WorldWideScience

Sample records for stz-induced diabetic type

  1. Metformin ameliorates insulitis in STZ-induced diabetic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Guo-Jun Jiang; Xue Han; Yu-Long Tao; Ya-Ping Deng; Jia-Wen Yu; Jian Cai; Guo-Fei Ren; Yuan-Nan Sun

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Metformin is currently the most widely used first-line hypoglycemic agent for diabetes mellitus. Besides glucose-lowering action, there is increasingly interest in the potential anti-inflammatory action of this drug. In the present study, we investigated the actions of metformin on experimental insulitis using STZ-induced diabetic mice. Methods Mice with acute diabetes induced by STZ were administered metformin by gavage. Changes of blood glucose and body weight, and the dai...

  2. Metformin ameliorates insulitis in STZ-induced diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims Metformin is currently the most widely used first-line hypoglycemic agent for diabetes mellitus. Besides glucose-lowering action, there is increasingly interest in the potential anti-inflammatory action of this drug. In the present study, we investigated the actions of metformin on experimental insulitis using STZ-induced diabetic mice. Methods Mice with acute diabetes induced by STZ were administered metformin by gavage. Changes of blood glucose and body weight, and the daily amount of food and water intake were measured. Pancreatic tissues were collected for histologic analyses. Pathological assessment and immunohistochemistry analysis were used to determine the effect of metformin on insulitis. Inflammatory cytokines in the pancreas and insulin levels were measured through ELISA analysis. Results Metformin significantly reduced blood glucose levels and improved aberrant water intake behavior in experimental diabetic mice. No significant differences were observed in terms of body weight and food intake behavior in metformin-treated animals. In the STZ-induced model of diabetes, we found the appearance of pronounced insulitis. However, metformin administration reduced the severity of insulitis assessed by blind pathological scoring. In addition, metformin treatment improved insulin levels in experimental diabetic mice. ELISA assay revealed decreased levels of inflammatory response marker IL-1β and TNF-α in the pancreatic tissues following metformin treatment. Conclusion Metformin attenuated insulitis in the STZ-induced mice model of diabetes. This islet-protective effect might be partly correlated with the anti-inflammatory action of metformin.

  3. L-carnitine ameliorated fatty liver in high-calorie diet/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice by improving mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yunqiu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are an increasing number of patients suffering from fatty liver caused by type 2 diabetes. We intended to study the preventive and therapeutic effect of L-carnitine (LC on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice and to explore its possible mechanism. Methods Thirty male Kungming mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, diabetic group, pre-treatment group (125 mg/kg BW, low-dose (125 mg/kg BW therapeutic group and high-dose (250 mg/kg BW therapeutic group. The morphology of hepatocytes was observed by light and electron microscopy. LC and ALC (acetyl L-carnitine concentrations in the liver were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Moreover, liver weight, insulin levels and free fatty acid (FFA and triglyceride (TG levels in the liver and plasma were measured. Results Average liver LC and ALC levels were 33.7% and 20% lower, respectively, in diabetic mice compared to control mice (P Conclusion LC supplements ameliorated fatty liver in type 2 diabetic mice by increasing fatty acid oxidation and decreasing the LC/ALC ratio in the liver. Therefore, oral administration of LC protected mitochondrial function in liver.

  4. Anti neuroinflammatory effect of Vildagliptin in ischaemia-reperfusion induced cerebral infarction in normal and STZ induced type-II diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleru Purnachander

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the major risk factor for cerebral ischemic stroke. Increased base line levels of oxidative stress in diabetes will lead to cerebral ischemic damage. In pathological conditions such as cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, free radicals cause oxidative stress and inflammation leading to increased injury of brain. Inflammation is one of the major pathological mechanisms involved in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury. Vildagliptin newer anti-diabetic drug of the class DPP-4 inhibitors is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties apart from its antihyperglycemic activity. Therefore the aim of the present study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of Vildagliptin against cerebral infarction induced ischemia reperfusion injury in normal and STZ induced diabetic Wistar rats. Cerebral infarction was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion followed by 4 hr reperfusion. Percent infarction, inflammatory markers such as MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were analysed. Treatment with Vildagliptin for a period of four weeks produced significant reduction in percent cerebral infarct volume. Vildagliptin at 10 mg/kg dose, showed significant reduction in markers like MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in diabetic group when compared to normal group and in contrast significant increase in anti-inflammatory marker like IL-10 levels. Vildagliptin showed significant cerebroprotective effect by antiinflammatory mechanisms.

  5. Anti-Glycemic and Anti-Hepatotoxic Effects of Mangosteen Vinegar Rind from Garcinia mangostana Against HFD/STZ-Induced Type II Diabetes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Naymul

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on anti-glycemic and anti-hepatotoxic effects of mangosteen vinegar rind (MVR on five weeks high-fat diet (HFD / single dose streptozotocin (STZ 30 mg/kg BW induced male ICR diabetic mice. Mice were randomly divided into five groups (n=6, normal control, diabetic control, and diabetic groups treated with MVR 100, 200 mg/kg BW and glibenclamide 60 mg/kg BW for one week. After the treatment, lipid profile, glycogen and bilirubin contents, oxidative damage (malondialdehyde, MDA, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT activities, antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT were measured in plasma and/or liver tissues. MVR and glibenclamide treatment to HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice significantly reduced their plasma glucose, plasma lipid profile, and hepatic lipid profile (P<0.05. Increased hepatic glycogen content indicates improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, oxidative damage markers were ameliorated in MVR- and glibenclamide-treated groups compared to the diabetic control group. MVR with phenolic compounds content of 75 mg GAE/g dry weight and antioxidant potential of 303 mmol/L Trolox/g dry weight acted as a hepatoprotective agent against oxidative damage.

  6. Novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine, prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Xin [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Xinghui [Departments of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Shanghai College of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ma, Fenfen; Luo, Shanshan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ge, Ruowen [Departmentof Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Zhu, Yizhun, E-mail: zhuyz@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Departmentof Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-13

    In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC, also named as ZYZ-802), a novel hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S)-releasing compound, had renoprotective effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic kidney injury. SPRC treatment significantly reduced the level of creatinine, kidney to body weight ratio and in particular, markedly decreased 24-h urine microalbuminuria excretion. SPRC suppressed the mRNA expression of fibronectin and type IV collagen. In vitro, SPRC inhibited mesangial cells over-proliferation and hypertrophy induced by high glucose. Additionally, SPRC attenuated inflammation in diabetic kidneys. SPRC also reduced transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling and expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3) pathway. Moreover, SPRC inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, p38 protein. Taken together, SPRC was demonstrated to be a potential therapeutic candidate to suppress diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • We synthesized a novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC). • SPRC was preliminarily demonstrated to prevent STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN). • SPRC may exert potential therapeutic candidate to suppress DN.

  7. Fenugreek Prevents the Development of STZ-Induced Diabetic Nephropathy in a Rat Model of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Jin

    2014-01-01

    evidently reduced by fenugreek treatment. Furthermore, the upregulation of TGF-β1 and CTGF at a transcriptional and translational level in DN rats was distinctly inhibited by fenugreek. Consequently, fenugreek prevents DN development in a STZ-induced diabetic rat model.

  8. Ameliorating effect of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract on altered glucose metabolism in high fat diet STZ induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haseena Banu Hedayathullah; Vinayagam, Kaladevi Siddhi; Palanivelu, Shanthi; Panchanadham, Sachdanandam

    2012-12-01

    To explore the protective effect of the drug Semecarpus anacardium (S. anacardium)on altered glucose metabolism in diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was induced by feeding rats with high fat diet followed by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg b.w.). Seven days after STZ induction, diabetic rats received nut milk extract of S. anacardium Linn. nut milk extract orally at a dosage of 200 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks. The effect of nut milk extract of S. anacardium on blood glucose, plasma insulin, glucose metabolising enzymes and GSK were studied. Treatment with SA extract showed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels and increase in plasma insulin levels and also increase in HOMA - β and decrease in HOMA -IR. The drug significantly increased the activity of glycolytic enzymes and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and increased the glycogen content in liver of diabetic rats while reducing the activities of gluconeogenic enzymes. The drug also effectively ameliorated the alterations in GSK-3 mRNA expression. Overall, the present study demonstrates the possible mechanism of glucose regulation of S. anacardium suggestive of its therapeutic potential for the management of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral chromium picolinate impedes hyperglycemia-induced atherosclerosis and inhibits proatherogenic protein TSP-1 expression in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic ApoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Rituparna; Sahu, Soumyadip; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Haney, Rebecca; Chavez, Ronaldo J; Shah, Shivani; Yalamanchili, Siri; Raman, Priya

    2017-03-27

    Increasing evidence suggests thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a potent proatherogenic matricellular protein, as a putative link between hyperglycemia and atherosclerotic complications in diabetes. We previously reported that the micronutrient chromium picolinate (CrP), with long-standing cardiovascular benefits, inhibits TSP-1 expression in glucose-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro. Here, we investigated the atheroprotective action of orally administered CrP in type 1 diabetic apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice and elucidated the role of TSP-1 in this process. CrP decreased lipid burden and neointimal thickness in aortic root lesions of hyperglycemic ApoE-/- mice; also, smooth muscle cell (SMC), macrophage and leukocyte abundance was prevented coupled with reduced cell proliferation. Attenuated lesion progression was accompanied with inhibition of hyperglycemia-induced TSP-1 expression and reduced protein O-glycosylation following CrP treatment; also, PCNA and vimentin (SMC synthetic marker) expression were reduced while SM-MHC (SMC contractile marker) levels were increased. To confirm a direct role of TSP-1 in diabetic atherosclerosis, hyperglycemic TSP-1-/-/ApoE-/- double knockout mice were compared with age-matched hyperglycemic ApoE-/- littermates. Lack of TSP-1 prevented lesion formation in hyperglycemic ApoE-/- mice, mimicking the atheroprotective phenotype of CrP-treated mice. These results suggest that therapeutic TSP-1 inhibition may have important atheroprotective potential in diabetic vascular disease.

  10. Effect of Rebaudioside A, a diterpenoid on glucose homeostasis in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Vengatash babu, Kaliyappan; Ramachandran, Vinayagam

    2012-09-01

    Rebaudioside A (Reb A), a major constituent of Stevia rebaudiana, was recently proposed as an insulinotropic agent. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of Reb A on the activities of hepatic enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in adult male Albino Wistar rats, weighing 180-200 g, by a single intraperitoneal injection at a dose of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight). Diabetic rats showed significant (Pdiabetic rats significantly (Pdiabetic rats. Thus, the results show that Reb A possesses an antihyperglycemic activity and provide evidence for its traditional usage in the control of diabetes.

  11. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effect of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract in a high-fat diet STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haseena Banu Hedayathullah; Vinayagam, Kaladevi Siddhi; Sekar, Ashwini; Palanivelu, Shanthi; Panchanadham, Sachdanandam

    2012-03-01

    Semecarpus anacardium commonly known as marking nut has been used in the Siddha system of medicine against various ailments. The antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of the drug was evaluated in Type 2 diabetic rats induced by feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) for 2 weeks followed by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) 35 mg/kg body weight. Three days after STZ induction, the hyperglycemic rats were treated with Semecarpus anacardium nut milk extract (SA) orally at a dosage of 200 mg/kg body weight daily for 30 days. Metformin (500 mg/kg body weight, orally) was used as a reference drug. The fasting blood glucose, insulin, Hb, HbA1c levels, and HOMA-IR and HOMA-β were measured, and also the levels of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes were observed. SA significantly (p < .05) reduced and normalized blood glucose levels and also decreased the levels of HbA1c as compared with that of HFD STZ control group. SA treatment also significantly (p < .05) increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes while decreasing the levels of lipid peroxidation. The potential antihyperglycemic action and antioxidant role might be due to the presence of flavonoids in the drug.

  12. Anti-diabetic activity of peony seed oil, a new resource food in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianhui; Wang, Hongxin; Ma, Caoyang; Lou, Zaixiang; Liu, Chengxiang; Tanver Rahman, MdRamim; Gao, Chuanzhong; Nie, Rongjing

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the components of a new resource food in China, peony seed oil (PSO) by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), its inhibitory effects on carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in vitro and its anti-diabetic effects on mice induced by streptozotocin (STZ). The results showed that peony seed oil showed weak anti-α-amylase activity; however, strong anti-α-glucosidase activity was noted. The GC-MS analysis of the oil showed 9 constituents of which α-linolenic acid was found to be the major component (38.66%), followed by linoleic acid (26.34%) and oleic acid (23.65%). The anti-diabetic potential of peony seed oil was tested in STZ induced diabetic mice. Administration of peony seed oil and glibenclamide reduced the blood glucose level and the area under curve (AUC) in STZ induced diabetic mice. There were significant increases in body weight, liver glycogen content, serum insulin level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and decreases in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), total serum cholesterol (TC), and triglyceride (TG) in test groups as compared to the untreated diabetic groups. In vivo antioxidant studies on STZ induced diabetic mice revealed the reduction of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increase of glutathione peroxides (GSH-px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH). The results provided a sound rationale for future clinical trials of oral administration of peony seed oil to alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

  13. Biomechanical and morphological remodelings of gastrointestinal tract in STZ-induced diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Hong; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Gui-Fang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the biomechanical and morphometrical remodeling of gastrointestinal (GI) tract in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. METERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen SD male rats of diabetic group(DM, a single tail vein injection 40mg/kg of STZ, 9 rats......) and normal group (CON, 9 rats) were used in the study. Blood glucose and body weight was regularly measured. After 60 days of experiment, morphometric properties and residual strains were studied in esophageal, duodenal, jejunal, ileal, colonic and rectal segments. Stress-strain of the wall was also studied......, jejunal, colonic wall in circumferential direction and the esophageal, colonic wall in longitudinal direction increased in DM group compared those with CON group (Pdiabetes induces morphometric and biomechanical remodeling in the gastrointestinal tract which is likely...

  14. Ophiocordyceps formosana improves hyperglycemia and depression-like behavior in an STZ-induced diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Wei; Hong, Tzu-Wen; Wang, Ying-Jing; Chen, Ko-Chien; Pei, Ju-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chu, Richard; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Sheen, Lee-Yan; Takahashi, Satoru; Ding, Shih-Torng; Shen, Tang-Long

    2016-08-24

    A newly defined Cordyceps species, Ophiocordyceps formosana (O. formosana) has been implicated in multitudinous bioactivities, including lowering glucose and cholesterol levels and modulating the immune system. However, few literatures demonstrate sufficient evidence to support these proposed functions. Although the use of Cordyceps spp. has been previously addressed to improve insulin insensitivity and improve the detrimental symptoms of depression; its mechanistic nature remains unsettled. Herein, we reveal the effects of O. formosana in ameliorating hyperglycemia accompanied with depression. Diabetes was induced in mice by employing streptozotocin(STZ), a chemical that is toxic to insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas. These streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice showed combined symptoms of hyperglycemia and depressive behaviors. Twenty-four STZ-induced mice were randomly divided into 3 groups subjected to oral gavage with 100 μL solution of either PBS or 25 mg/mL Ophiocordyceps formosana extract (OFE) or 2 mg/mL rosiglitazone (Rosi, positive control group). Treatments were administered once per day for 28 days. An additional 6 mice without STZ induction were treated with PBS to serve as the control group. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a glucose tolerance test and levels of adiponectin in plasma and adipose tissue were also quantified. Behavioral tests were conducted and levels of monoamines in various brain regions relating to depression were evaluated. HPLC analysis uncovered three major constituents, adenosine, D-mannitol and cordycepin, within O. formosana similar to other prestigious medicinal Cordyceps spp.. STZ-induced diabetic mice demonstrated decreased body weight and subcutaneous adipose tissue, while these symptoms were recovered in mice receiving OFE treatment. Moreover, the OFE group displayed improved insulin sensitivity and elevated adiponectin within the plasma and adipose tissue. The anti-depressive effect of OFE was

  15. Protective Effects of Berberine on Renal Injury in Streptozotocin (STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a serious diabetic complication with renal hypertrophy and expansion of extracellular matrices in renal fibrosis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT of renal tubular epithelial cells may be involved in the main mechanism. Berberine (BBR has been shown to have antifibrotic effects in liver, kidney and lung. However, the mechanism of cytoprotective effects of BBR in DN is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the curative effects of BBR on tubulointerstitial fibrosis in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice and the high glucose (HG-induced EMT in NRK 52E cells. We found that BBR treatment attenuated renal fibrosis by activating the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 signaling pathway in the diabetic kidneys. Further revealed that BBR abrogated HG-induced EMT and oxidative stress in relation not only with the activation of Nrf2 and two Nrf2-targeted antioxidative genes (NQO-1 and HO-1, but also with the suppressing the activation of TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Importantly, knockdown Nrf2 with siRNA not only abolished the BBR-induced expression of HO-1 and NQO-1 but also removed the inhibitory effect of BBR on HG-induced activation of TGF-β/Smad signaling as well as the anti-fibrosis effects. The data from present study suggest that BBR can ameliorate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN by activating Nrf2 pathway and inhibiting TGF-β/Smad/EMT signaling activity.

  16. Antidiabetic activities of polysaccharides from Anoectochilus roxburghii and Anoectochilus formosanus in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tingting; Duan, Xiaoyu; Ke, Yu; Zhang, Lan; Shen, Yingbin; Hu, Bin; Liu, Aiping; Chen, Hong; Li, Cheng; Wu, Wenjuan; Shen, Li; Liu, Yuntao

    2018-02-10

    Six polysaccharides were extracted from different parts (whole plants, roots and leaves) of Anoectochilus roxburghii and Anoectochilus formosanus (ARPs, ARPs-1, ARPs-2, AFPs, AFPs-1 and AFPs-2). Their primary characteristics were identified and their antidiabetic activities were evaluated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Root polysaccharides (ARPs-1and AFPs-1) and leaf polysaccharides (ARPs-2 and AFPs-2) were distinct from each other in terms of the Mws, monosaccharide compositions and functional groups. Notably, the primary structures of ARPs and AFPs were similar to those of ARPs-1and AFPs-1, respectively. In animal experiment, after feeding with polysaccharides samples, the body weight, blood glucose, glycogen, insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), malondiadehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme activities in liver and kidney of mice were tested to investigate the antidiabetic activities. All polysaccharides exhibited varying antidiabetic activities (antihyperglycemic, antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic activities), which were closely related to their primary characteristics. Furthermore, root polysaccharides with higher Mws and glucose content in both A. roxburghii and A. formosanus, exhibited better antidiabetic activities than leaf polysaccharides, and ARPs which showed the best antidiabetic activities had the potential to be used as functional food or medicine for diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Bio-optic signatures for advanced glycation end products in the skin in streptozotocin (STZ) Induced Diabetes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidian, Mayer; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Rowland, Rebecca A.; Balbado, Melisa L.; Lentsch, Griffin; Balu, Mihaela; Alexander, Micheal; Shiri, Li; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Kohen, Roni; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-02-01

    Type 1diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder that occurs due to the rapid destruction of insulin-producing beta cells, leading to insulin deficiency and the inability to regulate blood glucose levels and leads to destructive secondary complications. Advanced glycation end (AGEs) products, the result of the cross-linking of reducing sugars and proteins within the tissues, are one of the key causes of major complications associated with diabetes such as renal failure, blindness, nerve damage and vascular changes. Non-invasive techniques to detect AGEs are important for preventing the harmful effects of AGEs during diabetes mellitus. In this study, we utilized multiphoton microscopy to image biopsies taken from control rats and compared them to biopsies taken from streptozotocin (STZ) induced adult male diabetic rats. This was done at two and four weeks after the induction of hyperglycemia (>400 mg/dL) specifically to evaluate the effects of glycation on collagen. We chose to use an in-situ multiphoton microscopy method that combines multiphoton auto-florescence (AF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) to detect the microscopic influence of glycation. Initial results show high auto-florescence levels were present on the collagen, as a result of the accumulation of AGEs only two weeks after the STZ injection and considerably higher levels were present four weeks after the STZ injection. Future projects could involve evaluating advanced glycation end products in a clinical trial of diabetic patients.

  18. Anti-inflammatory role of sesamin in STZ induced mice model of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saif; ElSherbiny, Nehal M; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Alzahrani, Faisal A; Haque, Rizwanul; Khan, Raziuddin; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; AlQahtani, Mohammed H; Liou, Gregory I; Bhatia, Kanchan

    2016-06-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the common cause of diabetic vascular complications that leads to the blindness in the working age population throughout the world. Free radicals mediated oxidative stress and inflammation play a significant role in pathophysiology of DR. To find a new and safe drug to treat DR is still challenging and for that purpose the natural compounds may be therapeutic agents. Here we show that sesamin (SES), which is the main component of sesame seed and its oil, and has been reported as potent antioxidant and neuroprotective, could be a therapeutic agent in DR. In the present study, we investigated protective effect of SES in Streptozotocin (STZ) induced DR in mice. The mice were divided into three groups (Control, DR and DR+SES) for the study. After two weeks post-diabetic establishment, mice were treated with SES (30mg/kg BW, i.p, alternate day) for four weeks. Mice body weight and blood glucose level were measured from each group. The microglial activation of retina was determined by immunohistochemistry analysis by using Iba-1 as a microglia marker. Retinal mRNA levels of Iba-1, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined by qRT-PCR. The level of iNOS protein expression was examined by immunoblotting. Together these data demonstrate that SES treatment lowered the progression of diabetic retinal injury by: 1) decreasing blood glucose level, 2) suppressing microglia activation, 3) reducing retinal TNF-α and ICAM-1 levels and 4) quenching iNOS expression. In conclusion, the results suggest that SES treatment may be of therapeutic benefit in reducing the progression of DR by ameliorating hyperglycemia and inflammation in diabetic retina. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. High Pancreatic n-3 Fatty Acids Prevent STZ-Induced Diabetes in Fat-1 Mice: Inflammatory Pathway Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellenger, Jérôme; Bellenger, Sandrine; Bataille, Amandine; Massey, Karen A.; Nicolaou, Anna; Rialland, Mickaël; Tessier, Christian; Kang, Jing X.; Narce, Michel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of confounding factors, the effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on type 1 diabetes remain to be clarified. We therefore evaluated whether fat-1 transgenic mice, a well-controlled experimental model endogenously synthesizing n-3 PUFA, were protected against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. We then aimed to elucidate the in vivo response at the pancreatic level. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS β-Cell destruction was produced by multiple low-doses STZ (MLD-STZ). Blood glucose level, plasma insulin level, and plasma lipid analysis were then performed. Pancreatic mRNA expression of cytokines, the monocyte chemoattractant protein, and GLUT2 were evaluated as well as pancreas nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 and inhibitor of κB (IκB) protein expression. Insulin and cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining and lipidomic analysis were performed in the pancreas. RESULTS STZ-induced fat-1 mice did not develop hyperglycemia compared with wild-type mice, and β-cell destruction was prevented as evidenced by lack of histological pancreatic damage or reduced insulin level. The prevention of β-cell destruction was associated with no proinflammatory cytokine induction (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase) in the pancreas, a decreased NF-κB, and increased IκB pancreatic protein expression. In the fat-1–treated mice, proinflammatory arachidonic-derived mediators as prostaglandin E2 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid were decreased and the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 was detected. Moreover, the 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, precursor of the anti-inflammatory resolvin E1, was highly increased. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, these findings indicate that fat-1 mice were protected against MLD-STZ–induced diabetes and pointed out for the first time in vivo the beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA at the pancreatic level, on each step of the development of the pathology—inflammation, β-cell damage—through cytokine

  20. MiR-124 is Related to Podocytic Adhesive Capacity Damage in STZ-Induced Uninephrectomized Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Podocyte plays a key role in the pathogenesis of DN. Adhesive capacity damage of podocytes is characteristic in DN. Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs play crucial roles in controlling many cell adhesion molecules thus contribute to normal cell adhesion. The roles of miRNA in podocytic adhesive capacity damage in diabetic conditions remain largely unknown. Methods: Diabetes was induced by tail vein injection of streptozotocin (STZ into uninephrectomized male Wistar rats. Comparative miRNA expression array and real-time PCR analyses were conducted in sham group at week 0 (W0, n = 3 and STZ-induced uninephrectomized diabetic rats at week 1 (W1, n = 3 and week 2 (W2, n = 3 to demonstrate the greatest increased miRNA in renal cortex. At week 2, STZ-induced uninephrectomized diabetic rats were treated with vehicle (Group U, n = 9, chemically modified antisense RNA oligonucleotide (ASO complementary to the mature miR-124 (Group O, n = 8, miR-124 mismatch control sequence (Group M, n = 8. Urine specimens were obtained for measurement of urine albumin concentration and urinary podocyte specific protein (nephrin and podocin quantitation. Expression of integrin α3 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Results: MiRNAs are differentially regulated in renal cortex of STZ-induced uninephrectomized diabetic rats relative to sham rats. Among the up-regulated miRNAs, miR-124 expression demonstrated the greatest increase. Administration of miR-124 ASO for two weeks significantly reduced urinary podocytic nephrin, podocin and albumin excretion and up-regulate integrin α3 expression. Conclusion: MiR-124 is related to podocytic adhesive capacity damage and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of DN.

  1. Podocyte-specific deletion of Rac1 leads to aggravation of renal injury in STZ-induced diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizaka, Masanori [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Gohda, Tomohito, E-mail: goda@juntendo.ac.jp [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Takagi, Miyuki; Omote, Keisuke; Sonoda, Yuji [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Oliva Trejo, Juan Alejandro [Laboratory for Kidney Research (TMK Project), Medical Innovation Center, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 53 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8397 (Japan); Asao, Rin; Hidaka, Teruo [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Asanuma, Katsuhiko [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Laboratory for Kidney Research (TMK Project), Medical Innovation Center, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 53 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8397 (Japan); Horikoshi, Satoshi [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tomino, Yasuhiko [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Medical Corporation SHOWAKAI, 3-12-12 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023 (Japan)

    2015-11-20

    Rac1, a GTPase of the Rho subfamily, has a crucial role in cytoskeletal architecture, as well as the regulation of cell migration and growth. However, renal injury in mice with podocyte-specific deletion of Rac1 has yet to be elucidated fully due to conflicting findings. Herein, we identified a possible role for Rac1 in podocytes of streptozotocin- (STZ) induced diabetic mice. The urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) in the knockout (KO) group was significantly higher than that in the wild type (WT) group at any week of age. A more marked ACR increase was observed in STZ/KO group than STZ/WT group, although ACR did increase with weeks of age in both diabetic groups. The kidney sections from diabetic mice revealed a glomerular hypertrophy with mesangial expansion, but there was no appreciable difference in glomerular findings under a light microscope between STZ/WT and STZ/KO mice. However, an electron microscopy analysis revealed that regardless of the presence or absence of diabetes, both KO (KO and STZ/KO) groups had a higher rate of foot process effacement compared with both WT (WT and STZ/WT) groups. The expression levels of the slit diaphragm protein, podocin, was reduced with the induction of diabetes, and the levels in the STZ/KO group experienced a further reduction compared with the STZ/WT group. The number of WT1-positive cells in the STZ/KO group was more significantly decreased than that in the other three groups. In contrast, the numbers of cleaved caspase 3- and TUNEL-positive cells in the glomeruli of the STZ/KO group were more increased than those in the STZ/WT group. Thus, this study provides evidence that podocyte-specific deletion of Rac1 results in morphological alteration in podocytes, and that the induction of apoptosis or decreased expression of the slit diaphragm proteins by hyperglycemic stimuli are associated with the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Colonic PDGFRα Overexpression Accompanied Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXO3 Up-Regulation in STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colonic transit disorder-induced constipation is a major complication in diabetic patients. PDGFRα+ (platelet-derived growth factor receptor α-positive cells play critical roles in the inhibitory regulation of colonic motility, and FOXO3 (forkhead transcription factor 3 has a broad range of biological functions. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between FOXO3 and PDGFRα+ cell proliferation in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. Methods: The major experimental techniques used in this paper are immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-RCR and Western blotting for the evaluation of specific protein expression; ChIP assay for identifying the interaction between FOXO3 protein and the PDGFRα promotor; and lentiviral transfection for the overexpression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs to down-regulate FOXO3. Results: In proximal colonic smooth muscle tissue of STZ-induced diabetic mice, there was a significant increase in PDGFRα and Ki67 immunoreactivity. PDGFRα mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly increased in colonic smooth muscle tissue, but PDGFRβ expression was unchanged. Meanwhile, the expression of PDGF ligands, including both PDGFα and PDGFβ, was significantly increased in diabetic colonic smooth muscle tissue. In whole cell and nuclear extracts, the expression of FOXO3 protein was also significantly increased; however, the expression of P-FOXO3 (phosphorylated FOXO3 protein was significantly decreased. When NIH cells were incubated with 50 mmol/L glucose for 12 h, 24 h and 48 h, the expression of PDGFRα significantly increased, and in whole cell and nuclear extracts, the expression of FOXO3 protein was significantly increased. However, the expression of P-FOXO3 protein was significantly decreased. FOXO3 could bind to a site on the PDGFRα promoter, and the basal expression of PDGFRα was significantly reduced when endogenous FOXO3 expression was knocked down with FOXO3

  3. Investigation of metabolic changes in STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koellisch, Ulrich; Laustsen, Christoffer; Nørlinger, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    In the metabolism of acetate several enzymes are involved, which play an important role in free fatty acid oxidation. Fatty acid metabolism is altered in diabetes patients and therefore acetate might serve as a marker for pathological changes in the fuel selection of cells, as these changes occur...... in diabetes patients. Acetylcarnitine is a metabolic product of acetate, which enables its transport into the mitochondria for energy production. This study investigates whether the ratio of acetylcarnitine to acetate, measured by noninvasive hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]acetate magnetic resonance spectroscopy......, could serve as a marker for myocardial, hepatic, and renal metabolic changes in rats with Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in vivo. We demonstrate that the conversion of acetate to acetylcarnitine could be detected and quantified in all three organs of interest. More interestingly, we found...

  4. The characterization of a full-thickness excision open foot wound model in n5-streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic rats that mimics diabetic foot ulcer in terms of reduced blood circulation, higher C-reactive protein, elevated inflammation, and reduced cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Caroline Oi-Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Lam, Francis Fu-Yuen; Ng, Ethel Sau-Kuen; Lau, Kit-Man; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Cheung, Wing-Hoi

    2017-08-05

    Delayed foot wound healing is a major complication attributed to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, and these wounds may develop into foot ulcers. There are at least two types of DM wound models used in rodents to study delayed wound healing. However, clinically relevant animal models are not common. Most models use type 1 DM rodents or wounds created on the back rather than on the foot. An open full-thickness excision wound on the footpad of type 2 DM rats is more clinically relevant, but such a model has not yet been characterized systematically. The objective of this study was to investigate and characterize how DM affected a full-thickness excision open foot wound in n5-streptozotocin (n5-STZ)-induced type 2 DM rats. We hypothesized that elevated inflammation, reduced blood circulation, and cell proliferation due to hyperglycemia could delay the wound healing of DM rats. The wounds of DM rats were compared with those of non-DM rats (Ctrl) at Days 1 and 8 post wounding. The wound healing process of the DM rats was significantly delayed compared with that of the Ctrl rats. The DM rats also had higher C-reactive protein (CRP) and lower blood circulation and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in DM wounds. This confirmed that elevated inflammation and reduced blood flow and cell proliferation delayed foot wound healing in the n5-STZ rats. Hence, this open foot wound animal model provides a good approach to study the process of delayed wound healing.

  5. Protective effect of the daming capsule on impaired baroreflexes in STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperlipoidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guan-Yi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Daming capsule (DMC is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat hyperlipoidemia. Both clinic trials and studies on animal models have demonstrated that DMC is beneficial against diabetic symptoms. Impairment of the baroreflex can cause life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. This study was designed to elucidate the effects of DMC on baroreflexes in streptozocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperlipoidemia. Methods Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: untreated controls, rats pretreated STZ and high lipids (a diabetes model or DM rats, and DM rats treated with DMC. The baroreflex sensitivity was examined during intravenous injection of phenylephrine (PE or sodium nitroprusside (SNP and quantified by the change in heart rate over the change in mean arterial blood pressure (ΔHR/ΔMABP. Morphological remodeling of baroreceptors was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The mRNA levels and expression of GluR2 and a GABAA receptor subunit were measured by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results Compared to untreated DM rats, DMC significantly elevated the ratio of ΔHR/ΔMABP by enhancing the compensatory reduction in HR (-ΔHR in response to PE-induced hypertension (+ΔMABP (P P P A receptor expression. Conclusion The Daming capsule partially reversed the parasympathetic baroreflex impairment observed in STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperlipoidemia. Treatment with DMC also prevented the degeneration of neurons and myelinated axons in the brain stem NAm and reversed the down-regulation of GluR2 mRNA. Rescue of NAm function may contribute to the medicinal properties of DMC in diabetic rats.

  6. Anti-Diabetic, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Hyperlipidemic Activities of Flavonoids from Corn Silk on STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Zhang; Liying Wu; Zhongsu Ma; Jia Cheng; Jingbo Liu

    2015-01-01

    Corn silk is a well-known ingredient frequently used in traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of crude flavonoids extracted from corn silk (CSFs) on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results revealed that treatment with 300 mg/kg or 500 mg/kg of CSFs significantly reduced the body weight loss, water consumption, and especially the blood glucose (BG) concentration of diabetic mi...

  7. Delayed progression of diabetic cataractogenesis and retinopathy by Litchi chinensis in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilari, Eswar Kumar; Putta, Swathi

    2017-03-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effect of the aqueous fruit pericarp extract of Litchi chinensis (APLC) on parameters which leads to diabetic cataractogenesis and retinopathy in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The objective of the study is to evaluate the APLC for in vivo antioxidant activity and its role in inhibiting the polyol pathway and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The diabetic animals were treated with L. chinensis for a period of 12 weeks. At the end of 12 weeks, the animals were killed and the biochemical pathways involved in the pathogenesis of cataract such as oxidative stress by protein content, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and polyolpathway by aldose reductase (AR) in lens homogenates, alterations in protein carbonyl content (PCO) and AGEs in both serum and lens the APLC-treated diabetic rats were compared against diabetic control rats. Cataract progression due to hyperglycemia was monitored by slit lamp bio microscope and classified into four stages. Fundoscope test and retinal histopathology were done for assessing retinopathy. Statistically significant reduction in glucose, and elevation of protein content, SOD, CAT, and GSH levels and decreased levels of AR and PCO in lens homogenate and significant reduction in AGEs serum and lens homogenate were observed. Slit lamp examination, fundoscope, and histopathology showed improvement in retinal changes in APLC-treated rats compared to diabetic control animals. The treatment with APLC found to delay the progression of diabetic cataractogenesis and retinopathy, which might be due to its antioxidant activity, because of the presence of active phytochemicals in APLC.

  8. The effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed on oxidative stress in hippocampus of STZ-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Abbasnezhad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of diabetic complications. Diabetes impairs hippocampus neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and learning. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed on oxidative stress in STZ-induced diabetic rats' hippocampus. Materials and Methods: Diabetes induced by 60 mg/kg STZ, i.p, and the rats were divided into five experimental groups (n=8-10 in each group including control (received 0.5 ml normal saline, untreated STZ-diabetic (received 0.5 ml normal saline, and treated rats received Nigella sativa extract (200 and 400 mg/kg or metformin (300 mg/kg by gavage for 42 days. Serum glucose concentration and body weight as well as hippocampus tissue malondialdehyde and thiollevels were determined by calorimetric assay. Results: Serum glucose level in the diabetic rats treated with 200 mg/kg Nigella sativaextract at the days 24 and 45 decreased in comparison to untreated diabetic group (p

  9. The effect of Stevia rebaudiana on serum omentin and visfatin level in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Samad; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Tangestani, Hadis; Bagherinejad, Somaieh Tangerami; Bargahi, Afshar; Bazzi, Parviz; Daneshi, Adel; Sahrapoor, Azam; O'Connor, William J; Rahbar, Ali Reza

    2015-03-01

    Recently the role of adipocytokines in relationship to incidence of diabetes has been demonstrated. One of the medicinal plants that are used in the treatment of diabetes is stevia. This study investigates the effect of stevia on serum omentin and visfatin levels as novel adipocytokines in diabetic induced rats to find potential mechanisms for the anti hyperglycemic effect of stevia. Forty male wistar rats weighing 180-250 g were induced with diabetes by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The animals were divided into 5 groups of 8. Rats in group 1 (non-diabetic control) and group 2 (diabetic control) were treated with distilled water, and the rats in the treated groups, group 3 (T250), group 4 (T500), and group 5 (T750) were treated with stevia, gavaged every day at 9 a.m. in doses of 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg, respectively. At the end of the study significant reductions in fasting blood sugar (FBS), the homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), triglyceride (TG), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and Omentin level were found in groups 3 and 4 in comparison with group 2. Pancreatic histopathology slides demonstrated that stevia extract did not induce any increase in the number of β-cells. The conclusion is that prescription of stevia in the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg/d decreases the omentin level indirectly via activating insulin sensitivity and lowering blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  10. Effect of Resistance Exercise Training Associated with Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy on Serum Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in STZ-induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Molanouri Shamsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy is associated with type 1 diabetes. Effects of resistance exercise training associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy on serum inflammatory cytokines was exactly not clarified. Protein levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β in serum of healthy and streptozotocin (STZ- induced diabetic rats subjected to resistance exercise training were assessed in this study. Rats were divided into the control, training, control diabetic and diabetic training groups. Training groups performed the resistance training consisted of climbing a 1 m ladder with increasing weight added to the tail. Proteins levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β in serum were measured by the ELIZA method. The results of this study indicated that resistance training induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy in diabetic samples (P<0.05. Also, Resistance training decrease IL-6 protein levels in serum. Inflammatory cytokines could act as stress factors in diabetes. It seems that this kind of exercise training individually could not change cytokines levels in serum.

  11. [Effect of combination of insulin and selenium on insulin signal transduction in cardiac muscle of STZ-induced diabetic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Jiao; Yuan, Bing-Xiang; Zou, Ya-Min

    2011-03-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of low doses of insulin (1 u x kg(-1)) and selenium (180 microg x kg(-1)) in combination on general physiological parameters and insulin signal molecules in cardiac muscle of STZ-induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose were estimated using One Touch SureStep Blood Glucose meter. HbA1c levels were estimated using microcolumn assay. TG and TC were estimated using enzymatic assay. The levels of PI3K and GLUT4 in cardiac muscle were examined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The result showed that insulin in combination with selenium could significantly lower blood glucose and blood lipid levels and markedly restored the PI3K and GLUT4 levels in cardiac muscle. It could be concluded that there was cooperation between insulin and selenium, and that treatment of diabetic rats with combined doses of insulin and selenium increased cardiac glucose uptake by upregulating the level of PI3K-mediated GLUT4 in cardiac muscle, eventually ameliorating myocardial dysfunction.

  12. Recombinant human GLP-1(rhGLP-1) alleviating renal tubulointestitial injury in diabetic STZ-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weiqin; Xu, Shiqing; Wang, Zai; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Fang, Qing; Deng, Tingting; Zhang, Wenjian; Lou, Jinning

    2018-01-01

    GLP-1-based treatment improves glycemia through stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. Recently, more and more findings showed that GLP-1 could also protect kidney from diabetic nephropathy. Most of these studies focused on glomeruli, but the effect of GLP-1 on tubulointerstitial and tubule is not clear yet. In this study, we examined the renoprotective effect of recombinant human GLP-1 (rhGLP-1), and investigated the influence of GLP-1 on inflammation and tubulointerstitial injury using diabetic nephropathy rats model of STZ-induced. The results showed that rhGLP-1 reduced urinary albumin without influencing the body weight and food intake. rhGLP-1 could increased the serum C-peptide slightly but not lower fasting blood glucose significantly. In diabetic nephropathy rats, beside glomerular sclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis was very serious. These lesions could be alleviated by rhGLP-1. rhGLP-1 decreased the expression of profibrotic factors collagen I, α-SMA, fibronectin, and inflammation factors MCP-1 and TNFα in tubular tissue and human proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells). Furthermore, rhGLP-1 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB, MAPK in both diabetic tubular tissue and HK-2 cells. The inhibition of the expression of TNFα, MCP-1, collagen I and α-SMA in HK-2 cells by GLP-1 could be mimicked by blocking NF-κB or MAPK. These results indicate that rhGLP-1 exhibit renoprotective effect by alleviation of tubulointerstitial injury via inhibiting phosphorylation of MAPK and NF-κB. Therefore, rhGLP-1 may be a potential drug for treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) on testicular tissue in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, S; Balajadeh, B Kabiri; Golalipour, M J

    2011-08-15

    Urtica dioica L. (Stinging nettle) has already been known for a long time as a medicinal plant in the world. This histopathological and morphometrical study was conducted to determine the effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica leaves on testis of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Eighteen male Wistar rats were allocated to equally normal, diabetic and treatment groups. Hyperglycemia was induced by Streptozotocin (80 mg kg(-1)) in animals of diabetic and treatment groups. One week after STZ injection (80 mg kg(-1)), the rats of treatment group received the extract of U. dioica (100 mg/kg/day) IP for 28 days. After 5 weeks of study, all the rats were sacrificed and testes were removed and fixed in bouin and after tissue processing stained with H and E technique. Tubular cell disintegration, sertoli and spermatogonia cell vacuolization and decrease in sperm concentration in seminiferous tubules were seen in diabetic and treatment groups group in comparison with control. External Seminiferous Tubular Diameter (STD) and Seminiferous Epithelial Height (SEH) significantly reduced (p Urtica dioica leaves, after induction of diabetes; has no treatment effect on seminiferous tubules alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

  14. Ghrelin ameliorates nerve growth factor Dysmetabolism and inflammation in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuxing; Shen, Zhaoxing; Zhang, Dongling; Luo, Huiqiong; Chen, Jinliang; Sun, Yue; Xiao, Qian

    2017-06-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is characterized by cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation, deficient neurotrophic support, and neuronal and synaptic loss. Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide, is associated with neuromodulation and cognitive improvement, which has been considered as a potential protective agent for several neurodegenerative diseases. Here we sought to investigate the role of ghrelin in preventing diabetic-related neuropathology. We found that ghrelin attenuated astrocytic activation and reduced levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In addition, ghrelin inhibited p38 mitogen-associated protein kinase activation. The upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) precursor and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and downregulation of mature NGF and MMP-7 in the diabetic brain were reversed by ghrelin. Treatment with ghrelin elevated synaptophysin expression and synaptic density in diabetic rats. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ghrelin ameliorates diabetes-related neurodegeneration by preventing NGF dysmetabolism and synaptic degeneration through regulating MMP levels as well as inhibiting neuroinflammation.

  15. Evaluation of antidiabetic potential of selected traditional Chinese medicines in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Li, Xuegang; Chen, Xin; Ye, Xiaoli; Huang, Jing; Jin, Yanan; Li, Panpan; Deng, Yafei; Jin, Qing; Shi, Qing; Shu, Hejing

    2011-10-11

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used for treating complex chronic diseases owing to their fewer side-effects, better patient tolerance and relatively less cost. The present work was carried out to study the anti-diabetic efficacy and mechanisms of 34 TCMs. Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic mice were orally administrated with corresponding herbal solution once a day for 4 weeks. At the end of experiment, the level of plasma glucose, malondialdehyde (MDA), the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the serum aldose reductase (AR) were determined, the effects of TCM extract on α-glucosidase and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro were also evaluated. 13 out of the 34 herbs showed a statistically significant plasma glucose lowering action compared with the diabetic control group. Biochemical analysis revealed that Atractylodes macrocephala, Codonopsis pilosula, Dioscorea opposite, Flos lonicerae and Pueraria lobata may retard the progression of diabetes via reduce the blood glucose level and prevent the increase of AR activity. Other tested herbs, such as Ramulus cinnamomi, Cinnamomum cassia, and Eucommia ulmoides, showed the antidiabetic ability by either prevent the decrease in SOD activity or suppress the increase of MDA. Zymologic assay reveals that Pueraria lobata and Anemarrhena asphodeloides showed the highest inhibition against α-glucosidase and ACE respectively. Interestingly, the post-treatment glucose levels and AR activity were positively correlated with kidney/body weight of 34 herbs treated diabetic mice (p = 0.02, 0.04 respectively). Several potential antidiabetic herbs derived from Chinese traditional pharmacopeia such as Dioscorea opposite, Pueraria lobata, Codonopsis pilosula and Ramulus cinnamomi, have been found to exert a beneficial action on diabetes and diabetic complications via multi-mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. RNA-Seq analysis of glycosylation related gene expression in STZ-induced diabetic rat kidney inner medulla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian eQian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The UT-A1 urea transporter is crucial to the kidney’s ability to generate concentrated urine. Native UT-A1 from kidney inner medulla (IM is a heavily glycosylated protein with two glycosylation forms of 97 and 117 kDa. In diabetes, UT-A1 protein abundance, particularly the 117 kD isoform, is significantly increased corresponding to an increased urea permeability in perfused IM collecting ducts, which plays an important role in preventing the osmotic diuresis caused by glucosuria. However, how the glycan carbohydrate structure change and the glycan related enzymes regulate kidney urea transport activity, particularly under diabetic condition, is largely unknown. In this study, using sugar-specific binding lectins, we found that the carbohydrate structure of UT-A1 is changed with increased amounts of sialic acid, fucose, and increased glycan branching under diabetic conditions. These changes were accompanied by altered UT-A1 association with the galectin proteins, α-galactoside glycan binding proteins. To explore the molecular basis of the alterations of glycan structures, the highly sensitive next generation sequencing (NGS technology, Illumina RNA-seq, was employed to analyze genes involved in the process of UT-A1 glycosylation using streptozotocin (STZ - induced diabetic rat kidney. Differential gene expression analysis combining quantitative PCR revealed that expression of a number of important glycosylation related genes were changed under diabetic conditions. These genes include the glycosyltransferase genes Mgat4a, the sialylation enzymes St3gal1 and St3gal4 and glycan binding protein galectin-3, -5, -8 and -9. In contrast, although highly expressed in kidney IM, the glycosyltransferase genes Mgat1, Mgat2, and fucosyltransferase Fut8, did not show any changes. Conclusions: In diabetes, not only is UT-A1 protein abundance increased but the protein’s glycan structure is also significantly changed. UT-A1 protein becomes highly sialylated

  17. The effect of exercise on the peripheral nerve in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heung Yong; Lee, Kyung Ae; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-04-01

    The exact effectiveness of supportive care activities, such as exercise, in diabetes patients has yet to be elucidated in the diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) field. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the effect of regular exercise on the peripheral nerves of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The animals were divided as follows into six groups according to exercise combination and glucose control: Normal group, normal group with exercise (EXE), diabetic group (DM), DM group with EXE, DM+glucose control with insulin (INS), and DM+INS+EXE. Animals in the exercise groups were made to walk on a treadmill machine everyday for 30 min at a setting of 8 m/min without inclination. After 8 weeks, sensory parameters were evaluated, and after 16 weeks, biochemicals and peripheral nerves were quantified by immunohistochemistry and compared among experimental groups. The resulting data showed that fasting blood glucose levels and HbA1c levels were not influenced significantly by exercise in normal and DM groups. However, the current perception threshold and the von Frey stimulation test revealed higher thresholds in the DM+INS+EXE group than in the DM+INS group (PExercise alone was not associated with a significant protective effect on the peripheral nerve in the normal or DM groups; however, a beneficial effect from exercise was observed when hyperglycemia was controlled with insulin in the DM group. These findings suggest that exercise has a potential protective effect against DPN based on the preferential effort for glucose control, although exercise alone cannot prevent peripheral nerve damage from hyperglycemia.

  18. Exercise Training and Grape Seed Extract Co-Administration Improves Lipid Profile, Weight Loss, Bradycardia, and Hypotension of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badavi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:: Exercise Training (ET and Grape Seed Extract (GSE as an antioxidant have many positive effects on controlling diabetes mellitus and its complications. Objectives:: This study aimed to determine the effects of GSE alone or combined with ET on body weight, plasma lipid profile, blood pressure, and heart rate in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods:: In this study, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to five groups: sedentary control, sedentary diabetic, trained diabetic, GSE treated sedentary diabetic, and GSE treated trained diabetic. ET was conducted on the treadmill daily for 8 weeks. One way ANOVA followed by LSD test was used for statistical analysis. Results:: Reduction of body weight, high density lipoproteins, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure and increment of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein, and very low density lipoproteins were observed after STZ injection. Co-administration of GSE and ET had more positive effects on lipid profile compared to each method alone. In addition, GSE and ET modified heart rate partially, while their combination was more effective in improvement of heart rat in conscious rats. On the other hand, administration of ET or GSE alone did not affect systolic blood pressure and body weight, while their combination restored systolic blood pressure completely and improved body weight partially. Conclusions:: The study findings indicated that ET combined with GSE had more beneficial effects compared to each one alone on the complications of STZ induced diabetes. This may constitute a convenient and inexpensive therapeutic approach to diabetic complications.

