,3-DPG, ATP and ADP. Exposure to 8.8 percent oxygen alone stimulated ESF production and caused a leftward shift in the in vivo P/sub 50/; the addition of CO/sub 2/ significantly inhibited ESF production and blocked the shift in P/sub 50//sub (i.v.)/. The data suggest that increased oxygenation of the whole-body tissues occurs with exposure to 8.8 percent O/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ as reflected by lower whole-blood excess lactate accumulation. In keeping with the prevailing theory, the suppression of ESF production is probably a result of this increased oxygenation.

  20. New particle formation in the Svalbard region 2006-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Tunved, Peter; Galí, Martí; Leck, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Events of new particle formation (NPF) were analyzed in a 10-year data set of hourly particle size distributions recorded on Mt. Zeppelin, Spitsbergen, Svalbard. Three different types of NPF events were identified through objective search algorithms. The first and simplest algorithm utilizes short-term increases in particle concentrations below 25 nm (PCT (percentiles) events). The second one builds on the growth of the sub-50 nm diameter median (DGR (diameter growth) events) and is most closely related to the classical banana type of event. The third and most complex, multiple-size approach to identifying NPF events builds on a hypothesis suggesting the concurrent production of polymer gel particles at several sizes below ca. 60 nm (MEV (multi-size growth) events). As a first and general conclusion, we can state that NPF events are a summer phenomenon and not related to Arctic haze, which is a late winter to early spring feature. The occurrence of NPF events appears to be somewhat sensitive to the available data on precipitation. The seasonal distribution of solar flux suggests some photochemical control that may affect marine biological processes generating particle precursors and/or atmospheric photochemical processes that generate condensable vapors from precursor gases. Notably, the seasonal distribution of the biogenic methanesulfonate (MSA) follows that of the solar flux although it peaks before the maxima in NPF occurrence. A host of ancillary data and findings point to varying and rather complex marine biological source processes. The potential source regions for all types of new particle formation appear to be restricted to the marginal-ice and open-water areas between northeastern Greenland and eastern Svalbard. Depending on conditions, yet to be clarified new particle formation may become visible as short bursts of particles around 20 nm (PCT events), longer events involving condensation growth (DGR events), or extended events with elevated

  1. Evaluation of 1047-nm photoacoustic instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs from gasoline and diesel powered vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, W P; Zielinska, B; Rogers, C F; Sagebiel, J; Park, Kihong; Chow, Judith; Moosmüller, Hans; Watson, John G; Kelly, K; Wagner, D; Sarofim, A; Lighty, J; Palmer, G

    2005-07-15

    A series of measurements have been performed at Hill Air Force Base to evaluate real-time instruments for measurements of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs emitted from spark and ignition compression vehicles. Vehicles were operated at idle or fast idle in one set of measurements and were placed under load on a dynamometer during the second series. Photoacoustic instruments were developed that operated at a wavelength of 1047 nm where gaseous interference is negligible, although sensitivity to black carbon is good. Compact, efficient, solid-state lasers with direct electronic modulation capabilities are used in these instruments. Black carbon measurements are compared with samples collected on quartz fiber filters that were evaluated using the thermal optical reflectance method. A measure of total particle-bound PAH was provided by photoelectric aerosol sensors (PAS) and is evaluated against a sum of PAH mass concentrations obtained with a filter-denuder combination. The PAS had to be operated with a dilution system held at approximately 150 degrees C for most of the source sampling to prevent spurious behavior, thus perhaps compromising detection of lighter PAHs. PA and PAS measurements were found to have a high degree of correlation, perhaps suggesting that the PAS can respond to the polycyclic nature of the black carbon aerosol. The PAS to PA ratio for ambient air in Fresno, CA is 3.7 times as large in winter than in summer months, suggesting that the PAS clearly does respond to compounds other than BC when the instrument is used without the heated inlet.

  2. Synthesis of stable nanosilver particles (AgNPs) by the proteins of seagrass Syringodium isoetifolium and its biomedicinal properties

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ahila, N.K.; Ramkumar, V.S.; Prakash, S.; Manikandan, B.; Ravindran, J.; Dhanalakshmi, P.K.; Kannapirana, E.

    mortality (13 ± 4.7 to 100%) with LC<sub>50 value at 4 nM concentration. Thus, the optical property, crystal structure, size, shape, stability, bactericidal activity, cytotoxicity, and biocompatibility apparently proved that the biologically...

  3. Comparison of the two relaxation peaks in the Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 48}Fe{sub 2} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Genlian, E-mail: fangenlian@gmail.com [Multi-disciplinary Materials Research Center and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Ferroic Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Zhou Yumei [Multi-disciplinary Materials Research Center and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Ferroic Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Otsuka, Kazuhiro [Ferroic Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ren Xiaobing [Multi-disciplinary Materials Research Center and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Ferroic Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Suzuki, Tetsuro [Ferroic Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Yin Fuxing [Innovative Materials Engineering Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    The internal friction (tan {delta}) and storage modulus of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 48}Fe{sub 2} alloy were studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). On cooling, a broad relaxation peak with tan {delta} value as high as 0.2 was detected in R-phase. On heating, another relaxation peak with tan {delta} value of 0.06 was found in B19' martensite. Both relaxation peaks disappeared when the alloy was dehydrogenated in a dynamic vacuum furnace. Thus, the origin of both relaxation peaks was attributed to the interaction between twin boundaries and hydrogen atoms, as recently proved in Ti-Ni-Cu alloy. The direct comparison of these two relaxation peaks in the same sample indicates that the height of relaxation peaks increases with the decreasing of twinning shear.

  4. Suppression of the ferromagnetic order in the Heusler alloy Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} by hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar Mejía, C., E-mail: Catalina.Salazar@cpfs.mpg.de; Mydeen, K.; Naumov, P.; Medvedev, S. A.; Wang, C.; Schwarz, U.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M., E-mail: nicklas@cpfs.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hanfland, M. [ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Nayak, A. K. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2016-06-27

    We report on the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the magnetic and structural properties of the shape-memory Heusler alloy Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15}. Magnetization and x-ray diffraction experiments were performed at hydrostatic pressures up to 5 GPa using diamond anvil cells. Pressure stabilizes the martensitic phase, shifting the martensitic transition to higher temperatures, and suppresses the ferromagnetic austenitic phase. Above 3 GPa, where the martensitic-transition temperature approaches the Curie temperature in the austenite, the magnetization shows no longer indications of ferromagnetic ordering. We further find an extended temperature region with a mixture of martensite and austenite phases, which directly relates to the magnetic properties.

  5. Observation of giant exchange bias in bulk Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 42}Sn{sub 8} Heusler alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Suresh, K. G., E-mail: suresh@iitb.ac.in [Magnetic Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076 (India)

    2015-02-16

    We report a giant exchange bias (EB) field of 3520 Oe in bulk Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 42}Sn{sub 8} Heusler alloy. The low temperature magnetic state of the martensite phase has been studied by DC magnetization and AC susceptibility measurements. Frequency dependence of spin freezing temperature (T{sub f}) on critical slowing down relation and observation of memory effect in zero field cooling mode confirms the super spin glass (SSG) phase at low temperatures. Large EB is attributed to the strong exchange coupling between the SSG clusters formed by small regions of ferromagnetic order embedded in an antiferromagnetic (AFM) matrix. The temperature and cooling field dependence of EB have been studied and related to the change in unidirectional anisotropy at SSG/AFM interface. The training effect also corroborates with the presence of frozen (SSG) moments at the interface and their role in EB.

  6. Animal mortality resulting from uniform exposures to photon radiations: Calculated LD/sub 50/s and a compilation of experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Wells, S.M.; Young, R.W.

    1986-12-01

    Studies conducted during the 1950s and 1960s of radiation-induced mortality to diverse animal species under various exposure protocols were compiled into a mortality data base. Some 24 variables were extracted and recomputed from each of the published studies, which were collected from a variety of available sources, primarily journal articles. Two features of this compilation effort are (1) an attempt to give an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment so that interspecies differences due to body size were minimized and (2) a recomputation of the LD/sub 50/ where sufficient experimental data are available. Exposure rates varied in magnitude from about 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup 3/ R/min. This report describes the data base, the sources of data, and the data-handling techniques; presents a bibliography of studies compiled; and tabulates data from each study. 103 refs., 44 tabs.

  7. Exchange bias behavior in Ni{sub 50.0}Mn{sub 35.5} In{sub 14.5} ribbons annealed at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, T. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Sato Turtelli, R.; Groessinger, R. [Institut fur Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Sanchez, M.L.; Santos, J.D.; Rosa, W.O.; Prida, V.M. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Escoda, Ll.; Sunol, J.J. [Campus de Montilivi, Universidad de Girona, edifici PII, Lluis Santalo s/n. 17003 Girona (Spain); Koledov, V. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Hernando, B., E-mail: grande@uniovi.es [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Heusler alloy Ni{sub 50.0}Mn{sub 35.5}In{sub 14.5} ribbons were prepared by melt-spinning technique. Several short time annealings were carried out in order to enhance the exchange bias effect in this alloy ribbon. The magnetic transition temperature increases with the annealing, compared to the as-spun sample, however no significant differences in respective Curie temperatures were observed for austenite and martensite phases in such annealed samples. Exchange bias effect is observed at low temperatures for all samples and practically vanishes at 60 K for the as-spun sample, whereas for the annealed ribbons it vanishes at 100 K.

  8. Structural and microstructural study of nanostructured Fe{sub 50}Al{sub 40}Ni{sub 10} powders produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadef, F., E-mail: hadef77@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Physico-chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, Universite de Skikda, B.P.26 Skikda (Algeria); Otmani, A. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Physico-chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, Universite de Skikda, B.P.26 Skikda (Algeria); Djekoun, A. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme et Spectroscopie des Solide, Universite de Annaba, B.P.12 Annaba (Algeria); Greneche, J.M. [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense, UMR CNRS 6087 Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France)

    2011-08-15

    A nanostructured Fe{sub 50}Al{sub 40}Ni{sub 10} mixture was prepared by mechanical alloying of elemental Fe, Al and Ni powders in a planetary ball mill. Structural and microstructural changes during the milling process were followed by X-ray diffraction technique. The patterns so obtained were analyzed using the Maud program. An ordered B2 FeAl phase is formed after 1 h of milling. The observed lattice expansion is related to the production of antisite defects; Fe{sub Al} and Al{sub Fe}. During the intermediate stages of milling, the mechanical alloying process gives rise to a mixture of two BCC {alpha}{sub i}-Fe(Al,Ni) (i = 1,2) structures with the same crystallite size but different lattice parameters, microstrains and proportions. The BCC {alpha}{sub 2}-Fe(Al,Ni) disappeared after 4 h, only the B2 FeAl and BCC {alpha}{sub 1}-Fe(Al,Ni) solid solution persist over prolonged milling times. - Research highlights: {yields} Fe{sub 50}Al{sub 40}Ni{sub 10} was prepared by MA from Fe, Al and Ni powders in a planetary ball mill. {yields} B2 FeAl is formed after 1 h of MA. Lattice expansion is related to Fe{sub Al} and Al{sub Fe} defects. {yields} MA gives rise to 2 BCC structures with the same L but different a, <{sigma}{sup 2}>{sup 1/2} and %.

  9. Structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of Heusler alloys Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 38}Sb{sub 12} with boron addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nong, N.V., E-mail: ngno@risoe.dtu.dk [Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Tai, L.T. [Cryogenic Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, Hanoi University of Science, Vietnam National University, 334 Nguyen Trai, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Huy, N.T. [PetroVietnam University, 173 Trung Kinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trung, N.T. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, TU Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Bahl, C.R.H.; Venkatesh, R.; Poulsen, F.W.; Pryds, N. [Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2011-09-25

    Highlights: > We investigate the influence of the additional boron atoms on the structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of Heusler alloys Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 38}Sb{sub 12}B{sub x} with x = 1, 3, and 5. > We found that both the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic austenitic transition (T{sub C}) and the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic martensitic transition (T{sub M}) are tunable by varying the boron concentration. > Temperature dependent X-ray diffraction clearly shows a martensitic-austenitic magneto-structural transformation on heating. > Interestingly, the addition of boron atoms into the lattice favours the ferromagnetic ordering relatively to the antiferromagnetic arrangement below T{sub M}. This consequently affects on the magneto-structural transition as well as the size of magnetocaloric effect at T{sub M}. - Abstract: We report on the structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of the Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 38}Sb{sub 12}B{sub x} alloys in term of boron addition with x = 1, 3 and 5. We have found that both the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic austenitic transition (T{sub C}) and the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic martensitic transition (T{sub M}) are sensitively influenced by the boron addition: T{sub C} tends to increase, while T{sub M} decreases with increasing boron concentration. Temperature dependent X-ray diffraction in the range of 200-500 K clearly shows an evolution of the structural transformation from orthorhombic to cubic structure phase transition on heating for the x = 1 and 3 samples. Strikingly, the addition of boron atoms into the lattice favours the ferromagnetic ordering relatively to the antiferromagnetic arrangement below T{sub M}. This consequently affects on the magneto-structural transition as well as on the size of magnetocaloric effect.

  10. Single pulse near field study on a Co(3 nm)/Cu(6 nm)/Co(20 nm) multilayer structure by using a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmeanu, M.; Jipa, F.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Zamfirescu, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG-36, Magurele (Romania)

    2011-09-15

    Single pulse near field study on a Co(3 nm)/Cu(6 nm)/Co(20 nm) multilayer structure was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 200 fs at a wavelength of 775 nm. For the near field experiments, we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter deposited by spin coating on top of the multilayer structure, as well on top of Co (50 nm) and Cu (50 nm) thin films. The diameter and the morphologies of the holes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have estimated the fluence thresholds values for the near field and discuss their values in respect with the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. We compare the depths and the widths of the holes obtained at the same peak laser fluence for the Co thin film (50 nm), Cu thin film (50 nm) and Co(3 nm)/Cu(6 nm)/Co(20 nm) multilayer structure. Depending on the laser fluence, the ablation depth can reach the first, the second, or the third layer. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) by using the RSoft software. This type of a selective distribution of the ablation depth, in the near field regime, of a planar metal/dielectric interface can open new perspective in the excitation of propagating surface plasmons. (orig.)

  11. Single pulse near field study on a Co(3 nm)/Cu(6 nm)/Co(20 nm) multilayer structure by using a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmeanu, M.; Jipa, F.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Zamfirescu, M.

    2011-09-01

    Single pulse near field study on a Co(3 nm)/Cu(6 nm)/Co(20 nm) multilayer structure was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 200 fs at a wavelength of 775 nm. For the near field experiments, we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter deposited by spin coating on top of the multilayer structure, as well on top of Co (50 nm) and Cu (50 nm) thin films. The diameter and the morphologies of the holes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have estimated the fluence thresholds values for the near field and discuss their values in respect with the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. We compare the depths and the widths of the holes obtained at the same peak laser fluence for the Co thin film (50 nm), Cu thin film (50 nm) and Co(3 nm)/Cu(6 nm)/Co(20 nm) multilayer structure. Depending on the laser fluence, the ablation depth can reach the first, the second, or the third layer. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) by using the RSoft software. This type of a selective distribution of the ablation depth, in the near field regime, of a planar metal/dielectric interface can open new perspective in the excitation of propagating surface plasmons.

  12. Magneto-structural transformations in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37.5}Sn{sub 12.5−x}In{sub x} Heusler powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziarz, Wojciech; Wójcik, Anna; Czaja, Paweł [Instituite of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta Str, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Żywczak, Antoni [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Jan Dutkiewicz [Instituite of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta Str, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Hawełek, Łukasz [Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, ul. Sowinskiego 5, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Cesari, Eduard [Department de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Ctra. de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca E-07122 (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    The effect of ball milling and subsequently annealing of melt spun ribbons on magneto-structural transformations in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37.5}Sn{sub 12.5−x}In{sub x} (x=0, 2, 4, 6) ribbons is presented. Short time vibration milling allows to obtain chemically homogenous powders of angular particle shapes and size within 10–50 μm. Milling does not change the characteristic temperatures of martensitic transformation in comparison to the melt spun ribbons. The effect of In substitution for Sn on martensitic transformation has a complex mechanism, associated with electron density change. Substitution of Sn by In in both milled and annealed powders leads to decrease of Curie temperature of austenite and increase of martensitic transformation temperature, stabilizing martensitic phase. The coexistence of magnetic transformation of austenite and martensitic transformation at low magnetic field was observed. The intermartensitic transformation of 4O martensite to L1{sub 0} martensite was observed during cooling at low magnetic field and this was confirmed by TEM microstructure observations. The annealing process of as-milled powders leads to the change of their martensitic structure due to relaxation of internal stresses associated with anisotropic columnar grain microstructure formed during melt spinning process. The level of stresses introduced during milling of ribbons has no significant influence on martensitic transformation. The annealing process of as milled powders leads to enhancement of their magnetic properties, decrease of Curie temperature of austenite, and marginal change of temperature of martenisitic transformation. - Highlights: • Vibration milling of ribbons allows to obtain angular powders of size 10–50 μm. • Vibration milling improves chemical homogeneity of alloys. • Indium addition changes the magneto-structural transformations in Ni–Mn–Sn–In alloys. • Complex character of magneto-structural transformations is visible. • Multistep

  13. Magnetic field dependence of electrical resistivity and thermopower in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheswar Repaka, D. V.; Chen, X.; Ramanujan, R. V., E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Mahendiran, R., E-mail: phyrm@nus.edu.sg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 117551 (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    We report magnetization, magnetoresistance (MR) and magnetothermopower (MTEP) of melt spun Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} ribbons which exhibit an austentite to martensite phase transition at a temperature (T{sub M}) ≈ 294 K. Upon cooling from 400 K, dc-resistivity and thermopower show abrupt changes at T{sub M}, indicating a change in the electronic density of states. The thermopower is negative from 400 K down to 10 K. Application of a magnetic field of μ{sub 0}H = 5 T decreases T{sub M} by 5 K and induces large negative MR (-23%) but positive MTEP (9%) near T{sub M}. While the MR is appreciable from T{sub M} down to 10 K, MTEP is significant only below 60 K (MR = -2.5% and MTEP = +300% at 10 K). The magnetic field dependence of resistivity and thermopower show either reversible or irreversible behavior near T{sub M}, depending on whether the sample is zero-field cooled or field-cooled, which indicates that the electronic band structure near T{sub M} is magnetic history dependent.

  14. The influence of chemical disorder enhancement on the martensitic transformation of the Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 36}Sn{sub 14} Heusler-type alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passamani, E.C., E-mail: edson@cce.ufes.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910 Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Nascimento, V.P.; Larica, C.; Takeuchi, A.Y. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910 Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Alves, A.L.; Proveti, J.R. [Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas e Naturais, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29932-540, Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil); Pereira, M.C. [Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM), 39803-371 Teofilo Otoni, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Fabris, J.D. [Departamento de Quimica, UFVJM, 39100-000 Diamantina, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2011-07-28

    Highlights: > Chemical disorder affects martensitic transformation in Ni-Mn-Sn Heusler alloys. > Martensitic transition temperature depends on the L21-ferromagnetic fraction. > Grain boundaries induce drastic reduction of magnetization in milled Heusler alloys. > Magnetic properties of the milled Ni50Mn36Sn14 alloy get better after annealing. - Abstract: The effect of chemical disorder over the martensitic phase transformation of the Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 36}Sn{sub 14} Heusler-type alloy was systematically investigated by performing X-ray diffractometry (DRX), DC magnetization and {sup 57}Fe-doping and {sup 119}Sn-Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements. DRX patterns are characteristics of a L2{sub 1}-type chemically disordered structure, where the presence of this disorder was first evaluated by analyzing the relative intensity of the (1 1 1) DRX reflection, which varies in the case of Fe-doped and practically disappears for the milled samples. In consequence, the magnetic properties of Fe-doped well-milled samples related to the martensitic phase transformation change substantially. 300 K {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy data suggest that the changes in the magnetic properties related to the martensitic transformation are intrinsically correlated to the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic fractions, which are respectively associated with Fe atoms replacing Mn- and Sn-sites. In the case of milled samples, the drastic reduction of alloy magnetization was explained by the increase of the number of Mn atoms in the shell regions, which have a reduced magnetic moment comparatively to those in the grain cores. The magnetization change and the temperature transition in the martensitic transformation are governed by the grain core. The initial magnetic properties and martensitic transformation can be recovered by a subsequent annealing on the milled sample.

  15. Rapid solidification of Ni{sub 50}Nb{sub 28}Zr{sub 22} glass former alloy through suction-casting; Solidificacao rapida da liga formadora de fase amorfa Ni{sub 50}Nb{sub 28}Zr{sub 22} atraves de fundicao em coquilha por succao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, M.I.; Santos, F.S.; Bolfarini, C.; Botta Filho, W.J.; Kiminami, C.S., E-mail: issao16@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    To select new alloys with high glass forming ability (GFA) to present amorphous structure in millimeter scale, several semi-empirical models have been developed. In the present work, a new alloy, Ni{sub 50}Nb{sub 28}Zr{sub 22}d, was designed based on the combination of topological instability lambda (A) criterion and electronegativity difference ({Delta}e). The alloy was rapidly solidified in a bulk wedge sample by cooper mold suction casting in order to investigate its amorphization. The sample was characterized by the combination of scanning electron microscopy (MEV), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). For the minimum thickness of 200 {mu}m analyzed, it was found that the alloy did not show a totally amorphous structure. Factor such as low cooling rate, existence of oxides on the surface of the elements and presence of oxygen in the atmosphere of equipment did not allowed the achievement of higher amorphous thickness. (author)

  16. Dust Plasma Analogue for Interstellar 217.5 nm Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović, I.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The new ultraviolet (UV extinction measurements of carbonaceous nanoparticles in the range from 140 nm to 260 nm are presented. The plasma polymerized hydrocarbon nanoparticles were already proposed as a new astro analogue, which describe the infrared (IR extinction spectra in an excellent way. We use the same particles to find the possible carrier of the "mysterious" UV 217.5 nm extinction "bump" of interstellar media (ISM.

  17. Nitrogen versus helium: effects of the choice of the atomizing gas on the structures of Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Si{sub 10}B{sub 10} and Fe{sub 32}Ni{sub 36}Ta{sub 7}Si{sub 8}B{sub 17} powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, A

    2004-07-15

    Gas atomization can produce, besides a possible significant degree of undercooling, high cooling rates, whose extent depends on the size of the droplets, on their velocity with respect to the surrounding medium, on the thermo-physical properties of both the alloy and the gas, and of course on the operating conditions such as melt overheating and gas-to-metal flow ratio. In this respect it is well-known that the atomizing gas can play a significant role in determining both the powder size distribution and the kind and mix of phases which result from the solidification and cooling processes. The microstructures and solidification morphologies of powders obtained from nitrogen and helium sonic gas atomization of two iron-nickel base glass forming alloys, Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Si{sub 10}B{sub 10} and Fe{sub 32}Ni{sub 36}Ta{sub 7}Si{sub 8}B{sub 17}, were investigated by means of light microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The Fe{sub 32}Ni{sub 36}Ta{sub 7}Si{sub 8}B{sub 17} alloy exhibits a higher proneness to the development of amorphous phase than the Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Si{sub 10}B{sub 10} alloy, while the effect of the higher speed attainable by the stream of helium with respect to that of nitrogen, affords not only to obtain a larger amount of particles in the finer size ranges, but also to affect the relative amounts of phases within the different size fractions.

  18. Crystal structure, magnetization, {sup 125}Te NMR, and Seebeck coefficient of Ge{sub 49}Te{sub 50}R{sub 1} (R = La, Pr, Gd, Dy, and Yb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, E.M., E-mail: levin@iastate.edu [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Cooling, C. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bud’ko, S.L. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Straszheim, W.E. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Lograsso, T.A. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    GeTe, a self-doping semiconductor, is a well-known base compound for thermoelectric and phase-change materials. It is known, that replacement of Ge in Ag{sub 6.5}Sb{sub 6.5}Ge{sub 37}Te{sub 50} (TAGS-85) material by rare earth Dy significantly enhances both the power factor and thermoelectric figure of merit. Here we demonstrate how replacement of Ge in GeTe by rare earths with different atomic size and localized magnetic moments affect XRD patterns, magnetization, {sup 125}Te NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation, and the Seebeck coefficient of the alloys with a nominal composition of Ge{sub 49}Te{sub 50}R{sub 1} (R = La, Pr, Gd, Dy, and Yb). SEM, EDS and WDS data show that rare earth atoms in the matrix are present at smaller extent compared to a nominal composition, whereas rare earth also is present in inclusions. Rare earths affect the Seebeck coefficient, which is a result of interplay between the reduction due to higher carrier concentration and enhancement due to magnetic contribution. The effect of replacement of Ge in GeTe by Dy on the Seebeck coefficient is smaller than that observed in Ag{sub 6.5}Sb{sub 6.5}Ge{sub 36} Te{sub 50}Dy{sub 1}. This can be explained by larger amount of rare earth, which can be embedded into the lattice of materials containing [Ag + Sb] atomic pairs and possible effect from these pairs. - Highlights: • The effects of rare earth in Ge{sub 49}Te{sub 50}R{sub 1} (R = La, Pr, Gd, Dy, and Yb) are studied. • Rare earth atoms in the matrix are present at smaller extent compared to a nominal composition. • The effect on the Seebeck coefficient is a result from carrier concentration and magnetic contribution.

  19. Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3776 Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC; pictured in Appendix A) is designed for researchers interested in airborne particles smaller than 20 nm. With sensitivity to particles down to 2.5 nm in diameter, this UCPC is ideally suited for atmospheric and climate research, particle formation and growth studies, combustion and engine exhaust research, and nanotechnology research.

  20. Critical behavior and magnetocaloric effect in Co{sub 50−x}Ni{sub x}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} (x = 0 and 5) full Heusler alloy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, J.; Saha, S.N.; Nath, T.K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • The Curie temperature of alloy series of Co{sub 50−x}Ni{sub x}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} decreases with increasing x. • The critical exponents behavior and scaling relation of the alloy series have been investigated. • Using M–H data, employing Modified Arrott plot and Kouvel–Fisher plot exponents are estimated. • The estimated critical exponent values match very well with the mean field theory. • Under a magnetic field maximum up to 5 T, normal magnetocaloric effect has been observed. - Abstract: This work reports the investigation of critical behavior of Co{sub 50−x}Ni{sub x}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} (x = 0 and 5) and magneto caloric effect (MCE) of bulk Co{sub 2}CrAl full Heusler alloy system. The alloy series of Co{sub 50−x}Ni{sub x}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) have been prepared using arc melting technique. The magnetic properties of all the samples have been studied in the temperature range of 5–300 K. The value of Curie temperature (T{sub C}) is found to decrease with increasing doping concentration of the Ni (substitution of Ni at Co site). The critical exponents behavior and scaling relation have been investigated using magnetic isotherms in Co{sub 50−x}Ni{sub x}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} (x = 0 and 5) alloys. The critical exponents are estimated by various techniques such as, Modified Arrott plot, Kouvel–Fisher plot and critical isotherm technique. The value of critical exponents vicinity to the second order magnetic phase transition of Co{sub 50}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} were found to be β = 0.488 (7), γ = 1.144 (16) and δ = 3.336 (5) with T{sub C} = 328.64 (5) K whereas for Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 5}Cr{sub 25}Al{sub 25} the values are β = 0.522 (13), γ = 1.014 (6) and δ = 3.043 (7) with T{sub C} = 285.71 (11). The critical exponent values for both the samples are almost similar to the value as predicted by mean field theory. This has been best explained by long range mean field like ferromagnetic interaction in the

  1. Penetration of nanoparticles in 5 nm to 400 nm size range through two selected fibrous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochot, C.; Mouret, G.; Michielsen, N.; Chazelet, S.; Thomas, D.

    2011-07-01

    Due to the strong development of nanotechnologies, ultrafine particles could represent a growing hazard for workers health. When it is not possible to reduce the risk at its source, filtration systems are one of the means used to limit the exposure to hazardous substances such as airborne particles. The aim of this study is to measure the penetration of nanoparticles on a very large diameter range, from the nanometer size to the most penetrating particle size (MPPS). Here we present experimental results obtained for three different types of nanoparticles. Measurements of nanoparticle penetration through two low efficiency fiberglass media are carried out using two test benches presented in this article. Penetration values for carbon, copper and NaCl nanoparticles decreases with particle size, as predicted by theory. The value of the most penetrating particle size is situated between 100 and 300 nm. No thermal rebound was observed in this particle size range. The penetration values will be used, in further studies, to determine a global penetration model.

  2. Penetration of nanoparticles in 5 nm to 400 nm size range through two selected fibrous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochot, C; Michielsen, N [Aerosol Physics and Metrology Laboratory, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, BP68 - 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Mouret, G; Thomas, D [Laboratoire Reactions et Genie des Procedes, Nancy Universite, BP 20451 - 54001 Nancy (France); Chazelet, S, E-mail: clothilde.brochot@irsn.fr [Laboratory of polluant and air cleaning process, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Rue du Morvan CS 60027 - 54519 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France)

    2011-07-06

    Due to the strong development of nanotechnologies, ultrafine particles could represent a growing hazard for workers health. When it is not possible to reduce the risk at its source, filtration systems are one of the means used to limit the exposure to hazardous substances such as airborne particles. The aim of this study is to measure the penetration of nanoparticles on a very large diameter range, from the nanometer size to the most penetrating particle size (MPPS). Here we present experimental results obtained for three different types of nanoparticles. Measurements of nanoparticle penetration through two low efficiency fiberglass media are carried out using two test benches presented in this article. Penetration values for carbon, copper and NaCl nanoparticles decreases with particle size, as predicted by theory. The value of the most penetrating particle size is situated between 100 and 300 nm. No thermal rebound was observed in this particle size range. The penetration values will be used, in further studies, to determine a global penetration model.

  3. Simulating ultrafine particle formation in Europe using a regional CTM: contribution of primary emissions versus secondary formation to aerosol number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (CTM with detailed aerosol microphysics, PMCAMx-UF, was applied to the European domain to simulate the contribution of direct emissions and secondary formation to total particle number concentrations during May 2008. PMCAMx-UF uses the Dynamic Model for Aerosol Nucleation and the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS algorithm to track both aerosol number and mass concentration using a sectional approach. The model predicts nucleation events that occur over scales of hundreds up to thousands of kilometers especially over the Balkans and Southeast Europe. The model predictions were compared against measurements from 7 sites across Europe. The model reproduces more than 70% of the hourly concentrations of particles larger than 10 nm (N10 within a factor of 2. About half of these particles are predicted to originate from nucleation in the lower troposphere. Regional nucleation is predicted to increase the total particle number concentration by approximately a factor of 3. For particles larger than 100 nm the effect varies from an increase of 20% in the eastern Mediterranean to a decrease of 20% in southern Spain and Portugal resulting in a small average increase of around 1% over the whole domain. Nucleation has a significant effect in the predicted N<sub>50 levels (up to a factor of 2 increase mainly in areas where there are condensable vapors to grow the particles to larger sizes. A semi-empirical ternary sulfuric acid-ammonia-water parameterization performs better than the activation or the kinetic parameterizations in reproducing the observations. Reducing emissions of ammonia and sulfur dioxide affects certain parts of the number size distribution.

  4. Surface functionalized hollow silica particles and composites

    KAUST Repository

    Rodionov, Valentin

    2017-05-26

    Composition comprising hollow spherical silica particles having outside particle walls and inside particle walls, wherein the particles have an average particle size of about 10 nm to about 500 nm and an average wall thickness of about 10 nm to about 50 nm; and wherein the particles are functionalized with at least one organic functional group on the outside particle wall, on the inside particle wall, or on both the outside and inside particle walls, wherein the organic functional group is in a reacted or unreacted form. The organic functional group can be epoxy. The particles can be mixed with polymer precursor or a polymer material such as epoxy to form a prepreg or a nanocomposite. Lightweight but strong materials can be formed. Low loadings of hollow particles can be used.

  5. In situ observations of new particle formation in the tropical upper troposphere: the role of clouds and the nucleation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weigel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation (NPF, which generates nucleation mode aerosol, was observed in the tropical Upper Troposphere (UT and Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL by in situ airborne measurements over South America (January–March 2005, Australia (November–December 2005, West Africa (August 2006 and Central America (2004–2007. Particularly intense NPF was found at the bottom of the TTL. Measurements with a set of condensation particle counters (CPCs with different dp50sub> (50% lower size detection efficiency diameter or "cut-off diameter" were conducted on board the M-55 Geophysica in the altitude range of 12.0–20.5 km and on board the DLR Falcon-20 at up to 11.5 km altitude. On board the NASA WB-57F size distributions were measured over Central America in the 4 to 1000 nm diameter range with a system of nucleation mode aerosol spectrometers. Nucleation mode particle concentrations (NNM were derived from these measurements which allow for identifying many NPF events with NNM in the range of thousands of particles per cm3. Over Australia and West Africa, we identified NPF in the outflow of tropical convection, in particular of a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS. Newly formed particles with NNM > 1000 cm−3 were found to coexist with ice cloud particles (dp > 2 μm as long as cloud particle concentrations remained below 2 cm−3. The occurrence of NPF within the upper troposphere and the TTL was generally confined within 340 K to 380 K potential temperature, but NPF was of particular strength between 350 K and 370 K (i.e. ~1–4 km below the cold point tropopause. Analyses of the aerosol volatility (at 250 °C show that in the TTL on average 75–90% of the particles were volatile, compared to typically only 50% in the extra-tropical UT, indicative for the particles to mainly consist of H2SO4

  6. Role of nano-precipitation on the microstructure and shape memory characteristics of a new Ni{sub 50.3}Ti{sub 34.7}Zr{sub 15} shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evirgen, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Karaman, I., E-mail: ikaraman@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Pons, J.; Santamarta, R. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Noebe, R.D. [Materials and Structures Division, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    The microstructure and shape memory characteristics of the Ni{sub 50.3}Ti{sub 34.7}Zr{sub 15} shape memory alloy were investigated as a function of aging heat treatments that result in nanometer to submicron size precipitates. Microstructure–property relationships were developed by characterizing samples using transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and load-biased thermal cycling experiments. The precipitate size was found to strongly influence the martensitic transformation–precipitate interactions and ultimately the shape memory characteristics of the alloy. Aging treatments resulting in relatively fine precipitates, which are not an obstacle to twin boundaries and easily bypassed by martensite variants, exhibited higher transformation strain, lower transformation thermal hysteresis, and better thermal and dimensional stability compared to samples with relatively large precipitates. When precipitate dimensions approached several hundred nanometers in size they acted as obstacles to martensite growth, limiting martensite variant and twin size resulting in reduced functional and structural properties. Aging heat treatments were also shown to result in a wide range of transformation temperatures, increasing them above 100 °C in some cases, and affected the stress dependence of the transformation hysteresis and the stress versus transformation temperature relationships for the Ni{sub 50.3}Ti{sub 34.7}Zr{sub 15} alloy.

  7. Investigation of multifunctional properties of Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 40−x}Co{sub x}Sn{sub 10} (x = 0–6) Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Suresh, K.G., E-mail: suresh@phy.iitb.ac.in

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 40−x}Co{sub x}Sn{sub 10} Heusler alloys exhibit multifunctional properties. • Co doping results decrease in martensitic transition temperature and increase in T{sub C}{sup A}. • Ferromagnetic coupling increases with increase in Co concentration. • Large positive ΔS{sub M} of 10.5 J/kg K and large RCP of 125 J/kg was obtained for x = 1. • Large exchange bias field of 833 Oe was observed for Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 39}Co{sub 1}Sn{sub 10} alloy. - Abstract: A series of Co doped Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 40−x}Co{sub x}Sn{sub 10} (x = 0, 1, 2, 2.5, 3, 4 and 6) Heusler alloys has been investigated for their structural, magnetic, magnetocaloric and exchange bias properties. The martensitic transition temperatures are found to decrease with the increase in Co concentration due to the decrease in valence electron concentration (e/a ratio). The Curie temperature of austenite phase increases significantly with increasing Co concentration. A large positive magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) of 8.6 and 10.5 J/kg K, for a magnetic field change of 50 kOe is observed for x = 0 and 1 alloys, and ΔS{sub M} values decreases for higher Co concentrations. The relative cooling power shows a monotonic increase with the increase in Co concentration. Large exchange bias fields of 920 Oe and 833 Oe have been observed in the alloys with compositions x = 0 and 1, after field cooling in presence of 10 kOe. The unidirectional anisotropy arising at the interface between the frustrated and ferromagnetic phases is responsible for the large exchange bias observed in these alloys. With increase in Co, the magnetically frustrated phase diminishes in strength, giving rise to a decrease in the exchange bias effect for larger Co concentration. The exchange bias fields observed for compositions x = 0 and 1, in the present case are larger than that reported for Co doped Ni–Mn–Z (Z = Sn, Sb, and Ga) alloys. Temperature and cooling field dependence of the exchange bias

  8. In-situ X-ray diffraction studies of the phase transformations and structural states of B2, R and B19′ phases in Ti{sub 49.5}Ni{sub 50.5} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapenko, Marina G., E-mail: artifakt@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Meisner, Ludmila L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y., E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Zakharova, Margarita A., E-mail: tibiboreth@gmail.com [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The martensitic transformation, Debye–Waller factor, mean-square atomic displacements and the coefficient of thermal expansion on cooling of the Ti{sub 49.5}Ni{sub 50.5} shape memory alloy were examined using in-situ X-ray diffraction. It was revealed B2→R (T{sub R} ≡ T = 273 ± 10 K) along with B2→B19’ (M{sub s} ≡ T = 273 ± 10 K) transitions occur. It was found that Debye–Waller factor and mean-square displacement of B2 phase undergo significant increase as functions of temperature when phase transition B2→R and B2→B19’ take place. The analysis of the thermal expansion coefficient of the B2 phase indicates that the value of a increases almost linearly while cooling.

  9. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  10. 193 nm photodissociation of acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, B. A.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1991-06-01

    The product translational energy distribution P(ET) for acetylene photodissociation at 193 nm was obtained from the time-of-flight spectrum of the H atom fragments. The P(ET) shows resolved structure from the vibrational and electronic excitation of the C2H fragment; comparison of the translational energy release for given excited states of C2H with the known energy levels of these states gives D0(HCC-H) = 131.4 + or - 0.5 kcal/mol. This value is in agreement with that determined previously in this group from analogous studies of the C2H fragment and with the latest experimental and theoretical work. The high resolution of the experiment also reveals the nature of C2H internal excitation. A significant fraction of the H atoms detected at moderate laser power were from the secondary dissociation of C2H. The P(ET) derived for this channel indicates that most of the C2 is produced in excited electronic states.

  11. 193 nm photodissociation of acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balko, B.A.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.T. (Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 (USA))

    1991-06-15

    The product translational energy distribution {ital P}({ital E}{sub {ital T}}) for acetylene photodissociation at 193 nm was obtained from the time-of-flight spectrum of the H atom fragments. The {ital P}({ital E}{sub {ital T}}) shows resolved structure from the vibrational and electronic excitation of the C{sub 2}H fragment; comparison of the translational energy release for given excited states of C{sub 2}H with the known energy levels of these states gives {ital D}{sub 0}(HCC--H)=131.4{plus minus}0.5 kcal/mol. This value is in agreement with that determined previously in this group from analogous studies of the C{sub 2}H fragment and with the latest experimental and theoretical work. The high resolution of the experiment also reveals the nature of C{sub 2}H internal excitation. A significant fraction of the H atoms detected at moderate laser power were from the secondary dissociation of C{sub 2}H. The {ital P}({ital E}{sub {ital T}}) derived for this channel indicates that most of the C{sub 2} is produced in excited electronic states.

  12. 980 nm and 808 nm excitable upconversion nanoparticles for the detection of enzyme related reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstoß, Sandy F.; Wiesholler, Lisa M.; Buchner, Markus; Muhr, Verena; Märkl, Susanne; Baeumner, Antje J.; Hirsch, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Upconverting luminescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) represent an interesting class of nanomaterials for bioanalytical applications. Due to their excitation in the near infrared region of the spectra, no fluorescence of biological compounds is trigged. Compared to other nanomaterials like quantum dots they exhibit low cytotoxicity, high photostability, no blinking and chemical inertness. Nevertheless, UCNPs suffer from low quantum efficiency. Here we report on two different core-shell particle systems which have a core consisting of NaYF4 doped with Yb3+/ Tm3+ and an additional inert shell (NaYF4) or an active shell (NaYF4 doped with Yb3+/Nd3+). Nanoparticles without Yb3+ as sensitizer can be excited at 980 nm. However, water has an absorption band in this region. This results in a reduction of the upconversion efficiency in aqueous systems and a heating of the solution. For bioanalytical application, more beneficial is the shifting of the wavelength to 808 nm by additional doping of the shell with Nd3+. Both core-shell systems were investigated in respect to the monitor enzymatic reactions of dehydrogenases and oxidases involving the generation of either NADH or FADH2.

  13. Modeling the amorphous structure of mechanically alloyed Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 25}Cu{sub 25} using anomalous wide-angle x-ray scattering and reverse Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.C. de, E-mail: fsc1jcd@fisica.ufsc.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Poffo, C.M. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Souza, S.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Machado, K.D. [Departamento de Física, Centro Politécnico, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Trichês, D.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Grandi, T.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Biasi, R.S. de [Seção de Engenharia Mecânica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-01

    An amorphous Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 25}Cu{sub 25} alloy was produced by 19 h of mechanical alloying. Anomalous wide angle x-ray scattering data were collected at six energies and six total scattering factors were obtained. By considering the data collected at two energies close to the Ni and Cu K edges, two differential anomalous scattering factors about the Ni and Cu atoms were obtained, showing that the chemical environments around these atoms are different. Eight factors were used as input data to the reverse Monte Carlo method used to compute the partial structure factors S{sub Ti3Ti}(K), S{sub Ti–Cu}(K), S{sub Ti–Ni}(K), S{sub Cu3Cu}(K), S{sub Cu–Ni}(K) and S{sub Ni–Ni}(K) and the partial pair distribution functions G{sub Ti3Ti}(r), G{sub Ti–Cu}(r), G{sub Ti–Ni}(r), G{sub Cu3Cu}(r), G{sub Cu–Ni}(r) and G{sub Ni–Ni}(r). From the RMC final atomic configuration and G{sub ij}(r) functions, the coordination numbers and interatomic atomic distances for the first neighbors were determined.

  14. Transformation behavior and shape memory properties of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 15}Pd{sub 25}Cu{sub 10} high temperature shape memory alloy at various aging temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Saif ur, E-mail: saifur.rehman@smme.nust.edu.pk [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Mushtaq [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Nusair Khan, A.; Ali, Liaqat; Zaman, Sabah; Waseem, Muhammad [Institute of Industrial Control System, Rawalpindi (Pakistan); Ali, Liaqat; Jaffery, Syed Husain Imran [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-12-01

    This research presents an insight into the effect of various aging temperatures on the microstructure, hardness, phase transformation behavior and shape memory properties of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 15}Pd{sub 25}Cu{sub 10} high temperature shape memory alloy. The aging temperature was varied from 350 °C to 750 °C, whereas the shape memory properties were evaluated at 100–500 MPa. It was observed that the mentioned properties were strongly dependent on the aging temperatures. Based on the results obtained from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, microhardness testing, differential scanning calorimetry and thermomechanical testing, the aging temperatures can be divided into three ranges. At low aging temperatures (350 °C and below), the properties of the alloy remained the same as were found for solution treated sample, however at intermediate aging temperatures (400–600 °C) the properties of the alloy were changed significantly. Due to the formation of precipitates, the hardness was increased, whereas the phase transformation temperatures and work output were decreased considerably. The recovery ratio was found to be improved for intermediate aging temperatures. At high aging temperatures (650 °C and above), the hardness was decreased and the phase transformation temperatures were increased. Phase transformation temperature at the aging temperature of 750 °C was found to be increased significantly as compared to solution treated sample.

  15. Scattering matrices of martian dust analogs at 488 nm and 647 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Dominika D.; Muñoz, Olga; Moreno, Fernando; Ramos, José L.; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of five martian dust analogs, namely montmorillonite, two palagonite (JSC-1) samples, basalt, and calcite. The measurements are performed at 488 and 647 nm, covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. The experimental scattering matrices are compared with results of Lorenz-Mie calculations performed for the same size distributions and refractive indices as our analog samples. As expected, we find that scattering matrices of realistic polydispersions of dust particles cannot be replaced by such calculated matrices. In contrast, the measured phase functions for our martian dust analogs may be considered a good approximation for martian dust at the studied wavelengths. Further, because of the sensitivity of polarimetry to particle microphysics, spectro-polarimetric observations from the martian surface appear to be a powerful diagnostic tool to infer the composition of the dust in the martian atmosphere. To facilitate the use of the experimental matrices for multiple-scattering calculations with polarization included, we compute the corresponding synthetic scattering matrices based on the measurements and defined in the full angle range from 0° to 180°.

  16. Effect of silica particle size on macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Kusaka

    Full Text Available Amorphous silica particles, such as nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter particles, are used in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, paints, cosmetics, and food. Nevertheless, the immunotoxicity of these particles and the relationship between silica particle size and pro-inflammatory activity are not fully understood. In this study, we addressed the relationship between the size of amorphous silica (particle dose, diameter, number, and surface area and the inflammatory activity (macrophage phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, IL-1β secretion, cell death and lung inflammation. Irrespective of diameter size, silica particles were efficiently internalized by mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages via an actin cytoskeleton-dependent pathway, and induced caspase-1, but not caspase-11, activation. Of note, 30 nm-1000 nm diameter silica particles induced lysosomal destabilization, cell death, and IL-1β secretion at markedly higher levels than did 3000 nm-10000 nm silica particles. Consistent with in vitro results, intra-tracheal administration of 30 nm silica particles into mice caused more severe lung inflammation than that of 3000 nm silica particles, as assessed by measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice, and by the micro-computed tomography analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that silica particle size impacts immune responses, with submicron amorphous silica particles inducing higher inflammatory responses than silica particles over 1000 nm in size, which is ascribed not only to their ability to induce caspase-1 activation but also to their cytotoxicity.