  19. Polyploidy Analysis and Attenuation of Oxidative Stress in Hepatic Tissue of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with an Aqueous Extract of Vochysia rufa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Barbosa Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by hyperglycemia and alterations in the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Due to its hypoglycemic effect Vochysia rufa is frequently used in Uberlandia, Brazil, to treat DM. Despite its popularity, there is little information about its effect on hepatic tissue. Therefore, we evaluated the histoarchitecture, oxidative stress parameters, and polyploidy of liver tissue from streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats treated with aqueous extract of Vochysia rufa (AEV. Histology was determined by fixing the livers, processing, and staining with HE. Oxidative stress was determined by evaluating CAT, GPx, and SOD activity in liver homogenates and hepatic mitochondria fraction and by measuring GST, GSH levels and lipid peroxidation (MDA. Polyploidy was determined by subjecting isolated hepatocyte nuclei to flow cytometry. In the diabetic group, GST activity and GSH rates decreased whereas liver homogenate analysis showed that GPx, SOD activity and MDA increased. AEV treatment restored all parameters to normal levels. The oxidative stress analysis of hepatic mitochondria fraction showed similar results. Lower polyploid cell populations were found in the diabetic rat livers, even after glibenclamide treatment. Thus, AEV treatment efficiently reduced hepatic oxidative stress caused by STZ-induced diabetes and produced no morphological changes in the histological analysis.

  20. Anti-Diabetic, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Hyperlipidemic Activities of Flavonoids from Corn Silk on STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Liying; Ma, Zhongsu; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-12-23

    Corn silk is a well-known ingredient frequently used in traditional Chinese herbal medicines. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of crude flavonoids extracted from corn silk (CSFs) on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results revealed that treatment with 300 mg/kg or 500 mg/kg of CSFs significantly reduced the body weight loss, water consumption, and especially the blood glucose (BG) concentration of diabetic mice, which indicated their potential anti-diabetic activities. Serum total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays were also performed to evaluate the anti-oxidant effects. Besides, several serum lipid values including total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were reduced and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C) was increased. The anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic effect of the CSFs suggest a potential therapeutic treatment for diabetic conditions.

  1. Attenuation of diabetic nephropathy by Sanziguben Granule inhibiting EMT through Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidative effects in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenxue; Li, Qian; Lai, Sisi; Yang, Lei; Shi, Guoqi; Wang, Qing; Luo, Zijie; Zhao, Ruizhi; Yu, Yang

    2017-06-09

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is an acute and serious diabetic complication characterized by renal hypertrophy and renal fibrosis with the expansion of extracellular matrices. Diabetic nephropathy has become a major cause of end-stage kidney disease. Sanziguben Granule (SZGB) is a compound prescription which has been widely applied in clinical medicine for the prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy as well as for acute and chronic kidney injuries. However, the mechanism of protective effects of SZGB in DN remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the effects of SZGB on renal interstitial fibrosis, antioxidant proficiency, and apoptosis in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were prepared by performing a right uninephrectomy along with a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Rats were divided into six groups including sham, DN, SZGB-D, SZGB-Z, SZGB-G and fosinopril. SZGB and fosinopril were given to rats by gavage for 12 weeks. Samples from urine, blood and kidneys were collected for biochemical, histological, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. We found that rats treated with SZGB showed reduced 24-h urinary protein excretion along with reduced serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels. SZGB was also shown to prevent the disruption of catalase activity and reduce serum urea, creatinine, and renal malondialdehyde while increasing glutathione levels. Moreover, SZGB administration markedly improved the expression levels of E-cadherin, 4-HNE, Nrf2, HO-1, and Bcl-2, while it decreased the expression levels of Vimentin, α-SMA and Cleaved caspase-3 in the kidneys of diabetic rats. The renoprotective effects of SZGB was believed to be mediated by its antioxidant capacity, and SZGB treatment attenuated renal fibrosis through stimulating the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway in the diabetic kidneys. Therefore, it is suggested that SZGB can restrain epithelial

  2. The Research on the Relationship of RAGE, LRP-1, and Aβ Accumulation in the Hippocampus, Prefrontal Lobe, and Amygdala of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lou-Yan; Fei, Yu-Lang; Wang, Xiao-Ye; Wu, Song-Di; Du, Jun-Hui; Zhu, Mei; Jin, Long; Li, Ming; Li, Hai-Long; Zhai, Jia-Jia; Ji, Lu-Peng; Ma, Ran-Ran; Liu, Song-Fang; Li, Mo; Ma, Li; Ma, Xiao-Rui; Qu, Qiu-Min; Lv, Ya-Li

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been regarded as an important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and diabetic patients and animals have shown cognitive dysfunction. More research has shown that the amyloid-β (Aβ), which is a hallmark of AD, was found deposited in the hippocampus of diabetic rats. This Aβ accumulation is regulated by the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1). However, the expression of RAGE and LRP-1 in diabetic rats is not very clear. In the present study, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats to investigate whether the expression of RAGE and LRP-1 is related to Aβ 1-42 deposition at the hippocampus, prefrontal lobe, and amygdala in DM. We found that diabetic rats had longer escape latency and less frequency of entrance into the target zone than that of the control group (P RAGE increased (P RAGE positively (P RAGE, and LRP-1 were not changed in the amygdala between the diabetic rats and the control group. These findings indicated that upregulating RAGE and/or downregulating LRP-1 at the hippocampus and the prefrontal lobe contributed to the Aβ 1-42 accumulation and then further promoted the cognitive impairment of diabetic rats.

  3. A Soxhlet Extract of Gongronema latifolium Retains Moderate Blood Glucose Lowering Effect and Produces Structural Recovery in the Pancreas of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hindi, Bassel; Yusoff, Nor A.; Atangwho, Item J.; Ahmad, Mariam; Asmawi, Mohd Z.; Yam, Mun F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gongronema latifolium Benth. (GL) possesses considerable glucose lowering effects able to be utilized on a large-scale. This paper investigates the effects of a Soxhlet extract on hyperglycemia, Langerhans islets and glucose uptake by abdominal muscles. Methods: Ethanol and a Soxhlet apparatus were used to obtain GL ethanolic Soxhlet extract (GLES). It was then administered to randomly-segregated male Sprague-Dawley, normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats, using oral gavage to evaluate blood glucose levels (BGLs), serum lipid profile, insulin levels and the pancreas post-treatment. Results: GLES significantly (p Soxhlet extraction of Gongronema latifolium probably leads to the destruction of active heat-liable compounds. PMID:29083373

  4. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Doses of Low Energy Shock Wave Therapy on the Erectile Function of Streptozotocin (STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the therapeutic effect of different doses of low energy shock wave therapy (LESWT on the erectile dysfunction (ED in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. SD rats (n = 75 were randomly divided into 5 groups (normal control, diabetic control, 3 different dose LESWT treated diabetic groups. Diabetic rats were induced by intra-peritoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg and rats with fasting blood glucose ≥ 300 mg/dL were selected as diabetic models. Twelve weeks later, different doses of LESWT (100, 200 and 300 shocks each time treatment on penises were used to treat ED (7.33 MPa, 2 shocks/s three times a week for two weeks. The erectile function was evaluated by intracavernous pressure (ICP after 1 week washout period. Then the penises were harvested for histological study. The results showed LESWT could significantly improve the erectile function of diabetic rats, increase smooth muscle and endothelial contents, up-regulate the expression of α-SMA, vWF, nNOS and VEGF, and down- regulate the expression of RAGE in corpus cavernosum. The therapeutic effect might relate to treatment dose positively, and the maximal therapeutic effect was noted in the LESWT300 group. Consequently, 300 shocks each time might be the ideal LESWT dose for diabetic ED treatment.

  5. In Vivo Hypoglycaemic Effect and Inhibitory Mechanism of the Branch Bark Extract of the Mulberry on STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Yu Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Branch bark extract (BBE derived from the mulberry cultivar Husang 32 (Morus multicaulis L. with aqueous alcohol solution has been investigated as an inhibitor of α-glycosidase in vitro. Mulberry BBE was orally administered to STZ-induced diabetic mice for three weeks, and it improved the weight gain and ameliorated the swelling of liver and kidney in diabetic mice. Obviously, mulberry BBE not only can reduce the abnormally elevated levels of serum insulin and ameliorate insulin resistance induced by STZ, but also it regulates dyslipidemia in diabetic mice. To understand this therapeutic effect and the regulatory mechanisms of BBE in diabetic mice, a qRT-PCR experiment was performed, indicating that the mulberry BBE can regulate the mRNA expression of glycometabolism genes in diabetic mice, including glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, glucokinase (GCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, thereby regulating sugar metabolism and reducing the blood glucose level in diabetic mice. The mulberry BBE can increase the mRNA expression of the genes Ins1, Ins2 and pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1 and may decrease the insulin resistance in diabetic mice. Those results provide an important basis for making the best use of mulberry branch resources and producing biomedical drugs with added value.

  6. Antidiabetic and Hypolipidemic Activities of Curculigo latifolia Fruit:Root Extract in High Fat Fed Diet and Low Dose STZ Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Akmal Ishak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curculigo latifolia fruit is used as alternative sweetener while root is used as alternative treatment for diuretic and urinary problems. The antidiabetic and hypolipidemic activities of C. latifolia fruit:root aqueous extract in high fat diet (HFD and 40 mg streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats through expression of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolisms were investigated. Diabetic rats were treated with C. latifolia fruit:root extract for 4 weeks. Plasma glucose, insulin, adiponectin, lipid profiles, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT, urea, and creatinine levels were measured before and after treatments. Regulations of selected genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolisms were determined. Results showed the significant (P<0.05 increase in body weight, high density lipoprotein (HDL, insulin, and adiponectin levels and decreased glucose, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low density lipoprotein (LDL, urea, creatinine, ALT, and GGT levels in diabetic rats after 4 weeks treatment. Furthermore, C. latifolia fruit:root extract significantly increased the expression of IRS-1, IGF-1, GLUT4, PPARα, PPARγ, AdipoR1, AdipoR2, leptin, LPL, and lipase genes in adipose and muscle tissues in diabetic rats. These results suggest that C. latifolia fruit:root extract exerts antidiabetic and hypolipidemic effects through altering regulation genes in glucose and lipid metabolisms in diabetic rats.

  7. Hypoglycemic effect of the polyphenols rich extract from Rose rugosa Thunb on high fat diet and STZ induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liu; Tang, Dan; Zhao, Haiqing; Xin, Xuelei; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2017-03-22

    Rosa rugosa Thunb is a traditional Uygur medicine that has been used in the treatment of diabetes in Uygur ancient recipe for hundreds of years. However, the mechanism of Rosa rugosa Thunb activity is still unclear. This study was designed to address this issue by studying the polyphenols enriched extract (RPE) of Rosa rugosa Thunb in diabetic rats. RPE were tested in the inhibition of α-glucosidase and oxidative stress in vitro. RPE was administrated at dosages of 37.5, 75 and 150mg/kg body weight in the type 2 diabetic rats, which were made by high fat diet feeding plus a low dose of STZ injection (30mg/kg). The therapeutic effect was evaluated four weeks later. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT) and insulin signal pathway (PI3K/AKT) were examined to determine insulin sensitivity. Blood glucose levels and body weight were measured weekly in the study. In vitro, RPE exhibited an activity in the inhibition of α-glucosidase and had an excellent antioxidant activity in the liver of diabetic rats. RPE significantly decreased the fasting blood glucose, improved insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR), OGTT, ITT and blood lipid profile. The glycogen synthesis and hexokinase activity were increased together with the improved signaling activity of insulin as indicated by p-IRS, p-IR, p-AKT, and p-GSK-3β. The results suggest that RPE reduced blood glucose in type 2 diabetic rats by improvement of insulin sensitivity. The effect is likely achieved by inhibition of oxidative stress and α-glucosidase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of L-carnitine administration on serum insulin and adiponectin levels, and AMPK, APPL1 and PPARγ gene expression in STZ-induced diabetic rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shahouzehi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered as a metabolic disease in which insulin secretion and functions are disturbed and characterized by hyperglycemia. L-carnitine is synthesized in most mammals and plays critical role in fatty acid oxidation and energy production. Data about the L-carnitine hypoglycemic effects are controversial. We evaluated long-term oral L-carnitine administration effects on blood glucose, insulin and adiponectin levels, as well as expression of AMPK, APPL1 and PPARγ genes in liver of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Group 1 (control, did not receive any treatment, group 2 received 50 mg/kg STZ by i.p injection, group 3 received single dose of 50 mg/kg STZ by i.p injection and also 600 mg/kg/day L-carnitine orally for 5 weeks. Our results showed that L-carnitine long-term oral supplementation significantly reduced blood glucose and normalized insulin levels in diabetic rats. Also, we found that L-carnitine significantly increased AMPK and APPL1 expression, and showed a mild elevation of PPARγ expression. In sum, we suggest that long-term L-carnitine supplementation has beneficial effects on diabetic rats which showed hypoglycemic effects. Probably the beneficial effects of L-carnitine are contributed to the upregulation of insulin sensitizers such as AMPK and adiponectin.

  9. A Soxhlet Extract of Gongronema latifolium Retains Moderate Blood Glucose Lowering Effect and Produces Structural Recovery in the Pancreas of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassel Al-Hindi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gongronema latifolium Benth. (GL possesses considerable glucose lowering effects able to be utilized on a large-scale. This paper investigates the effects of a Soxhlet extract on hyperglycemia, Langerhans islets and glucose uptake by abdominal muscles. Methods: Ethanol and a Soxhlet apparatus were used to obtain GL ethanolic Soxhlet extract (GLES. It was then administered to randomly-segregated male Sprague-Dawley, normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats, using oral gavage to evaluate blood glucose levels (BGLs, serum lipid profile, insulin levels and the pancreas post-treatment. Results: GLES significantly (p < 0.05 decreased BGLs of normal rats in glucose tolerance testing at a dose of 2 g/kg b.w. but failed to do so in diabetic rats undergoing acute 7-h treatment. Given twice-daily, 1 g/kg b.w. of GLES moderately controlled diabetic BGLs starting from day 10. After 14 days of treatment, 1 g/kg and 0.5 g/kg b.w. of GLES caused 44% and 50% respective increases in the average area of Langerhans islets compared to DC. Using isolated rat abdominal muscle, GLES was found to be a mild insulin-sensitizer. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of the known glucose-lowering phytosterol, Sitostenone. Conclusion: Despite retaining moderate antidiabetic activity, Soxhlet extraction of Gongronema latifolium probably leads to the destruction of active heat-liable compounds.

  10. Chromane isolated from leaves of Dillenia indica improves the neuronal dysfunction in STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navpreet; Kishore, Lalit; Singh, Randhir

    2017-07-12

    According to the Indian traditional medicine, Dillenia indica L. has shown therapeutic efficacy in various diseases. Fruits and leaves of the plant possess anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Reactive oxygen species, formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and apoptosis are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of D. indica and its isolate, chromane (CR), on thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, allodynia, MNCV and oxidative-nitrosative stress in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of Streptozotocin (STZ; 65mg/kg) for the development of diabetic neuropathy. Chronic treatment with DAE (100, 200 and 400mg/kg, p.o.) and CR (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o.) for 30 days was started from the 60th day of STZ administration. Development of neuropathy was evident from a marked hyperalgesia and allodynia; reduced MNCV associated with increased formation of AGEs and reactive oxygen species. significantly attenuated behavioral and biochemical changes associated with diabetic neuropathy. Present study suggested that DAE and CR ameliorated hyperglycemia and diabetic neuropathic pain via modulation of oxidative-nitrosative stress and reduction in AGEs formation in the diabetic rats. Thus D. indica might be beneficial in chronic diabetics, ameliorate the progression of diabetic neuropathy and may also find application in diabetic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Active and passive mechanical properties of isolated arterioles from STZ-induced diabetic rats. Effect of aminoguanidine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M A; Ege, E A

    1994-12-01

    Studies were performed to examine the effect of experimental diabetes (4-6 weeks duration) on both the passive elastic and active myogenic properties of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles. Studies were conducted on untreated streptozotocin (60 mg/kg)-induced diabetic rats and in similar rats treated daily with either amino-guanidine (25 mg/kg) or methylguanidine (25 mg/kg). First-order cremaster muscle arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized in the absence of intraluminal flow. Video microscopy was used to determine relationships between arteriolar diameter and intraluminal pressure both in the active and passive (o mmol/l Ca(2+)-2 mmol/l EGTA superfusated) tes. The measurements were used to calculate active myogenic responses, arteriolar distensibility, and stress-strain relationships. Under passive conditions, arterioles from untreated diabetic animals appeared to be stiffer and less distensible compared with similar arterioles from control animals. Under active conditions, i.e., in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, arterioles from the untreated diabetic group showed impaired myogenic reactivity as evidenced by a significant (P < 0.001) reduction in the negative slope of the pressure-diameter relationship over a physiological range of intraluminal pressures. Chronic treatment with aminoguanidine prevented the diabetes-induced changes in the active and passive properties of the isolated arterioles while treatment with methylguanidine appeared ineffective. Vasodilator responses to topically applied acetylcholine (10(-8) to 5 x 10(-6) mol/l) were significantly impaired in diabetic animals irrespective of treatment with aminoguanidine. The data indicate that experimental diabetes is associated with a decreased passive distensibility, or stiffening, of skeletal muscle arterioles that, in addition, may contribute to impaired active myogenic responses.

  12. Evaluation of the Effect of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Citrullus colocynthis in Normoglycemic and Streptozocine (STZ Induced Diabetic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Nikbakht

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Adverse side effects of chemical drugs for treatment of diabetes persuaded the using of medical plants. Citrullus colocynthis is a plant which has been used traditionally for treatment of diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroalcholic extract of Citrullus colocynthis fruit on normoglycemic and streptozocine induced diabetic rats. Materials & Methods: 45 male Wistar rats weighing, 250-350 gr, have been selected and randomly divided in seven groups. Group1 without any drugs usage, group 2 that received normal saline (IV and distilled water (oral, group 3 received only streptozocine (IV, group 4 received only the extract of Citrullus colocynthis (1000 mg/kg, groups 5, 6 and 7 received 500, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg of Citrullus colocynthis extract after injection of STZ and induction of diabetes. Diabetes was induced by intravenous injection (45 mg/kg of STZ. Blood sampling was provided directly from animal heart and blood sugar was measured. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software using students t-test and ANOVA. Results: Mean of normal blood sugar in control group was 156.5±15.7 mg/dl which defined as normal blood sugar. Streptozocine significantly increased blood sugar (p<0.05. The Citrullus colocynthis extract with 500 mg/kg dosage has not significantly reduced the blood sugar but is dosage of 1000 and 1500 mg/kg significantly decreased the blood sugar in a dose-dependent mode (p<0.05. Results also showed that the extract in dosage of 1000 mg/kg did not have a significant effect on normoglycemic animals. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the extract of Citrullus colocynthis fruit dose-dependently reduced the blood glucose level in streptozocine-induced diabetic rats but did not have significant effect on normal blood sugar.

  13. Determination of micronutrients and oxidative stress status in the blood of STZ-induced experimental diabetic rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragbetli, Cennet; Dede, Semiha; Tanritanir, Pinar; Yoruk, Ibrahim Hakki; Ragbetli, Murat Cetin

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to research the effect of streptozotocin (STZ) at different doses on the serum micronutrients and oxidative stress status in diabetic rat models. Twenty male rats averaged 250 g and 3-4 months old were used as experimental models. They were put in four groups composed of five rats each. Diabetic was induced by administering STZ 55 and 65 mg/kg intraperitonally. The serum micronutrients including minerals and vitamins (Cu, Zn, Mg, Fe, vitamins D, E, and C) and oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, MDA) were determined. Cu, Zn, and Vitamin D3 levels were found to increase significantly in STZ groups (p micronutrients were affected significantly.

  14. Interaction of glimepiride with prokinetic drugs on some of gastrointestinal functions in STZ-induced diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Fouad

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Use of metoclopramide, domperidone or erythromycin with glimepiride may guard against the risk of gastrointestinal motility disturbance associated with glimepiride treated diabetic patients and may enhance the absorption of carbohydrates. The dose of glimepiride may be safely decreased when combined with erythromycin or metoclopramide.

  15. Inhibition of MAPK-mediated ACE expression by compound C66 prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong; Huang, Yi; Wang, Zhe; Fang, Qilu; Sun, Yusheng; Tong, Chao; Peng, Kesong; Wang, Yangwei; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu; Zhao, Yunjie; Liang, Guang

    2014-01-01

    A range of in vitro, experimental and clinical intervention studies have implicated an important role for hyperglycaemia-induced activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Blockade of RAS by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is an effective strategy in treating diabetic kidney diseases. However, few studies demonstrate the mechanism by which hyperglycaemia up-regulates the expression of ACE gene. Our previous studies have identified a novel curcumin analogue, (2E,6E)-2,6-bis(2-(trifluoromethyl)benzylidene)cyclohexanone (C66), which could inhibit the high glucose (HG)-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in mouse macrophages. In this study, we found that the renal protection of C66 in diabetic mice was associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inactivation and ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) down-regulation. Generally, MAPKs have been considered as a downstream signalling of Ang II and a mediator for Ang II-induced pathophysiological actions. However, using C66 and specific inhibitors as small molecule probes, in vitro experiments demonstrate that the MAPK signalling pathway regulates ACE expression under HG stimulation, which contributes to renal Ang II activation and the development of DN. This study indicates that C66 is a potential candidate of DN therapeutic agents, and more importantly, that reduction in ACE expression by MAPKs inhibition seems to be an alternative strategy for the treatment of DN. PMID:24330074

  16. Heterogeneous Downregulation of Angiotensin II AT1-A and AT1-B Receptors in Arterioles in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rat Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Razga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The renin granulation of kidney arterioles is enhanced in diabetes despite the fact that the level of angiotensin II in the diabetic kidney is elevated. Therefore, the number of angiotensin II AT1-A and AT1-B receptors in afferent and efferent arteriole’s renin-positive and renin-negative smooth muscle cells (SMC was estimated. Method. Immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopic level was combined with 3D stereological sampling techniques. Results. In diabetes the enhanced downregulation of AT1-B receptors in the renin-positive than in the renin-negative SMCs in both arterioles was resulted: the significant difference in the number of AT1 (AT1-A + AT1-B receptors between the two types of SMCs in the normal rats was further increased in diabetes and in contrast with the significant difference observed between the afferent and efferent arterioles in the normal animals, there was no such difference in diabetes. Conclusions. The enhanced downregulation of the AT1-B receptors in the renin-negative SMCs in the efferent arterioles demonstrates that the regulation of the glomerular filtration rate by the pre- and postglomerular arterioles is changed in diabetes. The enhanced downregulation of the AT1-B receptors in the renin-positive SMCs in the arterioles may result in an enhanced level of renin granulation in the arterioles.

  17. Effect of resistance exercise training on expression of Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molanouri Shamsi, M; Mahdavi, M; Quinn, L S; Gharakhanlou, R; Isanegad, A

    2016-09-01

    Impairment of adipose tissue and skeletal muscles accrued following type 1 diabetes is associated with protein misfolding and loss of adipose mass and skeletal muscle atrophy. Resistance training can maintain muscle mass by changing both inflammatory cytokines and stress factors in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 5-week ladder climbing resistance training program on the expression of Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and fast-twitch flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Induction of diabetes reduced body mass, while resistance training preserved FHL muscle weight in diabetic rats without any changes in body mass. Diabetes increased Hsp70 protein content in skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, and serum. Hsp70 protein levels were decreased in normal and diabetic rats by resistance training in the FHL, but not soleus muscle. Furthermore, resistance training decreased inflammatory cytokines in FHL skeletal muscle. On the other hand, Hsp70 and inflammatory cytokine protein levels were increased by training in adipose tissue. Also, significant positive correlations between inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and skeletal muscles with Hsp70 protein levels were observed. In conclusion, we found that in diabetic rats, resistance training decreased inflammatory cytokines and Hsp70 protein levels in fast skeletal muscle, increased adipose tissue inflammatory cytokines and Hsp70, and preserved FHL muscle mass. These results suggest that resistance training can maintain skeletal muscle mass in diabetes by changing inflammatory cytokines and stress factors such as Hsp70 in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

  18. Effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Prangos ferulacea (L. Lindle on histopathology of pancreas and diabetes treatment in STZ- induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Soltani band

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: The roots´ hydro-alcoholic extract of P.f seems to be capable to regenerate the islets of Langerhans in the treated rats in comparison with the untreated diabetic rats. This property can be due to some components of the plant that can increase insulin secretion.

  19. Protection against T1DM-Induced Bone Loss by Zinc Supplementation: Biomechanical, Histomorphometric, and Molecular Analyses in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Hernandes Bortolin

    Full Text Available Several studies have established an association between diabetes and alterations in bone metabolism; however, the underlying mechanism is not well established. Although zinc is recognized as a potential preventive agent against diabetes-induced bone loss, there is no evidence demonstrating its effect in chronic diabetic conditions. This study evaluated the effects of zinc supplementation in a chronic (90 days type 1 diabetes-induced bone-loss model. Male Wistar rats were distributed in three groups: control, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, and T1DM plus zinc supplementation (T1DMS. Serum biochemical analysis; tibia histomorphometric, biomechanical, and collagen-content analyses; and femur mRNA expression were evaluated. Relative to T1DM, the zinc-supplemented group showed increased histomorphometric parameters such as TbWi and BAr and decreased TbSp, increased biomechanical parameters (maximum load, stiffness, ultimate strain, and Young's modulus, and increased type I collagen content. Interestingly, similar values for these parameters were observed between the T1DMS and control groups. These results demonstrate the protective effect of zinc on the maintenance of bone strength and flexibility. In addition, downregulation of OPG, COL1A, and MMP-9 genes was observed in T1DMS, and the anabolic effects of zinc were evidenced by increased OC expression and serum ALP activity, both related to osteoblastogenesis, demonstrating a positive effect on bone formation. In contrast, T1DM showed excessive bone loss, observed through reduced histomorphometric and biomechanical parameters, characterizing diabetes-associated bone loss. The bone loss was also observed through upregulation of OPG, COL1A, and MMP-9 genes. In conclusion, zinc showed a positive effect on the maintenance of bone architecture and biomechanical parameters. Indeed, OC upregulation and control of expression of OPG, COL1A, and MMP-9 mRNAs, even in chronic hyperglycemia, support an anabolic

  20. Effect of Elderberry (Sambucus nigra L. Extract Supplementation in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo C. Salvador

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Elderberry (Sambucus nigra L. lipophilic and polar extract dietary supplementation effects were evaluated according to diabetes management indices, using an in vivo model. A research pipeline was constructed, that ranged from extract preparation, partial chemical characterization and toxicity evaluation, to examining the elderberry extract dietary supplementation effects on biofluid and tissues. Extracts toxicity was screened using an Aliivibrio fischeri bioluminescence model. A concentration of up to 60 mg/L was selected, and rat doses for oral supplementation were computed applying the interspecies correlation between A. fischeri and rats. Wistar type 2 diabetic rats, induced by streptozotocin (STZ, were fed a high-fat diet and supplemented for 4 weeks at doses of 190 and 350 mg/kg body weight/day of lipophilic and polar extract, respectively. As far as we know, lipophilic elderberry extract supplementation was assessed for the first time, while polar extract was administrated at higher doses and for a shorter period compared to previous studies, aiming to evaluate subacute supplementation effects. The polar extract modulated glucose metabolism by correcting hyperglycemia, while the lipophilic extract lowered insulin secretion. Both extracts lowered insulin resistance, without remarkable alterations to hematological indices, sera lipids and sera and tissular trace element homeostasis. In conclusion, elderberries are a potential source of bioactive compounds for formulations to be used as co-adjuvants in diabetes management.

  1. Renal injury is accelerated by global hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha deficiency in a mouse model of STZ-induced diabetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bohuslavová, Romana; Čerychová, Radka; Nepomucká, Kateřina; Pavlínková, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 48. ISSN 1472-6823 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Diabetic complications * Diabetic nephropathy * Hypoxia Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.275, year: 2016

  2. Changes in Iron Metabolism and Oxidative Status in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with Bis(maltolato Oxovanadium (IV as an Antidiabetic Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sánchez-González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of vanadium as a micronutrient and hypoglycaemic agent has yet to be fully clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate changes in the metabolism of iron and in antioxidant defences of diabetic STZ rats following treatment with vanadium. Four groups were examined: control; diabetic; diabetic treated with 1 mgV/day; and Diabetic treated with 3 mgV/day. The vanadium was supplied in drinking water as bis(maltolato oxovanadium (IV (BMOV. The experiment had a duration of five weeks. Iron was measured in food, faeces, urine, serum, muscle, kidney, liver, spleen, and femur. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, NAD(PH: quinone-oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1 activity, and protein carbonyl group levels in the liver were determined. In the diabetic rats, higher levels of Fe absorbed, Fe content in kidney, muscle, and femur, and NQO1 activity were recorded, together with decreased catalase activity, in comparison with the control rats. In the rats treated with 3 mgV/day, there was a significant decrease in fasting glycaemia, Fe content in the liver, spleen, and heart, catalase activity, and levels of protein carbonyl groups in comparison with the diabetic group. In conclusion BMOV was a dose-dependent hypoglycaemic agent. Treatment with 3 mgV/day provoked increased Fe deposits in the tissues, which promoted a protein oxidative damage in the liver.

  3. Effect of an aqueous extract of Cucurbita ficifolia Bouché on the glutathione redox cycle in mice with STZ-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Flores, M; Angeles-Mejia, S; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Medina-Navarro, R; Hernández-Saavedra, D; Ortega-Camarillo, C; Roman-Ramos, R; Cruz, M; Alarcon-Aguilar, F J

    2012-10-31

    Cucurbita ficifolia is used in Mexican traditional medicine as an anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory agent and its actions can be mediated by antioxidant mechanisms. Disturbance in the homeostasis of glutathione has been implicated in the etiology and progression of diabetes mellitus and its complications. It was evaluated, the effect of an aqueous extract of Cucurbita ficifolia on glycemia, plasma lipid peroxidation; as well as levels of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione and activities of enzymes involved in glutathione redox cycle: glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) in liver, pancreas, kidney and heart homogenates of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Increased blood glucose and lipid peroxidation, together with decreased of GSH concentration, GSH/GSSG ratio and its redox potential (E(h)), and enhanced activity of GPx and GR in liver, pancreas and kidney were the salient features observed in diabetic mice. Administration of the aqueous extract of Cucurbita ficifolia to diabetic mice for 30 days, used at a dose of 200 mg/kg, resulted in a significant reduction in glycemia, polydipsia, hyperphagia and plasma lipid peroxidation. Moreover, GSH was increased in liver, pancreas and kidney, and GSSG was reduced in liver, pancreas and heart, therefore GSH/GSSG ratio and its E(h) were restored. Also, the activities involved in the glutathione cycle were decreased, reaching similar values to controls. An aqueous extract of Cucurbita ficifolia with hypoglycemic action, improve GSH redox state, increasing glutathione pool, GSH, GSH/GSSG ratio and its E(h), mechanism that can explain, at least in part, its antioxidant properties, supporting its use as an alternative treatment for the control of diabetes mellitus, and prevent the induction of complications by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of GLUT4 expression by oral administration of Mg(2+) to control sugar levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaimani, Haniah; Soltani, Nepton; MaleKzadeh, Kianoosh; Sohrabipour, Shahla; Zhang, Nina; Nasri, Sema; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-06-01

    It has been previously shown that oral magnesium administration decreases the levels of glucose in the plasma. However, the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine the potential role of GLUT4 on plasma glucose levels by orally administering magnesium sulfate to diabetic rats. Animals were distributed among 4 groups (n = 10 rats per group): one group served as the non-diabetic control, while the other groups had diabetes induced by streptozotocin (intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection). The diabetic rats were either given insulin by i.p. injection (2.5 U·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1)), or magnesium sulfate in their drinking water (10 g·L(-1)). After 8 weeks of treatment, we conducted an i.p. glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), measured blood glucose and plasma magnesium levels, and performed in-vitro and in-vivo insulin level measurements by radioimmunoassay. Gastrocnemius (leg) muscles were isolated for the measurement of GLU4 mRNA expression using real-time PCR. Administration of magnesium sulfate improved IPGTT and lowered blood glucose levels almost to the normal range. However, the insulin levels were not changed in either of the in-vitro or in-vivo studies. The expression of GLU4 mRNA increased 23% and 10% in diabetic magnesium-treated and insulin-treated groups, respectively. Our findings suggest that magnesium lowers blood glucose levels via increased GLU4 mRNA expression, independent to insulin secretion.

  5. Abnormal Expressions of Age, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 Receptor in Colonic Wall Contributed to STZ-Induced Diabetic Colon Remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    glycation end product (AGE) and AGE receptor (RAGE) were up-regulated in the diabetic colon wall (2). However, it lacks data in relation to the association between AGE, RAGE, transforming growth factor- b1 (TGF-b1) and TGFb1 receptor expressions with colon morphological and biomechanical remodeling...... glucose level was measured. The parameters of morphometric and biomechanical properties of colonic segments were obtained from diabetic (DM) and normal (Con) rats. The expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor were detected in different layers of the colon by immunohistochemistry. In order...... to determine the expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor in association with other parameters, and to see interrelation among AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor expressions, the multiple linear regression analysis was done. Results: The expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF-b1 and TGF- b1 receptor...

  6. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT PARTS OF BAUHUNIA PURPUREA LINN. PLANT IN STZ-INDUCED DIABETIC ALBINO WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Brahmachari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work was undertaken to study the comparative phytochemical profiles and hypoglycemic effects of Bauhinia purpurea Linn. Barks (BPBE and leaves ethanolic extracts (BPLE in albino wistar rats to validate their ethno medical use in hyperglycemia as well as to explore the better option. Phytochemicals in ethanolic extracts were analyzed by standard natural product chemistry methods. Diabetes was developed in rats by single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin @ 60mg/ Kg bw. Diabetic albino wister rats (n=3 of either sex (150-200gm bw were orally fed with the extracts once daily for 4 weeks. Glibenclamide @ 0.5mg/Kg bw was used as a positive control for comparison. Fasting blood glucose level at 0, 14th and 28th day and hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin on 28th day of experiment were analyzed. Our results show that the extracts contain alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, terpenoids, tannins and phenolics. Rats treated with plant extracts show better glucose modulation, decreased hemoglobin glycosylation and improved hemoglobin concentration as compared to diabetic control. The hypoglycemic effect of only BPBE at 420 mgkg-1 on 14th and 28th day is comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (P>0.01. The bark extract has been observed to be more potent hypoglycemic agent than leave extract.

  7. Comparison of sensory tests and neuronal quantity of peripheral nerves between streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and paclitaxel (PAC)-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heung Yong; Lee, Na Young; Ko, Hyun A; Lee, Kyung Ae; Park, Tae Sun

    Although diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are different disease entities, they share similar neuropathic symptoms that impede quality of life for these patients. Despite having very similar downstream effects, there have been no direct comparisons between DPN and CIPN with respect to symptom severity and therapeutic responses. We compared peripheral nerve damage due to hyperglycemia with that caused by paclitaxel (PAC) treatment as represented by biochemical parameters, diverse sensory tests, and immunohistochemistry of cutaneous and sciatic nerves. The therapeutic effects of alpha-lipoic acid and DA-9801 were also compared in the two models. Animals were divided into seven groups (n = 7-10) as follows: normal, diabetes (DM), DM + alpha-lipoic acid 100 mg/kg (ALA), DM + DA-9801 (100 mg/kg), paclitaxel-treated rat (PAC), PAC + ALA (100 mg/kg), and PAC + DA-9801 (100 mg/kg). The sensory thresholds of animals to mechanical, heat, and pressure stimuli were altered by both hyperglycemia and PAC when compared with controls, and the responses to sensory tests were different between both groups. There were no significant differences in the biochemical markers of blood glutathione between DM and PAC groups (p > .05). Quantitative comparisons of peripheral nerves by intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) analysis indicated that the DM and PAC groups were similar (6.18 ± 1.03 vs. 5.01 ± 2.57). IENFD was significantly improved after ALA and DA-9801 treatment in diabetic animals (7.6 ± 1.28, 7.7 ± 1.28, respectively, p PAC-treated groups (6.05 ± 1.76, 5.66 ± 1.26, respectively, p > .05). Sciatic nerves were less damaged in the PAC-treated groups compared with the DM groups with respect to axonal diameter and area (8.60 ± 1.14 μm vs. 6.66 ± 1.07 μm, and 59.04 ± 15.16 μm2 vs. 35.71 ± 11.2 μm2, respectively, p < .05

  8. Navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and naringenin have anti-diabetic potentials in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama M; Hassan, Mohamed A; Abdel-Twab, Sanaa M; Abdel Azeem, Manal N

    2017-10-01

    The therapy of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) stays a challenging issue. During the last decade, there has been an interest in the expansion of anti-diabetic drugs especially those of natural sources. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the anti-hyperglycemic and the anti-hyperlipidemic effects as well as the anti-oxidant activities of navel orange hydroethanolic extract and its constituting flavonoids naringin and naringenin on nicotineamide (NA)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic rats. To induce T2DM, 16h-fasted rats were intraperitoneally injected with STZ at dose of 50mg/kg body weight (b. w.), 15min after the intraperitoneal administration of NA (120mg/kg b. w.). The NA/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats were orally treated with navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and narengenin at dose level of 100mg/kg b. w./day for 4 weeks. The treatments with navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and narengenin potentially alleviated the lowered serum insulin and C-peptide levels, the depleted liver glycogen content, the elevated liver glucose-6-phosphatase and glycogen phosphorylase activities, the deteriorated serum lipid profile, and the suppressed liver antioxidant defense system of NA/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats. The treatments also enhanced the mRNA expression of insulin receptor β-subunit, GLUT4 and adiponectin in adipose tissue of STZ/NA-induced type 2 diabetic rats. In conclusion, the navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and naringenin have potent anti-diabetic effects in NA/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats via their insulinotropic effects and insulin improving action which in turn may be mediated through enhancing insulin receptor, GLUT4 and adiponectin expression in adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethanol extract of mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel inhibits α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities, and ameliorates diabetes related biochemical parameters in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondi, Mahendranath; Prasada Rao, U J S

    2015-12-01

    Peel is a major by-product during processing of mango fruit into pulp. Recent report indicates that the whole peel powder ameliorated diabetes. In the present study, ethanolic extract of mango peel was analysed for its bioactive compounds, evaluated for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory properties, oral glucose tolerance test, antioxidant properties, plasma insulin level and biochemical parameters related to diabetes. In addition to gallic and protocatechuic acids, the extract also had chlorogenic and ferulic acids, which were not reported earlier in mango peel extracts. The peel extract inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities, with IC50 values of 4.0 and 3.5 μg/ml. Ethanolic extract of peel showed better glucose utilization in oral glucose tolerance test. Treatment of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with the extract decreased fasting blood glucose, fructosamine and glycated hemoglobin levels, and increased plasma insulin level. Peel extract treatment decreased malondialdehyde level, but increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes significantly in liver and kidney compared to diabetic rats. These beneficial effects were comparable to metformin, but better than gallic acid treated diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of peel extract may be through different mechanism like increased plasma insulin levels, decreased oxidative stress and inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzyme activities by its bioactive compounds. Thus, results suggest that the peel extract can be a potential source of nutraceutical or can be used in functional foods and this is the first report on antidiabetic properties of mango peel extract.

  10. Renal Protective Effects of Low Molecular Weight of Inonotus obliquus Polysaccharide (LIOP on HFD/STZ-Induced Nephropathy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Jung Chou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance and pro-inflammatory cytokines have been shown to play an important role in pathogeneses of renal damage on type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Inonotus obliquus (IO is a white rot fungus that belongs to the family Hymenochaetaceae; it has been used as an edible mushroom and exhibits many biological activities including anti-tumor, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperglycemic properties. Especially the water-soluble Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides (IOPs have been previously reported to significantly inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in mice and protect from streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. In order to identify the nephroprotective effects of low molecular weight of IOP fraction (LIOP, from the fruiting bodies of Inonotus obliquus, high-fat diet (HFD plus STZ-induced type 2-like diabetic nephropathy C57BL/6 mice were investigated in this study. Our data showed that eight weeks of administration of 10–100 kDa, LIOP (300 mg/kg had progressively increased their sensitivity to glucose (less insulin tolerance, reduced triglyceride levels, elevated the HDL/LDL ratio and decreased urinary albumin/creatinine ratio(ACR compared to the control group. By pathological and immunohistochemical examinations, it was indicated that LIOP can restore the integrity of the glomerular capsules and increase the numbers of glomerular mesangial cells, associated with decreased expression of TGF-β on renal cortex in mice. Consistently, three days of LIOP (100 μg/mL incubation also provided protection against STZ + AGEs-induced glucotoxicity in renal tubular cells (LLC-PK1, while the levels of NF-κB and TGF-β expression significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that LIOP treatment could ameliorate glucolipotoxicity-induced renal fibrosis, possibly partly via the inhibition of NF

  11. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  12. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  13. The Effect of Chang Run Tong on Biomechanical Colon Remodeling in STZ-Induced Type I Diabetic Rats - Is It Related to Advanced Glycation End Product Formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The expression of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and receptor of AGE (RAGE) were detected in different layers by using immunohistochemistry method and quantitatively analyzed by using imaging analysis software. Linear...... regression analysis was done to study association between AGE/RAGE expression with the histomorphometric and biomechanical parameters. RESULTS: The wet weight per unit length to body weight ratio, wall thickness, the cross-sectional wall area,opening angle and absolute values of inner and outer residual...... significantly lower than those in DM group (PRAGE in different colon layers was significantly higher in the DM group than in Con group (PRAGE expressions were highly correlated to the histomorphometric...

  14. Anti-Diabetic Effects of the Ethyl-Acetate Fraction of Trichilia catigua in Streptozo-tocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mello Gomes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Trichilia catigua A. Juss., known as “catuaba” in Brazil, has been popularly used as a tonic for fatigue, impotence and memory deficits. Previously, our group demonstrated that the ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF of T. catigua has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of EAF in type 1 diabetic rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (N: non-diabetic group, D: type 1 diabetic group, NC: non-diabetic + EAF group and DC: type 1 diabetic + EAF group. The latter two groups were treated with 200 mg/kg EAF. Type 1 diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin (STZ injection (35 mg/kg. Starting two days after STZ injection, EAF was administered daily by gavage for 8 weeks. Results: EAF attenuated body mass loss and reduced food and water intake. EAF improved hyperglycaemia and other biochemical parameters, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST. Furthermore, the number of pancreatic β-cells and the size of the islets had increased by β-cell proliferation in the DC group. EAF promoted reduction in kidney tissue damage in STZ-induced diabetic rats by reduction of renal fibrosis. Conclusion: The present study showed that EAF improves glucose homeostasis and endocrine pancreas morphology and inhibits the development of diabetic nephropathy in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  15. Anti-Diabetic Effects of the Ethyl-Acetate Fraction of Trichilia catigua in Streptozo-tocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rodrigo Mello; de Paulo, Luis Fernando; Bonato Panizzon, Cynthia Priscilla do Nascimento; Neves, Camila Quaglio; Cordeiro, Bruna Colombo; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; Francisco, Flávio Andrade; Piovan, Silvano; de Freitas Mathias, Paulo Cezar; Longhini, Renata; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; da Silva Reis, Angela Adamski; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço; Marçal Natali, Maria Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Trichilia catigua A. Juss., known as "catuaba" in Brazil, has been popularly used as a tonic for fatigue, impotence and memory deficits. Previously, our group demonstrated that the ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF) of T. catigua has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of EAF in type 1 diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (N: non-diabetic group, D: type 1 diabetic group, NC: non-diabetic + EAF group and DC: type 1 diabetic + EAF group). The latter two groups were treated with 200 mg/kg EAF. Type 1 diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin (STZ) injection (35 mg/kg). Starting two days after STZ injection, EAF was administered daily by gavage for 8 weeks. EAF attenuated body mass loss and reduced food and water intake. EAF improved hyperglycaemia and other biochemical parameters, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Furthermore, the number of pancreatic β-cells and the size of the islets had increased by β-cell proliferation in the DC group. EAF promoted reduction in kidney tissue damage in STZ-induced diabetic rats by reduction of renal fibrosis. The present study showed that EAF improves glucose homeostasis and endocrine pancreas morphology and inhibits the development of diabetic nephropathy in STZ-induced diabetic rats. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  17. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  18. Testicular cytoprotective activities of Curcuma longa in STZ-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Its major component is the curcumin that is found to be a natural antioxidant. Diabetes affects large number of young men of reproductive age. It is among a number of disorders associated with oxidative stress. There has been a relationship established between the reduction in glucose load and insulin resistance reduction ...

  19. Effect of vitamin D3 on behavioural and biochemical parameters in diabetes type 1-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaroto, Nicéia Spanholi; Thomé, Gustavo Roberto; da Costa, Pauline; Baldissareli, Jucimara; Hussein, Fátima Abdala; Schmatz, Roberta; Rubin, Maribel A; Signor, Cristiane; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Carvalho, Fabiano Barbosa; de Oliveira, Lizielle Souza; Pereira, Luciane Belmonte; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes is associated with long-term complications in the brain and reduced cognitive ability. Vitamin D3 (VD3 ) appears to be involved in the amelioration of hyperglycaemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Our aim was to analyse the potential of VD3 in avoiding brain damage through evaluation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), Na(+) K(+) -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and delta aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activities and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels from cerebral cortex, as well as memory in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Animals were divided into eight groups (n = 5): control/saline, control/metformin (Metf), control/VD3 , control/Metf + VD3 , diabetic/saline, diabetic/Metf, diabetic/VD3 and diabetic/Metf + VD3 . Thirty days after treatment, animals were submitted to contextual fear-conditioning and open-field behavioural tests, after which they were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex was dissected. Our results demonstrate a significant memory deficit, an increase in AChE activity and TBARS levels and a decrease in δ-ALA-D and Na(+) K(+) -ATPase activities in diabetic rats when compared with the controls. Treatment of diabetic rats with Metf and VD3 prevented the increase in AChE activity when compared with the diabetic/saline group. In treated diabetic rats, the decrease in Na(+) K(+) -ATPase was reverted when compared with non-treated rats, but the increase in δ-ALA-D activity was not. VD3 prevented diabetes-induced TBARS level and improved memory. Our results show that VD3 can avoid cognitive deficit through prevention of changes in important enzymes such as Na(+) K(+) -ATPase and AChE in cerebral cortex in type 1 diabetic rats. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Characterization of upper thoracic spinal neurons receiving noxious cardiac and/or somatic inputs in diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Marie Louise M; Qin, Chao; Wu, Mingyuan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine spinal processing of cardiac and somatic nociceptive input in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. Type 1 diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (50mg/kg) in 14 male Sprague-Dawley rats and citrate buffer was injected in 14 control rats. After 4-11weeks...

  1. Antihyperlipidemic effect of D-pinitol on streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethan, P K M Anu; Prince, P Stanely Mainzen

    2008-01-01

    D-pinitol (3-O-methyl-chiroinositol), an active principle of the traditional antidiabetic plant, Bougainvillea spectabilis, is claimed to exert insulin-like effects. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of D-pinitol on lipids and lipoproteins in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Rats were made type II diabetic by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight. STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significant (p < 0.05) increase in the levels of blood glucose and total cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phospholipids in serum, liver, kidney, heart, and brain. The levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol were significantly increased, and the level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was significantly decreased in diabetic rats Oral administration of D-pinitol to STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the levels of blood glucose and total cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phospholipids in serum, liver, kidney, heart, and brain. The D-pinitol also lowered significantly (p < 0.05) LDL and VLDL cholesterol levels and increased significantly (p < 0.05) HDL cholesterol levels in the serum of diabetic rats. Thus, the present study clearly showed the antihyperlipidemic effect of D-pinitol in STZ-induced type II diabetic rats.

  2. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  3. Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes; Oral hypoglycemic - type 2 diabetes; High blood sugar - type 2 diabetes ... mmol/L) 2 hours after drinking a special sugar drink. Diabetes screening is recommended for: Overweight children who have ...

  4. Bacterial Flora Changes in Conjunctiva of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    Full Text Available The microbiota of both humans and animals plays an important role in their health and the development of disease. Therefore, the bacterial flora of the conjunctiva may also be associated with some diseases. However, there are no reports on the alteration of bacterial flora in conjunctiva of diabetic rats in the literature. Therefore, we investigated the changes in bacterial flora in bulbar conjunctiva of rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced type I diabetes.A high dose of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p. was injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD rats to induce type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM. The diabetic rats were raised in the animal laboratory and at 8 months post-injection of STZ swab samples were taken from the bulbar conjunctiva for cultivation of aerobic bacteria. The bacterial isolates were identified by Gram staining and biochemical features. The identified bacteria from both diabetic and healthy rats were then compared.The diabetic and healthy rats had different bacterial flora present in their bulbar conjunctiva. In total, 10 and 8 bacterial species were found in the STZ and control groups, respectively, with only three species (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus gallinarum and Escherichia coli shared between the two groups. Gram-positive bacteria were common in both groups and the most abundant was Enterococcus faecium. However, after the development of T1DM, the bacterial flora in the rat bulbar conjunctiva changed considerably, with a reduced complexity evident.STZ-induced diabetes caused alterations of bacterial flora in the bulbar conjunctiva in rats, with some bacterial species disappearing and others emerging. Our results indicate that the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic humans should be surveyed for potential diagnostic markers or countermeasures to prevent eye infections in T1DM patients.

  5. Neural Degeneration in the Retina of the Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Ozawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy, a vision-threatening disease, has been regarded as a vascular disorder. However, impaired oscillatory potentials (OPs in the electroretinogram (ERG and visual dysfunction are recorded before severe vascular lesions appear. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the retinal neural degeneration observed in the streptozotocin-(STZ- induced type 1 diabetes model. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS and reactive oxygen species (ROS both cause OP impairment and reduced levels of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle protein for neurotransmitter release, most likely through excessive protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. ROS also decrease brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and inner retinal neuronal cells. The influence of both RAS and ROS on synaptophysin suggests that RAS-ROS crosstalk occurs in the diabetic retina. Therefore, suppressors of RAS or ROS, such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers or the antioxidant lutein, respectively, are potential candidates for neuroprotective and preventive therapies to improve the visual prognosis.

  6. Liver Proteome in Diabetes Type 1 Rat Model: Insulin-Dependent and -Independent Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Camila Pereira; Boone, Cory H T; Grove, Ryan A; Adamcova, Dana; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique; Adamec, Jiri; de Magalhães Padilha, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is a major public health problem that continues to burden the healthcare systems worldwide, costing exponentially more as the epidemic grows. Innovative strategies and omics system diagnostics for earlier diagnosis or prognostication of DM1 are essential to prevent secondary complications and alleviate the associated economic burden. In a preclinical study design that involved streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DM1, insulin-treated STZ-induced DM1, and control rats, we characterized the insulin-dependent and -independent changes in protein profiles in liver samples. Digested proteins were subjected to LC-MSE for proteomic data. Progenesis QI data processing and analysis of variance were utilized for statistical analyses. We found 305 proteins with significantly altered abundance among the control, DM1, and insulin-treated DM1 groups (p < 0.05). These differentially regulated proteins were related to enzymes that function in key metabolic pathways and stress responses. For example, gluconeogenesis appeared to return to control levels in the DM1 group after insulin treatment, with the restoration of gluconeogenesis regulatory enzyme, FBP1. Insulin administration to DM1 rats also restored the blood glucose levels and enzymes of general stress and antioxidant response systems. These observations are crucial for insights on DM1 pathophysiology and new molecular targets for future clinical biomarkers, drug discovery, and development. Additionally, we underscore that proteomics offers much potential in preclinical biomarker discovery for diabetes as well as common complex diseases such as cancer, dementia, and infectious disorders.

  7. Myocardial impulse propagation is impaired in right ventricular tissue of Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kristine Boisen; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular complications including arrhythmias, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be established. Decreased conduction velocity (CV), which is an independent risk factor for re-entry arrhythmias, is present in models with streptozotocin (STZ) induced type ...

  8. Administration of Zinc plus Cyclo-(His-Pro) Increases Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Rats during the Early Phase of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, In Yeol; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Bo Eun; Lee, Song Hee; Kho, A Ra; Sohn, Min; Suh, Sang Won

    2017-01-01

    The effects of zinc supplementation on hippocampal neurogenesis in diabetes mellitus have not been studied. Herein, we investigated the effects of zinc plus cyclo-(His-Pro) (ZC) on neurogenesis occurring in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus after streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. ZC (27 mg/kg) was administered by gavage once daily for one or six weeks from the third day after the STZ injection, and histological evaluation was performed at 10 (early phase) or 45 (late phase) days after STZ injection. We found that the proliferation of progenitor cells in STZ-induced diabetic rats showed an increase in the early phase. Additionally, ZC treatment remarkably increased the number of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and immature neurons in the early phase of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Furthermore, ZC treatment showed increased survival rate of newly generated cells but no difference in the level of neurogenesis in the late phase of STZ-induced diabetic rats. The present study demonstrates that zinc supplementation by ZC increases both NPCs proliferation and neuroblast production at the early phase of diabetes. Thus, this study suggests that zinc supplemented with a histidine/proline complex may have beneficial effects on neurogenesis in patients experiencing the early phase of Type 1 diabetes.

  9. Chrysin, an anti-inflammatory molecule, abrogates renal dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahad, Amjid [Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062 (India); Ganai, Ajaz Ahmad [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062 (India); Mujeeb, Mohd [Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062 (India); Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad, E-mail: was.sid121@gmail.com [Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi 110062 (India)

    2014-08-15

    Diabetic nepropathy (DN) is considered as the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide, but the current available treatments are limited. Recent experimental evidences support the role of chronic microinflammation in the development of DN. Therefore, the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) pathway has emerged as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of DN. We investigated the nephroprotective effects of chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone) in a high fat diet/streptozotocin (HFD/STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic Wistar albino rat model. Chrysin is a potent anti-inflammatory compound that is abundantly found in plant extracts, honey and bee propolis. The treatment with chrysin for 16 weeks post induction of diabetes significantly abrogated renal dysfunction and oxidative stress. Chrysin treatment considerably reduced renal TNF-α expression and inhibited the nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation. Furthermore, chrysin treatment improved renal pathology and suppressed transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), fibronectin and collagen-IV protein expressions in renal tissues. Chrysin also significantly reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and IL-6. Moreover, there were no appreciable differences in fasting blood glucose and serum insulin levels between the chrysin treated groups compared to the HFD/STZ-treated group. Hence, our results suggest that chrysin prevents the development of DN in HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats through anti-inflammatory effects in the kidney by specifically targeting the TNF-α pathway. - Highlights: • Chrysin reduced renal oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic rats. • Chrysin reduced serum levels of pro-inflammatory in diabetic rats. • Chrysin exhibited renal protective effect by suppressing the TNF-α pathway.

  10. Anti-diabetic effects of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides in streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic mice and potential mechanism via PI3K-Akt signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Wang, Cong; Li, Shuqin; Li, Weiwei; Yuan, Guoqi; Pan, Yuxiang; Chen, Haixia

    2017-11-01

    Polysaccharides are the main components of mushroom Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus) with antihyperglycemic activities. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-diabetic effects and the potential mechanism of I. obliquus polysaccharides (IOPS) in high fat diet and STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice. Results showed that oral administration of IOPS (900mg/kg) could significantly restore the body and fat mass weight, reduce fasting blood glucose levels, improve glucose tolerance ability, increase hepatic glycogen level and ameliorate insulin resistance compared to those of the control diabetic mice (Pdiabetic mice. The results suggested that IOPS might be a promising functional food or drug candidate for diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydrogen improves glycemic control in type1 diabetic animal model by promoting glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Amitani

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H(2 acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H(2 function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H(2 in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H(2 promoted 2-[(14C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K, protein kinase C (PKC, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H(2 significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. and oral (p.o. administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H(2 had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H(2 exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally.

  12. Cardioprotective effects of magnesium valproate in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhoomika M; Raghunathan, Suchi; Porwal, Urvashi

    2014-04-05

    We have evaluated the effect of magnesium valproate (210 mg/kg/day, p.o.) in type 2 diabetes induced cardiovascular complications induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 90 mg/kg, i.p.) in neonatal wistar rats. Various biochemical, cardiovascular and hemodynamic parameters were measured at the end of 8 weeks of treatment. STZ produced significant hyperglycaemia, hypoinsulinemia and dyslipidemia, which was prevented by magnesium valproate treatment. STZ produced increase in Creatinine Kinase, C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase levels and treatment with magnesium valproate produced reduction in these levels. STZ produced increase in cardiac and LV hypertrophy index, LV/RV ratio, LV collagen deposition and LV cardiomyocyte diameter which were decreased by magnesium valproate treatment. Magnesium valproate also prevented STZ induced hemodynamic alterations and oxidative stress. These results were further supported by histopathological studies in which magnesium valproate showed marked reduction in fibrosis and cardiac fiber disarray. In conclusion, our data suggests that magnesium valproate is beneficial as an anti-diabetic agent in type-2 diabetes mellitus and also prevents its cardiac complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Liver function of Streptozotocin- Induced Diabetic Rats Orally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the liver status of STZ- induced diabetic rats treated with aqueous root-bark extract of T. tetraptera for 35 days. Twenty-four (24) rats in four groups (normal control, diabetic control, T. tetraptera treated STZ induced diabetic rats at 150 mg/kg b. w. and T. tetraptera treated STZ-diabetic rats at 300 mg/kg ...

  14. Uninephrectomized High-Fat-Fed Nicotinamide-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: A Model for the Investigation of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina K. Bayrasheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (DM2 could be reproduced in rats with alimentary obesity by using low doses of streptozotocin (LD-STZ as well as STZ in high doses with preliminary nicotinamide (NA administration. However, STZ could induce tubulotoxicity. Aim. To develop rat model of DN in NA-STZ-induced DM2 and compare it with LD-STZ-model in order to choose the most relevant approach for reproducing renal glomerular and tubular morphofunctional diabetic changes. Starting at 3 weeks after uninephrectomy, adult male Wistar rats were fed five-week high-fat diet and then received intraperitoneally either LD-STZ (40 mg/kg or NA (230 mg/kg followed by STZ (65 mg/kg. Control uninephrectomized vehicle-injected rats received normal chow. At weeks 10, 20, and 30 (the end of the study, metabolic parameters, creatinine clearance, albuminuria, and urinary tubular injury markers (NGAL, KIM-1 were evaluated as well as renal ultrastructural and light microscopic changes at weeks 20 and 30. NA-STZ-group showed higher reproducibility and stability of metabolic parameters. By week 10, in NA-STZ-group NGAL level was significantly lower compared to LD-STZ-group. By week 30, diabetic groups showed early features of DN. However, morphofunctional changes in NA-STZ-group appeared to be more pronounced than those in STZ-group despite lower levels of KIM-1 and NGAL. We proposed a new rat model of DM2 with DN characterized by stable metabolic disorders, typical renal lesions, and lower levels of tubular injury markers as compared to LD-STZ-induced diabetes.

  15. ICV STZ induced impairment in memory and neuronal mitochondrial function: A protective role of nicotinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Gunjan; Patro, Ishan K; Nath, Chandishwar

    2011-10-10

    The present study was planned to evaluate the cholinergic influence on mitochondrial activity and neurodegeneration associated with impaired memory in intracerebroventricular (ICV) streptozotocin (STZ) treated rats. STZ (3mg/kg), administered ICV twice with an interval of 48h between the two doses, showed significant impairment in spatial memory tested by water maze test 14 days after first dose without altering blood glucose level and locomotor activity. Animals were sacrificed on 21st day of ICV administration. STZ significantly increased malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca(2+) ion influx, caspase-3 activity and decreased glutathione (GSH) level. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors tacrine and donepezil (5mg/kg, PO) pretreatment significantly prevented STZ induced memory deficit, oxidative stress, Ca(2+) influx and caspase-3 activity. Carbachol, a muscarinic cholinergic agonist (0.01mg/kg, SC) did not show any significant effect on ROS generation, Ca(2+) ion influx and caspase-3 activity. While nicotinic cholinergic agonist, nicotine, significantly attenuated ICV STZ induced mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-3 activity. The results indicate that instead of muscarinic receptors nicotinic receptors may be involved in neuroprotection by maintaining mitochondrial functions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanism for blockade of angiotensin subtype 1 receptors to lower plasma glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P; Liu, I-M; Tzeng, T-F; Yang, T-L; Cheng, J-T

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism(s) by which valsartan, a selective antagonist of angiotensin subtype 1 (AT(1)) receptor, decreased plasma glucose in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The plasma glucose concentration was assessed by the glucose oxidase method. The concentration of beta-endorphin in plasma or medium incubating adrenal medulla was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA levels of the subtype 4 form of glucose transporter (GLUT4) in soleus muscle and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver were detected by Northern blotting analysis, while the protein levels of GLUT4 in isolated soleus muscle and hepatic PEPCK were investigated using Western blotting analysis. A single intravenous injection of valsartan dose-dependently increased plasma beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BER) in parallel with the lowering of plasma glucose concentration in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Naloxone and naloxonazine inhibited the plasma glucose-lowering action of valsartan at doses sufficient to block opioid micro-receptors. In contrast to its action in wild-type diabetic mice, valsartan failed to modify plasma glucose in opioid micro-receptor knockout diabetic mice. Bilateral adrenalectomy in STZ-induced diabetic rats eliminated both the plasma glucose-lowering action and the plasma BER-elevating action of valsartan. In the isolated adrenal medulla of STZ-induced diabetic rats, angiotensin II (Ang II) or valsartan did not affect spontaneous BER secretion. Activation of cholinergic receptors by 1.0 micromol/l acetylcholine (ACh) enhanced BER secretion from the isolated adrenal medulla of STZ-induced diabetic rats, but not in the presence of 1.0 nmol/l Ang II, while valsartan reversed this inhibition by Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of STZ-induced diabetic rats with valsartan (0.2 mg/kg) three times daily for 3 days resulted in an increase in gene expression of GLUT4 in soleus muscle and impeded the

  17. Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop in adults. Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure. Treatment focuses on managing blood sugar levels with insulin, diet and lifestyle to prevent complications. Symptoms Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can appear relatively suddenly and ...

  18. Antiaging Gene Klotho Attenuates Pancreatic β-Cell Apoptosis in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Sun, Zhongjie

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis is the major cause of death of insulin-producing β-cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Klotho is a recently discovered antiaging gene. We found that the Klotho gene is expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Interestingly, halplodeficiency of Klotho (KL(+/-)) exacerbated streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes (a model of T1DM), including hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, diminished islet insulin storage, and increased apoptotic β-cells. Conversely, in vivo β-cell-specific expression of mouse Klotho gene (mKL) attenuated β-cell apoptosis and prevented STZ-induced diabetes. mKL promoted cell adhesion to collagen IV, increased FAK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibited caspase 3 cleavage in cultured MIN6 β-cells. mKL abolished STZ- and TNFα-induced inhibition of FAK and Akt phosphorylation, caspase 3 cleavage, and β-cell apoptosis. These promoting effects of Klotho can be abolished by blocking integrin β1. Therefore, these cell-based studies indicated that Klotho protected β-cells by inhibiting β-cell apoptosis through activation of the integrin β1-FAK/Akt pathway, leading to inhibition of caspase 3 cleavage. In an autoimmune T1DM model (NOD), we showed that in vivo β-cell-specific expression of mKL improved glucose tolerance, attenuated β-cell apoptosis, enhanced insulin storage in β-cells, and increased plasma insulin levels. The beneficial effect of Klotho gene delivery is likely due to attenuation of T-cell infiltration in pancreatic islets in NOD mice. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time that Klotho protected β-cells in T1DM via attenuating apoptosis. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Insulin prevents aberrant mitochondrial phenotype in sensory neurons of type 1 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghanoori, Mohamad-Reza; Smith, Darrell R; Roy Chowdhury, Subir; Sabbir, Mohammad Golam; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects approximately 50% of diabetic patients. Down-regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and function has been reported in both human tissues and in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from animal models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that loss of direct insulin signaling in diabetes contributes to loss of mitochondrial function in DRG neurons and to development of neuropathy. Sensory neurons obtained from age-matched adult control or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic rats were cultured with or without insulin before determining mitochondrial respiration and expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain and insulin signaling-linked proteins. For in vivo studies age-matched control rats and diabetic rats with or without trace insulin supplementation were maintained for 5months before DRG were analyzed for respiratory chain gene expression and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Insulin (10nM) significantly (Pdiabetic rats, with spare respiratory capacity increased by up to 3-fold (Pdiabetic animals exhibited improved thermal sensitivity in the hind paw and had increased dermal nerve density compared to untreated diabetic rats, despite no effect on blood glucose levels. In DRG of diabetic rats there was suppressed expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins and cytochrome c oxidase activity that was corrected by insulin therapy. Insulin elevates mitochondrial respiratory chain protein expression and function in sensory neurons and this is associated with enhanced neurite outgrowth and protection against indices of neuropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2000-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  1. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a ...

  2. Cerebrolysin Ameloriates Cognitive Deficits in Type III Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan S Georgy

    Full Text Available Cerebrolysin (CBL, a mixture of several active peptide fragments and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is currently used in the management of cognitive alterations in patients with dementia. Since Cognitive decline as well as increased dementia are strongly associated with diabetes and previous studies addressed the protective effect of BDNF in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes; hence this work aimed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of CBL in modulating the complications of hyperglycaemia experimentally induced by streptozotocin (STZ on the rat brain hippocampus. To this end, male adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into (i vehicle- (ii CBL- and (iii STZ diabetic-control as well as (iv STZ+CBL groups. Diabetes was confirmed by hyperglycemia and elevated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c%, which were associated by weight loss, elevated tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and decreased insulin growth factor (IGF-1β in the serum. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia caused learning and memory impairments that corroborated degenerative changes, neuronal loss and expression of caspase (Casp-3 in the hippocampal area of STZ-diabetic rats. Behavioral deficits were associated by decreased hippocampal glutamate (GLU, glycine, serotonin (5-HT and dopamine. Moreover, diabetic rats showed an increase in hippocampal nitric oxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances versus decreased non-protein sulfhydryls. Though CBL did not affect STZ-induced hyperglycemia, it partly improved body weight as well as HbA1c%. Such effects were associated by enhancement in both learning and memory as well as apparent normal cellularity in CA1and CA3 areas and reduced Casp-3 expression. CBL improved serum TNF-α and IGF-1β, GLU and 5-HT as well as hampering oxidative biomarkers. In conclusion, CBL possesses neuroprotection against diabetes-associated cerebral neurodegeneration and cognitive decline via anti

  3. Arachidonic acid and lipoxinA4 attenuate streptozotocin-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5 F cells in vitro and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundala, Naveen K V; Naidu, Vegi G M; Das, Undurti N

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe whether polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can protect rat insulinoma (RIN5 F) cells against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced apoptosis in vitro and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) in vivo and if so, what would be the mechanism of this action. RIN5 F cells were used for the in vitro study, whereas the in vivo study was performed in Wistar rats. STZ was used to induce apoptosis of RIN5 F cells in vitro and T1- and T2DM in vivo. The effect of PUFAs: γ-linolenic acid (GLA), arachidonic acid (AA) of ω-6 series, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) of ω-3 series; cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitors and antiinflammatory metabolite of AA and DHA, lipoxin A4 (LXA4), and resolvin D2 and protectin, respectively against STZ-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5 F cells in vitro and LXA4 against T1- and T2DM in vivo was studied. Changes in the antioxidant content, lipid peroxides, nitric oxide, and expression of PDX1, P65, nuclear factor-κb (NF-κb), and IKB genes in STZ-treated RIN5 F cells in vitro and Nrf2, GLUT2, COX2, iNOS protein levels in the pancreatic tissue of T1- and T2DM and LPCLN2 (lipocalin 2), NF-κb, IKB I in adipose tissue of T2DM after LXA4 treatment were studied. Plasma glucose, insulin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels also were measured in STZ-induced T1- and T2DM Wistar rats. Among all PUFAs tested, AA and EPA are the most effective against STZ-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5 F cells in vitro. Neither COX nor LOX inhibitors blocked the cytoprotective action of AA in vitro and T1- and T2DM by STZ. LXA4 production by RIN5 F cells in vitro and plasma LXA4 levels in STZ-induced T1- and T2DM animals were decreased by STZ that reverted to normal after AA treatment. AA prevented both T1- and T2DM induced by STZ. Antiinflammatory metabolite of AA and LXA4 prevented both T1- and T2DM induced by STZ. The expression of Pdx1, NF-κb, IKB genes in the

  4. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  5. Streptozotocin produces oxidative stress, inflammation and decreases BDNF concentrations to induce apoptosis of RIN5F cells and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathina, Siresha; Srinivas, Nanduri; Das, Undurti N

    2017-04-29

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as deficits in learning, memory and cognition and Alzheimer's disease are associated with diabetes mellitus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophic factor and is known to possess anti-obesity, anti-diabetic actions and is believed to have a role in memory and Alzheimer's disease. To investigate whether STZ can reduce BDNF production by rat insulinoma (RIN5F) cells in vitro and decrease BDNF levels in the pancreas, liver and brain in vivo. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5F cells in vitro and type 2 DM in Wistar rats was employed in the present study. Cell viability, activities of various anti-oxidants and secretion of BDNF by RIN5F cells in vitro were measured using MTT assay, biochemical methods and ELISA respectively. In STZ-induced type 2 DM rats: plasma glucose, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels and BDNF protein expression in the pancreas, liver and brain tissues were measured. In addition, neuronal count and morphology in the hippocampus and hypothalamus areas was assessed. STZ-induced suppression of RIN5F cell viability was abrogated by BDNF. STZ suppressed BDNF secretion by RIN5F cells in vitro. STZ-induced type 2 DM rats showed hyperglycemia, enhanced plasma IL-6 and TNF-αlevels and reduced plasma and pancreas, liver and brain tissues (P stress compared to untreated control. Hypothalamic and hippocampal neuron in STZ-treated animals showed a decrease in the number of neurons and morphological changes suggesting of STZ cytotoxicity. The results of the present study suggest that STZ is not only cytotoxic to pancreatic beta cells but also to hypothalamic and hippocampal neurons by inducing oxidative stress. STZ ability to suppress BDNF production by pancreas, liver and brain tissues suggests that impaired memory, learning, and cognitive dysfunction seen in diabetes mellitus could be due to BDNF deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antidiabetic Effect of Fresh Nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) in Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Il-Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate α-glucosidase inhibitory and antidiabetic effects of Nopal water extract (NPWE) and Nopal dry power (NADP) in low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by HFD and low-dose STZ. The rats were divided into four groups as follows: (1) nondiabetic rats fed a regular diet (RD-Control); (2) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD (HF-STZ-Control); (3) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with NPWE (100 mg/kg body weight, HF-STZ-NPWE); and (4) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with comparison medication (rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg, body weight, HF-STZ-Rosiglitazone). In results, NPWE and NADP had IC50 values of 67.33 and 86.68 μg/mL, both of which exhibit inhibitory activities but lower than that of acarbose (38.05 μg/mL) while NPWE group significantly decreased blood glucose levels compared to control and NPDP group on glucose tolerance in the high-fat diet fed rats model (P < 0.05). Also, the blood glucose levels of HR-STZ-NPWE group were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than HR-STZ-Control group on low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD. Based on these findings, we suggested that NPWE could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of blood glucose and a potential use as a dietary supplement.

  7. Antidiabetic Effect of Fresh Nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica in Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate α-glucosidase inhibitory and antidiabetic effects of Nopal water extract (NPWE and Nopal dry power (NADP in low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD. The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by HFD and low-dose STZ. The rats were divided into four groups as follows: (1 nondiabetic rats fed a regular diet (RD-Control; (2 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD (HF-STZ-Control; (3 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with NPWE (100 mg/kg body weight, HF-STZ-NPWE; and (4 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with comparison medication (rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg, body weight, HF-STZ-Rosiglitazone. In results, NPWE and NADP had IC50 values of 67.33 and 86.68 μg/mL, both of which exhibit inhibitory activities but lower than that of acarbose (38.05 μg/mL while NPWE group significantly decreased blood glucose levels compared to control and NPDP group on glucose tolerance in the high-fat diet fed rats model (P<0.05. Also, the blood glucose levels of HR-STZ-NPWE group were significantly lower (P<0.05 than HR-STZ-Control group on low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD. Based on these findings, we suggested that NPWE could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of blood glucose and a potential use as a dietary supplement.

  8. Lutein attenuates oxidative stress markers and ameliorates glucose homeostasis through polyol pathway in heart and kidney of STZ-induced hyperglycemic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharavana, Gurunathan; Joseph, G S; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2017-12-01

    Lutein's role on chronic hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated glucose homeostasis in heart and kidney is limited. Purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of lutein on cardiac and renal polyol pathway enzymes and oxidative stress markers under hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress condition using streptozotocin (STZ)-injected rat model. STZ-induced hyperglycemic (fasting blood glucose ≥11 mM) male Wistar rats were divided into two groups (n = 11/group). Group 1 received micellar lutein (39 nmol/day/rat) and group 2 (negative control) received micelle without lutein for 8 weeks. A separate group (no STZ injected) served as a positive control (n = 11/group). Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), biweekly urine glucose and activities of aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) enzymes were assessed. Activities of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant level were also evaluated. Lutein-administered hyperglycemic rats showed better glucose tolerance as evidenced with OGTT and biweekly urine glucose when compared to negative control. Activities of AR and SDH were decreased in heart and kidney of lutein-fed hyperglycemic rats. Also, they had significantly (p < 0.05) decreased malondialdehyde levels (66, 34, and 33 %) and increased reduced glutathione level (81, 18 and 92 %) in serum, heart and kidney, respectively. Altered antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione transferase were also affected in serum, heart and kidney of lutein-fed diabetic group. Lutein prevented cardiac and renal injury in STZ-induced hyperglycemic rats due to potential amelioration of altered activities in polyol pathway and oxidative stress markers.

  9. Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth and obesity — increases the risk of diabetes. Complications Type 2 diabetes can be easy to ignore, especially in the ... can help prevent these complications. Although long-term complications of diabetes develop gradually, they can eventually be disabling or ...

  10. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Back Close What Is Diabetes? Causes of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing T1D T1D ... about Insulin and T1D Learn More What Is Diabetes? Causes of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing T1D T1D ...

  11. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Donate Events More Type 1 Diabetes Facts Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease ... of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing T1D T1D Facts Insulin Types and Usage T1D Treatments Sign up ...

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Father of the Year Stop Diabetes at School ... Forecast Stop Diabetes Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Living With Type 2 Diabetes Recipes for Healthy ...

  13. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Father of the Year Stop Diabetes at School ... Forecast Stop Diabetes Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Living With Type 2 Diabetes Recipes for Healthy ...

  14. Puerarin attenuates learning and memory impairments and inhibits oxidative stress in STZ-induced SAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan-shan; Yang, Wei-na; Jin, Hui; Ma, Kai-ge; Feng, Gai-feng

    2015-12-01

    Puerarin (PUE), an isoflavone purified from the root of Pueraria lobata (Chinese herb), has been reported to attenuate learning and memory impairments in the transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we tested PUE in a sporadic AD (SAD) mouse model which was induced by the intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The mice were administrated PUE (25, 50, or 100mg/kg/d) for 28 days. Learning and memory abilities were assessed by the Morris water maze test. After behavioral test, the biochemical parameters of oxidative stress (glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutases (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA)) were measured in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The SAD mice exhibited significantly decreased learning and memory ability, while PUE attenuated these impairments. The activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased while MDA was increased in the SAD animals. After PUE treatment, the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were elevated, and the level of MDA was decreased. The middle dose PUE was more effective than others. These results indicate that PUE attenuates learning and memory impairments and inhibits oxidative stress in STZ-induced SAD mice. PUE may be a promising therapeutic agent for SAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of Alium Satium Extract on the Glomerular Diameter of STZ -induced Sprague dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilorini Susilorini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia exert toxic effect in kidney.The aim of this study was to investigate the short term effect of ethanolic extract of garlic in preventing nephropathy following streptozotocin (STZ induced rats. Twenty male Sprague dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 group, all group induced induced by single dose intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg kg-1 of streptozotocin (STZ. Treatment with 3 doses ethanolic extract of garlic (0,1; 0,25; 0,5 mg kg-1 day-1 was followed for 14 days, then the left kidneys were excised and histhopathological studies were carried out using scanner 3D Hitech and Panoramic view software. Statistical analysis have been done using non parametric analysis Kruskall Wallis. The study revealed that glomerular diameter of the treatment rats was significantly different from the control group (p=0,0001. Increasing doses didn’t make difference. The ethanolic extract of garlic (Allium sativum influences the diameter glomeruli but increasing doses has no effect on the glomerular diameter.

  16. Camel milk attenuates the biochemical and morphological features of diabetic nephropathy: inhibition of Smad1 and collagen type IV synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korish, Aida A; Abdel Gader, Abdel Galil; Korashy, Hesham M; Al-Drees, Abdul Majeed; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; Arafah, Maha M

    2015-03-05

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) that worsens its morbidity and mortality. There is evidence that camel milk (CM) improves the glycemic control in DM but its effect on the renal complications especially the DN remains unclear. Thus the current study aimed to characterize the effects of CM treatment on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN. Using STZ-induced diabetes, we investigated the effect of CM treatment on kidney function, proteinuria, renal Smad1, collagen type IV (Col4), blood glucose, insulin resistance (IR), lipid peroxidation, the antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH). In addition renal morphology was also examined. The current results showed that rats with untreated diabetes exhibited marked hyperglycemia, IR, high serum urea and creatinine levels, excessive proteinuria, increased renal Smad1 and Col4, glomerular expansion, and extracellular matrix deposition. There was also increased lipid peroxidation products, decreased antioxidant enzyme activity and GSH levels. Camel milk treatment decreased blood glucose, IR, and lipid peroxidation. Superoxide dismutase and CAT expression, CAT activity, and GSH levels were increased. The renoprotective effects of CM were demonstrated by the decreased serum urea and creatinine, proteinuria, Smad1, Col4, and preserved normal tubulo-glomerular morphology. In conclusion, beside its hypoglycemic action, CM attenuates the early changes of DN, decreased renal Smad1 and Col4. This could be attributed to a primary action on the glomerular mesangial cells, or secondarily to the hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of CM. The protective effects of CM against DN support its use as an adjuvant anti-diabetes therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  18. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave i sykepleie, 2014 Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturst...

  19. Type 2 diabetes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte Xenia

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with type 2 diabetes in vivo models and techniques suitable for testing new anti-diabetic compounds. In particular, the testing of TRP antagonist for beneficial effects against type 2 diabetes is considered. There are many choices of both in vitro techniques and in vivo models......, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin resistance in vivo and should, thus, be sufficient to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept of a TRP antagonist in type 2 diabetes in rodents. The experiments are suggestions and could be replaced or supplemented by others....

  20. Camel milk ameliorates hyperglycaemia and oxidative damage in type-1 diabetic experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Sunita; Rajput, Yudhishthir S; Pandey, Amit K; Sharma, Rajan; Singh, Raghvendar

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to assess anti-diabetic potential of goat, camel, cow and buffalo milk in streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 1 diabetic albino wistar rats. A total of 48 rats were taken for the study where one group was kept as non-diabetic control group (8 rats) while others (40 rats) were made diabetic by STZ (50 mg/kg of body weight) injection. Among diabetic rats, a control group (8 rats) was kept and referred as diabetic control whereas other four groups (8 rats each) of diabetic rats were fed on 50 ml of goat or camel or cow or buffalo milk for 4 weeks. All the rats (non-diabetic and diabetic) were maintained on standard diet for four weeks. STZ administration resulted in enhancement of glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein, HbA1c and reduction in high density lipoprotein in plasma and lowering of antioxidative enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase) activities in pancreas, kidney, liver and RBCs, coupled with enhanced levels of TBARS and protein carbonyls in pancreas, kidney, liver and plasma. OGTT carried out at the end of 4 week milk feeding indicated that all milks helped in early maintenance of glucose level. All milks reduced atherogenic index. In camel milk fed diabetic group, insulin concentration enhanced to level noted for non-diabetic control while goat, cow and buffalo milk failed to restore insulin level. HbA1c level was also restored only in camel milk fed diabetic group. The level of antioxidative enzymes (catalase, GPx and SOD) in pancreas enhanced in all milk fed groups. Camel milk and to a reasonable extent goat milk reduced formation of TBARS and PCs in tissues and blood. It can be concluded that camel milk ameliorates hyperglycaemia and oxidative damage in type-1 diabetic experimental rats. Further, only camel milk completely ameliorated oxidative damage in pancreas and normalised insulin level.

  1. Effects of Endurance Training on Lipid Metabolism and Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels in Streptozotocin-induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats on a High-fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Myoung; Kim, Eunjung

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] Exercise has been recognized as a simple and economical therapeutic modality that effectively benefits patients with diabetes, for instance, increasing insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. However, thus far, no studies have examined the effect of endurance training exercises on type 2 diabetes. Therefore, this study examined the effect of endurance training exercise regimens on body weight, glucose and insulin levels, lipid profiles, and HbA1c levels in STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats on a high-fat diet. HbA1c was considered an indicator of glucose control during endurance training. [Methods] A total of 36 rats were included in this study. Diabetes was induced by administering STZ to 2 groups of 12 rats each, and, the remaining 12 rats were classified as the normal group. Biochemical parameters were measured 28 days later, and included: serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, glycosylated hemoglobin, glucose, and insulin levels. [Results] A significant decrease in serum TC and TG levels, and an increase in HDL cholesterol level were observed in the endurance training group. Moreover, blood glucose and HbA1c levels after 28 days of exercising were significantly lower in the endurance training group than in the control group (pendurance training affects body weight and, lipid profiles, as well as fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and insulin levels, in STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats on a high- fat diet. We suggest that endurance training exercises may exhibit therapeutic, preventative, and protective effects against diabetes mellitus through improving lipid metabolism, glycemic control, and HbA1c levels.

  2. Interleukin-20 targets podocytes and is upregulated in experimental murine diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Hsing-Hui; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Wei-Yu; Hou, Ya-Chin; Weng, Yun-Han; Lai, Wei-Ting; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2017-03-31

    Interleukin (IL)-20, a proinflammatory cytokine of the IL-10 family, is involved in acute and chronic renal failure. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of IL-20 during diabetic nephropathy development. We found that IL-20 and its receptor IL-20R1 were upregulated in the kidneys of mice and rats with STZ-induced diabetes. In vitro, IL-20 induced MMP-9, MCP-1, TGF-β1 and VEGF expression in podocytes. IL-20 was upregulated by hydrogen peroxide, high-dose glucose and TGF-β1. In addition, IL-20 induced apoptosis in podocytes by activating caspase-8. In STZ-induced early diabetic nephropathy, IL-20R1-deficient mice had lower blood glucose and serum BUN levels and a smaller glomerular area than did wild-type controls. Anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody (7E) treatment reduced blood glucose and the glomerular area and improved renal functions in mice in the early stage of STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy. ELISA showed that the serum IL-20 level was higher in patients with diabetes mellitus than in healthy controls. The findings of this study suggest that IL-20 induces cell apoptosis of podocytes and plays a role in the pathogenesis of early diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Non-obese diabetic mice rapidly develop dramatic sympathetic neuritic dystrophy: a new experimental model of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Beaudet, Lucie N; Frederick, Kathy E; Parvin, Curtis A; Plurad, Santiago B; Levisetti, Matteo G

    2003-11-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites ("neuritic dystrophy") in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man.

  4. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  5. Type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identifi...

  6. BBT improves glucose homeostasis by ameliorating β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-gang; Xu, Xin; Wang, Gai-hong; Lei, Min; Quan, Ling-ling; Cheng, Yan-hua; Wan, Ping; Zhou, Jin-pei; Chen, Jing; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and increasing β-cell death are two typical dysfunctions of pancreatic β-cells in individuals that are destined to develop type 2 diabetes, and improvement of β-cell function through GSIS enhancement and/or inhibition of β-cell death is a promising strategy for anti-diabetic therapy. In this study, we discovered that the small molecule, N-(2-benzoylphenyl)-5-bromo-2-thiophenecarboxamide (BBT), was effective in both potentiating GSIS and protecting β-cells from cytokine- or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced cell death. Results of further studies revealed that cAMP/PKA and long-lasting (L-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2) (+) channel/CaMK2 pathways were involved in the action of BBT against GSIS, and that the cAMP/PKA pathway was essential for the protective action of BBT on β-cells. An assay using the model of type 2 diabetic mice induced by high-fat diet combined with STZ (STZ/HFD) demonstrated that BBT administration efficiently restored β-cell functions as indicated by the increased plasma insulin level and decrease in the β-cell loss induced by STZ/HFD. Moreover, the results indicated that BBT treatment decreased fasting blood glucose and HbA1c and improved oral glucose tolerance further highlighting the potential of BBT in anti-hyperglycemia research. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Statin Therapy Alters Lipid Storage in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena A Rebalka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available While statins significantly reduce cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of myopathy with statin use is a significant clinical side-effect. Recent guidelines recommend increasing inclusion criteria for statin treatment in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of statins on skeletal muscle health in those with diabetes (who already suffer from impairments in muscle health is ill-defined. Here we investigate the effects of Fluvastatin treatment on muscle health in wild-type and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. Wild-type and STZ-diabetic mice received diet enriched with 600 mg/kg Fluvastatin or control chow for 24 days. Muscle morphology, intra and extracellular lipid levels, and lipid transporter content was investigated. Our findings indicate that short-term Fluvastatin administration induced a myopathy that was not exacerbated by the presence of STZ-induced diabetes. Fluvastatin significantly increased ectopic lipid deposition within the muscle of STZ-diabetic animals, findings that were not seen with diabetes or statin treatment alone. Consistent with this observation, only Fluvastatin-treated diabetic mice downregulated protein expression of lipid transporters FAT/CD36 and FABPpm in their skeletal muscle. No differences in FAT/CD36 or FABPpm mRNA content were observed. Altered lipid compartmentalization resultant of a downregulation in lipid transporter content in STZ-induced diabetic skeletal muscle was apparent in the current investigation. Given the association between ectopic lipid deposition in skeletal muscle and the development of insulin-resistance, our findings highlight the necessity for more thorough investigations into the impact of statins in humans with diabetes.

  8. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  9. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects ofArctium lapparoot's hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  10. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:28348972

  11. Anti-diabetic effects of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex in type 2 diabetic mice and its sub-acute toxicity evaluation in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Chen, Zhongqin; Pan, Yuxiang; Gao, Xudong; Chen, Haixia

    2017-10-01

    Polysaccharides are important bioactive ingredients from Inonotus obliquus. This study aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel I. obliquus polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex (UIOPC) and investigate the anti-diabetic effects in streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mice and sub-acute toxicity in normal mice. The molecular weight of UIOPC was about 11.5 × 10 4 Da with the chromium content was 13.01% and the chromium was linked with polysaccharides through coordination bond. After treatment of UIOPC for four weeks, the body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, plasma insulin levels of the diabetic mice were significantly reduced when compared with those of the diabetic mice (p < 0.05). The results on serum profiles and antioxidant enzymes activities revealed that UIOPC had a positive effect on hypoglycemic and antioxidant ability. Histopathology results showed that UIOPC could effectively alleviate the STZ-lesioned tissues in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high dose administration of UIOPC had no obviously influence on serum profiles levels and antioxidant ability of the normal mice and the organ tissues maintained organized and integrity in the sub-acute toxicity study. These results suggested that UIOPC might be a good candidate for the functional food or pharmaceuticals in the treatment of T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes means you have glucose ( ...

  13. Insulin upregulates GRIM-19 and protects cardiac mitochondrial morphology in type 1 diabetic rats partly through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Guang; Dong, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Kan-Kai; He, Ya-Ping; Dai, Xiao-Yan; Li, Shuai; Li, Jing-Bo; Zhu, Wei; Wei, Meng

    2017-11-04

    Insulin is involved in the development of diabetic heart disease and is important in the activities of mitochondrial complex I. However, the effect of insulin on cardiac mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 subunit of retinoic-interferon-induced mortality 19 (GRIM-19) has not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin on the mitochondrial GRIM-19 in the hearts of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes. Protein changes of GRIM-19 were evaluated by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effects of insulin on mitochondrial complex I were detected in HeLa cells and H9C2 cardiac myocytes. During the development of diabetic heart disease, the cardiac function did not change within the 8 weeks, but the mitochondrial morphology was altered. The hearts from the rats with STZ-induced diabetes exhibited reduced expression of GRIM-19. Prior to the overt cardiac dilatation, mitochondrial alterations were already present. Following subcutaneous insulin injection, it was demonstrated that GRIM-19 protein was altered, as well as the mitochondrial morphology. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 had an effect on insulin signaling in H9C2 cardiacmyocytes, and decreased the level of GRIM-19 by half compared with that in the insulin group. The results indicate that insulin is essential for the control of cardiac mitochondrial morphology and the GRIM-19 expression partly via PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  15. Novel mechanism for plasma glucose-lowering action of metformin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Juei-Tang; Huang, Ching-Chiu; Liu, I-Min; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Chang, Chih Jen

    2006-03-01

    To better understand the insulin-independent plasma glucose-lowering action of metformin, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats to investigate the possible mechanisms. Oral intake of metformin decreased the plasma glucose of STZ-induced diabetic rats with a parallel increase of plasma beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BER). Mediation of opioid mu-receptors in the action of metformin was identified by the blockade of receptors with antagonist in STZ-induced diabetic rats and the failure of action in opioid mu-receptor knockout diabetic mice. Release of BER from adrenal glands by metformin was characterized, using bilateral adrenalectomy and the release of BER from isolated adrenal medulla of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Repeated treatment with metformin in STZ-induced diabetic rats increased the mRNA and protein levels of GLUT-4 in soleus muscle that was blocked by naloxonazine. Reduction of the mRNA or protein levels of hepatic PEPCK was also impeded in the same group of STZ-induced diabetic rats. In conclusion, our results provide novel mechanisms for the plasma glucose-lowering action of metformin, via an increase of beta-endorphin secretion from adrenal glands to stimulate opioid mu-receptor linkage, leading to an increase of GLUT-4 gene expression and an attenuation of hepatic PEPCK gene expression in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  16. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ahangarpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock, (A. lappa root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ-induced type2 diabetes in mice.Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10 as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated.Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (p

  17. Screening for type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, G E H M

    1999-01-01

    Summary and comment: Original articles: Diabetic patients detected by population-based stepwise screening already have a diabetic cardiovascular risk profile. Spijkerman AMW, Adriaanse MC, Dekker JM, Nijpels G, Stehouwer CDA, Bouter LM, Heine RJ. Diabetes Care 2002; 25(10): 1784–9. Screening for Type 2 diabetes — should it be now? Borch-Johnsen K, Lauritzen T, Glümer C, Sandbæk A. Diabetic Med 2003; 20(3): 175–81.

  18. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  19. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Farabi, Sarah S.

    2016-01-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  20. Eucommia bark (Du-Zhong improves diabetic nephropathy without altering blood glucose in type 1-like diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu HS

    2016-03-01

    . Conclusion: Oral administration of Du-Zhong improves STZ-induced DN in rats by inhibiting TGF-β/Smad signaling and suppressing TGF-β/connective tissue growth factor expression. Therefore, active principle from Du-Zhong is suitable to develop as new agent for DN in the future. Keywords: diabetic nephropathy, Du-Zhong, transforming growth factor-beta, Smad2/3, connective tissue growth factor, renal dysfunction

  1. Effect of Chinese medicine Qidengmingmu capsule on the STZ induced hyperglycemia rat's blood-retinal barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wen Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe retinal vessel leakage of streptozotocin(STZinduced diabetic rat, and the effect of traditional Chinese medicine on it. METHODS: We induced diabetic rat model by peritoneal injection of STZ, after the blood glucose raised, we used Evans blue to trace the leakage of blood-retina barrier(BRBevery month. After blood glucose rose three months later, we treated the Chinese medicine group diabetic rat with Qidengmingmu capsule. There were three groups of different dose, low dose group of 125mg/kg, middle dose group of 250mg/kg, high dose group of 500mg/kg. The control group was treated with calcium dobesilate(200mg/kg. After three months treated by medicine, the leakage of rat blood-retina barrier was evaluated. RESULTS: The damage of BRB and visual function occurred at two week after the blood glucose rose, and the damage aggravated with the continuing of high diabetic. But after the Chinese medicine treated three months, the rat's retina vessel leakage was reduced. CONCLUSION: BRB break down and visual acuity damage appears in early phase of STZ diabetic rat and get worse as the hyperglycemia keep on. The Chinese medicine Qidengmingmu capsule can prevent the vessel leakage by damage of BRB.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Trydal, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Hvert år får rundt 300 barn og 600 voksne diabetes mellitus type 1, og til sammen har rundt 28 000 personer denne sykdommen i Norge i dag. Det er en kronisk metabolsk sykdom, med en absolutt insulinmangel. Gjennom litteratur og forskning er det vist, at for å forebygge senkomplikasjoner, trenger pasienten informasjon, undervisning og praktisk veiledning når det gjelder medisinering, kosthold og fysisk aktivitet, og motivering til å mestre sykdommen. I praksis vil sykepleier spille en aktiv ro...

  3. Effect of GLP-1 on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits in the kidney of type 1 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-jin LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist, on the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits NOX4 and p22phox and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF in the kidney of streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic rats, and explore the protective effects and mechanisms of exenatide on the kidney of diabetic rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into control group (group A, n=7 and diabetic model group (n=23. Type 1 diabetic model was reproduced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. It was successful in 19 rats. Diabetic rats were randomly divided into diabetic control group (group B, n=10 and diabetic with treatment of exenatide group (group C, n=9. Rats in group C were injected subcutaneously with exenatide in dose of 5μg/kg twice daily. Rats in group A and B were given equivalent volume of normal saline by subcutaneous injection. All rats were sacrificed after eight weeks. The mRNA expression of renal p22phox and NOX4 were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. The protein expression of CTGF was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results The levels of blood glucose, lipids, creatinine, and urea nitrogen, the albumin excretion rate, kidney index, the mRNA expressions of renal NOX4 and p22phox, and the protein expression of renal CTGF were significantly increased in group B compared with that in group A (P0.05. Conclusion Exenatide can decrease the expressions of renal NOX4, p22phox and CTGF, decline the index of urinary protein, and alleviate the kidney hypertrophy in type 1 diabetic rats, implying that exenatide exerted a protective effect on the kidney.

  4. Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Li, Kaicheng; Yan, Junyan; Li, Fen; Ma, Shuai; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-12-15

    Recent evidence suggests a potential pro-diabetic effect of selenite treatment in type 2 diabetics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of selenite treatment in a nongenetic mouse model of type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were orally gavaged with selenite at 0.5 or 2.0mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle for 4 weeks. High-dose selenite treatment significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance index, in parallel with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and pyruvate tolerance. High-dose selenite treatment also attenuated hepatic IRS1/Akt/FoxO1 signaling and pyruvate kinase gene expressions, but elevated the gene expressions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and selenoprotein P (SelP) in the liver. Furthermore, high-dose selenite treatment caused significant increases in MDA contents, protein carbonyl contents, and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, concurrent with enhanced ASK1/MKK4/JNK signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that high-dose selenite treatment exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes, at least in part through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway, providing new mechanistic insights into the pro-diabetic effect of selenite in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tetradecyl 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoate Improves the Symptoms of Diabetic Mice by Modulation of Insulin and Adiponectin Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Xiang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetradecyl 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate (ABG-001 derived from Chinese medicine, gentiana regescens Franch is a leading compound with NGF mimic effect, it can induce neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells via the IGF-1/PI3K/ERK signaling pathway. Thus, we inferred that this compound had anti-diabetic effect and used streptozocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice to indicate it.Methods: ABG-001 was synthesized with 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and tetradecyl alcohol under certain reaction conditions. STZ-induced diabetic mice were used to investigate anti-diabetic effect. Oral glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test, RT-PCR, Western blot, ELISA assays and histological section were performed to do the analysis of action mechanism.Results: ABG-001 showed anti-diabetic effect in STZ-induced diabetic mice. In diabetic mice, the anti-diabetic effect of ABG-001 at a dose of 20 mg/kg was equal with metformin at a dose of 140 mg/kg. Moreover, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were significantly improved on diabetic mice. The plasma insulin, adiponectin and leptin were notably increased, whereas glucagon remarkably decreased. The gene expressions of adiponectin and leptin in adipose tissue, glucose transporter 4 and adiponectin receptor 1 in liver and gastrocnemius, ADR2 in hypothalamus and pancreas were obviously increased.Conclusion: ABG-001 exerts antidiabetic effects via modulation of insulin and adiponectin signaling pathways. This new type of molecule could be a promising drug candidate for treatment of diabetes.