  17. Magnetocaloric properties of as-quenched Ni{sub 50.4}Mn{sub 34.9}In{sub 14.7} ferromagnetic shape memory alloy ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Llamazares, J.L. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICYT), San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Garcia, C. [MIT, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts (United States); Hernando, B.; Prida, V.M. [Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Oviedo (Spain); Baldomir, D.; Serantes, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Fisica, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gonzalez, J. [UPV, Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    The temperature dependences of magnetic entropy change and refrigerant capacity have been calculated for a maximum field change of {delta} H=30 kOe in as-quenched ribbons of the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni{sub 50.4}Mn{sub 34.9}In{sub 14.7} around the structural reverse martensitic transformation and magnetic transition of austenite. The ribbons crystallize into a single-phase austenite with the L2{sub 1}-type crystal structure and Curie point of 284 K. At 262 K austenite starts its transformation into a 10-layered structurally modulated monoclinic martensite. The first- and second-order character of the structural and magnetic transitions was confirmed by the Arrott plot method. Despite the superior absolute value of the maximum magnetic entropy change obtained in the temperature interval where the reverse martensitic transformation occurs ({delta}S{sub M} {sup max}=7.2 Jkg{sup -1}K{sup -1}) with respect to that obtained around the ferromagnetic transition of austenite ({delta} S{sub M} {sup max}=2.6 Jkg{sup -1}K{sup -1}), the large average hysteretic losses due to the effect of the magnetic field on the phase transformation as well as the narrow thermal dependence of the magnetic entropy change make the temperature interval around the ferromagnetic transition of austenite of a higher effective refrigerant capacity (RC{sup magn}{sub eff}=95Jkg{sup -1} versus RC{sup struct}{sub eff}=60Jkg{sup -1}). (orig.)

  18. Advances in 750 nm VECSELs (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Esa J.; Ranta, Sanna; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Saarela, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Guina, Mircea

    2017-03-01

    Lasers operating in the transmission window of tissue at wavelengths between 700 and 800 nm are needed in numerous medical and biomedical applications, including photodynamic therapy and fluorescence microscopy. However, the performance of diode lasers in this spectral range is limited by the lack of appropriate compound semiconductors. Here, we review our recent research on 750 nm VECSELs. Two approaches to reaching the 750 nm wavelength will be discussed. The first approach relies on intra-cavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused 1500 nm VECSEL. The VECSEL gain chip comprises a GaAs-based DBR and an InP-based gain section, which allows for optical pumping with low-cost commercial diodes at 980 nm. With this scheme we have achieved watt-level output powers and tuning of the laser wavelength over a 40 nm band at around 750 nm. The second approach is direct emission at 750 nm using the AlGaAs/GaAs material system. In this approach visible wavelengths are required for optical pumping. However, the consequent higher costs compared to pumping at 980 nm are mitigated by the more compact laser setup and prospects of doubling the frequency to the ultraviolet range.

  19. Particle Emissions from Domestic Gas Cookers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Livbjerg, Hans; Wagner, Ayten Yilmaz

    2010-01-01

    The authors experimentally studied the formation of submicron particles from a domestic gas cooker in a compartment free from external particle sources. The effects of fuel (methane, natural gas, odorant-free natural gas), primary aeration, flow rate, and fuel sulphur content on particle emissions...... of the emitted particles were found to have a mean value of about 7 nm for partially premixed flames, increasing to ∼10 nm for nonpremixed flames. The quantity of primary air had a strong impact on the particle emissions, showing a minimum at a primary aeration level of 60-65%. Presence of sulphur in small...

  20. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  1. Polygamous particles

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kun-Ta; Feng, Lang; Sha, Ruojie; Dreyfus, Rémi; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA is increasingly used as an important tool in programming the self-assembly of micrometer- and nanometer-scale particles. This is largely due to the highly specific thermoreversible interaction of cDNA strands, which, when placed on different particles, have been used to bind precise pairs in aggregates and crystals. However, DNA functionalized particles will only reach their true potential for particle assembly when each particle can address and bind to many different kinds of particles. ...

  2. Laser hypersensitisation using 266nm light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    UV hypersensitisation using CW 266 nm light on hydrogenated Ge-doped fibre is reported. The optimum sensitisation fluence is found to be in the range of 5 to 10 kJ/cm2, coinciding with previous results obtained using 355 nm light, indicating the same end-process used in the photochemical reaction...

  3. Capillary Condensation in 8 nm Deep Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Junjie; Riordon, Jason; Zandavi, Seyed Hadi; Xu, Yi; Persad, Aaron H; Mostowfi, Farshid; Sinton, David

    2018-02-01

    Condensation on the nanoscale is essential to understand many natural and synthetic systems relevant to water, air, and energy. Despite its importance, the underlying physics of condensation initiation and propagation remain largely unknown at sub-10 nm, mainly due to the challenges of controlling and probing such small systems. Here we study the condensation of n-propane down to 8 nm confinement in a nanofluidic system, distinct from previous studies at ∼100 nm. The condensation initiates significantly earlier in the 8 nm channels, and it initiates from the entrance, in contrast to channels just 10 times larger. The condensate propagation is observed to be governed by two liquid-vapor interfaces with an interplay between film and bridging effects. We model the experimental results using classical theories and find good agreement, demonstrating that this 8 nm nonpolar fluid system can be treated as a continuum from a thermodynamic perspective, despite having only 10-20 molecular layers.

  4. Direct observation of new particle formation during ozonolysis of isoprene and ethene competing against the growth of preexisting particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Sato, Kei; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation during the ozonolysis of isoprene and ethene in the presence of ammonium nitrate seed particles (surface area concentrations = (0.8-3) × 107 nm2 cm-3) was investigated using a 1 nm scanning mobility particle sizer. Based on the size distribution of formed particles, particles with a diameter smaller than the minimum diameter of the seed particles (less than ∼6 nm) formed under dry conditions, but the formation of such particles was substantially suppressed during isoprene ozonolysis and was not observed during ethane ozonolysis under humid conditions. We propose that oligomeric hydroperoxides generated by stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs), including C1-sCI (CH2OO), contribute to new particle formation while competing to be taken up onto preexisting particles. The OH reaction products of isoprene and ethene seem to not contribute to new particle formation; however, they are taken up onto preexisting particles and contribute to particle growth.

  5. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of corneal damage induced by 1573 nm laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, D.; Chapel, C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses (DSV/DRR/SRBF), 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie; Pothier, C. [DGA-DCE/CTA/LOT, 94 - Arcueil (France); Sales, N. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses (DSV/DRM/SNV), 92 (France)

    2006-07-01

    Recent developments in laser technology have originated a variety of infrared laser sources between 1500-1700 nm called as 'eye-safe' which are gaining widespread use in industry, medicine and military applications. This spectral region has been called 'eye safe' because the cornea and aqueous humor absorb sufficient radiation to prevent nearly all potentially damaging radiation from reaching the retina whereas the lens does not absorb this spectral range and remains undamaged. However, in providing protection for the deeper layers of the eye, the cornea itself is susceptible to thermal damage. Previous studies, performed at 1540 nm with exposures less than 1 s, are inconsistent in the quantity of energy required to cause corneal damage. The purpose of this study was first, to determine the threshold damage exposure (E.D.{sub 50}) on rabbit cornea induced by a 3 ns single pulse emitted at 1573 nm, using clinical observations and histology and to compare the results to the limit values recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines or international standards. Secondly, it was suggested to investigate the cellular effects of infrared radiation with biochemical techniques on cell cultures in order to specify a cellular damage threshold and a better understanding of the laser - tissue interaction and the corneal injury. The minimal damage criterion was defined by a shallow, very small depression of the epithelial surface with a mild fluorescein staining. The E.D.{sub 50} obtained with corneal beam diameter of 400 mm is 26.6 J.cm{sup -2}. The corresponding radiant exposure, calculated with the 1 mm aperture diameter recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines or standards, is 4.3 J.cm{sup -2}. In vitro experiments have been carried out on primary keratocytes and H.T. 1080 epithelial cell line, using an expanded beam of 3.5 mm diameter on plates or Lab Tek holders. Cells were irradiated with 10 Hz pulse ratio frequency during 1, 2 or 3 s. The S A

  6. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  7. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  8. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression at 800 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion.......We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion....

  9. Estimate of the particle size in nanoparticles of magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paresque, M.C.; Castro, J.A.; Campos, M.F.; Oliveira, E.M.; Liuzzi, M.A.S.C. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full Text: Nanocrystalline particles of Fe3O4 were produced by co-precipitation in aquous mean. The particle size of magnetite is a very important parameter, because for particle size around 30 nm there is a transition superparamagnetic for ferromagnetic. This transition profoundly affects the properties of the nanofluid. The Langevin model allows an estimate of the particle size, directly from measured hysteresis curves. In this study, the particle size was also determined by x-ray diffraction with Rietveld analysis and by a Laser Particle Size Analyzer equipment. These two methods pointed out particle size around 20 nm. (author)

  10. Response of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (> 50 nm) to changes in ion-nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Enghoff, Martin B.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2012-01-01

    In experiments where ultraviolet light produces aerosols from trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour, the number of additional small particles produced by ionization by gamma sources all grow up to diameters larger than 50 nm, appropriate for cloud condensation nuclei. This res......In experiments where ultraviolet light produces aerosols from trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour, the number of additional small particles produced by ionization by gamma sources all grow up to diameters larger than 50 nm, appropriate for cloud condensation nuclei....... This result contradicts both ion-free control experiments and also theoretical models that predict a decline in the response of larger particles due to an insufficiency of condensable gases (which leads to slower growth) and to larger losses by coagulation between the particles. This unpredicted experimental...

  11. Particle detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Introduction, interaction of radiation with matter measurement of momentum of charged particles, of energy of e/gamma, hadrons, identification of particles. Design of HEP detectors. Principle of operation and performance of tracking sub-detectors, calorimeters and muon system.

  12. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles in the workplace: Exploring sampling techniques and strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Gijsbers, J.H.J.; Lurvink, M.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, toxicological and epidemiological studies on health effects related to particle exposure suggest that 'ultrafine particles' (particles with an aerodynamic diameter of <100 nm) may cause severe health effects after inhalation. Although the toxicological mechanisms for these effects have not

  13. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  14. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  15. Optical sensor technology for simultaneous measurement of particle speed and concentration of micro sized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper; Han, Anpan; Kristensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Experimental characterization of a sensor technology that can measure particle speed and concentration simultaneously in liquids and gases is presented here. The basic sensor principle is based on an optical element that shapes a light beam into well-defined fringes. The technology can be described...... as a hybrid between Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Laser Particle Counters. The experimental characterization of a lab-scale setup has been performed with polystyrene particles in the range from 750 nm to 20 μm, with various particle speeds. It is shown that particle concentrations can be determined...... independently from particle speeds and is a key advantage compared to normal Laser Particle Counters....

  16. Photomask development for 90-nm technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Cottle, Rand; Mackay, Scott; Xiao, Guangming; Unruh, James; Progler, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    To accelerate the time-to-market of advanced photomasks, Photronics launched its 90nm program in spring 2003. The program included three learning cycles and a technology transfer phase. Both 90nm test masks and product masks from leading integrated device manufacturers (IDMs) and foundries were exercised through the cycles. Stringent success criteria were set based on a survey of leading customers" requirements and the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). Hundreds of binary masks, embedded attenuated phase shift masks (EAPSMs), and alternating aperture phase shift masks (AAPSMs) were produced throughout the program. All targets were exceeded. This paper describes program success criteria, complexity of customer requirements, 90nm test vehicle design, and efforts on improving critical dimension (CD) uniformity and registration. Results in positive and negative chemically amplified resist (CAR) and tunable etching for AAPSM are shown. Details on AAPSM undercut optimization, intensity and CD imbalance are reported.

  17. Comparison of 20 nm silver nanoparticles synthesized with and without a gold core: Structure, dissolution in cell culture media, and biological impact on macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Wang, Chongmin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Smith, Jordan N.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kodali, Vamsi; Thrall, Brian D.; Chen, Shu; Porter, Alexandra E.; Ryan, Mary P.

    2015-01-01

    Widespread use of silver nanoparticles raises questions of environmental and biological impact. Many synthesis approaches are used to produce pure silver and silver-shell gold-core particles optimized for specific applications. Since both nanoparticles and silver dissolved from the particles may impact the biological response, it is important to understand the physicochemical characteristics along with the biological impact of nanoparticles produced by different processes. The authors have examined the structure, dissolution, and impact of particle exposure to macrophage cells of two 20 nm silver particles synthesized in different ways, which have different internal structures. The structures were examined by electron microscopy and dissolution measured in Rosewell Park Memorial Institute media with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were used to measure biological impact on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. The particles were polycrystalline, but 20 nm particles grown on gold seed particles had smaller crystallite size with many high-energy grain boundaries and defects, and an apparent higher solubility than 20 nm pure silver particles. Greater oxidative stress and cytotoxicity were observed for 20 nm particles containing the Au core than for 20 nm pure silver particles. A simple dissolution model described the time variation of particle size and dissolved silver for particle loadings larger than 9 μg/ml for the 24-h period characteristic of many in-vitro studies. PMID:26178265

  18. Comparison of 20 nm silver nanoparticles synthesized with and without a gold core: Structure, dissolution in cell culture media, and biological impact on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Wang, Chongmin; Engelhard, Mark H; Baer, Donald R; Smith, Jordan N; Liu, Chongxuan; Kodali, Vamsi; Thrall, Brian D; Chen, Shu; Porter, Alexandra E; Ryan, Mary P

    2015-09-15

    Widespread use of silver nanoparticles raises questions of environmental and biological impact. Many synthesis approaches are used to produce pure silver and silver-shell gold-core particles optimized for specific applications. Since both nanoparticles and silver dissolved from the particles may impact the biological response, it is important to understand the physicochemical characteristics along with the biological impact of nanoparticles produced by different processes. The authors have examined the structure, dissolution, and impact of particle exposure to macrophage cells of two 20 nm silver particles synthesized in different ways, which have different internal structures. The structures were examined by electron microscopy and dissolution measured in Rosewell Park Memorial Institute media with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were used to measure biological impact on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. The particles were polycrystalline, but 20 nm particles grown on gold seed particles had smaller crystallite size with many high-energy grain boundaries and defects, and an apparent higher solubility than 20 nm pure silver particles. Greater oxidative stress and cytotoxicity were observed for 20 nm particles containing the Au core than for 20 nm pure silver particles. A simple dissolution model described the time variation of particle size and dissolved silver for particle loadings larger than 9 μg/ml for the 24-h period characteristic of many in-vitro studies.

  19. Liquid Carbon Reflectivity at 19 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Mincigrucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We hereby report on a pump-probe reflectivity experiment conducted on amorphous carbon, using a 780 nm laser as a pump and a 19 nm FEL emission as probe. Measurements were performed at 50 degrees with respect to the surface normal to have an un-pumped reflectivity higher than 0.5%. A sub-10 fs time synchronization error could be obtained exploiting the nearly jitter-free capabilities of FERMI. EUV FEL-based experiments open the way to study the behaviour of a liquid carbon phase being unaffected by plasma screening.

  20. 1550-nm wavelength-tunable HCG VCSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Christopher; Rao, Yi; Huang, Michael; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate wavelength-tunable VCSELs using high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the top output mirror on VCSELs, operating at 1550 nm. Tunable HCG VCSELs with a ~25 nm mechanical tuning range as well as VCSELs with 2 mW output power were realized. Error-free operation of an optical link using directly-modulated tunable HCG VCSELs transmitting at 1.25 Gbps over 18 channels spaced by 100 GHz and transmitted over 20 km of single mode fiber is demonstrated, showing the suitability of the HCG tunable VCSEL as a low cost source for WDM communications systems.

  1. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise......We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...

  2. Bounce behavior of freshly nucleated biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, A.; Kannosto, J.; Kuuluvainen, H.; Arffman, A.; Joutsensaari, J.; Saukko, E.; Hao, L.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Tiitta, P.; Holopainen, J. K.; Keskinen, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Smith, J. N.; Laaksonen, A.

    2011-08-01

    The assessment of the climatic impacts and adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles requires detailed information on particle properties. However, very limited information is available on the morphology and phase state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The physical state of particles greatly affects particulate-phase chemical reactions, and thus the growth rates of newly formed atmospheric aerosol. Thus verifying the physical phase state of SOA particles gives new and important insight into their formation, subsequent growth, and consequently potential atmospheric impacts. According to our recent study, biogenic SOA particles produced in laboratory chambers from the oxidation of real plant emissions as well as in ambient boreal forest atmospheres can exist in a solid phase in size range >30 nm. In this paper, we extend previously published results to diameters in the range of 17-30 nm. The physical phase of the particles is studied by investigating particle bounce properties utilizing electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). We also investigate the effect of estimates of particle density on the interpretation of our bounce observations. According to the results presented in this paper, particle bounce clearly decreases with decreasing particle size in sub 30 nm size range. The comparison measurements by ammonium sulphate and investigation of the particle impaction velocities strongly suggest that the decreasing bounce is caused by the differences in composition and phase of large (diameters greater than 30 nm) and smaller (diameters between 17 and 30 nm) particles.

  3. Bounce behavior of freshly nucleated biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Virtanen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the climatic impacts and adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles requires detailed information on particle properties. However, very limited information is available on the morphology and phase state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles. The physical state of particles greatly affects particulate-phase chemical reactions, and thus the growth rates of newly formed atmospheric aerosol. Thus verifying the physical phase state of SOA particles gives new and important insight into their formation, subsequent growth, and consequently potential atmospheric impacts. According to our recent study, biogenic SOA particles produced in laboratory chambers from the oxidation of real plant emissions as well as in ambient boreal forest atmospheres can exist in a solid phase in size range >30 nm. In this paper, we extend previously published results to diameters in the range of 17–30 nm. The physical phase of the particles is studied by investigating particle bounce properties utilizing electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI. We also investigate the effect of estimates of particle density on the interpretation of our bounce observations. According to the results presented in this paper, particle bounce clearly decreases with decreasing particle size in sub 30 nm size range. The comparison measurements by ammonium sulphate and investigation of the particle impaction velocities strongly suggest that the decreasing bounce is caused by the differences in composition and phase of large (diameters greater than 30 nm and smaller (diameters between 17 and 30 nm particles.

  4. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  5. Condensation Particle Counter Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3772 CPC is a compact, rugged, and full-featured instrument that detects airborne particles down to 10 nm in diameter, at an aerosol flow rate of 1.0 lpm, over a concentration range from 0 to 1x104 #/cc. This CPC is ideally suited for applications without high concentration measurements, such as basic aerosol research, filter and air-cleaner testing, particle counter calibrations, environmental monitoring, mobile aerosol studies, particle shedding and component testing, and atmospheric and climate studies.

  6. Materials challenges for sub-20nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James W.

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses the future of resist materials for sub-20nm lithography. It is my contention that polymer-bound PAG based resists will be used to 16nm node. There has been enough progress in resolution and sensitivity to justify the use of these materials. PBP resists have shown that the principal demerit of acid diffusion can be overcome through attachment of the PAG anion to the lithographic polymer. Since the introduction of this chemically amplified resist approach, we have seen steady improvement in resolution, sensitivity, and LWR. We have also seen improvement in OOB response, outgassing, and pattern collapse. There is no doubt that continuous improvement is still required for these resist systems. We believe that increasing the overall resist quantum yield for acid generation substantially improves the shot noise problem thereby leading to faster high resolution resist materials. Using a 0.30NA EUV tool with dipole, we can achieve 22nm hp resolution, with 12mJ dose, and 4.2nm LWR.

  7. 130-nm tunable grating-mirror VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity configurat......We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity...... configuration instead of the extended cavity configuration can bring 130-nm tuning range around 1330-nm wavelength. The air-coupled cavity is known to reduce the quantum confinement factor in VCSELs, increasing threshold. In our air-coupled cavity HCG VCSEL case, the very short power penetration length...... in the HCG minimizes this reduction of the quantum confinement factor, not as significant as in the air-coupled cavity DBR VCSEL....

  8. Optical properties, morphology and elemental composition of atmospheric particles at T1 supersite on MILAGRO campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Carabali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particles were sampled at T1 supersite during MILAGRO campaign, in March 2006. T1 was located at the north of Mexico City (MC. Aerosol sampling was done by placing copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM on the last five of an 8-stage MOUDI cascade impactor. Samples were obtained at different periods to observe possible variations on morphology. Absorption and scattering coefficients, as well as particle concentrations (0.01–3 μm aerodynamic diameter were measured simultaneously using a PSAP absorption photometer, a portable integrating nephelometer, and a CPC particle counter. Particle images were acquired at different magnifications using a CM 200 Phillips TEM-EDAX system, and then calculated the border-based fractal dimension. Also, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS was used to determine the elemental composition of particles. The morphology of atmospheric particles for two aerodynamic diameters (0.18 and 1.8 μm was compared using border-based fractal dimension to relate it to the other particle properties, because T1-generated particles have optical, morphological and chemical properties different from those transported by the MC plume.

    Particles sampled under MC pollution influence showed not much variability, suggesting that more spherical particles (border-based fractal dimension close to 1.0 are more common in larger sizes (d<sub>50 = 1.8 μm, which may be attributed to aerosol aging and secondary aerosol formation. Between 06:00 and 09:00 a.m., smaller particles (d<sub>50 = 0.18 μm had more irregular shapes resulting in higher border-based fractal dimensions (1.2–1.3 for samples with more local influence. EDS analysis in d<sub>50 = 0.18 μm particles showed high contents of carbonaceous material, Si, Fe, K, and Co. Perhaps, this indicates an impact from industrial and vehicle emissions on atmospheric particles at T1.

  9. Polygamous particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun-Ta; Feng, Lang; Sha, Ruojie; Dreyfus, Rémi; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Seeman, Nadrian C; Chaikin, Paul M

    2012-11-13

    DNA is increasingly used as an important tool in programming the self-assembly of micrometer- and nanometer-scale particles. This is largely due to the highly specific thermoreversible interaction of cDNA strands, which, when placed on different particles, have been used to bind precise pairs in aggregates and crystals. However, DNA functionalized particles will only reach their true potential for particle assembly when each particle can address and bind to many different kinds of particles. Indeed, specifying all bonds can force a particular designed structure. In this paper, we present the design rules for multiflavored particles and show that a single particle, DNA functionalized with many different "flavors," can recognize and bind specifically to many different partners. We investigate the cost of increasing the number of flavors in terms of the reduction in binding energy and melting temperature. We find that a single 2-μm colloidal particle can bind to 40 different types of particles in an easily accessible time and temperature regime. The practical limit of ∼100 is set by entropic costs for particles to align complementary pairs and, surprisingly, by the limited number of distinct "useful" DNA sequences that prohibit subunits with nonspecific binding. For our 11 base "sticky ends," the limit is 73 distinct sequences with no unwanted overlaps of 5 bp or more. As an example of phenomena enabled by polygamous particles, we demonstrate a three-particle system that forms a fluid of isolated clusters when cooled slowly and an elastic gel network when quenched.

  10. Synthesis of Cationic Core-Shell Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, N.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant-free seeded (core-shell) polymerization of cationic polymer colloids is presented. Polystyrene core particles with sizes between 200 nm and 500 nm were synthesized. The number average diameter of the colloidal core particles increased with increasing monomer concentration. Cationic shells

  11. Alveolar macrophage accumulation rates, for 28 nm and 250 nm PSL, are mediated by separate mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, O R; Wong, V A, E-mail: moss@thehamner.or [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27509-2137 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    When macrophages accumulate 28 nm and 250 nm diameter polystyrene latex (PSL) beads, the accumulation rates should reflect differences in molecular and cellular function. We used a confocal microscope to measure the accumulation rates of nanoparticles by F344-rat-alveolar macrophages (approx25,000 cells adhered to a 0.7 cm{sup 2} surface). Over the cells were layered 0.1 ml of media, and 0.1 ml of media-with-beads. Fresh cells were introduced for each exposure scenario. The maximum possible individual macrophage exposures were as follows: 8x10{sup 6}, 8x10{sup 5}, and 8x10{sup 4} 28 nm beads per macrophage; and 8x10{sup 4} and 1.12x10{sup 4} 250 nm beads per macrophage. Accumulation rates were estimated over 23 minutes. The increase in bead accumulation-rate matched changes in bead-availability: 7x increase for 250 nm beads; 100x increase for 28 nm beads; and 700x increase for all bead availabilities. The maximum sustained 28 nm bead accumulation rate was > 30,000 /min (for 5 min). Increases in bead accumulation could be explained by two mechanisms: bead-diffusion; and, for the macrophage, macropinocytosis. Also for the highest concentrations of 28 nm beads, we saw a colligative threshold - possibly due to beads masking the cell surface or obstructing cellular mechanisms.

  12. Alveolar macrophage accumulation rates, for 28 nm and 250 nm PSL, are mediated by separate mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, O. R.; Wong, V. A.

    2009-02-01

    When macrophages accumulate 28 nm and 250 nm diameter polystyrene latex (PSL) beads, the accumulation rates should reflect differences in molecular and cellular function. We used a confocal microscope to measure the accumulation rates of nanoparticles by F344-rat-alveolar macrophages (~25,000 cells adhered to a 0.7 cm2 surface). Over the cells were layered 0.1 ml of media, and 0.1 ml of media-with-beads. Fresh cells were introduced for each exposure scenario. The maximum possible individual macrophage exposures were as follows: 8x106, 8x105, and 8x104 28 nm beads per macrophage; and 8x104 and 1.12x104 250 nm beads per macrophage. Accumulation rates were estimated over 23 minutes. The increase in bead accumulation-rate matched changes in bead-availability: 7x increase for 250 nm beads; 100x increase for 28 nm beads; and 700x increase for all bead availabilities. The maximum sustained 28 nm bead accumulation rate was > 30,000 /min (for 5 min). Increases in bead accumulation could be explained by two mechanisms: bead-diffusion; and, for the macrophage, macropinocytosis. Also for the highest concentrations of 28 nm beads, we saw a colligative threshold -- possibly due to beads masking the cell surface or obstructing cellular mechanisms.

  13. NM-Scale Anatomy of an Entire Stardust Carrot Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.

    2009-01-01

    Comet Wild-2 samples collected by NASA s Stardust mission are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and have experienced wide ranges of alteration during the capture process. There are two major types of track morphologies: "carrot" and "bulbous," that reflect different structural/compositional properties of the impactors. Carrot type tracks are typically produced by compact or single mineral grains which survive essentially intact as a single large terminal particle. Bulbous tracks are likely produced by fine-grained or organic-rich impactors [1]. Owing to their challenging nature and especially high value of Stardust samples, we have invested considerable effort in developing both sample preparation and analytical techniques tailored for Stardust sample analyses. Our report focuses on our systematic disassembly and coordinated analysis of Stardust carrot track #112 from the mm to nm-scale.

  14. Mathematical modeling of 980-nm and 1320-nm endovenous laser treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R; Wassmer, Benjamin; Zemmouri, Jaouad

    2007-03-01

    Endovenous laser treatment (ELT) has been proposed as an alternative in the treatment of reflux of the great saphenous vein (GSV) and small saphenous vein (SSV). Numerous studies have since demonstrated that this technique is both safe and efficacious. ELT was presented initially using diode lasers of 810 nm, 940 nm, and 980 nm. Recently, a 1,320-nm Nd:YAG laser was introduced for ELT. This study aims to provide mathematical modeling of ELT in order to compare 980 nm and 1,320 nm laser-induced damage of saphenous veins. The model is based on calculations describing light distribution using the diffusion approximation of the transport theory, the temperature rise using the bioheat equation, and the laser-induced injury using the Arrhenius damage model. The geometry to simulate ELT was based on a 2D model consisting of a cylindrically symmetric blood vessel including a vessel wall and surrounded by an infinite homogenous tissue. The mathematical model was implemented using the Macsyma-Pdease2D software (Macsyma, Inc., Arlington, MA). Calculations were performed so as to determine the damage induced in the intima tunica, the externa tunica and inside the peri-venous tissue for 3 mm and 5 mm vessels (considered after tumescent anesthesia) and different linear endovenous energy densities (LEED) usually reported in the literature. Calculations were performed for two different vein diameters: 3 mm and 5 mm and with LEED typically reported in the literature. For 980 nm, LEED: 50 to 160 J/cm (CW mode, 2 mm/second pullback speed, power: 10 W to 32 W) and for 1,320 nm, LEED: 50 to 80 J/cm (pulsed mode, pulse duration 1.2 milliseconds, peak power: 135 W, repetition rate 30 Hz to 50 Hz). Numerical simulations are in agreement with LEED reported in clinical studies. Mathematical modeling shows clearly that 1,320 nm, with a better absorption by the vessel wall, requires less energy to achieve wall damage. In the 810-1,320-nm range, blood plays only a minor role. Consequently, the

  15. Particle cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the Universe at the largest and smallest scales traditionally has been the subject of cosmology and particle physics, respectively. Studying the evolution of the Universe connects today's large scales with the tiny scales in the very early Universe and provides the link between the physics of particles and of the cosmos. This series of five lectures aims at a modern and critical presentation of the basic ideas, methods, models and observations in today's particle cosmology.

  16. On spin-canting in maghemite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Bødker, F.

    1994-01-01

    The degree of alignment of the magnetic moments of Fe3+ ions in ultrafine maghemite particles has been studied in samples with induced magnetic texture. The textured samples were prepared by freezing ferrofluids, containing 7.5 nm maghemite particles, in a magnetic field. Mössbauer spectroscopy...

  17. Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, B R

    2008-01-01

    An essential introduction to particle physics, with coverage ranging from the basics through to the very latest developments, in an accessible and carefully structured text. Particle Physics: Third Edition is a revision of a highly regarded introduction to particle physics. In its two previous editions this book has proved to be an accessible and balanced introduction to modern particle physics, suitable for those students needed a more comprehensive introduction to the subject than provided by the 'compendium' style physics books. In the Third Edition the standard mod

  18. Design of an 1800 nm Raman Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    in the pump power requirement and deteriorated noise properties. Here we demonstrate a Raman amplifier designed for signal wavelengths around 1800 nm. The amplification fiber is an OFS PM Raman fiber, and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser emitting at 1680 nm [4]. The amplifier was pumped co...... suggested as potential transmission fibers for extended wavelength operation, as low losses at long wavelengths have been predicted [3]. Fig. 1 illustrates the predicted low loss limit for a hollow core fiber and for comparison the measured loss of a OFS True Wave fiber. Besides low loss transmission fibers......, also extended band amplifiers are required. As a solution to the latter challenge, Raman amplifiers are suggested as promising candidates. The main hurdle when designing a long wavelength Raman amplifier is the increased intrinsic fiber attenuation which as a consequence leads to an increase...

  19. 1550 nm high contrast grating VCSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Christopher; Rao, Yi; Hofmann, Werner; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2010-07-19

    We demonstrate an electrically pumped high contrast grating (HCG) VCSEL operating at 1550 nm incorporating a proton implant-defined aperture. Output powers of >1 mW are obtained at room temperature under continuous wave operation. Devices operate continuous wave at temperatures exceeding 60 degrees C. The novel device design, which is grown in a single epitaxy step, may enable lower cost long wavelength VCSELs.

  20. 70-nm-bandwidth achromatic waveguide coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, S B; Li, L; Burke, J J; Lee, J E; Saavedra, S S

    1995-09-20

    We report a general approach to the design of broadband waveguide couplers. A double-parallel grating assembly is used to cancel the first chromatic order, and a proper choice of prism glass and base angle is made to compensate for the second chromatic order. The technique was applied to a Corning glass 7059 waveguide, and a spectral bandwidth of 70 nm was measured by the use of two complementary procedures.

  1. Inactivation of oxytocin by 254 nm radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erndt, A.; Karolczyk-Kostuch, S.; Polaczek, E.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of oxytocin in diluted solutions with 254 nm light reduced markedly the hormone activity. The decrease in activity in the range between 0 and 20 percent was nearly proportional to the increase in sulfhydryl group concentration. In view of the fundamental role of cystyl residue in holding the oxytocin native backbone conformation the results suggest that disulfide bond cleavage makes an essential contribution to photoinactivation of this hormone under the conditions used.

  2. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsmith, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Particle Physics is the first book to connect theory and experiment in particle physics. Duncan Carlsmith provides the first accessible exposition of the standard model with sufficient mathematical depth to demystify the language of gauge theory and Feynman diagrams used by researchers in the field. Carlsmith also connects theories to past, present, and future experiments.

  3. Zener pinning by coherent particles: pinning efficiency and particle reorientation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Chao; Guan, Miao; Ren, Fuzeng; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Shunhu; Zhao, Bingbing

    2017-09-01

    Zener pinning by coherent particles in copper-nickel model alloys has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that 4 nm Ni particles were easily cut by migrating Cu grain boundaries during boundary passage, while 7-8 nm particles were harder to cut and coherency-to-incoherency change occurred for some boundaries. Due to low volume fraction and easy cutting, 4 nm particles had a limited pinning effect on grain boundary motion. The increase in volume fraction and the suppressed cutting for 7-8 nm particles caused the boundary motion to be significantly retarded. Different grain boundaries exhibited the distinct ability to move past the same size particle. Significantly, with the pinning effect of Ni particles, misorientation dependence of boundary migration velocity became obvious, which is consistent with the findings in practical materials. During or after passage, the Ni particles were found to change orientation to become coherent with grain growth via various atomistic mechanisms. The mechanisms were discussed with respect to particle size and boundary misorientation.

  4. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  5. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous silica core-shell particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Nikolić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Core-shell particles were formed by deposition of primary silica particles synthesized from sodium silicate solution on functionalized silica core particles (having size of ~0.5 µm prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylortosilicate. The obtained mesoporous shell has thickness of about 60 nm and consists of primary silica particles with average size of ~21 nm. Scanning electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements showed that continuous silica shell exists around functionalized core particles which was additionally proved by FTIR and TEM results.

  7. TSI Model 3936 Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3936 Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) measures the size distribution of aerosols ranging from 10 nm up to 1000 nm. The SMPS uses a bipolar aerosol charger to keep particles within a known charge distribution. Charged particles are classified according to their electrical mobility, using a long-column differential mobility analyzer (DMA). Particle concentration is measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC). The SMPS is well-suited for applications including: nanoparticle research, atmospheric aerosol studies, pollution studies, smog chamber evaluations, engine exhaust and combustion studies, materials synthesis, filter efficiency testing, nucleation/condensation studies, and rapidly changing aerosol systems.

  8. Elementary particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

  9. Auroral particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  10. Experiments in which oil, water and colloidal particles meet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the results are reported of experimental studies in which oil, water and colloidal particles meet. Colloidal particles are particles that have at least one characteristic length scale in the range between a few nanometers (nm) and several micrometers (μm). Mixtures of oil and water,

  11. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  12. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  13. Optical absorption of silicon nitride membranes at 1064 nm and at 1550 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Krüger, Christoph; Martin, Iain W.; Bell, Angus; Hough, Jim; Kaufer, Henning; Rowan, Sheila; Schnabel, Roman; Steinlechner, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    Because of a low mechanical loss, thin films made of silicon nitride (Si3N4 ) are interesting for fundamental research and development in the field of gravitational-wave detection. Si3N4 membranes allow for the characterization of quantum radiation pressure noise (RPN), which will be a limiting noise source in gravitational-wave detectors of the second and third generations. Furthermore, Si3N4 is an interesting material for possible thermal noise reduction in highly reflective mirror coatings. For both applications, the optical absorption of Si3N4 needs to be low. This paper presents absorption measurements on low-stress Si3N4 membranes showing an absorption a factor of 7 lower at 1550 nm than at 1064 nm resulting in an estimated 2 times higher sensitivity in RPN experiments at the higher wavelength and making Si3N4 an interesting material for highly reflective multimaterial mirror coatings at 1550 nm.

  14. High-sweep-rate 1310 nm MEMS-VCSEL with 150 nm continuous tuning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, V; Cole, G D; Robertson, M; Uddin, A; Cable, A

    2012-07-05

    Microelectromechanical-systems-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (MEMS-VCSELs) capable of a 150 nm continuous tuning range near 1310 nm are demonstrated. These devices employ a thin optically pumped active region structure with large free-spectral range, which promotes wide and continuous tuning. To achieve VCSEL emission at 1310 nm, a wide-gain-bandwidth indium phosphide-based multiple quantum well active region is combined with a wide-bandwidth fully oxidised GaAs-based mirror through wafer bonding, with tuning enabled by a suspended dielectric top mirror. These devices are capable of being scanned over the entire tuning range at frequencies up to 500 kHz, making them ideal for applications such as swept source optical coherence tomography and high-speed transient spectroscopy.

  15. Absorption Measurements of Periodically Poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP at 775 nm and 1550 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Steinlechner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient generation of second-harmonic light and squeezed light requires non-linear crystals that have low absorption at the fundamental and harmonic wavelengths. In this work the photo-thermal self-phase modulation technique is exploited to measure the absorption coefficient of periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP at 1,550 nm and 775 nm. Themeasurement results are (84±40 ppm/cmand (127±24 ppm/cm, respectively. We conclude that the performance of state-of-the-art frequency doubling and squeezed light generation in PPKTP is not limited by absorption.

  16. Critical dimension variation caused by wrinkle in extreme ultra-violet pellicle for 3-nm node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guk-Jin; Kim, In-Seon; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Yeung, Michael; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jin-Goo; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2017-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pellicles help in the protection of EUV masks from defects, contaminants, and particles during the exposure process. However, a single-stack EUV pellicle can be easily deformed during the exposure process; therefore, multi-stack pellicles have been proposed to minimize the deformation of an EUV pellicle. However, wrinkles can be formed in an EUV pellicle due to extremely thin thickness. In this study, we investigated the impact of these wrinkles on the transmission and critical dimension (CD) variation for the 5- and 3-nm nodes. The 5- and 3-nm nodes can be used by conventional and high numerical aperture (NA) systems, respectively. The variation in the transmission and the allowable local tilt angle of the wrinkle as a function of the wrinkle height and periodicity were calculated. A change in transmission of 2.2% resulted in a 0.2 nm variation in the CD for the anamorphic NA system (3-nm node), whereas a transmission variation of 1.6% caused a 0.2 nm CD variation in the isomorphic NA system (5-nm node).

  17. Low temperature methane oxidation on differently supported 2 nm Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Guido; Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Quaade, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature CH4 oxidation was studied on 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on various metaloxides. The differences in reaction rates for the different systems suggest that the support material has an effect on the activity. From TEM analysis, we found that the gold particles were stable in size...... during the reaction. In addition to full oxidation to CO2, traces of C2H6 were detected when Au/TiO2 was used, indicating limited partial CH4 oxidation. TiO2 was found to be the best support for gold nanoparticles both in terms of activity and gold particle stability....

  18. Particle diffusion in complex nanoscale pore networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müter, Dirk; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Bock, H.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the diffusion of particles in the highly irregular pore networks of chalk, a very fine-grained rock, by combining three-dimensional X-ray imaging and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. X-ray imaging data were collected at 25 nm voxel dimension for two chalk samples...... with very different porosities (4% and 26%). The three-dimensional pore systems derived from the tomograms were imported into DPD simulations and filled with spherical particles of variable diameter and with an optional attractive interaction to the pore surfaces. We found that diffusion significantly...... decreased to as much as 60% when particle size increased from 1% to 35% of the average pore diameter. When particles were attracted to the pore surfaces, even very small particles, diffusion was drastically inhibited, by as much as a factor of 100. Thus, the size of particles and their interaction...

  19. Effectiveness of the Top-Down Nanotechnology in the Production of Ultrafine Cement (~220 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Wan Jo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation is dealing with the communition of the cement particle to the ultrafine level (~220 nm utilizing the bead milling process, which is considered as a top-down nanotechnology. During the grinding of the cement particle, the effect of various parameters such as grinding time (1–6 h and grinding agent (methanol and ethanol on the production of the ultrafine cement has also been investigated. Performance of newly produced ultrafine cement is elucidated by the chemical composition, particle size distribution, and SEM and XRD analyses. Based on the particle size distribution of the newly produced ultrafine cement, it was assessed that the size of the cement particle decreases efficiently with increase in grinding time. Additionally, it is optimized that the bead milling process is able to produce 90% of the cement particle <350 nm and 50% of the cement particle < 220 nm, respectively, after 6.3 h milling without affecting the chemical phases. Production of the ultrafine cement utilizing this method will promote the construction industries towards the development of smart and sustainable construction materials.

  20. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and carefully structured introduction to Particle Physics, including important coverage of the Higgs Boson and recent progress in neutrino physics. Fourth edition of this successful title in the Manchester Physics series. Includes information on recent key discoveries including : An account of the discovery of exotic hadrons, beyond the simple quark model; Expanded treatments of neutrino physics and CP violation in B-decays; An updated account of ‘physics beyond the standard model’, including the interaction of particle physics with cosmology; Additional problems in all chapters, with solutions to selected problems available on the book’s website; Advanced material appears in optional starred sections.

  1. Picosecond Laser Shock Peening of Nimonic 263 at 1064 nm and 532 nm Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Petronic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the surface modifications of nickel based superalloy Nimonic 263 induced by laser shock peening (LSP process. The process was performed by Nd3+:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (YAG picosecond laser using the following parameters: pulse duration 170 ps; repetition rate 10 Hz; pulse numbers of 50, 100 and 200; and wavelength of 1064 nm (with pulse energy of 2 mJ, 10 mJ and 15 mJ and 532 nm (with pulse energy of 25 mJ, 30 mJ and 35 mJ. The following response characteristics were analyzed: modified surface areas obtained by the laser/material interaction were observed by scanning electron microscopy; elemental composition of the modified surface was evaluated by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS; and Vickers microhardness tests were performed. LSP processing at both 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelengths improved the surface structure and microhardness of a material. Surface morphology changes of the irradiated samples were determined and surface roughness was calculated. These investigations are intended to contribute to the study on the level of microstructure and mechanical properties improvements due to LSP process that operate in a picosecond regime. In particular, the effects of laser wavelength on the microstructural and mechanical changes of a material are studied in detail.

  2. Laser Shock Processing of 6061-T6 Al alloy with 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Rosas, G., E-mail: gomezrg@hotmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierias, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino Garcia Barragan 1421, Guadalajara, Jalisco 44430 (Mexico); Rubio-Gonzalez, C. [Centro de Ingenieria y Desarrollo Industrial, Pie de la cuesta No. 702, Desarrollo San Pablo, Queretaro, Qro. 76130 (Mexico); Ocana, J.L.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J.A.; Morales, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, ETSII. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Casillas, F.J. [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Universidad de Guadalajara, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco 47460 (Mexico)

    2010-08-01

    Laser Shock Processing (LSP) has been proposed as a competitive alternative technology to classical treatments for improving fatigue and wear resistance of metals. We present a configuration and results in the LSP concept for metal surface treatments in underwater laser irradiation at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The purpose of the work is to compare the effect of both wavelengths on the same material. A convergent lens is used to deliver 1.2 J/pulse (1064 nm) and 0.9 J/pulse (532 nm) in a 8 ns laser FWHM pulse produced by 10 Hz Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with spots of a 1.5 mm in diameter moving forward along the work piece. A LSP configuration with experimental results using a pulse density of 2500 pulses/cm{sup 2} and 5000 pulses/cm{sup 2} in 6061-T6 aluminum samples are presented. High level compressive residual stresses are produced using both wavelengths. It has been shown that surface residual stress level is comparable to that achieved by conventional shot peening, but with greater depths. This method can be applied to surface treatment of final metal products.

  3. Characteristics of 630nm auroral polarization observed at Pokar Flat, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpei, T.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Hampton, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report the result of OI 630 nm auroral polarization observation at Poker Flat Research Range (Glat=65.12N, Glon=147.43W, Mlat=65.72N) during the period from December 2013 to April 2014. OI 630nm auroral emission is theoretically expected to show linear polarization with degrees up to 17% [Bommier et al., 2011]. The important point is that, the degree of linear polarization depends on energy and velocity anisotropy of precipitating electrons [Fujimoto et al., 1997]. Recent observation data also showed that 630nm auroral emission related to polar rain at high-latitudes linear polarization parallel to field with degrees of 2-7%[Lilensten et al., 2013]. However, these past measurements were limited in the polar cap region and its polarization characteristics are not clear. To examine auroral polarization with an accuracy of 1% polarization degree, we developed an imaging spectrograph which can measure auroral polarization in the wide field-of-view of 130 deg covering the wavelength range from 420 nm to 680 nm (resolution 2 nm). This new instrument enables us to obtain the linear polarization degrees at 557.7 nm and 630 nm auroral emissions simultaneously. Here, we can regard 557.7 nm aurora as a standard polarization light source because it does not produce polarization theoretically. We installed the spectrograph at Poker Flat Research Range and carried out precise calibration to estimate artificial polarization which is produced inside the optical system using an LED light source with a linear polarizer every 3 hours on five nights in December 2013. Since then, automatic operation was continuously carried every night out till the beginning of April 2014.We obtained the linear polarization of 630 nm aurora with degree of 5% showing elevation angle dependence. On the other hand, we unexpectedly measured the polarization of 557.7 nm emission which shows similar polarization property as 630 nm. We are considering two possibilities to interpret the results as follows

  4. Physical characterization of diesel soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, A.

    2004-07-01

    This study concentrates on characterizing diesel exhaust soot particles. In addition to particle size and number distributions, the particle structure was studied. To describe the structure of agglomerated particles, the concept of fractal dimension has been utilized. The experimental work was based on distribution measurements done with Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI). The work also included the development of ELPI to be more suitable for diesel particle studies. Diesel particles are small soot particles, number weighed size < 500 nm. Thus the fme particle deposition affects measurement. To solve this problem, the fme particle losses in the impactor were determined The losses are an essential part of impactor kernel functions, which describe the particle collection in the impactor. To find information on particle size distribution and particle morphology, the new method to determine the particle effective density and from that the fractal dimension was developed. The method is based on distribution measurement made with SMPS and ELPI. The basic feature of the method is the connection of particle effective density and aerodynamic and mobility equivalent sizes. The fractal like nature of agglomerated particles was also utilized in the method: the basic assumption was that degrease of effective density as a function of particle size is characterized by fractal behavior. The new method was used to study diesel particles. The found fractal dimension values varied from 2.5 to 3 depending on engine and dilution parameters. The effect of engine load on soot particles were studied with three different sized engines. According to the measurements the engine parameters affected the measured structure of agglomerates. The fractal dimension decreased with increasing engine load. In addition, the width of the number distribution of soot particles increased with engine load. The effect of volatile materials on particle

  5. Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    While biomedicine and geoscience use grids to bring together many different sub-disciplines, particle physicists use grid computing to increase computing power and storage resources, and to access and analyze vast amounts of data collected from detectors at the world's most powerful accelerators (1 page)

  6. Photodissociation of ethylene at 193 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, B. A.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1992-07-01

    The photodissociation of ethylene at 193 nm was studied by measuring the product translational energy distributions for the H+C2H3 and H2+C2H2 channels. In agreement with previous workers, it was determined that atomic and molecular elimination occur in relatively equal amounts. Using 1,1 D2CCH2 and 1,2 cis HDCCDH, it was shown that both acetylene and vinylidene are formed and that the acetylene/vinylidene ratio is approximately 2/3 in the molecular elimination. This H2 elimination channel has a translational energy distribution peaked at around 20 kcal/mol, indicating that it is a concerted process with a substantial exit barrier. It was found that the H atom elimination channel is best described as a simple bond rupture occurring after internal conversion of the electronically excited molecule to the vibrationally excited ground state ethylene. Some of the primary C2H3 product has sufficient internal energy to spontaneously decompose to H+HC≡CH. At higher laser intensity a large fraction of the C2H3, however, absorbs another photon and fragments to H+H2C=C: (1A1 and 3B2).