  6. Sclerostin antibody treatment improves fracture outcomes in a Type I diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Cristal S; Xie, LiQin; Hatsell, Sarah; Hum, Nicholas; Murugesh, Deepa; Economides, Aris N; Loots, Gabriela G; Collette, Nicole M

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients have osteopenia and impaired fracture healing due to decreased osteoblast activity. Further, no adequate treatments are currently available that can restore impaired healing in T1DM; hence a significant need exists to investigate new therapeutics for treatment of orthopedic complications. Sclerostin (SOST), a WNT antagonist, negatively regulates bone formation, and SostAb is a potent bone anabolic agent. To determine whether SOST antibody (SostAb) treatment improves fracture healing in streptozotocin (STZ) induced T1DM mice, we administered SostAb twice weekly for up to 21days post-fracture, and examined bone quality and callus outcomes at 21days and 42days post-fracture (11 and 14weeks of age, respectively). Here we show that SostAb treatment improves bone parameters; these improvements persist after cessation of antibody treatment. Markers of osteoblast differentiation such as Runx2, collagen I, osteocalcin, and DMP1 were reduced, while an abundant number of SP7/osterix-positive early osteoblasts were observed on the bone surface of STZ calluses. These results suggest that STZ calluses have poor osteogenesis resulting from failure of osteoblasts to fully differentiate and produce mineralized matrix, which produces a less mineralized callus. SostAb treatment enhanced fracture healing in both normal and STZ groups, and in STZ+SostAb mice, also reversed the lower mineralization seen in STZ calluses. Micro-CT analysis of calluses revealed improved bone parameters with SostAb treatment, and the mineralized bone was comparable to Controls. Additionally, we found sclerostin levels to be elevated in STZ mice and β-catenin activity to be reduced. Consistent with its function as a WNT antagonist, SostAb treatment enhanced β-catenin activity, but also increased the levels of SOST in the callus and in circulation. Our results indicate that SostAb treatment rescues the impaired osteogenesis seen in the STZ induced T1DM fracture model

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Ferrannini, Ele; Groop, Leif

    2015-01-01

    comorbidities), owing to hyperglycaemia and individual components of the insulin resistance (metabolic) syndrome. Environmental factors (for example, obesity, an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity) and genetic factors contribute to the multiple pathophysiological disturbances that are responsible...... for impaired glucose homeostasis in T2DM. Insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion remain the core defects in T2DM, but at least six other pathophysiological abnormalities contribute to the dysregulation of glucose metabolism. The multiple pathogenetic disturbances present in T2DM dictate......Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an expanding global health problem, closely linked to the epidemic of obesity. Individuals with T2DM are at high risk for both microvascular complications (including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (such as cardiovascular...

  8. Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou, Anastasia; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia; Rawshani, Araz; Dabelea, Dana; Bonifacio, Ezio; Anderson, Barbara J; Jacobsen, Laura M; Schatz, Desmond A; Lernmark, Åke

    2017-03-30

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), also known as autoimmune diabetes, is a chronic disease characterized by insulin deficiency due to pancreatic β-cell loss and leads to hyperglycaemia. Although the age of symptomatic onset is usually during childhood or adolescence, symptoms can sometimes develop much later. Although the aetiology of T1DM is not completely understood, the pathogenesis of the disease is thought to involve T cell-mediated destruction of β-cells. Islet-targeting autoantibodies that target insulin, 65 kDa glutamic acid decarboxylase, insulinoma-associated protein 2 and zinc transporter 8 - all of which are proteins associated with secretory granules in β-cells - are biomarkers of T1DM-associated autoimmunity that are found months to years before symptom onset, and can be used to identify and study individuals who are at risk of developing T1DM. The type of autoantibody that appears first depends on the environmental trigger and on genetic factors. The pathogenesis of T1DM can be divided into three stages depending on the absence or presence of hyperglycaemia and hyperglycaemia-associated symptoms (such as polyuria and thirst). A cure is not available, and patients depend on lifelong insulin injections; novel approaches to insulin treatment, such as insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring and hybrid closed-loop systems, are in development. Although intensive glycaemic control has reduced the incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications, the majority of patients with T1DM are still developing these complications. Major research efforts are needed to achieve early diagnosis, prevent β-cell loss and develop better treatment options to improve the quality of life and prognosis of those affected.

  9. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular ...

  10. Antidiabetic effect of Korean traditional Baechu (Chinese cabbage) kimchi in a type 2 diabetes model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Choi, Haymie

    2009-04-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the antidiabetic effects of two dietary dosages (0.5% and 2.0%) of freeze-dried Korean traditional Baechu (Chinese cabbage) kimchi in a high-fat (HF) diet-fed, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) rat model. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed HF diet for 2 weeks and then randomly divided into four groups of eight animals: normal control (NC), diabetic control (DBC), kimchi low (KML) (0.5%), and kimchi high (KMH) (2.0%) groups. Diabetes was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg of body weight) in all groups except the NC group. After 4 weeks of feeding of experimental diets, serum insulin concentrations and Homeostatic Model Assessment pancreatic beta-cell function were increased and blood glycated hemoglobin was decreased in the kimchi-fed groups compared to the DBC group, while a significant (P KML groups; however, differences were not significant. Food intake, body weight gain, Homeostatic Model Assessment insulin resistance index, and serum lipid profiles were not significantly influenced by kimchi-containing diets. Data of this study suggest that dietary Baechu kimchi has some antidiabetic effects even when fed with a HF-containing diet. Better results are possible if it is consumed with normal or low-fat rather than HF-containing diet.

  11. L-citrulline protects from kidney damage in type 1 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza J Romero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end-stage renal disease, associated with endothelial dysfunction. Chronic supplementation of L-arginine (L-arg, the substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, failed to improve vascular function. L-citrulline (L-cit supplementation not only increases L-arg synthesis, but also inhibits cytosolic arginase I (Arg I, a competitor of eNOS for the use of L-arg, in the vasculature. Aims. To investigate whether L-cit treatment reduces diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetes in mice and rats and to study its effects on arginase II (ArgII function, the main renal isoform. Methods. STZ-C57BL6 mice received L-cit or vehicle supplemented in the drinking water. For comparative analysis, diabetic ArgII knock out mice and L-cit-treated STZ-rats were evaluated. Results. L-cit exerted protective effects in kidneys of STZ-rats, and markedly reduced urinary albumin excretion, tubulo-interstitial fibrosis and kidney hypertrophy, observed in untreated diabetic mice. Intriguingly, L-cit treatment was accompanied by a sustained elevation of tubular ArgII at 16 wks and significantly enhanced plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Diabetic ArgII knock out mice showed greater BUN levels, hypertrophy, and dilated tubules than diabetic wild type mice. Despite a marked reduction in collagen deposition in ArgII knock out mice, their albuminuria was not significantly different from diabetic wild type animals. L-cit also restored NO/ROS balance and barrier function in high glucose-treated monolayers of human glomerular endothelial cells. Moreover, L-cit also has the ability to establish an anti-inflammatory profile, characterized by increased IL-10 and reduced IL-1beta and IL-12(p70 generation in the human proximal tubular cells. Conclusions. L-cit supplementation established an anti-inflammatory profile and significantly preserved the nephron function during type 1

  12. Diabetes Type 1 - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetes Type 1 URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetes Type 1 - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Topical application of propolis enhances cutaneous wound healing by promoting TGF-beta/Smad-mediated collagen production in a streptozotocin-induced type I diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozzein, Wael N; Badr, Gamal; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A; Sayed, Ayat; Al-Waili, Noori S; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is considered to be one of the most serious complications associated with diabetes as it significantly increases the susceptibility of patients to infection. Propolis is a natural bee product used extensively in foods and beverages that has significant benefits to human health. In particular, propolis has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects that could be useful for improving wound healing. In this study, we investigated the effects of topical application of propolis on the healing and closure of diabetic wounds in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetic mouse model. Sixty male mice were distributed equally into 3 experimental groups: group 1, non-diabetic control mice; group 2, diabetic mice; and group 3, diabetic mice treated daily with a topical application of propolis. We found that diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in the levels of TGF-β1 and a prolonged elevation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and MMP9 in wound tissues compared with control non-diabetic mice. Moreover, the wound tissues of diabetic mice showed a marked reduction in the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 as well as a marked reduction in collagen production. Interestingly, compared with untreated diabetic mice, topical application of propolis significantly enhanced the closure of diabetic wounds and decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MMP9 to near normal levels. Most importantly, compared with untreated diabetic mice, the treatment of diabetic mice with propolis significantly enhanced the production of collagen via the TGF-β1/Smad2,3 signaling axis in wounded tissues. Our findings reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the improved healing and closure of diabetic wounds following topical propolis application. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Topical Application of Propolis Enhances Cutaneous Wound Healing by Promoting TGF-Beta/Smad-Mediated Collagen Production in a Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael N. Hozzein

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Impaired wound healing is considered to be one of the most serious complications associated with diabetes as it significantly increases the susceptibility of patients to infection. Propolis is a natural bee product used extensively in foods and beverages that has significant benefits to human health. In particular, propolis has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects that could be useful for improving wound healing. In this study, we investigated the effects of topical application of propolis on the healing and closure of diabetic wounds in a streptozotocin (STZ-induced type I diabetic mouse model. Methods: Sixty male mice were distributed equally into 3 experimental groups: group 1, non-diabetic control mice; group 2, diabetic mice; and group 3, diabetic mice treated daily with a topical application of propolis. Results: We found that diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in the levels of TGF-β1 and a prolonged elevation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and MMP9 in wound tissues compared with control non-diabetic mice. Moreover, the wound tissues of diabetic mice showed a marked reduction in the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 as well as a marked reduction in collagen production. Interestingly, compared with untreated diabetic mice, topical application of propolis significantly enhanced the closure of diabetic wounds and decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MMP9 to near normal levels. Most importantly, compared with untreated diabetic mice, the treatment of diabetic mice with propolis significantly enhanced the production of collagen via the TGF-β1/Smad2,3 signaling axis in wounded tissues. Conclusion: Our findings reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the improved healing and closure of diabetic wounds following topical propolis application.

  15. The ability of hesperidin compared to that of insulin for preventing osteoporosis induced by type I diabetes in young male albino rats: A histological and biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Azza Saad; Amer, Mona Gomah; Abd El-Haleem, Manal Reda; Karam, Rehab Ahmed

    2017-04-04

    Patients with type I diabetes are at increased risk of osteoporosis even after insulin therapy in adult stage. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of hesperidin (hesp) therapy versus that of insulin alone in the alleviation of osteoporosis arising from type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in young rats. Hesperidin was administered orally to STZ-induced diabetes. The animals were evaluated morphologically and biochemically and compared with that received daily SC injections of long-acting insulin. Histologically, we observed the degeneration of osteoblasts and osteocytes, decreased collagen fibers, and disturbed bone turn over markers in untreated DM rats. Hesperidin+ insulin supplementation to diabetic rats caused significant improvement of most of the bone histological and morphometric parameters compared with the insulin-treated group. Furthermore, hesp treatment significantly reduced pro-inflammatory mediators TNFα and NF-κB and increased serum biochemical markers of bone turnover, including osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC) and decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). These data demonstrated that hesp could be considered to be a beneficial drug for preventing diabetic osteoporosis in growing age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of Chromium Picolinate Supplementation on the Pancreas and Macroangiopathy in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim was to explore the effect of the chromium picolinate (CrPic administration on the pancreas and macroangiopathy of type II diabetes mellitus rats. Methods. The type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM rat model was induced by low-dose streptozotocin (STZ. The rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (ten rats in each group. After supplementing CrPic for 15 weeks, the histopathological examination was performed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining. Serum insulin and NO level were determined by radioimmunoassay and colorimetry, respectively. Serum glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C, adiponectin (APN, advanced glycation end products (AGES, and apelin were measured by ELISA. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was applied for detecting the mRNA expression of APN and apelin. Results. After CrPic treatment, compared with the T2DM control group (group 2, pancreas sections stained with HE showed the completed pancreatic cells structure and no inflammatory infiltration in groups 4 and 5. In addition, the levels of serum NO and insulin were significantly increased and the serum levels of HbA1C, AGES, APN, and apelin were significantly decreased in groups 4 and 5 compared with group 2. The mRNA expression of APN and apelin in groups 4 and 5 was also recovered to the normal level. Conclusion. CrPic can recover the function of Β-cells and alleviate macroangiopathy in STZ-induced T2DM rats.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Predisposes to Type 1 Diabetes in Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Daniela; Costa, Frederico R C; Pereira, Camila A; Rocha, Fernanda A; Yaochite, Juliana N U; Oliveira, Gabriela G; Carneiro, Fernando S; Tostes, Rita C; Ramos, Simone G; Zamboni, Dario S; Camara, Niels O S; Ryffel, Bernhard; Silva, João S

    2017-01-01

    Although a correlation between polymorphisms of NOD-like receptor family-pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been identified, the potential function and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in T1D have not been clarified. The present study shows that non-obese diabetic mice exhibited increased NLRP3, and pro-IL-1β gene expression in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs). Similar increases in gene expression of NLRP3, apoptosis associated speck like protein (ASC) and pro-IL-1β were induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, diabetic C57BL/6 mice also exhibited increased IL-1β protein expression in the pancreatic tissue at day 7, which remained elevated until day 15. Diabetic mice also showed increased positive caspase-1 macrophages in the PLNs, which were decreased in NLRP3 -/- mice, but not in ASC -/- mice, after STZ treatment. NLRP3- and IL-1R-deficient mice, but not ASC-deficient mice, showed reduced incidence of diabetes, less insulitis, lower hyperglycemia, and normal insulin levels compared to wild-type (WT) diabetic mice. Notably, these mice also displayed a decrease in IL-17-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells (Th17 and Tc17) and IFN-γ-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells (Th1 and Tc1) in the PLNs. Following STZ treatment to induce T1D, NLRP3-deficient mice also exhibited an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cell and mast cell numbers in the PLNs along with a significant increase in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-4 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, diabetic mice revealed increased circulating expression of genes related to mitochondrial DNA, such as cytochrome b and cytochrome c , but not NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (NADH). Mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) from diabetic mice, but not from non-diabetic mice, induced significant IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by WT macrophages, which was reduced in NLRP3 -/- macrophages. Finally, mDNA administration in vivo increased Th17/Tc

  18. Genetics Home Reference: type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Type 1 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood ...

  19. High fat diet attenuates hyperglycemia, body composition changes, and bone loss in male streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Adriana Lelis; DeMambro, Victoria E; Guntur, Anyonya R; Le, Phuong; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; de Paula, Francisco José Albuquerque; Motyl, Katherine J

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing and alarming prevalence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in type I diabetic patients (T1DM), particularly in adolescence. In general, low bone mass, higher fracture risk, and increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT) are features of diabetic osteopathy in insulin-deficient subjects. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated with normal or high bone mass, a greater risk of peripheral fractures, and no change in MAT. Therefore, we sought to determine the effect of weight gain on bone turnover in insulin-deficient mice. We evaluated the impact of a 6-week high-fat (HFD) rich in medium chain fatty acids or low-fat diet (LFD) on bone mass and MAT in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model using male C57BL/6J mice at 8 weeks of age. Dietary intervention was initiated after diabetes confirmation. At the endpoint, lower non-fasting glucose levels were observed in diabetic mice fed with high fat diet compared to diabetic mice fed the low fat diet (STZ-LFD). Compared to euglycemic controls, the STZ-LFD had marked polydipsia and polyphagia, as well as reduced lean mass, fat mass, and bone parameters. Interestingly, STZ-HFD mice had higher bone mass, namely less cortical bone loss and more trabecular bone than STZ-LFD. Thus, we found that a HFD, rich in medium chain fatty acids, protects against bone loss in a T1DM mouse model. Whether this may also translate to T1DM patients who are overweight or obese in respect to maintenance of bone mass remains to be determined through longitudinal studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Together Print en español Tratamiento de la diabetes tipo 2 After kids or teens are diagnosed with ... reduce the risk of other chronic illnesses, like cancer. Besides all of these benefits, exercise also can ...

  1. Effect of naringenin on brain insulin signaling and cognitive functions in ICV-STZ induced dementia model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenqing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Lu, Yongliang; Hu, Bin; Yu, Huarong

    2014-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that severe abnormalities in brain glucose/energy metabolism and insulin signaling have been documented to take a pivotal role in early sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathology. It has been reported that naringenin (NAR), derived from citrus aurantium, exhibits antioxidant potential and protects the brain against neurodegeneration. The current study was designed to further investigate the protective effect of the NAR on neurodegeneration in a rat model of AD induced by an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and to determine whether this neuroprotective effect was associated with brain insulin signaling. Rats were injected bilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg), while sham rats received the same volume of vehicle and then supplemented with NAR (25, 50 mg, 100 mg/kg, respectively) for 3 weeks. The ICV-STZ injected rats did not have elevated blood glucose levels. 21 days following ICV-STZ injection, rats treated with NAR had better learning and memory performance in the Morris water maze test compared with rats treated with saline. We demonstrated that NAR increased the mRNA expression of INS and INSR in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In addition, NAR reversed ICV-STZ induced Tau hyper-phosphorylation in both hippocampus and cerebral cortex through downregulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity, a key kinase in the insulin signaling. Brain levels of Abeta, which were elevated in ICV-STZ rats, were significantly reduced in NAR-treated rats via upregulation of insulin degrading enzyme. These effects were mediated by increased insulin and insulin receptors expression in the brain, suggesting that insulin sensitizer agents might have therapeutic efficacy in early AD.

  2. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications. PMID:21115758

  3. [Sport and type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsser, C; Meyer, P; Philippe, J; Jornayvaz, F R

    2013-06-05

    Physical activity is recognised to be an efficient measure in improving glycemic control in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This evidence is lacking in type I diabetes but type 1I diabetics benefit from the same advantages like the general population. For many type I diabetics, especially younger patients, sport represents an important modality in the treatment of their disease but also of their quality of life. However, this is often a challenge for the patient as well as for the physician regarding the metabolic consequences (hypo- but also hyperglycemia) which can appear in relation with physical activity. There are existing general recommendations concerning the intake of carbohydrates and the reduction of insulin doses but those have to be adapted individually for each patient and depend significantly on different sports and on the intensity of sport.

  4. Anti-diabetic effect of Cyclo-His-Pro (CHP)-enriched yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the hypoglycemic effects of the daily oral dose of 0.50 to 0.75 g/kg of yeast hydrolysate (YH) containing high Cyclo-His-Pro (51.0 mg CHP/g YH) on normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats for 14 days. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, after administrations of the YH for ...

  5. Zanthoxylum alkylamides activate phosphorylated AMPK and ameliorate glycolipid metabolism in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tingyuan; Zhu, Yuping; Kan, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Zanthoxylum alkylamides on the glycolipid metabolism of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Diabetic rats were given daily oral treatments of 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg bw alkylamides for 28 days. Alkylamides significantly decreased fasting blood glucose and fructosamine content, as well as relieved organ enlargement caused by diabetes. The serum and liver triglyceride, malondialdehyde, and free fatty-acid contents of rats with STZ-induced diabetes were significantly reduced. Total cholesterol in the liver also significantly decreased. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and Western blot detected insignificantly increased (P > 0.05) mRNA expression levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the skeletal muscle of diabetic rats. However, AMPK and p-AMPK (Thr172) protein expression levels significantly increased. The mRNA and protein expression levels of silencing information regulator 1 significantly increased. The mRNA expression levels of acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) and protein p-ACC (Ser79) also increased. The mRNA and protein expression levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) were significantly upregulated in the skeletal muscle cell membranes of diabetic rats. Results indicated that alkylamides activated the AMPK-signaling pathway. Thus, inhibiting ACC activity reduced fatty-acid synthesis. The rapid translocation of GLUT4 mediated increased glucose transport rate and reduced blood glucose. Therefore, alkylamides can ameliorate glucose and lipid metabolism disorders in diabetic rats by activating the AMPK pathway.

  6. Impaired Mitochondrial Respiratory Functions and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbuswamy K. Prabu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown a tissue-specific increase in oxidative stress in the early stages of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this study, we investigated oxidative stress-related long-term complications and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the different tissues of STZ-induced diabetic rats (>15 mM blood glucose for 8 weeks. These animals showed a persistent increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively production. Oxidative protein carbonylation was also increased with the maximum effect observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes ubiquinol: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (Complex III and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV were significantly decreased while that of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex II were moderately increased in diabetic rats, which was confirmed by the increased expression of the 70 kDa Complex II sub-unit. Mitochondrial matrix aconitase, a ROS sensitive enzyme, was markedly inhibited in the diabetic rat tissues. Increased expression of oxidative stress marker proteins Hsp-70 and HO-1 was also observed along with increased expression of nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that mitochondrial respiratory complexes may play a critical role in ROS/RNS homeostasis and oxidative stress related changes in type 1 diabetes and may have implications in the etiology of diabetes and its complications.

  7. Early onset type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, A; Thomsen, R W; Nielsen, J S

    2017-01-01

    was more frequent and meeting physical activity recommendations less likely in persons with early-onset type 2 DM. CONCLUSIONS: We found a clear age-gradient, with increasing prevalence of clinical and behavioural risk factors the younger the onset age of type 2 DM. Younger persons with early-onset type 2......AIM: To examine the association between early onset of type 2 diabetes (DM) and clinical and behavioural risk factors for later diabetes complications. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5115 persons with incident type 2 DM enrolled during 2010-2015 in the Danish Centre for Strategic...... Research in Type 2 Diabetes-cohort. We compared risk factors at time of diagnosis among those diagnosed at ≤45 years (early-onset) with diagnosis age 46-55, 56-65 (average-onset = reference), 66-75, and >75 years (late-onset). Prevalence ratios (PRs) were computed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Poor...

  8. Inhibition of (prorenin Receptor Contributes to Renoprotective Effects of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS plays a pivotal role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R blockade elevates (prorenin, which may bind to (prorenin receptor (PRR and exert receptor-mediated, angiotensin-independent profibrotic effects. We therefore investigated whether PRR activation leads to the limited anti-fibrotic effects of AT1R blockade on DN, and whether PRR inhibition might ameliorate progression of DN.Methods: To address the issue, the expression of RAS components was tested in different stages of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats (6, 12, and 24 weeks and 6-week AT1R blockade (losartan treated diabetic rats. Using the blocker for PRR, the handle region peptide (HRP of prorenin, the effects of PRR on high glucose or Ang II-induced proliferative and profibrotic actions were evaluated by measurement of cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 activity, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 expression in rat mesangial cells (MCs.Results: PRR was downregulated in the kidneys of different stages of diabetic rats (6, 12, and 24 weeks. Moreover, 6-week losartan treatment further suppressed PRR expression via upregulating AT2R, and ameliorated diabetic renal injury. HRP inhibited high glucose and Ang II-induced proliferative and profibrotic effects in MCs through suppressing TGF-β1 expression and activating MMP-2. Meanwhile, HRP enhanced losartan's anti-fibrotic effects through further inhibiting phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and TGF-β1 expression. Moreover, the inhibitive effect of HRP on Ang II-induced TGF-β1 expression depended on the regulation of PRR expression by AT2R.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that inhibition of PRR contributes to renoprotection against diabetic nephropathy by AT1R blockade.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's Your Risk? KidsHealth from Nemours The Genetic Landscape of Diabetes (2004) Type 2 Diabetes Knowledge Portal ... ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility. Nat Genet. 2014 ...

  10. Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes Type 2 Is Serious But Manageable Past Issues / ... t have to knock yourself out to prevent diabetes. The key is: small steps that lead to ...

  11. Synergistic exacerbation of mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction and resultant learning and memory deficit in a mouse model of diabetic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Long; Li, Jianping; Fang, Du; Zhong, Changjia; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is considered to be a risk factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Although recent evidence indicates that diabetes exaggerates pathologic features of AD, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To determine whether mitochondrial perturbation is associated with the contribution of diabetes to AD progression, we characterized mouse models of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes and transgenic AD mouse models with diabetes. Brains from mice with STZ-induced diabetes revealed a significant increase of cyclophilin D (CypD) expression, reduced respiratory function, and decreased hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP); these animals had impaired spatial learning and memory. Hyperglycemia exacerbated the upregulation of CypD, mitochondrial defects, synaptic injury, and cognitive dysfunction in the brains of transgenic AD mice overexpressing amyloid-β as shown by decreased mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV enzyme activity and greatly decreased mitochondrial respiratory rate. Concomitantly, hippocampal LTP reduction and spatial learning and memory decline, two early pathologic indicators of AD, were enhanced in the brains of diabetic AD mice. Our results suggest that the synergistic interaction between effects of diabetes and AD on mitochondria may be responsible for brain dysfunction that is in common in both diabetes and AD.

  12. Synergistic Exacerbation of Mitochondrial and Synaptic Dysfunction and Resultant Learning and Memory Deficit in a Mouse Model of Diabetic Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Long; Li, Jianping; Fang, Du; Zhong, Changjia; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is considered to be a risk factor in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Although recent evidence indicates that diabetes exaggerates pathologic features of AD, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To determine whether mitochondrial perturbation is associated with the contribution of diabetes to AD progression, we characterized mouse models of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes and transgenic AD mouse models with diabetes. Brains from mice with STZ-induced diabetes revealed a significant increase of cyclophilin D (CypD) expression, reduced respiratory function, and decreased hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP); these animals had impaired spatial learning and memory. Hyperglycemia exacerbated the upregulation of CypD, mitochondrial defects, synaptic injury, and cognitive dysfunction in the brains of transgenic AD mice overexpressing amyloid-β as shown by decreased mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV enzyme activity and greatly decreased mitochondrial respiratory rate. Concomitantly, hippocampal LTP reduction and spatial learning and memory decline, two early pathologic indicators of AD, were enhanced in the brains of diabetic AD mice. Our results suggest that the synergistic interaction between effects of diabetes and AD on mitochondria may be responsible for brain dysfunction that is in common in both diabetes and AD. PMID:25096625

  13. Effect of interleukin-6 (IL-6) on the vascular smooth muscle contraction in abdominal aorta of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Ting; Shan, Jing-Li; Sun, Peng; Yang, Ting-Ting; Chang, Xin-Wen; Li, Sen; Wang, Paulus S; Xie, Dong-Ping

    2011-10-31

    Patients with type 1 diabetes are at a risk of hypertension. However, the mechanisms behind the findings are not completely known. The aim of the present study was to investigate involvement of interleukin-6 (IL-6) on the contraction of abdominal aorta in rats with type 1 diabetes. IL-6 levels in the plasma of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes were determined by ELISA. The abdominal aorta was dissected free of fat and connective tissues and then cut into spiral rings. The endothelium-denuded strip was vertically suspended in tissue chambers containing 5 ml Krebs solution at 37 degrees C and bubbled continuously with 95% O2-5% CO2. The effects of phenylephrine (Phe) on the contractile responses of abdominal aorta were recorded. The effects of IL-6 and anti-rat IL-6 antibody on the Phe-induced response were also examined. Plasma levels of IL-6 increased time-dependently in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. Phe caused concentration-dependent contraction in aortic rings. Phe-induced contractions were higher in vascular strips of STZ-induced diabetic rats than that of control rats. Pretreatment of vascular strips with IL-6 for 1 h did not cause contraction but enhanced the contraction in response to Phe. Treatment of the vascular strips with an anti-IL-6 antibody for 1 h decreased the Phe-induced contractions. These results suggest that IL-6 causes vascular smooth muscle contraction in abdominal aorta of rats with type 1 diabetes.

  14. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the leading causes of visual impairment[1] .... diabetic kidney disease. The study protocol ... hip ratio), systolic and diastolic blood pressures, serum creatinine ...

  15. The Dietary Furocoumarin Imperatorin Increases Plasma GLP-1 Levels in Type 1-Like Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yu Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Imperatorin, a dietary furocoumarin, is found not only in medicinal plants, but also in popular culinary herbs, such as parsley and fennel. Recently, imperatorin has been shown to activate GPR119 in cells. Another GPR, GPR131, also called TGR5 or G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1, is known to regulate glucose metabolism. Additionally, TGR5 activation increases glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1 secretion to lower blood sugar levels in animals. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether the effects of imperatorin on GLP-1 secretion are mediated by TGR5. First, we transfected cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 cells with the TGR5 gene. Glucose uptake was confirmed in the transfected cells using a fluorescent indicator. Moreover, NCI-H716 cells, which secrete GLP-1, were used to investigate the changes in calcium concentrations and GLP-1 levels. In addition, streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1-like diabetic rats were used to identify the effects of imperatorin in vivo. Imperatorin dose-dependently increased glucose uptake in CHO-K1 cells expressing TGR5. In STZ diabetic rats, similar to the results in NCI-H716 cells, imperatorin induced a marked increase of GLP-1 secretion that was reduced, but not totally abolished, by a dose of triamterene that inhibited TGR5. Moreover, increases in GLP-1 secretion induced by imperatorin and GPR119 activation were shown in NCI-H716 cells. We demonstrated that imperatorin induced GLP-1 secretion via activating TGR5 and GPR119. Therefore, imperatorin shall be considered as a TGR5 and GPR119 agonist.

  16. Effect of Chang Run Tong on the Biomechanical and Morphometric Remodeling of Colon and Rectum in STZ Induced Diabetic Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Hong; Zhao, Dong; Zhao, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    , low dosage: 25 g/kg/day) and normal (Con) rats. The experimental period was 60 d. The blood glucose level and body weight were measured. The circumferential length, wall thickness, and opening angle were measured from the segments in the no-load and zero-stress states. The residual strain was computed...

  17. Effect of Tangweian Jianji on the Biomechanical and Morphometric Remodeling of Colon and Rectum in STZ Induced Diabetic Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Hong; Tong, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Gui-Fang

    2012-01-01

    was computed. Circumferential and longitudinal stresses and strains were computed from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry for the colonic segment. RESULTS: The glucose and insulin levels did not differ among DM, TH and TL groups. Wet weight, wall thickness, cross......-sectional wall area, opening angle, and absolute values of residual strain of colonic and rectal segments in DM group were significantly higher than those in CON group (P

  18. Ophiocordyceps formosana improves hyperglycemia and depression-like behavior in an STZ-induced diabetic mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chao-Wei; Hong, Tzu-Wen; Wang, Ying-Jing; Chen, Ko-Chien; Pei, Ju-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chu, Richard; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Sheen, Lee-Yan; Takahashi, Satoru; Ding, Shih-Torng; Shen, Tang-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background A newly defined Cordyceps species, Ophiocordyceps formosana (O. formosana) has been implicated in multitudinous bioactivities, including lowering glucose and cholesterol levels and modulating the immune system. However, few literatures demonstrate sufficient evidence to support these proposed functions. Although the use of Cordyceps spp. has been previously addressed to improve insulin insensitivity and improve the detrimental symptoms of depression; its mechanistic nature remains ...

  19. Inhibition with N-acetylcysteine of enhanced production of tumor necrosis factor in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, M; Satoh, J; Zhu, X P; Takahashi, K; Fukuzawa, M; Muto, G; Muto, Y; Toyota, T

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported that the in vivo production of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) was significantly enhanced after the onset of diabetes in spontaneous type 1 and 2 diabetic animals. In this report we confirmed the enhanced production of TNF in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and then attempted to suppress the enhanced TNF production with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione synthesis. The lipopolysaccharide-induced serum TNF activities were significantly enhanced in STZ-induced diabetic rats (6-18 weeks of age) compared with those of nondiabetic rats throughout the 12-week experiment. A single, oral administration of NAC (200 or 1000 mg/kg body wt) significantly suppressed the enhanced TNF production in the diabetic rats compared with that in untreated rats in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, in the long-term (6 or 12 weeks) administrations, smaller doses of NAC (50 or 200 mg/kg/day) also significantly inhibited the enhanced production of TNF regardless of the dose of NAC. NAC administration, however, did not suppress the TNF production of nondiabetic rats. The long-term NAC administration affected neither body weight nor levels of serum glucose, fructosamine, albumin, and triglyceride. These results show that NAC administration significantly suppressed the enhanced TNF production in diabetic rats and indicate that NAC might be useful in preventing TNF-mediated pathological conditions in diabetes.

  20. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The risk of DR exists in patients with type 2 diabetes even in normoalbuminuric individuals. Close monitoring is particularly needed if patients have longer duration of diabetes, hypertension, anemia, or high normal albuminuria. Keywords: Albuminuria, Diabetic retinopathy, Predictors, Type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

  1. Glucagon and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    In normal physiology, glucagon from pancreatic alpha cells plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis via its regulatory effect on hepatic glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes suffer from fasting and postprandial hyperglucagonemia, which stimulate hepatic glucose...... production and, thus, contribute to the hyperglycemia characterizing these patients. Although this has been known for years, research focusing on alpha cell (patho)physiology has historically been dwarfed by research on beta cells and insulin. Today the mechanisms behind type 2 diabetic hyperglucagonemia...... or antagonization of the glucagon receptor constitutes potentially effective treatment strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes. In this review, we focus on the regulation of glucagon secretion by the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GIP. Furthermore, potential advantages and limitations...

  2. Multiple low-dose radiation prevents type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage through attenuation of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance and subsequent renal inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Shao

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms.Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured.HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2 expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks.These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress.

  3. GLP-1 analog liraglutide protects against cardiac steatosis, oxidative stress and apoptosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomoaki; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Hendarto, Hari; Makimura, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Shuji; Yokomizo, Hisashi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2015-05-01

    Accumulating evidence has implicated that GLP-1 may have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here we show that GLP-1 analog, liraglutide, inhibits cardiac steatosis, oxidative stress and apoptosis in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic rats, via activation of AMPK-Sirt1 pathway. Diabetic rats were treated with subcutaneous injections of liraglutide (0.3 mg/kg/12 h) for 4 weeks. Myocardial steatosis (detected by oil red O staining and myocardial triglyceride and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents assay), expression of protein kinase C (PKC), heart NAD(P)H oxidase activity, oxidative stress markers (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine staining), apoptosis (TUNEL analysis) and genes that affect apoptosis and lipid metabolism were evaluated. Administration of liraglutide did not affect plasma glucose and insulin levels or body weights in STZ-induced diabetic rats, but normalized myocardial steatosis, expression of PKC, NAD(P)H oxidase activity, oxidative stress markers and apoptosis, all of which were significantly increased in diabetic hearts. Additionally, expression of genes mediating lipid uptake, synthesis and oxidation were increased in the diabetic hearts, and these increases were all reduced by liraglutide. In addition, liraglutide increased expression of Sirt1 and phosphorylated AMPK in the diabetic hearts. Liraglutide may have a beneficial effect on cardiac steatosis, DAG-PKC-NAD(P)H pathway, oxidative stress and apoptosis via activation of AMPK-Sirt1 pathway, independently of a glucose-lowering effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Update on type 2 diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-23

    Feb 23, 2009 ... better outcomes, such as enhanced quality of life, and reductions in morbidity, largely due to microvascular complications, and premature mortality, primarily due to macrovascular disease. This article focuses on recent developments in the management of type 2 diabetes; specifically, the legacy effect and ...

  5. Update on type 2 diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-23

    Feb 23, 2009 ... randomised to diet or metformin therapy. In this, the originally described benefits on myocardial infarction and death from any cause in the metformin-treated group persisted at follow-up (33%, p=0.005, and 27%, p=0.002 respectively). In type 1 diabetics too, the appearance of a delayed benefit of earlier ...

  6. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth / For Parents / Type 1 ... español Diabetes tipo 1: ¿Qué es? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  7. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth / For Parents / Type 2 ... español Diabetes tipo 2: ¿Qué es? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  8. Rosmarinic acid ameliorates hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats, potentially by modulating the expression of PEPCK and GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runtuwene, Joshua; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Amitani, Marie; Morinaga, Akinori; Takimoto, Yoshiyuki; Kairupan, Bernabas Harold Ralph; Inui, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural substance that may be useful for treating diabetes mellitus. The present study investigated the effects of RA on glucose homeostasis and insulin regulation in rats with streptozocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes or high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes. Glucose homeostasis was determined using oral glucose tolerance tests and postprandial glucose tests, and insulin activity was evaluated using insulin tolerance tests and the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance. Additionally, the protein expression levels of PEPCK and GLUT4 were determined using Western blot analysis. RA administration exerted a marked hypoglycemic effect on STZ-induced diabetic rats and enhanced glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed diabetic rats. These effects of RA were dose-dependent. Meanwhile, RA administration reversed the STZ- and HFD-induced increase in PEPCK expression in the liver and the STZ- and HFD-induced decrease in GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle. RA reduces hyperglycemia and ameliorates insulin sensitivity by decreasing PEPCK expression and increasing GLUT4 expression.

  9. Tetrahydrobiopterin Has a Glucose-Lowering Effect by Suppressing Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in an Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase–Dependent Manner in Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fujita, Yoshihito; Obara, Akio; Ohashi, Akiko; Fukushima, Toru; Sato, Yuichi; Ogura, Masahito; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Hosokawa, Masaya; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction induces insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor of eNOS that regulates eNOS activity. In the diabetic state, BH4 is oxidized to 7,8-dihydrobiopterin, which leads to eNOS dysfunction owing to eNOS uncoupling. The current study investigates the effects of BH4 on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in diabetic mice. Single administration of BH4 lowered fasting blood glucose levels in wild-type mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and alleviated eNOS dysfunction by increasing eNOS dimerization in the liver of these mice. Liver has a critical role in glucose-lowering effects of BH4 through suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. BH4 activated AMP kinase (AMPK), and the suppressing effect of BH4 on gluconeogenesis was AMPK-dependent. In addition, the glucose-lowering effect and activation of AMPK by BH4 did not appear in mice with STZ-induced diabetes lacking eNOS. Consecutive administration of BH4 in ob/ob mice ameliorated glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Taken together, BH4 suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis in an eNOS-dependent manner, and BH4 has a glucose-lowering effect as well as an insulin-sensitizing effect in diabetic mice. BH4 has potential in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23649519

  10. Barn og diabetes type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Marte Elise; Sagbakken, Sina Bekkelund

    2017-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave sykepleie, 2017 Bakgrunn: Vi har valgt denne problemstillingen fordi diabetes type 1 er svært utbredt hos barn i Norge. Videre har vi lite erfaringer med barn og ønsket å lære mer om denne pasientgruppen. Vi ønsket videre å se på hvordan vi kan undervise og veilede for å gi god og hensiktsmessig sykepleie til barn og deres familier. Hensikt: Finne ut hvordan sykepleier kan fremme egenomsorg hos barn med diabetes gjennom veiledning og undervisning. Dette er noe som sykepl...

  11. The effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the EDHF-type relaxation and cardiac function in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absi, Mais; Oso, Hani; Khattab, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    The endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) response is a critical for the functioning of small blood vessels. We investigated the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the EDHF response and its possible role in the regulation of cardiac function. The vasorelaxant response to ACh- or NS309- (direct opener endothelial small- (SKCa)- and intermediate-conductance (IKCa) calcium-activated potassium channels; main components of EDHF response) were measured in pressurized mesenteric arteries (diameter 300–350 μm). The response to 1 μM ACh was reduced in diabetes (84.8 ± 2.8% control vs 22.5 ± 5.8% diabetics; n ⩾ 8; P < 0.001). NS309 (1 μM) relaxations were also decreased in diabetic arteries (78.5 ± 8.7% control vs 32.1 ± 5.8% diabetics; n ⩾ 5; P < 0.001). SKCa and IKCa-mediated EDHF relaxations in response ACh or NS309 were also significantly reduced by diabetes. Ruthenium red, RuR, a blocker of TRP channels, strongly depress the response to ACh and NS309 in control and diabetic arteries. RuR decreased SKCa and IKCa-mediated EDHF vasodilatation in response to NS309 but not to ACh. An elevation in systolic blood pressure was observed in diabetic animals. ECG recording of control hearts showed shortening of PR interval. RuR reduced PR interval and R wave amplitude in diabetic hearts. In conclusion, the reduced EDHF-type relaxations in STZ-induced diabetes is due impairment of KCa channels function. TRP channels possibly contribute to EDHF vasodilatation via direct opening of endothelial KCa. It is possible that EDHF and TRP channels contribute to the regulation of cardiac function and therefore can be considered as therapeutic targets to improve cardiovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:25685443

  12. Exercise Training Improves the Defective Centrally Mediated Erectile Responses in Rats with Type I Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Mayhan, William G.; Patel, Kaushik P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction is a serious and common complication of diabetes mellitus. Apart from the peripheral actions, central mechanisms are also responsible for the penile erection. Aim The goal of the present study was to determine the impact of exercise training (ExT) on the centrally mediated erectile dysfunction in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetic (T1D) rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with STZ to induce diabetes mellitus. Three weeks after STZ or vehicle injections, rats were assigned to either ExT (treadmill running for 3-4 weeks) or sedentary groups to produce four experimental groups: control+sedentary, T1D+sedentary, control+ExT and T1D+ExT. Main Outcome Measure After 3-4 weeks ExT, central N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced penile erectile responses were measured. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression in the paraventricular neuleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was measured by using histochemistry, real time PCR and Western blot approaches. Results In rats with T1D, ExT significantly improved the blunted erectile response and ICP changes to NMDA (50ng) microinjection within the PVN (T1D+ExT: 3.0±0.6 penile erection/rat; T1D+sedentary: 0.5±0.3 penile erection/rat within 20mins, P<0.05). ExT improved erectile dysfunction induced by central administration of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) donor, SNP in T1D rats. Other behavior responses including yawning and stretching, induced by central NMDA and SNP microinjection were also significantly increased in T1D rats after ExT. Furthermore, we found ExT restored the nNOS mRNA and protein expression in the PVN in T1D rats. Conclusions These results suggest that ExT may have beneficial effects on the erectile dysfunction in diabetes through improvement of NO bioavailability within the PVN. Thus, ExT may be used as therapeutic modality to up-regulate nNOS within the PVN and improve the central component of the erectile dysfunction in

  13. Insulin-Producing Cells Differentiated from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro Ameliorate Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ying; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yishu; Su, Xuejin; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Lihong; Tan, Yi; Wintergerst, Kupper A; Li, Yan; Li, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The two major obstacles in the successful transplantation of islets for diabetes treatment are inadequate supply of insulin-producing tissue and immune rejection. Induction of the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) for autologous transplantation may alleviate those limitations. hMSCs were isolated and induced to differentiate into IPCs through a three-stage differentiation protocol in a defined media with high glucose, nicotinamide, and exendin-4. The physiological characteristics and functions of IPCs were then evaluated. Next, about 3 × 10(6) differentiated cells were transplanted into the renal sub-capsular space of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nude mice. Graft survival and function were assessed by immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining and measurements of blood glucose levels in the mice. The differentiated IPCs were characterized by Dithizone (DTZ) positive staining, expression of pancreatic β-cell markers, and human insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. Moreover, 43% of the IPCs showed L-type Ca2+ channel activity and similar changes in intracellular Ca2+ in response to glucose stimulation as that seen in pancreatic β-cells in the process of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of functional IPCs into the renal subcapsular space of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice ameliorated the hyperglycemia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that transplanted IPCs sustainably expressed insulin, c-peptide, and PDX-1 without apparent apoptosis in vivo. IPCs derived from hMSCs in vitro can ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic hyperglycemia, which indicates that these hMSCs may be a promising approach to overcome the limitations of islet transplantation.

  14. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Nicoline; Ringholm, Lene; Stage, Edna

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy.......To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy....

  15. Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1...

  16. Anti-diabetic effect of Murraya koenigii leaves on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulselvan, P; Senthilkumar, G P; Sathish Kumar, D; Subramanian, S

    2006-10-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic efficacy of Murraya koenigii in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of ethanolic extract of M. koenigii at a dose of 200 mg/kg/ b.w./day for a period of 30 days significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid and creatinine in diabetic treated group of animals. Determination of plasma insulin level revealed the insulin stimulatory effect of the extract. The results suggest that M. koenigii possesses statistically significant hypoglycemic potential in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The M. koenigii extract appeared to be more effective than glibenclamide, a known antidiabetic drug.

  17. Diabetic Nephropathy and Microalbuminuria in Pregnant Women With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Julie Agner; Asbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Callesen, Nicoline Foged

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and microalbuminuria in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes in comparison with type 1 diabetes and to describe pregnancy outcomes in these women following the same antihypertensive protocol.......To evaluate the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and microalbuminuria in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes in comparison with type 1 diabetes and to describe pregnancy outcomes in these women following the same antihypertensive protocol....

  18. Pycnogenol efficiency on glycaemia, motor nerve conduction velocity and markers of oxidative stress in mild type diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankyova, S; Kucera, P; Goldenberg, Z; Yaghi, D; Navarova, J; Kyselova, Z; Stolc, S; Klimas, J; Racanska, E; Matyas, S

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the effects of Pycnogenol at various doses on preprandial and postprandial glucose levels, the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAGA) and on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Pycnogenol treatment (10, 20, 50 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day) lasted for 8 weeks after induction of diabetes. Pycnogenol significantly decreased elevated levels of preprandial glycaemia in treated animals at all doses. At doses of 10 mg/kg b.w./day and 20 mg/kg b.w./day it significantly decreased elevated levels of postprandial glycaemia compared with diabetic non-treated animals. Pycnogenol failed to induce a significant decrease of postprandial glycaemia at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w./day. Pycnogenol improved significantly the impaired MNCV at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w./day compared with non-treated animals. The levels of TBARs were elevated in diabetic rats. The levels of NAGA increased gradually despite the treatment. Pycnogenol failed to affect the increased levels of TBARs and NAGA. Pycnogenollowered the elevated levels of glycaemia and reduced the decline in motor nerve conduction velocity in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The effect of Pycnogenol on postprandial glycaemic levels and MNCV was not dose-dependent. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Type-1 diabetes induces depot-specific alterations in adipocyte diameter and mass of adipose tissues in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, A; Varedi, M; Hadjzadeh, M-Al-R; Omrani, G H

    2010-07-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a metabolic disorder associated with massive reduction in mass of adipose tissue. Measuring cell diameter, an index of fat metabolism, we determined depot-specific alterations in weight of adipose tissue, fat cell diameter and size heterogeneity and distribution at 5 depots in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. T1D was induced by a single injection of STZ. Seven days after the injection, fat depots were isolated, weighted, washed and maintained in tissue culture medium. Using a microscope equipped with calibrated micrometer, cell diameter as well as size distribution pattern and heterogeneity of adipocytes were determined in fresh tissue slices of subcutaneous (SC), proximal epididymal (PE), distal epididymal (DE), perirenal (PR) and retroperitoneal (RP) fat depots. The T1D induced marked reductions in fat mass and mean of fat cell diameter at all depots. The most affected depot was the SC. With the exception of PE, adipocytes at all depots showed significant increases in size heterogeneity. The effect of the diabetes on mean fat cell diameter and size heterogeneity was minimal at PE depot. Depots with similar cell size distribution pattern exhibited similar fat mass reduction. However, the DE depot with a unique cell size distribution pattern showed a fat mass reduction similar to that of PE and PR depots. These data indicate that T1D induces a massive fat mass reduction in a reasonably depot-specific manner and that the fat depots close to survival organs are less vulnerable to fat mobilization. Moreover, peculiar disagreement between cell size distribution and heterogeneity as well as the level of fat mass reduction at DE and PE depots suggests that not only cell size and heterogeneity but also local factors may play roles in depot-specific fat mobilization. J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  20. Genetics of Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Korre; Pedersen, Casper-Emil Tingskov; Moltke, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects millions of people worldwide. Improving the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and ultimately improving the treatment strategies are, thus, of great interest. To achieve this, identification of genetic variation predisposing to T2D is important. A large number...... of complex disease variants and describe their contributions to the understanding of the genetics of T2D. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York....

  1. Diabetes mellitus type 2 - erfaringer og mestring

    OpenAIRE

    Onstad, Christine; Fiskå, Helene Sæth

    2016-01-01

    Bakgrunn: Forekomsten av diabetes mellitus øker dramatisk i hele verden, og representerer en stor utfordring for menneskene med diabetes og helsevesenet. I Norge er det antagelig rundt 350 000 til 400 000 personer med diabetes, hvorav 90% har diabetes mellitus type 2.

  2. : Diabetes mellitus 1. type and physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Prouza, Michal

    2014-01-01

    1 Abstrakt Name of thesis Diabetes mellitus I. type and physical activity Aim of thesis The bachelor's thesis deals with diabetes mellitus I. type, the opportunity of compensation by adequate physical aktivity and diet and consecutive complications of diabetes. Methodology Collecting of the data from available literature and internet's resources. There is no personal interviews in this work. Results General description of the diabetes mellitus I. type, question of the physical aktivity with t...

  3. Effect of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Sesbania sesban (Linn Merr. root on glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Choudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was carried out to investigate the hypoglycemic effects of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Sesbania sesban (SS (Merr. roots, which is widely used in inflammation, fever, ulcers, leucoderma and diabetes in various parts of India. Materials and Methods: SS extracts were administered orally at doses (500 and 1000 mg/kg to normal and streptozotocin (STZ induced Type-2 diabetic mice. The fasting blood glucose (FBG, biochemical parameters in serum viz., blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, urea, creatinine and total protein, change in body weight, internal organs weight, food intake, water intake and glycogen level in liver were performed for the evaluation of hypoglycemic effects. Results: Both doses of aqueous and ethanolic SS extracts caused a marked decrease of FBG in STZ induced Type-2 diabetic mice. Both extracts decreased the cholesterol, TG, urea, creatinine level and increased the insulin, HDL cholesterol and total protein level. Decrease in body weight and glycogen level induced by STZ was restored. Increase in water and food intake induced by STZ was decreased. Conclusions: The results suggest that aqueous and ethanolic extracts of SS may have hypoglycemic potential for the Type-2 diabetes and support the traditional use of the roots of plant as a hypoglycemic agent.

  4. What causes type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschard, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    To study type 1 diabetes (T1D), excellent animal models exist, both spontaneously diabetic and virus-induced. Based on knowledge from these, this review focuses on the environmental factors leading to T1D, concentrated into four areas which are: (1) The thymus-dependent immune system: T1D is a T...... the T1D process, even if initiated by virus. Theoretically, the risk from immunotherapy elicits a higher frequency of malignancy. (2) The activity of the beta cells: Resting beta cells display less antigenicity and are less sensitive to immune destruction. Beta-cell rest can be induced by giving insulin...... externally in metabolic doses or by administering potassium-channel openers. Both procedures prevent T1D in animal models, whereas no good human data exist due to the risk of hypoglycemia. (3) NKT cells: According to the hygiene hypothesis, stimulation of NKT cells by non-pathogen microbes gives rise to less...

  5. Diabetes distress among type 2 diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is being increasingly recognized as a serious global health problem and is frequently associated with co-morbid distress, contributing double burden for the individual and the society. Aim: This study documents the proportion of diabetes distress and factors associated with it. Methods: A ...

  6. Diabetes distress among type 2 diabetic patients | Islam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study documents the proportion of diabetes distress and factors associated with it. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to June 2012. Data were collected through interview and record review of 165 adults with type 2 diabetes. Results: The proportion of diabetes distress among the study ...

  7. Antidiabetic Effects of Carassius auratus Complex Formula in High Fat Diet Combined Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carassius auratus complex formula, including Carassius auratus, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Lycium chinense, and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, is a combination prescription of traditional Chinese medicine, which has always been used to treat diabetes mellitus in ancient China. In this study, we provided experimental evidence for the use of Carassius auratus complex formula in the treatment of high fat diet combined streptozotocin- (STZ- induced type 2 diabetes. Carassius auratus complex formula aqueous extract was prepared and the effects of it on blood glucose, serum insulin, adipose tissue weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, total cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG levels in mice were measured. Moreover, adiponectin, TG synthesis related gene expressions, and the inhibitory effect of aldose reductase (AR were performed to evaluate its antidiabetic effects. After the 8-week treatment, blood glucose, insulin levels, and adipose tissue weight were significantly decreased. OGTT and HOMA-IR index showed improved glucose tolerance. It could also lower plasma TG, TC, and liver TG levels. Furthermore, Carassius auratus complex formula could inhibit the activity of AR and restore adiponectin expression in serum. Based on these findings, it is suggested that Carassius auratus complex formula possesses potent anti-diabetic effects on high fat diet combined STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  8. Heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Hulmán, Adam; Solomon, Thomas P.J.

    2016-01-01

    among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel...... glycaemic markers of diabetes risk can provide additional information to the established diagnostic criteria. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for elevated fasting versus postprandial glucose concentration, as well as knowledge about the expected responsiveness to treatment...... in individuals with different clinical characteristics at diagnosis, may contribute to optimising strategies for management of hyperglycaemia in both pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes....

  9. Puberty and type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Various data on type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have showed that the incidence of T1DM peaks at puberty. However, diabetes control and complications could be adversely affected by the physiological changes of puberty. In early years of insulin therapy, severe growth retardation with pubertal delay, like in Mauriac syndrome, have been reported. Insulin and leptin are metabolic factors, circulating in the periphery, which participate in the hypothalamic control of metabolism and reproduction. Insulin may be an important regulator of leptin in humans. Increased levels of advanced glycation end products suppress activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator, resulting in pubertal delay. Glycemic control deteriorates during puberty as the lean body mass doubles mainly over a period of 25 years, which increases insulin requirement. There is also an increase in insulin resistance over the period of puberty. In normal individuals, fasting and postprandial insulin concentrations reach a peak in both sexes in mid to late puberty. Puberty, at all stages, has the worst insulin resistance. It has been observed that an excessive GH secretion in T1DM during puberty has significant effects on ketogenesis. Adolescent T1DM tends to decompensate very rapidly and develop ketoacidosis when the late night insulin dose is omitted. Adolescence is a critical developmental phase that presents unique challenges and opportunities to individuals with diabetes, their families and their healthcare providers. PMID:25941652

  10. Puberty and type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhankar Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various data on type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM have showed that the incidence of T1DM peaks at puberty. However, diabetes control and complications could be adversely affected by the physiological changes of puberty. In early years of insulin therapy, severe growth retardation with pubertal delay, like in Mauriac syndrome, have been reported. Insulin and leptin are metabolic factors, circulating in the periphery, which participate in the hypothalamic control of metabolism and reproduction. Insulin may be an important regulator of leptin in humans. Increased levels of advanced glycation end products suppress activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH pulse generator, resulting in pubertal delay. Glycemic control deteriorates during puberty as the lean body mass doubles mainly over a period of 25 years, which increases insulin requirement. There is also an increase in insulin resistance over the period of puberty. In normal individuals, fasting and postprandial insulin concentrations reach a peak in both sexes in mid to late puberty. Puberty, at all stages, has the worst insulin resistance. It has been observed that an excessive GH secretion in T1DM during puberty has significant effects on ketogenesis. Adolescent T1DM tends to decompensate very rapidly and develop ketoacidosis when the late night insulin dose is omitted. Adolescence is a critical developmental phase that presents unique challenges and opportunities to individuals with diabetes, their families and their healthcare providers.

  11. Brittle type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Federico; Verzaro, Roberto; Provenzano, Vincenzo; Ricordi, Camillo

    2007-01-01

    A small group of patients affected by type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a severe instability of glycemic values with frequent and unpredictable hypoglycemic and/or ketoacidosis episodes which cannot be explained by errors of patients or diabetologists. The quality of life of these patients is dramatically compromised in particular because of the frequency of acute events, hospital recoveries and precocious appearance of chronic complications. This clinical condition has been defined as "brittle diabetes". A precise quantification of these patients is difficult because diagnostic criteria are still not well defined and it is often difficult to verify errors of patients in terms of inappropriate conduct with the pathology. Even more than the other kinds of diabetes, therapy is based on education, glycemic control, intensive therapy and strict interaction between physicians and patients. The introduction of insulin analogous, with either ultra-fast and ultra-slow action and the use of subcutaneous insulin pumps have significantly increased the possibility of treating the most of these cases. However, there is a minority of patients resistant to the therapy. In similar cases, pancreas or islet transplantation represents an effective therapeutic option entailing good expected outcomes. The main limiting factor of beta cell function replacement by transplantation is so far represented by the potentially severe side effects of the immunosuppression therapy necessary to avoid graft rejection and recurrence of autoimmunity.

  12. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Positive Predictor of Type 2 Diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E. Rice

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to consider the relative benefits of screening for type two diabetes mellitus in women with a previous pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. Recent studies suggest that women who experience GDM are at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 10–20 years of their index pregnancy. If considered as a stand-alone indicator of the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, GDM is a poor diagnostic test. Most women do not develop GDM during pregnancy and of those that do most do not develop type 2 diabetes. There is, however, a clear need for better early detection of predisposition to disease and/or disease onset to significantly impact on this global pandemic. The putative benefits of multivariate approaches and first trimester and preconception screening to increase the sensitivity of risk assignment modalities for type 2 diabetes are proposed.

  13. Lipotoxicity in type 2 diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    As obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming an epidemic in westernized countries, the incidence and prevalence of obesity- and diabetes-related co-morbidities are increasing. In type 2 diabetes ectopic lipid accumulation in the heart has been associated with cardiac dysfunction and apoptosis, a process termed lipotoxicity. Since cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in diabetic patients, diagnosis and treatment become increasingly important. Although ischaemic heart disease is a major problem in diabetes, non-ischaemic heart disease (better known as diabetic cardiomyopathy) becomes increasingly important with respect to the impairment of cardiac function and mortality in type 2 diabetes. The underlying aetiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood but is beginning to be elucidated. Various mechanisms have been proposed that may lead to lipotoxicity. Therefore, this review will focus on the mechanisms of cardiac lipid accumulation and its relation to the development of cardiomyopathy.

  14. Atypical diabetes in children: ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaibhav, Atul; Mathai, Mathew; Gorman, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus also known as atypical or flatbush diabetes is being increasingly recognised worldwide. These patients are typically obese, middle-aged men with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. The aetiology and pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear but some initial research suggests that patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes have a unique predisposition to glucose desensitisation. These patients have negative autoantibodies typically associated with type 1 diabetes but have shown to have human leucocyte antigen (HLA) positivity. At initial presentation, there is an impairment of both insulin secretion and action. β Cell function and insulin sensitivity can be markedly improved by initiating aggressive diabetes management to allow for discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment. These patients can be maintained on oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin therapy can be safely discontinued after few months depending on their β cell function. PMID:23302548

  15. Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Diabetic vitrectomy represents an end-point of diabetic retinopathy progression. This study was designed to estimate long-term incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and associated risk factors. METHODS: Retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a large diabetes centre between...... 1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register. RESULTS: The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were...... nonclearing vitreous haemorrhage (43%) or tractional retinal detachment (57%). The cumulative incidence rates of diabetic vitrectomy were 1.6% after 5 years and 2.9% after 10 years. When excluding patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy, the corresponding rates were higher; 3.7% and 6.4%, respectively...

  16. Opposite Expression of SPARC between the Liver and Pancreas in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseer, Kanikkai Raja; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Sook; Yun, Jong Won

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular protein that regulates several cellular events, including inflammation and tissue remodelling. In this study, we investigated the tissue-specific expression of SPARC in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, and found that SPARC was significantly up-regulated in the liver while down-regulated in the pancreas of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Chronic inflammation occurred in the diabetic pancreas accompanied by up-regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) and its targets (TNFα, Il6, CRP, and Fn1) as well as myeloperoxidase (Mpo) and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 2 (Cxcr2). Diabetic liver showed significant up-regulation of Tgfb1 as well as moderately less up-regulated TNFα and reduced Fn1, resulting in elevated fibrogenesis. PARP-1 was not up-regulated during CD95-mediated apoptosis, resulting in restoration of high ATP levels in the diabetic liver. On the contrary, CD95-dependent apoptosis was not observed in the diabetic pancreas due to up-regulation of PARP-1 and ATP depletion, resulting in necrosis. The cytoprotective machinery was damaged by pancreatic inflammation, whereas adequate antioxidant capacity indicates low oxidative stress in the diabetic liver. High and low cellular insulin content was found in the diabetic liver and pancreas, respectively. Furthermore, we identified six novel interacting partner proteins of SPARC by co-immunoprecipitation in the diabetic liver and pancreas, and their interactions with SPARC were predicted by bioinformatics tools. Taken together, opposite expression of SPARC in the diabetic liver and pancreas may be related to inflammation and immune cell infiltration, degrees of apoptosis and fibrosis, cytoprotective machinery, and cellular insulin levels. PMID:26110898

  17. COX-2 but not mPGES-1 contributes to renal PGE2 induction and diabetic proteinuria in mice with type-1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanjun Jia

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 has been implicated to play a pathogenic role in diabetic nephropathy (DN but its source remains unlcear. To elucidate whether mPGES-1, the best characterized PGE2 synthase, was involved in the development of DN, we examined the renal phenotype of mPGES-1 KO mice subjected to STZ-induced type-1 diabetes. After STZ treatment, mPGES-1 WT and KO mice presented the similar onset of diabetes as shown by similar elevation of blood glucose. Meanwhile, both genotypes of mice exhibited similar increases of urinary and renal PGE2 production. In parallel with this comparable diabetic status, the kidney injury indices including the urinary albumin excretion, kidney weight and the kidney histology (PAS staining did not show any difference between the two genotypes. By Western-blotting and quantitative qRT-PCR, mPGES-1, mPGES-2, cPGES and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH remain unaltered following six weeks of diabetes. Finally, a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (50 mg/kg/day was applied to the STZ-treated KO mice, which resulted in significant reduction of urinary albumin excretion (KO/STZ: 141.5±38.4 vs. KO/STZ + Celebrex: 48.7±20.8 ug/24 h, p<0.05 and the blockade of renal PGE2 induction (kidney: KO/STZ: 588.7±89.2 vs. KO/STZ + Celebrex: 340.8±58.7 ug/24 h, p<0.05; urine: KO/STZ 1667.6±421.4 vs. KO/STZ + Celebrex 813.6±199.9 pg/24 h, p<0.05, without affecting the blood glucose levels and urine volume. Taken together, our data suggests that an as yet unidentified prostaglanind E synthase but not mPGES-1 may couple with COX-2 to mediate increased renal PGE2 sythsesis in DN.

  18. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Type 2 diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000328.htm Type 2 diabetes - self-care To use the sharing features on this page, ... diabetes - 2017. 10. Microvascular complications and foot care. Diabetes Care . 2017;40(Suppl 1):S88-S98. PMID: 27979897 ...

  20. Eating disorders in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, J.; Skinner, T. C.

    2005-01-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether there is an increased risk of developing eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review located 12 empirical studies of eating pathology in females with type 1 diabetes. Review of these papers indicates...... that there is no evidence for an increase in the rates of anorexia or bulimia, in females with type 1 diabetes. However, the data do suggest that eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) are more prevalent in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Key features of these articles are reviewed and discussed....

  1. Platelet activation in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferroni, P; Basili, S; Falco, A; Davì, G

    2004-01-01

    The abnormal metabolic state that accompanies diabetes renders arteries susceptible to atherosclerosis, being capable of altering the functional properties of multiple cell types, including endothelium and platelets...

  2. Vitamin D and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    К.S. Biliaieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data concerning the problem of vitamin D deficiency in adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1. A correlation between vitamin D deficiency and compensation of the disease is shown. The examination of adolescent patients suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus found a connection between levels of vitamin D, duration and the degree of type 1 diabetes compensation. Further studies are focused on studying the impact and the correction of vitamin D status in children with diabetes mellitus type 1, on improving the glycemic control and quality of life of a patient.

  3. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Father of the Year Stop Diabetes at School ... Forecast Stop Diabetes Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Living With Type 2 Diabetes Recipes for Healthy ...

  4. Nutritional counseling in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Benko, Borut

    2014-01-01

    I my thesis I present diabetes mellitus, nutritional counseling and the connection between the two. The teoretical part of my thesis describes the causes and types od diabetes, therapy and some possible complications of diabetes mellitus. I also present the importance of discipline and consistency in diabetes therapy; nutritional counseling and some of the practical theories used in nutritional counseling. I used case study method to describe and give meaning to the influence of healthy, b...

  5. Exploring diabetes type 1-related stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Samereh; Abazari, Parvaneh; Mardanian, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Empowerment of people with diabetes means integrating diabetes with identity. However, others' stigmatization can influence it. Although diabetes is so prevalent among Iranians, there is little knowledge about diabetes-related stigma in Iran. The present study explored diabetes-related stigma in people living with type 1 diabetes in Isfahan. A conventional content analysis was used with in-depth interview with 26 people with and without diabetes from November 2011 to July 2012. A person with type 1 diabetes was stigmatized as a miserable human (always sick and unable, death reminder, and intolerable burden), rejected marriage candidate (busy spouse, high-risk pregnant), and deprived of a normal life [prisoner of (to must), deprived of pleasure]. Although, young adults with diabetes undergo all aspects of the social diabetes-related stigma; in their opinion they were just deprived of a normal life. It seems that in Isfahan, diabetes-related stigma is of great importance. In this way, conducting an appropriate intervention is necessary to improve the empowerment process in people with type 1 diabetes in order to reduce the stigma in the context.

  6. Exercise and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical...... metabolic effects of exercise in T2DM patients with special focus on which parameters to consider for optimizing metabolic improvements. We then discuss the mechanisms whereby exercise exerts its anti-inflammatory and related metabolic effects. Evidence exists that interleukin (IL)-1β is involved...... in pancreatic β-cell damage, whereas tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α appears to be a key molecule in peripheral insulin resistance. Mechanistic studies in humans suggest that moderate acute elevations in IL-6, as provoked by exercise, exert direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF...

  7. Saxagliptin for type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonio R Chacra, MDDiabetes Center, Federal University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Saxagliptin (Onglyza™ is a potent, selective, once-daily dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor indicated for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D. By blocking DPP-4, saxagliptin increases and prolongs the effects of incretins, a group of peptide hormones released by intestinal cells after meals, which stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion to lower blood glucose. In controlled clinical trials, saxagliptin administered as monotherapy or in combination with metformin, glyburide, or a thiazolidinedione improved glycemic control in a clinically significant manner, reflected by significant decreases in glycated hemoglobin (monotherapy, -0.5%; add-on to metformin, thiazolidinedione, or sulfonylurea, -0.6% to 0.9%; initial combination with metformin, -2.5%, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial glucose compared with controls. Additionally, saxagliptin improved β-cell function, reflected as increases in homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-2β. Saxagliptin was generally well tolerated; it did not increase hypoglycemia compared with controls, and was weight neutral. A meta-analysis of Phase II and III trials showed that saxagliptin did not increase the risk of major cardiovascular events. Professional organizations have updated their guidelines for T2D to include a DPP-4 inhibitor as an early treatment option—either as initial therapy in combination with metformin, or as add-on therapy for patients whose glycemia is inadequately controlled by a single oral antidiabetic drug.Keywords: saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor, type 2 diabetes

  8. Streptozotocin-induced type-1-diabetes disease onset in Sprague-Dawley rats is associated with an altered intestinal microbiota composition and decreased diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Elaine; Marques, Tatiana M; O'Sullivan, Orla; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Cotter, Paul D; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that microbiota composition can significantly affect host health and play a role in disease onset and progression. This study assessed the impact of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1-diabetes (T1D) on intestinal microbiota composition and diversity in Sprague-Dawley rats, compared with healthy controls over time. T1D was induced by injection of a single dose (60 mg STZ kg(-1)) of STZ, administered via the intraperitoneal cavity. Total DNA was isolated from faecal pellets at weeks 0 (pre-STZ injection), 1, 2 and 4 and from caecal content at week 5 from both healthy and T1D groups. High-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing was employed to investigate intestinal microbiota composition. The data revealed that although intestinal microbiota composition between the groups was similar at week 0, a dramatic impact of T1D development on the microbiota was apparent post-STZ injection and for up to 5 weeks. Most notably, T1D onset was associated with a shift in the Bacteroidetes : Firmicutes ratio (Pmicrobiota composition and reduced microbial diversity over time. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Screening for type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Summary and comment: Original articles: Diabetic patients detected by population-based stepwise screening already have a diabetic cardiovascular risk profile. Spijkerman AMW, Adriaanse MC, Dekker JM, Nijpels G, Stehouwer CDA, Bouter LM, Heine RJ. Diabetes Care 2002; 25(10): 1784–9. Screening

  10. It's Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  11. Effects of Ursolic Acid Derivatives on Caco-2 Cells and Their Alleviating Role in Streptozocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect and mechanism of a series of ursolic acid (UA derivatives on glucose uptake were investigated in a Caco-2 cells model. Their effect on hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress were also demonstrated in streptozocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino]-2-deoxy-glucose (2-NBDG was used as a fluorescein in Caco-2 cells model to screen UA derivatives by glucose uptake and expression of glucose transporter protein (SGLT-1, GLUT-2. Moreover, STZ-induced diabetic rats were administered with these derivatives for 4 weeks of treatment. The fasting blood glucose (FBG, insulin levels, biochemical parameters, lipid levels, and oxidative stress markers were finally evaluated. The results of this study indicated that compounds 10 and 11 significantly inhibited 2-NBDG uptake under both Na+-dependent and Na+-independent conditions by decreasing SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 expression in the Caco-2 cells model. Further in vivo studies revealed that compound 10 significantly reduced hyperglycemia by increasing levels of serum insulin, total protein, and albumin, while the fasting blood glucose, body weight and food intake were restored much closer to those of normal rats. Compounds 10 and 11 showed hypolipidemic activity by decreasing the total amounts of cholesterol (TC and triglycerides (TG. Furthermore, compound 10 showed antioxidant potential which was confirmed by elevation of glutathione (GSH and superoxide dismutase (SOD and reduction of malondialdehyde (MDA levels in the liver and kidney of diabetic rats. It was concluded that compound 10 caused an apparent inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells and hypoglycemia, hypolipidemia and augmented oxidative stress in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Thus, compound 10 could be developed as a potentially complementary therapeutic or prophylactic agent for diabetics mellitus and its complications.

  12. Diabetes knowledge among Greek Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Bougioukli, Vasiliki; Iosifidou, Parthena; Vasiloglou, Maria F; Gerama, Maria-Assimina; Mitsos, Dimitrios; Chrysanthakopoulou, Ioanna; Tsigga, Maria; Kazakos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes knowledge has been shown to improve glycemic control and associate with several demographic parameters. In Greece, a country with high obesity rates, disease knowledge has never been evaluated in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study aimed to assess diabetes knowledge and its associations between social and demographic parameters, among Greek type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred fifty nine patients with T2DM were recruited from an urban and a rural clinic in Greece. Diabetes knowledge was assessed with the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT). Basic anthropometry was performed. Data regarding glycemic control and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from the patients' medical files. Greek T2DM patients demonstrated poor disease knowledge (mean DKT score 8.3±2.2/14.0 and mean DKT as a percent of correct answers 59.6±15.8%). No differences were observed between sex, place of residence, or glycemic control, among subjects. Patients with higher education demonstrated greater diabetes knowledge. Simple obesity with concurrent central obesity or suboptimal glycemic control decreased diabetes knowledge among participants. Additionally, waist circumference was inversely correlated to diabetes knowledge. Based on the DKT, Greek patients exhibit poor diabetes knowledge. This study provides evidence for the need for better diabetes education in order to ameliorate disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Egypt J Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2008; 6(1): 3-12. 3. Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Azza A. G. Tantawy. Professor of Pediatrics, Ain Shams University, Cairo. Introduction. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases with several million people already affected around the ...

  14. Heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Hulmán, Adam; Solomon, Thomas P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease with large variation in the relative contributions of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction between subgroups and individuals. Some of these differences are reflected in the way people are diagnosed. However, differences in glucose regulation exist...... among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel...... in individuals with different clinical characteristics at diagnosis, may contribute to optimising strategies for management of hyperglycaemia in both pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes....

  15. Decrease of PPARδ in Type-1-Like Diabetic Rat for Higher Mortality after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chia Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-δ (PPARδ expression in rats after spinal cord injury (SCI have been previously reported. Diabetic animals show a higher mortality after SCI. However, the relationship between the progress of diabetes and PPARδ in SCI remains unknown. In the present study, we used compressive SCI in streptozotocin-(STZ- induced diabetic rats. GW0742, a PPARδ agonist, was used to evaluate its merit in STZ rats after SCI. Changes in PPARδ expression were detected by Western blot. Survival rates were also estimated. A lower expression of PPARδ in spinal cords of STZ-diabetic rats was observed. In addition, the survival times in two-week induction diabetes were longer than those in eight-week induction group, which is consistent with the expression of PPARδ in the spinal cord. Moreover, GW0742 significantly increased the survival time of STZ rats. Furthermore, their motor function and pain response were attenuated by GSK0660, a selective PPARδ antagonist, but were enhanced by GW0742. In conclusion, the data suggest that higher mortality rate in STZ-diabetic rats with SCI is associated with the decrease of PPARδ expression. Thus, change of PPARδ expression with the progress of diabetes seems responsible for the higher mortality rate after SCI.

  16. Zataria multiflora essential oil reduces diabetic damages in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetic effects were analyzed in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The yield of EO was 3% and carvactol (53%), p-cymene (17%), and thymol (11%) were detected as the main EO components. The antioxidant and nitric oxide ...

  17. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor of retinopathy, so absence of microalbuminuria may tend clinician not to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR). Aim: The aim of our study was to estimate prevalence of DR in patients with type 2 diabetes who have normoalbuminuria, and to study predictors for DR, ...

  18. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social Sciences 15.0 version software (Chicago, IL, USA).The continuous variables expressed as means (SD and Student's t‑test or Mann–Whitney test were ..... Rodriguez J, et al. Risk factors for Type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in a mexican‑american population: Proyecto VER. Am J Ophthalmol 2002;134:390‑8. 5.

  19. Type 2 Diabetes and Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helzner, Elizabeth Purchase; Contrera, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) and type 2 diabetes are both highly prevalent disabling conditions. Type 2 diabetes has been modestly associated with a higher likelihood of HI in many, but not all, population-based studies, with stronger associations found in studies that included younger age groups. Pathophysiologic studies suggest that persons with diabetes are predisposed to HI in the higher frequencies. Proposed mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and HI include the combined contributions of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress to cochlear microangiopathy and auditory neuropathy. In this review, we highlight recent population-based studies of type 2 diabetes and HI and examine evidence for diabetes-induced pathophysiologic changes that may result in damage to the auditory system.

  20. Effect of potent ethyl acetate fraction of Stereospermum suaveolens extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, T; Chatterjee, Tapan Kumar; Senthilkumar, G P; Mani, Tamizh

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of ethyl acetate fraction of ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens in streptozotocin-(STZ-) induced diabetic rats by acute and subacute models. In this paper, various fractions of ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens were prepared and their effects on blood glucose levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats were studied after a single oral administration (200 mg/kg). Administration of the ethyl acetate fraction at 200 mg/kg once daily for 14 days to STZ-induced diabetic rats was also carried out. The parameters such as the fasting blood glucose, hepatic glycogen content, and pancreatic antioxidant levels were monitored. In the acute study, the ethyl acetate fraction is the most potent in reducing the fasting serum glucose levels of the STZ-induced diabetic rats. The 14-day repeated oral administration of the ethyl acetate fraction significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose and pancreatic TBARS level and significantly increased the liver glycogen, pancreatic superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities as well as reduced glutathione levels. The histopathological studies during the subacute treatment have been shown to ameliorate the STZ-induced histological damage of pancreas. This paper concludes that the ethyl acetate fraction from ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens possesses potent antihyperglycemic and antioxidant properties, thereby substantiating the use of plant in the indigenous system of medicine.

  1. Effect of Potent Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Stereospermum suaveolens Extract in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of ethyl acetate fraction of ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens in streptozotocin-(STZ- induced diabetic rats by acute and subacute models. In this paper, various fractions of ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens were prepared and their effects on blood glucose levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats were studied after a single oral administration (200?mg/kg. Administration of the ethyl acetate fraction at 200?mg/kg once daily for 14 days to STZ-induced diabetic rats was also carried out. The parameters such as the fasting blood glucose, hepatic glycogen content, and pancreatic antioxidant levels were monitored. In the acute study, the ethyl acetate fraction is the most potent in reducing the fasting serum glucose levels of the STZ-induced diabetic rats. The 14-day repeated oral administration of the ethyl acetate fraction significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose and pancreatic TBARS level and significantly increased the liver glycogen, pancreatic superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities as well as reduced glutathione levels. The histopathological studies during the subacute treatment have been shown to ameliorate the STZ-induced histological damage of pancreas. This paper concludes that the ethyl acetate fraction from ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens possesses potent antihyperglycemic and antioxidant properties, thereby substantiating the use of plant in the indigenous system of medicine.

  2. ClC-3 deficiency protects preadipocytes against apoptosis induced by palmitate in vitro and in type 2 diabetes mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Ying; Huang, Xiong-Qin; Zhao, Li-Yan; Sun, Fang-Yun; Chen, Wen-Liang; Du, Jie-Yi; Yuan, Feng; Li, Jie; Huang, Xue-Lian; Liu, Jie; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Guan, Yong-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Wen; Wang, Guan-Lei

    2014-11-01

    Palmitate, a common saturated free fatty acid (FFA), has been demonstrated to induce preadipocyte apoptosis in the absence of adipogenic stimuli, suggesting that preadipocytes may be prone to apoptosis under adipogenic insufficient conditions, like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). ClC-3, encoding Cl(-) channel or Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter, is critical for cell fate choices of proliferation versus apoptosis under diseased conditions. However, it is unknown whether ClC-3 is related with preadipocyte apoptosis induced by palmitate or T2DM. Palmitate, but not oleate, induced apoptosis and increase in ClC-3 protein expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte. ClC-3 specific siRNA attenuated palmitate-induced apoptosis and increased protein levels of Grp78, ATF4, CHOP and phosphorylation of JNK1/2, whereas had no effects on increased phospho-PERK and phospho-eIF2α protein expression. Moreover, the enhanced apoptosis was shown in preadipocytes from high-sucrose/fat, low-dose STZ induced T2DM mouse model with hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia (elevated serum TG and FFA levels) and insulin resistance. ClC-3 knockout significantly attenuated preadipocyte apoptosis and the above metabolic disorders in T2DM mice. These data demonstrated that ClC-3 deficiency prevent preadipocytes against palmitate-induced apoptosis via suppressing ER stress, and also suggested that ClC-3 may play a role in regulating cellular apoptosis and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism during T2DM.

  3. Reduction of n-3 PUFAs, specifically DHA and EPA, and enhancement of peroxisomal beta-oxidation in type 2 diabetic rat heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Lianguo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is overwhelming evidence that dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, mainly EPA (C20:5n-3 and DHA (C22:6n-3, has cardiovascular protective effects on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM but not on healthy people. Because the T2DM heart increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO to compensate for the diminished utilization of glucose, we hypothesize that T2DM hearts consume more n-3 PUFAs and, therefore, need more n-3 PUFAs. In the present study, we investigated the changes in cardiac n-3 PUFAs and peroxisomal beta-oxidation, which are responsible for the degradation of PUFAs in a high-fat diet (HFD and low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ induced type 2 diabetic rat model. Methods and results The capillary gas chromatography results showed that all the n-3 (or omega-3 PUFAs, especially DHA (~50% and EPA (~100%, were significantly decreased, and the n-6/n-3 ratio (~115% was significantly increased in the hearts of diabetic rats. The activity of peroxisomal beta-oxidation, which is crucial to very-long-chain and unsaturated FA metabolism (including DHA, was significantly elevated in DM hearts. Additionally, the real-time PCR results showed that the mRNA expression of most peroxisomal beta-oxidation key enzymes were up-regulated in T2DM rat hearts, which might contribute to the reduction of n-3 (or omega-3 PUFAs. Conclusion In conclusion, our results indicate that T2DM hearts consume more n-3 PUFAs, especially DHA and EPA, due to exaggerated peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

  4. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long......-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them...... previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes...

  5. The Effectiveness of Various Salacca Vinegars as Therapeutic Agent for Management of Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia on Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elok Zubaidah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the potency of salacca vinegar made from various Indonesian salacca fruit extracts as therapeutic agent for hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia for STZ-induced diabetic rats. The rats were grouped into untreated rats, STZ-induced diabetic rats without treatment, and STZ-induced diabetic rats treated with Pondoh salacca vinegar, Swaru salacca vinegar, Gula Pasir salacca vinegar, Madu salacca vinegar, or Madura salacca vinegar. Parameter observed included blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, triglyceride (TG, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and pancreas histopathology of the samples. The results demonstrated that all salacca vinegars were capable of reducing blood sugar (from 25.1 to 62% and reducing LDL (from 9.5 to 14.8 mg/dL, TG (from 58.3 to 69.5 mg/dL, MDA (from 1.1 to 2.2 mg/dL, and TC (from 56.3 to 70.5 mg/dL as well as increasing HDL blood sugar of STZ-induced diabetic Wistar rats (from 52.3 to 60 mg/dL. Various salacca vinegars were also capable of regenerating pancreatic cells. Nevertheless, the ability of Swaru salacca vinegar to manage hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia appeared to be superior to other salacca vinegars. Swaru salacca vinegar is a potential therapeutic agent to manage hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  6. Progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2010-01-01

    We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes.......We studied the progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 2 diabetes....

  7. Auditory Impairment in Young Type 1 Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanlian; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Ren, Jianmin; Wang, Yajuan; Zhao, Faming

    2015-10-01

    More attention has recently been focused on auditory impairment of young type 1 diabetics. This study aimed to evaluate auditory function of young type 1 diabetics and the correlation between clinical indexes and hearing impairment. We evaluated the auditory function of 50 type 1 diabetics and 50 healthy subjects. Clinical indexes were measured along with analyzing their relation of auditory function. Type 1 diabetic patients demonstrated a deficit with elevated thresholds at right ear and left ear when compared to healthy controls (p p V and interwave I-V) and left ear (wave III, V and interwave I-III, I-V) in diabetic group significantly increased compared to those in control subjects (p p p p p <0.01). Type 1 diabetics exerted higher auditory threshold, slower auditory conduction time and cochlear impairment. HDL-cholesterol, diabetes duration, systemic blood pressure, microalbuminuria, GHbA1C, triglyceride, and age may affect the auditory function of type 1 diabetics. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human intestinal microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2013-10-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota in immune-mediated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, has deservedly received a lot of attention. Evidently, changes in the intestinal microbiota are associated with type 1 diabetes as demonstrated by recent studies. Children with beta-cell autoimmunity have shown low abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and increase in the abundance of members of the Bacteroidetes phylum in fecal microbiota. These alterations could explain increased gut permeability, subclinical small intestinal inflammation, and dysregulation of oral tolerance in type 1 diabetes. However, these studies do not provide evidence of the causative role of the gut microbiota in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity, yet. In animal models, the composition of gut microbiota modulates the function of both innate and adaptive immunity, and intestinal bacteria are regulators of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, prevention of type 1 diabetes could, in the future, be based on the interventions targeted to the gut microbiota.

  9. Diabetes and the brain: Cognitive performance in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, A.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with altered brain function, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. The issues surrounding the cognitive and emotional status in chronic, older diabetic patients remain complex. The literature shows contrasting findings and

  10. Sugar and Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Michael E J; Te Morenga, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Consumption of sugar, specifically sugar-sweetened beverages, has been widely held responsible by the media for the global rise in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Systematic reviews and dietary guidelines relating dietary sugars to T2DM. Weight gain and T2DM incidence are associated with diet and lifestyle patterns characterized by high consumptions of any sweetened beverages. High sugar intakes impair risk factors for macrovascular complications of T2DM. Much of the association between sugars and T2DM is eliminated by adjusting data for body mass index (BMI). However, BMI adjustment does not fully account for adiposity (r 2 =0.65-0.75). Excess sugar can promote weight gain, thus T2DM, through extra calories, but has no unique diabetogenic effect at physiological levels. Ethical concerns about caffeine added to sweetened beverages, undetectable by consumers, to increase consumption. Evidence needed for limiting dietary sugar below 10% energy intake. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Antidiabetic effect of polysaccharides from Pleurotus ostreatus in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Hu, Tao; Zhou, Hongli; Zhang, Yang; Jin, Gang; Yang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of total polysaccharides extracted from Pleurotus ostreatus on type 2 diabetes. Rats were administered with high-fat diet and streptozotocin (STZ) to induce diabetes. The rats were then treated with 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/d POP or vehicle for 4 weeks. Our experiments indicated that POP reduces hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia levels, improves insulin resistance, and increases glycogen storage by activating GSK3 phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation. Moreover, POP reduces the risk of oxidative damage by increasing superoxide dismutase(SOD), catalase(CAT), and glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px) activities and decreasing malonaldehyde(MDA) level. These results suggest that POP exerts antidiabetic effect on STZ-induced diabetic rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Type 1 Diabetes in Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Maureen; Helgeson, Vicki; Wiebe, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been studied as a chronic illness of childhood. However, young adulthood is a critical time for the development and integration of lifelong diabetes management skills, and research is starting to identify unique challenges faced by youth with diabetes as they age into adulthood. Most young adults experience multiple transitions during this unstable developmental period, including changes in lifestyle (e.g., education, occupation, living situation), changes in health care, and shifting relationships with family members, friends, and intimate others. Young adults with type 1 diabetes must navigate these transitions while also assuming increasing responsibility for their diabetes care and overall health. Despite these critical health and psychosocial concerns, there is a notable lack of evidence-based clinical services and supports for young adults with type 1 diabetes. We review relevant evolving concerns for young adults with type 1 diabetes, including lifestyle considerations, health care transitions, psychosocial needs, and changes in supportive networks, and how type 1 diabetes impacts and is impacted by these key developmental considerations. Specific avenues for intervention and future research are offered. PMID:25901502

  13. [Chronic nicotinamide overload and type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Sun, Wu-Ping; Liu, Xing-Xing; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2010-02-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a major global health problem. It is generally accepted that type 2 diabetes is the result of gene-environmental interaction. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction is unclear. Diet change is known to play an important role in type 2 diabetes. The fact that the global high prevalence of type 2 diabetes has occurred following the spread of food fortification worldwide suggests a possible involvement of excess niacin intake. Our recent study found that nicotinamide overload and low nicotinamide detoxification may induce oxidative stress associated with insulin resistance. Based on the relevant facts, this review briefly summarized the relationship between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the nicotinamide metabolism changes induced by excess niacin intake, aldehyde oxidase inhibitors, liver diseases and functional defects of skin. We speculate that the gene-environmental interaction in type 2 diabetes may be a reflection of the outcome of the association of chronic nicotinamide overload-induced toxicity and the relatively low detoxification/excretion capacity of the body. Reducing the content of niacin in foods may be a promising strategy for the control of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Genetics of type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permutt, M A; Chiu, K; Ferrer, J; Glaser, B; Inoue, H; Nestorowicz, A; Stanley, C A; Tanizawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    Defining the genetic basis of Type II or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) will accelerate our progress toward understanding its etiology and will provide new therapeutic targets for treatment of this common disease. Here we present a brief overview of the history of the search for diabetes genes and report current strategies employed by our laboratory and by others in this effort. Isolation and subsequent mapping of candidate genes involved in insulin production and action has been a major effort in this field. Our lab has focused on pancreatic islet beta-cell genes, since the insulin lack of NIDDM is often the result of resistance to the action of insulin that is superimposed on a limited ability to produce insulin. A number of islet genes have been evaluated, including those involved in glucose metabolism, islet K+ channel genes, and transcription factors. For each gene, human cDNAs and genomic clones have been isolated and simple sequence repeat polymorphisms (SSRPs) identified. The SSRPs were used to map the genes by linkage in CEPH pedigrees, or sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were used to map the genes to radiation hybrids (RH) or to YAC clones containing SSRPs. The SSRPs have then been used as markers for linkage analyses in families with NIDDM. Mutation screening by single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and by sequencing has revealed variants that have been tested in association studies. A strategy was devised to generate novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from human pancreatic islet genes by differential display of islet mRNA. In the first phase of this project we identified 42 cDNAs that were preferentially expressed in pancreatic islets relative to exocrine tissue. When compared to sequences in GenBank, novel genes were represented by 69%. Enhanced islet expression was confirmed by Northern analysis of RNA. Sequence-tagged sites were synthesized for a number of islet ESTs and used to map these genes to human chromosomes. This

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone in the type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duskova, M; Hruskovicova, H; Hill, M; Starka, L

    2012-04-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is believed to exert, besides others, positive effects on the insulin resistance or its secretion and glucose metabolism. There are several reports dealing with the DHEA levels and its effects in the type 2 diabetes mellitus, but less information is available on the type 1 diabetic subjects. Recently, a report dealing with the lack of the age-dependent decline of the DHEA levels in the type 2 diabetic subjects was published. The aim of the present study was to answer the question whether a comparable change in the aging pattern of the DHEA and its sulphate could be detected in the type 1 diabetes mellitus. The data regarding the DHEA and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) concentrations in the serum obtained from 116 patients with the type 1 diabetes mellitus and 259 controls were gathered from the database of the Institute of Endocrinology (Prague, Czech Republic). No significant differences in the level of the DHEA-S were found between the type 1 diabetics and controls either in men or women. However, lower DHEA levels were found in the type 1 diabetic women, but not in men. The age-dependent declines of both the DHEA and DHEA-S were similar to those in controls. In contrast to the type 2 diabetes, the levels of DHEA-S in the type 1 diabetic patients were practically identical with those in controls. In contrast to men, in women, the DHEA basal levels were lower than those seen in controls. The age dependence of both hormones followed the pattern of the decline in controls.

  16. Dietary Sodium Intake in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Laura Ferreira; Stark, Sue; Steenkiste, Ann; Piraino, Beth; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2014-07-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Superimposed hypertension further increases the risk and is associated with increased dietary sodium intake. There are few data available on dietary sodium intake in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to quantify dietary sodium intake in a cohort of self-referred patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify sociodemographic characteristics associated with it. Sodium intake in this cohort was far greater than current recommendations. Increased awareness of sodium intake in this population might lead to target interventions to reduce sodium intake and potentially improve long-term outcomes.

  17. Real life with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a form of diabetes mellitus that results from the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Those affected by this disorder have a challenging life, both in terms of health and social adjustments. Various "alternative medicines" are offered to them in an effort to cure. Research has shown that good control over diabetes can be maintained through regular self-monitoring of blood glucose and frequent checking of diabetic complications. Here, I describe a female with T1DM and her journey with the disorder.

  18. Consumption of Dietary Resistant Starch Partially Corrected the Growth Pattern Despite Hyperglycemia and Compromised Kidney Function in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Gar Yee; Rowling, Matthew J; Schalinske, Kevin L; Grapentine, Kelly; Loo, Yi Ting

    2016-10-12

    We previously demonstrated that feeding of dietary resistant starch (RS) prior to the induction of diabetes delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy and maintained vitamin D balance in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. Here, we examined the impact of RS on kidney function and vitamin D homeostasis following STZ injection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered STZ and fed a standard diet containing cornstarch or 20, 10, or 5% RS for 4 weeks. T1D rats fed 10 and 20% RS, but not 5% RS, gained more weight than cornstarch-fed rats. Yet, renal health and glucose metabolism were not improved by RS. Our data suggest that RS normalized growth patterns in T1D rats after diabetes induction in a dose-dependent manner despite having no effect on blood glucose and vitamin D balances. Future interventions should focus on the preventative strategies with RS in T1D.

  19. Weight management in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siram, Amulya T; Yanagisawa, Robert; Skamagas, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a well known risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at risk for weight gain as a result of multiple influences, including sedentary lifestyle, high-calorie diet, diabetes medications, sociocultural factors, chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, and a dysregulated enteroendocrine axis. Because both diabetes mellitus and obesity predispose patients to abnormal cardiometabolic profiles and increased cardiovascular disease, management of diabetes mellitus should focus on weight management and optimizing cardiometabolic parameters, concomitant with glycemic control. Lifestyle modification incorporating healthy, calorie-appropriate diets and increased physical activity, in addition to metformin, are central components to diabetes management and weight management. These interventions have been shown to improve body weight, glycemic control, and overall cardiometabolic profile. The weight-neutral and weight-losing diabetes medications include metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and amylin analogs. It is essential that providers understand the metabolic and weight effects of diabetes medications in order to develop strategies for managing diabetes mellitus while helping patients maintain or lose weight in order to improve their overall health outcomes.

  20. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Somatotype in elderly type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; Putzu, Paolo F; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-09-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4 +/- 7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9 +/- 7.1 years). The pathological subjects were compared with a control group consisting of 280 healthy individuals (134 men, mean age 74.2 +/- 7.3 years; 146 women, mean age 74.9 +/- 7.4 years). The Heath-Carter somatotype was applied. Diabetic men and women (mean somatotype, respectively: 6.8-5.6-0.6 and 8.6-6.4-0.2) presented significantly higher values of endomorphy than the controls (p = 0.043 in men, p = 0.003 in women); men also had a lower mesomorphic component (p = 0.000). The somatotype method revealed physical peculiarities in type 2 diabetes patients. The marked endomorphy in the pathological individuals can be related to general fatness, which is a well known disease risk factor. The somatotype appears to be a suitable technique for the assessment of physique in type 2 diabetes patients.

  2. Weight and type 2 diabetes: new recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Most patients with type 2 diabetes have excess adiposity. There is wide consensus that adequate treatment of type 2 diabetes requires a simultaneous approach to overweight/obesity and the remaining cardiovascular risk factors. Non-pharmacological interventions (diet, exercise) represent the cornerstone of the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Weight loss through lifestyle modification has shown clear benefits in these patients, requiring an individualised and multidisciplinary approach with structured programmes endowed with specific resources. The weight gain associated with some antidiabetic drugs (secretagogues, glitazones, insulin) can hamper glycaemic control, compromising treatment adherence, worsening vascular risk profile, and limiting the benefits of treatment. Therefore, the current tendency is to adopt a weight-centred approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes, giving priority to those antidiabetic drugs that have a neutral effect on weight or that favour weight loss (metformin, incretin therapies, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). Metabolic surgery is an effective alternative for patients with type 2 diabetes and a BMI ≥35 kg/m2 and allows remission of diabetes in a large proportion of patients, especially if the disease is not very advanced. A consensus document supported by various Spanish scientific societies has recently been published. This document makes a series of specific recommendations on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with diabetes and obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Hulmán, Adam; Solomon, Thomas P.J.

    2016-01-01

    among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel...... glycaemic markers of diabetes risk can provide additional information to the established diagnostic criteria. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for elevated fasting versus postprandial glucose concentration, as well as knowledge about the expected responsiveness to treatment......Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease with large variation in the relative contributions of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction between subgroups and individuals. Some of these differences are reflected in the way people are diagnosed. However, differences in glucose regulation exist...

  4. Heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Hulmán, Adam; Solomon, Thomas P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease with large variation in the relative contributions of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction between subgroups and individuals. Some of these differences are reflected in the way people are diagnosed. However, differences in glucose regulation exist...... among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel...... glycaemic markers of diabetes risk can provide additional information to the established diagnostic criteria. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for elevated fasting versus postprandial glucose concentration, as well as knowledge about the expected responsiveness to treatment...

  5. Liraglutide for treating type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many persons with type 1 diabetes do not achieve glycemic targets, why new treatments, complementary to insulin, are of interest. Liraglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist could be a potential pharmacological supplement to insulin. This review discusses...... the mechanism of actions, efficacy and safety of liraglutide as add-on to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: Physiological and clinical data on liraglutide in type 1 diabetes were reviewed. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE and EMBASE, with the final search performed February 16...... there was no clinically relevant effect on HbA1c. Adverse events were mostly transient gastrointestinal side effects, primarily nausea. Based on the available data, liraglutide cannot be recommended as add-on therapy to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes with the aim to improve glycemic control. Ongoing trials...

  6. Intensive integrated therapy of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    The macro- and microvascular burden of type 2 diabetes is well established. A number of recent single risk factor intervention trials targeting hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, procoagulation, microalbumuria, and existing cardiovascular disorders have, however, shown major beneficial...