  7. Photodissociation of ethylene at 193 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balko, B.A.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.T. (Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1992-07-15

    The photodissociation of ethylene at 193 nm was studied by measuring the product translational energy distributions for the H+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and H{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} channels. In agreement with previous workers, it was determined that atomic and molecular elimination occur in relatively equal amounts. Using 1,1 D{sub 2}CCH{sub 2} and 1,2 {ital cis} HDCCDH, it was shown that both acetylene and vinylidene are formed and that the acetylene/vinylidene ratio is approximately 2/3 in the molecular elimination. This H{sub 2} elimination channel has a translational energy distribution peaked at around 20 kcal/mol, indicating that it is a concerted process with a substantial exit barrier. It was found that the H atom elimination channel is best described as a simple bond rupture occurring after internal conversion of the electronically excited molecule to the vibrationally excited ground state ethylene. Some of the primary C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product has sufficient internal energy to spontaneously decompose to H+HC{equivalent to}CH. At higher laser intensity a large fraction of the C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, however, absorbs another photon and fragments to H+H{sub 2}C=C: ({sup 1}{ital A}{sub 1} and {sup 3}{ital B}{sub 2}).

  8. Superoleophilic particles and coatings and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T; D& #x27; Urso, Brian

    2013-07-30

    Superoleophilic particles and surfaces and methods of making the same are described. The superoleophilic particles can include porous particles having a hydrophobic coating layer deposited thereon. The coated porous particles are characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m and a plurality of nanopores. Some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity. The superoleophilic particles also include oil pinned within the nanopores of the porous particles The plurality of porous particles can include (i) particles including a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features comprising a contiguous, protrusive material, (ii) diatomaceous earth particles, or (iii) both. The surfaces can include the superoleophilic particles coupled to the surface.

  9. Effect of nanomaterial and media physicochemical properties on Ag NM aggregation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshinnia, Kamelia; Sikder, Mithun; Cai, Bo; Baalousha, Mohammed

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterial (NM) aggregation is a key process determining their environmental, fate behavior and effects. Nanomaterials are typically engineered to remain kinetically stable; however, in environmental and toxicological media, NMs are prone to aggregation. The aggregation kinetics of NM is typically quantified by measuring their attachment efficiency (α) and critical coagulation concentration (CCC). Several studies measured α and CCC for Ag NMs with a major focus on investigating the effects of ionic strength, ion valency and natural organic matter, with few studies investigating other environmental factors such as light and dissolved oxygen and none investigating the effect of particle size, buffer type and concentration, or surface coverage by capping agent. A survey of recent research articles reporting CCC values for Ag NMs reveals substantial variation in experimental conditions and particle stability with CCC values of monovalent and divalent counterions covering a wide range (ca. 25 to infinity for monovalent counterions and 1.6 to infinity for divalent counterions). Here, we rationalize the differences in the CCC values for Ag NMs based on the variability in the experimental conditions, which includes NM and medium physicochemical properties. Capping agents determines NM stability mechanism with citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and alginate stabilizing NM by electrostatic mechanism; whereas polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), casein, dextrin, tween, branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), and Gum Arabic stabilizing NMs by steric mechanisms. The CCC values for Ag NMs with different capping agents follow the order citrate∼alginate∼SDSNM size and buffer concentration and decreases with light irradiation. For sterically stabilized PVP-Ag NMs, the CCC increases with the coating concentration/surface coverage and completely

  10. Aerosol Optical Properties of Smoke from the Las Conchas Wildfire, Los Alamos, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Flowers, B. A.; Aiken, A. C.; Klein, B. Z.; Mazzoleni, C.; Sharma, N.; China`, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Las Conchas wildfire in Northern New Mexico started on June, 26 2011 and spread rapidly, eventually burning an area of 634 km2 (245 mi2). Due to the close proximity to the fire, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was shut down and the town evacuated for several days. Immediately after LANL reopened (7/6/2011) the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division (EES-14) attained unique measurements of the smoke by sampling the ambient air. Three Integrated Photoacoustic/Nephelometer Spectrometers (DMT Inc.) were set up to measure aerosol light absorption and scattering coefficients. A University of Northwest Switzerland thermodenuder was used to remove compounds that are volatile at temperatures up to 200C. The aerosol's optical properties were measured before and after denuding the sample at 405nm (blue), 532nm (green), 781nm (red), and for non-denuded particles also at 375nm (ultraviolet). The aerosol size distributions were measured after the denuder with a Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS, TSI Inc.) and black carbon was measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, DMT Inc.). Additionally, ambient measurements of Total Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10) were collected continuously at the LANL air monitoring stations. These measurements are used in conjunction with numerical simulations to determine the bulk optical properties of the aerosol. Aerosols in wildfire smoke are composed of organic and black carbon (soot) particles that are formed during wood combustion and pyrolysis. The optical properties of the smoke particles are complex and lead to large uncertainties in assessing the global climate. During the measurement period, the Las Conchas fire provided very high particle concentrations (up to 200 μg/m3) that were exploited to investigate their optical properties. By heating the particles to temperatures ranging from 75 to 200C in the denuder, volatile organics were removed and the optical properties of the remaining particles were measured

  11. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  12. Magnetic Susceptibility of liquid Gd-NM (NM = Cu, Ga, Ge alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimakura Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For rare earth alloys, the indirect interaction of RKKY is at work between rare-earth atoms. Therefore, the magnetism of them depends on the number of conduction electrons and the distance between rare-earth metals. In this work, to reveal the relationship between the number of conduction electrons and magnetic property of rare earth metal alloys, magnetic susceptibility measurements for liquid Gd-NM (NM = Cu, Ga, Ge was performed by Faraday method. As the results, it was observed that the sign of paramagnetic Curie temperature of Cu-Gd alloys are positive at all composition, while Ga-Gd and Ge-Gd alloys show negative paramagnetic Curie temperature at certain composition. Moreover, it was indicated when the alloy at certain composition shows highest melting temperature, it has the lowest paramagnetic Curie temperature.

  13. EFFECT OF ASE ON PERFORMANCE OF TDFA FOR 1479 nm-1555 nm WAVELENGTH RANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INDERPREET KAUR

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, mathematical modelling of TDFA for broadened gain spectrum and reduced noise figure has been carried out by keeping all practical parameters in consideration. A model of TDFA has been designed based on simulation after considering all the major parameters like ASE pump and signal power. The present research claims to support 96 DWDM channels across 1479 nm-1555 nm wavelength range, with a peak gain of 26 dB (without ASE and with a peak gain 24 dB, ASE of 1.5 dBm for optimum fiber length of TDF as 10 m. With this proposed model, the gain of 24 dB and NF of 7 dB has been achieved.

  14. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-03-31

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices.

  15. Absolute frequency references at 1529 nm and 1560 nm using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    de Escobar, Y Natali Martinez; Coop, Simon; Vanderbruggen, Thomas; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof T; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a double optical frequency reference (1529 nm and 1560 nm) for the telecom C-band using $^{87}$Rb modulation transfer spectroscopy. The two reference frequencies are defined by the 5S$_{1/2} F=2 \\rightarrow $ 5P$_{3/2} F'=3$ two-level and 5S$_{1/2} F=2 \\rightarrow $ 5P$_{3/2} F'=3 \\rightarrow $ 4D$_{5/2} F"=4$ ladder transitions. We examine the sensitivity of the frequency stabilization to probe power and magnetic field fluctuations, calculate its frequency shift due to residual amplitude modulation, and estimate its shift due to gas collisions. The short-term Allan deviation was estimated from the error signal slope for the two transitions. Our scheme provides a simple and high performing system for references at these important wavelengths. We estimate an absolute accuracy of $\\sim$ 1 kHz is realistic.

  16. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices. PMID:28362339

  17. Measurement of the physical properties of secondary organic aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannosto, J.

    2012-07-01

    The work of this thesis concentrates on applying the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI, Dekati Ltd.) and scanning/differential mobility particle sizer (SMPS/DMPS) to estimate the particle density and particle solidity of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) d{sub me} < 200 nm. The density estimation method has been extended to smaller particle sizes and the data treatment of the method has been modified to be suitable for large data series and multimodal size distributions. The limitations of the method have been studied using both laboratory tests and simulations. The lowest mode particle diameter for the density method was found to be 10 nm. For multimodal size distributions, the density results varied approximately by 15 %. The density measurements were performed at the SMEAR II station and the density of boreal forest particles was measured. The ELPI was used to study the physical phase of the fresh SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of pure {alpha}-pinene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of a living Scots pine in a chamber. The phase of SOA particles formed in the boreal forest was analyzed as well. The particles were found to bounce from smooth impaction plates of ELPI towards lower impactor stages. The behavior was interpreted as an indication of a solid physical phase of the particles. The interpretation was corroborated by SEM (Scanning electron microscope) images. In the TEM (Tunneling electron microscope) analysis, the particles were non-crystalline. Based on these results, the particles were inferred to have adopted an amorphous (glassy) physical state. The {alpha}-pinene particles had similar bouncing ability as the Scots pine derived particles indicating similar physical phase behavior. The measured bounce factor did not significantly change during the particle growth for particles larger than 40 nm, indicating no changes in particle solidity. For the smallest particles (below 40 nm), the calculated bounce factor increased as the particles grew

  18. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  19. Analysis of multi-mode to single-mode conversion at 635 nm and 1550 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Bogatzki, Angelina; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Hofmann, Jens; Schröder, Henning

    2016-03-01

    We propose two low-cost and robust optical fiber systems based on the photonic lantern (PL) technology for operating at 635 nm and 1550 nm. The PL is an emerging technology that couples light from a multi-mode (MM) fiber to several single-mode (SM) fibers via a low-loss adiabatic transition. This bundle of SM fibers is observed as a MM fiber system whose spatial modes are the degenerate supermodes of the bundle. The adiabatic transition allows that those supermodes evolve into the modes of the MM fiber. Simulations of the MM fiber end structure and its taper transition have been performed via functional mode solver tools in order to understand the modal evolution in PLs. The modelled design consists of 7 SM fibers inserted into a low-index capillary. The material and geometry of the PLs are chosen such that the supermodes match to the spatial modes of the desired step-index MM fiber in a moderate loss transmission. The dispersion of materials is also considered. These parameters are studied in two PL systems in order to reach a spectral transmission from 450 nm to 1600 nm. Additionally, an analysis of the geometry and losses due to the mismatching of modes is presented. PLs are typically used in the fields of astrophotonics and space photonics. Recently, they are demonstrated as mode converters in telecommunications, especially focusing on spatial division multiplexing. In this study, we show the use of PLs as a promising interconnecting tool for the development of miniaturized spectrometers operating in a broad wavelength range.

  20. Virus-like particles in cystic mammary adenoma of a snow leopard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S; Laughlin, D C

    1975-11-01

    Virus-like particles were observed in the giant cells of a mammary adenoma of a snow leopard kept in captivity. Particles that measured 115 to 125 nm in diameter budded from the lamella of endoplasmic reticulum and were studded on their inner surfaces with dense granules (approximately 12 nm) that gave them their unique ultrastructural morphology. Such particles were not observed extracellularly. Type B or type C particles were not seen in the tumor tissue.

  1. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated by the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the elusive Higgs Boson, interest in particle physics continues at a high level among scientists and the general public. This book includes theoretical aspects, with chapters outlining the generation model and a charged Higgs boson model as alternative scenarios to the Standard Model. An introduction is provided to postulated axion photon interactions and associated photon dispersion in magnetized media. The complexity of particle physics research requiring the synergistic combination of theory, hardware and computation is described in terms of the e-science paradigm. The book concludes with a chapter tackling potential radiation hazards associated with extremely weakly interacting neutrinos if produced in copious amounts with future high-energy muon-collider facilities.

  2. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  3. Surgical smoke and ultrafine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Dennis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrocautery, laser tissue ablation, and ultrasonic scalpel tissue dissection all generate a 'surgical smoke' containing ultrafine ( Methods To measure the amount of generated particulates in 'surgical smoke' during different surgical procedures and to quantify the particle number concentration for operation room personnel a condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Inc. was applied. Results Electro-cauterization and argon plasma tissue coagulation induced the production of very high number concentration (> 100000 cm-3 of particles in the diameter range of 10 nm to 1 μm. The peak concentration was confined to the immediate local surrounding of the production side. In the presence of a very efficient air conditioning system the increment and decrement of ultrafine particle occurrence was a matter of seconds, with accumulation of lower particle number concentrations in the operation room for only a few minutes. Conclusion Our investigation showed a short term very high exposure to ultrafine particles for surgeons and close assisting operating personnel – alternating with longer periods of low exposure.

  4. Comparison of 3D surfaces produced by 248-nm and 193-nm excimer laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toenshoff, Hans K.; Graumann, Christoph; Rinke, Marcus; Hesener, Hanno; Kulik, Christian

    1998-10-01

    Currently there is a strong demand for refractive optical elements made from glass in 21/2D and 3D-structures. Due to the characteristics of brittle materials like glass, only a limited number of manufacturing methods can be used to machine these materials with sub-micron resolution. Thus, current microstructures made out of glass are mainly manufactured by photolithography and etching process. Lithography techniques are only for economic purposes for a series production, but is not suitable for manufacturing prototypes or a small series. Micromachining done with Excimer Lasers in combination with high precision CNC- controlled handling systems offers flexible design possibilities for optical components. Due to the limitations of conventional machining techniques for brittle materials, a new laser machining system for material processing at a wavelength of 193 nm has been designed and built. The better absorption of 193 nm compared to 248 nm or larger wavelengths leads to damage free microstructuring of most glasses. Data generation for the volume to be ablated starts with the mathematical description of the surface shape of the optical component. The contour can be derived from a mathematical function or individual xyz-data point information from any CAD-program. A pre-processor calculates the CNC-data for laser triggering, xyz-table and the CNC- mask control. Each laser pulse leads to a material removal, defined by the illuminated surface on the workpiece as well as the energy density. Superposition or overlapping of pulses allows the creation of the desired surface. The surface roughness is determined by the wavelength as well as the chosen ablation strategy. To achieve best results, the process has to be carefully adjusted for a specific material. This technique is a sufficient method for structuring grooves in ceramics or glass as well as producing aspherical transparent optical surfaces or micro lens arrays. This paper shall describe the potential of 193 nm

  5. Nanotoxicology: An Emerging Discipline Evolving from Studies of Ultrafine Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Günter Oberdörster; Eva Oberdörster; Jan Oberdörster

    2005-01-01

    Although humans have been exposed to airborne nanosized particles (NSPs; < 100 nm) throughout their evolutionary stages, such exposure has increased dramatically over the last century due to anthropogenic sources...

  6. Metallic nano-particles for trapping light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongan; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2013-02-07

    We study metallic nano-particles for light trapping by investigating the optical absorption efficiency of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film with and without metallic nano-particles on its top. The size and shape of these nano-particles are investigated as to their roles of light trapping: scattering light to the absorption medium and converting light to surface plasmons. The optical absorption enhancement in the red light region (e.g., 650nm) due to the light trapping of the metallic nano-particles is observed when a layer of metallic nano-particle array has certain structures. The investigation of the light with incident angles shows the importance of the coupling efficiency of light to surface plasmons in the metallic nano-particle light trapping. PACS: 73.20.Mf, 42.25.s, 88.40.hj.

  7. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Qin, Hongyi [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taesung, E-mail: tkim@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  8. Antibacterial characteristics of heated scallop-shell nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Riku; Sawai, Jun; Kikuchi, Mikio; Yahata, Shinya; Satoh, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Heated scallop-shell (HSS) nano-particles, prepared using a wet grinding mill, and microparticles were examined for their antibacterial activity against vegetative bacterial cells and spores. The median diameters of the nano-particles and micro-particles were approximately 20 nm and 30 µm, respectively. The antibacterial activity of HSS against Escherichia coli increased with an increase in concentration, regardless of particle size; however, the antibacterial activity of the nano-particles was much higher than that of micro-particles. The sporicidal activity of the nano-particles was also much higher than that of micro-particles, with HSS nano-particles able to kill Bacillus subtilis spores. A reduction of more than three orders of magnitude for B. subtilis spores was confirmed following a 30 min treatment at 5 mg/ml and 60℃, showing that the combination of HSS nano-particle treatment with mild heating was particularly effective for controlling bacterial spores.

  9. Response of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (> 50 nm) to changes in ion-nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Enghoff, M. B.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-12-01

    The role of ionization in the formation of clouds and aerosols has been debated for many years. A body of evidence exists that correlates cloud properties to galactic cosmic ray ionization; however these results are still contested. In recent years experimental evidence has also been produced showing that ionization can promote the nucleation of small aerosols at atmospheric conditions. The experiments showed that an increase in ionization leads to an increase in the formation of ultrafine aerosols (~3 nm), but in the real atmosphere such small particles have to grow by coagulation and condensation to become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in order to have an effect on clouds. However, numerical studies predict that variations in the count of ultra-fine aerosols will lead only to an insignificant change in the count of CCN. This is due to 1) the competition between the additional ultra-fine aerosols for the limited supply of condensable gases leading to a slower growth and 2) the increased loss rates of the additional particles during the longer growth-time. We investigated the growth of aerosols to CCN sizes using an 8 m3 reaction chamber made from electro-polished stainless steel. One side was fitted with a Teflon foil to allow ultraviolet light to illuminate the chamber, which was continuously flushed with dry purified air. Variable concentrations of water vapor, ozone, and sulfur dioxide could be added to the chamber. UV-lamps initiated photochemistry producing sulfuric acid. Ionization could be enhanced with two Cs-137 gamma sources (30 MBq), mounted on each side of the chamber. Figure 1 shows the evolution of the aerosols, following a nucleation event induced by the gamma sources. Previous to the event the aerosols were in steady state. Each curve represents a size bin: 3-10 nm (dark purple), 10-20 nm (purple), 20-30 nm (blue), 30-40 nm (light blue), 40-50 nm (green), 50-60 nm (yellow), and 60-68 nm (red). Black curves show a ~1 hour smoothing. The initial

  10. MEBES reticle writers for 350-nm and 250-nm design rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Frank E.; Naber, Robert J.; Dean, Robert L.; Sauer, Charles A.

    1994-11-01

    New MEBES reticle writers are described that meet the production requirements of the 350- nm and 250-nm design rules required for 64 Mb and first generation 256 Mb DRAM techniques. These raster scan e-beam systems are based on the MEBES IV thermal field emission (TFE) exposure system, in production use since early 1992. The MEBES IV-TFE system exceeds its 500-nm design rule requirement and is routinely used to product reticles of first-generation 64 Mb DRAMs, prototype 256 Mb DRAMs, and phase shift masks. The success of MEBES IV-TFE is based on a close working relationship with system users, who provided input to establish the requirements of the new reticle writers. The new reticle writers are the result of a two-phase development program. The initial phase, completed in 1993, focused on productivity improvements to the base system, which proved to have excellent accuracy. These improvements ease the handling of the large pattern files, improve the use of the 160 MHz writing rate with a faster data path and more efficient writing strategy, and improve overall system utilization with in situ (maskless) beam-calibration techniques. The second phase of development, completed early in 1994, focused on the production reticle requirements of second-generation 64 Mb DRAM, including optical proximity correction features, and first-generation 256 Mb DRAM. The second development phase improves data path speed, system accuracy, and system productivity. System and subsystem performance is shown for the first and second development phases. Lithographic and write-time performance on the product is presented and discussed in the context of system requirements.

  11. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  12. Particle Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    * Assumes no prior knowledge* Adopts a modelling approach* Numerous tutorial problems, worked examples and exercises included* Elementary topics augmented by planetary motion and rotating framesThis text provides an invaluable introduction to mechanicsm confining attention to the motion of a particle. It begins with a full discussion of the foundations of the subject within the context of mathematical modelling before covering more advanced topics including the theory of planetary orbits and the use of rotating frames of reference. Truly introductory , the style adoped is perfect for those u

  13. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International

  14. Alignment robustness for 90 nm and 65 nm node through copper alignment mark integration optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Scott; Hinnen, Paul; Morton, Rob; Cooper, Kevin; Sassoulas, Pierre-Olivier; Depre, Jerome; Navarro, Ramon; van Haren, Richard; Browning, Clyde; Reber, Doug; Megens, Henry

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, methods for stacking ASML scribe lane alignment marks (SPM) and improving the mark performance at initial copper metal levels are discussed. The new mark designs and the theoretical reasons for mark design and/or integration change are presented. In previous joint publications between ASML and Freescale Semiconductor [1], improved overlay performance and alignment robustness for Back End Of Line (BEOL) layers by the application of stacked scribe lane marks (SPM) was presented. In this paper, further improvements are demonstrated through the use of optimized Versatile Scribe Lane Mark design (VSPM). With the application of stacked optimized VSPM-marks, the alignment signal strength of marks in the copper metal layer is increased compared to stacked SPM marks. The gains in signal strength stability, which is typical for stacked marks, as well as significantly reduced scribe lane usage, are also maintained. Through the placement of specially designed orthogonal scatter-bars in selected layers under the VSPM-marks, the alignment performance of initial inlaid metal layers is improved as well. The integration of these marks has been evaluated for the 90 nm and 65 nm technology nodes as part of a joint development program between the Crolles2 Alliance and ASML. A measured overlay improvement of ~10-15% was obtained by a strategy change from floating copper marks to stacked optimized VSPM marks.

  15. UV spectroscopy of Titan's atmosphere, planetary organic chemistry and prebiological synthesis. II - Interpretation of new IUE observations in the 220-335 nm range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, Regis; Wagener, Richard; Mckay, Christopher P.; Caldwell, John; Fricke, Karl-Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical model developed by McKay et al. (1989) to characterize the size distribution, thermal structure, and chemical composition of the stratospheric haze of Titan is applied to new 220-335-nm albedo measurements obtained with the long-wavelength prime camera of the IUE during August 1987. Data and model predictions are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is shown that a simple model with particles of one size at a given altitude does not accurately reproduce the observed features in all spectral regions, but that good general agreement is obtained using a model with a uniformly mixed layer at 150-600 km and a bimodal distribution of small 'polymer' haze particles (radius less than 20 nm) and larger haze particles (radius 100-500 nm). The number densities implied by this model require, however, a mechanism such as electrostatic charging or reaction kinetics to inhibit coagulation of the smaller particles.

  16. Particle agglomeration and properties of nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yijun; Oztekin, Alparslan, E-mail: alo2@lehigh.edu; Neti, Sudhakar [Lehigh University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States); Mohapatra, Satish [Dynalene Inc. (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The present study demonstrates the importance of actual agglomerated particle size in the nanofluid and its effect on the fluid properties. The current work deals with 5 to 100 nm nanoparticles dispersed in fluids that resulted in 200 to 800 nm agglomerates. Particle size distributions for a range of nanofluids are measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Wet scanning electron microscopy method is used to visualize agglomerated particles in the dispersed state and to confirm particle size measurements by DLS. Our results show that a combination of base fluid chemistry and nanoparticle type is very important to create stable nanofluids. Several nanofluids resulted in stable state without any stabilizers, but in the long term had agglomerations of 250 % over a 2 month period. The effects of agglomeration on the thermal and rheological properties are presented for several types of nanoparticle and base fluid chemistries. Despite using nanodiamond particles with high thermal conductivity and a very sensitive laser flash thermal conductivity measurement technique, no anomalous increases of thermal conductivity was measured. The thermal conductivity increases of nanofluid with the particle concentration are as those predicted by Maxwell and Bruggeman models. The level of agglomeration of nanoparticles hardly influenced the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid. The viscosity of nanofluids increased strongly as the concentration of particle is increased; it displays shear thinning and is a strong function of the level of agglomeration. The viscosity increase is significantly above of that predicted by the Einstein model even for very small concentration of nanoparticles.

  17. Temperature characteristic of 808nm VCSELs with large aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan; Feng, Dawei; Hao, Yongqin; Wang, Yong; Yan, Changling; Lu, Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In order to study the output characteristics of 808nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser(VCSEL) with large aperture at different temperature, 808nm VCSEL with 500μm emitting diameter are fabricated with Reticular Electrode Structure(RES). Lasing wavelength, optical power and the threshold current are measured by changing the temperature of heat sink. And an output power of 0.42W is achieved at 1.3A at room temperature under continuous wave operation. The central wavelength is 803.32nm, and the full width at half maximum is 0.16nm, the temperature shift is 0.06nm/°, the thermal resistance is 0.098°/mW. The testing results show that 808nm VCSEL with large aperture is good temperature characteristic.

  18. Antifungal effect of 405-nm light on Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, K; Tanaka, S; Ibaraki, Y; Yoshimura, K; Ito, S

    2014-12-01

    There is very little information on the fungistatic or fungicidal effect of visible light. This study investigated the effect of 405-nm light, generated by a light-emitting diode array, on the economically important fungus Botrytis cinerea. The mycelial growth of B. cinerea was inhibited to the greatest extent by light at 405 and 415 nm and was negligibly inactivated at 450 nm, suggesting the presence of a photosensitizing compound that absorbs light mainly at wavelengths of 405-415 nm. Delta-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor of endogenous photosensitizer porphyrins, was used to determine the role of these porphyrins in 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of the fungus. Concentration-dependent inhibition of spore germination by delta-aminolevulinic acid and accumulation of singlet oxygen in the spores was observed when the spores were exposed to 405-nm light. These results suggest that the excitation of endogenous porphyrins and subsequent accumulation of singlet oxygen could partially explain the 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of B. cinerea. The development of symptoms in detached tomato leaves inoculated with B. cinerea spores was significantly reduced by irradiation with 405-nm light, indicating that 405-nm light has a potential use for controlling plant diseases caused by B. cinerea. Grey mould (Botrytis cinerea) is a very successful necrotroph, causing serious losses in more than 200 crop hosts. This study investigated the antifungal effect of 405-nm light on this pathogen. Our results suggest that the excitation of endogenous porphyrins and subsequent accumulation of singlet oxygen contribute to the 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of grey mould. The development of symptoms in detached tomato leaves inoculated with B. cinerea spores was significantly inhibited by irradiation with 405-nm light, indicating that this wavelength of light has a potential use in controlling plant diseases caused by B. cinerea. © 2014 The Society for

  19. Virus safety of plasma products using 20 nm instead of 15 nm filtration as virus removing step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderman, A H L; ter Hart, H G J; Prins-de Nijs, I M M; Bloem, J; Stoffers, S; Kempers, A; Derksen, G J; Al, B; Dekker, L; Over, J

    2012-11-01

    During the manufacture of human plasma derivatives, a series of complementary measures are undertaken to prevent transmission of blood-borne viruses. Virus filtration using 15 nm (Planova15N) filters has successfully been implemented in manufacturing processes for various plasma derivatives primarily because virus filtration is a technique, mild for proteins, that can effectively remove even small non-lipid-enveloped viruses, such as HAV and parvovirus B19. However, the use of 15 nm filters has limitations with regard to protein capacity of the filters and the process flow, resulting in an expensive manufacturing step. Therefore, studies were performed to test whether the use of 20 nm (Planova20N) filters, having different characteristics compared to 15 nm filters, can be an alternative for the use of 15 nm filters. It is shown that 20 nm filtration can be an alternative for 15 nm filtration. However, the virus removal capacity of the 20 nm filters depends on the plasma product that is filtered. Therefore, an optimisation study must be performed with regard to process parameters such as pressure, pH and protein concentration for each plasma product. In this study, using optimised conditions, the virus removal capacity of 20 nm filters appears to be comparable or even better when compared to that of 15 nm filters. Copyright © 2012 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanoparticle production by UV irradiation of combustion generated soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipe, Christopher B.; Choi, Jong Hyun; Lucas, Donald; Koshland, Catherine P.; Sawyer, Robert F.

    2004-07-01

    Laser ablation of surfaces normally produce high temperature plasmas that are difficult to control. By irradiating small particles in the gas phase, we can better control the size and concentration of the resulting particles when different materials are photofragmented. Here, we irradiate soot with 193 nm light from an ArF excimer laser. Irradiating the original agglomerated particles at fluences ranging from 0.07 to 0.26 J/cm{sup 2} with repetition rates of 20 and 100 Hz produces a large number of small, unagglomerated particles, and a smaller number of spherical agglomerated particles. Mean particle diameters from 20 to 50 nm are produced from soot originally having a mean electric mobility diameter of 265nm. We use a non-dimensional parameter, called the photon/atom ratio (PAR), to aid in understanding the photofragmentation process. This parameter is the ratio of the number of photons striking the soot particles to the number of the carbon atoms contained in the soot particles, and is a better metric than the laser fluence for analyzing laser-particle interactions. These results suggest that UV photofragmentation can be effective in controlling particle size and morphology, and can be a useful diagnostic for studying elements of the laser ablation process.

  1. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  2. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  3. Formation and characterization of low resistivity sub-100 nm copper films deposited by electroless on SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asher, T. [Dept. of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978, Tel-Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: tamaras3@tau.ac.il; Inberg, A.; Glickman, E.; Fishelson, N.; Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Dept. of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2009-10-30

    Thin Cu films of microelectronic quality and low electrical resistivity were created by electroless deposition (ELD) onto SiO{sub 2} surface modified first with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) and activated then by 5 nm gold nano-particles (AuNPs). The presence of highly oriented amino-terminated SAM was revealed by XPS and ToF-SIMS analyses. The Cu films were deposited in boron- and phosphorous-free tartrate/formaldehyde electrolyte. Controlling the deposition rate via the solution pH permitted a minimum value in resistivity {rho}. XPS depth profile revealed that diffusion of Cu into SiO{sub 2} modified by APTMS did not take place after annealing at 220 deg. C, 4 h. Moreover, annealing resulted in the drop of electrical resistivity to {rho} = 4 {+-} 0.4 {mu}{omega} cm for the films with the thickness of 35-100 nm. This value of {rho} is several times smaller than those reported in literature for sub-100 nm Cu films deposited by electroless on different SAMs. It is speculated that nano-scale porosity and corrugated structure observed by HRTEM and AFM in the ELD Cu films contribute to the resistivity. The obtained results demonstrate a viable route for formation of low resistivity, sub-100 nm Cu films on dielectrics for microelectronic application.

  4. Comparing magnetostructural transitions in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 18.75}Cu{sub 6.25}Ga{sub 25} and Ni{sub 49.80}Mn{sub 34.66}In{sub 15.54} Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubenko, Igor [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Granovsky, Alexander [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Lahderanta, Erkki [Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 (Finland); Kashirin, Maxim; Makagonov, Vladimir [Voronezh State Technical University, Voronezh 394026 (Russian Federation); Aryal, Anil; Quetz, Abdiel; Pandey, Sudip [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Rodionov, Igor [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Samanta, Tapas; Stadler, Shane [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mazumdar, Dipanjan, E-mail: dmazumdar@siu.edu [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Ali, Naushad [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The crystal structure, magnetic and transport properties, including resistivity and thermopower, of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 18.75}Cu{sub 6.25}Ga{sub 25} and Ni{sub 49.80}Mn{sub 34.66}In{sub 15.54} Heusler alloys were studied in the (10–400) K temperature interval. We show that their physical properties are remarkably different, thereby pointing to different origin of their magnetostructural transition (MST). A Seebeck coefficient (S) was found to pass minimum of about −20 µV/K in respect of temperature for both compounds. It was shown that MST observed for both compounds results in jump-like changes in S for Ga-based compound and jump in resistivity of about 20 and 200 µΩ cm for Ga and In –based compounds, respectively. The combined analyzes of the present results with that from literature show that the density of states at the Fermi level does not change strongly at the MST in the case of Ni–Mn–In alloys as compared to that of Ni–Mn–Ga. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependencies of resistivity for Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 18.75}Cu{sub 6.25}Ga{sub 25} and Ni{sub 49.80}Mn{sub 34.66}In{sub 15.54} obtained on heating (open symbols) and cooling (closed symbols). Arrows indicate the temperature of direct (T{sub M}) and inverse (T{sub A}) martensitic transitions and ferromagnetic ordering of the austenitic (T{sub C}) and martensitic (T{sub CM}) phases. The T{sub CM}=T{sub A}/T{sub M} in the case of Ga-based alloy. - Highlights: • Magnetostructural transitions (MST) in two compounds with same parent material. • The figure exemplifies how sensitive MST properties are to the density of states. • Proper understanding is required for utilizing these multifunctional materials.

  5. [Research on NEDC ultrafine particle emission characters of a port fuel injection gasoline car].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Jin; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Lou, Di-Ming

    2012-12-01

    A Santana gasoline car with multi-port fuel injection (PFI) system was used as the research prototype and an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) was employed to investigate the exhaust ultrafine particle number and size distribution characters of the tested vehicle in new European driving cycle (NEDC). The tested results showed that the vehicle's nuclear particle number, accumulation particle number, as well as the total particle number emission increased when the car drove in accelerated passage, and the vehicle's particle number emission was high during the first 40 seconds after test started and when the speed was over 90 km x h(-1) in extra urban driving cycle (EUDC) in NEDC. The ultrafine particle distribution of the whole NEDC showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, with diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameter was 24 nm. The ultrafine particle distribution of the urban driving cycle named by the economic commission for Europe (ECE) e. g. ECE I, ECE II - IV, the extra urban driving cycle e. g. EUDC, and the idling, constant speed, acceleration, deceleration operation conditions of NEDC all showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, also with particle diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameters of different driving cycle and different driving mode were from 14 nm to 42 nm. Therefore, the ultrafine particle emissions of the tested PFI gasoline car were mainly consisted of nuclear mode particles with a diameter of less than 50 nm.

  6. Anetoderma treated with combined 595-nm pulsed-dye laser and 1550-nm non-ablative fractionated laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Krystle; Ross, Nicholas Alexander; Saedi, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Anetoderma is a skin disorder characterized by a focal loss of dermal elastic tissue whereby patients present with soft, depressible lesions. We postulated that a series of combination treatment using the 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) and the 1550-nm non-ablative fractionated laser (NAFL) would improve the anetoderma lesions. Our patient with biopsy proven anetoderma received 3 treatments with a combination of 595-nm PDL and 1550-nm NAFL spaced 3 weeks apart. Skin biopsies were performed at baseline and immediately prior to the third treatment. Stains for hematoxylin and eosin and Verhoeff Van Gieson (VVG) were performed. Improvement in lesion color, texture, and overall appearance was noted after the second treatment and continued following the third treatment. Post-treatment VVG staining demonstrated an increase in dermal elastin fibers and a decrease in elastin fiber fragmentation. Thus, the combination of 595-nm PDL and 1550-nm NAFL should be considered as a treatment modality for anetoderma.

  7. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Klimont, Zbigniew; Visschedijk, Antoon; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Amann, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa), coke production (Russia and China), and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation) scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol-cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response to tightening

  8. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas–Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa, coke production (Russia and China, and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol–cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response

  9. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter 2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  10. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretel, H.; Oliveira, J. A.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Ramalho, L. T. O.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI - only Ca(OH)2, GII - laser 688 nm, and GIII - laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p < 0.05) and between groups GI and GIII (p < 0.01). On 60th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm.

  11. Particle kickers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    These devices are designed to provide a current pulse of 5000 Amps which will in turn generate a fast magnetic pulse that steers the incoming beam into the LHC. Today, the comprehensive upgrade of the LHC injection kicker system is entering its final stages. The upgraded system will ensure the LHC can be refilled without needing to wait for the kicker magnets to cool, thus enhancing the performance of the whole accelerator.   An upgraded kicker magnet in its vacuum tank, with an upgraded beam screen. The LHC is equipped with two kicker systems installed at the injection points (near points 2 and 8, see schematic diagram) where the particle beams coming from the SPS are injected into the accelerator’s orbit. Each system comprises four magnets and four pulse generators in which the field rises to 0.12 Tesla in less than 900 nanoseconds and for a duration of approximately 8 microseconds. Although the injection kickers only pulse 12 times to fill the LHC up with beam, the LHC beam circ...

  12. On high speed transmission with the 850 nm VCSELs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.; Chorchos, Łukasz; Puerta Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    One of the key research challenges is development of energy efficient high bit rate data interconnects. The most promising solutions are based on 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) and multi mode fibre (MMF). In this paper options to realize energy efficient 850 nm data interc...

  13. 14/16nm FinFET Radiation Response Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    inverter-based DFF, and Figure 1. Floorplan layout of 16nm bulk FinFET test chip with multiple CREST configuration flip-flop shift registers. Figure...D. Rennie, " Neutron - and Proton-Induced Single Event Upsets for D- and DICE-Flip/Flop Designs at a 40 nm Technology Node," IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci

  14. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, 19W Memorial Dr, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Mohapatra, S. [Dynalene Inc., 5250W Coplay Rd, Whitehall, Pennsylvania 18052 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  15. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-01

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  16. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  17. Electron beam inspection of 16nm HP node EUV masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Narukawa, Shogo; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Lin, Chia-Wen; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Jau, Jack

    2012-11-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for 16nm HP node semiconductor device manufacturing and beyond. The fabrication of defect free EUV mask is one of the most challenging roadblocks to insert EUVL into high volume manufacturing (HVM). To fabricate and assure the defect free EUV masks, electron beam inspection (EBI) tool will be likely the necessary tool since optical mask inspection systems using 193nm and 199nm light are reaching a practical resolution limit around 16nm HP node EUV mask. For production use of EBI, several challenges and potential issues are expected. Firstly, required defect detection sensitivity is quite high. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2011, the smallest defect size needed to detect is about 18nm for 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Secondly, small pixel size is likely required to obtain the high sensitivity. Thus, it might damage Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer due to accumulated high density electron beam bombardments. It also has potential of elevation of nuisance defects and reduction of throughput. These challenges must be solved before inserting EBI system into EUV mask HVM line. In this paper, we share our initial inspection results for 16nm HP node EUV mask (64nm HP absorber pattern on the EUV mask) using an EBI system eXplore® 5400 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). In particularly, defect detection sensitivity, inspectability and damage to EUV mask were assessed. As conclusions, we found that the EBI system has capability to capture 16nm defects on 64nm absorber pattern EUV mask, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Furthermore, we confirmed there is no significant damage to susceptible Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer. We also identified that low throughput and high nuisance defect rate are critical challenges needed to address for the 16nm HP node EUV mask inspection. The high nuisance defect rate could be generated by poor LWR and stitching errors during EB writing

  18. Neutron study of magnetic excitations in 8-nm -Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Lefmann, Kim; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2006-01-01

    By use of inelastic neutron scattering we have studied magnetic fluctuations in 8-nm particles of antiferromagnetic alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) as a function of temperature and applied magnetic fields. The fluctuations are dominated by uniform excitations. Studies have been performed on both coated...... by finite-size effects, and we have estimated the size of this moment from the experimental neutron data. The field dependence of epsilon(0) for the interacting nanoparticles differs strongly from that of the noninteracting nanoparticles, and this is a result of the influence of exchange interaction between...

  19. In-Situ Characteristics of Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagels, Joakum; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Bioenergy Technology; Swietlicki, Erik [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2005-07-01

    In this work we used a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Electrical Low-pressure Impactor to: a) Derive information of the particle morphology through air-borne analysis and b) Identify time and size variations of particle phase components from incomplete combustion and ash-components. The results presented here covers measurements in two moving grate boilers (12 MW operating on moist forest residue and 1.5 MW operating on wood pellets). We have previously shown that PM1 estimated from Electrical Low-Pressure Impactor (ELPI)-measurements consisted of a rather constant background with peaks correlating with CO and OGC peaks. In the 1.5 MW boiler EC contributed to 34% of PM1, while in the 12 MW boiler EC was below 0.5%. Figure 2 shows time variations in the 1.5 MW boiler as the current in three stages of the ELPI-impactor. Note that time-variations increase strongly with particle size. The fraction of the gravimetric mass detected as water-soluble ions (IC) decreased from {approx} 70% for dae= 78 and 133 nm to {approx} 25% for 322 and 510 nm particles and increased to around 50% for particles larger than 1 {mu}m. In the 12 MW boiler time variations were as low as for 128 nm particles and IC recovery was high for all studied particle sizes. Based on these data we conclude that PM consisting of ash-components are formed with small time variations mainly in mobility-sizes below 250 nm, while Elemental Carbon is emitted at high concentrations during peaks on the time-scale 10-30 s, mainly in particle sizes larger than 150 nm. However, the detailed mixing status of these two particle types/materials is still not known.

  20. NM23-H1: a Metastasis-Associated Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Torng Tee

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The protein product of nm23-H1 gene has activity of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP kinase, which catalyzes the phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates to the corresponding nucleoside triphosphates. Reductions in nm23 expression have been significantly associated with aggressive behavior in melanoma, breast, colon, and gastric carcinomas. On the contrary, high levels of nm23 gene expression are noted in the advanced stage of thyroid carcinomas and associated with significant reductions in survival for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma patients. Although expression of nm23/NDP kinase is divergent in various malignant tumors, its reduced expression seems to be related to increased metastatic potential in most carcinoma types. However, it is hypothesized that nm23 may play a tissue-specific role, and that different regulatory mechanisms may act in different tumors. In ovarian carcinoma, nm23-H1/NDP kinase may be correlated with some clinicopathologic characteristics. In cervical cancer, nm23-H1 is probably involved in cervical carcinogenesis and correlated with some aggressive parameters. Overexpression of nm23-H1 protein may indicate poor survival for cervical cancer patients. Other than histidine 118 residue (amino acid sequence 118: histidine concerned with NDP kinase activity of nm23-H1, serine 120 (amino acid sequence 120: serine related activity of histidine-dependent protein phosphotransfer was recently reported to be responsible for its biological suppressive effects. To inhibit metastatic potential, nm23-H1 is also demonstrated to co-immunoprecipitate the kinase suppressor of Ras and phosphorylate it, and therefore reduce activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in response to signaling.

  1. Picosecond laser texturization of mc-silicon for photovoltaics: A comparison between 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm radiation wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binetti, Simona [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Le Donne, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.ledonne@mater.unimib.it [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Rolfi, Andrea [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Jäggi, Beat; Neuenschwander, Beat [Bern University of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Information Technology, Institute for Applied Laser, Photonics and Surface Technologies ALPS, Pestalozzistrasse 20, CH-3400 Burgdorf (Switzerland); Busto, Chiara [ENI Spa, Via Giacomo Fauser, 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Frigeri, Cesare [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area Delle Scienze 37/A, Fontanini, 43010 Parma (Italy); Scorticati, Davide; Longoni, Luca; Pellegrino, Sergio [Laserpoint Srl, Via Della Burrona 51, 20090 Vimodrone, Milano (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on mc-Si. • Three laser wavelengths were used which effectively reduce Si reflectivity up to 8%. • The subsurface damage induced by the three lasers was studied in detail. • μ-Raman, PL and TEM proved that UV laser provides the lowest subsurface damage. • UV laser induced damage is located above the depletion region of the p–n junction. - Abstract: Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on multi-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. Three different laser wavelengths were employed (i.e. 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and the resulting morphologies were observed to effectively reduce the reflectivity of the samples after laser irradiation. Besides, a comparative study of the laser induced subsurface damage generated by the three different wavelengths was performed by confocal micro-Raman, photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results of both the structural and optical characterization showed that the mc-Si texturing performed with the laser at 355 nm provides surface reflectivity between 11% and 8% over the spectral range from 400 nm to 1 μm, while inducing the lowest subsurface damage, located above the depletion region of the p–n junction.

  2. Kinetic nucleation and ions in boreal forest particle formation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain a more comprehensive picture on different mechanisms behind atmospheric particle formation, measurement results from QUEST 2-campaign are analyzed with an aid of an aerosol dynamic model. A special emphasis is laid on air ion and charged aerosol dynamics. Model simulations indicate that kinetic nucleation of ammonia and sulphuric acid together with condensation of sulphuric acid and low-volatile organic vapours onto clusters and particles explain basic features of particle formation events as well as ion characteristics. However, an observed excess of negative ions in the diameter range 1.5-3nm and overcharge of 3-5nm particles demonstrate that ions are also involved in particle formation. These observations can be explained by preferential condensation of sulphuric acid onto negatively charged clusters and particles and/or contribution of ion-induced nucleation on particle formation. According to model simulations, which assume that the nucleation rate is equal to the sulfuric acid collision rate, the relative contribution of ion-based particle formation seems to be smaller than kinetic nucleation of neutral clusters. Conducted model simulations also corroborate the recently-presented hypothesis according to which a large number of so-called thermodynamically stable clusters (TSCs having a diameter between 1-3nm exist in the atmosphere. TSCs were found to grow to observable sizes only under favorable conditions, e.g. when the pre-existing particle concentration was low.