  7. Intensive integrated therapy of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    The macro- and microvascular burden of type 2 diabetes is well established. A number of recent single risk factor intervention trials targeting hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, procoagulation, microalbumuria, and existing cardiovascular disorders have, however, shown major beneficial...... effects on long-term outcome. The results from these studies are anticipated to change the future management of type 2 diabetes, and most of the updated national guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes recommend a multipronged approach driven by ambitious treatment targets. The outcome...... of this intensive integrated therapy has, however, only been investigated in a few studies of patients with type 2 diabetes. One of these trials, the Steno-2 Study, showed that intensive intervention for an average of 7.8 years cuts cardiovascular events as well as nephropathy, retinopathy, and autonomic neuropathy...

  8. Cell therapy for type 1 diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muir, K R; Lima, M J; Docherty, H M; Docherty, K

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy in the form of human islet transplantation has been a successful form of treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes for over 10 years, but is significantly limited by lack of suitable donor material...

  9. Exercise therapy in Type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F.E. Praet (Stephan); L.J.C. van Loon (Luc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractStructured exercise is considered an important cornerstone to achieve good glycemic control and improve cardiovascular risk profile in Type 2 diabetes. Current clinical guidelines acknowledge the therapeutic strength of exercise intervention. This paper reviews the wide

  10. Type 2 diabetes and the skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, V. V.; Mitchell, Deborah M; Rosen, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    . Clinicians should be aware that BMD measurements underestimate fracture risk in people with type 2 diabetes, and that new treatments for diabetes, with neutral or positive effects on skeletal health, might play a part in the management of diabetes in those at high risk of fracture. Data for the optimum...... fractures. The mechanisms underlying skeletal fragility in diabetes are not completely understood, but are multifactorial and likely include effects of obesity, hyperglycaemia, oxidative stress, and accumulation of advanced glycation end products, leading to altered bone metabolism, structure, and strength...... management of osteoporosis in patients with type 2 diabetes are scarce, but in the absence of evidence to the contrary, physicians should follow guidelines established for postmenopausal osteoporosis. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd....

  11. Diabetes Distress Among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Sturt, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    with type 1 diabetes: the prevalence of DD; demographic, clinical, behavioral and psychosocial correlates of DD and interventions that reduce DD. Consistent with adult studies, around one third of adolescents experience elevated DD and this is frequently associated with suboptimal glycemic control, low self......Diabetes distress (DD) refers to the negative emotions arising from living with diabetes and the burden of self-management. Among adults, the prevalence and significance of DD are well established, but this is not the case among adolescents. This systematic review investigated among adolescents...

  12. Nephropathy in patients with recently diagonised type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Albuminuria is long recognised as a sign of renal disease in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, renal disease occurs after a longer duration of diabetic state. In type 2 diabetes, it is more variable. Objective: To determine the prevalence and any risk factors of albuminuria in shortterm (<2 yrs) type 2 diabetes. Design: ...

  13. The Difference in Self-Esteem between Type I Diabetics and Type II Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Linda Kay

    Diabetes Mellitus is a disease which can affect an individual both physically and emotionally. Type I diabetics, representing about 10% of the diabetic population, can be characterized as having little or no insulin supply in their pancreas. Usually under the age of 30, they are required to take one or more insulin injections daily and must follow…

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor reverses aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics through the JAK/STAT pathway in cultured sensory neurons derived from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Saleh, Ali; Akude, Eli; Smith, Darrell R; Morrow, Dwane; Tessler, Lori; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in sensory neurons and contributes to diabetic neuropathy. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) stimulates axon regeneration in type 1 diabetic rodents and prevents deficits in axonal caliber, nerve conduction, and thermal sensation. We tested the hypothesis that CNTF enhances sensory neuron function in diabetes through JAK/STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription) signaling to normalize impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. The effect of CNTF on gene expression and neurite outgrowth of cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons derived from control and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rodents was quantified. Polarization status and bioenergetics profile of mitochondria from cultured sensory neurons were determined. CNTF treatment prevented reduced STAT3 phosphorylation (Tyr 705) in DRG of STZ-diabetic mice and also enhanced STAT3 phosphorylation in rat DRG cultures. CNTF normalized polarization status of the mitochondrial inner membrane and corrected the aberrant oligomycin-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization in axons of diabetic neurons. The mitochondrial bioenergetics profile demonstrated that spare respiratory capacity and respiratory control ratio were significantly depressed in sensory neurons cultured from STZ-diabetic rats and were corrected by acute CNTF treatment. The positive effects of CNTF on neuronal mitochondrial function were significantly inhibited by the specific JAK inhibitor, AG490. Neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons from age-matched control and STZ-induced diabetic rats was elevated by CNTF and blocked by AG490. We propose that CNTF's ability to enhance axon regeneration and protect from fiber degeneration in diabetes is associated with its targeting of mitochondrial function and improvement of cellular bioenergetics, in part, through JAK/STAT signaling.

  15. Diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus – clinical and biochemical differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krdžalić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this retrospective study was to establish differences in clinical picture, biochemical parametres and precipitating factors in patiens with diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A total number of 25 patients was hospitalised in the Intensive Case Unit of the Department for Internal Diseases of the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica in the period of 14 months. Most patients had type 1 diabetes whose ketoacidosis showed symptoms of vomiting, stomachache and it was most often caused by a discontinued application of insulin or an infection. In patients with type 2 diabetes an inadequate regulation of glycemia had been noticed before hospitalisation and diabetic ketoacidosis was manifested by polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia and weight loss. Precipitating factor in most patients with type 2 diabetes was an infection. In addition, a significant number of patients were newly discovered diabetics whose precipitating factor in most cases could not be found and the symptoms of the disease correspond to insulin dependent patients. The observed biochemical parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the groups of patients suffering from different types of diabetes. This study has shown that diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetes. DKA can be prevented by education of patients, improvement of health care as well as improved communication between patients and doctors of family medicine.

  16. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign of ...

  17. Early Neurodegeneration in the Retina of Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Hille W.; Verbraak, Frank D; Kok, Pauline H. B.; Stehouwer, Marilette; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan; DeVries, J. Hans; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrated thinning of the inner retinal layers in type 2 diabetic patients compared to controls. The findings conform to previously reported changes in type 1 diabetes and support the concept that diabetic retinopathy includes a neurodegenerative component.

  18. Insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Kirti; Apostolopoulou, Maria; Roden, Michael

    2015-12-01

    For long the presence of insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes has been questioned. Detailed metabolic analyses revealed 12%-61% and up to 20% lower whole-body (skeletal muscle) and hepatic insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes, depending on the population studied. Type 1 diabetes patients feature impaired muscle adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and enhanced oxidative stress, predominantly relating to hyperglycemia. They may also exhibit abnormal fasting and postprandial glycogen metabolism in liver, while the role of hepatic energy metabolism for insulin resistance remains uncertain. Recent rodent studies point to tissue-specific differences in the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance. In non-obese diabetic mice, increased lipid availability contributes to muscle insulin resistance via diacylglycerol/protein kinase C isoforms. Furthermore, humans with type 1 diabetes respond to lifestyle modifications or metformin by 20%-60% increased whole-body insulin sensitivity, likely through improvement in both glycemic control and oxidative phosphorylation. Intensive insulin treatment and islet transplantation also increase but fail to completely restore whole-body and hepatic insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, insulin resistance is a feature of type 1 diabetes, but more controlled trials are needed to address its contribution to disease progression, which might help to optimize treatment and reduce comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Blink reflex in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkholy, Saly H; Hosny, Hanan M; Shalaby, Nevein M; El-Hadidy, Reem A; Abd El-Rahim, Noha T; Mohamed, Manal M

    2014-12-01

    An evaluation of the extent of damage of the central nervous system in diabetes mellitus is of high value in current research. Electrophysiological abnormalities are frequently present in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic cranial neuropathy is one of the complications of the disease. Blink reflex is used to diagnose subclinical cranial neuropathy. The objective is to test the utility of blink reflex in detecting subclinical cranial nerve involvement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged from 30 to 60 years examined clinically and neurologically. Blink reflex and nerve conduction studies for the upper and lower limbs were performed and compared with 20 matched normal controls. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy showed significant prolonged distal latency and reduced amplitudes of the R2C response compared with the control, patients without peripheral neuropathy showed insignificant changes. Alteration of R2 correlated with the type of treatment and the duration of the disease. In patients without peripheral neuropathy, ulnar sensory distal latencies showed significant positive correlation with R2I latency, whereas its Conduction Velocity (CV) showed significant positive correlation with R2C amplitudes and negative correlation with R2C latency. R2C is the most sensitive parameter in the blink reflex, which can help in the diagnosis of subclinical diabetic cranial neuropathy.

  20. Ghrelin and insulin gene expression changes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after rosiglitazone pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Yildirim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of rosiglitazone treatment on islet ghrelin and insulin gene expressions in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. Animals were divided into four groups. 1. Intact controls. 2. Rosiglitazonetreated controls. 3. STZ-induced diabetes. 4. Rosiglitazonetreated diabetes. Rosiglitazone was given for 7 days at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight. Ghrelin and insulin gene expressions were investigated by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. There was no statistically significant difference in body weight between STZ-induced diabetic rats and rosiglitazone-treated diabetic rats during the experimental period. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in blood glucose levels and insulin immunoreactive cell numbers between STZ-induced diabetic rats and rosiglitazone- treated diabetic rats. There was a tendency towards a reduction of ghrelin gene expression in diabetic animals compared with intact controls. We found, in addition, that ghrelin immunoreactive and ghrelin mRNA expressing cells were frequent in the epithelial lining of the ducts suggesting ductal epithelium might be the source of the regenerating islet ghrelin cells, as is known for other islet cells. The results show that short-term rosiglitazone pretreatment had no significant effect on ghrelin and insulin gene expressions.

  1. Effects of diabetes on oxidative and nitrosative stress in kidney mitochondria from aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gallardo, Rocío V; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Esquivel-Gutiérrez, Edgar; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Manzo-Avalos, Salvador; Campos-García, Jesús; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Boldogh, Istvan; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from defects in the secretion and/or action of insulin. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) develops in diabetic patients and is characterized by a progressive deterioration of renal function. The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) produces most of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are involved in diabetic nephropathy. Due to the high incidence of DM in the elderly, the aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative and nitrosative stress in kidney mitochondria from aged rats. We evaluated lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO(•)) production, S-nitrosylation profiles, glutathione levels, and glutathione reductase and aconitase activities under streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetes in kidney mitochondria from aged rats. The results showed an increase in LPO, NO(•) production, and S-nitrosylated proteins in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. A decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels and glutathione reductase (GR) and aconitase activities in the rats that received the STZ-induced diabetes treatment was also observed, when compared with the age-related controls. The data suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stresses promote mitochondrial oxidative dysfunction in the more advanced age rat kidney in STZ-induced diabetes.

  2. Anti-diabetic and spermatogenic activity of Cocculus hirsutus (L) Diels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blood glucose levels. After STZ-induced diabetes, it was observed that both standard drug (glibenclamide) and methanolic extract of C. hirsutus were significantly superior to control in reducing blood sugar on long treatment (15 days). The data suggested that C. hirsutus could be of benefit in diabetes mellitus in controlling ...

  3. Emerging adulthood and Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallis, M; Willaing, I; Holt, R I G

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To compare clinical, psychological, education and social variables in emerging adults (aged 18-30 years) with Type 1 diabetes with their adult counterparts aged >30 years. METHODS: A single assessment multinational sample was surveyed as part of the larger second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes...... experience and family support) and diabetes education factors. RESULTS: Emerging adults differed from adults aged >30 years with regard to a number of psychosocial variables. Emerging adults reported better overall quality of life, social support and support from their healthcare team compared with adults...... aged >30 years of age; however, emerging adults experienced greater diabetes-specific distress and were less engaged in self-management. Diabetes education was related to a number of indicators, while experience of discrimination was harmful, but these impacts did not differ between emerging adults...

  4. Genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Pedersen, Oluf

    2005-01-01

    and classified into MODY1-6 according to the mutated genes that by being expressed in the pancreatic beta-cells confirm at the molecular level the clinical presentation of MODY as a predominantly insulin secretory deficient form of diabetes mellitus. Genomewide linkage studies of presumed polygenic type 2......Throughout the last decade, molecular genetic studies of non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus have contributed significantly to our present understanding of this disease's complex aetiopathogenesis. Monogenic forms of diabetes (maturity-onset diabetes of the young, MODY) have been identified...... diabetic populations indicate that loci on chromosomes 1q, 5q, 8p, 10q, 12q and 20q contain susceptibility genes. Yet, so far, the only susceptibility gene, calpain-10 (CAPN10), which has been identified using genomewide linkage studies, is located on chromosome 2q37. Mutation analyses of selected...

  5. Rosmarinic acid ameliorates hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats, potentially by modulating the expression of PEPCK and GLUT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runtuwene J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Joshua Runtuwene,1,2 Kai-Chun Cheng,1 Akihiro Asakawa,1 Haruka Amitani,1 Marie Amitani,1 Akinori Morinaga,1 Yoshiyuki Takimoto,3 Bernabas Harold Ralph Kairupan,2 Akio Inui1 1Department of Psychosomatic Internal Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, Japan; 2Faculty of Medicine, Sam Ratulangi University, Manado, Indonesia; 3Department of Biomedical Ethics, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Background: Rosmarinic acid (RA is a natural substance that may be useful for treating diabetes mellitus. The present study investigated the effects of RA on glucose homeostasis and insulin regulation in rats with streptozocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetes or high-fat diet (HFD-induced type 2 diabetes.Methods: Glucose homeostasis was determined using oral glucose tolerance tests and postprandial glucose tests, and insulin activity was evaluated using insulin tolerance tests and the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance. Additionally, the protein expression levels of PEPCK and GLUT4 were determined using Western blot analysis.Results: RA administration exerted a marked hypoglycemic effect on STZ-induced diabetic rats and enhanced glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed diabetic rats. These effects of RA were dose-dependent. Meanwhile, RA administration reversed the STZ- and HFD-induced increase in PEPCK expression in the liver and the STZ- and HFD-induced decrease in GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle.Conclusion: RA reduces hyperglycemia and ameliorates insulin sensitivity by decreasing PEPCK expression and increasing GLUT4 expression. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, STZ, HFD, HOMA-IR, PEPCK, GLUT4

  6. Mediterranean diet and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Giugliano, Dario

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of selected dietary components is favourably associated with prevention of type 2 diabetes, but discordant results for some foods or single nutrients continue to appear. The study of complete dietary patterns represents the most adequate approach to assess the role of diet on the risk of diabetes. The term 'Mediterranean diet' essentially refers to a primarily plant-based dietary pattern whose greater consumption has been associated with higher survival for lower all-cause mortality. At least five large prospective studies report a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy people or at risk patients with the highest adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Five randomized controlled trials have evaluated the effects of a Mediterranean diet, as compared with other commonly used diets, on glycaemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Improvement of HbA1c levels was greater with a Mediterranean diet and ranged from 0.1% to 0.6% for HbA1c . No trial reported worsening of glycaemic control with a Mediterranean diet. Although no controlled trial specifically assessed the role of a Mediterranean diet in reducing cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetes, there is evidence that post-infarct or high-risk patients, including diabetic patients, may have cardiovascular benefits from a Mediterranean diet. The evidence so far accumulated suggests that adopting a Mediterranean diet may help prevent type 2 diabetes; moreover, a lower carbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet seems good for HbA1c reduction in persons with established diabetes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Polyneuropathy in diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska, Małgorzata

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a clinical state of nerve damage caused by hyperglicaemia, raised activation of polyol pathway, oxydative stress, changes in endoneurial arteries and myelinated fibres. Patient complains of pain and paresthesiae in hands and limbs. The feelings of pain, temperature, touch, vibration are significantly reduced. The changes may also concern cranial nerves (IIII, IV, VI, VII), intracostal nerves, hands and limbs (Garland and Tavemer syndrome). Autonomic neuropathy concerns the impairment of autonomic functions of cardio-vascular, gastro-intestinal, uro-genital and other systems. The treatment concerns the improvement of diabetes metabolic control. Antiinflammatory antisteroid drugs are widely used but their usefulness is limited. Antidepressive drugs are the most often used group. The improvement is observed after 6 months of treatment. The side effects - orthostatic hypotension, heart rhythm disturbation and obstipation are harmful for the patients with coronary heart disease. In the cases of persistent pain the oral antiepileptic drugs may be used or cream with capsaicin for skin surface.

  8. Psoriasis er associeret med type 2-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Knop, Filip Krag; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a global prevalence of 2-3%. In recent years it has been established that patients with psoriasis carry an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The association is most likely due...... to a combination of shared genes, immunoinflammatory mechanisms and a number of diabetes risk factors in patients with psoriasis. The current review summarises the evidence in the field and calls for attention on diabetes risk assessment, preventive measures and treatment in patients with psoriasis....

  9. Mitochondrial oxidative function and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Boushel, Robert; Dela, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    The cause of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is unknown. The major part of insulin-mediated glucose disposal takes place in the skeletal muscle, and increased amounts of intramyocellular lipid has been associated with insulin resistance and linked to decreased activity of mitochondrial...... oxidative phosphorylation. This review will cover the present knowledge and literature on the topics of the activity of oxidative enzymes and the electron transport chain (ETC) in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes. Different methods of studying mitochondrial function are described, including...... discussed. Several studies show reduced activity of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetics. The reductions are independent of muscle fiber type, and are accompanied by visual evidence of damaged mitochondria. In most studies, the reduced oxidative enzyme activity is explained by decreases...

  10. Reduced incretin effect in type 2 diabetes: cause or consequence of the diabetic state?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina; Højberg, Patricia V; Larsen, Steen; Madsbad, Sten; Vølund, Aage; Holst, Jens J; Krarup, Thure

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the reduced incretin effect observed in patients with type 2 diabetes is a primary event in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes or a consequence of the diabetic state...

  11. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  12. Spontaneous Type 2 Diabetic Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-wei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2 diabetes (T2DM, is one of the most common chronic diseases and continues to increase in numbers with large proportion of health care budget being used. Many animal models have been established in order to investigate the mechanisms and pathophysiologic progress of T2DM and find effective treatments for its complications. On the basis of their strains, features, advantages, and disadvantages, various types of animal models of T2DM can be divided into spontaneously diabetic models, artificially induced diabetic models, and transgenic/knockout diabetic models. Among these models, the spontaneous rodent models are used more frequently because many of them can closely describe the characteristic features of T2DM, especially obesity and insulin resistance. In this paper, we aim to investigate the current available spontaneous rodent models for T2DM with regard to their characteristic features, advantages, and disadvantages, and especially to describe appropriate selection and usefulness of different spontaneous rodent models in testing of various new antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Spontaneous type 2 diabetic rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang-Wei; Sun, Guang-Dong; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Wang, Ji; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Miao, Li-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2 diabetes (T2DM), is one of the most common chronic diseases and continues to increase in numbers with large proportion of health care budget being used. Many animal models have been established in order to investigate the mechanisms and pathophysiologic progress of T2DM and find effective treatments for its complications. On the basis of their strains, features, advantages, and disadvantages, various types of animal models of T2DM can be divided into spontaneously diabetic models, artificially induced diabetic models, and transgenic/knockout diabetic models. Among these models, the spontaneous rodent models are used more frequently because many of them can closely describe the characteristic features of T2DM, especially obesity and insulin resistance. In this paper, we aim to investigate the current available spontaneous rodent models for T2DM with regard to their characteristic features, advantages, and disadvantages, and especially to describe appropriate selection and usefulness of different spontaneous rodent models in testing of various new antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of individualized diabetes education for type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To evaluate the effect of individualized education for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: A total of 280 patients (158 males, mean age 63 ± 10 years) with T2DM were randomly divided into study and control group. Eysenck Personality questionnaire was used to assess the personality of the ...

  16. Icariside II ameliorates diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian W

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wenjie Tian,1,2,* Hongen Lei,1,* Ruili Guan,1 Yongde Xu,1 Huixi Li,1 Lin Wang,1 Bicheng Yang,1 Zhezhu Gao,1 Zhongcheng Xin1 1Andrology Center, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, 2Department of Urology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the therapeutic effects and potential mechanisms of icariside II (ICA II on reversing diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type I diabetic rats.Methods: Newborn male Sprague Dawley rats were labeled with thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU for tracking endogenous label retaining progenitor cells (LRCs. At age of 8 weeks, 48 rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control group (n=16, diabetes mellitus group (DM; n=16, and diabetes mellitus plus ICA II therapy group (DM+ICA II, n=16. Eight weeks induced for diabetes with STZ, rats in DM group and DM+ICA II group were treated with vehicle or ICA II (5 mg/kg/day for another 8 weeks, respectively. Then, blood creatinine, 24-hour urine protein, blood urea nitrogen, and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured, as well as the expression of von Willebrand factor, malondialdehyde, transforming growth factor-β/drosophila mothers against decapentaplegic protein/connective tissue growth factor (TGF-β/Smad/CTGF signaling, marker of proliferation Ki-67, and EdU+ LRCs in renal tissues.Results: Increased levels of creatinine, 24-hour urine protein, and blood urea nitrogen and remarkably decreased proportion of normal glomeruli and increased proportions of I, IIa, IIb, and III glomeruli were observed in diabetic rats, while ICA II could reverse these changes. Interestingly, ICA II could significantly downregulate the levels of malondialdehyde and TGF-β/Smad/CTGF signaling and increase the expression of von Willebrand factor, Ki-67, and EdU+ LRCs in the kidney.Conclusion: ICA

  17. Diallyl trisulfide ameliorates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in type 1 diabetic rats: role of SIRT1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liming; Li, Shu; Tang, Xinlong; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Han, Jinsong; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yuji; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Yinli; Yang, Yang; Wang, Huishan

    2017-07-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) protects against apoptosis during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury in diabetic state, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly defined. Previously, we and others demonstrated that silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) activation inhibited oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress during MI/R injury. We hypothesize that DATS reduces diabetic MI/R injury by activating SIRT1 signaling. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic rats were subjected to MI/R surgery with or without perioperative administration of DATS (40 mg/kg). We found that DATS treatment markedly improved left ventricular systolic pressure and the first derivative of left ventricular pressure, reduced myocardial infarct size as well as serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities. Furthermore, the myocardial apoptosis was also suppressed by DATS as evidenced by reduced apoptotic index and cleaved caspase-3 expression. However, these effects were abolished by EX527 (the inhibitor of SIRT1 signaling, 5 mg/kg). We further found that DATS effectively upregulated SIRT1 expression and its nuclear distribution. Additionally, PERK/eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP-mediated ER stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed by DATS treatment. Moreover, DATS significantly activated Nrf-2/HO-1 antioxidant signaling pathway, thus reducing Nox-2/4 expressions. However, the ameliorative effects of DATS on oxidative stress and ER stress-mediated myocardial apoptosis were inhibited by EX527 administration. Taken together, these data suggest that perioperative DATS treatment effectively ameliorates MI/R injury in type 1 diabetic setting by enhancing cardiac SIRT1 signaling. SIRT1 activation not only upregulated Nrf-2/HO-1-mediated antioxidant signaling pathway but also suppressed PERK/eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP-mediated ER stress level, thus reducing myocardial apoptosis and eventually preserving cardiac function.

  18. VITAMIN D AND DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pasyechko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. As it is established that diabetes mellitus causes metabolic disturbances of all types (first of all because of carbohydrate metabolism, affection of blood vessels, nerves, different organs and tissues. However, the influence of DM on the level of microelements is still not investigated enough. Despite the sufficient variety of medicaments, compensation of diabetes mellitus is achieved in less than 30% of patients. For this reason, the search of new ways of treatment which are aimed at the improvement of carbohydrate metabolism is an urgent issue. Objective. The research was aimed to reveal the deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OHD3] and its correlation with carbohydrate metabolism. Methods. Thirty five patients with diabetes mellitus Type 2 aged 55-74 with illness duration 2-4 years were examined. The control group included 35 healthy people of the same age and sex. Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OHD3] were tested by means of radioimmunoassay. The level of glycated haemoglobin was tested by means of liquid chromatography. Results. Correlation of the level of vitamin D with the degree of diabetes mellitus Type 2 compensation has been detected. Conclusions. A clear tendency to the improvement of diabetes mellitus Type 2 compensation after medication correction with vitamin D was evidenced.

  19. [Familial hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos Alberto; Ramírez-Moguel, Erika; Gallegos-Martínez, José; Leyva, Octavio; Oseguera, Jorge; Lozano, Horacio; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a cardiovascular risk factor in type-2 diabetes. However, this abnormality may be caused by several mechanisms. In familial hypertriglyceridemia, a hyperlipidemia associated with type-2 diabetes, plasma accumulation of non atherogenic particles explains the presence of hypertriglyceridemia. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of coronary insufficiency and carotid artery stenosis in patients with type-2 diabetes with or without familial hypertriglyceridemia. Controls were paired against cases based on age, gender, diabetes duration, treatment and other cardiovascular risk factors. Controls had either a normal lipid profile (n=48) or hyperlipidemia (n=15). The intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries was significantly lower in cases compared to controls (0.55 +/- 0.12 vs 0.63 +/- 0.22 in normolipidemic controls and 0.66 +/- 0.18 mm in hyperlipidemic subjects (p=0.02)). Exercise treadmill testing was abnormal in a similar proportion of cases and controls (4.8 vs 6.2%). Incidence of cardiovascular complications was not different between groups. We therefore conclude that severe hypertriglyceridemia due to familial hypertriglyceridemia is not associated with an increased prevalence of symptomatic atherosclerosis in patients with type-2 diabetes.

  20. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This nationwide prospective multicenter study took place in eight Danish centers treating pregnant women with type 1 diabetes during 1993...... population. Six of the perinatal deaths (16%) were related to congenital malformations. Only 34% of women performed daily home monitoring of blood glucose at conception, and 58% received preconceptional guidance. Pregnancies with serious adverse outcomes (perinatal death and/or congenital malformations) were......, daily self-monitoring was associated with a reduction in serious adverse outcomes. The caesarean section rate was 55.9 and 12.6%, respectively, and the risk of preterm delivery was 41.7 and 6.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Type 1 diabetic pregnancies are still complicated by considerably higher rates...

  1. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one...... of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis....... of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean...

  2. PCOS in adolescence and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreau, Anne-Marie; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a frequent disorder in women of reproductive age that consists of a heterogeneous combination of hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation, and polycystic ovaries. Hyperandrogenism and anovulation are clearly linked to insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinism, with an ovarian androgenic hyperresponsiveness to circulating insulin. Evidence is increasing that suggests that lipotoxicity, which is a key mechanism in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, could also explain the androgen overproduction. During adolescence, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may be difficult but is of importance because PCOS increases future risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic complications. Metabolic perturbations begin early in adolescence and also exist in adolescent relatives of women with PCOS, even before clinical signs of PCOS. Screening for impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes is also important in this population, and treatment should focus on PCOS clinical manifestations as well as long-term metabolic risk.

  3. Type 2-diabetes. Sociale relationer og sundhedsadfaerd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Anne Friis; Avlund, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    thoroughly based on Danish data. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between social relations and health behaviour among adult Danes with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and based on data from the report ''Sundheds- og Sygelighedsundersøgelsen......INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that challenges the Danish health care system and health behaviour is important in connection with rehabilitation. Foreign research shows that social relations are associated with a healthy lifestyle, but this effect has not yet been examined...... 2000'', published by The National Institute of Public Health; 264 respondents with type 2 diabetes were included in the final study population. Social relations were measured in terms of civil status, social contact and functional network. Health behaviour reflects whether the respondents comply...

  4. Type 2-diabetes. Sociale relationer og sundhedsadfaerd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Anne Friis; Avlund, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that challenges the Danish health care system and health behaviour is important in connection with rehabilitation. Foreign research shows that social relations are associated with a healthy lifestyle, but this effect has not yet been examined...... thoroughly based on Danish data. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between social relations and health behaviour among adult Danes with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and based on data from the report ''Sundheds- og Sygelighedsundersøgelsen...... 2000'', published by The National Institute of Public Health; 264 respondents with type 2 diabetes were included in the final study population. Social relations were measured in terms of civil status, social contact and functional network. Health behaviour reflects whether the respondents comply...

  5. Type 1 diabetes guidelines: Are they enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Abdul Zargar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of insulin by Banting and Best in 1922 changed the landscape of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Guidelines on T1DM should be evidence based and should emphasize comprehensive risk management. Guidelines would improve awareness amongst governments, state health care providers and the general public about the serious long-term implications of poorly managed diabetes and of the essential resources needed for optimal care. T1DM requires lifelong daily medication, regular control as well as access to facilities to manage acute and chronic complications. American Diabetes Association 2014 guidelines recommends annual nephropathy screening for albumin levels; random spot urine sample for albumin-to-creatinine ratio at start of puberty or age ≥10 years, whichever is earlier, once the child has had diabetes for 5 years. Hypertension should be screened for in T1DM patients by measuring blood pressure at each routine visit. Dyslipidemia in T1DM patients is important and patients should be screened if there is a family history of hypercholesterolemia or a cardiovascular event before the age of 55 years exists or if family history is unknown. Retinopathy is another important complication of diabetes and patients should be subjected to an initial dilated and comprehensive eye examination. Basic diabetes training should be provided for school staff, and they should be assigned with responsibilities for the care of diabetic children. Self-management should be allowed at all school settings for students.

  6. Vitamins and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Ana Laura, Guadarrama-López; Elina, Martínez-Carrillo Beatriz; Donají, Benítez-Arciniega Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25388747

  7. Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashi Wangdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bhutan is a South Asian country with a total population of 733,643. Bhutan has a very low burden of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, while that of type 2 diabetes mellitus is very high and increasing at alarming rates. Bhutan has a notably high proportion of over-weight and obese population. First case of T1DM was detected in 2006 and all the detected patients are in the age range of 14-15 years. The challenges in T1DM management include lack of knowledge among health care workers and patients, and limited access to health care services because of the difficult terrain.

  8. Type 2 diabetes sits in a chair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Thyfault, J P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to skyrocket across the industrialized world leading to soaring medical costs, reduced quality of life and increased mortality rates. Therefore, a more firm understanding of the development of the disease and effective, low cost therapies....... In this review, we cover these topics and use current scientific evidence to support our belief that 'type 2 diabetes sits in a chair'. We also discuss a relatively new question that has yet to be examined: Would reducing sitting time be an effective treatment for T2D?...

  9. [Surgical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Muciño-Bermejo, María Jimena

    2014-01-01

    Sustained remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and significantly improved hyperlipidemia and arterial hypertension, control has been achieves in both lean and obese patient after bariatric surgery procedures or other gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in these patients derives not only in reducing weight and caloric intake, but also endocrine changes resulting from surgical manifestation gastrointestinal tract. In this article we review the clinical outcomes of such interventions (collectively called "metabolic surgery") and the perspectives on the role that these surgeries play in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdi, Tashi

    2015-04-01

    Bhutan is a South Asian country with a total population of 733,643. Bhutan has a very low burden of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), while that of type 2 diabetes mellitus is very high and increasing at alarming rates. Bhutan has a notably high proportion of over-weight and obese population. First case of T1DM was detected in 2006 and all the detected patients are in the age range of 14-15 years. The challenges in T1DM management include lack of knowledge among health care workers and patients, and limited access to health care services because of the difficult terrain.

  11. Type 2-diabetes. Sociale relationer og sundhedsadfaerd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Anne Friis; Avlund, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that challenges the Danish health care system and health behaviour is important in connection with rehabilitation. Foreign research shows that social relations are associated with a healthy lifestyle, but this effect has not yet been examined...... to the recommendations for physical activity and diet. Only the association between functional network and diet remains significant when adjusted for the effects of co-variates. CONCLUSION: The study shows a need for the promotion of health behaviour among adult Danes with type 2 diabetes, and indicates that social...

  12. Do People with Type 2 Diabetes Think They are Unhealthy?

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Salinas, Karla C.; Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolas; Delgado-Sandoval, Silvia C.; Olvera-Villanueva, Georgina; Ruiz-Paloalto, Ma Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that presents a significant burden on health care systems in many countries. With the rise of obesity, the incidence of Type 2 diabetes has also been steadily increasing. A healthy lifestyle and understanding of diabetes management are important factors for delaying the onset of comorbidities associated with Type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the self-perception of health in individuals with Type 2 diabetes as it relat...

  13. of Nigerian Type 2 diabetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    degrees of generalized and central/abdominal fat, implying a greater risk of developing Type 2 DM in view of the relationship between body fat distribution and insulin resistance. Long term prospective studies are needed to define anthropometric indices predictive of the development of Type 2 DM, as well as its relation to ...

  14. Intensive diabetes therapy and ocular surgery in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Sun, Wanjie; Das, Arup; Gangaputra, Sapna; Kiss, Szilard; Klein, Ronald; Cleary, Patricia A; Lachin, John M; Nathan, David M

    2015-04-30

    The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed a beneficial effect of 6.5 years of intensive glycemic control on retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Between 1983 and 1989, a total of 1441 patients with type 1 diabetes in the DCCT were randomly assigned to receive either intensive diabetes therapy or conventional therapy aimed at preventing hyperglycemic symptoms. They were treated and followed until 1993. Subsequently, 1375 of these patients were followed in the observational Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. The self-reported history of ocular surgical procedures was obtained annually. We evaluated the effect of intensive therapy as compared with conventional therapy on the incidence and cost of ocular surgery during these two studies. Over a median follow-up of 23 years, 130 ocular operations were performed in 63 of 711 patients assigned to intensive therapy (8.9%) and 189 ocular operations in 98 of 730 patients assigned to conventional therapy (13.4%) (Pintensive therapy was associated with a reduction in the risk of any diabetes-related ocular surgery by 48% (95% confidence interval [CI], 29 to 63; Pintensive therapy and 61 who received conventional therapy underwent cataract extraction (adjusted risk reduction with intensive therapy, 48%; 95% CI, 23 to 65; P=0.002); 29 patients who received intensive therapy and 50 who received conventional therapy underwent vitrectomy, retinal-detachment surgery, or both (adjusted risk reduction, 45%; 95% CI, 12 to 66; P=0.01). The costs of surgery were 32% lower in the intensive-therapy group. The beneficial effects of intensive therapy were fully attenuated after adjustment for mean glycated hemoglobin levels over the entire follow-up. Intensive therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes was associated with a substantial reduction in the long-term risk of ocular surgery. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; DCCT

  15. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Ginkgo biloba Extract in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daye Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE has been reported to have a wide range of health benefits in traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effects of GBE on streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetes in rats. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by the administration of STZ (60 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally. GBE (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b.w. was administered orally once a day for a period of 30 days. Body weight and blood glucose levels were determined in different experimental days. Serum lipid profile and antioxidant enzymes in hepatic and pancreatic tissue were measured at the end of the experimental period. Significant decreases in body weight and antioxidant ability and increases in blood glucose, lipid profile, and lipid peroxidation were observed in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The administration of GBE and glibenclamide daily for 30 days in STZ-induced diabetic rats reversed the above parameters significantly. GBE possesses antihyperglycemic, antioxidant, and antihyperlipidemia activities in STZ-induced chronic diabetic rats, which promisingly support the use of GBE as a food supplement or an adjunct treatment for diabetics.

  16. [Cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajchenberg, Bernardo Léo; Rassi, Nelson; Feitosa, Alina Coutinho R; Lerário, Antonio Carlos; Betti, Roberto Tadeu Barcelos

    2008-03-01

    The association between type 1 diabetes and coronary heart disease has become very clear since the late 1970. It has been demonstrated that there is an important increased risk in morbidity and mortality caused by coronary artery disease in young adults with type 1 diabetes compared with the non diabetic population. The underlying pathogeneses is still poorly understood. While the role of glycemic control in the development of microvascular disease complication is well established its role in CVD in patients with DM1 remains unclear with epidemiologic studies reporting conflicting data. Recent findings from the DCCT/EDIC showed that prior intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT was associated with less atherosclerosis, largely because of reduced level of HbA1c during the DCCT. The improvement of glycemic control itself appeared to be particularly effective in younger patients with shorter duration of the disease. Other analyses suggested the glycemia may have a stronger effect on CAD in patients without than in those with albuminúria. Other major determinants of coronary artery disease are the components of metabolic syndrome and the surrogate measure of insulin resistence: eGDR. It is proposed that patients with DM1 should have aggressive medical therapy, risk factor modification and careful monitoring not only of his blood sugar but also of the other processes involved in the atherosclerotic process, mostly the ones with family history of type 2 diabetes.

  17. An immune origin of type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolb, H; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    environmental factors the contribute to the risk of type 2 diabetes-diet and physical activity-have a direct impact on levels of systemic immune mediators. In animal models, targeting of immune genes enhanced or suppressed the development of obesity or diabetes. Obesity is associated with the infiltration...... and proinflammatory activity of macrophages in adipose tissue, and immune mediators may be important regulators of insulin resistance, mitochondrial function, ectopic lipid storage and beta cell dysfunction or death. Intervention studies targeting these pathways would help to determine the contribution......Subclinical, low-grade systemic inflammation has been observed in patients with type 2 diabetes and in those at increased risk of the disease. This may be more than an epiphenomenon. Alleles of genes encoding immune/inflammatory mediators are associated with the disease, and the two major...

  18. Erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the stud....... CONCLUSIONS: Hypoglycaemia triggers a rise in plasma erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes. The response is influenced by basal RAS activity. Erythropoietin may carry a neuroprotective potential during hypoglycaemia....... was to explore plasma erythropoietin response to hypoglycaemia and the relationship to basal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and cognitive function. METHODS: We performed a single-blinded, controlled, cross-over study with induced hypoglycaemia or maintained glycaemic level. Nine patients with type 1......AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the study...

  19. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hongyu; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Choi, Anna L

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prospective data regarding persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) are limited, and the results for individual POPs are not entirely consistent across studies. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively examine plasma POP concentrations in relation to incident T2D...... and total PCBs, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support an association between POP exposure and the risk of type 2 diabetes.......-1990 and participated in two case-control studies in the Nurses' Health Study. We identified 48 incident T2D cases through June 30, 2008. We conducted a literature search in MEDLINE and EMBASE through December 2011 to identify prospective studies on POPs in relation to diabetes. We used a fixed-effects model...

  20. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka [Division of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kangawa, Kenji [Department of Biochemistry, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Nakazato, Masamitsu, E-mail: nakazato@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  1. Thiazolidinedione derivatives in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, C.J.J.; Smits, P.

    2006-01-01

    In Europe, the thiazolidinedione derivatives pioglitazone and rosiglitazone have been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus either as monotherapy for patients with intolerance or contraindications to metformin or in combination therapy. This class of drugs seems particularly suited

  2. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate...

  3. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Perry, John R. B.; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rayner, N. William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E.; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M.; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U.; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D.; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A.; Below, Jennifer E.; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L.; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Varga, Tibor V.; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P.; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F.; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P.; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E.; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K. L.; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H. T.; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E.; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S.; Fowler, Sharon P.; Freedman, Barry I.; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K.; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R.; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A.; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C.; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J.; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J.; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R.; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O.; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P.; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B.; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J.; Ebrahim, Shah B.; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Lehman, Donna M.; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Small, Kerrin S.; Ried, Janina S.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W.; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Bowden, Donald W.; Collins, Francis S.; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C.; Spector, Timothy D.; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M.; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E. Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L.; Wilson, James G.; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M.; Meigs, James B.; Cox, Nancy J.; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C.; Scott, Laura J.; Morris, Andrew P.; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate,

  4. Type 2-diabetes hos etniske minoriteter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Mette; Hansen, Caroline Raun; Koefoed, Birgitte Gade

    2012-01-01

    In general, type 2 diabetes is more common among immigrants than among the inhabitants with a Western background. The higher prevalence among ethnic minorities is probably due to a complex correlation between genetic factors, diet, exercise, linguistic and cultural obstacles, low birthweight...

  5. Insulin and Alzheimer disease: type 3 diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Jagua Gualdrón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease is a neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system whose incidence will increase in next years. Recent investigations relate alzheimer with insulin signaling defects in neurons. Is alzheimer Disease a type 3 diabetes? In this communication write a brief article about evidences from this alzheimer‘s disease model.

  6. Bartter's Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting See

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patient's condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin, oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  7. Altered expression of mitofusin 2 in penile tissues of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Wang, T; Zhang, Y; Li, R; Wang, S; Xu, H; Liu, J; Ye, Z

    2014-06-01

    Diabetic erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication in diabetes mellitus, and the efficacy of first-line therapies is not satisfactory. Recent studies revealed that corporal apoptosis was responsible for the nonresponsiveness of severe ED to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) is a versatile protein, regulating mitochondrial morphology and playing an important role in apoptosis. Several studies showed that expression of Mfn2 was decreased in STZ-induced diabetic rats' kidney, myocardium and retina, which was associated with diabetic nephropathy, cardiomyopathy and retinopathy respectively. In this study, our aim was to explore the expression of Mfn2 and apoptosis in diabetic rats' penes. We found that erectile function (ICP/MAP) elicited by electrical stimulation of cavernous nerve was markedly impaired in diabetic rats compared with the normal rats. The mRNA and protein levels of Mfn2 were found to be significantly reduced in diabetic rats' penile tissues. Compared with normal rats, the content of smooth muscle and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio were dramatically decreased, and penile apoptotic index and expression of activated-caspase-3 were dramatically increased in diabetic rats. This data indicated that repression of Mfn2 in diabetic rats' penes might be associated with excessive apoptosis in diabetes-induced severe ED. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. High prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes in adult offspring of women with gestational diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes: the role of intrauterine hyperglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine D; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Hansen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    the background population (O-BP). RESULTS: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose) in the four groups was 21, 12, 11, and 4%, respectively. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for type 2 diabetes/pre-diabetes......OBJECTIVE: The role of intrauterine hyperglycemia and future risk of type 2 diabetes in human offspring is debated. We studied glucose tolerance in adult offspring of women with either gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or type 1 diabetes, taking the impact of both intrauterine hyperglycemia...... and genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes into account. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The glucose tolerance status following a 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was evaluated in 597 subjects, primarily Caucasians, aged 18-27 years. They were subdivided into four groups according to maternal...

  9. Disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Docet, María F; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2011-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for disordered eating behaviors (DEB). Due to the fact that type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and adolescence, the coexistence of eating disorders (ED) and diabetes often affects adolescents and young adults. Since weight management during this state of development can be especially difficult for those with type 1 diabetes, some diabetics may restrict or omit insulin, a condition known as d...

  10. The impact of low-dose insulin on peripheral nerve insulin receptor signaling in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Sugimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The precise mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of insulin in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic animals remain unknown, but altered peripheral nerve insulin receptor signaling due to insulin deficiency might be one cause. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diabetes was induced in 10-week-old, male Wistar rats by injecting them with STZ (45 mg/kg. They were assigned to one group that received half of an insulin implant (∼1 U/day; I-group, n = 11 or another that remained untreated (U-group, n = 10 for 6 weeks. The controls were age- and sex-matched, non-diabetic Wistar rats (C-group, n = 12. Low-dose insulin did not change haemoglobin A1c, which increased by 136% in the U-group compared with the C-group. Thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the U-group, but not in the I-group. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities decreased in the U-group, whereas sensory nerve conduction velocity increased by 7% (p = 0.0351 in the I-group compared with the U-group. Western blots showed unaltered total insulin receptor (IR, but a 31% decrease and 3.1- and 4.0-fold increases in phosphorylated IR, p44, and p42 MAPK protein levels, respectively, in sciatic nerves from the U-group compared with the C-group. Phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK protein decreased to control levels in the I-group (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Low-dose insulin deactivated p44/42 MAPK and ameliorated peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. These findings support the notion that insulin deficiency per se introduces impaired insulin receptor signaling in type 1 diabetic neuropathy.

  11. The Impact of Low-Dose Insulin on Peripheral Nerve Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Baba, Masayuki; Suzuki, Susumu; Yagihashi, Soroku

    2013-01-01

    Background The precise mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of insulin in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals remain unknown, but altered peripheral nerve insulin receptor signaling due to insulin deficiency might be one cause. Methodology and Principal Findings Diabetes was induced in 10-week-old, male Wistar rats by injecting them with STZ (45 mg/kg). They were assigned to one group that received half of an insulin implant (∼1 U/day; I-group, n = 11) or another that remained untreated (U-group, n = 10) for 6 weeks. The controls were age- and sex-matched, non-diabetic Wistar rats (C-group, n = 12). Low-dose insulin did not change haemoglobin A1c, which increased by 136% in the U-group compared with the C-group. Thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the U-group, but not in the I-group. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities decreased in the U-group, whereas sensory nerve conduction velocity increased by 7% (p = 0.0351) in the I-group compared with the U-group. Western blots showed unaltered total insulin receptor (IR), but a 31% decrease and 3.1- and 4.0-fold increases in phosphorylated IR, p44, and p42 MAPK protein levels, respectively, in sciatic nerves from the U-group compared with the C-group. Phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK protein decreased to control levels in the I-group (pinsulin deactivated p44/42 MAPK and ameliorated peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction in rats with STZ-induced diabetes. These findings support the notion that insulin deficiency per se introduces impaired insulin receptor signaling in type 1 diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24023699

  12. [Cell therapy for type I diabete].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, I B

    2009-01-01

    Cell therapy is a modern and promising approach to type I diabetes mellitus treatment. Nowadays a wide range of cells is used in laboratory experiments and clinical studies, including allogeneic and xenogeneic cells of Langergance islets, bone marrow cells, haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and cord blood stem cells. Any type of the cells named could correct the status of the patients to a certain extent. However, full recovery after cell therapy has not been achieved yet.

  13. Teleconsultation in type 1 diabetes mellitus (TELEDIABE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Federico; Stefani, Ilario; Rivolta, Benedetta; Pintaudi, Basilio; Meneghini, Elena; Luzi, Livio; Mazzone, Antonino

    2018-02-01

    The growing incidence of diabetes and the need to contain healthcare costs empower the necessity to identify new models of care. Telemedicine offers an acknowledged instrument to provide clinical health care at a distance, increasing patient compliance and the achievement of therapeutical goals. The objective was to test the feasibility and the efficacy in the improvement of the glycemic control of the teleconsultation for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A randomized open-label, parallel arms, controlled trial was conducted in two diabetes centers in Italy. Participants affected by type 1 diabetes mellitus have been randomly (1:1) assigned to receive their visits as standard or a web-based care. Patients in the teleconsultation group can arrange their appointments on a Web site and can also have access to web educational courses or to nutritional and psychological counseling. The primary outcome was the assessment of glycemic control by HbA1c measurement after a 12-month follow-up. Overall 74 participants were followed for 1 year. HbA1c changes were not statistically different within (p = 0.56 for standard care group; p = 0.45 for telemedicine group) and between (p = 0.60) groups when considering differences from baseline to the end of the study. Patients randomized to teleconsultation reported reduced severe hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.03). In addition, they were largely satisfied with the activities, perceived a good improvement in the self-management of the diabetes, and reported to have a time saving and a cost reduction. In conclusion, TELEDIABE proposes a new system for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Hypomagnesemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Dasgupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypomagnesemia is reported in type 2 diabetes; magnesium deficiency may play a role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and altered insulin function. Objective: To assess the incidence of hypomagnesemia among noncritically ill patients of Type 2 diabetes mellitus and to evaluate the relation of hypomagnesemia to glycemic control and various long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty, noncritically ill (APACHE score < 10 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, who were admitted in the Departments of Medicine and Endocrinology, GMCH for uncontrolled hyperglycemia and/or various diabetic complications were studied. Serum magnesium was assessed at admission and rechecked in those found to be deficient. Results: Hypomagnesemia (Se magnesium < 1.6 mg/dl was documented in 17 (11.33% patients with a female:male ratio of 9:8. Mean HbA1c was 11.9% in the hypomagnesemic patients compared with 9.8% in controls (P =0.0016. Retinopathy, microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, foot ulceration, and neuropathy was present in 64%, 47%, 17.64%, 58.8%, and 82.35%, respectively, of the patients with hypomagnesemia as compared with 45.8% (P =0.118, 38.34% (P =0.704,15.03% (P =0.566, 22.55% (P =0.011 and 82.7% (P =0.976 without hypomagnesemia. Coronary artery disease was less common in the hypomagnesemia group (17.6% vs 39%, but comparable in the subgroup < 50 years (27% vs 25% (P =0.796. Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia in diabetes was associated with poorer glycemic control, retinopathy, nephropathy, and foot ulcers.

  15. Perinatal Polyunstaurated Fatty Acids Supplementation Causes Alterations in Fuel Homeostasis in Adult Male Rats but does not Offer Resistance Against STZ-induced Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G.; Kacsandi, A.; Kobor-Nyakas, D. E.; Hogyes, E.; Nyakas, C.; Hőgyes, E.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal factors can have major imprinting effects on homeostatic mechanisms in the developing fetus and newborn. Here we studied whether supplemented perinatal polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) influence energy balance and fuel homeostasis later in life. Between day 10 after conception and day 10

  16. GLP-1 agonists for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Maria J; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1-RA) have emerged as a new treatment option for type 2 diabetes. The GLP-1-RA are administered subcutaneously and differ substantially in pharmacokinetic profiles. AREAS COVERED: This review describes the pharmacokinetics...... and legal documents in the form of assessment reports from the European Medicines Agency and the United States Food and Drug Administration. EXPERT OPINION: GLP-1-based therapy combines several unique mechanisms of action and have the potential to gain widespread use in the fight against diabetes...

  17. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Schools: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.; Gordon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) reports that approximately 0.2% of all persons under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This represents 186,300 children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been a disease of children and adolescents. Although type 2 diabetes has in the past…

  18. Low-Magnitude High-Frequency Vibration Accelerated the Foot Wound Healing of n5-streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats by Enhancing Glucose Transporter 4 and Blood Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Caroline Oi-Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Jiang, Jonney Lei; Wang, Tina Bai-Yan; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Cheung, Wing-Hoi

    2017-09-14

    Delayed wound healing is a Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) complication caused by hyperglycemia, systemic inflammation, and decreased blood microcirculation. Skeletal muscles are also affected by hyperglycemia, resulting in reduced blood flow and glucose uptake. Low Magnitude High Frequency Vibration (LMHFV) has been proven to be beneficial to muscle contractility and blood microcirculation. We hypothesized that LMHFV could accelerate the wound healing of n5-streptozotocin (n5-STZ)-induced DM rats by enhancing muscle activity and blood microcirculation. This study investigated the effects of LMHFV in an open foot wound created on the footpad of n5-STZ-induced DM rats (DM_V), compared with no-treatment DM (DM), non-DM vibration (Ctrl_V) and non-DM control rats (Ctrl) on Days 1, 4, 8 and 13. Results showed that the foot wounds of DM_V and Ctrl_V rats were significantly reduced in size compared to DM and Ctrl rats, respectively, at Day 13. The blood glucose level of DM_V rats was significantly reduced, while the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression and blood microcirculation of DM_V rats were significantly enhanced in comparison to those of DM rats. In conclusion, LMHFV can accelerate the foot wound healing process of n5-STZ rats.

  19. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Tajes, Juan Fernandez; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stančáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D; Hattersley, Andrew T; Bowden, Donald W; Collins, Francis S; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C; Spector, Timothy D; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L; Wilson, James G; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M; Meigs, James B; Cox, Nancy J; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P; Mohlke, Karen L; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C; Scott, Laura J; Morris, Andrew P; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of heritability. To test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole genome sequencing in 2,657 Europeans with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in a total of 12,940 subjects from five ancestral groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support a major role for lower-frequency variants in predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:27398621

  20. Green tea and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Im, Sung-Soon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    Green tea and coffee consumption have been widely popular worldwide. These beverages contain caffeine to activate the central nervous system by adenosine receptor blockade, and due to the caffeine, addiction or tolerance may occur. In addition to this caffeine effect, green tea and coffee consumption have always been at the center of discussions about human health, disease, and longevity. In particular, green tea catechins are involved in many biological activities such as antioxidation and modulation of various cellular lipid and proteins. Thus, they are beneficial against degenerative diseases, including obesity, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and various inflammatory diseases. Some reports also suggest that daily consumption of tea catechins may help in controlling type 2 diabetes. However, other studies have reported that chronic consumption of green tea may result in hepatic failure, neuronal damage, and exacerbation of diabetes, suggesting that interindividual variations in the green tea effect are large. This review will focus on the effect of green tea catechins extracted from the Camellia sinensis plant on type 2 diabetes and obesity, and the possible mechanistic explanation for the experimental results mainly from our laboratory. It is hoped that green tea can be consumed in a suitable manner as a supplement to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  1. Green tea and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyung Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Green tea and coffee consumption have been widely popular worldwide. These beverages contain caffeine to activate the central nervous system by adenosine receptor blockade, and due to the caffeine, addiction or tolerance may occur. In addition to this caffeine effect, green tea and coffee consumption have always been at the center of discussions about human health, disease, and longevity. In particular, green tea catechins are involved in many biological activities such as antioxidation and modulation of various cellular lipid and proteins. Thus, they are beneficial against degenerative diseases, including obesity, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and various inflammatory diseases. Some reports also suggest that daily consumption of tea catechins may help in controlling type 2 diabetes. However, other studies have reported that chronic consumption of green tea may result in hepatic failure, neuronal damage, and exacerbation of diabetes, suggesting that interindividual variations in the green tea effect are large. This review will focus on the effect of green tea catechins extracted from the Camellia sinensis plant on type 2 diabetes and obesity, and the possible mechanistic explanation for the experimental results mainly from our laboratory. It is hoped that green tea can be consumed in a suitable manner as a supplement to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  2. [Diabetes self-management and its association with diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Yang, Xiu-fen; Deng, Yu; Gu, Hong; Ren, Xue-tao; Xu, Jun; Ma, Kai; Liu, Ning-pu

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the association of diabetic self-management with the risk of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cross-sectional study. Recruited patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Desheng community of urban Beijing between November 2009 and May 2011. All patients were surveyed using a standardized questionnaire and underwent detailed ophthalmic examination. Patients were classified into DR group or diabetic without retinopathy (DWR) group according to the grading of fundus color photographs using the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) standard grading protocol. In the DR group, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was further defined. The overall levels of diabetes self-management in the study population were assessed and compared for the differences between DR and DWR, PDR and NPDR groups. One thousand one hundred patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited. The prevalence of DR was 32.1% (353/1100) in the study population. Sixty-three percent (652/1035) of patients had glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level less than 7.0%. The majority of patients (85.4%, 916/1072) conducted a diet control, 77.3% (827/1070) exercised, 56.0% (609/1088) monitored blood glucose regularly, 56.8% (416/733) detected HbA1c more than once every six months, 71.7% (762/1062) had ophthalmologic examination after the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, and 47.9% (525/1097) had mydriatic check-up. Increased risk of DR was associated with longer duration of diabetes (more than 10 years) (OR = 3.90, 95% CI:2.97-5.51, P obedience to diet control (OR = 1.72, 95% CI:1.22-2.43, P obedience to diet control and less exercise, which suggest that lower level of diabetic self-management increased the risk of DR.

  3. Camp for Youth With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan-Bohm, Kelly; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; DeSalvo, Daniel; Gunn, Sheila; Hilliard, Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Camps for youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have grown in size and scope since they first emerged in the 1920s. Anecdotal evidence suggests that attending camp with other youth with T1D is beneficial, largely attributed to sharing fun, active experiences and removing the isolation of living with diabetes. However, few studies have evaluated the psychosocial and medical impacts of T1D camp attendance during and after camp sessions. In addition, T1D camps have been a setting for numerous studies on a variety of T1D-related research questions not related to camp itself, such as testing novel diabetes management technologies in an active, non-laboratory setting. This paper reviews the evidence of psychosocial and medical outcomes associated with T1D camp attendance across the globe, provides an overview of other research conducted at camp, and offers recommendations for future research conducted at T1D camp.

  4. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandi Catherine Muze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country′s population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the years to 10% in 2012-13. The program has been able to reduce the proportion of patients with HbA1c values of 11-14%; from 71.9% in 2008 to 49.8% in 2012-13. The challenges, which CDiC faces are misdiagnosis, low public awareness, and stigma especially in the reproductive age/adolescent groups.

  5. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in known diabetic patients attending the diabetes outpatient department ... regular medication, diet and exercise to avoid development and progress of DR. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus ... Type II Diabetes Mellitus (DM II) is a chronic progressive condition which is ...

  6. [Pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillausseau, P-J; Laloi-Michelin, M

    2003-11-01

    "Common" type 2 diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disease. Hyperglycemia is related to a decrease in glucose peripheral uptake, and to an increase in hepatic glucose production, due to reduced insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. Multiple insulin secretory defects are present, including loss of basal pulsatility, lack of early phase of insulin secretion after intravenous glucose administration, decreased basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations, excess in prohormone secretion, and progressive decrease in insulin secretory capacity with time. These genetically determined abnormalities appear early in the course of the disease. Insulin resistance affects muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. For the same plasma insulin levels, peripheral glucose uptake and hepatic glucose production suppressibility are lower in diabetic patients than in controls. It results from aging of the population and from "western" lifestyle, with progressive increase in mean body weight, due to excess in energy intake, decreased energy expenses and low physical activity level. The role of beta-cell dysfunction, as well as the interplay between insulin secretory defect and insulin resistance are now better understood. In subjects with normal beta-cell function, increase in insulin needs secondary to insulin resistance is compensated by an increase in insulin secretion adjusted to maintain plasma glucose levels to normal. In subjects genetically predisposed to type 2 diabetes, failure of beta-cell to compensate for increased needs is responsible for a progressive elevation in plasma glucose levels, then for overt type 2 diabetes. This adaptative phenomenon is called beta-cell compensation of insulin resistance. The lack of compensation is responsible for type 2 diabetes. When permanent hyperglycemia is present, progressive insulin secretory failure with time ensues, due to glucotoxicity and to lipotoxicity. Simple changes in lifestyle, such regular moderate physical activity

  7. Cytokine ratios in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath; Muddapur, M V; Kulkarni, Raghavendra D

    Chronic periodontitis may influence systemic cytokines in type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine ratios in type 2 diabetes with, and without chronic periodontitis. Gingival status, periodontal, glycemic parameters and serum cytokines were evaluated in participants grouped as healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 diabetes with, and without chronic periodontitis. Cytokine ratios showed significant differences in type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, were highest in participants having both type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, with a statistically significant cut-off point and area under curve by receiver operating characteristic. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased caspase-3 immunoreactivity of erythrocytes in STZ diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fırat, Uğur; Kaya, Savaş; Cim, Abdullah; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin; Gökalp, Osman; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Tamer, Mehmet Numan

    2012-01-01

    Eryptosis is a term to define apoptosis of erythrocytes. Oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, both of which exist in the diabetic intravascular environment, can trigger eryptosis of erythrocytes. In this experimental study, it is presented that the majority of erythrocytes shows caspase-3 immunoreactivity in streptozocin- (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Besides that, caspase-3 positive erythrocytes are aggregated and attached to vascular endothelium. In conclusion, these results may start a debate that eryptosis could have a role in the diabetic complications.

  9. Diabetes mellitus-associated periodontitis: differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspriello, S D; Zizzi, A; Tirabassi, G; Buldreghini, E; Biscotti, T; Faloia, E; Stramazzotti, D; Boscaro, M; Piemontese, M

    2011-04-01

    Although many studies have appeared about diabetes mellitus-associated periodontitis, few have compared periodontitis inflammatory markers between type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and information regarding this issue is scarce and contradictory. We evaluated the levels of plasma C-reactive protein and of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in gingival crevicular fluid in two groups of subjects affected by T1DM and T2DM, in order to identify possible differences between the two classes in the inflammatory mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated periodontitis. Plasma C-reactive protein and gingival crevicular fluid IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured in periodontitis patients affected by type 1 (P-T1DM, n = 24) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (P-T2DM, n = 24). Gingival crevicular fluid levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in P-T1DM subjects were significantly higher than in P-T2DM subjects. In P-T1DM subjects, we found significant negative correlations between the duration of diabetes mellitus and IL-1β and between the duration of diabetes mellitus and TNF-α. This study shows that IL-1β and TNF-α levels in periodontitis patients with T1DM are affected by the duration of diabetes mellitus. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Familial Clustering of Type 2 Diabetes among Omanis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Al-Sinani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods: A random cohort of 1182 Omani individuals visiting the Family Medicine Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, Muscat, Oman, for regular medical checkup, aged ≥40 years, were sampled. Patients were categorized into three groups: (1 individuals who claim not to have diabetes and had no family history of diabetes; (2 individuals who claim not to have diabetes but had family history of diabetes; (3 individuals with diabetes. Only 16% of these Omani individuals had no diabetes and no family history of diabetes. Another separate random cohort of 234 Omani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, from the Diabetes Clinic at SQUH, were interviewed and questioned about their family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Ninety five percent of the patients had a family history of diabetes. Eighty percent had first degree relatives with diabetes and 46% had second degree relatives with diabetes. At least one parent with diabetes was reported among 55% of these diabetics, while maternal diabetes (55% was found to be higher than paternal diabetes (47%. However, only 15% had both parents with diabetes. Furthermore, almost half of the 234 diabetics were having at least one of the following relatives with diabetes: brother, sister, aunt or an uncle. Conclusion: The findings of this study confirm familial aggregation of diabetes among the Omani population. Compared to other populations, familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Omanis is relatively very high, and is perhaps due to the very high degree of consanguinity among Omanis. Since almost everyone seems to have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, the dramatic lifestyle changes over the past 25 years, could tip the population into an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Modulation of Diabetes and Dyslipidemia in Diabetic Insulin-Resistant Rats by Mangiferin: Role of Adiponectin and TNF-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMIRA SALEH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangiferin, present in Mangifera indica bark, was reported to produce hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activity in an animal model of genetic type 2 diabetes and in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Its effect on diabetic insulin-resistant animals has not been investigated. The current work aimed to explore the effect of mangiferin on diabetic insulin-resistant rat model. Diabetes was induced by high-fat/high fructose diet for eight weeks followed by a subdiabetogenic dose of streptozotocin (HFD-Fr-STZ. Rats were treated with mangiferin (20 mg/kg i.p. for 28 days starting one week after STZ and its effects were compared to the standard insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone. HFD-Fr-STZ, induced obesity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance accompanied by depletion in liver glycogen and dyslipidemia. Moreover, there was an elevation in serum TNF-α and a reduction in adiponectin. Mangiferin ameliorated the consequences of HFD-Fr-STZ and its actions were comparable to the effects of the standard insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone. The results obtained in this study provide evidence that mangiferin is a possible beneficial natural compound for type 2 diabetes and metabolic disorders associated with the metabolic syndrome. This effect is mediated through improving insulin sensitivity, modulating lipid profile and reverting adipokine levels to normal.

  12. Suicidal ideation reported by adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes : Results from Diabetes MILES-Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handley, T.E.; Ventura, A.D.; Browne, J.L.; Rich, J.; Attia, J.R.; Pouwer, F.; Speight, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To examine the prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation (SI) in a community-based sample of adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Methods Participants were 3338 adults aged 18–70 years with Type 1 diabetes (n = 1376) or Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin: n = 1238; insulin: n = 724) from a

  13. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents For ... million Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes." "Fifty four million Americans are at risk for ...

  14. Pregnancy outcome in type 1 diabetic women with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekbom, P; Damm, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    2001-01-01

    To determine the influence of microalbuminuria on pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 diabetes.......To determine the influence of microalbuminuria on pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 diabetes....

  15. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  16. The MODY Type of Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carolina Soares Viana de [UNIFESP; Furuzawa, Gilberto K. [UNIFESP; Reis, André Fernandes [UNIFESP

    2002-01-01

    It is estimated that close to 5% of the individuals classified as having type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and about 10% of those considered type 1 DM (previously categorized as juvenile type) are actual carriers of a MODY mutation. In this form of DM, there is evident co-segregation of some mutations and the advent of hyperglycemia, this fact having been reproduced by the study of several families of different populations. Its main characteristic is being one of the few causes of DM in which the...

  17. Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Prevented With Early Pharmacological Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    In the U.S., ?21 ? 106 individuals have type 2 diabetes, and twice as many have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Approximately 40?50% of individuals with IGT will progress to type 2 diabetes over their lifetime. Therefore, treatment of high-risk individuals with IGT to prevent type 2 diabetes has important medical, economic, social, and human implications. Weight loss, although effective in reducing the conversion of IGT to type 2 diabetes, is difficult to achieve and maintain. Moreover, 40?...

  18. Carbon monoxide and biliverdin prevent endothelial cell sloughing in rats with type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodella, Luigi; Lamon, Brian D; Rezzani, Rita; Sangras, Bhavani; Goodman, Alvin I; Falck, John R; Abraham, Nader G

    2006-06-15

    Hyperglycemia has been linked to increased oxidative stress, a resultant endothelial cell dysfunction, and, ultimately, apoptosis. Heme oxygenases (HO-1/HO-2) and the products of their activity, biliverdin/bilirubin and carbon monoxide (CO), play a physiological role in the vascular system. The effects of heme-mediated HO-1 induction, CO, and biliverdin on urinary 8-epi-isoprostane PGF(2alpha) and endothelial cell sloughing were examined in an animal model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Hyperglycemia itself did not affect HO-1 and HO-2 protein levels, but caused a net decrease in HO activity. Weekly heme administration induced HO-1 protein, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Administration of biliverdin or the CO donor, CORM-3, decreased urinary 8-epi-isoprostane PGF(2alpha), P biliverdin modestly decreased endothelial cell sloughing (26 +/- 3.5 cells/ml blood, P < 0.003). Administration of CORM-3 to diabetic rats resulted in a significant decrease in endothelial cell sloughing to 21.3 +/- 2.3 (P < 0.001). Administration of SnMP to CORM-3 diabetic rats only partially reversed the protective effects of CORM-3 on endothelial cell sloughing from 21.3 +/- 2.3 to 29 +/- 2.1 cells/ml, thus confirming a direct protective of CO, in addition to the ability of CORM-3 to induce HO-1 protein. These results demonstrate that exogenously administered CO or bilirubin can prevent endothelial cell sloughing in diabetic rats, likely via a decrease in oxidative stress, and thus represents a novel approach to prophylactic vascular protection in diabetes.

  19. Stigma Perceived and Experienced by Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Møller; Willaing, Ingrid; Ventura, Adriana D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to (a) culturally and linguistically adapt the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale (DSAS-1) from English (for Australia) into Danish and (b) examine psychometric properties of the measure among Danish adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We performed a forward......-backward translation, face validity interviews with experts and cognitive debriefing of the Danish version (DSAS-1 DK) with ten adults from the target group. The DSAS-1 DK was then completed by 1594 adults with type 1 diabetes. Electronic clinical records provided age, diabetes duration, diabetes-related complications...... to advance research into the stigma perceived and experienced by adults with type 1 diabetes in a Danish context....

  20. Increased cancer mortality in type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubink-Veltmaat, L. J.; Kleefstra, N.; Kollen, B. J.; Bilo, H. J. G.; Landman, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether there is a relationship between type two diabetes and cancer mortality. It also is unclear whether obesity and body mass index (BMI) are associated with cancer in type 2 diabetes patients. Patients and Methods: In 1998, 1,145 patients with type two diabetes mellitus

  1. Illness representations of type 2 diabetes patients are associated with perceptions of diabetes threat in relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, S.C.M.; Nijkamp, M.D.; Cornel, M.C.; Snoek, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the fight against the type 2 diabetes epidemic, patients might be asked to discuss familial susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in their family. Illness representations of patients (N = 546) were assessed to explore their impact on perceived type 2 diabetes threat in relatives. Reporting high type

  2. Metformin in adults with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrie, John R; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ford, Ian

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a major cause of reduced life expectancy in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Intensive insulin therapy prevents CV complications but is constrained by hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Adjunct metformin reduces insulin dose requirement and stabilizes weight...... but there are no data on its cardiovascular effects. We have therefore initiated an international double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (REMOVAL: REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions in type 1 diabetes) to examine whether metformin reduces progression of atherosclerosis in adults with T1D....... Individuals ≥40 years of age with T1D for ≥5 years are eligible if they have ≥3 of 10 specified CV risk factors. The enrolment target is 500 participants in 17 international centres. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After 12 weeks of single-blind placebo-controlled run-in, participants with ≥ 70% adherence...

  3. Reporting Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe potential factors influencing reporting of severe hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 1 diabetes and to analyze their effect on reported rates of severe hypoglycemia. RECENT FINDINGS: Reported rates of severe hypoglycemia defined as need for third party...... by partners report higher rates of severe hypoglycemia. There is a large variation between studies reporting incidence and prevalence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes, mainly explained by definition of severity, methods of reporting, and patient selection. These findings call...... hypoglycemia are 0.02-0.5 events per patient-year and 1-29%, respectively. When subjects with recurrent severe hypoglycemia in the past or suffering from impaired hypoglycemia awareness are excluded from participation in studies, lower rates are reported. Studies applying anonymous reporting or reporting...

  4. [Dietary advice in type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigalleau, Vincent; Gonzalez, Concepcion; Raffaitin, Christelle; Gin, Henri

    2010-04-20

    The dietary advice is a part of the global care for type 2 diabetes. First, overweight implies a caloric restriction. When poor glucose control is associated with weight gain, important errors are obvious (excess fat and sugar), providing more pills or insulin without correcting them is poorly effective, but promotes further weight gain. Normal body weight, or poor glucose control despite loss of weight, needs to reappraise the diagnosis: diabetes type, intercurrent disease. The cofactors of the "metabolic syndrom" are usually present, so saturated fat has to be reduced, while maintaining fish, fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Blood pressure and dyslipidemia may need further counselling about dietary sodium, carbohydrates, cholesterol. When insulin, sulfonylurea or glinids are indicated, the dietary intake of carbohydrates has to be regular to avoid hypoglycemia.

  5. Date Fruit Extract Is a Neuroprotective Agent in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: A Multimodal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangiabadi, Nasser; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Sheibani, Vahid; Jafari, Mandana; Shabani, Mohammad; Asadi, Ali Reza; Tajadini, Hale; Jarahi, Morteza

    2011-01-01

    Background. To study the effects of an aqueous extract of date fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae) diet on diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. Methods. The effects of a date fruit extract (DFE) diet on diabetic neuropathy in STZ-induced diabetic rats were evaluated and compared with a nondiabetic control group, diabetic control group (sham), and vehicle group with respect to the following parameters: open field behavioral test, motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), and morphological observations. Results. In the model of STZ-induced of diabetic neuropathy, chronic treatment for 6 weeks with DFE counteracted the impairment of the explorative activity of the rats in an open field behavioral test and of the conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve (MNCV). In addition, pretreatment with DFE significantly reversed each nerve diameter reduction in diabetic rats. Conclusion. DFE treatment shows efficacy for preventing diabetic deterioration and for improving pathological parameters of diabetic neuropathy in rats, as compared with control groups. PMID:22191015

  6. [Pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneto, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    The development of type 2 diabetes is usually associated with a combination of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance in various insulin target tissues such as the liver, muscle and adipocytes. Normal β-cells can compensate for insulin resistance by increasing insulin secretion or β-cell mass, but insufficient compensation leads to the onset of glucose intolerance. Once hyperglycemia becomes apparent, β-cell function gradually deteriorates and insulin resistance aggravates. This process is called "glucose toxicity".

  7. Prevalence of lean type 2 diabetes mellitus in recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Chaudhary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity has always been thought to be a risk factor for diabetes; however, some studies in India have reported that even lean people are prone to diabetes. We conducted this study to see if this holds true for this part of the country. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of lean type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in recently diagnosed type 2 DM in Manipur. Materials and Methods: All recently diagnosed type 2 DM patients, within a period of 24 weeks, who attended the endocrine clinic of RIMS from Jan to Dec 2012 are included in the study. Exclusion criteria are patients with chronic diseases. Results: Out of the 181 recently diagnosed diabetics 3.9% had a BMI of <19 kg/m 2 of which five are females (5.4% of female patients and two are males (2.2% of male patients. Mean age of Lean diabetics is 54.86 ± 15.32, mean fasting glucose is 212 ± 105.5 mg% and mean postprandial glucose is 351.57 ± 167.79 mg%. DM complications were observed in 28.6% of the Lean diabetics. Conclusion: Our study shows a low prevalence rate of Lean DM in recently diagnosed type 2 DM.

  8. [Type 2 diabetes: what therapeutic strategy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, A; Hartemann-Heurtier, A

    2001-02-17

    GOAL OF TREATMENT: Prevention of diabetic micro and macroangiopathy is the goal of treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus. A well-controlled glucose level is the key to prevention of microangiopathy; there is no threshold level. Antihypertensive treatment, with the goal of blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg is also beneficial in preventing aggravation of microangiopathy. For macroangiopathy, prevention is based in priority on treatment of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease; the threshold level for drug treatment and the therapeutic objective are those defined for secondary prevention in non-diabetic patients, i.e. blood pressure below 140/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol under 1.30 g/l. The beneficial effect of lower glucose levels on preventing macrovascular risk was not formally demonstrated by the UKPDS, probably because the difference between the control and the treatment group HbA1c levels was minimal, 0.9 points. REVISITING STRATEGY: It is thus time to revisit the preventive strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus, i.e. step-by-step increments, as currently proposed for worsening glucose levels. Metformine should be prescribed if the HbA1c is above normal in order to achieve the demonstrated benefit in prevention of microangiopathy and in the hope, motivated by pathophysiology data, of preventing insulin failure. Slow-release insulin at bedtime should be added to the oral hypoglycemiants if fasting glucose exceeds 1.60 or 1.80 g/l, even if the HbA1c remains below 8%. NEW HYPOGLYCEMIANTS: The role of these new agents in this more "aggressive" strategy remains to be defined. Glinides will have to demonstrate their superiority over sulfamides (fewer episodes of hypoglycemia with comparable efficacy) to justify their high cost. Glitazones will have to demonstrate a beneficial effect in second intention combination with metformine on cardiovascular morbidity mortality in type 2 diabetes patients with a metabolic insulin-resistance syndrome and visceral obesity

  9. Arrhythmias in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycaemia of Type 2 diabetes mellitus causes long term damage to heart resulting in coronary artery disease (CAD, myocardial infarction (MI, congestive heart failure (CHF, and sudden death from arrhythmias. AIMS: To study the prevalence of different types of arrhythmias in T2DM, particularly in association with Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN. METHODS: A cross-sectional study including 100 patients of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM presenting with cardiac arrhythmias, was done at our hospital over 2 years. Detailed history along with physical examination and tests for CAN were done. Routine investigations along with echocardiography, stress test, Holter monitoring were done. RESULTS: Sinus Tachycardia (ST was the commonest arrhythmia, found in 32% of patients. 20% had Complete Heart Block (CHB, 15% had Sinus Bradycardia (SB, and 15% had Atrial Fibrillation (AF. Ventricular Premature Complex (VPC was found in 10% and 3% had Atrial Premature Complex (APC. 3% had first degree AV block, whereas 1% had Paroxysmal Supra Ventricular Tachycardia (PSVT, and another 1% had Ventricular Tachycardia (VT. Poorly controlled diabetes and co-morbidities was associated with higher incidence of arrhythmias. 62% of patients had prolonged QTc, majority of which had CAN. Most of the patients responded to standard therapy.

  10. Proteasome Activators, PA28α and PA28β, Govern Development of Microvascular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy and Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Yadranji Aghdam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN and diabetic retinopathy (DR are major complications of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. DN and DR are mainly caused by injury to the perivascular supporting cells, the mesangial cells within the glomerulus, and the pericytes in the retina. The genes and molecular mechanisms predisposing retinal and glomerular pericytes to diabetic injury are poorly characterized. In this study, the genetic deletion of proteasome activator genes, PA28α and PA28β genes, protected the diabetic mice in the experimental STZ-induced diabetes model against renal injury and retinal microvascular injury and prolonged their survival compared with wild type STZ diabetic mice. The improved wellbeing and reduced renal damage was associated with diminished expression of Osteopontin (OPN and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1 in the glomeruli of STZ-injected PA28α/PA28β double knockout (Pa28αβDKO mice and also in cultured mesangial cells and retinal pericytes isolated from Pa28αβDKO mice that were grown in high glucose. The mesangial PA28-mediated expression of OPN under high glucose conditions was suppressed by peptides capable of inhibiting the binding of PA28 to the 20S proteasome. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that diabetic hyperglycemia promotes PA28-mediated alteration of proteasome activity in vulnerable perivascular cells resulting in microvascular injury and development of DN and DR.

  11. Mortality in people with type 2 diabetes in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulnier, H.E.; Seaman, H.E.; Raleigh, V.S.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Colhoun, H.M.; Lawrenson, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aims Under-reporting of diabetes on death certificates contributes to the unreliable estimates of mortality as a result of diabetes. The influence of obesity on mortality in Type 2 diabetes is not well documented. We aimed to study mortality from diabetes and the influence of obesity on mortality in

  12. Improving School Experiences for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Saori S.; Hopkins, Amanda; Burke, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is one of the most common metabolic diseases in children worldwide and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is growing. T1D is complicated to manage and adolescents with diabetes face unique, age-specific challenges. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which schools can create a positive…

  13. The differential impact of diabetes type on female sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner-Engel, P; Schiavi, R C; Vietorisz, D; Smith, H

    1987-01-01

    Although diabetes is associated with a high prevalence of erectile impairment in men, its effect on the sexuality of women remains unclear. Since diabetes consists of different disorders, diabetes type may have confounded previous studies by differentially impacting on sexual functioning and marital satisfaction. To evaluate this possibility, 35 Type I diabetic married women were compared with 42 healthy married controls and 23 Type II diabetic women with 23 controls. Assessments were made on all aspects of sexual response, activity, dysfunction and satisfaction; on cognitive and psychological dimensions of sexuality; and on marital adjustment. Results indicated that diabetes type is highly associated with sexual responsiveness and marital satisfaction. Type I diabetes was found to have little or no effect on women, while Type II diabetes had a pervasively negative impact on sexual desire, orgasmic capacity, lubrication, sexual satisfaction, sexual activity, and on the relationship with the sexual partner.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea and diabetic neuropathy: a novel association in patients with type 2 diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tahrani, Abd A; Ali, Asad; Raymond, Neil T; Begum, Safia; Dubb, Kiran; Mughal, Shanaz; Jose, Biju; Piya, Milan K; Barnett, Anthony H; Stevens, Martin J

    2012-01-01

    ...) is also common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Because OSA is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that OSA is associated with peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes...

  15. Insulinbehandling af voksne med type 1-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2015-01-01

    treatment can be delivered with insulin pumps. Adjustments of insulin dosing can be rationally based on dosing algorithms. This requires frequent glucose measurements and knowledge about dietary carbohydrate content. Today, the treatment and its complexity are individualized according to needs and wishes......Whereas insulin treatment of type 1 diabetes formerly was limited by the availability of one or a few types of insulin with suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties, insulin analogues with more fitting physiological action profiles have now been developed and ultimately near-physiological insulin...

  16. Insulinbehandling af voksne med type 1-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2015-01-01

    Whereas insulin treatment of type 1 diabetes formerly was limited by the availability of one or a few types of insulin with suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties, insulin analogues with more fitting physiological action profiles have now been developed and ultimately near-physiological insulin...... treatment can be delivered with insulin pumps. Adjustments of insulin dosing can be rationally based on dosing algorithms. This requires frequent glucose measurements and knowledge about dietary carbohydrate content. Today, the treatment and its complexity are individualized according to needs and wishes...

  17. Incretin-based therapy and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristine J; Knop, Filip Krag

    2010-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and their therapeutic potential in treating patients with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glucose-induced insulin...... secretion, and inappropriately regulated glucagon secretion which in combination eventually result in hyperglycemia and in the longer term microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications. Traditional treatment modalities--even multidrug approaches--for type 2 diabetes are often unsatisfactory...

  18. Naringin prevents bone loss in a rat model of type 1 Diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoira, M; Rodríguez, V; Picotto, G; Battaglino, R; Tolosa de Talamoni, N

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to know whether naringin (NA) could prevent the bone complications in a model of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes. Rats were divided in: 1) controls, 2) STZ-rats, 3) STZ-rats treated with 40 mg NA/kg, and 4) STZ-rats treated with 80 mg NA/kg. BMD and BMC were performed by DEXA. Bone histomorphometry and histology as well as TRAP staining were done in tibia. Osteocalcin (OCN) was determined in bone and serum. Glutathione content and SOD and catalase activities were assayed in bone marrow from femur. The data showed that NA80 increased the BMD and BMC from the long bones of STZ-rats. Both NA40 and NA80 normalized the trabecular number and the trabecular separations. An increase in the number of adipocytes and TRAP(+) cells in tibia from STZ-rats was blocked by NA. NA40 treatment increased the number of OCN(+) cells, but only the NA80 treatment allowed to reach the control values. NA normalized the SOD and catalase activities in bone marrow of femur from STZ-rats. In conclusion, NA avoids alterations in the physical properties and microstructure of bone from STZ-rats probably by stimulation of osteoblastogenesis, inhibition of the osteoclastogenesis and adipogenesis via blocking the oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diabetic autoimmune markers in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathout, E H; Thomas, W; El-Shahawy, M; Nahab, F; Mace, J W

    2001-06-01

    There is an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents. Absence of known diabetes autoimmune markers is sometimes required to confirm the diagnosis. To identify clinical and autoimmune characteristics of type 2 diabetes in a pediatric population. We report an analysis of 48 children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes, compared with 39 randomly selected children with type 1 diabetes, diagnosed and followed at the Loma Linda University Pediatric Diabetes Center. Ethnic, familial, seasonal, and autoimmune marker characteristics are outlined. To determine the reliability of antibody testing in confirming the type of diabetes at diagnosis, we studied the incidence of positive islet cell antibodies (ICAs), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADs), and insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) at diagnosis in both groups. ICA512, GADs, and IAAs were measured by radioimmunoassay. The cohort with type 2 diabetes had a similar gender distribution as the group with type 1 diabetes but a significantly higher age at diagnosis. Ethnic background was significantly different between the 2 groups, predominantly Hispanic in type 2 and white in type 1. Body mass index was significantly higher in type 2 diabetes (mean = 31.24 kg/m(2)). Among the patients with type 2 diabetes, 33% presented in diabetic ketoacidosis, random blood glucose at diagnosis ranged from 11.4 to 22.25 mmol/L (228-445 mg/dL), fasting C-peptide levels ranged from 0.89 to 2.7 nmol/L (2.7-8.2 ng/mL; normal: <1.36 nmol/L), and hemoglobin A(1C) was 10.8 +/- 3.5% (normal: <6.6%). None of these parameters was significantly different from the type 1 diabetes group. Although the incidence of diabetes antibody markers was significantly lower in type 2 versus type 1 diabetes, 8.1% of patients with type 2 diabetes had positive ICAs, 30.3% had positive GADs, and 34.8% had positive IAAs without ever being treated with insulin. In the type 2 diabetes group, none of the Hispanic patients had ICAs

  20. Preventive pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Choudhary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades certain demographic changes have been observed worldwide, which have led to an increase in the prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated cardiovascular disease are major contributors to this disease burden leading to rising morbidity and mortality. It is worrisome to see that type 2 diabetes with its micro- and macrovascular complications is occurring in younger populations where it was hitherto unseen. Prevention appears to be an important strategy to reduce the burden of disease. Along with inculcating healthy lifestyle habits across populations, it may be suitable to use preventive pharmacotherapy in those with pre-diabetes and / or other risk factors like obesity, hypertension, and on the like. Metformin, alpha glucosidase inhibitors like acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose, and pioglitazone have all been used with success. The issues of compliance and adverse effects during long-term use have tempered the use of these drugs. The best approach would be to motivate the patient for effective lifestyle changes, and pharmacological management if the lifestyle changes are not successful in achieving their goals.

  1. Pharmacotherapy of 'treatment resistant' type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2017-04-01

    Despite type 2 diabetes (T2D) management offers a variety of pharmacological interventions targeting different defects, numerous patients remain with persistent hyperglycaemia responsible for severe complications. Unlike resistant hypertension, treatment resistant T2D is not a classical concept although it is a rather common observation in clinical practice. Areas covered: This article proposes a definition for 'treatment resistant diabetes', analyses the causes of poor glucose control despite standard therapy, briefly considers the alternative approaches to glucose-lowering pharmacotherapy and finally describes how to overcome poor glycaemic control, using innovative oral or injectable combination therapies. Expert opinion: Before considering intensifying the pharmacotherapy of a patient with poorly controlled T2D, it is important to verify treatment adherence, target obesity and consider various non pharmacological improvement quality interventions. If treatment resistant diabetes is defined as not achieving glycated haemoglobin target despite oral triple therapy with a third glucose-lowering agent added to metformin-sulfonylurea dual treatment, the combination of a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor and a sodium glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor may offer new opportunities before considering injectable therapies. Insulin basal therapy (± metformin) may be optimized by the addition of a SGLT2 inhibitor or a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist.

  2. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus: new treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaso, Juan F

    2014-08-04

    The benefits and problems associated with traditional hypoglycemic drugs, such as failure of beta cells, hypoglycemia and weight gain, that lead to a worsening of diabetes, are reviewed. New hypoglycemic drugs with incretin effect (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors), achieve, in a glucose dependent manner, an glycosylated hemoglobin reduction without hypoglycemia or increase in body weight. Recently, another group of oral hypoglycemic drugs, sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy in diabetes control by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. However, long-term effects and cardiovascular prevention remain to be demonstrated. We have more and better drugs nowadays. Hypoglycemic treatment should be customized (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, risk-benefit, risk of hypoglycemia, weight changes, cardiovascular risk), with a combination of drugs being necessary in most cases. However, we do not have yet an ideal hypoglycemic drug. Moreover we must remember that an early and intensive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with early pharmacological intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    In the U.S., ∼ 21 × 10(6) individuals have type 2 diabetes, and twice as many have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Approximately 40-50% of individuals with IGT will progress to type 2 diabetes over their lifetime. Therefore, treatment of high-risk individuals with IGT to prevent type 2 diabetes has important medical, economic, social, and human implications. Weight loss, although effective in reducing the conversion of IGT to type 2 diabetes, is difficult to achieve and maintain. Moreover, 40-50% of IGT subjects progress to type 2 diabetes despite successful weight reduction. In contrast, pharmacological treatment of IGT with oral antidiabetic agents that improve insulin sensitivity and preserve β-cell function--the characteristic pathophysiological abnormalities present in IGT and type 2 diabetes--uniformly have been shown to prevent progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. The most consistent results have been observed with the thiazolidinediones (Troglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [TRIPOD], Pioglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [PIPOD], Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication [DREAM], and Actos Now for the Prevention of Diabetes [ACT NOW]), with a 50-70% reduction in IGT conversion to diabetes. Metformin in the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by 31% and has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for treating high-risk individuals with IGT. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, which augment insulin secretion, preserve β-cell function, and promote weight loss, also would be expected to be efficacious in preventing the progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. Because individuals in the upper tertile of IGT are maximally/near-maximally insulin resistant, have lost 70-80% of their β-cell function, and have an ∼ 10% incidence of diabetic retinopathy, pharmacological intervention, in combination with diet plus exercise, should be instituted.

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus with its high morbidity and mortality becomes an important health problem. The multifactorial etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus is relative to many gene and molecule alterations, and increased insulin resistance. Besides these, however, there are still other predisposing and risk factors accounting for type 2 diabetes mellitus not to be identified and recognized. Emerging evidence indicated that defects in galanin function played a crucial role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Galanin homeostasis is tightly relative to insulin resistance and is regulated by blood glucose. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinism, enhanced plasma galanin levels and decreased galanin receptor activities are some of the characters of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The discrepancy between high insulin level and low glucose handling is named as insulin resistance. Similarly, the discrepancy between high galanin level and low glucose handling may be denominated as galanin resistance too. In this review, the characteristic milestones of type 2 diabetes mellitus were condensed as two analogical conceptual models, obesity-hyper-insulin-insulin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity-hyper-galanin-galanin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both galanin resistance and insulin resistance are correlative with each other. Conceptualizing the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance may inspire a new concept to deepen our knowledge about pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, eventually leading to novel preventive and therapeutic interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cheow Peng; Loke, Seng Cheong

    2013-09-03

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is among the most nutritious subtropical and tropical vegetables. It is also used in traditional medicine practices for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research in animal and human models suggests a possible role of sweet potato in glycaemic control. To assess the effects of sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We searched several electronic databases, including The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SIGLE and LILACS (all up to February 2013), combined with handsearches. No language restrictions were used. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared sweet potato with a placebo or a comparator intervention, with or without pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. Two authors independently selected the trials and extracted the data. We evaluated risk of bias by assessing randomisation, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting and other potential sources of bias. Three RCTs met our inclusion criteria: these investigated a total of 140 participants and ranged from six weeks to five months in duration. All three studies were performed by the same trialist. Overall, the risk of bias of these trials was unclear or high. All RCTs compared the effect of sweet potato preparations with placebo on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. There was a statistically significant improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) at three to five months with 4 g/day sweet potato preparation compared to placebo (mean difference -0.3% (95% confidence interval -0.6 to -0.04); P = 0.02; 122 participants; 2 trials). No serious adverse effects were reported. Diabetic complications and morbidity, death from any cause, health-related quality of life, well-being, functional outcomes and costs were not investigated. There is insufficient evidence about the use of sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition to improvement in trial methodology

  6. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Functional Hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Atmaca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study aims to investigate the effect of blood sugar regulation and vitamin D levels on calcium metabolism and parathormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Material and Method: We included 132 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who presented to our outpatient clinic for regular check up between August 2013 and October 2013. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, albumin, creatinine, parathormone, 25-Hydroxy vitamin D [25(OHD], spot urinary calcium and creatinine levels were studied for each patient. Results: Vitamin D levels were below 30 ng/mL in 96.9% (n=128 and below 20 ng/mL in 78.7% (n=102 of the patients included in the study. Patients with impaired blood sugar regulation (HbA1c >10% had lower levels of PTH, albumin and 25(OHD levels and higher phosphorus levels compared to patients with HbA1c levels below 10% (p=0.018, p=0.043, p=0.002, p=0.01, respectively. The rates of functional hypoparathyroidism (parathormone <65 ng/mL in patients with vitamin D levels below 30 ng/mL and 20 ng/mL were 63.2% and 59.6%, respectively. Among the diabetic patients with vitamin D levels <30 ng/mL, magnesium levels were significantly lower in those with functional hypoparathyroidism (parathormone <65 ng/mL compared to those with secondary hyperparathyroidism (p=0.015. Comparative statistical analysis of patients with HbA1c levels above and below 10% demonstrated higher proportion of patients with functional hypoparathyroidism in the group with impaired blood sugar regulation (p=0.035 for patients with vitamin levels below 30 ng/mL, and p=0.031 for patients with vitamin levels below 20 ng/mL. Discussion: Impaired blood sugar regulation leads to functional hypoparathyroidism with secondary hypomagnesemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus, as was previously described for subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete M; Westergaard, Tine; Frisch, Morten

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil....... OBJECTIVE: To assess the co-occurrence of T1D and MS by estimating the risk for MS in patients with T1D and the risk for T1D in first-degree relatives of patients with MS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Two population-based disease registers, the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish...

  8. Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Diaz-Perdigones, Cristina; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, many studies have related gut microbiome to development of highly prevalent diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Obesity itself is associated to changes in the composition of gut microbiome, with a trend to an overgrowth of microorganisms more efficiently obtaining energy from diet. There are several mechanisms that relate microbiota to the onset of insulin resistance and diabetes, including changes in bowel permeability, endotoxemia, interaction with bile acids, changes in the proportion of brown adipose tissue, and effects associated to use of drugs like metformin. Currently, use of pro and prebiotics and other new techniques such as gut microbiota transplant, or even antibiotic therapy, has been postulated to be useful tools to modulate the development of obesity and insulin resistance through the diet. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carmody, David

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1\\/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Varenicline may trigger severe hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P.L.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.; Thorsteinsson, B.

    2008-01-01

    is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity, especially in diabetes, use of effective drugs indicated for smoking cessation is rational. Case report We report multiple episodes of severe hypoglycaemia after starting varenicline in a 53-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes. Since onset of diabetes......, intensified blood glucose monitoring and careful education of patients with diabetes treated with varenicline. Further investigation of the use of varenicline in patients with diabetes is warranted Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  11. Varenicline may trigger severe hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P L; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Thorsteinsson, B

    2008-01-01

    is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity, especially in diabetes, use of effective drugs indicated for smoking cessation is rational. CASE REPORT: We report multiple episodes of severe hypoglycaemia after starting varenicline in a 53-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes. Since onset of diabetes......, intensified blood glucose monitoring and careful education of patients with diabetes treated with varenicline. Further investigation of the use of varenicline in patients with diabetes is warranted....

  12. Discontinuation of statins among patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, E.J.F.; Nijpels, G.; Welschen, L.M.C.; Hugtenburg, J.G.; Dekker, J.M.; Souverein, P.C.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Statins play an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Several studies have reported low adherence with statins among patients with type 2 diabetes. Studies comparing discontinuation of statins compared with discontinuation of oral anti-diabetics

  13. Patients with type 2 diabetes and difficulties associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Many patients with type 2 diabetes are uncontrolled on maximum oral treatment. The early introduction of insulin can lower diabetes-related complications. The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons behind a perceived reluctance of patients with type 2 diabetes to commence insulin therapy despite ...

  14. Metabolic syndrome in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Type 2 diabetes is becoming epidemic and several studies have shown that diabetes is associated with increased co.morbidities and impaired functional health in the general adult population. Type 2 diabetes is one of the co.morbidities associated with metabolic syndrome that carries with it ...

  15. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  16. Interbirth interval is associated with childhood type 1 diabetes risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Svensson, Jannet; Waldhoer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    of childhood type 1 diabetes has not been investigated. A secondary analysis of 14 published observational studies of perinatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes was conducted. Risk estimates of diabetes by category of interbirth interval were calculated for each study. Random effects models were used...... to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Overall, 2,787 children with type 1 diabetes were included. There was a reduction in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals...

  17. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Anne Sofie; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) has been associated with a poor prognosis in patients with diabetes. Because CAN is common in patients with diabetic nephropathy, we evaluated the predictive value of CAN in type 1 diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy....

  18. Diabetes Distress and Depression in South Asian Canadians with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Rawel; Tang, Tricia S

    2017-02-01

    South Asians are disproportionately affected by diabetes compared to some other ethnic groups in Canada. Although depression and diabetes distress are psychological issues well studied in the general population of those with diabetes, they have not been investigated in South Asian Canadians with type 2 diabetes. We sought to identify the rates of depression and diabetes distress in South Asian adults with type 2 diabetes and to explore the relationship among glycemic control, depression and diabetes distress. We recruited 41 South Asian adults with type 2 diabetes for this study. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels were collected via venous puncture. We utilized the Diabetes Distress Scale to assess total diabetes distress and its subscales (emotional distress, interpersonal distress, regimen-related distress and physician distress) and the Personal Health Questionnaire-9 to assess depressive symptoms. The rate of depression was 15%, and the rate of total diabetes distress was 52.5%. Although neither measure was found to be correlated with A1C levels, depression had a moderate positive correlation with total diabetes distress (r=0.696; pdiabetes distress is a serious concern for South Asian Canadians with type 2 diabetes. Given that depression and diabetes distress are linked, studies recruiting a larger and more diverse sample of South Asian Canadians should be conducted to better understand the psychological issues that may impact diabetes self-management in this community. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mild hypothyroidism improves glucose tolerance in experimental type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini, S; Bobby, Zachariah; Joseph, Manoj

    2015-06-25

    Co-existence of type 2 diabetes and hypothyroidism is an emerging trend observed in clinical practice. Although the effects of isolated type 2 diabetes and hypothyroidism are well known, there are limited studies addressing the metabolic complications when these two conditions co-exist. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction between type 2 diabetes and hypothyroidism with respect to glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and redox balance in a state were these two diseases coexist. Sixty male Wistar Albino rats were randomised into six groups. Group 1: control, Group 2: overt hypothyroidism, Group 3: mild hypothyroidism, Group 4: type 2 diabetes, Group 5: mild hypothyroidism + type 2 diabetes, Group 6: overt hypothyroidism + type 2 diabetes. Experimental hypothyroidism was created by the administration of propyl-2-thiouracil and type 2 diabetes by feeding rats with 60% fructose (w/w). The duration of the study was 6 weeks. All the parameters were estimated at the start (basal) and the end of the study. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test was carried out and area under curve (AUC) calculated to assess the glucose tolerance. Thyroid profile, lipid profile and oxidative stress parameters were also measured. Plasma TSH level was elevated 3-fold in the mild hypothyroid group and 15.2-fold in the overt hypothyroid group in comparison to the control group. Thyroid profile was found to be normal in type 2 diabetic group. There was no significant difference between hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism+diabetes groups with respect to thyroid profile. Among the six groups the degree of glucose intolerance was found to be maximum for overt hypothyroidism+diabetes group, followed by diabetes group and overt hypothyroidism group. An interesting finding was that glucose intolerance was significantly reduced in mild hypothyroidism+diabetes group (increase in AUC: 48.04%) in comparison with isolated diabetes group (increase in AUC: 71.63%). Similar results were

  20. Genetic basis of type 2 diabetes mellitus: implications for therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolford, Johanna K; de Courten, Barbora

    2004-01-01

    in the management of type 2 diabetes include lifestyle intervention through diet modification and exercise, and oral or injected hypoglycemic agents; however, not all individuals with type 2 diabetes respond in the same way to these treatments. Because of variability in the clinical course of the disease......Type 2 diabetes mellitus represents a multifactorial, heterogeneous group of disorders, which result from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has increased dramatically worldwide over the past several decades, a trend that has been heavily...... influenced by the relatively recent changes in diet and physical activity levels. There is also strong evidence supporting a genetic component to type 2 diabetes susceptibility and several genes underlying monogenic forms of diabetes have already been identified. However, common type 2 diabetes is likely...