  3. The PHOCUS Project: Mesospheric Ice Particle Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaplanov, M.; Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, intostrong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. Here we will describe the optical measurements of the ice particlesand present first results including comparison to the other simultaneous measurements.Ice particle properties were probed with a set of three NLC photometers from Stockholm University. NLC photometry is currently the best technique available for determining altitude ranges of NLC in situ. At the same time, UV photometry allows a study of particle properties like size and shape by analysing the spectral dependence (colour ratio), angle dependence (phase function), and polarisation of the scattering. The set of NLC photometer flown on PHOCUS was a unique photometer package that for the first time investigated all three parameters simultaneously. Two forward-viewing photometers measured at different wavelengths (one in the UV at 220 nm and the other in the visible at 440 nm) and were both equipped with fixed linear polarisers. The payload spin was utilised to scan through the polarisation direction, thus providing us with the Stokes vectors I, Q and U at both wavelengths. The third photometer (also measured in the UV at 220 nm)was mounted sideways, viewing the overhead sky at an angle of 40°from the rocket spin axis. Due to the payload spin, the NLC was observed under varying scattering geometries as the payload approached the cloud layer. Thus, this set of NLC photometers provided a complete optical characterization of the

  4. The biological effects upon the cardiovascular system consequent to exposure to particulates of less than 500 nm in size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James; Gregory, Clive C; Matthews, Ian P; Hoogendoorn, Bastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particulate matter contribution to cardiovascular disease is not known and not regulated. PM up to 500 nm are abundant in urban air and alveolar deposition is significant. Effects beyond the alveolar barrier within the body or in vitro tissues exposed to particles <500 nm. MEDLINE; Ovid-MEDLINE PREM; Web of Science; PubMed (SciGlobe). 127 articles. Results in tables: "subject type exposed", "exposure type", "technique". Heart rate, vasoactivity, atherosclerotic advancement, oxidative stress, coagulability, inflammatory changes are affected. Production of reactive oxygen species is a useful target to limit outcomes associated with UFP exposure.

  5. Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joakim; Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik; Gharibi, Arash [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2003-05-01

    particle number concentration increased slightly with increasing load, at the same time the fine mode particles became smaller. This was probably caused by different degree of particle coagulation as the residence time in the boiler was changed. The mean diameter during combustion of forest residue was around 100 nm compared to 70-80 nm for dry wood and pellets, while the total number was close to constant. This explains the differences in mass concentration found in the impactor measurements. The concentrations of CO and THC was highest for the dry wood fuel, the PAH concentration was highest for pellets combustion in boiler 4, however this boiler was poorly tuned at the time of measurement. The PAH concentration was 5 times higher during combustion of dry wood compared to forest residue. The concentration of CO, THC and PAH varied to a great extend. The high concentrations were measured in boilers running at a low load. The concentration of particle organic carbon was less than 15% of PMI for all fuels. However we used heated primary dilution, which inhibits the condensation of organic components into, the particle phase. A significant fraction of the emitted organic carbon may condense to the particle phase during dilution after the stack or after being oxidized in the atmosphere. We also measured elemental carbon in the particle phase. The contribution to PM1 was as high as 25-30% during pellets combustion at low load and 8% at low load during combustion of dry wood. In all other cases the EC-concentration was less than 3% of PMI. PIXE and lon-chromatography confirmed that alkali-salts were the dominant chemical species. PIXE analysis revealed that emitted amounts of heavy metals such as Zn, Cd and Pb are strongly dependent on the type of the fuel used. Forest residues gave high emissions of Zn, Cd and Pb, while pellets gave very high emissions of Cd and Zn. The fuel with the lowest emissions of heavy metals was dry wood. This again could be related to ash content in

  6. Biogeochemical Recycling on Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, R.; Stewart, B.; Khaing, H.; Tatro, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    Trace elements are recycled on sea-salt particles that are produced and later re-deposited in the surface ocean. This recycling process involves aluminum, iron, and other elements commonly associated with mineral dust. Non-crustal Al can amount to as much as ~ 30% of the total aerosol Al at Bermuda, but this occurs only during a few months of the year when the dust concentrations and deposition rates are low. Simple model calculations suggest that ~15 to 20% of the total Al dry deposition during December and January can be attributed to recycled sea salt, but when dust concentrations are higher, recycling accounts for only ~ 1% of the Al dry deposition. Non-crustal/non-sea salt (NC/NSS) sources account for > 70% of the aerosol Sb, Se, V, and Zn, but differences in the dry deposition velocities for particles of different sizes are such that the amount of Sb and Se recycled on sea spray approaches or exceeds their new inputs to the open ocean from dust and the NC/NSS sources. More recently, recycling on aerosol particles has been found to occur in other environments, including the deserts in the southwestern USA. In this case, the recycling of radionuclides released during nuclear weapons tests many years ago occurs via the resuspension of contaminated soil particles. Studies conducted near Carlsbad, NM have shown that the temporal variability in ^{239,240}Pu and ^{241}Am activities tracks that of Al, a mineral dust indictor, in aerosol samples. Analyses of soil samples from various sites have shown that plutonium is released from the particles by chemical procedures developed for removing iron oxides from mineral particles; this implies that the dust/plutonium relationship is mediated by iron oxides.

  7. Development of 2-channel (532 nm and 355 nm) mobile LIDAR for mapping particulate matter in the atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors describe the developmentof 2-Channel (532 nm and 355 nm) mobile LIDAR system for studying atmospheric particulate matter. The system is currently tested in house at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research...

  8. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  9. Mode resolved density of atmospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aalto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the mode resolved density of ultrafine atmospheric particles measured in boreal forest environment. The method used here enables us to find the distinct density information for each mode in atmospheric fine particle population: the density values for nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode particles are presented. The experimental data was gained during 2 May 2005–19 May 2005 at the boreal forest measurement station "SMEAR II" in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The density values for accumulation mode varied from 1.1 to 2 g/cm3 (average 1.5 g/cm3 and for Aitken mode from 0.4 to 2 g/cm3 (average 0.97 g/cm3. As an overall trend during the two weeks campaign, the density value of Aitken mode was seen to gradually increase. With the present method, the time dependent behaviour of the particle density can be investigated in the time scale of 10 min. This allows us to follow the density evolution of the nucleation mode particles during the particle growth process following the nucleation burst. The density of nucleation mode particles decreased during the growth process. The density values for 15 nm particles were 1.2–1.5 g/cm3 and for grown 30 nm particles 0.5–1 g/cm3. These values are consistent with the present knowledge that the condensing species are semi-volatile organics, emitted from the boreal forest.

  10. Characterisation of particle emissions from the driving car fleet and the contribution to ambient and indoor particle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Finn; Wåhlin, Peter; Kildesø, Jan; Afshari, Alireza; Fogh, Christian L.

    The population is mainly exposed to high air pollution concentrations in the urban environment, where motor vehicle emissions constitute the main source of fine and ultrafine particles. These particles can penetrate deep into the respiratory system, and studies indicate that the smaller the particle, the larger the health impacts. The chemical composition, surface reactivity and physical properties are also important. However, the knowledge about chemical and physical properties of particles and the temporal and spatial variability of the smallest particles is still very limited. The present study summarises the first results of a larger project with the aims to improve the knowledge. The concentration and the emissions of ultrafine particles from petrol and diesel vehicles, respectively, have been quantified using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer of ultrafine particles in the size range 6-700 nm and routine monitoring data from urban streets and urban background in Denmark. The quantification was carried out using receptor modelling. The number size distributions of petrol and diesel emissions showed a maximum at 20-30 nm and non-traffic at ≈100 nm. The contribution of ultrafine particles from diesel vehicles is dominating in streets. The same technique has been applied on PM 10, and ≈50% contribution from non-traffic. The technique has also been introduced in relation to elemental and organic carbon, and the first data showed strong correlation between traffic pollution and elemental carbon. The outdoor air quality has a significant effect on indoor pollution levels, and we spend most of the time indoors. Knowledge about the influence of ambient air pollution on the concentrations in the indoor environment is therefore crucial for assessment of human health effects of traffic pollution. The results of our studies will be included in air quality models for calculation of human exposure. Preliminary results from our first campaign showed, that the deposition

  11. Transferrable Plasmonic Au Thin Film Containing Sub-20 nm Nanohole Array Constructed via High-Resolution Polymer Self-Assembly and Nanotransfer Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Soonmin; Jeon, Suwan; Kim, Jong Min; Baek, Kwang Min; Lee, Gun Ho; Kim, Hyowook; Shin, Jonghwa; Jung, Yeon Sik

    2018-01-10

    The fabrication and characterization of nanoscale hole arrays (NHA) have been extensively performed for a variety of unique characteristics including extraordinary optical transmission phenomenon observed for plasmonic NHAs. Although the size miniaturization and hole densification are strongly required for enhancement of high-frequency optical responses, from a practical point-of-view, it is still not straightforward to manufacture NHA using conventional lithography techniques. Herein, a facile, cost-effective, and transferrable fabrication route for high-resolution and high-density NHA with sub-50 nm periodicity is demonstrated. Solvent-assisted nanotransfer printing with ultrahigh-resolution combined with block copolymer self-assembly is used to fabricate well-defined Si nanomesh master template with 4-fold symmetry. An Au NHA film on quartz substrate is then obtained by thermal-evaporation on the Si master and subsequent transfer of the sample, resulting in NHA structure having a hole with a diameter of 18 nm and a density over 400 holes/μm2. A resonance peak at the wavelength of 650 nm, which is not present in the transmittance spectrum of a flat Au film, is observed for the Au NHA film. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results propose that the unexpected peak appears because of plasmonic surface guiding mode. The position of the resonance peak shows the sensitivity toward the change of the refractive index of surrounding medium, suggesting it as a promising label-free sensor application. In addition, other types of Au nanostructure arrays such as geometry-controlled NHA and nanoparticle arrays (NPAs) shows the outstanding versatility of our approach.

  12. Efficient single-pass third-harmonic generation from 1560 nm to 520 nm for pumping doubly-resonant OPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kong; Wang, Junmin

    2017-08-01

    A ~545 mW single-frequency tunable 520 nm green laser has been demonstrated using a periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) bulk crystal based on single-pass third-harmonic generation (THG) of a 1560 nm laser via single-pass second-harmonic generation (SHG) followed by single-pass sum-frequency generation (SFG). In single-pass SHG, two cascaded periodically-poled magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate (PPMgO:LN) crystals were used, and ~3.5 W 780.25 nm doubled laser output is produced, corresponding to maximum doubling efficiency of 26.8%. The system can provide a pump source (520 nm) for an optical parametric oscillator for two-color entangled continuous-variable optical field generation at 1560 and 780 nm and two-color local oscillators for homodyne detection.

  13. Particle size distribution and its relationship to black carbon in two urban and one rural site in Santiago de Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramsch, E; Reyes, E; Oyola, P; Ma, Rubio; López, G; Pérez, P; Martínez, R

    2014-07-01

    The size distribution of particles has been studied in three sites in the Metropolitan area of Santiago de Chile in the winter of 2009 and a comparison with black carbon was performed. Two sites are located near busy streets in Santiago and the other site is located in a rural area about 40 km west of Santiago with little influence from vehicles, but large influence from wood burning. The campaign lasted 1 or 2 weeks in each site. We have divided the particle size measurements into four groups (10-39 nm, 40-62 nm, 63-174 nm, and 175-700 nm) in order to compare with the carbon monitor. In the sites near the street, black carbon has a high correlation (R = 0.85) with larger particles (175-700 nm). The correlation decreased when black carbon was compared with smaller particles, having very small correlation with the smallest sizes (10-39 nm). In the rural site, black carbon also has a high correlation (R = 0.86) with larger particles (175-700 nm), but the correlation between black carbon and the finest particles (10-39 nm) decreases to near 0. These measurements are an indication that wood burning does not generate particles smaller than -50 nm. In the urban sites, particle size distribution is peaked toward smaller particles (10-39 nm) only during rush hours, but at other times, particles size distribution is peaked toward larger sizes. When solar radiation was high, evidence of secondary particle formation was seen in the rural site, but not in the urban sites. The correlation between the number of secondary particles and solar radiation was R2 = 0.46, indicating that it there may be other variables that play a role in ultrafine particle formation. Implications: A study of the size distribution of particles and black carbon concentration in two street sites and one rural site shows that in the last site the number of particles ultrafine particles (d particles is about 2 times lower. Thus, the rural site has less of the particles that are more dangerous to health

  14. Photolysis of tryptophan with 337. 1 nm laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkman, R.F.; Hibbard, L.B.; Dillon, J.

    1986-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of L-tryptophan were photolyzed by exposure to 337.1 nm radiation from a pulsed nitrogen laser. These data were compared with results for the 290 nm conventional-source photolysis of tryptophan. The loss of Trp was observed to be first order for 290 nm photolysis but of mixed order for 337.1 nm photolysis. Five photolysis products including N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, tryptamine and two unknown products were detected. The tryptophan-containing peptides N-acetyl-tryptophanamide (NATA) and tryptophylglycine (Trp-Gly) were also observed to photolyze upon 337.1 nm laser radiation demonstrating that this phenomenon is not restricted to free tryptophan monomer. A number of experiments were performed in an effort to determine the mechanism of photolysis at this wavelength. It is concluded that this photolysis results either from a very weak absorption tail extending to 337.1 nm in tryptophan itself or from a reaction involving an impurity sensitizer which absorbs the 337.1 nm radiation.

  15. Synthesis of sub-10 nm solid lipid nanoparticles for topical and biomarker detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colón, Xiomara; Patchan, Marcia W.; Theodore, Mellisa L.; Le, Huong T.; Sample, Jennifer L.; Benkoski, Jason J.; Patrone, Julia B.

    2014-02-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are a promising platform for sensing in vivo biomarkers due to their biocompatibility, stability, and their ability to carry a wide range of active ingredients. The skin is a prominent target organ for numerous inflammatory and stress-related biomarkers, making it an excellent site for early detection of physiological imbalance and application of sensory nanoparticles. Though smaller particle size has generally been correlated with increased penetration of skin models, there has been little attention paid to the significance of other nanoparticle synthesis parameters with respect to their physical properties. In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of sub-10 nm SLNs by the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method. These particles were specifically designed for topical delivery of hydrogen peroxide-detecting chemiluminescent dyes. A systematic design of experiments approach was used to investigate the role of the processing variables on SLN form and properties. The processing variables were correlated with the SLN properties (e.g., dye solubility, phase inversion temperature, particle size, polydispersity, melting point, and latent heat of melting). Statistical analysis revealed that the PIT method, while allowing total control over the thermal properties, resulted in well-controlled synthesis of ultra-small particles, while allowing great flexibility in the processing conditions and incorporated compounds.

  16. Designing to win in sub-90nm mask production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan

    2005-11-01

    An informal survey conducted with key customers by Photronics indicates that the time gap between technology nodes has accelerated in recent years. Previously the cycle was three years. However, between 130nm and 90nm there was less than a 2 year gap, and between 90nm and 65nm a 1.5 year gap exists. As a result, the technical challenges have increased substantially. In addition, mask costs are rising exponentially due to high capital equipment cost, a shrinking customer base, long write times and increased applications of 193nm EAPSM or AAPSM. Collaboration among EDA companies, mask houses and wafer manufacturers is now more important than ever. This paper will explore avenues for reducing mask costs, mainly in the areas of: write-time reduction through design for manufacturing (DFM), and yield improvement through specification relaxation. Our study conducted through layout vertex modeling suggests that a simple design shape such as a square versus a circle or an angled structure helps reduce shot count and write time. Shot count reduction through mask layout optimization, and advancement in new generation E-beam writers can reduce write time up to 65%. An advanced laser writer can produce those less critical E-beam layers in less than half the time of an e-beam writer. Additionally, the emerging imprint lithography brings new life and new challenges to the photomask industry with applications in many fields outside of the semiconductor industry. As immersion lithography is introduced for 45nm device production, polarization and MEEF effects due to the mask will become severe. Larger magnification not only provides benefits on CD control and MEEF, but also extends the life time of current 90nm/65nm tool sets where 45nm mask sets can be produced at a lower cost.

  17. Nano particle and defect detection: physical limit of state-of-the-art systems and novel measurement technique to improve upon this

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Zwet, E.J. van; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, (dark field) imaging based, particle detection systems rely on identifying a particle based on its irradiance. It can be shown that for a very smooth wafer with 0.1 nm surface roughness (rms) this approach results in a particle detection limit larger than 20 nm. By carefully studying

  18. Tapered diode laser pumped 946 nm Nd:YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Haynes Pak Hay; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2009-01-01

    We successfully implemented a 946 nm Nd:YAG laser based on a 808 nm tapered diode pump laser. The tapered diode is developed at the Ferdinand-Braun-Institute fur Hochstfrequenztechnik in Germany. Figure 2 shows the experimental setup and results of each pump source coupled into a 1.5 mm crystal...... laser, we show that tapered diode laser pumping potentially increase the power of 946 nm lasers by a factor of two and reduce the threshold by a factor of three....

  19. Picosecond Laser Pulse Optical Density of Three 1060-NM Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    pul- ses. These included a dyed glass plate (Schott KG-3), a polymethyl methacrylate plate ( PMMA ) developed for the Air Force for 1060-nm- specific...Schott KG-3), a polymethyl methacrylate plate ( PMMA ) developed for the Air Force for 1060-nm-specific visors, and a dielectric-coated laser cavity... Ocular tissue damage due to ultrashort 1060-nm light pulses from a mode-locked Nd:glass laser. Appl Opt 14:1759-1761 (1975). 4. Taboada, J., and D. D

  20. High power composite cavity fiber laser oscillator at 1120 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianming; Li, Cheng; Yan, Dapeng

    2017-12-01

    A high power composite cavity fiber laser oscillator at 1120 nm is demonstrated experimentally. Performances of the 1120 nm single fiber laser oscillator and the composite cavity are investigated and compared, and the parasitic oscillation created by the strong amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) can be suppressed effectively in the composite cavity scheme. 2.04-kW 1120-nm signal light with a good beam quality (M2=1.15) is obtained, and the optical conversion efficiency of the composite cavity fiber laser oscillator is about 63% in the experiment. The compact architecture of composite cavity provides an effective scheme for power scaling of long wavelength lasers.

  1. REAL TIME MEASUREMENT OF ULTRAFINE AND NANO PARTICLES AND SIGNIFICANCE OF OPERATING GEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. NAKHAWA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research paper focuses on characterization of ultrafine and nanoparticle emissions from diesel vehicle to investigate their physical characterization in terms of number and size as they are more vulnerable and responsible for toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. An investigation has been carried out to identify the significance of different operating gears, clutch, declutch and gear change operations for their contributions to particle number(PN on urban and extra urban part of the driving cycle. A bi-modal particle size distribution pattern was observed for both urban and extra urban parts where almost all the particles are below 200 nm and particle number peaks appear at 7 to 8 nm and at 70 nm. Nano particles contribute approximately, 70% of total particle number over urban part. Experimental investigation shows that the most significant gear for their contribution to particle number are 3rd and 5th gears on urban and extra urban part of the driving cycle respectively.

  2. New particle searches

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2000-01-01

    This review presents recent results on new particle searches achieved at Tevatron, Hera and LEP. After a brief outline of the searches on exotic particles, results on supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons are detailed. Near future prospects are also given.

  3. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  4. Space-Qualified 1064 nm Seed and Metrology Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A space-qualified, single-frequency oscillator operating at 1064 nm is a critical component for a number of active optical measurement systems that have been...

  5. BIA Wingate High School WWTF, Fort Wingate, NM: NN0020958

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPDES Permit and Fact Sheet explaining EPA's action under the Clean Water Act to issue NPDES Permit No. NN0020958 to Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Wingate High School Wastewater Treatment Lagoon, Fort Wingate, NM.

  6. Compact 2050 nm Semiconductor Diode Laser Master Oscillator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to develop DFB laser master oscillators at the novel wavelength of 12050 nm. Two prototypes will be built, tested, and delivered ....

  7. Monitoring particle growth in deposition plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebrowski, T.; Bahre, H.; Böke, M.; Winter, J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods are frequently used to deposit barrier layers, e.g. on polymers for food packaging. These plasmas may suffer from particle (dust) formation. We report on a flexible monitoring system for dust. It is based on scanning a 3D plasma volume for particles by laser light scattering. The lower size limit of particles detected in the presented system is 20 nm. We report on existence diagrams for obtaining dust free or dust loaded capacitively or inductively coupled rf-plasmas in C2H2 depending on pressure, flow and rf-power. We further present growth rates for dust in these plasmas and show that monodisperse particles are only obtained during the first growth cycle.

  8. Particle number size distribution and new particle formation: new characteristics during the special pollution control period in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Tao; Wang, Shulan; Wang, Wenxing

    2012-01-01

    New particle formation is a key process in shaping the size distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere. We present here the measurement results of number and size distribution of aerosol particles (10-10000 nm in diameter) obtained in the summer of 2008, at a suburban site in Beijing, China. We firstly reported the pollution level, particle number size distribution, diurnal variation of the particle number size distribution and then introduced the characteristics of the particle formation processes. The results showed that the number concentration of ultrafine particles was much lower than the values measured in other urban or suburban areas in previous studies. Sharp increases of ultrafine particle count were frequently observed at noon. An examination of the diurnal pattern suggested that the burst of ultrafine particles was mainly due to new particle formation promoted by photochemical processes. In addition, high relative humidity was a key factor driving the growth of the particles in the afternoon. During the 2-month observations, new particle formation from homogeneous nucleation was observed for 42.7% of the study period. The average growth rate of newly formed particles was 3.2 nm/hr, and varied from 1.2 to 8.0 nm/hr. The required concentration of condensable vapor was 4.4 x 10(7) cm(-3), and its source rate was 1.2 x 106 cm(-3) sec(-1). Further calculation on the source rate of sulphuric acid vapor indicated that the average participation of sulphuric acid to particle growth rates was 28.7%.

  9. A 205GHz Amplifier in 90nm CMOS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    A 205GHz Amplifier in 90nm CMOS Technology Shahab Ardalan, Senior Member, IEEE Electrical Department, Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering...greater CMOS technologies . Keywords: Amplifier, neutralization, parasitic, Psat, P1dB.   Introduction Millimeter-wave and sub-mm-wave (THz band...amplifier has been implemented and fabricated in 90nm CMOS technology . The proposed amplifier attained a gain of 10.5 dB whilst consuming a dc power

  10. Investigations of a Dual Seeded 1178 nm Raman Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM 87117-5776 . NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications...ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER *Leidos, Inc 11951 Freedom Drive Reston, VA 20190 **University of New Mexico ECE Building, Room 125...AFRL/RDLT 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) AFRL-RD-PS-TP-2016-0009 12. DISTRIBUTION

  11. Investigation of a Pulsed 1550 nm Fiber Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Technical Paper APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Directed Energy Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE...NUMBER The University of New Mexico ECE Building, Room 125 Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10...SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory AFRL/RDLT 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  12. Porous metal oxide particles and their methods of synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin; Liu, Qiang

    2013-03-12

    Methods are generally disclosed for synthesis of porous particles from a solution formed from a leaving agent, a surfactant, and a soluble metal salt in a solvent. The surfactant congregates to form a nanoparticle core such that the metal salt forms about the nanoparticle core to form a plurality of nanoparticles. The solution is heated such that the leaving agent forms gas bubbles in the solution, and the plurality of nanoparticles congregate about the gas bubbles to form a porous particle. The porous particles are also generally disclosed and can include a particle shell formed about a core to define an average diameter from about 0.5 .mu.m to about 50 .mu.m. The particle shell can be formed from a plurality of nanoparticles having an average diameter of from about 1 nm to about 50 nm and defined by a metal salt formed about a surfactant core.

  13. Trends in nanosecond melanosome microcavitation up to 1540 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2015-09-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of bovine and porcine melanosomes were previously reported, using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the visible (532 nm) and the near-infrared (NIR) from 1000 to 1319 nm. Here, we report average radiant exposure thresholds for bovine melanosome microcavitation at additional NIR wavelengths up to 1540 nm, which range from ˜0.159 J/cm2 at 800 nm to 4.5 J/cm2 at 1540 nm. Melanosome absorption coefficients were also estimated, and decreased with increasing wavelength. These values were compared to retinal pigment epithelium coefficients, and to water absorption, over the same wavelength range. Corneal total intraocular energy retinal damage threshold values were estimated and compared to the previous (2007) and recently changed (2014) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe levels. Results provide additional data that support the recent changes to the MPE levels, as well as the first microcavitation data at 1540 nm, a wavelength for which melanosome microcavitation may be an ns-pulse skin damage mechanism.

  14. EUV lithography at the 22nm technology node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Obert; Koay, Chiew-Seng; Petrillo, Karen; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Arnold, John; Horak, Dave; Burkhardt, Martin; McIntyre, Gregory; Deng, Yunfei; La Fontaine, Bruno; Okoroanyanwu, Uzo; Wallow, Tom; Landie, Guillaume; Standaert, Theodorus; Burns, Sean; Waskiewicz, Christopher; Kawasaki, Hirohisa; Chen, James H.-C.; Colburn, Matthew; Haran, Bala; Fan, Susan S.-C.; Yin, Yunpeng; Holfeld, Christian; Techel, Jens; Peters, Jan-Hendrik; Bouten, Sander; Lee, Brian; Pierson, Bill; Kessels, Bart; Routh, Robert; Cummings, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    We are evaluating the readiness of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography for insertion into production at the 15 nm technology node by integrating it into standard semiconductor process flows because we believe that device integration exercises provide the truest test of technology readiness and, at the same time, highlight the remaining critical issues. In this paper, we describe the use of EUV lithography with the 0.25 NA Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) to pattern the contact and first interconnect levels of a large (~24 mm x 32 mm) 22 nm node test chip using EUV masks with state-of-the-art defectivity (~0.3 defects/cm2). We have found that: 1) the quality of EUVL printing at the 22 nm node is considerably higher than the printing produced with 193 nm immersion lithography; 2) printing at the 22 nm node with EUV lithography results in higher yield than double exposure double-etch 193i lithography; and 3) EUV lithography with the 0.25 NA ADT is capable of supporting some early device development work at the 15 nm technology node.

  15. Tissue measurement using 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Chad A.; Wu, Huawen; Yang, William

    2013-03-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to provide characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues has shown increasing success in recent years. Most of this work has been performed using near-infrared laser sources such as 785 or 830 nm, in a balance of reduced intrinsic fluorescence in the tissues and quantum efficiency in the silicon detectors often used. However, even at these wavelengths, many tissues still exhibit strong or prohibitive fluorescence, and these wavelengths still cause autofluorescence in many common sampling materials, such as glass. In this study, we demonstrate the use of 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy for the study of biological tissues. A number of tissues are evaluated using the 1064 nm system and compared with the spectra obtained from a 785 nm system. Sampling materials are similarly compared. These results show that 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy provides a viable solution for measurement of highly fluorescent biological tissues such as liver and kidney, which are difficult or impossible to extract Raman at 785 nm.

  16. Transillumination of interproximal caries lesions with 830-nm light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Graham C.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    New imaging technology is needed for the early detection of dental caries (decay) in the interproximal contact sites between teeth. Previous measurements have demonstrated that dental enamel is highly transparent in the near-IR near 1310-nm making that wavelength range ideal for the transillumination of interproximal lesions. However, imaging at 1310-nm involves the use of expensive InGaAs technology. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a low cost near-IR sensitive imaging system employing a CCD camera with enhanced near-IR sensitivity operating at 830-nm with the 1310-nm InGaAs system. Images of simulated caries lesions were acquired through tooth sections of varying thickness and whole teeth in order to demonstrate the utility of a near-IR dental transillumination system for the imaging of early dental caries (decay). Simulated lesions, representing the optical scattering of natural dental caries, were placed in plano-parallel dental enamel sections and whole anterior teeth. The contrast ratio between the simulated lesions and surrounding sound enamel was calculated from analysis of the respective spatial intensity profiles in the acquired projection images. This study shows that near-IR transillumination at 830-nm offers significantly improved image contrast over the visible range, but less image contrast than at 1310-nm.

  17. Particle Filtering With Invertible Particle Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark

    2017-08-01

    A key challenge when designing particle filters in high-dimensional state spaces is the construction of a proposal distribution that is close to the posterior distribution. Recent advances in particle flow filters provide a promising avenue to avoid weight degeneracy; particles drawn from the prior distribution are migrated in the state-space to the posterior distribution by solving partial differential equations. Numerous particle flow filters have been proposed based on different assumptions concerning the flow dynamics. Approximations are needed in the implementation of all of these filters; as a result the articles do not exactly match a sample drawn from the desired posterior distribution. Past efforts to correct the discrepancies involve expensive calculations of importance weights. In this paper, we present new filters which incorporate deterministic particle flows into an encompassing particle filter framework. The valuable theoretical guarantees concerning particle filter performance still apply, but we can exploit the attractive performance of the particle flow methods. The filters we describe involve a computationally efficient weight update step, arising because the embedded particle flows we design possess an invertible mapping property. We evaluate the proposed particle flow particle filters' performance through numerical simulations of a challenging multi-target multi-sensor tracking scenario and complex high-dimensional filtering examples.

  18. Preparation of Ultrafine Colloidal Gold Particles using a Bioactive Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Anjali

    2004-02-01

    Synthesis of nanometer-sized particles with new physical properties is an area of tremendous interest. In metal particles, the changes in size modify the electron density in the particles, which shifts the plasmon band. The most significant size effects occur when the particles are ultrafine (size is synthesis of ultrafine metal particles is enormously important to exploit their unique and selective application. Here we report a novel method for the synthesis of ultrafine gold particles in the size range of 0.5-3 nm using dopamine hydrochloride (dhc), an important neurotransmitter. This is the first time where such an important bioactive molecule like dhc has been used as a reagent for the transformation of Au(III) to Au(0). The synthesis is carried out, for the first time, either in simple aqueous or in a nonionic micellar (for example Triton X-100 (TX-100)) medium. The gold sol has a beautiful yellow-brown color showing λmax at 470 nm. The appearance of the absorption peak at substantially shorter wavelength (usually gold sol absorbs at ˜520 nm) indicates that the particles are very small. The method discussed here is very simple, reproducible and does not involve any reagent, which contains 'P' or 'S' atoms. Also in this case no polymer or dendrimer or thiol-related stabilizer is used. The effects of different parameters (such as the presence or absence of O2, temperature, TX-100 concentration and dhc concentration) on the formation of ultrafine gold particles are discussed. The effects of 3-mercapto propionic acid and pyridine on the ultrafine gold sol are also studied and compared with those on photochemically prepared gold sol. It is observed that 3-mercapto propionic acid dampens the plasmon absorption at 470 nm of ultrafine gold particles. Pyridine, on the other hand, has no effect on the particles.

  19. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Min [Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hyun [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bonghwan, E-mail: bhkim@cu.ac.kr [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silica particles were easily prepared by an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. • The particle size was controlled by the ammonium hydroxide/water molar ratio. • The size-controlled diameter of silica particles ranged from 40 to 400 nm. • The particles were formed in a relatively short reaction time. - Abstract: Using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  20. Complex refractive indices of thin films of secondary organic materials by spectroscopic ellipsometry from 220 to 1200 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhang, Yue; Martin, Scot T

    2013-01-01

    The complex refractive indices of three different types of secondary organic material (SOM) were obtained for 220 to 1200 nm using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. Aerosol particles were produced in a flow tube reactor by ozonolysis of volatile organic compounds, including the monoterpenes α-pinene and limonene and the aromatic catechol (benzene-1,2-diol). Optically reflective thin films of SOM were grown by electrostatic precipitation of the aerosol particles onto silicon substrates. The ellipsometry analysis showed that both the real and imaginary components of the refractive indices decreased with increasing wavelength. The real part n(λ) could be parametrized by the three-term form of Cauchy's equation, as follows: n(λ) = B + C/λ(2) + D/λ(4) where λ is the wavelength and B, C, and D are fitting parameters. The real refractive indices of the three SOMs ranged from 1.53 to 1.58, 1.49-1.52, and 1.48-1.50 at 310, 550, and 1000 nm, respectively. The catechol-derived SOM absorbed light in the ultraviolet (UV) range. By comparison, the UV absorption of the monoterpene-derived SOMs was negligible. On the basis of the measured refractive indices, optical properties were modeled for a typical atmospheric particle population. The results suggest that the wavelength dependence of the refractive indices can vary the Angstrom exponent by up to 0.1 across the range 310 to 550 nm. The modeled single-scattering albedo can likewise vary from 0.97 to 0.85 at 310 nm (UV-B). Variability in the optical properties of different types of SOMs can imply important differences in the relative effects of atmospheric particles on tropospheric photochemistry, as well as possible inaccuracies in some satellite-retrieved properties such as optical depth and mode diameter.

  1. First tests of CHERWELL, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor: A CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) using 180 nm technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylroie-Smith, James, E-mail: j.mylroie-smith@qmul.ac.uk [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Kolya, Scott; Velthuis, Jaap [University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bevan, Adrian; Inguglia, Gianluca [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Headspith, Jon; Lazarus, Ian; Lemon, Roy [Daresbury Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom); Crooks, Jamie; Turchetta, Renato; Wilson, Fergus [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The Cherwell is a 4T CMOS sensor in 180 nm technology developed for the detection of charged particles. Here, the different test structures on the sensor will be described and first results from tests on the reference pixel variant are shown. The sensors were shown to have a noise of 12 e{sup −} and a signal to noise up to 150 in {sup 55}Fe.

  2. Chip development in 65 nm CMOS technology for the high luminosity upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germic, Leonard; Hemperek, Tomasz; Kishishita, Testsuichi; Krueger, Hans; Rymaszewski, Piotr; Wermes, Norbert [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Havranek, Miroslav [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    The LHC High Luminosity upgrade will result in a significant change of environment in which particle detectors are going to operate, especially for devices very close to the interaction point like pixel detector electronics. Challenges coming from the higher hit rate will have to be solved by designing faster and more complex circuits, while at the same time keeping in mind very high radiation hardness requirements. Therefore matching the specification set by the high luminosity upgrade requires a large R and D effort. Our group is participating in such a joint development * namely the RD53 collaboration * which goal is to design a new pixel chip using an advanced 65 nm CMOS technology. During this presentation motivations and benefits of using this very deep-submicron technology will be shown together with a comparison with older technologies (130 nm, 250 nm). Most of the talk is allocated to presenting some of the circuits designed by our group, along with their performance measurement results.

  3. Recent developments in Fourier domain mode locked lasers for optical coherence tomography: imaging at 1310 nm vs. 1550 nm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Benjamin R; Wieser, Wolfgang; Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Huber, Robert

    2009-07-01

    We report on recent progress in Fourier domain mode-locking (FDML) technology. The paper focuses on developments beyond pushing the speed of these laser sources. After an overview of improvements to FDML over the last three years, a brief analysis of OCT imaging using FDML lasers with different wavelengths is presented. For the first time, high speed, high quality FDML imaging at 1550 nm is presented and compared to a system at 1310 nm. The imaging results of human skin for both wavelengths are compared and analyzed. Sample arm optics, power on the sample, heterodyne gain, detection bandwidth, colour cut levels and sample location have been identical to identify the influence of difference in scattering and water absorption. The imaging performance at 1310 nm in human skin is only slightly better and the results suggest that water absorption only marginally affects the penetration depth in human skin at 1550 nm. For several applications this wavelength may be preferred.

  4. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm, the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  5. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  6. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  7. Biogenic particle formation and growth in an isoprene dominated ecosystem in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Ortega, J.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.; You, Y.; Karl, T.; Seco, R.; Turnipseed, A.; Kim, S.; Harley, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Forests are an important source of atmospheric aerosol particles. While many studies have shown that oxidation products of biogenic VOCs can produce secondary aerosol particles, some studies have also suggested that isoprene, the most dominant VOC from forests, can suppress new particle formation, but the mechanism behind these suppression effects is unknown. To investigate potential isoprene suppression effects related to new particle formation and possible chemical mechanisms responsible for biogenic secondary aerosol formation, we have conducted measurements of aerosol sizes and chemical analysis of VOCs in a Missouri forest during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower: NOx, Oxidant, Isoprene Research) in the summer of 2012. Biogenic VOCs in this ecosystem are dominated by isoprene. Aerosol number concentrations of particles larger than 1 nm and larger than 3 nm were measured with a particle sizing magnifier (PSM) and a condensation particle counter (CPC). Aerosol sizes from 5 to 200 nm were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizing magnifier (SMPS). Key biogenic VOCs, such as isoprene and monoterpenes, were measured with a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOFMS), a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS) and gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). From these results, we will discuss how oxidation products of biogenic VOCs produce newly formed sub-3 nm particles and how the growth of these new particles is enhanced or suppressed by possible chemical species.

  8. The photochemistry of ozone at 193 and 222 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, Andrew A.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; Gierczak, Tomasz; Thompson, John E.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1991-09-01

    Measurements at 193 and 222nm are reported for the quantum yields for the formation of O(1D) and O(3P) from the photolysis of ozone. The quantum yield for O(3P) was observed to be 0.13 + or - 0.02 at 222 nm, and the primary quantum yield for O(1D) was found to be 0.87 + or - 0.04. The present measurements are consistent with other studies of O3 photolysis within the Hartley band which indicate that a significant portion (5-12 percent) of the products are formed in the ground state. At 193 nm the quantum yield for the production of excited state O(1D) atoms is 0.46 + or - 0.29, which is significantly less than what is observed during photolysis within the lower energy Hartley band. The quantum yield for O(3P) atoms at 193 nm was found to be 0.57 + or - 0.14. It was also observed that the quantum yield for O atoms is greater than unity at 193 nm, indicating the presence of a channel which produces three O(3P) atoms.

  9. RET and DFM techniques for sub 30nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilada, E.; Entradas, J.; Gardin, C.; Pena, J. N.; Villaret, A.; Farys, V.; Beylier, C.; Robert, F.; Postnikov, S.; Armeanu, A. M.; Moyroud, C.; Chaoui, F.; Granger, F. B.; Toublan, O.

    2012-03-01

    The resolution enhancement through lithography hardware (wavelength and Numerical Aperture) has come to a stop putting the burden on computational lithography to fill in the resulting gap between design and process until the arrival of EUV tools. New Computational Lithography techniques such as Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Sub Resolution Assist Feature (SRAF), and Lithography Friendly Design (LFD) constitute a significant transformation of the design. These new Computational Lithography applications have become one of the most computationally demanding steps in the design process. Computing farms of hundreds and even thousands of CPUs are now routinely used to run these applications. The 28nm node presents many difficulties due to low k1 lithography whereas the 20nm requires double patterning solutions. In this paper we present a global view of enhanced RET and DFM techniques deployed to provide a robust 28nm node and prepare for 20nm. These techniques include advanced OPC manipulation through end user IP insertion into EDA software, optimized sub resolution assist features (SRAF) placement and pixilated OPC. These techniques are coupled with a fast litho print check, aka LFD, for 28nm P&R.

  10. 100-nm gate lithography for double-gate transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperova, Azalia A.; Zhang, Ying; Babich, Inna V.; Treichler, John; Yoon, Jung H.; Guarini, Kathryn; Solomon, Paul M.

    2001-09-01

    The double gate field effect transistor (FET) is an exploratory device that promises certain performance advantages compared to traditional CMOS FETs. It can be scaled down further than the traditional devices because of the greater electrostatic control by the gates on the channel (about twice as short a channel length for the same gate oxide thickness), has steeper sub-threshold slope and about double the current for the same width. This paper presents lithographic results for double gate FET's developed at IBM's T. J. Watson Research Center. The device is built on bonded wafers with top and bottom gates self-aligned to each other. The channel is sandwiched between the top and bottom polysilicon gates and the gate length is defined using DUV lithography. An alternating phase shift mask was used to pattern gates with critical dimensions of 75 nm, 100 nm and 125 nm in photoresist. 50 nm gates in photoresist have also been patterned by 20% over-exposure of nominal 100 nm lines. No trim mask was needed because of a specific way the device was laid out. UV110 photoresist from Shipley on AR-3 antireflective layer were used. Process windows, developed and etched patterns are presented.

  11. Switching Properties of sub-100 nm Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryputen, Larysa; Piotrowski, Stephan; Bapna, Mukund; Chien, Chia-Ling; Wang, Weigang; Majetich, Sara; Ross, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs) have great potential for realizing high-density non-volatile memory and logic devices. It is critical to solve scalability problem to implement such devices, to achieve low resistance area and to reduce switching current density while maintaining thermal stability. We present our recent results on fabrication of high resolution Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Ta p-MTJ devices and characterization of their switching properties as well as topography and current mapping by using nanoscale Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy. Our patterning method is based on using hydrogen silsesquioxane resist mask combined with ion beam etching. It allows to fabricate p-MTJ devices down to 40 nm in diameter while maintaining the magnetic quality of the multilayers. Repeatable, consistent switching behaviour has been observed in the obtained p-MTJ devices of 500 nm down to 40 nm with 10 - 800 mV voltage applied. Switching field increased as device diameter decreased, from 580 Oe at 500 nm (MR = 10%) to 410 Oe at 80 nm (MR = 9%). We discuss the effect of device sizes on the switching properties. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of the six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation Program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and in part through the National Science Foundation through NCN-Needs Program, Contract 12207020-EEC.

  12. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  13. Comparative hazard identification of nano- and micro-sized cerium oxide particles based on 28-day inhalation studies in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Ilse; Mathijssen, Liesbeth E A M; Bokkers, Bas G H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847062; Muijser, Hans; Cassee, Flemming R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143038990

    2014-01-01

    There are many uncertainties regarding the hazard of nanosized particles compared to the bulk material of the parent chemical. Here, the authors assess the comparative hazard of two nanoscale (NM-211 and NM-212) and one microscale (NM-213) cerium oxide materials in 28-day inhalation toxicity studies

  14. Control over Particle Size Distribution by Autoclaving Poloxamer-Stabilized Trimyristin Nanodispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas; Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-06

    Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection into the bloodstream. Consequently, small particles with a narrow particle size distribution are desired. Hitherto, there are, however, only limited possibilities for the preparation of monodisperse, pharmaceutically relevant dispersions. In this work, the effect of autoclaving at 121 °C on the particle size distribution of lipid nanoemulsions and -suspensions consisting of the pharmaceutically relevant components trimyristin and poloxamer 188 was studied. Additionally, the amount of emulsifier needed to stabilize both untreated and autoclaved particles was assessed. In our study, four dispersions of mean particle sizes from 45 to 150 nm were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. The particle size distribution before and after autoclaving was characterized using static and dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was used for particle size distribution analyses and for the determination of free poloxamer 188. Upon autoclaving, the mean particle size increased to up to 200 nm, but not proportionally to the initial size. At the same time, the particle size distribution width decreased remarkably. Heat treatment thus seems to be a promising approach to achieve the desired narrow particle size distribution of such dispersions. Related to the lipid content, suspension particles needed more emulsifier for stabilization than emulsion droplets, and smaller particles more than larger ones.

  15. Exploring uptake and biodistribution of polystyrene (nano)particles in zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pomeren, M; Brun, N R; Peijnenburg, W J G M; Vijver, M G

    2017-09-01

    In ecotoxicology, it is continuously questioned whether (nano)particle exposure results in particle uptake and subsequent biodistribution or if particles adsorb to the epithelial layer only. To contribute to answering this question, we investigated different uptake routes in zebrafish embryos and how they affect particle uptake into organs and within whole organisms. This is addressed by exposing three different life stages of the zebrafish embryo in order to cover the following exposure routes: via chorion and dermal exposure; dermal exposure; oral and dermal exposure. How different nanoparticle sizes affect uptake routes was assessed by using polystyrene particles of 25, 50, 250 and 700nm. In our experimental study, we showed that particle uptake in biota is restricted to oral exposure, whereas the dermal route resulted in adsorption to the epidermis and gills only. Ingestion followed by biodistribution was observed for the tested particles of 25 and 50nm. The particles spread through the body and eventually accumulated in specific organs and tissues such as the eyes. Particles larger than 50nm were predominantly adsorbed onto the intestinal tract and outer epidermis of zebrafish embryos. Embryos exposed to particles via both epidermis and intestine showed highest uptake and eventually accumulated particles in the eye, whereas uptake of particles via the chorion and epidermis resulted in marginal uptake. Organ uptake and internal distribution should be monitored more closely to provide more in depth information of the toxicity of particles. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gold/silver core-shell 20 nm nanoparticles extracted from citrate solution examined by XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Smith, Jordan N.; Baer, Donald R.

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles of many types are widely used in consumer and medical products. The surface chemistry of particles and the coatings that form during synthesis or use in many types of media can significantly impact the behaviors of particles including dissolution, transformation and biological or environmental impact. Consequently it is useful to be able to extract information about the thickness of surface coatings and other attributes of nanoparticles produced in a variety of ways. It has been demonstrated that X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) can be reliably used to determine the thickness of organic and other nanoparticles coatings and shells. However, care is required to produce reliable and consistent information. Here we report the XPS spectra from gold/silver core-shell nanoparticles of nominal size 20 nm removed from a citrate saturated solution after one and two washing cycles. The Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) program had been used to model peak amplitudes to obtain information on citrate coatings that remain after washing and demonstrate the presence of the gold core. This data is provided so that others can compare use of SESSA or other modeling approaches to quantify the nature of coatings to those already published and to explore the impacts particle non-uniformities on XPS signals from core-shell nanoparticles.

  17. Characterization of particle number size distribution and new particle formation in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Chuan; Peng, Jianfei; He, Lingyan; Cao, Liming; Zhu, Qiao; Cui, Jie; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of particle number size distribution (PND) and new particle formation (NPF) events in Southern China is essential for mitigation strategies related to submicron particles and their effects on regional air quality, haze, and human health. In this study, seven field measurement campaigns were conducted from December 2013 to May 2015 using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) at four sites in Southern China, including three urban sites and one background site. Particles were measured in the size range of 15-615nm, and the median particle number concentrations (PNCs) were found to vary in the range of 0.3×104-2.2×104cm-3 at the urban sites and were approximately 0.2×104cm-3 at the background site. The peak diameters at the different sites varied largely from 22 to 102nm. The PNCs in the Aitken mode (25-100nm) at the urban sites were up to 10 times higher than they were at the background site, indicating large primary emissions from traffic at the urban sites. The diurnal variations of PNCs were significantly influenced by both rush hour traffic at the urban sites and NPF events. The frequencies of NPF events at the different sites were 0%-30%, with the highest frequency occurring at an urban site during autumn. With higher SO2 concentrations and higher ambient temperatures being necessary, NPF at the urban site was found to be more influenced by atmospheric oxidizing capability, while NPF at the background site was limited by the condensation sink. This study provides a unique dataset of particle number and size information in various environments in Southern China, which can help understand the sources, formation, and the climate forcing of aerosols in this quickly developing region, as well as help constrain and validate NPF modeling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A new solar reference spectrum from 165 to 3088 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Bolsée, David; Pereira, Nuno; Bekki, Slimane; Hauchecorne, Alain; Irbah, Abdenour; Cessateur, Gaël; Sluse, Dominique

    2017-04-01

    Since April 5, 2008 and until February 15, 2017 the SOLAR/SOLSPEC spectro-radiometer on the International Space Station performed accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the far ultraviolet to the infrared (165 nm to 3088 nm). These measurements are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and of the impact of solar variability on climate (via Earth's atmospheric photochemistry). In particular, a new reference solar spectrum is established covering most of the unusual solar cycle 24 from minimum in 2008 to maximum. Temporal variability in the UV (165 to 400 nm) is presented in several wavelengths bands. These results are possible thanks to revised engineering corrections, improved calibrations and new procedures to account for thermal and aging advanced corrections. Uncertainties on these measurements are evaluated and compare favorably with other instruments.

  19. Prototyping the HPDP Chip on STM 65 NM Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadas, C.; Dramitinos, G.; Syed, M.; Helfers, T.; Dedes, G.; Schoellkopf, J.-P.; Dugoujon, L.

    2011-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH is involved in the of the High Performance Data Processor (HPDP) development programme for telecommunication applications under a DLR contract. The HPDP project targets the implementation of the commercially available reconfigurable array processor IP (XPP from the company PACT XPP Technologies) in a radiation hardened technology.In the current complementary development phase funded under the Greek Industry Incentive scheme, it is planned to prototype the HPDP chip in commercial STM 65 nm technology. In addition it is also planned to utilise the preliminary radiation hardened components of this library wherever possible.This abstract gives an overview of the HPDP chip architecture, the basic details of the STM 65 nm process and the design flow foreseen for the prototyping. The paper will discuss the development and integration issues involved in using the STM 65 nm process (also including the available preliminary radiation hardened components) for designs targeted to be used in space applications.

  20. Nanoparticle growth by particle-phase chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Apsokardu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of particle-phase chemistry to alter the molecular composition and enhance the growth rate of nanoparticles in the 2–100 nm diameter range is investigated through the use of a kinetic growth model. The molecular components included are sulfuric acid, ammonia, water, a non-volatile organic compound, and a semi-volatile organic compound. Molecular composition and growth rate are compared for particles that grow by partitioning alone vs. those that grow by a combination of partitioning and an accretion reaction in the particle phase between two organic molecules. Particle-phase chemistry causes a change in molecular composition that is particle diameter dependent, and when the reaction involves semi-volatile molecules, the particles grow faster than by partitioning alone. These effects are most pronounced for particles larger than about 20 nm in diameter. The modeling results provide a fundamental basis for understanding recent experimental measurements of the molecular composition of secondary organic aerosol showing that accretion reaction product formation increases linearly with increasing aerosol volume-to-surface-area. They also allow initial estimates of the reaction rate constants for these systems. For secondary aerosol produced by either OH oxidation of the cyclic dimethylsiloxane (D5 or ozonolysis of β-pinene, oligomerization rate constants on the order of 10−3 to 10−1 M−1 s−1 are needed to explain the experimental results. These values are consistent with previously measured rate constants for reactions of hydroperoxides and/or peroxyacids in the condensed phase.

  1. Electrodeposited Magnesium Nanoparticles Linking Particle Size to Activation Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqi Shen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of hydrogen absorption/desorption can be improved by decreasing particle size down to a few nanometres. However, the associated evolution of activation energy remains unclear. In an attempt to clarify such an evolution with respect to particle size, we electrochemically deposited Mg nanoparticles on a catalytic nickel and noncatalytic titanium substrate. At a short deposition time of 1 h, magnesium particles with a size of 68 ± 11 nm could be formed on the nickel substrate, whereas longer deposition times led to much larger particles of 421 ± 70 nm. Evaluation of the hydrogen desorption properties of the deposited magnesium nanoparticles confirmed the effectiveness of the nickel substrate in facilitating the recombination of hydrogen, but also a significant decrease in activation energy from 56.1 to 37.8 kJ·mol−1 H2 as particle size decreased from 421 ± 70 to 68 ± 11 nm. Hence, the activation energy was found to be intrinsically linked to magnesium particle size. Such a reduction in activation energy was associated with the decrease of path lengths for hydrogen diffusion at the desorbing MgH2/Mg interface. Further reduction in particle size to a few nanometres to remove any barrier for hydrogen diffusion would then leave the single nucleation and growth of the magnesium phase as the only remaining rate-limiting step, assuming that the magnesium surface can effectively catalyse the dissociation/recombination of hydrogen.

  2. Mass analysis of charged aerosol particles in NLC and PMSE during the ECOMA/MASS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Robertson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available MASS (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer is a multichannel mass spectrometer for charged aerosol particles, which was flown from the Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, through NLC and PMSE on 3 August 2007 and through PMSE on 6 August 2007. The eight-channel analyzers provided for the first time simultaneous measurements of the charge density residing on aerosol particles in four mass ranges, corresponding to ice particles with radii <0.5 nm (including ions, 0.5–1 nm, 1–2 nm, and >3 nm (approximately. Positive and negative particles were recorded on separate channels. Faraday rotation measurements provided electron density and a means of checking charge density measurements made by the spectrometer. Additional complementary measurements were made by rocket-borne dust impact detectors, electric field booms, a photometer and ground-based radar and lidar. The MASS data from the first flight showed negative charge number densities of 1500–3000 cm−3 for particles with radii >3 nm from 83–88 km approximately coincident with PMSE observed by the ALWIN radar and NLC observed by the ALOMAR lidar. For particles in the 1–2 nm range, number densities of positive and negative charge were similar in magnitude (~2000 cm−3 and for smaller particles, 0.5–1 nm in radius, positive charge was dominant. The occurrence of positive charge on the aerosol particles of the smallest size and predominately negative charge on the particles of largest size suggests that nucleation occurs on positive condensation nuclei and is followed by collection of negative charge during subsequent growth to larger size. Faraday rotation measurements show a bite-out in electron density that increases the time for positive aerosol particles to be neutralized and charged negatively. The larger particles (>3 nm are observed throughout the NLC region, 83–88 km, and the smaller particles are observed primarily at the high end of the range, 86–88 km

  3. Mass analysis of charged aerosol particles in NLC and PMSE during the ECOMA/MASS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Robertson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available MASS (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer is a multichannel mass spectrometer for charged aerosol particles, which was flown from the Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, through NLC and PMSE on 3 August 2007 and through PMSE on 6 August 2007. The eight-channel analyzers provided for the first time simultaneous measurements of the charge density residing on aerosol particles in four mass ranges, corresponding to ice particles with radii <0.5 nm (including ions, 0.5–1 nm, 1–2 nm, and >3 nm (approximately. Positive and negative particles were recorded on separate channels. Faraday rotation measurements provided electron density and a means of checking charge density measurements made by the spectrometer. Additional complementary measurements were made by rocket-borne dust impact detectors, electric field booms, a photometer and ground-based radar and lidar. The MASS data from the first flight showed negative charge number densities of 1500–3000 cm−3 for particles with radii >3 nm from 83–88 km approximately coincident with PMSE observed by the ALWIN radar and NLC observed by the ALOMAR lidar. For particles in the 1–2 nm range, number densities of positive and negative charge were similar in magnitude (~2000 cm−3 and for smaller particles, 0.5–1 nm in radius, positive charge was dominant. The occurrence of positive charge on the aerosol particles of the smallest size and predominately negative charge on the particles of largest size suggests that nucleation occurs on positive condensation nuclei and is followed by collection of negative charge during subsequent growth to larger size. Faraday rotation measurements show a bite-out in electron density that increases the time for positive aerosol particles to be neutralized and charged negatively. The larger particles (>3 nm are observed throughout the NLC region, 83–88 km, and the smaller particles are observed primarily at the high end of the range, 86–88 km. The second flight into

  4. Ultraviolet photorefraction at 325 nm in doped lithium niobate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Feifei; Zhang, Guoquan; Bo, Fang; Sun, Haifeng; Kong, Yongfa; Xu, Jingjun; Volk, Tatyana; Rubinina, Natalia M.

    2010-02-01

    We studied the photorefractive effect of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) doped with Mg, Zn, In, Hf, or codoped with Mg and Fe at an ultraviolet (UV) wavelength down to 325 nm. It is found that the UV photorefraction of LiNbO3 doped with Mg, Zn, In, or Hf was enhanced significantly as compared to that of the nominally pure LiNbO3. Our results show that the property of resistance against photorefraction in highly Mg, Zn, In, or Hf doped LiNbO3 is true only in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. By contrast, these crystals exhibit excellent photorefractive characteristics at UV wavelength of 325 nm, even better than those at 351 nm. For example, the photorefractive two-wave coupling gain coefficient Γ and the photorefractive recording sensitivity at 325 nm were measured to be ˜38 cm-1 and 37.7 cm/J, respectively, in a LiNbO3 crystal doped with 9 mol % Zn. The photorefractive response time of a Mg:LiNbO3 with a 9 mol % Mg was measured to be 73 ms with a total recording intensity of 614 mW/cm2 at 325 nm. In highly Mg, Zn, In, or Hf doped LiNbO3 crystals, diffusion dominates over photovoltaic effect and electrons are the dominant charge carriers in UV photorefraction at 325 nm. The results are also of interest to the study on the defect structure of LiNbO3 near to the absorption edge.

  5. FDML swept source at 1060 nm using a tapered amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel frequency-swept light source working at 1060nm that utilizes a tapered amplifier as gain medium. These devices feature significantly higher saturation power than conventional semiconductor optical amplifiers and can thus improve the limited output power of swept sources...... in this wavelength range. We demonstrate that a tapered amplifier can be integrated into a fiber-based swept source and allows for high-speed FDML operation. The developed light source operates at a sweep rate of 116kHz with an effective average output power in excess of 30mW. With a total sweep range of 70 nm...

  6. Spectral narrowing of a 980 nm tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Lucas Leclin, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    in wavelength specific applications and hence, it is vital to stabilize the emission spectrum of these devices. In our experiment, we describe the wavelength narrowing of a 12 element 980 nm tapered diode laser bar using a simple Littman configuration. The tapered laser bar which suffered from a big smile has......, a slow axis focusing cylindrical lens of 40 mm focal length and an output coupler which is 10% reflective. In the free running mode, the laser emission spectrum was 5.5 nm wide at an operating current of 30A. The output power was measured to be in excess of 12W. Under the external cavity operation...

  7. Cost-effective tunable 1310nm DWDM transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorchos, Łukasz; Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.

    2015-09-01

    The growing demand for higher data rate transmissions in local and metropolitan area networks is main reason of developing effective and inexpensive transmission systems. In this paper, study about the possibility to realize 1310 nm tunable DWDM transmitter using commercially available low-cost DFB lasers is presented. Extensive DFB lasers characterization has been performed which led to establish relationships between laser current, operational temperature, emitted wavelength and power. An algorithm to find the laser settings for a desired wavelength grid has been proposed and tested. Generation of the 1310nm DWDM channels with frequency spacing between 120 and 240GHz has been demonstrated.

  8. 30 Gbps bottom-emitting 1060 nm VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatarczak, Anna; Zheng, Y.; Rodes, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    1060 nm VCSEL-based data transmission over 50 m OM3 MMF at 30 Gbit/s is experimentally demonstrated. A highly-strained bottom-emitting QW VCSEL with p-type modulation doping is used with 3.77 mA bias and 0.55 V data amplitude.......1060 nm VCSEL-based data transmission over 50 m OM3 MMF at 30 Gbit/s is experimentally demonstrated. A highly-strained bottom-emitting QW VCSEL with p-type modulation doping is used with 3.77 mA bias and 0.55 V data amplitude....

  9. Particle size distribution in ferrofluid macro-clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wah-Keat, E-mail: wklee@bnl.gov [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ilavsky, Jan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Under an applied magnetic field, many commercial and concentrated ferrofluids agglomerate and form large micron-sized structures. Although large diameter particles have been implicated in the formation of these macro-clusters, the question of whether the particle size distribution of the macro-clusters are the same as the original fluid remains open. Some studies suggest that these macro-clusters consist of larger particles, while others have shown that there is no difference in the particle size distribution between the macro-clusters and the original fluid. In this study, we use X-ray imaging to aid in a sample (diluted EFH-1 from Ferrotec) separation process and conclusively show that the average particle size in the macro-clusters is significantly larger than those in the original sample. The average particle size in the macro-clusters is 19.6 nm while the average particle size of the original fluid is 11.6 nm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray imaging was used to isolate ferrofluid macro-clusters under an applied field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small angle X-ray scattering was used to determine particle size distributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show that macro-clusters consist of particles that are larger than average.

  10. 234 nm and 246 nm AlN-Delta-GaN quantum well deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Ooi, Yu Kee; Islam, S. M.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) AlN-delta-GaN quantum well (QW) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission wavelengths of 234 nm and 246 nm are proposed and demonstrated in this work. Our results reveal that the use of AlN-delta-GaN QW with ˜1-3 monolayer GaN delta-layer can achieve a large transverse electric (TE)-polarized spontaneous emission rate instead of transverse magnetic-polarized emission, contrary to what is observed in conventional AlGaN QW in the 230-250 nm wavelength regime. The switching of light polarization in the proposed AlN-delta-GaN QW active region is attributed to the rearrangement of the valence subbands near the Γ-point. The light radiation patterns obtained from angle-dependent electroluminescence measurements for the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)-grown 234 nm and 246 nm AlN-delta-GaN QW LEDs show that the photons are mainly emitted towards the surface rather than the edge, consistent with the simulated patterns achieved by the finite-difference time-domain modeling. The results demonstrate that the proposed AlN-delta-GaN QWs would potentially lead to high-efficiency TE-polarized surface-emitting DUV LEDs.

  11. Non-muscle (NM) myosin heavy chain phosphorylation regulates the formation of NM myosin filaments, adhesome assembly and smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Gunst, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    Non-muscle (NM) and smooth muscle (SM) myosin II are both expressed in smooth muscle tissues, however the role of NM myosin in SM contraction is unknown. Contractile stimulation of tracheal smooth muscle tissues stimulates phosphorylation of the NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 and causes NM myosin filament assembly at the SM cell cortex. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable NM myosin mutant, NM myosin S1943A, in SM tissues inhibits ACh-induced NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction, and also inhibits the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes during contractile stimulation. NM myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation but not SM myosin RLC phosphorylation is regulated by RhoA GTPase during ACh stimulation, and NM RLC phosphorylation is required for NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction. NM myosin II plays a critical role in airway SM contraction that is independent and distinct from the function of SM myosin. The molecular function of non-muscle (NM) isoforms of myosin II in smooth muscle (SM) tissues and their possible role in contraction are largely unknown. We evaluated the function of NM myosin during contractile stimulation of canine tracheal SM tissues. Stimulation with ACh caused NM myosin filament assembly, as assessed by a Triton solubility assay and a proximity ligation assay aiming to measure interactions between NM myosin monomers. ACh stimulated the phosphorylation of NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 in tracheal SM tissues, which can regulate NM myosin IIA filament assembly in vitro. Expression of the non-phosphorylatable mutant NM myosin S1943A in SM tissues inhibited ACh-induced endogenous NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation, NM myosin filament formation, the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes and tension development. The NM myosin cross-bridge cycling inhibitor blebbistatin suppressed adhesome complex assembly and SM contraction without inhibiting NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation or NM myosin filament assembly. Rho

  12. Size-resolved chemical composition, effective density, and optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Lu, Xiaohui; Li, Ling; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ci; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Biomass burning aerosol has an important impact on the global radiative budget. A better understanding of the correlations between the mixing states of biomass burning particles and their optical properties is the goal of a number of current studies. In this work, the effective density, chemical composition, and optical properties of rice straw burning particles in the size range of 50-400 nm were measured using a suite of online methods. We found that the major components of particles produced by burning rice straw included black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and potassium salts, but the mixing states of particles were strongly size dependent. Particles of 50 nm had the smallest effective density (1.16 g cm-3) due to a relatively large proportion of aggregate BC. The average effective densities of 100-400 nm particles ranged from 1.35 to 1.51 g cm-3 with OC and inorganic salts as dominant components. Both density distribution and single-particle mass spectrometry showed more complex mixing states in larger particles. Upon heating, the separation of the effective density distribution modes confirmed the external mixing state of less-volatile BC or soot and potassium salts. The size-resolved optical properties of biomass burning particles were investigated at two wavelengths (λ = 450 and 530 nm). The single-scattering albedo (SSA) showed the lowest value for 50 nm particles (0.741 ± 0.007 and 0.889 ± 0.006) because of the larger proportion of BC content. Brown carbon played an important role for the SSA of 100-400 nm particles. The Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) values for all particles were above 1.6, indicating the significant presence of brown carbon in all sizes. Concurrent measurements in our work provide a basis for discussing the physicochemical properties of biomass burning aerosol and its effects on the global climate and atmospheric environment.

  13. Laser particle sorter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  14. Isolation of Enterococcus faecium NM113, Enterococcus faecium NM213 and Lactobacillus casei NM512 as novel probiotics with immunomodulatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nahla M; Heine, Holger; Abdou, Sania M; Shenana, Mohamed E; Zakaria, Mohamed K; El-Diwany, Ahmed

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics, defined as living bacteria that are beneficial for human health, mainly function through their immunomodulatory abilities. Hence, these microorganisms have proven successful for treating diseases resulting from immune deregulation. The aim of this study was to find novel candidates to improve on and complement current probiotic treatment strategies. Of 60 lactic acid bacterial strains that were isolated from fecal samples of healthy, full-term, breast-fed infants, three were chosen because of their ability to activate human immune cells. These candidates were then tested with regard to immunomodulatory properties, antimicrobial effects on pathogens, required pharmacological properties and their safety profiles. To identify the immunomodulatory structures of the selected isolates, activation of specific innate immune receptors was studied. The three candidates for probiotic treatment were assigned Enterococcus faecium NM113, Enterococcus faecium NM213 and Lactobacillus casei NM512. Compared with the established allergy-protective strain Lactococcus lactis G121, these isolates induced release of similar amounts of IL-12, a potent inducer of T helper 1 cells. In addition, all three neonatal isolates had antimicrobial activity against pathogens. Analysis of pharmacological suitability showed high tolerance of low pH, bile salts and pancreatic enzymes. In terms of safe application in humans, the isolates were sensitive to three antibiotics (chloramphenicol, tetracycline and erythromycin). In addition, the Enterococcus isolates were free from the four major virulence genes (cylA, agg, efaAfs and ccf). Moreover, the isolates strongly activated Toll-like receptor 2, which suggests lipopeptides as their active immunomodulatory structure. Thus, three novel bacterial strains with great potential as probiotic candidates and promising immunomodulatory properties have here been identified and characterized. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. 1700 nm and 1800 nm band tunable thulium doped mode-locked fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Siamak Dawazdah; Dashtabi, Mahdi Mozdoor; Lee, Hui Jing; Arabanian, Atoosa Sadat; Rashid, Hairul Azhar Abdul

    2017-10-06

    This paper presents short wavelength operation of tunable thulium-doped mode-locked lasers with sweep ranges of 1702 to 1764 nm and 1788 to 1831 nm. This operation is realized by a combination of the partial amplified spontaneous emission suppression method, the bidirectional pumping mechanism and the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) technique. Lasing at emission bands lower than the 1800 nm wavelength in thulium-doped fiber lasers is achieved using mode confinement loss in a specially designed photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The enlargement of the first outer ring air holes around the core region of the PCF attenuates emissions above the cut-off wavelength and dominates the active region. This amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) suppression using our presented PCF is applied to a mode-locked laser cavity and is demonstrated to be a simple and compact solution to widely tunable all-fiber lasers.

  16. Low-noise design issues for analog front-end electronics in 130 nm and 90 nm CMOS technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Manghisoni, M; Re, V; Speziali, V; Traversi, G

    2007-01-01

    Deep sub-micron CMOS technologies provide wellestablished solutions to the implementation of low-noise front-end electronics in various detector applications. The IC designers’ effort is presently shifting to 130 nm CMOS technologies, or even to the next technology node, to implement readout integrated circuits for silicon strip and pixel detectors, in view of future HEP applications. In this work the results of noise measurements carried out on CMOS devices in 130 nm and 90 nm commercial processes are presented. The behavior of the 1/f and white noise terms is studied as a function of the device polarity and of the gate length and width. The study is focused on low current density applications where devices are biased in weak or moderate inversion. Data obtained from the measurements provide a powerful tool to establish design criteria in nanoscale CMOS processes for detector front-ends in LHC upgrades.

  17. Soot Particle Studies - Instrument Inter-Comparison – Project Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, E.; Sedlacek, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Ahern, A.; Wrobel, W.; Slowik, J. G.; Olfert, J.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Cappa, C. D.; Schwarz, J.; Spackman, J. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Trimborn, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Freedman, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Brem, B.; Kok, G.; Subramanian, R.; Freitag, S.; Clarke, A.; Thornhill, D.; Marr, L.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2010-03-06

    An inter-comparison study of instruments designed to measure the microphysical and optical properties of soot particles was completed. The following mass-based instruments were tested: Couette Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyzer (CPMA), Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (AMS-SMPS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) and Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS2000CE). Optical instruments measured absorption (photoacoustic, interferometric, and filter-based), scattering (in situ), and extinction (light attenuation within an optical cavity). The study covered an experimental matrix consisting of 318 runs that systematically tested the performance of instruments across a range of parameters including: fuel equivalence ratio (1.8 {le} {phi} {le} 5), particle shape (mass-mobility exponent (D{sub f m}), 2.0 {le} D{sub f m} {le} 3.0), particle mobility size (30 {le} d{sub m} {le} 300 nm), black carbon mass (0.07 {le} m{sub BC} {le} 4.2 fg) and particle chemical composition. In selected runs, particles were coated with sulfuric acid or dioctyl sebacate (DOS) (0.5 {le} {Delta}r{sub ve} {le} 201 nm) where {Delta}r{sub ve} is the change in the volume equivalent radius due to the coating material. The effect of non-absorbing coatings on instrument response was determined. Changes in the morphology of fractal soot particles were monitored during coating and denuding processes and the effect of particle shape on instrument response was determined. The combination of optical and mass based measurements was used to determine the mass specific absorption coefficient for denuded soot particles. The single scattering albedo of the particles was also measured. An overview of the experiments and sample results are presented.

  18. Photodegradation of perfluorooctanoic acid by 185 nm vacuum ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Peng-yi; Liu, Jian

    2007-01-01

    The photodegradation of persistent and bioaccumulative perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water by 185 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light was examined to develop an effective technology to deal with PFOA pollution. PFOA degraded very slowly under irradiation of 254 nm UV light. However, 61.7% of initial PFOA was degraded by 185 nm VUV light within 2 h, and defluorination ratio reached 17.1%. Pseudo first-order-kinetics well simulated its degradation and defluorination. Besides, fluoride ion formed in water, 4 shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), that is, perfluoroheptanoic acid, perfluorohexanoic acid, perfluoropentanoic acid, and perfluorobutanoic acid. These were identified as intermediates by LC-MS measurement. These PFCAs consecutively formed and further degraded with irradiation time. According to the mass balance calculation, no other byproducts were formed. It was proposed that PFCAs initially are decarboxylated by 185 nm light, and the radical thus formed reacts with water to form shorter-chain PFCA with one less CF2 unit.

  19. EST Table: NM_001046878 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046878 LOC732875 10/09/29 100 %/169 aa ref|NP_001040343.1| peripheral-type benzodiazepine... receptor [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51223.1| peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor [Bombyx mori] 10/

  20. comparing the 810nm diode laser with conventional surgery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... SUMMARY. Aim: To compare the use of the 810nm diode laser with conventional surgery in the management of soft tissue mucogingival problems associated with orthodontic treatment. Methods: Orthodontic patients requiring different soft tissue surgical procedures were randomly assigned to.

  1. EST Table: NM_001043468 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001043468 Mf-cpa 10/09/29 91 %/479 aa ref|NP_001036933.1| molting fluid carboxyp...eptidase A [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD60916.1| molting fluid carboxypeptidase A [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 50 %/393 aa

  2. Benchmarking of 50 nm features in thermal nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gourgon, C.; Chaix, N.; Schift, H.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this benchmarking is to establish a comparison of several tools and processes used in thermal NIL with Si stamps at the nanoscale among the authors' laboratories. The Si stamps have large arrays of 50 nm dense lines and were imprinted in all these laboratories in a similar to 100...

  3. EST Table: NM_001043377 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available moting Protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 30 %/136 aa FBpp0237404|DvirGJ22987-PA 10/08/...NM_001043377 Pp 10/09/29 92 %/154 aa ref|NP_001036842.1| promoting protein [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAA89306.1| Pro

  4. 77 FR 62481 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Crownpoint, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Crownpoint, NM AGENCY: Federal Communications....415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications... preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR Part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO...

  5. 850-nm oxide VCSEL development at Hewlett-Packard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongyu; Dudley, James J.; Lim, Sui F.; Lei, Chun; Liang, Bing; Tashima, M.; Hodge, Lee A.; Zhang, Xuemei; Herniman, John; Herrick, Robert W.

    1999-04-01

    Oxide confined VCSELs are being developed at Hewlett-Packard for the next-generation low cost fiber optics communication applications. Compared to the existing 850 nm implant confined VCSELs, the oxide VCSELs have lower operating voltages, higher slope efficiencies, and better modal bandwidth characteristics. Preliminary data on epitaxy and oxidation control uniformity, device performance, and reliability will be discussed.

  6. EST Table: NM_001043517 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001043517 Cycb 10/09/29 89 %/700 aa ref|NP_001036982.1| Cycle like factor b [Bom...byx mori] dbj|BAB91178.1| Cycle like factor BmCyc b [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 52 %/387 aa FBpp0114038|DanaGF108

  7. EST Table: NM_001167716 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001167716 Vps4 10/09/29 88 %/438 aa ref|NP_001161188.1| vacuolar protein sorting...ojGI14672-PA 10/08/29 64 %/432 aa Y34D9A.10#CE39043#WBGene00021334#locus:vps- 4#status:Confirmed#UniProt:Q9B

  8. Direct visualization of fluid dynamics in sub-10 nm nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huawei; Zhong, Junjie; Pang, Yuanjie; Zandavi, Seyed Hadi; Persad, Aaron Harrinarine; Xu, Yi; Mostowfi, Farshid; Sinton, David

    2017-07-13

    Optical microscopy is the most direct method to probe fluid dynamics at small scales. However, contrast between fluid phases vanishes at ∼10 nm lengthscales, limiting direct optical interrogation to larger systems. Here, we present a method for direct, high-contrast and label-free visualization of fluid dynamics in sub-10 nm channels, and apply this method to study capillary filling dynamics at this scale. The direct visualization of confined fluid dynamics in 8-nm high channels is achieved with a conventional bright-field optical microscope by inserting a layer of a high-refractive-index material, silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ), between the substrate and the nanochannel, and the height of which is accurately controlled down to a few nanometers by a SiO 2 spacer layer. The Si 3 N 4 layer exhibits a strong Fabry-Perot resonance in reflection, providing a sharp contrast between ultrathin liquid and gas phases. In addition, the Si 3 N 4 layer enables robust anodic bonding without nanochannel collapse. With this method, we demonstrate the validity of the classical Lucas-Washburn equation for capillary filling in the sub-10 nm regime, in contrast to the previous studies, for both polar and nonpolar liquids, and for aqueous salt solutions.

  9. Trends and challenges in VLSI technology scaling towards 100 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, S.; Sachdev, M.; Svensson, C.; Nauta, Bram

    Summary form only given. Moore's Law drives VLSI technology to continuous increases in transistor densities and higher clock frequencies. This tutorial will review the trends in VLSI technology scaling in the last few years and discuss the challenges facing process and circuit engineers in the 100nm

  10. EST Table: NM_001184845 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ptor) 10/09/29 63 %/2474 aa gb|ACH47049.1| target of rapamycin [Blattella germanica] 10/09/13 55 %/2493 aa F...437 aa gi|91089099|ref|XP_971819.1| PREDICTED: similar to fkbp-rapamycin associated protein [Tribolium castaneum] NM_001184845 ...

  11. Isolation and genomic characterization of Escherichia coli O157:NM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:NM and E. coli O157:H7 strains have been reported throughout the world. In developed countries, serotype O157:H7 represents the major cause of human diseases; however, there have been increasing reports of non-O157 Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli strains ...

  12. Optically pumped 1550nm wavelength tunable MEMS VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ansbæk, Thor; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the design and fabrication of an optically pumped 1550nm tunable MEMS VCSEL with anenclosed MEMS. The MEMS is defined in SOI and the active material, an InP wafer with quantum wells arebonded to the SOI and the last mirror is made from the deposition of dielectric materials...

  13. EST Table: NM_001177411 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001177411 tan 10/09/29 96 %/395 aa ref|NP_001170882.1| tan protein [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAI87831.1| Tan...0/09/10 46 %/375 aa gi|91078850|ref|XP_971848.1| PREDICTED: similar to tan CG12120-PA [Tribolium castaneum] AU000330 ...

  14. High gain 1310nm Raman amplifier (withdrawal notice)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CzyŻak, Paweł; Turkiewicz, Jarosław Piotr; Mazurek, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    This paper has been withdrawn. The following nearly identical paper is available in this conference proceedings: Jarosław Piotr Turkiewicz and Paweł Czyżak, "The high gain 1310nm Raman amplifier," Proc. SPIE 9228, Optical Fibers and Their Applications 2014, 92280P (May 12, 2014); doi:10.1117/12.2067055.

  15. EST Table: NM_001123349 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001123349 18w 10/09/29 92 %/1295 aa ref|NP_001116821.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAB85498.1| 18 wheel...|Amel|GB15177-PA 10/09/10 58 %/1242 aa gi|91076478|ref|XP_972409.1| PREDICTED: similar to 18 wheeler [Tribolium castaneum] FS922922 ...

  16. EST Table: NM_001046698 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046698 LOC692853 10/09/29 93 %/269 aa ref|NP_001040163.1| ischemia/reperfusion... inducible protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36179.1| ischemia/reperfusion inducible protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/

  17. EST Table: NM_001046937 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046937 LOC732938 10/09/29 100 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantation pr...otein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 79 %/222 aa FBpp0234606|Dv

  18. EST Table: NM_001142927 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001142927 Kynu 10/09/29 100 %/426 aa ref|NP_001136399.1| kynureninase [Bombyx mo...ri] dbj|BAH03383.1| kynureninase [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 32 %/432 aa C15H9.7#CE06835#WBGene00015802#kynurenina

  19. Emerging ≈800 nm Excited Lanthanide-Doped Upconversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoji; Li, Zhanjun; Zhang, Yuanwei; Guo, Shaohong; Pendharkar, Aarushi Iris; Lu, Min; Huang, Ling; Huang, Wei; Han, Gang

    2017-02-01

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles can tune near-infrared light to visible or even ultra-violet light in emissions. Due to their unique photophysical and photochemical properties, as well as their promising bioapplications, there has been a great deal of enthusiastic research performed to study the properties of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles in the past few years. Despite the considerable progress in this area, numerous challenges associated with the nanoparticles, such as a low upconversion efficiency, limited host materials, and a confined excitation wavelength, still remain, thus hindering further development with respect to their applications and in fundamental science. Recently, innovative strategies that utilize alternative sensitizers have been designed in order to engineer the excitation wavelengths of upconversion nanoparticles. Here, focusing on the excitation wavelength at ≈800 nm, recent advances in the design, property tuning, and applications of ≈800 nm excited upconversion nanoparticles are summarized. Benefiting from the unique features of ≈800 nm light, including deep tissue penetration depth and low photothermal effect, the ≈800 nm excited upconversion nanoparticles exhibit superior potential for biosensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, therapy, and three dimensional displays. The critical aspects of such emerging nanoparticles with regards to meeting the ever-changing needs of future development are also discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. EST Table: NM_001044201 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001044201 Tert 10/09/29 100 %/703 aa ref|NP_001037666.1| telomerase reverse tran...scriptase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABC95023.1| telomerase reverse transcriptase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF56516.1| telomerase reverse

  1. EST Table: NM_001130897 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001130897 CCAP 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/29 100 %/103 aa ref|NP_001124369.1| crustacean... cardioactive peptide [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAG50376.1| crustacean cardioactive peptide [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 l

  2. EST Table: NM_001109916 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001109916 Coc 10/09/29 94 %/260 aa ref|NP_001103386.1| cocoonase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABR14241.1| cocoona...se [Bombyx mori] gb|ABU49588.1| cocoonase [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 41 %/232 aa FBpp014387

  3. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.

  4. Small Particle Driven Chain Disentanglements in Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senses, Erkan; Ansar, Siyam M.; Kitchens, Christopher L.; Mao, Yimin; Narayanan, Suresh; Natarajan, Bharath; Faraone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and bulk rheology, we studied the effect of particle size on the single-chain dynamics, particle mobility, and bulk viscosity in athermal polyethylene oxide-gold nanoparticle composites. The results reveal a ≈25 % increase in the reptation tube diameter with the addition of nanoparticles smaller than the entanglement mesh size (≈5 nm ), at a volume fraction of 20%. The tube diameter remains unchanged in the composite with larger (20 nm) nanoparticles at the same loading. In both cases, the Rouse dynamics is insensitive to particle size. These results provide a direct experimental observation of particle-size-driven disentanglements that can cause non-Einstein-like viscosity trends often observed in polymer nanocomposites.

  5. Small Particle Driven Chain Disentanglements in Polymer Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senses, Erkan; Ansar, Siyam M.; Kitchens, Christopher L.; Mao, Yimin; Narayanan, Suresh; Natarajan, Bharath; Faraone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and bulk rheology, we studied the effect of particle size on the single chain dynamics, particle mobility, and bulk viscosity in athermal polyethylene oxide-gold nanoparticle composites. The results reveal an ≈ 25 % increase in the reptation tube diameter with addition of nanoparticles smaller than the entanglement mesh size (≈ 5 nm), at a volume fraction of 20 %. The tube diameter remains unchanged in the composite with larger (20 nm) nanoparticles at the same loading. In both cases, the Rouse dynamics is insensitive to particle size. These results provide a direct experimental observation of particle size driven disentanglements that can cause non-Einstein-like viscosity trends often observed in polymer nanocomposites.

  6. Introducing asymmetric functionality into MOFs via the generation of metallic Janus MOF particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Abraham; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2016-04-14

    Herein we report a versatile methodology for engineering metallic Janus MOF particles based on desymmetrization at interfaces, whereby each MOF particle is partially coated with a desired metal. We demonstrate that it enables the fabrication of homogeneous Janus MOF particles according to the MOF (ZIF-8, UiO-66 or UiO-66-SH), the metal (Au, Co or Pt), the MOF particle size (from the micrometer to the submicrometer regime) and the metal-film thickness (from 5 nm to 50 nm) employed. We anticipate that our strategy could be applied to impart new functionalities to MOFs, including asymmetric functionalization, magnetic-guidance and motorization.

  7. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Tada-Oikawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO2 nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO2 particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm and rutile (50 nm TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL of anatase (100 nm, rutile (50 nm, and P25 TiO2 particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO2 particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm TiO2 particles increased interleukin (IL-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm TiO2 particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO2 particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles.

  8. Meeting the challenges of 157-nm microstepper technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Osamu; Uchida, Noboru; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    For the aim of fabricating next-generation semiconductor devices, researchers are now attempting to enhance 157-nm lithography so as to achieve 70-nm node level various circuit designs. Many of the challenges for 157-nm technology such as contamination and purge control, calcium fluoride intrinsic birefringence, finding resists with suitable performance characteristics, have been performed. The major challenge, in terms of stability of tool performance, has been the apparent accumulation of contamination on the bottom of the objective. This has been evidenced by a reduction in resolution performance and an increase in the non-uniformity of the illumination intensity across the image plane. Uniformity over the entire imaging field has increased from 0.58% to as much as 18.5% through the use of the tool. This paper reports our demonstration that loss of uniformity due to contamination from resist outgassing can be reversed by cleaning the bottom surface of the lens of 157-nm microstepper (Ultratech Stepper Inc.) in- situ using 157-nm light and a small concentration of O2 in the N2 purging for exposure area. With an in-situ oxygen (O2) and vacuum ultra violet (VUV) cleaning, the uniformity of over the full imaging field has been improved from 18.5% to 6.0%. The edges of the imaging field do not recover as well during a cleaning as the center of the field, as the central 0.5 mm diameter of the field uniformity has been improved to more or less 2.0%. The procedure of this in-situ O2 cleaning will also be introduced, and in addition to this in-situ O2 cleaning, some recent results in system performance will be shown and many of these challenges will be discussed.

  9. Progress on high-power 808nm VCSELs and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Delai; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Van Leeuwen, Robert; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Kovsh, Alexey; Ghosh, Chuni

    2017-02-01

    High power 808nm semiconductor lasers are widely used for pumping neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal to produce high-brightness lasing at 1064nm. In addition, there are growing interest to use such high power 808nm lasers in the field of automotive infra-red (IR) illumination and medical aesthetic treatment. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have emerged as a promising candidate and attracted increased interests for those applications, due to their combined advantages of high efficiency, low diverging circular beam, narrow emission spectrum with reduced temperature sensitivity, low-cost manufacturability, simpler coupling optics, and increased reliability, especially at high temperatures. They can emit very high power with very high power density as they can be conveniently configured into large two-dimensional arrays and modules of arrays. We report recent development on such high-power, high-efficiency 808nm VCSELs with industrial leading 55% power conversion efficiency (PCE). Top emitting VCSELs were grown by MOCVD and processed into single devices and 2D arrays using selective wet oxidation process and substrate removal technique for efficient current confinement and heat removal. Peak PCE of 51% and peak power of 800W were achieved from 5x5mm array, corresponding to peak power density of 4kW/cm2. Pumped with new generation of 2.3kW VCSEL module, Q-switched laser pulse energy at 1064nm reached 46.9mJ, more than doubled from previously reported results.

  10. Synthesis of Nm-PHB (nanomelanin-polyhydroxy butyrate) nanocomposite film and its protective effect against biofilm-forming multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, George Seghal; Jackson, Stephen A; Priyadharsini, Sethu; Dobson, Alan D W; Selvin, Joseph

    2017-08-22

    Melanin is a dark brown ubiquitous photosynthetic pigment which have many varied and ever expanding applications in fabrication of radio-protective materials, food packaging, cosmetics and in medicine. In this study, melanin production in a Pseudomonas sp. which was isolated from the marine sponge Tetyrina citirna was optimized employing one-factor at a time experiments and characterized for chemical nature and stability. Following sonication nucleated nanomelanin (Nm) particles were formed and evaluated for antibacterial and antioxidant properties. Nanocomposite film was fabricated using combinations (% w/v) of polyhydroxy butyrate-nanomelanin (PHB:Nm) blended with 1% glycerol. The Nm was found to be spherical in shape with a diameter of 100-140 nm and showed strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The Nm-PHB nanocomposite film was homogeneous, smooth, without any cracks, and flexible. XRD and DSC data indicated that the film was crystalline in nature, and was thermostable up to 281.87 °C. This study represents the first report on the synthesis of Nm and fabrication of Nm-PHB nanocomposite film which show strong protective effect against multidrug resistant Staphyloccoccus aureus. Thus this Nm-PHB nanocomposite film may find utility as packaging material for food products by protecting the food products from oxidation and bacterial contamination.

  11. Hygroscopicity and chemical composition of Antarctic sub-micrometre aerosol particles and observations of new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic near-coastal sub-micrometre aerosol particle features in summer were characterised based on measured data on aerosol hygroscopicity, size distributions, volatility and chemical ion and organic carbon mass concentrations. Hysplit model was used to calculate the history of the air masses to predict the particle origin. Additional measurements of meteorological parameters were utilised. The hygroscopic properties of particles mostly resembled those of marine aerosols. The measurements took place at 130 km from the Southern Ocean, which was the most significant factor affecting the particle properties. This is explained by the lack of additional sources on the continent of Antarctica. The Southern Ocean was thus a likely source of the particles and nucleating and condensing vapours. The particles were very hygroscopic (HGF 1.75 at 90 nm and very volatile. Most of the sub-100 nm particle volume volatilised below 100 °C. Based on chemical data, particle hygroscopic and volatile properties were explained by a large fraction of non-neutralised sulphuric acid together with organic material. The hygroscopic growth factors assessed from chemical data were similar to measured. Hygroscopicity was higher in dry continental air masses compared with the moist marine air masses. This was explained by the aging of the marine organic species and lower methanesulphonic acid volume fraction together with the changes in the inorganic aerosol chemistry as the aerosol had travelled long time over the continental Antarctica. Special focus was directed in detailed examination of the observed new particle formation events. Indications of the preference of negative over positive ions in nucleation could be detected. However, in a detailed case study, the neutral particles dominated the particle formation process. Freshly nucleated particles had the smallest hygroscopic growth factors, which increased subsequent to particle aging.

  12. Finely divided methylsilsesquioxane particles with SiO4/2 fragments in structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Averichkin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of structural and morphological investigations of methylsilsesquioxane finely divided particles synthesized by hydrolytic co-condensation of in situ alkoxylated methyltrichlorosilane and tetrachlorous silicon are presented. The silica-type hydrophobe particles have been obtained using the abovementioned method with an output of 98.7–99.4 wt% of the load. These particles have been identified as crystalline formations with a lattice period of 5.5–8.0 nm and an interplane distance of 0.92–1.04 nm in the near order. We show that unlike for well-known crystalline methylsilsesquioxanes, introduction of chemically bonded SiO4/2 fragments to the material structure leads to the formation of 2–3 μm-sized spherical particles from the initial 10–15 nm particles; these particles are responsible for the spherical morphology of the surface. A method of extracting siloxane nanoparticles (2.5–280 nm from the reaction products has been described, the behavior of particles in suspension has been studied and particle dimensional parameters have been determined using helium−neon 0.6328 nm laser correlation spectroscopy.

  13. Advances in Biomagnetic Interfacing Concepts Derived from Polymer-Magnetic Particle Complexes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riffle, Judy S

    2005-01-01

    Our research on the development and characterization of magnetic nanoparticle-polymer complexes for tile project period 6/1/03-12/31/04 has yielded approximately 10-nm diameter cobalt particles coated...

  14. Characterization and corrosion behavior of F6NM stainless steel treated in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-yang; Cai, Zhen-bing; Yang, Wen-jin; Shen, Xiao-yao; Xue, Guo-hong; Zhu, Min-hao

    2018-03-01

    F6NM martensitic stainless steel was exposed to 350 °C water condition for 500, 1500, and 2500 h to simulate pressurized water reactor (PWR) condition. The characterization and corrosion behavior of the oxide film were investigated. Results indicate that the exposed steel surface formed a double-layer oxide film. The outer oxide film is Fe-rich and contains two type oxide particles. However, the inner oxide film is Cr-rich, and two oxide films, whose thicknesses increase with increasing exposure time. The oxide film reduces the corrosion behavior because the outer oxide film has many crack and pores. Finally, the mechanism and factors affecting the formation of the oxide film were investigated.

  15. Radiation hard pixel sensors using high-resistive wafers in a 150 nm CMOS processing line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, D.-L.; Hemperek, T.; Caicedo, I.; Gonella, L.; Hügging, F.; Janssen, J.; Krüger, H.; Macchiolo, A.; Owtscharenko, N.; Vigani, L.; Wermes, N.

    2017-06-01

    Pixel sensors using 8'' CMOS processing technology have been designed and characterized offering the benefits of industrial sensor fabrication, including large wafers, high throughput and yield, as well as low cost. The pixel sensors are produced using a 150 nm CMOS technology offered by LFoundry in Avezzano. The technology provides multiple metal and polysilicon layers, as well as metal-insulator-metal capacitors that can be employed for AC-coupling and redistribution layers. Several prototypes were fabricated and are characterized with minimum ionizing particles before and after irradiation to fluences up to 1.1 × 1015 neq cm-2. The CMOS-fabricated sensors perform equally well as standard pixel sensors in terms of noise and hit detection efficiency. AC-coupled sensors even reach 100% hit efficiency in a 3.2 GeV electron beam before irradiation.

  16. Optical properties of soot particles: measurement - model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, S.; Lambe, A. T.; Lack, D.; Massoli, P.; Cross, E. S.; Dubey, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Olfert, J.; Freedman, A.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In order to accurately model the direct radiative impact of black carbon (BC), the refractive index and shape dependent scattering and absorption characteristics must be known. At present, the assumed shape remains highly uncertain because BC particles are fractal-like, being agglomerates of smaller (20-40 nm) spherules, yet traditional optical models such as Mie theory typically assume a spherical particle morphology. To investigate the ability of various optical models to reproduce observed BC optical properties, we measured light absorption and extinction coefficients of methane and ethylene flame soot particles. Optical properties were measured by multiple instruments: absorption by a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS), absorption and scattering by a 3-wavelength photoacoustic/nephelometer spectrometer (PASS-3) and extinction and scattering by a cavity attenuated phase shift spectrometer (CAPS). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) and mobility size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Measurements were made for nascent soot particles and for collapsed soot particles following coating with dioctyl sebacate or sulfuric acid and thermal denuding to remove the coating. Wavelength-dependent refractive indices for the sampled particles were derived by fitting the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections to spherical particle Mie theory and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory. The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation assumes that the absorption properties of soot are dictated by the individual spherules and neglects interaction between them. In general, Mie theory reproduces the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections for particles with volume equivalent diameters (VED) ~160 nm. The discrepancy is most pronounced for

  17. Quantitative effect of temperature to the absorbance of aqueous glucose in wavelength range from 1200nm to 1700nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Houxin; An, Lin; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Kexin

    2005-09-05

    In this paper, to find the quantitative errors of aqueous glucose induced by the temperature change at every wave point ranging from 1200nm to 1700nm, the calibration curve is calculated and shown. During the measurement the temperature varies from 30 degrees to 40 degrees , at a 2 degrees interval, and aqueous glucose concentration ranges from 100mg/dL to 500mg/dL, at a interval of 100mg/dL. The absorption of aqueous glucose decreases with the increasing of temperature, also the absorbance decreases. In addition, only 1 degrees change in the temperature induces about -7x10-3 and -4x10-3 errors in the absorbance of the aqueous glucose at the wavelength of 1550nm, 1610nm respectively. So the examined result should be correct according to the data read from the calibration curve if the temperatures of modeling and measuring are not uniform. Using this method, the error caused by the temperature change can be reduced even eliminated.

  18. Study of drain-extended NMOS under electrostatic discharge stress in 28 nm and 40 nm CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihuai; Jin, Hao; Dong, Shurong; Zhong, Lei; Han, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Researches on the electrostatic discharge (ESD) performance of drain-extended NMOS (DeNMOS) under the state-of-the-art 28 nm and 40 nm bulk CMOS process are performed in this paper. Three distinguishing phases of avalanche breakdown stage, depletion region push-out stage and parasitic NPN turn on stage of the gate-grounded DeNMOS (GG-DeNMOS) fabricated under 28 nm CMOS process measured with transmission line pulsing (TLP) test are analyzed through TCAD simulations and tape-out silicon verification detailedly. Damage mechanisms and failure spots of GG-DeNMOS under both CMOS processes are thermal breakdown of drain junction. Improvements based on the basic structure adjustments can increase the GG-DeNMOS robustness from original 2.87 mA/μm to the highest 5.41 mA/μm. Under 40 nm process, parameter adjustments based on the basic structure have no significant benefits on the robustness improvements. By inserting P+ segments in the N+ implantation of drain or an entire P+ strip between the N+ implantation of drain and polysilicon gate to form the typical DeMOS-SCR (silicon-controlled rectifier) structure, the ESD robustness can be enhanced from 1.83 mA/μm to 8.79 mA/μm and 29.78 mA/μm, respectively.

  19. Cryogenic Lifetime Studies of 130 nm and 65 nm CMOS Technologies for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, James R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Deptuch, G. W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wu, Guoying [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Gui, Ping [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility intends to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. Research is under way to place the electronics inside the cryostat. For reasons of efficiency and economics, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This, then, requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130 nm and 65 nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. Our results show that both technologies achieve the lifetimes required by the experiment. Minimal design changes are necessary in the case of the 130 nm process and no changes whatsoever are necessary for the 65 nm process.

  20. Beyond the God particle

    CERN Document Server

    Lederman, Leon M

    2013-01-01

    On July 4, 2012, the long-sought Higgs Boson--aka "the God Particle"--was discovered at the world's largest particle accelerator, the LHC, in Geneva, Switzerland. On March 14, 2013, physicists at CERN confirmed it. This elusive subatomic particle forms a field that permeates the entire universe, creating the masses of the elementary particles that are the basic building blocks of everything in the known world--from viruses to elephants, from atoms to quasars.

  1. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    We are developing particle methods as a general framework for large scale simulations of discrete and continuous systems in science and engineering. The specific application and research areas include: discrete element simulations of granular flow, smoothed particle hydrodynamics and particle...... vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  2. Investigation of transient dynamics of capillary assisted particle assembly yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virganavičius, D. [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Laboratory of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Juodėnas, M. [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Tamulevičius, T., E-mail: tomas.tamulevicius@ktu.lt [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Department of Physics, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentų St. 50, Kaunas LT-51368 (Lithuania); Schift, H. [Laboratory of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Tamulevičius, S. [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Department of Physics, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentų St. 50, Kaunas LT-51368 (Lithuania)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Regular particles arrays were assembled by capillary force assisted deposition. • Deposition yield dynamics was investigated at different thermal velocity regimes. • Yield transient behavior was approximated with logistic function. • Pattern density influence for switching behavior was assessed. - Abstract: In this paper, the transient behavior of the particle assembly yield dynamics when switching from low yield to high yield deposition at different velocity and thermal regimes is investigated. Capillary force assisted particle assembly (CAPA) using colloidal suspension of green fluorescent 270 nm diameter polystyrene beads was performed on patterned poly (dimethyl siloxane) substrates using a custom-built deposition setup. Two types of patterns with different trapping site densities were used to assess CAPA process dynamics and the influence of pattern density and geometry on the deposition yield transitions. Closely packed 300 nm diameter circular pits ordered in hexagonal arrangement with 300 nm pitch, and 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} square pits with 2 μm spacing were used. 2-D regular structures of the deposited particles were investigated by means of optical fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The fluorescence micrographs were analyzed using a custom algorithm enabling to identify particles and calculate efficiency of the deposition performed at different regimes. Relationship between the spatial distribution of particles in transition zone and ambient conditions was evaluated and quantified by approximation of the yield profile with a logistic function.

  3. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm, 980 nm) on color change of teeth after external bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomars, Nazanin; Azarpour, Pouneh; Mirzaei, Mansooreh; Hashemi Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-12-30

    Subject and aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of diode laser-activated bleaching systems for color change of teeth. Materials & Methods: 40 premolars with intact enamel surfaces were selected for five external bleaching protocols (n=8). Two different wavelengths of diode laser (810 and 980 nm) with two different hydrogen peroxide concentrations (30% and 46%) were selected for laser bleaching. Group 1 received bleaching (Heydent- Germany) with a 810 nm diode laser; Group 2 received bleaching (Heydent- Germany) with a 980 nm diode laser; Group 3 received bleaching (laser white*20- Biolase) with a 810 nm diode laser; Group 4 received bleaching (laser white*20- Biolase) with a 980 nm diode laser, with an output power of 1.5 W, in continuous wave (cw) mode for each irradiation. Group 5 as control group received 40% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost, Ultradent-USA) with no light activation. The color of teeth was scored at baseline and 1 week after bleaching with spectrophotometer. Color change data on the CIEL*a*b* system were analyzed statistically by the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results: All the bleaching techniques resulted in shade change. According to ΔE values, all techniques were effective to bleach the teeth (ΔE ≥ 3). Statistically significant differences were detected among bleaching protocols (p=0.06). Regarding shade change values expressed as ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*, ΔE*, laser bleached groups were no statistically different with each other (p>0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching with different wavelengths of diode laser resulted in the same results.

  4. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  5. High energy particle astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  6. The Effects of Toxic Particles in Human Lung Cells - Research Area 8. Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-05

    particles associated with metal-on-metal hip implants. Orthopedic implants restore mobility to hundreds of thousands of patients, including military...from orthopedic implants. Recent studies indicate that patients with metal-on-metal implants have increased rates of bladder cancer only 5-9 years... apparent sizes emerge, around 10 nm and 60 nm. The zeta potential of the particles in the larger distribution (~ -30mV at pH 6.5) is of slightly larger

  7. Ion projection lithography: November 2000 status and sub-70-nm prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesmaier, Rainer; Wolter, Andreas; Loeschner, Hans; Schunck, Stefan

    2000-10-01

    Among all next generation lithography (NGL) options Ion Projection Lithography (IPL) offers the smallest (particle) wavelength of 5x10- 5nm (l00keV Helium ions). Thus, 4x reduction ion-optics has diffraction limits IOS) has been realized and assembled. In parallel to the PDT-IOS effort, at Leica Jena a test bench for a vertical vacuum 300mm-wafer stage has been realized. Operation of magnetic bearing supported stage movement has already been demonstrated. As ASML vacuum compatible optical wafer alignment system, with 3nm(3(sigma) ) precision demonstrated in air, has been integrated to this wafer test bench system recently. Parallel to the IPL tool development, Infineon Technologies Mask House and the Institute for Microelectronics Stuttgart are intensively working on the development of IPL stencil masks with success in producing 150mm and 200mm stencil masks as reported elsewhere. This paper is focused on information about the status of the PDT-IOS tool.

  8. Light scattering by cosmic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Min, M.

    2008-01-01

    We define cosmic particles as particles outside the Earth. Two types of cosmic particles can be distinguished, namely liquid and solid particles. The solid particles are often called grains or cosmic dust particles. Cosmic particles occur in a great variety of astronomical objects and environments.

  9. Dynamics of concentrated ferrofluid with labelled particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V.T.; Orlova, D.N.; Sibilev, A.I. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina, St. Petersburg district (Russian Federation); Torok, G.G.; Kali, G.; Cser, L. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics, POB 49 Budapest (Hungary)

    1999-07-01

    In the study of ferrofluid dynamics the separation of self and pair correlation is the essential problem at both intermediate and high concentrations of the magnetic phase. The neutron spin-echo (NSE) total scattering function S{sub t}(q, t)={beta}S{sub p}(q, t)+(1-{beta})S{sub s}(q, t) contains both contributions, where the parameter {beta}={sigma}{sub p}/({sigma}{sub p}+{sigma}{sub s}) depends on the corresponding cross sections {sigma}{sub s,p}. To distinguish these different kinds of dynamics we eliminated one of them by using a mixture of magnetic particles with different scattering amplitudes and concentrations. The NSE experiments (LLB, CE-Saclay) at momentum transfer q{sub 1}{approx}0.4 nm {approx}1/D{sub p} (D{sub p} is the particle diameter) and q{sub 2}{approx}0.7 nm1/D{sub p} have been carried out for these opposite situations. The functions S{sub p}(q, t), S{sub s}(q, t), from these data behave quite differently. The autocorrelations reveal a stretched relaxation at low q: S{sub s}(q, t)=exp[-q{sup 2}{gamma}(t)/2], where {gamma}(t)=2Dt{sup {alpha}} is the squared particle displacement, the exponent {alpha}=0.5{+-}0.1 at q{sub 1}, and {alpha}=0.8{+-}0.1 at q{sub 2}. The magnitude {alpha}<1 indicates the strong influence of dipole forces on the motion of a particle. It resembles the segmental relaxation in a polymer chain. On the other hand, the pair correlations show the oscillations (period{approx}40 ns, amplitude{approx}1 nm) mixed with diffusion. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm3. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 104 /cm3 and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices.

  11. Simulation of 100 nm Vertical Replacement Gate (VRG) MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, P. K.; Ibrahim, K.; Aziz, A. Abdul; Rashid, M.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we simulate two dimensional n-type 100 nm vertical replacement gate (VRG) metal oxide semiconductor field oxide transistor (MOSFET). The simulations are done with using DEVEDIT and ATLAS from Silvaco International. The VRG VMOST with channel doping carrier concentration of 3.5×1018 cm-3 and the width of the body region between the two channel lengths of 200 nm resulted in a threshold voltage (Vth) of 0.90 V, an off-state leakage current (Ioff) of 6.71×10-15 A/μm, a subthreshold slope (S) of 95.84 mV/dec, and a drain current (ID) of 200 μA/μm. In addition, we study the effects of channel doping carrier concentration (NC) and the width of the body region between the two channel lengths (WB). Besides, the simulation results also compared with experiment result from other researchers.

  12. Photodissociation of NH3 at 106-200 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, M.; Lee, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    The absorption and fluorescence cross sections for NH3 are measured in the 106-200 nm region using synchrotron radiation as the light source. The threshold wavelengths for the production of the NH (b to X) and NH (c to a) emissions from NH3 dissociation are measured and compared with previous measurements. The heat of formation of NH determined from these thresholds agrees well with the value determined from thermochemical data. The process of dissociation of NH3 into NH2(2AL) and H2(S) has a significant quantum yield whose maximum at 134 nm is about twice the NH(c) production yield. All the vibronic levels of the B and C states produce the NH2(2A1) emission, contrary to previous theoretical interpretations.

  13. Raster Shaped Beam Pattern Generation for 70 nm Photomask Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Thomas H.; Finklestein, Ira; Kao, Huei-Mei; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Long, Darryn; Lozes, Richard L.; Pearce-Percy, Henry T.; Sagle, Allan L.; Varner, Jeffrey K.; Winter, Stacey; Gesley, Mark A.; Abboud, Frank E.

    2002-12-01

    Photomask complexity is rapidly increasing as feature sizes are scaled down and as optical proximity correction (OPC) methods become widespread. The growing data content of critical mask levels requires that pattern generator solutions be adapted to maintain productivity. Raster shaped beam (RSB) technology has been developed to enable the production of 70 nm photomasks and the development of 50 nm masks. RSB is built on and extends the capability of the 50 kV MEBES platform. The beam is shaped as it is scanned, printing the mask pattern on a calibrated flash grid. Complex OPC patterns are efficiently tiled by combining a relatively small maximum shape size with a high flash rate of 100 MHz. The maximum shape size and the current density can be adjusted to match a wide set of mask applications. Proximity effects are corrected with dose modulation using a real-time computation.

  14. Magnetic Behavior of Surface Nanostructured 50-nm Nickel Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermally evaporated 50-nm nickel thin films coated on borosilicate glass substrates were nanostructured by excimer laser (0.5 J/cm2, single shot, DC electric field (up to 2 kV/cm and trench-template assisted technique. Nanoparticle arrays (anisotropic growth features have been observed to form in the direction of electric field for DC electric field treatment case and ruptured thin film (isotropic growth features growth for excimer laser treatment case. For trench-template assisted technique; nanowires (70–150 nm diameters have grown along the length of trench template. Coercive field and saturation magnetization are observed to be strongly dependent on nanostructuring techniques.

  15. Sub-100 nm wrinkling of polydimethylsiloxane by double frontal oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nania, Manuela; Foglia, Fabrizia; Matar, Omar K; Cabral, João T

    2017-02-02

    We demonstrate nanoscale wrinkling on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at sub-100 nm length scales via a (double) frontal surface oxidation coupled with a mechanical compression. The kinetics of the glassy skin propagation is resolved by neutron and X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, combined with mechanical wrinkling experiments to evaluate the resulting pattern formation. In conventional PDMS surface oxidation, the smallest wrinkling patterns attainable have an intrinsic lower wavelength limit due to the coupling of skin formation and front propagation at fixed strain εprestrain, whose maximum is, in turn, set by material failure. However, combining two different oxidative processes, ultra-violet ozonolysis followed by air plasma exposure, we break this limit by fabricating trilayer laminates with excellent interfacial properties and a sequence of moduli and layer thicknesses able to trivially reduce the surface topography to sub-100 nm dimensions. This method provides a powerful, yet simple, non-lithographic approach to extend surface patterning from visible to the deep UV range.

  16. 1060-nm Tunable Monolithic High Index Contrast Subwavelength Grating VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2013-01-01

    We present the first tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) where the top distributed Bragg reflector has been completely substituted by an air-cladded high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (HCG) mirror. In this way, an extended cavity design can be realized by reducing...... the reflection at the semiconductor #x2013;air interface using an anti-reflective coating (ARC). We demonstrate how the ARC can be integrated in a monolithic structure by oxidizing AlGaAs with high Al-content. The HCG VCSEL has the potential to achieve polarization stable single-mode output with high tuning...... efficiency. The HCG VCSEL shows a total tuning range of 16 nm around an emission wavelength of 1060 nm with 1-mW output power....

  17. Tunnel junction 850-nm VCSEL for aperture uniformity and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, P. S.; Yan, J.; Wu, T. C.; Kyi, W.; Pao, J.; Riaziat, M.

    2017-02-01

    We are reporting the first successful fabrication of 850-nm buried tunnel junction (BTJ) VCSELs. Multiple parameters were considered for the design. First, n-type dopants other than silicon had to be considered for an abrupt junction. Second, proper layer thickness had to be chosen. Finally, compatibility with regrowth and processing had to be ensured. In this paper the successful fabrication and performance of 850-nm BTJ VCSELs with tunnel junctions comprised of GaAs and AlGaAs materials is demonstrated. Key achieved parameters include a significant improvement in the slope efficiency from approximately 0.45 W/A in an oxide-aperture VCSEL to over 0.6 W/A.

  18. EST Table: NM_001043458 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001043458 Apkc 10/09/29 93 %/586 aa ref|NP_001036923.1| atypical protein kinase ...C [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAE17023.1| atypical protein kinase C [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 72 %/601 aa FBpp0292491|aPK...ef|XP_974234.1| PREDICTED: similar to atypical protein kinase C [Tribolium castaneum] FS907336 ...

  19. EST Table: NM_001046972 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046972 LOC732975 10/09/29 100 %/182 aa ref|NP_001040437.1| muscular protein 2...0 [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51386.1| muscular protein 20 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 61 %/173 aa FBpp0235584|DvirGJ2116...aa gi|91077564|ref|XP_972465.1| PREDICTED: similar to muscular protein 20 [Tribolium castaneum] FS765856 ...

  20. EST Table: NM_001044218 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001044218 glv2 10/09/29 100 %/173 aa ref|NP_001037683.1| gloverin 2 [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAE53372.1| antibac...terial peptide [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF51564.1| gloverin2 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS917189 ...

  1. EST Table: NM_001043703 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001043703 Osp 10/09/29 93 %/1801 aa ref|NP_001037168.1| ovarian serine protease ...[Bombyx mori] gb|AAL62027.1|AF294884_1 ovarian serine protease [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 43 %/583 aa FBpp016242...189234398|ref|XP_974954.2| PREDICTED: similar to ovarian serine protease [Tribolium castaneum] FS920735 ...

  2. EST Table: NM_001173359 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001173359 Surf1 10/09/29 100 %/228 aa ref|NP_001166830.1| surfeit 1 isoform 2 [B...ombyx mori] gb|ABD36359.1| surfeit protein isoform 2 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 35 %/216 aa FBpp0179156|DperGL15...|XP_972868.1| PREDICTED: similar to surfeit locus protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS918885 ...

  3. EST Table: NM_001046863 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046863 Surf1 10/09/29 100 %/294 aa ref|NP_001040328.1| surfeit 1 isoform 1 [B...ombyx mori] gb|ABD36358.1| surfeit protein isoform 1 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 45 %/250 aa FBpp0162190|DmojGI12...|XP_972868.1| PREDICTED: similar to surfeit locus protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS918885 ...

  4. EST Table: NM_001044001 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001044001 LOC693032 10/09/29 100 %/596 aa ref|NP_001037466.1| chitooligosacchari...dolytic beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase precursor [Bombyx mori] sp|P49010.1|HEXC_BOMMO RecName: Full=Chitooligo...e; AltName: Full=Beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase; Flags: Precursor gb|AAC60521.1| chitool...igosaccharidolytic beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase [Bombyx mori] prf||2107188A chitooligosaccharidolytic be

  5. Hardmask technology for sub-100 nm lithographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, Katherina; Mahorowala, Arpan P.; Medeiros, David R.; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Petrillo, Karen E.; Angelopoulos, Marie; Grill, Alfred; Patel, Vishnubhai; Halle, Scott; Brunner, Timothy A.; Conti, Richard; Allen, Scott D.; Wise, Richard

    2003-06-01

    The importance of hardmask technology is becoming increasingly evident as the demand for high-resolution imaging dictates the use of ever-thinner resist films. An appropriately designed etch resistant hardmask used in conjunction with a thin resist can provide the combined lithographic and etch performance needed for sub-100 nm device fabrication. We have developed a silicon-based, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) prepared material that performs both as an antireflective coating (ARC) and a hardmask and thus enables the use of thin resists for device fabrication. This ARC/hardmask material offers several advantages over organic bottom antireflective coatings (BARC). These benefits include excellent tunability of the material's optical properties, which allows superior substrate reflectivity control, and high etch selectivity to resist, exceeding 2:1. In addition, this material can serve as an effective hardmask etch barrier during the plasma etching of dielectric stacks, as the underlying silicon oxide etches eight times faster than this material in typical fluorocarbon plasma. These properties enable the pattering of features in 1-2 μm dielectric stacks using thin resists, imaging that would otherwise be impossible with conventional processing. Potential extendibility of this approach to feature sizes below 100nm has been also evaluated. High resolution images as small as 50nm, have been transferred into a 300nm thick SiO2 layer by using Si ARC/hardmask material as an etch mask. Lithographic performance and etch characteristics of a thin resist process over both single layer and index-graded ARC/hardmask materials will be shown.

  6. EST Table: NM_001130877 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001130877 hibadh 10/09/29 96 %/314 aa ref|NP_001124349.1| 3-hydroxyisobutyrate d...DROGENASE PRECURSOR (EC 1.1.1.31) (HIBADH) (FRAGMENT)#status:Confirmed#UniProt:Q9...1 10/09/10 41 %/279 aa gnl|Amel|GB17533-PA 10/09/10 46 %/279 aa gi|189238804|ref|XP_974950.2| PREDICTED: similar to Hibadhb [Tribolium castaneum] FS797397 ...

  7. EST Table: NM_001044219 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001044219 glv4 10/09/29 100 %/171 aa ref|NP_001037684.1| gloverin 4 [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAE53373.1| antibac...terial peptide [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF63528.1| gloverin4 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS798027 ...

  8. Particle Image Velocimetry for Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhart, Carl; Chiu, Richard; Santiago, Juan

    1997-11-01

    A micro PIV system is being developed to measure velocity vectors with spatial resolutions of the order of several microns. Advancements in microfabrication technologies have facilitated the development of many new microfluidic devices. These devices present new and challenging fluid problems at the micro-scale, which are not present at the macro-scale. In general, analysis of fluid problems at the micron-scale have often been limited to measuring only bulk properties of the flow field. Lanzillotto et al. (1996) have used x-ray tomography to obtain whole-field velocity measurements in 500 - 1000 micron diameter tubes. They report velocity-vector spacings of roughly 40 microns. The current research is an attempt to extend the super-resolution PIV technique of Keane et al. (1995), to address fluid mechanics problems in microfabricated devices. Here, 50 - 200 nm diameter particles are imaged using an epi-fluorescent microscope and a scientific-grade CCD camera. Particles are illuminated by a continuously emitting Mercury arc lamp or by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The spatial resolution of optical techniques are fundamentally limited by the diffraction of light. We will discuss the ultimate spatial and temporal resolution limits of PIV for micro-flows, and report recent experimental.

  9. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodríguez, Lucía; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepción; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier

    2017-07-13

    Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2-1 W and energy density: 1-7 J/cm²) using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed). The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm²; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing.

  10. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Illescas-Montes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. Methods: The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2–1 W and energy density: 1–7 J/cm2 using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed. The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. Results: fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm2; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. Conclusion: The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing.

  11. International interlaboratory study for sizing and quatification of Ag nanoparticles in food simulants by single-particle ICPMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linsinger, T.P.J.; Peters, R.J.B.; Weigel, S.

    2014-01-01

    This publication describes the first international intercomparison of particle-size determination by single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICPMS). Concentrated monodisperse silver nanoparticle suspensions with particle diameters of 20, 40 and 100 nm and a blank solution

  12. The Formation of Porous Membranes by Filtration of Aerosol Nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Klint; Johannessen, Tue; Mosleh, Majid

    2002-01-01

    Flame-generated aerosol particles of Al2O3 were deposited by gas filtration on two types of porous and ceramic tubes of α-Al2O3 with mean pore diameters of 450 and 2700 nm, respectively. The particles were aggregates with average mobility diameters in the range of 30¨¢100 nm and primary particle...... diameters of 4¨¢8 nm. The particles are characterized by differential mobility analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and by their specific surface area. The deposited membranes are characterized by gas permeability measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and by their pore size distribution from...... nitrogen capillary condensation. The particles form a distinct, homogeneous membrane layer with a porosity of ∼90% on top of the substrate surface and only penetrate slightly into the substrate structure. The mean pore sizes of the deposited membranes determined by nitrogen condensation agree approximately...

  13. Photophoretic trapping of absorbing particles in air and measurement of their single-particle Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C; Coleman, Mark

    2012-02-27

    A new method is demonstrated for optically trapping micron-sized absorbing particles in air and obtaining their single-particle Raman spectra. A 488-nm Gaussian beam from an Argon ion laser is transformed by conical lenses (axicons) and other optics into two counter-propagating hollow beams, which are then focused tightly to form hollow conical beams near the trapping region. The combination of the two coaxial conical beams, with focal points shifted relative to each other along the axis of the beams, generates a low-light-intensity biconical region totally enclosed by the high-intensity light at the surface of the bicone, which is a type of bottle beam. Particles within this region are trapped by the photophoretic forces that push particles toward the low-intensity center of this region. Raman spectra from individual trapped particles made from carbon nanotubes are measured. This trapping technique could lead to the development of an on-line real-time single-particle Raman spectrometer for characterization of absorbing aerosol particles.

  14. Fluidization of spherocylindrical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vinay V.; Nijssen, Tim M. J.; Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Hofman, Jeroen; Kuipers, Hans; Padding, Johan T.

    2017-06-01

    Multiphase (gas-solid) flows are encountered in numerous industrial applications such as pharmaceutical, food, agricultural processing and energy generation. A coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) approach is a popular way to study such flows at a particle scale. However, most of these studies deal with spherical particles while in reality, the particles are rarely spherical. The particle shape can have significant effect on hydrodynamics in a fluidized bed. Moreover, most studies in literature use inaccurate drag laws because accurate laws are not readily available. The drag force acting on a non-spherical particle can vary considerably with particle shape, orientation with the flow, Reynolds number and packing fraction. In this work, the CFD-DEM approach is extended to model a laboratory scale fluidized bed of spherocylinder (rod-like) particles. These rod-like particles can be classified as Geldart D particles and have an aspect ratio of 4. Experiments are performed to study the particle flow behavior in a quasi-2D fluidized bed. Numerically obtained results for pressure drop and bed height are compared with experiments. The capability of CFD-DEM approach to efficiently describe the global bed dynamics for fluidized bed of rod-like particles is demonstrated.

  15. Fluidization of spherocylindrical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Vinay V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase (gas-solid flows are encountered in numerous industrial applications such as pharmaceutical, food, agricultural processing and energy generation. A coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD and discrete element method (DEM approach is a popular way to study such flows at a particle scale. However, most of these studies deal with spherical particles while in reality, the particles are rarely spherical. The particle shape can have significant effect on hydrodynamics in a fluidized bed. Moreover, most studies in literature use inaccurate drag laws because accurate laws are not readily available. The drag force acting on a non-spherical particle can vary considerably with particle shape, orientation with the flow, Reynolds number and packing fraction. In this work, the CFD-DEM approach is extended to model a laboratory scale fluidized bed of spherocylinder (rod-like particles. These rod-like particles can be classified as Geldart D particles and have an aspect ratio of 4. Experiments are performed to study the particle flow behavior in a quasi-2D fluidized bed. Numerically obtained results for pressure drop and bed height are compared with experiments. The capability of CFD-DEM approach to efficiently describe the global bed dynamics for fluidized bed of rod-like particles is demonstrated.

  16. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro effects of 7 nm alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristig, Simon; Chernousova, Svitlana; Meyer-Zaika, Wolfgang; Epple, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles were prepared in nine different metal compositions with silver/gold molar ratios of ranging from 90:10 to 10:90. The one-pot synthesis in aqueous medium can easily be modified to gain control over the final particle diameter and the stabilizing agents. The purification of the particles to remove synthesis by-products (which is an important factor for subsequent in vitro experiments) was carried out by multiple ultracentrifugation steps. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential centrifugal sedimentation (DCS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-vis spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) showed spherical, monodisperse, colloidally stable silver-gold nanoparticles of ≈7 nm diameter with measured molar metal compositions very close to the theoretical values. The examination of the nanoparticle cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) showed that the toxicity is not proportional to the silver content. Nanoparticles with a silver/gold molar composition of 80:20 showed the highest toxicity.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro effects of 7 nm alloyed silver–gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ristig

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alloyed silver–gold nanoparticles were prepared in nine different metal compositions with silver/gold molar ratios of ranging from 90:10 to 10:90. The one-pot synthesis in aqueous medium can easily be modified to gain control over the final particle diameter and the stabilizing agents. The purification of the particles to remove synthesis by-products (which is an important factor for subsequent in vitro experiments was carried out by multiple ultracentrifugation steps. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, differential centrifugal sedimentation (DCS, dynamic light scattering (DLS, UV–vis spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS showed spherical, monodisperse, colloidally stable silver–gold nanoparticles of ≈7 nm diameter with measured molar metal compositions very close to the theoretical values. The examination of the nanoparticle cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs showed that the toxicity is not proportional to the silver content. Nanoparticles with a silver/gold molar composition of 80:20 showed the highest toxicity.

  19. Megahertz FDML Laser with up to 143nm Sweep Range for Ultrahigh Resolution OCT at 1050nm

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Jan Philip; Eibl, Mattias; Pfeiffer, Tom; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present a new design of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser (FDML laser), which provides a new record in sweep range at ~1um center wavelength: At the fundamental sweep rate of 2x417 kHz we reach 143nm bandwidth and 120nm with 4x buffering at 1.67MHz sweep rate. The latter configuration of our system is characterized: The FWHM of the point spread function (PSF) of a mirror is 5.6um (in tissue). Human in vivo retinal imaging is performed with the MHz laser showing more details in vascular structures. Here we could measure an axial resolution of 6.0um by determining the FWHM of specular reflex in the image. Additionally, challenges related to such a high sweep bandwidth such as water absorption are investigated.

  20. 10 nm Diameter Periodic Holes On The Barrier Layer Of Hexagonally Ordered Nanoporous Alumina Produced By Grazing Ar+ Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Metzger, Robert M.

    2002-03-01

    Long-term anodization of aluminum provides a hexagonally ordered array of nanopores with very uniform pore diameters between 30 and 50 nm and pore spacings of 80 to 100 nm within a matrix of amorphous aluminum oxide [1]. However, one often desires smaller diameters. Because the bottom of each pore is U-shaped, we can use this geometrical feature and gradually open the U-shaped bottom cap of the alumina nanochannel by controlled grazing-angle Ar+ ion milling, and thus form pore apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter [2]. Such smaller hole diameters may be useful for exposing sub-10 nm diameter ordered cobalt particles as catalysts for preparation of ordered array of single wall carbon nanotubes, for organizing nano-scale electrodes for molecular electronic devices, and as a pattern transfer mask. Supported in part by NSF-DMR-0095215 ==== [1] F. Li, L. Zhang, and R. M. Metzger, Chem. Mater. 10(9): 2470-2480 (1998). [2] T. Xu, G. Zangari, and R. M. Metzger, Nanoletters, accepted and in press.

  1. Submicron particles of Co, Ni and Co–Ni alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 5 ... Magnetic Materials Volume 24 Issue 5 October 2001 pp 515-521 ... Magnetic sub-micron sized particles (with diameters in the range 100–600 nm) of Co, Ni and Co–Ni alloys, protected with polyvinylpyrrolidone have been prepared in gram quantities ...

  2. Strong magnetic response of submicron silicon particles in the infrared

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Etxarri, A; Gómez-Medina, R; Froufe-Pérez, L S; López, C; Chantada, L; Scheffold, F; Aizpurua, J; Nieto-Vesperinas, M; Sáenz, J J

    2011-01-01

    .... However, we find that Silicon particles with index of refraction∼3.5 and radius∼200 nm present strong electric and magnetic dipolar resonances in telecom and near-infrared frequencies, (i.e. at wavelengths≈1.2-2 mm...

  3. Alignment of rod-shaped gold particles by electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zande, B.M.I. van der; Koper, G.J.M.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    1999-01-01

    The electro-optical response of colloidal dispersions of rod-shaped gold particles is studied for various aspect ratios (2.6 < L/d < 49; d = 15 nm) by monitoring the absorbance spectra in the visible wavelength regime. The absorbance spectra strongly depend on the degree of orientational order of

  4. Fractal-like dimension of nanometer Diesel soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skillas, G.; Baltensperger, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegmann, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    Measurements with a low-pressure impactor and a differential mobility analyser were conducted for Diesel soot at various engine loads. By means of these measurements a fractal-like dimension of Diesel soot particles, with diameters ranging from 55 up to 260 nm, was established. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  5. Writing time estimation of EB mask writer EBM-9000 for hp16nm/logic11nm node generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamikubo, Takashi; Takekoshi, Hidekazu; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Yamada, Hirokazu; Hattori, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    The scaling of semiconductor devices is slowing down because of the difficulty in establishing their functionality at the nano-size level and also because of the limitations in fabrications, mainly the delay of EUV lithography. While multigate devices (FinFET) are currently the main driver for scalability, other types of devices, such as 3D devices, are being realized to relax the scaling of the node. In lithography, double or multiple patterning using ArF immersion scanners is still a realistic solution offered for the hp16nm node fabrication. Other lithography candidates are those called NGL (Next Generation Lithography), such as DSA (Directed-Self-Assembling) or nanoimprint. In such situations, shot count for mask making by electron beam writers will not increase. Except for some layers, it is not increasing as previously predicted. On the other hand, there is another aspect that increases writing time. The exposure dose for mask writing is getting higher to meet tighter specifications of CD uniformity, in other words, reduce LER. To satisfy these requirements, a new electron beam mask writer, EBM-9000, has been developed for hp16nm/logic11nm generation. Electron optical system, which has the immersion lens system, was evolved from EBM-8000 to achieve higher current density of 800A/cm2. In this paper, recent shot count and dose trend are discussed. Also, writing time is estimated for the requirements in EBM-9000.

  6. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  7. Time history of diesel particle deposition in cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, P.; Rahimzadeh, H.; Ahmadi, G.; Brown, R.; Inthavong, K.

    2016-12-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) treatment reactors have recently been developed for elimination of diesel particulate matter for reducing both the mass and number concentration of particles. The role of the plasma itself is obscured by the phenomenon of particle deposition on the reactor surface. Therefore, in this study, the Lagrangian particle transport model is used to simulate the dispersion and deposition of nano-particles in the range of 5 to 500 nm in a NTP reactor in the absence of an electric field. A conventional cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge reactor is selected for the analysis. Brownian diffusion, gravity and Saffman lift forces were included in the simulations, and the deposition efficiencies of different sized diesel particles were studied. The results show that for the studied particle diameters, the effect of Saffman lift is negligible and gravity only affects the motion of particles with a diameter of 500 nm or larger. Time histories of particle transport and deposition were evaluated for one-time injection and a continuous (multiple-time) injection. The results show that the number of deposited particles for one-time injection is identical to the number of deposited particles for multiple-time injections when adjusted with the shift in time. Furthermore, the maximum number of escaped particles occurs at 0.045 s after the injection for all particle diameters. The presented results show that some particle reduction previously ascribed to plasma treatment has ignored contributions from the surface deposition.

  8. Novel 755-nm diode laser vs. conventional 755-nm scanned alexandrite laser: Side-by-side comparison pilot study for thorax and axillary hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Uwe; Wagner, Justinus A; Paasch, Hartmut W

    2015-01-01

    Alexandrite (755 nm) and diode lasers (800-810 nm) are commonly used for hair removal. The alexandrite laser technology is somewhat cumbersome whereas new diode lasers are more robust. Recently, alexandrite-like 755 nm wavelength diodes became available. To compare the efficacy, tolerability, and subject satisfaction of a 755 nm diode laser operated in conventional (HR) and non-conventional in-motion (SHR) modes with a conventional scanned alexandrite 755 nm laser for chest and axillary hair removal. A prospective, single-center, proof of principle study was designed to evaluate the safety, efficacy and handling of a 755 nm diode laser system in comparison to a standard alexandrite 755 nm scanning hair removal laser. The new 755 nm diode is suitable to be used in SHR and HR mode and has been tested for its safety, efficacy and handling in a volunteer with success. Overall, both systems showed a high efficacy in hair reduction (88.8% 755 nm diode laser vs. 77.7% 755 nm alexandrite laser). Also, during the study period, no severe adverse effects were reported. The new 755 nm diode laser is as effective and safe as the traditional 755 nm alexandrite laser. Additionally, treatment with the 755 nm diode laser with HR and SHR modes was found to be less painful.

  9. Analytical particle measurements in an optical microflume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Joseph D.; Terray, Alex [Naval Research Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Bio/Analytical Chemistry Section, Code 6112 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hart, Sean J., E-mail: sean.hart@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Bio/Analytical Chemistry Section, Code 6112 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    In this work, microscopic particles in a fluid flow are manipulated using forces generated by a high power laser beam. The resulting manipulations on the particles are imaged using a microscope lens connected to a CCD camera. Differential forces on particles of varying physical and chemical composition have been measured. The goal is to measure the optical forces on a diverse range of particles and catalog the associated chemical and physical differences to understand which properties and mechanisms result in the largest force differentials. Using these measurements our aim is to better understand differences between similar microspheres in terms of size, morphology, or chemical composition. Particles of the same size, but different composition show large variations in optical pressure forces and are easily discernable in the present analytical system. In addition, we have demonstrated the ability to differentiate a 70 nm size difference between two NIST precision size standard polystyrene microspheres, corresponding to a 2.0 pN difference in optical force. Lastly, the instrument was used to measure differences between biological samples of similar size, demonstrating the ability to make precise analytical measurements on microorganism samples.

  10. A particle image velocimetry system for microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, J.G.; Beebe, D.J.; Wereley, S.T.; Meinhart, C.D. [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Adrian, R.J. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) system has been developed to measure instantaneous and ensemble-averaged flow fields in micron-scale fluidic devices. The system utilizes an epifluorescent microscope, 100-300 nm diameter seed particles, and an intensified CCD camera to record high-resolution particle-image fields. Velocity vector fields can be measured with spatial resolutions down to 6.9 x 6.9 x 1.5{mu} m. The vector fields are analyzed using a double-frame cross-correlation algorithm. In this technique, the spatial resolution and the accuracy of the velocity measurements is limited by the diffraction limit of the recording optics, noise in the particle image field, and the interaction of the fluid with the finite-sized seed particles. The stochastic influence of Brownian motion plays a significant role in the accuracy of instantaneous velocity measurements. The micro-PIV technique is applied to measure velocities in a Hele-Shaw flow around a 30{mu} m (major diameter) elliptical cylinder, with a bulk velocity of approximately 50{mu} m s{sup -1}. (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  11. Gastroretentive particles formulated with thiomers: development and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyigit, Zeynep Ay; Vetter, Anja; Guneri, Tamer; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate gastroretentive particulate delivery systems using Riboflavin-5'-monophosphate sodium salt dihydrate (RF5'PNa) as model drug. Poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine and chitosan-4-thiobuthylamidine were evaluated and compared as anionic and cationic polymers for gastroretentive particles. Permeation studies were performed with freshly excised stomach mucosa from rats. Polymers and combination with glutathione were evaluated for permeation enhancing properties. Furthermore, particles were prepared by air jet milling and characterized. Permeation studies showed that the apparent permeability coefficients for RF5'PNa with thiomers and glutathione are 1.511-fold and 2.354-fold higher than control, respectively. It can be seen from the results glutathione in combination with thiomers has a significant influence for increasing permeation. Poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine and chitosan-4-thiobuthylamidine particles demonstrated a mean diameter of 336.5 +/- 16.5 and 396.3 +/- 17.0 nm and zeta potential of -19.98 +/- 1.015 and 27.15 +/- 0.500 mV, respectively. The drug loading of Poly(acrylic acid) particles was significantly higher than chitosan particles. The release rate of RF5'PNa from the thiolated particles was slower compared with unmodified particles. Moreover, thiolated particles showed higher mucoadhesive properties compared to unmodified particles. Overall, thiolated particles of both anionic and cationic polymers had improved mucoadhesive and controlled release properties. Therefore, they could be promising for gastroretentive delivery systems.

  12. Benefit of depolarization ratio at λ = 1064 nm for the retrieval of the aerosol microphysics from lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gasteiger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A better quantification of aerosol properties is required for improving the modelling of aerosol effects on weather and climate. This task is methodologically demanding due to the diversity of the microphysical properties of aerosols and the complex relation between their microphysical and optical properties. Advanced lidar systems provide spatially and temporally resolved information on the aerosol optical properties that is sufficient for the retrieval of important aerosol microphysical properties. Recently, the mass concentration of transported volcanic ash, which is relevant for the flight safety of aeroplanes, was retrieved from measurements of such lidar systems in southern Germany. The relative uncertainty of the retrieved mass concentration was on the order of ±50%. The present study investigates improvements of the retrieval accuracy when the capability of measuring the linear depolarization ratio at 1064 nm is added to the lidar setup. The lidar setups under investigation are based on those of MULIS and POLIS of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich (Germany which measure the linear depolarization ratio at 355 and 532 nm with high accuracy. The improvements are determined by comparing uncertainties from retrievals applied to simulated measurements of this lidar setup with uncertainties obtained when the depolarization at 1064 nm is added to this setup. The simulated measurements are based on real lidar measurements of transported Eyjafjallajökull volcano ash. It is found that additional 1064 nm depolarization measurements significantly reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved mass concentration and effective particle size. This significant improvement in accuracy is the result of the increased sensitivity of the lidar setup to larger particles. The size dependence of the depolarization does not vary strongly with refractive index, thus we expect similar benefits for the retrieval in case of measurements of other volcanic ash

  13. Design of the 65 nm CLICpix demonstrator chip

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P.; Campbell, M.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid pixel detector ASIC designed to be used in the vertex detector for the CLIC experiment is presented in this note. It has been designed using a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology. The main features include simultaneous 4-bit TOT and TOA measurements with 10 ns accuracy, a spatial resolution of 3 um (the pixel size is 25x25 um), an on-chip data compression scheme and power pulsing capability. A prototype with a fully featured array of 64 by 64 pixels has been designed and produced. Testing on the prototype is ongoing.

  14. Conjugated 12 nm long oligomers as molecular wires in nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Strobel, Sebastian; Bundgaard, Eva

    2009-01-01

    containing 3–19 phenyl units were synthesised by step wise HWE-reactions of a bifunctional OPV-monomer which allowed for complete control of the sizes of the OPVs. Workup and analysis (1H- and 13C-NMR, mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography) of each step ensured a high purity of the final...... products. Final end group functionalities of the OPVs were introduced either as the first step (alcohol) or the last step (thioacetate). We further demonstrate a fabrication method for well defined nanogap electrode devices based on silicon-on-insulator technology, featuring a gap distance of down to 9 nm...

  15. EST Table: NM_001184844 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001184844 TOR1 10/09/29 53 %/2461 aa ref|XP_625130.1| PREDICTED: similar to FKBP12-rapamycin... complex-associated protein (FK506-binding protein 12-rapamycin complex-associated protein 1) (R...apamycin target protein) (RAPT1) (Mammalian target of rapamycin) (MTOR) isoform 1 [Apis mellifera] 10/09/13 ...9/10 50 %/2441 aa gi|91089099|ref|XP_971819.1| PREDICTED: similar to fkbp-rapamycin associated protein [Tribolium castaneum] CK537623 ...

  16. Towards Using DNAzyme in Sub-20 nm Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirar, Qassim

    DNAzyme is a unique molecule with applications ranging from gene regulation to molecular machines. Another attractive venue for the use of DNAzyme is next generation lithography, sub-20 nm lithography, harnessing the unique features of specific recognition and self-assembly. Tools to achieve that goal are discussed and experimental procedures were presented. Loading DNAzyme on gold nanoparticles, depositing self-assembled monolayers and DNA patterning using soft lithographic techniques are tools that are explored. To support the findings, different characterization techniques are employed.

  17. Ocular safety limits for 1030nm femtosecond laser cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2013-03-01

    Application of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has added unprecedented precision and reproducibility but ocular safety limits for the procedure are not well-quantified. We present an analysis of safety during laser cataract surgery considering scanned patterns, reduced blood perfusion, and light scattering on residual bubbles formed during laser cutting. Experimental results for continuous-wave 1030 nm irradiation of the retina in rabbits are used to calibrate damage threshold temperatures and perfusion rate for our computational model of ocular heating. Using conservative estimates for each safety factor, we compute the limits of the laser settings for cataract surgery that optimize procedure speed within the limits of retinal safety.

  18. High-throughput optical coherence tomography at 800 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Keisuke; Fard, Ali; Malik, Omer; Fu, Gilbert; Quach, Alan; Jalali, Bahram

    2012-08-27

    We report high-throughput optical coherence tomography (OCT) that offers 1,000 times higher axial scan rate than conventional OCT in the 800 nm spectral range. This is made possible by employing photonic time-stretch for chirping a pulse train and transforming it into a passive swept source. We demonstrate a record high axial scan rate of 90.9 MHz. To show the utility of our method, we also demonstrate real-time observation of laser ablation dynamics. Our high-throughput OCT is expected to be useful for industrial applications where the speed of conventional OCT falls short.

  19. EST Table: NM_001046789 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046789 LOC692949 10/09/29 95 %/267 aa ref|NP_001040254.1| beadex/dLMO protein... [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36315.1| beadex/dLMO protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 74 %/175 aa FBpp0262745|DyakGE17735...0 aa gnl|Amel|GB11268-PA 10/09/10 71 %/212 aa gi|91080717|ref|XP_975367.1| PREDICTED: similar to beadex/dLMO protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS794536 ...

  20. EST Table: NM_001046920 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001046920 LOC732920 10/09/29 94 %/371 aa ref|NP_001040385.1| pelota-like protein... [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51295.1| pelota-like protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 71 %/371 aa FBpp0253329|DwilGK24186...ene:AGAP008269 10/09/10 67 %/371 aa gnl|Amel|GB10750-PA 10/09/10 69 %/371 aa gi|91095145|ref|XP_967126.1| PREDICTED: similar to pelota [Tribolium castaneum] FS917768 ...

  1. Background-Free 3D Nanometric Localization and Sub-nm Asymmetry Detection of Single Plasmonic Nanoparticles by Four-Wave Mixing Interferometry with Optical Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoriniants, George; Masia, Francesco; Giannakopoulou, Naya; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2017-10-01

    Single nanoparticle tracking using optical microscopy is a powerful technique with many applications in biology, chemistry, and material sciences. Despite significant advances, localizing objects with nanometric position precision in a scattering environment remains challenging. Applied methods to achieve contrast are dominantly fluorescence based, with fundamental limits in the emitted photon fluxes arising from the excited-state lifetime as well as photobleaching. Here, we show a new four-wave-mixing interferometry technique, whereby the position of a single nonfluorescing gold nanoparticle of 25-nm radius is determined with 16 nm precision in plane and 3 nm axially from rapid single-point measurements at 1-ms acquisition time by exploiting optical vortices. The precision in plane is consistent with the photon shot-noise, while axially it is limited by the nano-positioning sample stage, with an estimated photon shot-noise limit of 0.5 nm. The detection is background-free even inside biological cells. The technique is also uniquely sensitive to particle asymmetries of only 0.5% ellipticity, corresponding to a single atomic layer of gold, as well as particle orientation. This method opens new ways of unraveling single-particle trafficking within complex 3D architectures.

  2. Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  3. LHCb unveils new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announces the observation of four “exotic” particles from its analysis of the LHC data.   The LHCb experimental cavern. On 28 June, the LHCb collaboration reported the observation of three new "exotic" particles and confirmation of the existence of a fourth one in data from the LHC. These particles each appear to be formed by four quarks (the fundamental constituents of the matter inside all the atoms of the universe): two quarks and two antiquarks (that is, a tetraquark). Due to their non-standard quark content, the newly observed particles have been included in the broad category of so-called exotic particles, although their exact theoretical interpretation is still under study.            The quark model, proposed by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964, is considered to be the most valid scheme for the classification of hadrons (all the composite particles) that has been fou...

  4. Viscous properties of ferrofluids containing both micrometer-size magnetic particles and fine needle-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ido, Yasushi, E-mail: ido.yasushi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Electric and Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Nishida, Hitoshi [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, 13 Hongo-cho, Toyama (Japan); Iwamoto, Yuhiro [Department of Electric and Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Yokoyama, Hiroki [KYB Corporation, 2-4-1 Hamamatsu-cho, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    Ferrofluids containing both micrometer-size spherical magnetic particles and nanometer-size needle-like nonmagnetic hematite particles were newly produced. Average length of long axis of the needle-like nonmagnetic particles was 194 nm and the aspect ratio was 8.3. Shear stress and viscosity were measured using the rheometer with the additional equipment for viscosity measurements in the presence of magnetic field. When the total volume fraction of particles in the fluid is constant (0.30), there is the specific mixing ratio of the particles to increase viscosity of the fluid drastically in the absence of magnetic field due to the percolation phenomenon. The fluid of the specific mixing ratio shows solid-like behavior even in the absence of magnetic field. Mixing the needle-like nonmagnetic particles causes strong yield stress and strong viscous force in the presence of magnetic field. - Highlights: • Viscous properties of new magnetic functional fluids were studied experimentally. • The new fluids contain spherical magnetic particles and needle-like particles. • Percolation occurs in the fluid of specific mixing ratio of particles without field. • The fluid of the specific mixing ratio behaves like solid without field. • Mixing needle-like particles causes strong yield stress of the fluid in the field.

  5. Recycling concrete: An undiscovered source of ultrafine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-06-01

    While concrete recycling is practiced worldwide, there are many unanswered questions in relation to ultrafine particle (UFP; Dp recycling sites. In particular: (i) Does recycling produce UFPs and in what quantities? (ii) How do they disperse around the source? (iii) What impact does recycling have on ambient particle number concentrations (PNCs) and exposure? (iv) How effective are commonly used dust respirators to limit exposure? We measured size-resolved particles in the 5-560 nm range at five distances between 0.15 and 15.15 m that were generated by an experimentally simulated concrete recycling source and found that: (i) the size distributions were multimodal, with up to ˜93% of total PNC in the UFP size range; and (ii) dilution was a key particle transformation mechanism. UFPs showed a much slower decay rate, requiring ˜62% more distance to reach 10% of their initial concentration compared with their larger counterparts in the 100-560 nm size range. Compared with typical urban exposure during car journeys, exposure decay profiles showed up to ˜5 times higher respiratory deposition within 10 m of the source. Dust respirators were found to remove half of total PNC; however the removal factor for UFPs was only ˜57% of that observed in the 100-560 nm size range. These findings highlight a need for developing an understanding of the nature of the particles as well as for better control measures to limit UFP exposure.

  6. Influence of dsDNA fragment length on particle binding in an evanescent field biosensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koets, Marjo; van Ommering, Kim; Wang, Liqin; Testori, Emilie; Evers, Toon H; Prins, Menno W J

    2014-04-07

    Particle labels are widely used in affinity-based biosensing due to the high detection signal per label, the high stability, and the convenient biofunctionalization of particles. In this paper we address the question how the time-course of particle binding and the resulting signals depend on the length of captured target molecules. As a model system we used fragments of dsDNA with lengths of 105 bp (36 nm), 290 bp (99 nm) and 590 bp (201 nm), detected in an evanescent-field optomagnetic biosensing system. On both ends the fragments were provided with small-molecule tags to allow binding of the fragments to protein-coated particles and to the capture molecules at the sensor surface. For isolated single particles bound to the surface, we observe that the optical scattering signal per particle depends only weakly on the fragment length, which we attribute to the pivoting motion that allows the particles to get closer to the surface. Our data show a strong influence of the fragment length on the particle binding: the binding rate of particles to the sensor surface is an order of magnitude higher for the longest dsDNA fragments compared to the smallest fragment studied in this paper. We attribute the enhanced binding rate to the length and motional freedom of the fragments. These results generate a new dimension for the design of assays and systems in particle-based biosensing.

  7. Sedimentation of active particles

    OpenAIRE

    Vachier, Jérémy; Marco G. Mazza

    2017-01-01

    Active particles convert energy from chemical, biochemical, or other processes into motion. Their collective motion has attracted enormous interest on account of the technological applications of artificial and biological particles. By combining theoretical arguments, and molecular dynamics simulations we explore the collective behavior of active particles under a gravity field in three dimensions. Dilute systems exhibit sedimentation, which we study with two approaches. Firstly, we solve ana...

  8. Music of elementary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternheimer, J.

    1983-12-12

    This note offers a new point of view on particle masses. It is shown that they are distributed following a musical scale, the chromatic tempered scale -for stable particles- subdivided into microintervals including unstable particles. A theoretical explanation, based on causality, allows one also to calculate their global distribution along the mass scale, in agreement with experiment, and indicating the existence of ''musical'' laws in the vibratory organisation of matter.

  9. A method for detecting the presence of organic fraction in nucleation mode sized particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vaattovaara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation and growth has a very important role in many climate processes. However, the overall knowlegde of the chemical composition of atmospheric nucleation mode (particle diameter, d<20 nm and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d≤50 nm is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer method to shed light on the presence of an organic fraction in the nucleation mode size class in different atmospheric environments. The basic principle of the organic fraction detection is based on our laboratory UFO-TDMA measurements with organic and inorganic compounds. Our laboratory measurements indicate that the usefulness of the UFO-TDMA in the field experiments would arise especially from the fact that atmospherically the most relevant inorganic compounds do not grow in subsaturated ethanol vapor, when particle size is 10 nm in diameter and saturation ratio is about 86% or below it. Furthermore, internally mixed particles composed of ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid with sulfuric acid mass fraction ≤33% show no growth at 85% saturation ratio. In contrast, 10 nm particles composed of various oxidized organic compounds of atmospheric relevance are able to grow in those conditions. These discoveries indicate that it is possible to detect the presence of organics in atmospheric nucleation mode sized particles using the UFO-TDMA method. In the future, the UFO-TDMA is expected to be an important aid to describe the composition of atmospheric newly-formed particles.

  10. Nanoparticles in cigarette smoke; real-time undiluted measurements by a scanning mobility particle sizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, W.D. van; Gopal, S.R.; Scheepers, P.T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture of smoke constituents, often characterised by size-resolved particle distributions. Since descriptions of ultrafine particles <50 nm are absent, our aim was to explore the existence of these nanoparticles in fresh and undiluted cigarette smoke. We measured

  11. [Status and distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during Olympics Games in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jian-yong; Su, Chang; Guo, Yu-ming; Wang, Jia-jia; Zhang, K Max; Pan, Xiao-chuan

    2010-06-18

    To understand the characteristics of size and concentration of the ultrafine particles (UFPs) during the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, as well as the influencing factors for number concentration of UFPs. Ultrafine particle monitor model 3031, manufactured by USA TSI Co., was used to monitor the daily number concentration of 20-500 nm particles, and descriptive analysis was conducted based on the data collected. During the Olympics, the mean value of number concentration for 20-100 nm particulate matter is 5 920.43 particles/ cm3. Particles ranging 30-50 nm account for the largest portion(23.49%) among particles of all sizes. There are two peak values on the curve of 24 hours' number concentration for 20-100 nm particles, respectively, at noon and evening. This paper indicates that the number concentration of ultrafine particles registered considerable reduction in the 2008's Olympics compared to the pre-Olympics years. And observation of the curves indicated that the number concentrations of the UFPs with bigger size are related to traffic volume, whereas for smaller size UFPs, illumination may be a more important influencing factor. Also there are significant correlations between number concentration and temperature as well as relative humidity.

  12. Role of particle size in visible light photocatalysis of Congo Red ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Their visible light photocatalytic activity was tested for the degradation of Congo Red dye. Maximum photodegradation was observed for the NC with = 0.1 synthesized by CPH (particle size, 71 nm). Similar composition prepared by SSR method (particle size, 6.19 m) showed lower photoactivity in comparison even with ...

  13. Effect of indirect non-thermal plasma on particle size distribution and composition of diesel engine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linbo, GU; Yixi, CAI; Yunxi, SHI; Jing, WANG; Xiaoyu, PU; Jing, TIAN; Runlin, FAN

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effect of the gas source flow rate on the actual diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM), a test bench for diesel engine exhaust purification was constructed, using indirect non-thermal plasma technology. The effects of different gas source flow rates on the quantity concentration, composition, and apparent activation energy of PM were investigated, using an engine exhaust particle sizer and a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. The results show that when the gas source flow rate was large, not only the maximum peak quantity concentrations of particles had a large drop, but also the peak quantity concentrations shifted to smaller particle sizes from 100 nm to 80 nm. When the gas source flow rate was 10 L min-1, the total quantity concentration greatly decreased where the removal rate of particles was 79.2%, and the variation of the different mode particle proportion was obvious. Non-thermal plasma (NTP) improved the oxidation ability of volatile matter as well as that of solid carbon. However, the NTP gas source rate had little effects on oxidation activity of volatile matter, while it strongly influenced the oxidation activity of solid carbon. Considering the quantity concentration and oxidation activity of particles, a gas source flow rate of 10 L min-1 was more appropriate for the purification of particles.

  14. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  15. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  16. Particle Correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kress, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Particle correlations are extensively studied to obtain information about the dynamics of hadron production. From 1989 to 2000 the four LEP collaborations recorded more than 16 million hadronic Z0 decays and several thousand W+W- events. In Z0 decays, two-particle correlations were analysed in detail to study Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations for various particle species. In fully-hadronic W+W- decays, particle correlations were used to study whether the two W bosons decay independently. A review of selected results is presented.

  17. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  18. Magnetic-luminescent spherical particles synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Norma L.; Flores, Dora L.; Hirata, Gustavo A.

    2015-07-01

    The combination of magnetic and luminescent properties in a single particle system, opens-up a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this work, we performed the synthesis of magnetic-luminescent Gd2O3:Eu3+@Fe2O3 particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis performed in a tubular furnace. In order to achieve the composite formation, commercial superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a luminescent Eu3+-doped Gd2O3 shell in a low-cost one-step process. The spray pyrolysis method yields deagglomerated spherical shape magneto/luminescent particles. The photoluminescence spectra under UV excitation (λExc = 265 nm) of the magnetic Gd2O3:Eu3+@Fe2O3 compound showed the characteristic red emission of Eu3+ (λEm = 612 nm). This magneto/luminescent system will find applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  19. Electrical Analysis of 65 nm PMOS Based on SOI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrus, Syed Muhamad Firdauz Bin Syed; Abdullah, Mohd. Hanapiah Bin; Rusop, Mohamad

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and the performance analysis of 65 nm PMOS using Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. As the technology evolved towards minimizing the scaling size, the scaling activity has it own limitations. The Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) is the primary method used to overcome the scaling limitation. In this paper, the 65 nm PMOS device with 0.4 μm thickness of Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) Technology was fabricated and the performance of the devices was analyzed by focusing on the electrical characteristics of Id-Vd and Id-Vg curves for bulk PMOS and the one with SOI technology. The fabrication process simulation and electrical characteristic was simulated using SILVACO TCAD ATHENA and ATLAS simulator. A very promising results were obtained, the device with SOI technology shows improvement in drain saturation current of Idsat = -269 uA/um from -257 uA/um of bulk PMOS (with increment of 4.7%) and the SOI device exhibits lower threshold voltage of pVth(SOI) = -0.2165 V compared to pVth(bulk) = -0.2367 V (with decrement of 8.5%). It could also be seen that a higher Id-Vg curve obtained for SOI device which means higher drain current produced at lower control voltage thus contribute to a faster switching mechanism with low leakage over the bulk, all these would lead to a device with low power consumption and at the same time exhibit faster performance.

  20. Negative-tone cycloolefin photoresist for 193-nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, ShihChi; Hsieh, Kuo-Huang; Wang, Lon A.

    2001-08-01

    The chemistry of acid-catalyzed dehydration reaction and followed by crosslinking of the tert-alcohol group in the cycloolefin photoresists was used to tailor the performance of the photoresists for 193nm lithography. A radiation- sensitive photoacid generator (PAG) in this chemically amplified photoresist (CAMP) can change the polarity of the exposed area of the resist and exhibit a negative-tone behavior. The cycloolefin resists are synthesized by the free radical copolymerization of alicyclic monomer and maleic anhydride, and/or by the cationic polymerization of alicyclic monomer via Pd catalyst followed by the attaching of tert-alcohol group in to the resist. The side reaction of cycloolefin copolymer was observed at the temperature below the post exposure baking (PEB) temperature, but this problem can be eliminated by the introduction of isobornyl methacrylate into the polymer. The lithographic performance of the resists was investigated by using isopropyl alcohol as a developer under various processing conditions. The results demonstrate that these resists are the promising candidates for being used in 193nm lithography.

  1. Efficient frequency doubling at 776 nm in a ring cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhen-Hai; Liu, Shi-Long; Liu, Shi-Kai; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    We report efficient frequency doubling (FD) at 776 nm using periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) in a ring cavity pumped by a commercial erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) operating at 1552 nm. Two sets of input couplers are used that have been optimized to operate in the low pump and high pump regimes. The maximum conversion efficiencies measured for these couplers are 65.8% (transmittance T=4.5%) and 65.9% (T=9.1%). The internal conversion efficiencies are 85.0% and 88.2%, respectively, after the mode-matching efficiency and filtering transmittance have been taken into account. The maximum output powers obtained for the two couplers are 333 mW and 602 mW at pump powers of 535 mW and 999 mW, respectively. Coupling efficiency of more than 80% to single mode fibers indicates the high beam quality of the FD laser. This FD laser will be useful for quantum optics experiments in the telecommunications band and atomic physics experiments.

  2. Discrimination of liver malignancies with 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Isaac J; Patil, Chetan A; Lieber, Chad A; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely demonstrated for tissue characterization and disease discrimination, however current implementations with either 785 or 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation have been ineffectual in tissues with intense autofluorescence such as the liver. Here we report the use of a dispersive 1064 nm Raman system using a low-noise Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) array to discriminate highly autofluorescent bulk tissue ex vivo specimens from healthy liver, adenocarcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma (N = 5 per group). The resulting spectra have been combined with a multivariate discrimination algorithm, sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR), to predict class membership of healthy and diseased tissues, and spectral bands selected for robust classification have been extracted. A quantitative metric called feature importance is defined based on classification outputs and is used to guide the association of spectral features with biological indicators of healthy and diseased liver tissue. Spectral bands with high feature importance for healthy and liver tumor specimens include retinol, heme, biliverdin, or quinones (1595 cm(-1)); lactic acid (838 cm(-1)); collagen (873 cm(-1)); and nucleic acids (1485 cm(-1)). Classification performance in both binary (normal versus tumor, 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity) and three-group cases (classification accuracy: normal 89%, adenocarcinoma 74%, hepatocellular carcinoma 64%) indicates the potential for accurately separating healthy and cancerous tissues and suggests implications for utilizing Raman techniques during surgical guidance in liver resection.

  3. 1125-nm quantum dot laser for tonsil thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has the potential to provide a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy. Clinical implementation requires that the lymphoid tissue of tonsils is heated homogeneously to produce an amount of primary thermal injury that corresponds to gradual postoperative tonsil shrinkage, with minimal risk of damage to underlying critical blood vessels. Optical constants are derived for tonsils from tissue components and used to calculate the depth of 1/e of irradiance. The 1125 nm wavelength is shown to correspond to both deep penetration and minimal absorption by blood. A probe for tonsil thermal therapy that comprises two opposing light emitting, temperature controlled surfaces is described. For ex vivo characterization of tonsil heating, a prototype 1125 nm diode laser is used in an experimental apparatus that splits the laser output into two components, and delivers the radiation to sapphire contact window surfaces of two temperature controlled cells arranged to irradiate human tonsil specimens from opposing directions. Temperatures are measured with thermocouple microprobes at located points within the tissue during and after irradiation. Primary thermal damage corresponding to the recorded thermal histories are calculated from Arrhenius parameters for human tonsils. Results indicate homogeneous heating to temperatures corresponding to the threshold of thermal injury and above can be achieved in advantageously short irradiation times.

  4. Vitreoretinal surgery with the 193-nm excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Hemo, Itzhak; Turovets, Igor; Zauberman, Hanan; Lewis, Aaron

    1994-06-01

    The 193-nm excimer laser is known for its ability to precisely ablate soft biological tissues in the air environment with sub- micron depth control and sub-micron damage zones in the surrounding. The lack of a convenient delivery system and strong absorption of this radiation by biological liquids prevented, until recently, microsurgical applications of this laser. We have constructed special tips that are capable of delivering enough energy for effective removal of soft tissues in a strongly absorbing liquid environment. These tips attach to an articulated arm-based delivery system. This instrument was applied to vitreoretinal membranes removal. The accepted technique for these membranes removal is mechanical peeling and cutting which is associated with strong traction of the retina and this occasionally results in retinal damage. It was demonstrated in this study that the 193-nm excimer laser is capable of safely and precisely cutting and ablating these membranes which enable their removal without exerting any tractional forces on the retina. The effective cutting regime of retina and vitreoretinal membranes occurred at energy fluence of about 250- to 350-mJ/cm2/pulse with a corresponding cutting depth of 50 to 150 micrometers /pulse. The results obtained in this study suggest that this technology could be applicable to a wide variety of intraocular procedures.

  5. Granular corneal dystrophy in 830-nm spectral optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J; Szkulmowska, Anna; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Bajraszewski, Tomasz; Wawrocka, Anna; Krawczynski, Maciej R; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2008-08-01

    Spectral optical coherence tomography (SOCT) is a new imaging technique that can provide high-resolution tomograms much faster and with higher sensitivity than conventional Time domain (TdOCT) systems. Its usefulness in producing cross-sectional imaging of different corneal pathologies in vivo has already been presented. The aim of this case report is to show 830-nm SOCT findings in granular corneal dystrophy. A 48-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy was examined with a slit-lamp, confocal microscope (Confoscan 4) and a prototype SOCT instrument constructed at the Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland. A genetic examination showed a mutation of arginine 555-to-tryptophan (Arg555Trp) in the TGFBI gene that confirmed the clinical diagnosis. SOCT tomograms showed multiple hyperreflective changes throughout the corneal stroma that corresponded to hyaline deposits. Precise and objective assessment of the localization, size, shape, and light scattering properties of the pathologic changes was possible. Three-dimensional rendering of the acquired data allowed a comprehensive evaluation of the deposits in the central cornea. SOCT (830 nm) provides clinically valuable 2- and 3-dimensional assessments of pathomorphologic changes in granular corneal dystrophy in vivo.

  6. Role of bimodal distribution in tailoring the inter-particle interactions in Cu{sub 79}Co{sub 21} nanogranular films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh, E-mail: dinesh1.goyal@gmail.com; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: dinesh1.goyal@gmail.com; Pandya, Dinesh K., E-mail: dinesh1.goyal@gmail.com [Thin Film Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Nanogranular Cu{sub 79}Co{sub 21} films were deposited by magnetron co-sputtering and their magnetotransport properties were investigated as a function of thickness (t). The fitting of magnetoresistance (MR) data reveals the presence of bimodal distribution of Co-particles. With the increase of film thickness from 25 to 200 nm, whereas smaller particle (2.5 nm) distribution remains unaffected, the bigger one grows monotonically from 3.3 nm to 4.9 nm for 25 ≤ t < 100 nm and stays same (4.9 nm) for 100 ≤ t ≤ 200 nm. From MR data recorded in the range of 20–300 K, it is observed that dependence of MR on thickness keeps on reducing on lowering the temperature. This observance has been presented in terms of presence of bimodal distribution and its role in tailoring the inter-particle magnetic interactions.

  7. Effects of silver nanoparticles (NM-300K) on Lumbricus rubellus earthworms and particle characterization in relevant test matrices including soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Merel J C; Handy, Richard D; Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; van den Berg, Johannes H J; Herrera Rivera, Zahira E; Bovenschen, Jan; Molleman, Bastiaan; Baveco, Johannes M; Tromp, Peter; Peters, Ruud J B; Koopmans, Gerwin F; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; van den Brink, Nico W

    2014-04-01

    The impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNP; at 0 mg Ag/kg, 1.5 mg Ag/kg, 15.4 mg Ag/kg, and 154 mg Ag/kg soil) and silver nitrate (AgNO3 ; 15.4 mg Ag/kg soil) on earthworms, Lumbricus rubellus, was assessed. A 4-wk exposure to the highest AgNP treatment reduced growth and reproduction compared with the control. Silver nitrate (AgNO3 ) exposure also impaired reproduction, but not as much as the highest AgNP treatment. Long-term exposure to the highest AgNP treatment caused complete juvenile mortality. All AgNP treatments induced tissue pathology. Population modeling demonstrated reduced population growth rates for the AgNP and AgNO3 treatments, and no population growth at the highest AgNP treatment because of juvenile mortality. Analysis of AgNP treated soil samples revealed that single AgNP and AgNP clusters were present in the soil, and that the total Ag in soil porewater remained high throughout the long-term experiment. In addition, immune cells (coelomocytes) of earthworms showed sensitivity to both AgNP and AgNO3 in vitro. Overall, the present study indicates that AgNP exposure may affect earthworm populations and that the exposure may be prolonged because of the release of a dissolved Ag fraction to soil porewater. © 2013 SETAC.

  8. Improved identification of primary biological aerosol particles using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Froyd, Karl D.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP), especially at altitudes relevant to cloud formation, are scarce. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has been used to probe aerosol chemical composition from ground and aircraft for over 20 years. Here we develop a method for identifying bioaerosols (PBAP and particles containing fragments of PBAP as part of an internal mixture) using SPMS. We show that identification of bioaerosol using SPMS is complicated because phosphorus-bearing mineral dust and phosphorus-rich combustion by-products such as fly ash produce mass spectra with peaks similar to those typically used as markers for bioaerosol. We have developed a methodology to differentiate and identify bioaerosol using machine learning statistical techniques applied to mass spectra of known particle types. This improved method provides far fewer false positives compared to approaches reported in the literature. The new method was then applied to two sets of ambient data collected at Storm Peak Laboratory and a forested site in Central Valley, California to show that 0.04-2 % of particles in the 200-3000 nm aerodynamic diameter range were identified as bioaerosol. In addition, 36-56 % of particles identified as biological also contained spectral features consistent with mineral dust, suggesting internal dust-biological mixtures.

  9. Particle size effect on velocity of gold particle embedded laser driven plastic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhareshwar L.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A scheme to enhance the target foil velocity has been investigated for a direct drive inertial fusion target. Polymer PVA (polyvinyl alcohol or (C2H4On target foils of thickness 15–20 μm were used in plain form and also embedded with gold in the nano-particle (Au-np or micro-particle (Au-mp form. Nano-particles were of 20–50 nm and micro-particles of 2–3 μm in size. 17% higher target velocity was measured for foils embedded with nano-particle gold (Au-np as compared to targets embedded with micro-particles gold (Au-mp. The weight of gold in both cases was in the range 40–55% of the full target weight (atomic percentage of about 22%. Experiments were performed with the single beam of the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS at 0.43 μm wavelength (3ω of the fundamental wavelength, 120 Joule energy and 300 psec pulse duration. Laser intensity on the target was about 1015 W/cm2. A simple model has been proposed to explain the experimental results.

  10. Preparation of plate-like potassium sodium niobate particles by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, Shenyang 110142 (China); Bai, Shan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, Shenyang 110142 (China); Department of Intelligent Systems Design Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Toyama Prefectural University, Imizu, Toyama 939-0398 (Japan); Karaki, Tomoaki [Department of Intelligent Systems Design Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Toyama Prefectural University, Imizu, Toyama 939-0398 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Potassium sodium niobate (K,Na)NbO{sub 3} (KNN) particles with a plate-like morphology were prepared. First, an unknown potassium sodium niobate hydrate particles with 150-nm thickness and 1500-nm width were synthesised by a hydrothermal method. After calcining these particles at 450 C, plate-like KNN particles were obtained, which were expected to be used as templates for KNN textured ceramics. It was found that sodium dodecyl-benzene-sulfonate (SDBS) acting as surfactant played an important role in controlling the morphology of the particles in the hydrothermal process. The SDBS surfactant-assisted hydrothermal synthesis is feasible for the mass production of plate-like alkaline niobate template particles. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Observations of particles at their formation sizes in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Rohan; Pushpawela, Buddhi; He, Congrong; Li, Hui; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-07-01

    New particle formation (NPF) has been observed in many highly polluted environments of South East Asia, including Beijing, where the extent of its contribution to intense haze events is still an open question. Estimated characteristics of NPF events, such as their starting times and formation and growth rates of particles, are more accurate when the detection range of particles extends to smaller sizes. In order to understand the very first steps of particle formation, we used a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) to investigate particle characteristics at sizes exactly at which atmospheric nucleation and cluster activity occurs. Observations over a continuous 3-month period in Beijing showed 26 NPF events. These events generally coincided with periods with relatively clean air when the wind direction was from the less industrialised north. No NPF events were observed when the daily mean PM2. 5 concentration exceeded 43 µg m-3, which was the upper threshold for particle formation in Beijing. The fraction of particles that are charged in the size range 2-42 nm was normally about 15 %. However, this fraction increased to 20-30 % during haze events and decreased to below 10 % during NPF events. With the NAIS, we very precisely determined the starting times of NPF to a greater accuracy than has been possible in Beijing before and provided a temporal distribution of NPF events with a maximum at about 08:30 LT. Particle formation rates varied between 12 and 38 cm-3 s-1. Particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range of 0.5-9.0 nm h-1. These results are more reliable than previous studies in Beijing as the measurements were conducted for the first time at the exact sizes at which clusters form into particles and provide useful insight into the formation of haze events.

  12. Effect of particle size on the photochromic response of PWA/SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feng-Hsi [Tamkang University, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (China); Chen, Ching-Chung [Tamkang University, Energy and Opto-Electronic Materials Research Center (China); Lin, Dar-Jong; Don, Trong-Ming; Cheng, Liao-Ping, E-mail: lpcheng@mail.tku.edu.t [Tamkang University, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (China)

    2010-10-15

    A series of photochromic phosphotungstic acid (PWA)/SiO{sub 2} composites were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Depending on the feeding schedule of PWA during synthesis, the size of the formed PWA/SiO{sub 2} particles varied considerably from as small as 1.2 nm to ca. 10 nm. With decreasing silica particle size, the total contact area/interaction between SiO{sub 2} and PWA increases, as revealed by FT-IR and solid-state {sup 29}Si-NMR analyses. Particularly, when the size of PWA/SiO{sub 2} is {approx}1 nm, crystallization of PWA is inhibited, and PWA presents as amorphous molecular entities distributing uniformly in the SiO{sub 2} host, which is in evidence in the XRD spectroscopy and HR-TEM imaging. In contrast, substantial crystallization of PWA takes place when PWA/SiO{sub 2} particles are as large as 10 nm, in which case less amount of surface free Si-OH is available for PWA to make bonds with. Photochromism occurs activated by ultraviolet light irradiation. The rate of coloration/bleaching is found to depend strongly on the particle size of PWA/SiO{sub 2}; specifically, the rate increases twice when the particle size is reduced from 10 nm to 1.2 nm.

  13. Synthesis of Brushite Particles in Reverse Microemulsions of the Biosurfactant Surfactin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Fo Chang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the “green chemistry” use of the biosurfactant surfactin for the synthesis of calcium phosphate using the reverse microemulsion technique was demonstrated. Calcium phosphates are bioactive materials that are a major constituent of human teeth and bone tissue. A reverse microemulsion technique with surfactin was used to produce nanocrystalline brushite particles. Structural diversity (analyzed by SEM and TEM resulted from different water to surfactin ratios (W/S; 250, 500, 1000 and 40,000. The particle sizes were found to be in the 16–200 nm range. Morphological variety was observed in the as-synthesized microemulsions, which consisted of nanospheres (~16 nm in diameter and needle-like (8–14 nm in diameter and 80–100 nm in length noncalcinated particles. However, the calcinated products included nanospheres (50–200 nm in diameter, oval (~300 nm in diameter and nanorod (200–400 nm in length particles. FTIR and XRD analysis confirmed the formation of brushite nanoparticles in the as-synthesized products, while calcium pyrophosphate was produced after calcination. These results indicate that the reverse microemulsion technique using surfactin is a green process suitable for the synthesis of nanoparticles.

  14. Magnetic properties of nano-composite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xia

    Chemical synthesis routes for hollow spherical BaFe12O 19, hollow mesoporous spherical BaFe12O19, worm-shape BaFe12O19 and FeCo particles were developed. These structured particles have great potentials for the applications including magnetic recording medium, catalyst support, and energy storage. Magnetically exchange coupled hard/soft SrFe12O19/FeCo and MnBi/FeCo composites were synthesized through a newly proposed process of magnetic self-assembly. These exchange coupled composites can be potentially used as rare-earth free permanent magnets. Hollow spherical BaFe12O19 particles (shell thickness ˜5 nm) were synthesized from eth-ylene glycol assisted spray pyrolysis. Hollow mesoporous spherical BaFe12O19 particles (shell thickness ˜100 nm) were synthesized from ethanol assisted spray pyrolysis, followed by alkaline ethylene glycol etching at 185 °C. An alpha-Fe2O3 and BaCO3 nanoparticle mixture was synthesized with reverse microemulsion, followed by annealing at 900 °C for 2 hours to get worm-shape BaFe 12O19 particles, which consisted of 3-7 stacked hexagonal plates. FeCo nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing FeCl2 and CoCl2 in diphenyl ether with n-butyllithium at 200 °C in an inert gas environment. The surfactant of oleic acid was used in the synthesis to make particles well dispersed in nonpolar solvents (such as hexane). SrFe12O19/FeCo core/shell particles were prepared through a magnetic self-assembly process. The as-synthesized soft FeCo nanoparticles were magnetically attracted by hard SrFe12O19 parti-cles, forming a SrFe12O19/FeCo core/shell structure. The magnetic self-assembly mechanism was confirmed by applying alternating-current demagnetization to the core/shell particles, which re-sulted in a separation of SrFe 12O19 and FeCo particles. MnBi/FeCo composites were synthesized, and the exchange coupling between MnBi and FeCo phases was demonstrated by smooth magnetic hysteresis loop of MnBi/FeCo composites. The thermal stability of Mn

  15. Particle Swarm Optimisation with Spatial Particle Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Vesterstrøm, Jakob Svaneborg; Riget, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce spatial extension to particles in the PSO model in order to overcome premature convergence in iterative optimisation. The standard PSO and the new model (SEPSO) are compared w.r.t. performance on well-studied benchmark problems. We show that the SEPSO indeed managed...... to keep diversity in the search space and yielded superior results....

  16. Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Symmetry is a fundamental concept which can be found in the whole range of human activities e. g. from arts to science. The beauty of a statues is often related to its symmetric form. In physics, all the laws are related to some sort of symmetry. Equally important is a small breakdown ofsymmetry. Even for the case of a statue, its beauty might be enhanced by introducing small distortions. In this course, we investigate the role symmetry in the world of elementary particles. Some symmetries found there are very similar to those which can be seen in our daily life, while others are more exotic and related to the quantum nature of the elementary particles. Our particular focus ismade on symmetry and its violation between the matter and anti-matter, known as CP violation. It is experimentally well established that particleand anti-particle behave a tiny bit differently in the world of elementary particles. We discuss how this would be explained and how we can extendour knowledge. Evolution of our universe is stro...

  17. Functionalization of emissive conjugated polymer nanoparticles by coprecipitation: consequences for particle photophysics and colloidal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amita; Bezuidenhout, Michael; Walsh, Nichola; Beirne, Jason; Felletti, Riccardo; Wang, Suxiao; Fitzgerald, Kathleen T; Gallagher, William M; Kiely, Patrick; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-07-29

    The functionalization of polyfluorene (PFO) nanoparticles by coprecipitation of the conjugated polymer with an amphiphilic comb polymer, consisting of a hydrophobic polystyrene backbone with hydrophilic, carboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene oxide side-chains (PS-PEG-COOH), is investigated. The comb polymer affects the properties of the formed hybrid nanoparticles. Non-functionalized particles are typically larger (28 nm) than functionalized ones (20 nm); peak molar extinction coefficients are found to differ in a similar trend. Zeta potentials are negative, consistent with negative surface charge on PFO particles due to chemical defect formation, with additional charge on functionalized particles due to the pendant carboxylic acid groups. Emission quantum yields of functionalized particles are typically larger, consistent with lower efficiency of energy transfer to quenchers in smaller particles and weaker PFO interchain interactions due to chain dilution. The trend in per-particle fluorescence brightness values, as confirmed by single particle fluorescence imaging, reflects the nanoparticle extinction coefficients. Photostability studies on aqueous dispersions of hybrid particles indicate mild photobrightening under continuous illumination while PFO particles exhibit slow exponential emission decay. Functionalized particles are also resistant to aggregation during exposure to adenocarcinoma cells. Generally, the hybrid particles exhibit more favorable time-, pH- and medium-dependent stabilities, likely due to steric and electrostatic stabilization by PEG-carboxylic acid functionalities. Overall, the functionalized particles exhibit attractive properties: Reasonably small size, tight size distribution, high absorption cross section, radiative rate and emission quantum yield, excellent brightness and photostability, and good colloidal stability.

  18. Functionalization of emissive conjugated polymer nanoparticles by coprecipitation: consequences for particle photophysics and colloidal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amita; Bezuidenhout, Michael; Walsh, Nichola; Beirne, Jason; Felletti, Riccardo; Wang, Suxiao; Fitzgerald, Kathleen T.; Gallagher, William M.; Kiely, Patrick; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-07-01

    The functionalization of polyfluorene (PFO) nanoparticles by coprecipitation of the conjugated polymer with an amphiphilic comb polymer, consisting of a hydrophobic polystyrene backbone with hydrophilic, carboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene oxide side-chains (PS-PEG-COOH), is investigated. The comb polymer affects the properties of the formed hybrid nanoparticles. Non-functionalized particles are typically larger (28 nm) than functionalized ones (20 nm); peak molar extinction coefficients are found to differ in a similar trend. Zeta potentials are negative, consistent with negative surface charge on PFO particles due to chemical defect formation, with additional charge on functionalized particles due to the pendant carboxylic acid groups. Emission quantum yields of functionalized particles are typically larger, consistent with lower efficiency of energy transfer to quenchers in smaller particles and weaker PFO interchain interactions due to chain dilution. The trend in per-particle fluorescence brightness values, as confirmed by single particle fluorescence imaging, reflects the nanoparticle extinction coefficients. Photostability studies on aqueous dispersions of hybrid particles indicate mild photobrightening under continuous illumination while PFO particles exhibit slow exponential emission decay. Functionalized particles are also resistant to aggregation during exposure to adenocarcinoma cells. Generally, the hybrid particles exhibit more favorable time-, pH- and medium-dependent stabilities, likely due to steric and electrostatic stabilization by PEG-carboxylic acid functionalities. Overall, the functionalized particles exhibit attractive properties: Reasonably small size, tight size distribution, high absorption cross section, radiative rate and emission quantum yield, excellent brightness and photostability, and good colloidal stability.

  19. Observing thermomagnetic stability of nonideal magnetite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Kasama, Takeshi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    The thermomagnetic behavior of remanence-induced magnetite (Fe3O4) particles in the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) size range (similar to 0.1-10 mu m), which dominate the magnetic signature of many rock lithologies, is investigated using off-axis electron holography. Construction of magnetic induction...... maps allowed for the visualization of the vortex domain state in an individual Fe3O4 grain (similar to 200nm in diameter) as a function of temperature. Acquisition of a series of electron holograms at 100 degrees C intervals during in situ heating up to 700 degrees C demonstrates the vortex state...

  20. Remanence enhancement in magnetically interacting particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Heliang; Li, Jiang Yu

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we report an effective-medium theory on the remanence of magnetically interacting particles to demonstrate the effect of intergranular magnetostatic interactions on the remanence enhancement of materials, which agrees excellently with micromagnetic simulations. A dimensionless parameter λ measuring the competition between anisotropy energy and magnetostatic energy is defined, which completely characterizes the remanence of magnets if the exchange coupling is negligible, appropriate when the grain size is 10 nm or larger. Three distinct regimes were observed: λ1 for soft magnets, where the dominance of magneto-static energy leads to much reduced remanence in the materials.

  1. A hybrid chip based on aerodynamics and electrostatics for the size-dependent classification of ultrafine and nano particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ho; Park, Dongho; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2009-09-21

    Conventional virtual impactors experience a large pressure drop when they classify particles according to size, in particular ultrafine particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. Therefore, most virtual impactors have been used to classify particles larger than 100 nm. Their cut-off diameters are also fixed by the geometry of their flow channels. In the proposed virtual impactor, particles smaller than 100 nm are accelerated by applying DC potentials to an integrated electrode pair. By the electrical acceleration, the large pressure drop could be significantly decreased and new cut-off diameters smaller than 100 nm could be successfully added. The geometric cut-off diameter (GCD) of the proposed virtual impactor was designed to be 1.0 microm. Performances including the GCD and wall loss were examined by classifying dioctyl sebacate of 100 to 600 nm in size and carbon particles of 0.6 to 10 microm in size. The GCD was measured to be 0.95 microm, and the wall loss was highest at 1.1 microm. To add new cut-off diameters, monodisperse NaCl particles ranging from 15 to 70 nm were classified using the proposed virtual impactor with applying a DC potential of 0.25 to 3.0 kV. In this range of the potential, the new cut-off diameters ranging from 15 to 35 nm was added.

  2. Deposition of Flame-generated Al2O3 Nano-particles on a Porous Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Klint; Johannessen, Jens Tue; Wedel, Stig

    1998-01-01

    When particles of catalytic materials become less than 50 nm they start toexhibit a stronger catalytic activity compared to their bulk counterparts. Nano-particles are thus good candidates for manufacture of highly activecatalysts. Nanometer sized particles of catalytic materials may be generated...... athigh temperatures in flames. The direct deposition from gas phase on a ceramicsubstrate tube of flame-generated particles leads to a uniform, porous layer ofsmall particles, masking the coarser structure of the substrate tube. The methodlooks promising for manufacture of catalytic filters and membranes....

  3. A comparative study of submicron particle sizing platforms: accuracy, precision and resolution analysis of polydisperse particle size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Will; Kozak, Darby; Coleman, Victoria A; Jämting, Åsa K; Trau, Matt

    2013-09-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of a polydisperse or multimodal system can often be difficult to obtain due to the inherent limitations in established measurement techniques. For this reason, the resolution, accuracy and precision of three new and one established, commercially available and fundamentally different particle size analysis platforms were compared by measuring both individual and a mixed sample of monodisperse, sub-micron (220, 330, and 410 nm - nominal modal size) polystyrene particles. The platforms compared were the qNano Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor, Nanosight LM10 Particle Tracking Analysis System, the CPS Instruments's UHR24000 Disc Centrifuge, and the routinely used Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZS Dynamic Light Scattering system. All measurements were subjected to a peak detection algorithm so that the detected particle populations could be compared to 'reference' Transmission Electron Microscope measurements of the individual particle samples. Only the Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor and Disc Centrifuge platforms provided the resolution required to resolve all three particle populations present in the mixed 'multimodal' particle sample. In contrast, the light scattering based Particle Tracking Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering platforms were only able to detect a single population of particles corresponding to either the largest (410 nm) or smallest (220 nm) particles in the multimodal sample, respectively. When the particle sets were measured separately (monomodal) each platform was able to resolve and accurately obtain a mean particle size within 10% of the Transmission Electron Microscope reference values. However, the broadness of the PSD measured in the monomodal samples deviated greatly, with coefficients of variation being ~2-6-fold larger than the TEM measurements across all four platforms. The large variation in the PSDs obtained from these four, fundamentally different platforms, indicates that great care must still be taken in

  4. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in an urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan, during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM1 (d ≤ 1 μm, and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D. The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal, accumulation mode (Nacu, Aitken mode (NAitken, and nucleation mode (Nnuc particles were 13.9 × 103 cm−3, 1.2 × 103 cm−3, 6.1 × 103 cm−3, and 6.6 × 103 cm−3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm accounted for 91% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm, indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc / NOx ratio of 192.4 cm−3 ppbv−1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times of the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Averages (± 1σ of the diameter growth rate (GR and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10, were 11.9 ± 10.6 nm h−1 and 6.9 ± 3.0 cm−3 s−1, respectively. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB · SO2/CS, for new particle formation (NPF events suggested that photooxidation of SO2 was likely one of the major mechanisms for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover

  5. Effect of particle size on the thermo-optic properties of gold nanofluids – A thermal lens study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kurian, Achamma [Photonics Lab, Department of Physics, Catholicate College, Pathanamthitta (India); George, Sajan D., E-mail: sajan.george@manipal.edu [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2014-01-28

    Spherical gold nanoparticles having particle size in the range 30 to 50 nm are prepared using citrate reduction of gold chloride trihydrate in water. The influence of particle size on the thermal diffusivity value of gold nanofluid is measured using dual beam thermal lens technique. The present study shows that the particle size influences the effective thermal diffusivity value of the nanofluid substantially and the value decreases with decrease in particle size for the investigated samples.

  6. Teaching particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hanley, P

    2000-01-01

    Particle physics attracts many students who hear of news from CERN or elsewhere in the media. This article examines which current A-level syllabuses include which bits of particle physics and surveys the many different types of resource available to teachers and students. (0 refs).

  7. Particle density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishcuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Loehner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhayay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.-R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soederstroem, K.; Sood, G.; Soerensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; Eijinhoven, N. van; Niewenhuizen, G.J. van; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voeroes, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R

    2003-03-10

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  8. Particle density fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Bedangadas; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Busching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lohne, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhyay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Nystrand, J.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Phatak, S.C.; Pavliouk, S.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soderstrom, K.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voros, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R.; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2003-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  9. Particles, contacts, bulk behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, Stefan; Tomas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Granular matter consists of discrete “particles”. These can be separate sand-grains, agglomerates (made of many primary particles), or solid materials like rock, composites, or metal-alloys—all with particulate inhomogeneous, possibly anisotropic micro-structure. Particles can be as small as

  10. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  11. [Submicron particles in smoke resulting from welding alloys and cast alloy in metalworking industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avino, P; Manigrasso, M; Fanizza, Carla; Carrai, P; Solfanelli, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of welding fumes depends on both chemical composition and ability to penetrate and deposit deeply in the lungs. Their penetration and deposition in the regions of the respiratory system is mainly determined by their size. The knowledge of the size distribution of welding fumes is a crucial information towards the estimate of the doses of toxic compounds delivered into the respiratory tract. Particle number size distribution was continuously measured during different welding operations by means of a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer, which counts and classifies particles, according to their electrical mobility, in 32 size-channels, in the range from 5.6 to 523 nm, with is time resolution. The temporal evolution of submicrometric particles (6-523 nm), nucleation mode particles (6-16 nm) and the fraction 19-523 nm before, during and after the welding operations performed with/without local exhaust ventilation are reported and extensively discussed. Before welding, nucleation mode particles represent about 7% of submicrometric particles; after about 40 s from the welding start, the percent contribution of nucleation mode particles increases to 60%. Total and nucleation mode particle concentrations increase from 2.1 x 10(4) to 2.0 x 10(6) and from 1.6 x 10(3) to 1.0 x 10(6), respectively. The temporal variation of the particle number size distribution across the peaks, evidences the strong and fast-evolving contribution of nucleation mode particles: peak values are maintained for less than 10 s. The implication of such contribution on human health is linked to high deposition efficiency of the submicrometric particles in the alveolar interstitial region of the human respiratory system, where gas exchange occurs.

  12. Characteristics of Fine Particles in an Urban Atmosphere—Relationships with Meteorological Parameters and Trace Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhao Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric fine particles (diameter < 1 μm attract a growing global health concern and have increased in urban areas that have a strong link to nucleation, traffic emissions, and industrial emissions. To reveal the characteristics of fine particles in an industrial city of a developing country, two-year measurements of particle number size distribution (15.1 nm–661 nm, meteorological parameters, and trace gases were made in the city of Wuhan located in central China from June 2012 to May 2014. The annual average particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode (15.1 nm–30 nm, Aitken mode (30 nm–100 nm, and accumulation mode (100 nm–661 nm reached 4923 cm−3, 12193 cm−3 and 4801 cm−3, respectively. Based on Pearson coefficients between particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters, precipitation and temperature both had significantly negative relationships with particle number concentrations, whereas atmospheric pressure was positively correlated with the particle number concentrations. The diurnal variation of number concentration in nucleation mode particles correlated closely with photochemical processes in all four seasons. At the same time, distinct growth of particles from nucleation mode to Aitken mode was only found in spring, summer, and autumn. The two peaks of Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles in morning and evening corresponded obviously to traffic exhaust emissions peaks. A phenomenon of “repeated, short-lived” nucleation events have been created to explain the durability of high particle concentrations, which was instigated by exogenous pollutants, during winter in a case analysis of Wuhan. Measurements of hourly trace gases and segmental meteorological factors were applied as proxies for complex chemical reactions and dense industrial activities. The results of this study offer reasonable estimations of particle impacts and provide references for emissions control strategies in

  13. Organic-rich nanoparticles (diameter: 10-30 nm) in diesel exhaust: Fuel and oil contribution based on chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Saitoh, Katsumi; Fujitani, Yuji; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Shinji

    2011-11-01

    The size distribution of particle number concentrations and comprehensive chemical composition (elemental and organic carbon, elements, ions, and organic compounds) by particle size (diameter: 0.010-10 μm) were measured under no-load and transient conditions in the exhaust from an 8-L diesel engine with no exhaust after-treatment system and from a 3-L diesel vehicle equipped with an oxidation catalyst. High concentrations of nuclei-mode particles were emitted from the 8-L engine under no-load condition (8L-NoLoad), even when low-sulfur (8 ppm) fuel was used, but no nuclei-mode particles were emitted from the 3-L vehicle. Organic carbon accounted for a major part (79-80%) of the measured components of the nanoparticles (diameter: 10-32 nm) under 8L-NoLoad, but elemental carbon accounted for only 8-15%; elements and ions including sulfate accounted for only small percentages. The mass chromatogram ( m/ z 85) patterns obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the nanoparticles were similar to those for lubricating oil, and the peak profiles for hopanes were equivalent to those in oil. The 17α(H),21β(H)-hopane concentrations per particle mass were higher in smaller particles. The elements concentrated in oil were also concentrated in the nanoparticles. These results suggest that not sulfate and fuel but organics derived from oil were the primary components of the nanoparticles under 8L-NoLoad. From the 17α(H),21β(H)-hopane concentrations, the oil contribution to the sum of measured components in the nanoparticles under 8L-NoLoad was estimated at 79-92%. Comparable oil contributions were estimated from Ca and Zn concentrations.

  14. A Novel Aerosol Method for the Production of Hydrogel Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Guzman-Villanueva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of generating hydrogel particles for various applications including drug delivery purposes was developed. This method is based on the production of hydrogel particles from sprayed polymeric nano/microdroplets obtained by a nebulization process that is immediately followed by gelation in a crosslinking fluid. In this study, particle synthesis parameters such as type of nebulizer, type of crosslinker, air pressure, and polymer concentration were investigated for their impact on the mean particle size, swelling behavior, and morphology of the developed particles. Spherical alginate-based hydrogel particles with a mean particle size in the range from 842 to 886 nm were obtained. Using statistical analysis of the factorial design of experiment it was found that the main factors influencing the size and swelling values of the particles are the alginate concentration and the air pressure. Thus, it was demonstrated that the method described in the current study is promising for the generation of hydrogel particles and it constitutes a relatively simple and low-cost system.

  15. Shape effects and size distributions of astrophysical dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rakesh K.; Botet, Robert

    2017-05-01

    In the infrared and visible wavelength ranges, the extinction cross-sections of small irregular particles are essentially proportional to the corresponding cross-sections for spheres of the same volume, which confirms a previous statement by Mathis. The situation differs for large disordered particles because of the contribution of large surface areas. The differences between irregular particles and homogeneous spheres of the same mass might depend on the material. For example, graphite particles are less sensitive to surface shapes than silicate particles. As a consequence, the successful fit of the average galactic extinction curve by an ensemble of graphite + silicate spherical particles, can also be replaced by a fit using an ensemble of irregular particles, including a smaller amount of silicate. Because the interstellar dust particles are expected to be generally of irregular shapes, the former fit with spherical particles could have overestimated the relative amount of silicate in the interstellar medium (ISM). In the same spirit, we discuss various interpretations of the remarkable stability of the 217.5-nm peak in the ISM extinction.

  16. Artificial neural network based particle size prediction of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youshia, John; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Particle size of nanoparticles and the respective polydispersity are key factors influencing their biopharmaceutical behavior in a large variety of therapeutic applications. Predicting these attributes would skip many preliminary studies usually required to optimize formulations. The aim was to build a mathematical model capable of predicting the particle size of polymeric nanoparticles produced by a pharmaceutical polymer of choice. Polymer properties controlling the particle size were identified as molecular weight, hydrophobicity and surface activity, and were quantified by measuring polymer viscosity, contact angle and interfacial tension, respectively. A model was built using artificial neural network including these properties as input with particle size and polydispersity index as output. The established model successfully predicted particle size of nanoparticles covering a range of 70-400nm prepared from other polymers. The percentage bias for particle prediction was 2%, 4% and 6%, for the training, validation and testing data, respectively. Polymer surface activity was found to have the highest impact on the particle size followed by viscosity and finally hydrophobicity. Results of this study successfully highlighted polymer properties affecting particle size and confirmed the usefulness of artificial neural networks in predicting the particle size and polydispersity of polymeric nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glassy behavior in magnetic fine particles

    CERN Document Server

    Muro, M G D; Labarta, A

    2000-01-01

    A detailed study of the static and dynamic magnetic properties of nanocrystalline barium hexaferrite powder was done. Particles of about 10 nm diameter exhibit the main features attributed to glassy behavior. Different results make evident the presence of strong interactions in the studied system. This glassy state is mostly attributed to the frustration induced by magnetic interactions between randomly distributed particles, although the surface spins contribution cannot be discarded. The effective energy barrier distribution obtained from the analysis of the time dependence of the thermoremanence in terms of the T ln (t/tau sub 0) scaling shows a maximum located at energies higher than the mean anisotropy energy barrier. When doing the relaxation experiments after field cooling at increasing fields, the obtained effective energy distribution progressively resembles the anisotropy energy distribution. Therefore, we demonstrate how the glassy state can be erased by applying a magnetic field.

  18. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  19. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  20. EST Table: NM_001111333 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lar)|GO:0008270(zinc ion binding) 10/09/29 81 %/425 aa ref|NP_001104803.1| broad-complex isoform Z2 [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD23979.1| bro...ad-complex Z2-isoform [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD23981.1| broad-complex Z2-isoform [Bomby...oad-Complex isoform Z2 [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD46733.1| broad-complex A-Z2 isoform [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD46740.1| broad...%/474 aa gnl|Amel|GB30150-PB 10/09/10 41 %/468 aa gi|159149120|gb|ABW91135.1| broad-complex isoform Z5 [Tribolium castaneum] NM_001111333 ...

  1. Extreme ultraviolet resist materials for sub-7 nm patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2017-06-26

    Continuous ongoing development of dense integrated circuits requires significant advancements in nanoscale patterning technology. As a key process in semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM), high resolution lithography is crucial in keeping with Moore\\'s law. Currently, lithography technology for the sub-7 nm node and beyond has been actively investigated approaching atomic level patterning. EUV technology is now considered to be a potential alternative to HVM for replacing in some cases ArF immersion technology combined with multi-patterning. Development of innovative resist materials will be required to improve advanced fabrication strategies. In this article, advancements in novel resist materials are reviewed to identify design criteria for establishment of a next generation resist platform. Development strategies and the challenges in next generation resist materials are summarized and discussed.

  2. Sub-10 nm patterning with DNA nanostructures: a short perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke; Park, Myeongkee; Ding, Junjun; Hu, Huan; Zhang, Zheng

    2017-11-01

    DNA is the hereditary material that contains our unique genetic code. Since the first demonstration of two-dimensional (2D) nanopatterns by using designed DNA origami ˜10 years ago, DNA has evolved into a novel technique for 2D and 3D nanopatterning. It is now being used as a template for the creation of sub-10 nm structures via either ‘top-down’ or ‘bottom-up’ approaches for various applications spanning from nanoelectronics, plasmonic sensing, and nanophotonics. This perspective starts with an histroric overview and discusses the current state-of-the-art in DNA nanolithography. Emphasis is put on the challenges and prospects of DNA nanolithography as the next generation nanomanufacturing technique.

  3. Corneal and skin laser exposures from 1540-nm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Mitchell, Michael A.; Rico, Pedro J.; Fletcher, David J.; Eurell, Thomas E.; Roach, William P.

    2000-06-01

    Mechanisms of tissue damage are investigated for skin and cornea exposures from 1540 nm ('eye safe') laser single pulses of 0.8 milli-seconds. New skin model data point out the advantages of using the Yucatan mini-pig versus the Yorkshire pig for in-vivo skin laser exposures. Major advantages found include similarities in thickness and melanin content when compared with human skin. Histology from Yucatan mini-pig skin exposures and the calculation of an initial ED50 threshold indicate that the main photon tissue interaction may not be solely due to water absorption. In-vitro corneal equivalents compared well with in-vivo rabbit cornea exposure under similar laser conditions. In-vivo and in-vitro histology show that initial energy deposition leading to damage occurs intrastromally, while epithelial cells show no direct injury due to laser light absorption.

  4. Cycloolefin/maleic anhydride copolymers for 193-nm resist compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. D.; Dammel, Ralph R.; Cook, Michelle M.; Ficner, Stanley A.; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Oberlander, Joseph E.; Durham, Dana L.; Klauck-Jacobs, Axel

    1999-06-01

    Several novel norbornene carboxylate monomers consisting of isobornyl and alkyl ether chains on the ester groups were synthesized and polymerized with maleic anhydride (MA), t- butylnorbornene carboxylate (BNC), hydroxyethylnorbornene carboxylate (HNC) and norbornene carboxylic acid (NC). These polymers were compared with BNC/HNC/NC/MA tetra-polymers with respect to glass transition temperature (Tg) as well as photoresist performance using a 193 nm exposure tool. It was observed that introduction of these groups decreases the Tg but not to the extent where the polymers can be used as an annealing type resist. The synthesis of these polymers, their characterization, and their lithographic evaluation as 193 resists will be discussed in this paper. Further optimization in terms of final polymer composition as well as resist formulation is on-going in order to fully exploit these monomers for photoresist application.

  5. 1940 nm all-fiber Q-switched fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, P.; Estrada, A.; Katta, N.; Lim, E.; McElroy, A.; Milner, T. E.; Mokan, V.; Underwood, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present development of a nanosecond Q-switched Tm3+-doped fiber laser with 16 W average power and 4.4 kW peak power operating at 1940 nm. The laser has a master oscillator power amplifier design, and uses large mode area Tm3+-doped fibers as the gain medium. Special techniques are used to splice Tm3+-doped fibers to minimize splice loss. The laser design is optimized to reduce non-linear effects, including modulation instability. Pulse width broadening due to high gain is observed and studied in detail. Medical surgery is a field of application where this laser may be able to improve clinical practice. The laser together with scanning galvanometer mirrors is used to cut precisely around small footprint vessels in tissue phantoms without leaving any visible residual thermal damage. These experiments provide proof-of-principle that this laser has promising potential in the laser surgery application space.

  6. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  7. EST Table: NM_001111334 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001111334 Br-c 10/09/29 81 %/420 aa ref|NP_001104804.1| broad-complex isoform Z1... [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD23978.1| broad-complex Z1-isoform [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD23983.1| broad-complex Z1-isofo...rm [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD24045.1| Broad-Complex isoform Z1 [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD24046.1| Broad-Complex isofor...m Z1 [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD46732.1| broad-complex A-Z1 isoform [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAD46739.1| broad...-complex B-Z1 isoform [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAF43564.1| Broad-Complex isoform Z1 [Bombyx mori] 1

  8. Observation of new particle formation in subtropical urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the new particle formation events in a subtropical urban environment in the Southern Hemisphere. The study measured the number concentration of particles and its size distribution in Brisbane, Australia during 2009. The variation of particle number concentration and nucleation burst events were characterised as well as the particle growth rate which was first reported in urban environment of Australia. The annual average NUFP, NAitken and NNuc were 9.3×103, 3.7×103 and 5.6×103 cm−3, respectively. Weak seasonal variation in number concentration was observed. Local traffic exhaust emissions were a major contributor of the pollution (NUFP observed in morning which was dominated by the Aitken mode particles, while particles formed by secondary formation processes contributed to the particle number concentration during afternoon. Overall, 65 nucleation burst events were identified during the study period. Nucleation burst events were classified into two groups, with and without particles growth after the burst of nucleation mode particles observed. The average particle growth rate of the nucleation events was 4.6 nm h−1 (ranged from 1.79–7.78 nm h−1. Case studies of the nucleation burst events were characterised including (i the nucleation burst with particle growth which is associated with the particle precursor emitted from local traffic exhaust emission, (ii the nucleation burst without particle growth which is due to the transport of industrial emissions from the coast to Brisbane city or other possible sources with unfavourable conditions which suppressed particle growth and (iii interplay between the above two cases which demonstrated the impact of the vehicle and industrial emissions on the variation of particle number concentration and its size

  9. Depth of penetration of a 785nm wavelength laser in food powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Peng, Yankun; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful, rapid, and non-destructive method for both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of chemical composition. However it is important to measure the depth of penetration of the laser light to ensure that chemical particles at the very bottom of a sample volume is detected by Raman system. The aim of this study was to investigate the penetration depth of a 785nm laser (maximum power output 400mw) into three different food powders, namely dry milk powder, corn starch, and wheat flour. The food powders were layered in 5 depths between 1 and 5 mm overtop a Petri dish packed with melamine. Melamine was used as the subsurface reference material for measurement because melamine exhibits known and identifiable Raman spectral peaks. Analysis of the sample spectra for characteristics of melamine and characteristics of milk, starch and flour allowed determination of the effective penetration depth of the laser light in the samples. Three laser intensities (100, 200 and 300mw) were used to study the effect of laser intensity to depth of penetration. It was observed that 785nm laser source was able to easily penetrate through every point in all three food samples types at 1mm depth. However, the number of points that the laser could penetrate decreased with increasing depth of the food powder. ANOVA test was carried out to study the significant effect of laser intensity to depth of penetration. It was observed that laser intensity significantly influences the depth of penetration. The outcome of this study will be used in our next phase of study to detect different chemical contaminants in food powders and develop quantitative analysis models for detection of chemical contaminants.

  10. Lasing at 300 nm and below: Optical challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzella, D. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Couprie, M.E. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)]|[CEA DSM DRECAM SPAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Billardon, M. [ESPCI, Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    The FEL experiment in the visible and near UV on the Super ACO storage ring has given, since 1989, important informations on the SRFEL dynamics and, furthermore, a very good beam stability has been achieved. In addition, the operation at 350 nm with this good stability and a long beam lifetime allowed us to perform the first user experiment in biology and to start with a campaign for using the laser as photons source for experiments in other domains, coupling FEL light and the Synchrotron Radiation. For this, FEL starts to be very competitive with respect to the other conventional laser sources, provided that it could oscillate further in the UV, say at 300 nm and below. So, the real challenge is now given by the lasing at shorter wavelengths and, for this, by the optical technology existing nowadays. Since 1992 the efforts have been concentrating to look for every kind of solution allowing us to overcome the problem of having a very low gain. From an optical point of view, in the range of wavelengths explored, there is a lack of transparents dielectric materials for substrates and coatings. Substrates are required at the same time to be relatively not absorbing (a few tens 10{sup -6}), to have a very good surface quality (RMS roughness below 10 {Angstrom}) because of scattering losses dramatically increasing in this spectral range and, due to the thermal load of the undulator emission, to have adequate thermal characteristics. In order to fulfill all these requirements, a good characterisation and modelisation of the substrates is needed, especially to correlate thermal loading and mechanical deformations from one hand, and roughness and scattering losses from the other hand. Coatings must be not absorbing too and, above all, the most amorphous as possible (this could be obtained with IBS deposition technique), in order to insure a good reproduction of the substrate roughness at the interfaces and on the top layer and an higher resistance to the XUV photons load.

  11. Multiple product pathways in photodissociation of nitromethane at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Masataka; Kohge, Yasunori; Yamasaki, Katsuyoshi; Kohguchi, Hiroshi, E-mail: kohguchi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2016-02-14

    In this paper, we present a photodissociation dynamics study of nitromethane at 213 nm in the π → π{sup *} transition. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and ion-imaging were applied to measure the internal state distributions and state-resolved scattering distributions of the CH{sub 3}, NO(X {sup 2}Π, A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}), and O({sup 3}P{sub J}) photofragments. The rotationally state-resolved scattering distribution of the CH{sub 3} fragment showed two velocity components, of which the slower one decreased the relative intensity as the rotational and vibrational excitations. The translational energy distribution of the faster CH{sub 3} fragment indicated the production of the NO{sub 2} counter-product in the electronic excited state, wherein 1 {sup 2}B{sub 2} was the most probable. The NO(v = 0) fragment exhibited a bimodal translational energy distribution, whereas the NO(v = 1 and 2) fragment exhibited a single translational energy component with a relatively larger internal energy. The translational energy of a portion of the O({sup 3}P{sub J}) photofragment was found to be higher than the one-photon dissociation threshold, indicating the two-photon process involved. The NO(A {sup 2}Σ{sup +}) fragment, which was detected by ionization spectroscopy via the Rydberg ←A {sup 2}Σ{sup +} transition, also required two-photon energy. These experimental data corroborate the existence of competing photodissociation product pathways, CH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2},CH{sub 3} + NO + O,CH{sub 3}O + NO, and CH{sub 3}NO + O, following the π → π{sup *} transition. The origins of the observed photofragments are discussed in this report along with recent theoretical studies and previous dynamics experiments performed at 193 nm.

  12. New single-layer positive photoresists for 193-nm photolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Shimokawa, Tsutomu; Byers, Jeff D.; Medeiros, David R.; Willson, C. Grant; Niu, Qingshang J.; Frechet, Jean M. J.; Allen, Robert D.

    1997-07-01

    New series of chemically amplified, single layer, positive tone photoresists for 193 nm lithography have been developed. These resists were formulated from a series of cycloaliphatic co- and terpolymers of 2-methyl propyl bicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2- ene-5-carboxylate (carbo-tert-butoxynorbornene), bicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2-ene carboxylic acid (norbornene carboxylic acid), 8-methyl-8-carboxy tetracyclo(4,4,0.12,5,17,10)dodec-3-ene (methyltetracyclododecene carboxylic acid), norbornenemethanol, and maleic anhydride, which were synthesized by free radical, vinyl addition and ring opening metathesis polymerization techniques. The polymers derived from ring opening metathesis polymerization have bee successfully hydrogenated to provide yet another member of this group of materials. The cycloaliphatic polymer backbones provide etch resistance, mechanical properties and stability to radiation. The lithographic function is provided by carefully tailored pendant groups, which include an acid functionality that is masked by protecting groups that undergo acid catalyzed thermolysis as well as polar groups that influence the adhesion, wetability and dissolution properties of the polymer. The polymers are soluble in common organic solvents and have glass transition temperatures ranging from less than 60 degrees Celsius to higher than 250 degrees Celsius depending on their specific structure and mode of polymerization. They are at least as transparent at 193 nm as the corresponding acrylics. Their dry etch resistance varies with the formulation, but the base polymers etch more slowly than novolac under conditions typically used to pattern polysilicon. Upon exposure and baking, the resists have demonstrated high sensitivities (9-25 mJ/cm2), and 0.16 micrometer features have bean resolved.

  13. Characterization of ultrafine and fine particles from CHP Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-08-15

    particles in the emitted PM{sub 0.1} fraction from plant BM3. The measurements at the gas fired CHP plants showed that the overall number of particles emitted from the gas fired engines consisted of ultrafine particles (PM{sub 0.1}). The relatively high emissions of particles from gas fired engines as used in GF1 (natural gas fired) and GF2 (landfill gas fired) are likely to be caused by the addition of lubrication oil to the engines. The EDX analysis showed that all particle size fractions from GF1 and GF2 were primarily dominated by carbon and oxygen, indicating that most of the particles were soot particles consisting of EC (Elemental Carbon) and OC (Organic Carbon). The SEM analysis showed that the particles from GF1 and GF2 were primarily spherical soot particles. The measurements of particle concentrations from the gas oil fired plant GO showed that by number, most of the particles consisted of ultrafine particles (PM{sub 0.1}). However, in contrast to the gas fired plants, a higher share of the particles were in the range between 0.1 mum and 1 mum. As found for the gas fired plants, the EDX analysis showed that all the particle size fractions were dominated by carbon and oxygen. Trace amounts of Si, Ca and Fe were found in some particle fractions. The SEM images of selected particles indicated that the majority of the particles in the PM{sub 0.1} fraction were agglomerations of primary particles with a diameter in the range 30-50 nm. (LN)

  14. The interactive effect of agitation condition and titania particle size in hydrothermal synthesis of titanate nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safaei, Maryam; Sarraf-Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.i [Tarbiat Modares University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidzadeh, Mehdi [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The nucleation and growth mechanisms of hydrothermal synthesized nanotitanates are proposed based on the interaction effect between agitation condition and pristine titania particle size. TEM examination and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements revealed distinct morphology and textural properties depending on TiO{sub 2} particle size in constant agitation condition. Regarding to the supersaturation degree, heterogeneous nucleation dominates for nanotubes formation from large particle size of raw material. On the other hand, homogeneous nucleation determines nanospheres formation from small particle size of raw material. The nanotubes have an outer diameter ranging from 8 to 10 nm and inner diameter of 2 to 3 nm. The nanospheres have diameters ranging from 50 to 100 nm.

  15. Size controllable synthesis of ultrafine spherical gold particles and their simulation of plasmonic and SERS behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Zao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Xibin [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Luo, Jiangshan; Li, Xibo [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yi, Yong [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, Mianyang (China); Jiang, Xiaodong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Yi, Yougen, E-mail: yougenyi@mail.csu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tang, Yongjian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-04-01

    A simple and reproducible way was explored to synthesize quasi-spherical gold particles with different size distributions in water by rapidly adding a mixture solution of HAuCl{sub 4}, sodium citrate, and a trace amount of silver nitrate. By careful tuning of the reaction parameters, mono-disperse gold particles with the diameter of 5–220 nm can be obtained controllably. The particle size of 130 nm for the particles film showed the highest SERS activity with the 632.8 nm excitation. The theoretical calculations of the UV–vis extinction spectra can be directly compared with experiments by using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA). Control of nanostructure shape allows optimization of plasmon resonance for molecular detection and spectroscopy.

  16. Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying Li; Achariya Suriyawong; Michael Daukoru; Ye Zhuang; Pratim Biswas [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States). Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory

    2009-05-15

    Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 m at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 {mu}m, and 10 {mu}m. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effect of Particle Size and Operating Conditions on Pt3Co PEMFC Cathode Catalyst Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Gummalla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The initial performance and decay trends of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC cathodes with Pt3Co catalysts of three mean particle sizes (4.9 nm, 8.1 nm, and 14.8 nm with identical Pt loadings are compared. Even though the cathode based on 4.9 nm catalyst exhibited the highest initial electrochemical surface area (ECA and mass activity, the cathode based on 8.1 nm catalyst showed better initial performance at high currents. Owing to the low mass activity of the large particles, the initial performance of the 14.8 nm Pt3Co-based electrode was the lowest. The performance decay rate of the electrodes with the smallest Pt3Co particle size was the highest and that of the largest Pt3Co particle size was lowest. Interestingly, with increasing number of decay cycles (0.6 to 1.0 V, 50 mV/s, the relative improvement in performance of the cathode based on 8.1 nm Pt3Co over the 4.9 nm Pt3Co increased, owing to better stability of the 8.1 nm catalyst. The electron microprobe analysis (EMPA of the decayed membrane-electrode assembly (MEA showed that the amount of Co in the membrane was lower for the larger particles, and the platinum loss into the membrane also decreased with increasing particle size. This suggests that the higher initial performance at high currents with 8.1 nm Pt3Co could be due to lower contamination of the ionomer in the electrode. Furthermore, lower loss of Co from the catalyst with increased particle size could be one of the factors contributing to the stability of ECA and mass activity of electrodes with larger cathode catalyst particles. To delineate the impact of particle size and alloy effects, these results are compared with prior work from our research group on size effects of pure platinum catalysts. The impact of PEMFC operating conditions, including upper potential, relative humidity, and temperature on the alloy catalyst decay trends, along with the EMPA analysis of the decayed MEAs, are reported.

  18. Germicidal Efficacy and Mammalian Skin Safety of 222-nm UV Light

    OpenAIRE

    Buonanno, Manuela; Ponnaiya, Brian; Welch, David; Stanislauskas, Milda; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Smilenov, Lubomir; Lowy, Franklin D.; Owens, David M.; Brenner, David J.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that 207-nm ultraviolet (UV) light has similar antimicrobial properties as typical germicidal UV light (254 nm), but without inducing mammalian skin damage. The biophysical rationale is based on the limited penetration distance of 207-nm light in biological samples (e.g. stratum corneum) compared with that of 254-nm light. Here we extended our previous studies to 222-nm light and tested the hypothesis that there exists a narrow wavelength window in the far-UVC region,...

  19. Correlating particle size and shape of supported Ru/gamma-Al2O3 catalysts with NH3 decomposition activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ayman M; Prasad, Vinay; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Lonergan, William W; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Chen, Jingguang G; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2009-09-02

    While ammonia synthesis and decomposition on Ru are known to be structure-sensitive reactions, the effect of particle shape on controlling the particle size giving maximum turnover frequency (TOF) is not understood. By controlling the catalyst pretreatment conditions, we have varied the particle size and shape of supported Ru/gamma-Al(2)O(3) catalysts. The Ru particle shape was reconstructed by combining microscopy, chemisorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. We show that the particle shape can change from a round one, for smaller particles, to an elongated, flat one, for larger particles, with suitable pretreatment. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the calcination most likely leads to planar structures. We show for the first time that the number of active (here B(5)) sites is highly dependent on particle shape and increases with particle size up to 7 nm for flat nanoparticles. The maximum TOF (based on total exposed Ru atoms) and number of active (B(5)) sites occur at approximately 7 nm for elongated nanoparticles compared to at approximately 1.8-3 nm for hemispherical nanoparticles. A complete, first-principles based microkinetic model is constructed that can quantitatively describe for the first time the effect of varying particle size and shape on Ru activity and provide further support of the characterization results. In very small nanoparticles, particle size polydispersity (due to the presence of larger particles) appears to be responsible for the observed activity.

  20. Gold particle formation via photoenhanced deposition on lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniewski, A. M.; Meeks, V.; Nemanich, R. J.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we report on a technique to reduce gold chloride into sub-micron particles and nanoparticles. We use photoelectron transfer from periodically polarized lithium niobate (PPLN) illuminated with above band gap light to drive the surface reactions required for the reduction and particle formation. The particle sizes and distributions on the PPLN surface are sensitive to the solution concentration, with inhibited nucleation and large particles (>150 nm) for both low (2E-8M to 9E-7M) and high (1E-5M to 1E-3M) concentrations of gold chloride. At midrange values of the concentration, nucleation is more frequent, resulting in smaller sized particles (<150 nm). We compare the deposition process to that for silver, which has been previously studied. We find that the reduction of gold chloride into nanoparticles is inhibited compared to silver ion reduction, due to the multi-step reaction required for gold particle formation. This also has consequences for the resulting deposition patterns: while silver deposits into nanowires along boundaries between areas with opposite signed polarizations, such patterning of the deposition is not observed for gold, for a wide range of concentrations studied (2E-8 to 1E-3M).

  1. Manipulation and confinement of single particles using fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-06-12

    High precision control of micro- and nanoscale objects in aqueous media is an essential technology for nanoscience and engineering. Existing methods for particle trapping primarily depend on optical, magnetic, electrokinetic, and acoustic fields. In this work, we report a new hydrodynamic flow based approach that allows for fine-scale manipulation and positioning of single micro- and nanoscale particles using automated fluid flow. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate trapping and two-dimensional (2D) manipulation of 500 nm and 2.2 μm diameter particles with a positioning precision as small as 180 nm during confinement. By adjusting a single flow parameter, we further show that the shape of the effective trap potential can be efficiently controlled. Finally, we demonstrate two distinct features of the flow-based trapping method, including isolation of a single particle from a crowded particle solution and active control over the surrounding medium of a trapped object. The 2D flow-based trapping method described here further expands the micro/nanomanipulation toolbox for small particles and holds strong promise for applications in biology, chemistry, and materials research.

  2. Gold particle formation via photoenhanced deposition on lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaniewski, A.M., E-mail: azaniews@asu.edu; Meeks, V.; Nemanich, R.J.

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Gold chloride is reduced into solid gold nanoparticles at the surface of a polarized semiconductor. • Reduction processes are driven by ultraviolet light. • Gold nanoparticle and silver nanoparticle deposition patterns are compared. - Abstract: In this work, we report on a technique to reduce gold chloride into sub-micron particles and nanoparticles. We use photoelectron transfer from periodically polarized lithium niobate (PPLN) illuminated with above band gap light to drive the surface reactions required for the reduction and particle formation. The particle sizes and distributions on the PPLN surface are sensitive to the solution concentration, with inhibited nucleation and large particles (>150 nm) for both low (2E−8M to 9E−7M) and high (1E−5M to 1E−3M) concentrations of gold chloride. At midrange values of the concentration, nucleation is more frequent, resulting in smaller sized particles (<150 nm). We compare the deposition process to that for silver, which has been previously studied. We find that the reduction of gold chloride into nanoparticles is inhibited compared to silver ion reduction, due to the multi-step reaction required for gold particle formation. This also has consequences for the resulting deposition patterns: while silver deposits into nanowires along boundaries between areas with opposite signed polarizations, such patterning of the deposition is not observed for gold, for a wide range of concentrations studied (2E−8 to 1E−3M).

  3. Identification and quantification of particle growth channels during new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Pennington

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF is a key source of ambient ultrafine particles that may contribute substantially to the global production of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. While NPF is driven by atmospheric nucleation, its impact on CCN concentration depends strongly on atmospheric growth mechanisms since the growth rate must exceed the loss rate due to scavenging in order for the particles to reach the CCN size range. In this work, chemical composition measurements of 20 nm diameter particles during NPF in Hyytiälä, Finland, in March–April 2011 permit identification and quantitative assessment of important growth channels. In this work we show the following: (A sulfuric acid, a key species associated with atmospheric nucleation, accounts for less than half of particle mass growth during this time period; (B the sulfate content of a growing particle during NPF is quantitatively explained by condensation of gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules (i.e., sulfuric acid uptake is collision-limited; (C sulfuric acid condensation substantially impacts the chemical composition of preexisting nanoparticles before new particles have grown to a size sufficient to be measured; (D ammonium and sulfate concentrations are highly correlated, indicating that ammonia uptake is driven by sulfuric acid uptake; (E sulfate neutralization by ammonium does not reach the predicted thermodynamic end point, suggesting that a barrier exists for ammonia uptake; (F carbonaceous matter accounts for more than half of the particle mass growth, and its oxygen-to-carbon ratio (~ 0.5 is characteristic of freshly formed secondary organic aerosol; and (G differences in the overall growth rate from one formation event to another are caused by variations in the growth rates of all major chemical species, not just one individual species.

  4. Ultrafine particles from a vented gas clothes dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lance

    Ultrafine particles (˜10-100 nm) were measured continuously for 18 months in an occupied townhouse. A major source was determined to be the gas clothes dryer. Although the dryer was vented to the outdoors it consistently produced an order of magnitude increase in the ultrafine concentrations compared to times with no indoor sources. Short-term peak number concentrations exceeded 100,000 cm -3 on a number of occasions. The source strength was conservatively estimated at about 6×10 12 ultrafine particles produced per drying episode. These values are underestimates, since the part of the peak below 9.8 nm was not measured. Averaged over 150 h of operation, the number concentration showed a major peak at the smallest size measured (9.8 nm) and a secondary peak at 30 nm. Loss rates of the ultrafines due to diffusion, deposition, and particle growth (1-2 h -1) were high compared to losses due to air exchange (0.1-0.6 h -1). Considering the reported health effects of ultrafines, the widespread use of gas dryers, and the substantial amount of time that gas dryers are operated in many homes, it may be desirable to carry out further research to determine if the results reported here for a single dryer in one home are reproducible under different conditions.

  5. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  6. SCIL nanoimprint solutions: high-volume soft NIL for wafer scale sub-10nm resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorkamp, R.; Verschuuren, M. A.; van Brakel, R.

    2016-10-01

    Nano-patterning materials and surfaces can add unique functionalities and properties which cannot be obtained in bulk or micro-structured materials. Examples range from hetro-epitaxy of semiconductor nano-wires to guiding cell expression and growth on medical implants. [1] Due to the cost and throughput requirements conventional nano-patterning techniques such as deep UV lithography (cost and flat substrate demands) and electron-beam lithography (cost, throughput) are not an option. Self-assembly techniques are being considered for IC manufacturing, but require nano-sized guiding patterns, which have to be fabricated in any case.[2] Additionally, the self-assembly process is highly sensitive to the environment and layer thickness, which is difficult to control on non-flat surfaces such as PV silicon wafers or III/V substrates. Laser interference lithography can achieve wafer scale periodic patterns, but is limited by the throughput due to intensity of the laser at the pinhole and only regular patterns are possible where the pattern fill fraction cannot be chosen freely due to the interference condition.[3] Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a promising technology for the cost effective fabrication of sub-micron and nano-patterns on large areas. The challenges for NIL are related to the technique being a contact method where a stamp which holds the patterns is required to be brought into intimate contact with the surface of the product. In NIL a strong distinction is made between the type of stamp used, either rigid or soft. Rigid stamps are made from patterned silicon, silica or plastic foils and are capable of sub-10nm resolution and wafer scale patterning. All these materials behave similar at the micro- to nm scale and require high pressures (5 - 50 Bar) to enable conformal contact to be made on wafer scales. Real world conditions such as substrate bow and particle contaminants complicate the use of rigid stamps for wafer scale areas, reducing stamp lifetime and

  7. Optical Properties of Airborne Soil Organic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veghte, Daniel P. [William; China, Swarup [William; Weis, Johannes [Chemical; Department; Kovarik, Libor [William; Gilles, Mary K. [Chemical; Laskin, Alexander [Department

    2017-09-27

    Recently, airborne soil organic particles (ASOP) were reported as a type of solid organic particles emitted after water droplets impacted wet soils. Chemical constituents of ASOP are macromolecules such as polysaccharides, tannins, and lignin (derived from degradation of plants and biological organisms). Optical properties of ASOP were inferred from the quantitative analysis of the electron energy-loss spectra acquired over individual particles in the transmission electron microscope. The optical constants of ASOP are further compared with those measured for laboratory generated particles composed of Suwanee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) reference material, which was used as a laboratory surrogate of ASOP. The particle chemical compositions were analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. ASOP and SRFA exhibit similar carbon composition, but SRFA has minor contributions of S and Na. When ASOP are heated to 350 °C their absorption increases as a result of their pyrolysis and partial volatilization of semi-volatile organic constituents. The retrieved refractive index (RI) at 532 nm of SRFA particles, ASOP, and heated ASOP were 1.22-62 0.07i, 1.29-0.07i, and 1.90-0.38i, respectively. Compared to RISRFA, RIASOP has a higher real part but similar imaginary part. These measurements of ASOP optical constants suggest that they have properties characteristic of atmospheric brown carbon and therefore their potential effects on the radiative forcing of climate need to be assessed in atmospheric models.

  8. Nanoscale lateral displacement arrays for the separation of exosomes and colloids down to 20 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Benjamin H.; Smith, Joshua T.; Gifford, Stacey M.; Wang, Chao; Brink, Markus; Bruce, Robert L.; Austin, Robert H.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Astier, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) pillar arrays are an efficient technology to sort, separate and enrich micrometre-scale particles, which include parasites, bacteria, blood cells and circulating tumour cells in blood. However, this technology has not been translated to the true nanoscale, where it could function on biocolloids, such as exosomes. Exosomes, a key target of 'liquid biopsies', are secreted by cells and contain nucleic acid and protein information about their originating tissue. One challenge in the study of exosome biology is to sort exosomes by size and surface markers. We use manufacturable silicon processes to produce nanoscale DLD (nano-DLD) arrays of uniform gap sizes ranging from 25 to 235 nm. We show that at low Péclet (Pe) numbers, at which diffusion and deterministic displacement compete, nano-DLD arrays separate particles between 20 to 110 nm based on size with sharp resolution. Further, we demonstrate the size-based displacement of exosomes, and so open up the potential for on-chip sorting and quantification of these important biocolloids.

  9. Impact through time of different sized titanium dioxide particles on biochemical and histopathological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Marcos E; Tasat, Deborah R; Ramos, Emilio; Paparella, María L; Evelson, Pablo; Rebagliati, Raúl Jiménez; Cabrini, Rómulo L; Guglielmotti, María B; Olmedo, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    Due to corrosion, a titanium implant surface can be a potential source for the release of micro (MPs) and nano-sized particles (NPs) into the biological environment. This work sought to evaluate the biokinetics of different sized titanium dioxide particles (TiO2 ) and their potential to cause cell damage. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with 150 nm, 10 nm, or 5nm TiO2 particles. The presence of TiO2 particles was evaluated in histologic sections of the liver, lung, and kidney and in blood cells at 3 and 12 months. Ultrastructural analysis of liver and lung tissue was performed by TEM, deposit concentration in tissues was determined spectroscopically, and oxidative metabolism was assessed by determining oxidative membrane damage, generation of superoxide anion (O2(-)), and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. TiO2 particles were observed inside mononuclear blood cells and in organ parenchyma at 3 and 12 months. TiO2 deposits were consistently larger in liver than in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophage O2(-) generation and average particle size correlated negatively (p < 0.05). NPs were more reactive and biopersistent in lung tissue than MPs. Antioxidant activity, particularly in the case of 5 nm particles, failed to compensate for membrane damage in liver cells; the damage was consistent with histological evidence of necrosis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  11. Genotoxic effects of 1064-nm Nd:YAG and 532-nm KTP lasers on fibroblast cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, N; Bedir, A; Bilgici, B; Aydin, F; Okuyucu, A; Ozmen, Z C; Turanli, A Y

    2010-07-01

    Several different laser types are used in cutaneous surgery. The neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG (KTP, potassium titanyl phosphate) lasers are widely used in dermatology. To investigate the possible genotoxic effects on fibroblasts of irradiation with a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser and a 532-nm KTP laser. Fibroblast cell cultures were exposed to each of the lasers, using 10-mm spot size at 60 ms pulse duration with 10, 20, 40 J/cm(2) and 3, 6, 12 J/cm(2) fluences, respectively. Fibroblasts in passages 1-6 were used. During laser irradiation, 96-well microplate cultures were kept on a cooling block and transported on ice and in the dark, and processed immediately for single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay (also known as a comet assay). DNA damage was determined by computerized assessment of comet assay. There was increasing damage with increasing numbers of passages. For the Nd:YAG laser, the greatest damage occurred on passages 5 and 6, whereas the greatest damage appeared at passages 3 and 4 for KTP and returned to baseline at passages 5 and 6. Damage also increased with each dose increment for both wavelengths. At the highest dose for both wavelengths (Nd:YAG 40 J/cm(2) and KTP 12 J/cm(2)), damage was higher with the Nd:YAG laser. Different patterns of cellular damage were seen for different cell-culture passages, treatment doses, and laser wavelengths. These dose ranges are generally used for the treatment of vascular and pigmented lesions and for rejuvenation purposes. As replicative ageing or cell senescence is one of the critical factors determining the extent of cell damage induced by laser therapy, these results may have important implications for clinical practice.

  12. Adaptive polymer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzidou, Kyriaki; Crosby, Alfred J.

    2008-07-01

    Adaptable polymer particles that can change geometry, flow characteristics, and adsorption properties upon the stimulation of an environmental change, such as temperature, are fabricated by utilizing the residual stress developed at the interface of a bilayer. We propose a phase diagram that can be used to predict the shape and size of the adaptive polymer particles as a function of the material modulus, thickness ratio, and the bilayer's lateral dimensions. The materials used are gold/titanium and polydimethylsiloxane, but the method is applicable to a wide range of material combinations. Initial demonstrations of this responsive control and its impact on properties of the adaptive polymer particles are also presented.

  13. Universe of Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2010-01-01

    The entire Universe is made up of particles. But where do they come from? What is the origin of the laws of nature? The permanent exhibition "Universe of Particles", installed on the ground floor of the Globe of Science and Innovation, invites you to discover CERN by taking you on a journey all the way back to the Big Bang. It will help you answer questions such as: What's the purpose of this research? How do you accelerate particles? How do you detect them? What are today's theories on matter and the Universe? How does this affect our daily life?

  14. Particle physics builds potential

    CERN Document Server

    Camporesi, Tiziano

    2004-01-01

    Surveys of the career prospects of particle physicists in Europe, such as that one carried out in 2000 at DELPHI, reveal that particle phycisists are much in demand. The findings are fairly independent of a student's nationality, despite the big differences in the education systems of different countries across the continent. According to the DELPHI survey, half of all physics students remain in an academic environment after graduation. For those particle physicists who leave academia, the DELPHI survey showed that about half find jobs in hi- tech industry. The bottom line is that a degree in physics offers very good job prospects and career opportunities. (Edited abstract).

  15. Impact of two particle measurement techniques on the determination of N95 class respirator filtration performance against ultrafine particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostofi, Reza [Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Noeel, Alexandra [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haghighat, Fariborz, E-mail: haghi@bcee.concordia.ca [Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahloul, Ali [Institut de Recherche Robert-Sauve en Sante et en Securite du Travail, Montreal, Quebec H3A 3C2 (Canada); Lara, Jaime [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cloutier, Yves [Institut de Recherche Robert-Sauve en Sante et en Securite du Travail, Montreal, Quebec H3A 3C2 (Canada)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance evaluation of respirator using two different measurement techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaction and electrical mobility were used to characterize ultrafine particle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The experiment was done using ultrafine-sized poly-dispersed aerosols. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both techniques show that MPPS would occur at a similar size range. - Abstract: The purpose of this experimental study was to compare two different particle measurement devices; an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), to measure the number concentration and the size distribution of NaCl salt aerosols to determine the collection efficiency of filtering respirators against poly disperse aerosols. Tests were performed on NIOSH approved N95 filtering face-piece respirators (FFR), sealed on a manikin head. Ultrafine particles found in the aerosols were also collected and observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the results, there is a systematic difference for the particle size distribution measured by the SMPS and the ELPI. It is largely attributed to the difference in the measurement techniques. However, in spite of these discrepancies, reasonably similar trends were found for the number concentration with both measuring instruments. The particle penetration, calculated based on mobility and aerodynamic diameters, never exceeded 5% for any size range measured at constant flow rate of 85 L/min. Also, the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), with the lowest filtration efficiency, would occur at a similar ultrafine size range <100 nm. With the ELPI, the MPPS was at 70 nm aerodynamic diameter, whereas it occurred at 40 nm mobility diameter with the SMPS.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles <500 nm. Herein, we show the first application of atomic force microscopy with infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) to detect trace organic and inorganic species and probe intraparticle chemical variation in individual particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with <100 nm spatial resolution for phase separated particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  17. Measurement of intravenously administered γ-Fe2O3 particle amount in mice tissues using vibrating sample magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Mikio; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohara, Yusuke; Yanagihara, Hideto; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Kita, Eiji

    2014-12-01

    Dispersions of platelet γ-Fe2O3 particles 30-50nm in size were intravenously administered to mice and the amount of particles accumulated in each tissue was obtained by magnetization measurement using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Background noise was greatly reduced by measuring dried tissues under a magnetic field of 500 Oe so that the effect of diamagnetism was slight. Remarkable particle accumulation was observed in the liver and spleen. Considerable particle accumulation was observed in the lung when a large quantity of γ-Fe2 O3 particles was administered. There was no significant particle accumulation in the kidney and heart.

  18. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high East Antarctic plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm−3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm−3 and 0.086 μm3 cm−3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm−3 and 0.009 μm3 cm−3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, natural new particle formation was observed on 60 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm in size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h−1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm−3 s−1. Most of the events were similar to those observed at other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events slowly growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in central Antarctica.

  19. From Agglomerates of Spheres to Irregularly Shaped Particles: Determination of Dynamic Shape Factors from Measurements of Mobility and Vacuum Aerodynamic Diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Cai, Yong; Imre, Dan G.

    2006-03-01

    With the advert of aerosol instrumentation it has become possible to simultaneously measure individual particle mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. For spherical particles these two diameters yield individual particle density. In contrast, assigning a physical meaning to the mobility or aerodynamic diameter of aspherical particles is not straightforward. This paper presents an experimental exploration of the effect of particle shape on the relationship between mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. We make measurements on systems of three types: 1) Agglomerates of spheres, for which the density and the volume are known; 2) Ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, succinic acid and lauric acid irregularly shaped particles of known density; and 3) Internally mixed particles, containing organics and ammonium sulfate, of unknown density and shape. For agglomerates of spheres we observed alignment effects in the DMA and report the first measurements of the dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in free molecular regime. We present here the first experimental determination of the DSF of ammonium sulfate particles. We find for ammonium sulfate particles a DSF that increases from 1.03 to 1.07 as particle mobility diameter increases from 160 nm to 500 nm. Three types of NaC1 particles were generated and characterized: nearly spherical particles with DSF of ~1.02; cubic with DSF that increases from 1.065 to 1.17 as particle mobility diameter increases from 200 nm to 900 nm; and compact agglomerates with DSF 1.3-1.4. Organic particles were found very nearly spherical. The data suggest that particles composed of binary mixtures of ammonium sulfate and succinic acid have lower dynamic shape factors than pure ammonium sulfate particles. However, for internally mixed ammonium sulfate and lauric acid particles we cannot distinguish between nearly spherical particles with low density and particles with DSF of 1.17.

  20. Limitations in the Use of Unipolar Charging for Electrical Mobility Sizing Instruments: A Study of the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus; Gudmundsson, A.; Pagels, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    range, with an apparent upper limit for GMD of 300nm. It also estimates a higher particle number concentration as compared to the other instruments. Analysis of the 22 FMPS electrometer currents and calculation of average number of charges per particle show a diameter dependence of response of [GRAPHICS...... distributions with a true GMD above 200nm cannot be measured reliably with the FMPS. Copyright 2015 American Association for Aerosol Research...