  1. Insulin detemir versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, Sanne G.; Simon, Airin C. R.; Holleman, Frits; Hoekstra, Joost B.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chronically elevated blood glucose levels are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Many diabetes patients will eventually require insulin treatment to maintain good glycaemic control. There are still uncertainties about the optimal insulin treatment regimens for type 2 diabetes, but

  2. Effects of black hoof medicinal mushroom, phellinus linteus (Agaricomycetes), polysaccharide extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaç, Mustafa; Zeytinoğlu, Melih; Şentürk, Hakan; Kartkaya, Kazim; Kanbak, Göngör; Bayramoğlu, Gökhan; Oğlakci, Ayşegül; Griensven, van Leo J.L.D.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report the healing effects of a Phellinus linteus fruiting body hot water extract (PLE) in streptozotocin (STZ)–induced diabetic rats. PLE was given before and after STZ. The preprotective, protective, and postprotective effects of PLE on STZ-induced oxidative stress were

  3. L-Arginine supplementation prevents allodynia and hyperalgesia in painful diabetic neuropathic rats by normalizing plasma nitric oxide concentration and increasing plasma agmatine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Lusliany J; Farges, M C; Davin, N; Sion, B; Privat, A M; Vasson, M P; Eschalier, A; Courteix, C

    2017-07-19

    Neuropathic pain is a common diabetic complication. It is characterized by symptoms of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked pain including hyperalgesia and allodynia. L-Arginine is a common precursor of many metabolites of biological interest, in particular, nitric oxide (NO), ornithine, and hence polyamines. In central nervous system, NO, glutamate, and polyamines share an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated effect. We hypothesized that a variation in arginine metabolism caused by diabetes may contribute to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain and to the worsening of clinical and biological signs of diabetes. We examined whether oral L-arginine supplementation (2.58 ± 0.13 g/l in drinking water for 3 weeks) could improve the development of neuropathic pain and the clinical, biological, and metabolic complications of diabetes in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (D) rats. STZ administration induced classical symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Diabetic rats also displayed mechanical hypersensitivity, tactile, and thermal allodynia. Plasma citrulline and NO levels were increased in diabetic hyperalgesic/allodynic rats. L-Arginine supplementation failed to reduce hyperglycaemia, polyphagia, and weight loss. Moreover, it abolished hyperalgesia and allodynia by normalizing NO plasma concentration and increasing plasma agmatine concentration. L-Arginine supplementation prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, tactile, and thermal allodynia in painful diabetic neuropathy with concomitant reduction of NO and increased agmatine production, offering new therapeutic opportunities for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain.

  4. The streetlight effect in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Manuela; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    In the nearly 100 years since the discovery of therapeutic insulin, significant research efforts have been directed at finding the underlying cause of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and developing a "cure" for the disease. While progress has clearly been made toward each of these goals, neither vision has been fulfilled. With increasing pressure from both public and private funders of diabetes research, growing impatience of those with T1D at the lack of practical discoveries, increased competition for research funds, uncertainties on the reproducibility of published scientific data, and questions regarding the value of animal models, the current research environment has become extraordinarily difficult to traverse from the perspective of investigators. As a result, there is an increasing pressure toward performance of what might be considered "safe" research, where the aim is to affirm existing dogmas rather than to pioneer efforts involving unconventional thought. Psychologists refer to this practice as "observational bias" while cartoonists label the process the "streetlight effect." In this Perspective, we consider notions in T1D research that should be subject to bold question and provide additional concepts, many somewhat orphan to research efforts, whose investigation could lead to a means for truly identifying the cause of and a cure for T1D. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Cheema

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Maori and Pacific Islands peoples of New Zealand suffer a greater burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and associated comorbidities than their European counterparts. Empirical evidence supports the clinical application of aerobic and resistance training for effective diabetes management and potential remission, but few studies have investigated the effectiveness of these interventions in specific ethnic cohorts. We recently conducted the first trial to investigate the effect of prescribed exercise training in Polynesian people with T2DM. This article presents the cultural considerations undertaken to successfully implement the study. The research procedures were accepted and approved by cultural liaisons and potential participants. The approved methodology involved a trial evaluating and comparing the effects of two, 16-week exercise regimens (i.e. aerobic training and resistance training on glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, related diabetes markers (i.e. insulin resistance, blood lipids, relevant cytokines and anthropometric and hemodynamic indices and health-related quality of life. Future exercise-related research or implementation strategies in this cohort should focus on cultural awareness and techniques to enhance participation and compliance. Our approach to cultural consultation could be considered by researchers undertaking trials in this and other ethnic populations suffering an extreme burden of T2DM, including indigenous Australians and Americans.

  6. Alcohol and type 2 diabetes. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietraszek, A; Gregersen, S; Hermansen, K

    2010-06-01

    To describe a) the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and b) the impact of alcohol on the glycemic control with and without anti-diabetic drugs. We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library data base with the key words "Diabetes Mellitus, type 2" and "Alcohol Drinking" in English-language studies in adults. For the first part of the review we selected meta-analyses, review articles and observational studies more recent than year 1990 including at least 1000 participants. For the second part of the review we included all articles more recent than year 1990. Most observational studies find a J-shaped association between alcohol intake and incidence of T2D. Interestingly, drinking pattern plays a role, i.e. binge drinking increases the risk of T2D. Opposing information exists about the influence of beverage type. In T2D the acute effects on plasma glucose, insulin, fatty acids and triglyceride vary, in part depending on concomitant intake of food. Acute alcohol intake does not induce hypoglycemia in diet treated T2D, but increases the risk of hypoglycemia in sulphonylurea treated patients. In most studies, long-term alcohol use is associated with improved glycemic control in T2D. Alcohol consumption reduces the incidence of T2D, however, binge drinking seems to increase the incidence. Acute intake of alcohol does not increase risk of hypoglycemia in diet treated subjects with T2D, only when sulphonylurea is co-administered. Long-term alcohol use seems to be associated with improved glycemic control in T2D probably due to improved insulin sensitivity.

  7. Subjective sleep impairment in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES-The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nefs, G.; Donga, E.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Bot, M.; Speight, J.; Pouwer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Despite growing recognition of the impact of sleep on diabetes, a clear profile of people with diabetes regarding subjective sleep impairment has yet to be established. This study examines: (1) subjective sleep characteristics in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes; (2) the relationship of

  8. Subjective sleep impairment in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes : Results from Diabetes MILES-The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nefs, Giesje; Donga, Esther; van Someren, Eus; Bot, Mariska; Speight, Jane; Pouwer, François

    AIMS: Despite growing recognition of the impact of sleep on diabetes, a clear profile of people with diabetes regarding subjective sleep impairment has yet to be established. This study examines: (1) subjective sleep characteristics in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes; (2) the relationship of

  9. Albiglutide for treating type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Naver, Signe V.; Knop, Filip K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Albiglutide is a once-weekly, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist approved during 2014 in both the US and Europe for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. The recommended dose is 30 mg with the possibility of uptitration to 50 mg based on individual glycemic response...... in monotherapy and as an add-on to different background therapies confers placebo-corrected reductions in glycemia with changes in glycated hemoglobin of -0.8 to -1.0%. Albiglutide did not cause significant weight loss compared to placebo, but the adverse events profile was favorable with gastrointestinal...

  10. Type 2-diabetes. Sociale relationer og sundhedsadfaerd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Anne Friis; Avlund, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    with the official Danish recommendations for physical activity, diet, alcohol and smoking. Adjustments were made for sex, age, income, self-rated health, functional ability, stress and Body Mass Index. RESULTS: Social relations measured as civil status and functional network are positively associated with adherence...... to the recommendations for physical activity and diet. Only the association between functional network and diet remains significant when adjusted for the effects of co-variates. CONCLUSION: The study shows a need for the promotion of health behaviour among adult Danes with type 2 diabetes, and indicates that social...

  11. Therapeutic perspectives in type-1 diabetes

    CERN Document Server

    SINGH, PRACHI; TUPALLY, KARNAKER R; PODDAR, KINGSHUK; Tan, Aaron; VENKATESAN, VENKY; PAREKH, HARENDRA S; PASTORIN, GIORGIA

    2016-01-01

    This book provides critical insights into and appraisals of recent breakthroughs in type 1 diabetes modulation, with a particular emphasis on the potential impact of current prevention and treatment strategies. It also discusses recent successes and failures in clinical trials. Presenting an comprehensive overview of the disease, it is especially useful for newcomers in the field. It also includes illustrations, which make it easy for the reader to grasp the basic concepts involved. Furthermore, the tables include concise and easy-to-understand information on current clinical trials.

  12. Liraglutide for Type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning; Torekov, Signe Sørensen; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous liraglutide (Victoza, Novo Nordisk) was approved for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Europe in 2009 and in the USA in 2010. In December 2014, liraglutide 3.0 mg was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and in March 2015 by the European Medicines Agency...... (EMA) for the treatment of chronic weight management under the brand name Saxenda Novo Nordisk. Liraglutide causes a glucose-dependent increase in insulin secretion, decreases glucagon secretion and promotes weight loss by inhibiting appetite. Liraglutide probably induces satiety through activation...

  13. Nye farmakologiske behandlingsmodaliteter ved type 2-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    The variable pathogenesis and progressive nature of type 2 diabetes emphasise the need for new antidiabetic treatments. The long acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors have improved the treatment. Novel approaches include inhibitors of sodium glucose...... co-transporter 2, which increase renal glucose elimination, G-protein-coupled receptor agonists, which potentiate insulin and incretin hormone secretion. Proof of principle has been shown for glucagon receptor agonists, glucokinase activators and treatment with dual intestinal peptides, which all...

  14. Momordica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cheow Peng; Yassin, Zaitun; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan

    2012-08-15

    Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) is not only a nutritious vegetable but it is also used in traditional medical practices to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Experimental studies with animals and humans suggested that the vegetable has a possible role in glycaemic control. To assess the effects of mormodica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several electronic databases were searched, among these were The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2012), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SIGLE and LILACS (all up to February 2012), combined with handsearches. No language restriction was used. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared momordica charantia with placebo or a control intervention, with or without pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. Two authors independently extracted data. Risk of bias of the trials was evaluated using the parameters of randomisation, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting and other potential sources of bias. A meta-analysis was not performed given the quality of data and the variability of preparations of momordica charantia used in the interventions (no similar preparation was tested twice). Four randomised controlled trials with up to three months duration and investigating 479 participants met the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias of these trials (only two studies were published as a full peer-reviewed publication) was generally high. Two RCTs compared the effects of preparations from different parts of the momordica charantia plant with placebo on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. There was no statistically significant difference in the glycaemic control with momordica charantia preparations compared to placebo. When momordica charantia was compared to metformin or glibenclamide, there was also no significant change in reliable parameters of glycaemic control. No serious adverse effects were reported in any trial. No trial investigated death from any cause

  15. Insulin Signaling in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännmark, Cecilia; Nyman, Elin; Fagerholm, Siri; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Ekstrand, Eva-Maria; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes originates in an expanding adipose tissue that for unknown reasons becomes insulin resistant. Insulin resistance reflects impairments in insulin signaling, but mechanisms involved are unclear because current research is fragmented. We report a systems level mechanistic understanding of insulin resistance, using systems wide and internally consistent data from human adipocytes. Based on quantitative steady-state and dynamic time course data on signaling intermediaries, normally and in diabetes, we developed a dynamic mathematical model of insulin signaling. The model structure and parameters are identical in the normal and diabetic states of the model, except for three parameters that change in diabetes: (i) reduced concentration of insulin receptor, (ii) reduced concentration of insulin-regulated glucose transporter GLUT4, and (iii) changed feedback from mammalian target of rapamycin in complex with raptor (mTORC1). Modeling reveals that at the core of insulin resistance in human adipocytes is attenuation of a positive feedback from mTORC1 to the insulin receptor substrate-1, which explains reduced sensitivity and signal strength throughout the signaling network. Model simulations with inhibition of mTORC1 are comparable with experimental data on inhibition of mTORC1 using rapamycin in human adipocytes. We demonstrate the potential of the model for identification of drug targets, e.g. increasing the feedback restores insulin signaling, both at the cellular level and, using a multilevel model, at the whole body level. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance in an expanded adipose tissue results from cell growth restriction to prevent cell necrosis. PMID:23400783

  16. Thyroid Function In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Srinidhi; Kumar J, Ashok; K, Prajna; Shetty, Shobith Kumar; Rai, Tirthal; Shrinidhi; Begum, Mohamedi; Shashikala

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetic patients have higher prevalence of thyroid disorders than the general population which may have an influence on diabetic management. The present study compared the levels of thyroid hormones, serum creatinine, glycated haemoglobin and urine microalbumin between type 2 diabetics without any complications, type 2 diabetics with nephropathy and age and sex matched normal controls. Result: The mean serum T3 level in type 2 diabetics without any complications was 91.27 ± 14.56 ng/dl , in type 2 diabetics with nephropathy was 88.5320 ± 30.87 ng/dl and in controls was 134.98 ± 28.55 ng/dl. The mean serum T4 level in type 2 diabetics without any complications was 7.73 ± 1.42 μg/dl, in type 2 diabetics with nephropathy was 7.25 ± 2.72 μg/dl and in controls was 8.61 ± 1.73 μg/dl. The mean serum TSH level in type 2 diabetics without any complications was 3.99 ± 1.87 μIU/ml, in type 2 diabetics with nephropathy was 4.27 ± 1.62 μIU/ml and in controls was 2.07 ± 1.09 μIU/ml. Correlations between T3, T4, TSH with serum creatinine, glycated haemoglobin were not statistically significant in type 2 diabetes without any complications and diabetic nephropathy. We found a statistically significant correlation between T3 and urine microalbumin in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion: Failure to recognize the presence of abnormal thyroid hormone levels may be a primary cause of poor management of diabetes mellitus type 2. Therefore there is a need for the routine assay of thyroid hormones in type 2 diabetics and diabetic nephropathy in order to improve the quality of life and reduce the morbidity. PMID:24086845

  17. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus in the pediatric age group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, María J; Colino, E; López-Capapé, M; Alonso, M; Barrio, R

    2005-02-01

    In the past two decades, type 2 diabetes mellitus has increased in children and adolescents, especially within certain ethnic groups. This increase has been parallel to the rising prevalence of obesity. Because of the overlap between some clinical characteristics, the differential diagnosis between type 1 and 2 diabetes is difficult. Of 300 diabetic patients in our diabetes section, only three (1 %) had type 2 diabetes. Two patients were obese adolescents with a positive family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus; the third patient was a prepubertal, overweight girl with no family history of this disorder. The diagnosis was incidental in two patients and one patient presented with ketoacidosis. The differences between the three patients reveal the great clinical variability of this disorder and suggest that various underlying factors are involved in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Pancreatic mitochondrial complex I exhibits aberrant hyperactivity in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzi Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that NADH/NAD+ redox balance is heavily perturbed in diabetes, and the NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is a major source of oxidative stress in diabetic tissues. In mitochondria, complex I is the only site for NADH oxidation and NAD+ regeneration and is also a major site for production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. Yet how complex I responds to the NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance and any potential consequences of such response in diabetic pancreas have not been investigated. We report here that pancreatic mitochondrial complex I showed aberrant hyperactivity in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Further studies focusing on streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes indicate that complex I hyperactivity could be attenuated by metformin. Moreover, complex I hyperactivity was accompanied by increased activities of complexes II to IV, but not complex V, suggesting that overflow of NADH via complex I in diabetes could be diverted to ROS production. Indeed in diabetic pancreas, ROS production and oxidative stress increased and mitochondrial ATP production decreased, which can be attributed to impaired pancreatic mitochondrial membrane potential that is responsible for increased cell death. Additionally, cellular defense systems such as glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, sirtuin 3, and NQO1 were found to be compromised in diabetic pancreas. Our findings point to the direction that complex I aberrant hyperactivity in pancreas could be a major source of oxidative stress and β cell failure in diabetes. Therefore, inhibiting pancreatic complex I hyperactivity and attenuating its ROS production by various means in diabetes might serve as a promising approach for anti-diabetic therapies.

  19. The changing epidemiology of diabetic microangiopathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, P

    2005-01-01

    Diabetic microvascular complications in the kidney and the eye are a major burden for diabetic patients due to increased morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease and diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in younger...... patients, representing a major public health concern. During the past two decades beneficial effects of, in particular, aggressive antihypertensive control and strict glycaemic control have been demonstrated in randomised controlled clinical trials. Technological improvements in diabetes care have made...... good metabolic control easier to achieve. Has this led to an improved prognosis? In observational studies from dedicated centres, a decrease from 47 to 13% has been reported in the incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy after 20-25 years of diabetes, and the incidence of overt diabetic...

  20. Intracavernous delivery of a designed angiopoietin-1 variant rescues erectile function by enhancing endothelial regeneration in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai-Rong; Kim, Woo Jean; Song, Jae Sook; Piao, Shuguang; Choi, Min Ji; Tumurbaatar, Munkhbayar; Shin, Sun Hwa; Yin, Guo Nan; Koh, Gou Young; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    Patients with diabetic erectile dysfunction often have severe endothelial dysfunction and respond poorly to oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. We examined the effectiveness of the potent angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) variant, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-Ang1, in promoting cavernous endothelial regeneration and restoring erectile function in diabetic animals. Four groups of mice were used: controls; streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice; STZ-induced diabetic mice treated with repeated intracavernous injections of PBS; and STZ-induced diabetic mice treated with COMP-Ang1 protein (days -3 and 0). Two and 4 weeks after treatment, we measured erectile function by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. The penis was harvested for histologic examinations, Western blot analysis, and cGMP quantification. We also performed a vascular permeability test. Local delivery of the COMP-Ang1 protein significantly increased cavernous endothelial proliferation, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) phosphorylation, and cGMP expression compared with that in the untreated or PBS-treated STZ-induced diabetic group. The changes in the group that received COMP-Ang1 restored erectile function up to 4 weeks after treatment. Endothelial protective effects, such as marked decreases in the expression of p47(phox) and inducible NOS, in the generation of superoxide anion and nitrotyrosine, and in the number of apoptotic cells in the corpus cavernosum tissue, were noted in COMP-Ang1-treated STZ-induced diabetic mice. An intracavernous injection of COMP-Ang1 completely restored endothelial cell-cell junction proteins and decreased cavernous endothelial permeability. COMP-Ang1-induced promotion of cavernous angiogenesis and erectile function was abolished by the NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin. These findings support the concept of cavernous endothelial regeneration by use of the recombinant Ang1 protein as

  1. The Genetic Landscape of Renal Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholm, Niina; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Ahlqvist, Emma

    2017-01-01

    in larger numbers of subjects with type 1 diabetes characterized for a wider range of cross-sectional diabetic kidney disease phenotypes. In 2843 subjects, we estimated that the heritability of diabetic kidney disease was 35% (P=6.4×10(-3)). Genome-wide association analysis and replication in 12...... influencing the risk of diabetic kidney disease. However, sets of alleles increasing body mass index (P=2.2×10(-5)) and the risk of type 2 diabetes (P=6.1×10(-4)) associated with the risk of diabetic kidney disease. We also found genome-wide genetic correlation between diabetic kidney disease and failure...... kidney disease in those with type 1 diabetes and highlight some key pathways that may be responsible. Altogether these results reveal important biology behind the major cause of kidney disease....

  2. Poor pregnancy outcome in women with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine D; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Ekbom, Pia

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the perinatal outcome and the frequency of maternal complications in pregnancies of women with type 2 diabetes during 1996-2001. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Medical records of 61 consecutive singleton pregnancies in women with type 2 diabetes from 1996 to 2001 were studied....... Pregnancy outcome was compared with that of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes during 1996-2000, the background population, and pregnant women with type 2 diabetes during 1980-1992 from the same department. RESULTS: The perinatal mortality in pregnancies complicated by type 2 diabetes (4/61, 6.......6%) was increased four- and ninefold, respectively, and the rate of major congenital malformations (4/60, 6.7%) was more than doubled, although not statistically significant, compared with type 1 diabetic pregnancies and the background population. The glycemic control was similar or better in women with type 2...

  3. The influence of type 1 diabetes on pancreatic weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L; Kaddis, John S; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Pugliese, Alberto; Schatz, Desmond A; Shuster, Jonathan J; Atkinson, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of pancreases obtained at autopsy or by radiography note reduced pancreas weight (PW) and size, respectively, in type 1 diabetes; this finding is widely considered to be the result of chronic insulinopenia. This literature is, however, limited with respect to the influence of age, sex, anthropometric factors and disease duration on these observations. Moreover, data are sparse for young children, a group of particular interest for type 1 diabetes. We hypothesised that the pancreas-to-body weight ratio would normalise confounding inter-subject factors, thereby permitting better characterisation of PW in type 1 diabetes. Transplant-grade pancreases were recovered from 216 organ donors with type 1 diabetes (n = 90), type 2 diabetes (n = 40) and no diabetes (n = 86). Whole-organ and head, body and tail weights were determined. The relative PW (RPW; PW [g] / body weight [kg]) was calculated and tested for normalisation of potential differences due to age, sex and BMI. PW significantly correlated with body weight in control donors (R (2) = 0.76, p type 1 diabetes (0.57 ± 0.18, p type 2 diabetes (0.93 ± 0.30), had significantly lower RPW. The relative weights of each pancreatic region from donors with type 1 diabetes were significantly smaller than those of regions from control donors and donors with type 2 diabetes (p type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. RPW allows for comparisons across a wide range of donor ages by eliminating confounding variables. These data validate an interesting feature of the type 1 diabetes pancreas and underscore the need for additional studies to identify the mechanistic basis for this finding, including those beyond the chronic loss of endogenous insulin secretion.

  4. Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: The influence of changing diagnostic criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Noctor, Eoin; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-01-01

    A previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) carries a lifetime risk of progression to type 2 diabetes of up to 60%. Identification of those women at higher risk of progression to diabetes allows the timely introduction of measures to delay or prevent diabetes onset. However, there is a large degree of variability in the literature with regard to the proportion of women with a history of GDM who go on to develop diabetes. Heterogeneity between cohorts with regard to diagnostic criteria ...

  5. LEPTIN RESISTANCE AND TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Oleshchuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is one of adipocyte-secreted hormones. It signals to the brain and other tissues about the status of body energy reserves. Circulating leptin levels are directly proportional to the amount of the body fat. Leptin concentration increases when surfeit and decreases during fasting. Obese patients are hyperleptinemic compared with thin persons and they are tolerant to the central hypothalamic effects of leptin. The reduced sensitivity toward exogenous and endogenous leptin is commonly referred to as leptin resistance. Alterations in the signaling of the long isoform of the leptin receptor play the crucial role in leptin resistance. Surfeit may induce leptin resistance and other metabolic sequelae of obesity. Leptin insensitivity and insulin resistance play a major role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Metformin remains the preferred first-line pharmacologic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It reduces hepatic glucose production, increases glucose uptake in peripheral tissue and can lead to weight loss. Metformin decreases both insulin and leptin concentration, restores the sensitivity to these hormones. But some studies have shown poor relationship between metformin action and leptin level. And the mechanism of metformin action on leptin resistance remains unclear. Thus, these issues should be studied as well as polymorphisms in genes encoding metformin action.

  6. Metformin + saxagliptin for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2012-01-01

    Metformin is considered as the first-line drug therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, by promoting insulin secretion and reducing glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner, offer new opportunities for oral therapy after failure of metformin. An updated review of the literature demonstrates that saxagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, and metformin may be administered together, separately or in fixed-dose combination (FDC), either as saxagliptin added to metformin or as initial combination in drug-naive patients. Both compounds exert complementary pharmacodynamic actions leading to better improvement in blood glucose control (fasting plasma glucose, postprandial glucose, HbA1c) than either compound separately. Adding saxagliptin to metformin monthotherapy results in a consistent, sustained and safe reduction in HbA1c levels. Tolerance is excellent without hypoglycemia or weight gain. The combination saxaglitpin plus metformin may be used as first-line or second-line therapy in the management of type 2 diabetes, especially as a valuable alternative to the classical metformin-sulfonylurea combination.

  7. Diabetes stigma is associated with negative treatment appraisals among adults with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, E; Browne, J L; Ventura, A D

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To explore factors associated with negative insulin appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, including perceived and experienced diabetes stigma. METHODS: The second Diabetes MILES - Australia study (MILES-2) is a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural...... diabetes stigma (Type 2 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale), insulin appraisals [Insulin Treatment Appraisal Scale (ITAS)] and known correlates of insulin appraisals: diabetes-specific distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes scale) and diabetes-specific self-efficacy (Confidence in Diabetes Self-care scale......, BMI, years using insulin, injections per day), self-efficacy, diabetes-specific distress and diabetes stigma (all P

  8. Long-term mortality and retinopathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing in Denmark as well as the rest of the world. Due to diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications, the morbidity and the mortality is higher among type 1 diabetic patients. The aim of this thesis was to examine a population-based cohort...... of 727 type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, with an onset of diabetes before 1 July 1973 in order to: (1) Evaluate the all-cause mortality rates and the influence of sex, duration of diabetes and calendar year of diagnosis in a 33-year follow-up (Paper I). (2) Examine glycaemic regulation...... of DR was graded higher in the digital photos. Among these, PDR was detected in three eyes using digital photos but remained undetected on all films. This suggests that digital photos with wide fields are the best way to detect DR in long-term type 1 diabetic patients. Overall, it is concluded...

  9. Chromium, zinc and magnesium status in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Chiang; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2015-11-01

    Chromium, zinc, and magnesium are involved in insulin signal transduction, glucose metabolism, and cellular antioxidative defense. This review details the statuses of chromium, zinc, and magnesium in type 1 diabetes patients. Blood levels of trace elements (especially magnesium and zinc) were lower in type 1 diabetes patients than in controls and were even lower in type 1 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control. Studies with mouse models have shown that chromium and magnesium supplementation alleviated diabetes-induced complications and improved glycemic control. Many studies indicated positive correlations between decreased levels of serum chromium, zinc, and magnesium and poor glycemic control. The supplementation of type 1 diabetes patients with zinc, magnesium, and chromium may help to control diabetes and prevent diabetes-related oxidative injuries, but require further study.

  10. Diabetes self-management (DSM in Omani with type-2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Alrahbi

    2014-12-01

    Practice implications: The findings of this study set the stage to develop teaching strategies that will improve DSM and subsequently improve diabetes management in patient with type-2 diabetes in Oman.

  11. Long-term outcomes of Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with biopsy-proven diabetic nephropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shimizu, Miho; Furuichi, Kengo; Toyama, Tadashi; Kitajima, Shinji; Hara, Akinori; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Takamura, Toshinari; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the structural-functional relationships and the prognostic factors for renal events, cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients with biopsy-proven diabetic nephropathy...

  12. Cognitive function in children and subsequent type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Gunilla M; Hulting, Anna-Lena; Montgomery, Scott M

    2008-03-01

    To assess whether a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by age 42 years is associated with prior cognitive deficits in childhood. Logistic regression estimated type 2 diabetes risk among 9,113 members of the 1958 British birth cohort of the National Child Development Study (NCDS). Associations with type 2 diabetes were estimated for general ability and reading comprehension assessments at age 11 years, modeled using SD units. Adjustment was for markers of early-life exposures, social and material family characteristics, sex, and disability, with further adjustment for BMI at age 7 years. Adjusted odds ratios (95% CIs) for type 2 diabetes (n = 69) are 0.67 (0.51-0.87) for general ability and 0.58 (0.44-0.77) for reading comprehension. Neither additional adjustment for BMI, nor limiting the definition of type 2 diabetes to onset after age 33 years altered the associations substantially. Impaired cognitive function may precede clinical onset of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Anti-diabetic and renoprotective effects of aliskiren in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoz, Amal M; El-Latif, Hekma A Abd; Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Hassanein, Nahed M; Shoka, Afaf A

    2016-12-01

    Since chronic kidney disease due to diabetic nephropathy (DN) is becoming an ever larger health burden worldwide, more effective therapies are desperately needed. In the present study, the anti-diabetic and renoprotective effects of aliskiren have been evaluated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN in rats. DN was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (65 mg/kg). Three weeks after STZ, rats were divided into four groups; normal, diabetic, diabetic treated with gliclazide (10 mg/kg/day) for 1 month, and diabetic treated with aliskiren (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 month. At the end of the experiment, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded. Rats were then euthanized and serum was separated for determination of glucose, insulin, kidney function tests, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). One kidney was used for estimation of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and nitric oxide (NO) contents. Other kidney was used for histopathological study and immunohistochemical measurement of caspase-3 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). In addition, islets of Langerhans were isolated from normal rats by collagenase digestion technique for in vitro study. Aliskiren normalized STZ-induced hyperglycemia, increased insulin level both in vivo and in vitro, normalized kidney function tests and blood pressure, and alleviated STZ-induced kidney histopathological changes. This could be related to the ability of aliskiren toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress and inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by STZ in rats. However, aliskiren was more effective than gliclazide in relieving STZ-induced DN. These findings support the beneficial effect of aliskiren treatment in DN which could be attributed to its anti-diabetic, renoprotective, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects. Moreover, clinical studies are required to establish the

  14. Lipid peroxidation in type 2 diabetes : Relationship with macrovascular disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oranje, W A; Rondas-Colbers, G J; Swennen, G N; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    BACKGROUND: Macrovascular disease is the leading cause of death in diabetes. The increased risk of atherosclerosis in diabetes may be partly explained by increased lipid peroxidation. METHODS: We assessed lipid peroxidation in subjects with type 2 diabetes with (n = 23) and without (n = 23)

  15. Prevalence and determinants of proteinuria among type 2 diabetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage kidney disease among type 2 diabetics worldwide. Proteinuria has been noted to be the cardinal symptom of progressive loss of renal func-tion. This study examined the impact of duration of diabetes, demography (age, gender) and meta-bolic factors on the frequency ...

  16. Lymphocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Beta cell apoptosis has been associated with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) onset in newly diagnosed diabetic patients. There is an emerging evidence that T cell-induced apoptosis is a dominant effector mechanism in diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1). Pancreatic β-cells derived from newly ...

  17. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... Review Article: The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Africa. 130. 2011 Volume 16 No 3. JEMDSA. Introduction. Approximately 171 million people worldwide have diabetes, and this number is increasing.1 Diabetes mellitus is a chronic illness, characterised by hyperglycaemia ...

  18. Early Neurodegeneration in the Retina of Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Hille W.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Kok, Pauline H. B.; Stehouwer, Marilette; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan; DeVries, J. Hans; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diabetes type 2 causes thinning of retinal layers as a sign of neurodegeneration and to investigate the possible relationship between this thinning and duration of diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy (DR) status, age, sex, and glycemic

  19. Clinical and Biochemical Features of Type 2 Diabetic Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... obesity and micro- or macroalbuminuria. HbA1c%, ALP, cholesterol, triglycerides and LDLC were higher in diabetics than controls. In contrast, urea, creatinine and HDLC were lower in diabetics. Keywords: Clinical and Biochemical Features, Gaza Strip, Type 2 Diabetes, Lipids, albuminuria, Family history, complications.

  20. Cholelithiasis and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Nigerians | Olokoba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: 100 type 2 diabetic patients and 100 age and sex- matched controls under-went real time ultrasonography to determine the prevalence of Gallstone disease. Result: 15% of the diabetic patients had ultrasound evidence of Gallstone disease as compared to 7% in non diabetic controls. Conclusions: Gallstone ...

  1. Cognitive impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An understanding of the mechanisms of diabetes-‐related cognitive impairment and the resulting behaviors of patients can help healthcare professionals implement treatments to significantly improve health status and quality of life of patients with diabetes. KEYWORDS: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus; Cognitive Impairment and ...

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: phylogenetic motifs for predicting protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-06-28

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a medical condition associated with abnormally high levels of glucose (or sugar) in the blood. Keeping this view, we demonstrate the phylogenetic motifs (PMs) identification in type 2 diabetes mellitus very likely corresponding to protein functional sites.

  3. Iliopsoas abscess in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, Evelina; Franceschi, Roberto; Cauvin, Vittoria; d’Annunzio, Giuseppe; Pini Prato, Alessio; Castagnola, Elio; Di Palma, Annunziata

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Iliopsoas abscesses have been reported in adult diabetic patients, but only one case has been so far reported in the pediatric diabetic literature. We report three cases of iliopsoas abscesses in three adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, suggesting that an increased awareness of this condition is required for its early recognition and prompt treatment. PMID:26273460

  4. The Prevalence of Orthostatic Hypotension in Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic Hypotension is a serious and common complication of diabetes mellitus. AIMS: To determine the prevalence and risk factors of Orthostatic Hypotension in type 2 diabetic patients in a diabetes mellitus clinic in Enugu South-East Nigeria. METHOD AND MATERIALS: A structured questionnaire ...

  5. Screening for microalbuminuria in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of these individuals present with type 2 diabetes. Individuals with diabetes are at higher risk of suffering renal damage. It is observed that in spite of the medical facilities made available to these company workers, they do not present early for management but rather present when diabetic complications have set in to ...

  6. Circulating Adipokine levels in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was undertaken with the aim of investigating adipokine levels in the Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Methods: This is a cross sectional study conducted in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), a-700 bed tertiary hospital centre in Lagos, Nigeria. 53 diabetic subjects and 27 non-diabetic controls with ...

  7. Hypertension In Type II Diabetes Mellitus In Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with hypertension in diabetes. Conclusion: Hypertension is commoner in diabetes in sub-saharan Africa that it was previously believed. The finding of hypertension should arouse the possibility of the presence of microangiopathic complications in type II diabetes. Highland Medical Research Journal Vol.1(2) 2002: 22-24 ...

  8. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians sh...

  9. Atopic Dermatitis and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ali R.  Tehrani; Zahra Rahnama; Elham Ahmadi

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Atopic diseases, including asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis, are characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction mediated by T helper 2 cells, while type 1 diabetes mellitus is mediated by T helper 1 cells. Approach: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of atopic dermatitis between children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and age-matched controls. We conducted a case-control study enrolling 150 cases with type 1 diabetes mellitus between 2-20 years from pe...

  10. The natural history of type 1A diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenbarth, George S.; Jeffrey, Joy

    2008-01-01

    We can now predict the development of Type 1A (Immune Mediated) diabetes primarily through the determination of four biochemically characterized islet autoantibodies [insulin, GAD65, IA-2 (ICA512) and (Znt8)]. Prediction is possible because beta-cell destruction is chronically progressive and very slow in most, but not all individuals. We can also prevent type 1A diabetes in animal models and a major goal is the prevention of type 1A diabetes in man with multiple clinical trials underway. ...

  11. Postprandial blood glucose latency after oatmeal is a valid screening test for diabetic gastropathy in type 1 diabetes, but not in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüngling, B; Schleiffer, T; Buttmann, A; Kraatz, K; Kress, S; Vogt, M; Windeler, J; Riemann, J F

    2001-04-01

    Disordered gastric motility occurs frequently in diabetes mellitus. Gastric emptying time is abnormal in about 50% of diabetic patients and delayed emptying time is known as an important cause for brittle diabetes in type 1 diabetes. We compared the rise in blood glucose after a standardized meal (oatmeal test) as a noninvasive screening test for diabetic gastropathy with the noninvasive measurement of gastric emptying time with ultrasound in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. The test result was considered pathological if the rise of blood glucose after an initial steady state did not reach 20 mg/dl in the first 20 min after the meal (prolonged blood glucose latency). We found a sensitivity of 90% (58.7-99.8) and a specificity of 100% (71.5-100) for the oatmeal test in type 1 diabetes in the gastropathy screening. In type 2 diabetes we found a sensitivity of 13% (1.5-38.3) and a specificity of 78% (60-90.7) (95% CI). In conclusion, the oatmeal test seemed to be a good, noninvasive screening test in diabetic gastropathy in type 1 diabetes, but has no diagnostic value in type 2 diabetes. The causes for such a difference may be due to a different postprandial blood glucose regulation in type 2 diabetes compared to the beta-cell-depleted type 1 diabetes.

  12. Improved prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Anne Sofie; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In early studies, a median survival time of 5 to 7 years from onset of diabetic nephropathy was observed. Furthermore, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was the main cause of death. We prospectively assessed the impact of reno- and cardiovascular protective treatment on prognosis in type 1...... diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: We prospectively followed 199 type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and 192 patients with normoalbuminuria for 10 years. Aggressive antihypertensive treatment was initiated in patients with diabetic nephropathy in mid 1980s, whereas statins......%) died; hereof, 25 deaths (42%) were ascribed to cardiovascular causes while 30 patients (50%) with nephropathy died with ESRD. The estimate of median survival time from onset of diabetic nephropathy was 21.7 years, SE 3.3 years. CONCLUSION: The survival of patients with diabetic nephropathy has improved...

  13. Temporal dystrophic remodeling within the intrinsic cardiac nervous system of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Chantalle E; Durston, Melanie; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Smith, Darrell R; Freed, Darren; Glazner, Gordon W; Tian, Ganghong; Fernyhough, Paul; Arora, Rakesh C

    2014-06-04

    The pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) in diabetic individuals, called "diabetic cardiomyopathy", is only partially understood. Alterations in the cardiac autonomic nervous system due to oxidative stress have been implicated. The intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS) is an important regulatory pathway of cardiac autonomic function, however, little is known about the alterations that occur in the ICNS in diabetes. We sought to characterize morphologic changes and the role of oxidative stress within the ICNS of diabetic hearts. Cultured ICNS neuronal cells from the hearts of 3- and 6-month old type 1 diabetic streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats and age-matched controls were examined. Confocal microscopy analysis for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and amino acid adducts of (E)-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) using immunofluorescence was undertaken. Cell morphology was then analyzed in a blinded fashion for features of neuronal dystrophy and the presence of 4-HNE adducts. At 3-months, diabetic ICNS neuronal cells exhibited 30% more neurite swellings per area (p = 0.01), and had a higher proportion with dystrophic appearance (88.1% vs. 50.5%; p = <0.0001), as compared to control neurons. At 6-months, diabetic ICNS neurons exhibited more features of dystrophy as compared to controls (74.3% vs. 62.2%; p = 0.0448), with 50% more neurite branching (p = 0.0015) and 50% less neurite outgrowth (p = <0.001). Analysis of 4-HNE adducts in ICNS neurons of 6-month diabetic rats demonstrated twice the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to controls (p = <0.001). Neuronal dystrophy occurs in the ICNS neurons of STZ-induced diabetic rats, and accumulates temporally within the disease process. In addition, findings implicate an increase in ROS within the neuronal processes of ICNS neurons of diabetic rats suggesting an association between oxidative stress and the development of dystrophy in cardiac autonomic neurons.

  14. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The global increase in the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has brought asymptomatic bacteriuria, one of its complications to the fore. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with type 2 diabetes, identify the bacterial pathogens and their ...

  15. Tests for genetic interactions in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morahan, Grant; Mehta, Munish; James, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental factors lead to immune dysregulation causing type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders. Recently, many common genetic variants have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, but each has modest individual effects. Familial clustering of type 1...

  16. Fetuin-A and type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Ismail Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion We concluded that fetuin-A may play a role in the pathogenesis of type II DM, and high serum fetuin-A has a strong association with IR and glycemic control in type II diabetic patients. Future studies are recommended to establish the possibility of using fetuin-A as a predictor of insulin resistance in type II diabetic patients.

  17. Effect of traditional plant medicines (Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Syzygium cumini on oxidative stress and insulin resistance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Sharafeldin

    2015-10-01

    Both CZ and SC possessed antioxidant activity as shown by elevated SOD and GPx activities and reduction in LPO. CZ and SC are functioning to improve the level of insulin, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress and kidney and liver dysfunctions in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  18. Metabolomic Biomarkers in the Progression to Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the snapshot of all detectable metabolites and lipids in biological materials and has potential in reflecting genetic and environmental factors contributing to the development of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. The progression to seroconversion to development of type 1...... diabetes has been studied using this technique, although in relatively small cohorts and at limited time points. Overall, three observations have been consistently reported; phospholipids at birth are lower in children developing type 1 diabetes early in childhood, methionine levels are lower in children...... at seroconversion, and triglycerides are increased at seroconversion and associated to microbiome diversity, indicating an association between the metabolome and microbiome in type 1 diabetes progression....

  19. Animal models in type 2 diabetes research: an overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivasan, K; Ramarao, P

    2007-01-01

    .... Appropriate experimental models are essential tools for understanding the pathogenesis, complications, and genetic or environmental influences that increase the risks of type 2 diabetes and testing...

  20. Innovative Approaches to Treating Type 1 Diabetes Addressed in Beta-Cell Replacement Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Father of the Year Stop Diabetes at School ... Forecast Stop Diabetes Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Living With Type 2 Diabetes Recipes for Healthy ...

  1. Major Long-Term Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Father of the Year Stop Diabetes at School ... Forecast Stop Diabetes Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure Living With Type 2 Diabetes Recipes for Healthy ...

  2. Insulin Sensitivity To Trace Metals (Chromium, Manganese) In Type 2 Diabetic Patients And Non Diabetic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Bibi; Orakzai, Bibi Ali; Faryal, Uzma; Hassan, Mukhtar; Rasheed, Shazia; Wazir, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus constitutes one of the most important problems in developing and non-developing countries. The purpose of the study to estimate the concentrations of Chromium and Manganese in diabetic and non-diabetic population of Hazara division. The cross sectional comparative study was carried out on one hundred blood samples of Type 2 Diabetic patients collected non-randomly from Ayub Teaching Hospital and one hundred normal healthy controls from Women Medical College Abbottabad from September 2014 to April 2015. The study included two hundred subjects. Among them 100 were diabetic and 100 non diabetic respectively. The blood samples were collected from Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad. The serum Chromium and Manganese levels were determined by Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer. Serum Chromium and Manganese levels were decreased in diabetic and increased in non-diabetic patients. Low serum level of Chromium and manganese were found in diabetic patients as compare to non-diabetic individuals.

  3. Skeletal Metabolism, Fracture Risk, and Fracture Outcomes in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Civitelli, Roberto; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Khosla, Sundeep; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-07-01

    Fracture risk is significantly increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and individuals with diabetes experience worse fracture outcomes than normoglycemic individuals. Factors that increase fracture risk include lower bone mass in type 1 diabetes and compromised skeletal quality and strength despite preserved bone density in type 2 diabetes, as well as the effects of comorbidities such as diabetic macro- and microvascular complications. In this Perspective, we assess the developing scientific knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of skeletal fragility in patients with diabetes and the emerging data on the prediction, treatment, and outcomes of fractures in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colstrup, Miriam; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In 1989 the St. Vincent declaration set a five-year target for approximating outcomes of pregnancies in women with diabetes to those of the background population. We investigated and quantified the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM......) to evaluate if the goals of the 1989 St. Vincent Declaration have been obtained concerning foetal and neonatal complications. Methods: Twelve population-based studies published within the last 10 years with in total 14 099 women with T1DM and 4 035 373 women from the background population were identified....... The prevalence of four foetal and neonatal complications was compared. Results: In women with T1DM versus the background population, congenital malformations occurred in 5.0% (2.2-9.0) (weighted mean and range) versus 2.1% (1.5-2.9), relative risk (RR) = 2.4, perinatal mortality in 2.7% (2.0-6.6) versus 0.72% (0...

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedecke, Julia H; Mtintsilana, Asanda; Dlamini, Siphiwe N; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Compared to global estimates, Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has the highest projected rates of increase in type 2 diabetes (T2D) over the next 25years. This is attributed to the ageing population, increasing urbanisation and the associated lifestyle changes. Although the prevalence does not differ by gender, deaths attributable to T2D in SSA are greater in women, likely due to differences in beliefs and access to care. Women in SSA also have greater risk factor burden for T2D than men, in particular obesity, which is explained in part by sociocultural factors. The pathogenesis of diabetes differs between African and Caucasian women, with implications for risk assessment. African women are more insulin resistant than their Caucasian counterparts, despite a more 'favourable' body fat distribution. Notably, women in SSA face the dual burden of T2D and HIV/AIDS. HIV positive women in SSA are typically young and obese, with the latter being exacerbated by anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Cultural perceptions regarding weight loss and limited financial resources are the major limitations to the management of T2D. Hence prevention is vital. However, there is a paucity of studies examining the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to reduce T2D in SSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Individualized glycaemic targets and pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Clifford J; Aschner, Pablo; Del Prato, Stefano; LaSalle, James; Ji, Linong; Matthaei, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    The Global Partnership for Effective Diabetes Management, established to provide practical guidance to improve patient outcomes in diabetes, has developed and modified recommendations to improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. The Global Partnership advocates an individualized therapeutic approach and, as part of the process to customize therapy, has previously identified specific type 2 diabetes patient subgroups that require special consideration. This article builds on earlier publications, expanding the scope of practical guidance to include newly diagnosed individuals with complications and women with diabetes in pregnancy. Good glycaemic control remains the cornerstone of managing type 2 diabetes, and plays a vital role in preventing or delaying the onset and progression of diabetic complications. Individualizing therapeutic goals and treatments to meet glycaemic targets safely and without delay remains paramount, in addition to a wider programme of care to reduce cardiovascular risk factors and improve patient outcomes.

  7. Retinopathy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zuabi, Homoud; Al-Tammar, Yaqoub; Al-Moataz, Reem; Al-Sabti, Khalid; Wani, Vivek B; Hamama, Fahad; Mohammad, Hanan; Al-Suwayan, Mai H

    2005-01-01

    To study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its association with risk factors in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients in two primary care diabetic clinics in Kuwait. All newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients attending Ferdous and Yarmouk Health Care Diabetic Clinics in Farwaniya and Asma Health Areas, respectively, during the period of January 2002 to July 2004 were examined for the presence of diabetic retinopathy by color fundus photographs. Risk factors such as sex, age, hypertension, nephropathy, hyperglycemia, level of glycated hemoglobin, microalbuminuria and hyperlipidemia were evaluated by statistical analysis for their possible association with the presence of diabetic retinopathy at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. Of the 92 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients studied, diabetic retinopathy was present in 7 (7.6%) patients. Two of the 7 patients had maculopathy that needed treatment by photocoagulation. High glycated hemoglobin in 51 patients (55.4%), microalbuminuria in 25 (27.2%), hypertension in 29 (315%), hyperlipidemia in 69 (75%), obesity in 45 (48.9%) and overweight in 37(40.2%) were noted in the study population. Microalbuminuria was weakly associated with the presence of retinopathy (p = 0.08) at the time of diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors were not statistically significant. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 7.6% among the study population. Maculopathy was present in 2 of the 7 patients needing photocoagulation.

  8. [New therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Pellitero, Silvia

    2015-06-22

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has led to a growing interest in the investigation of new therapies. Treatment of T2DM has focused on the insulinopenia and insulin resistance. However, in the last 10 years, new lines of research have emerged for the treatment of T2DM and preclinical studies appear promising. The possibility of using these drugs in combination with other currently available drugs will enhance the antidiabetic effect and promote weight loss with fewer side effects. The data provided by post-marketing monitoring will help us to better understand their safety profile and potential long-term effects on target organs, especially the cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The gut microbiota in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine; Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of the gut microbiota has intensified within the past decade with the introduction of cultivation-independent methods. By investigation of the gut bacterial genes, our understanding of the compositional and functional capability of the gut microbiome has increased. It is now widely...... recognized that the gut microbiota has profound effect on host metabolism and recently changes in the gut microbiota have been associated with type 2 diabetes. Animal models and human studies have linked changes in the gut microbiota to the induction of low-grade inflammation, altered immune response......, and changes in lipid and glucose metabolism. Several factors have been identified that might affect the healthy microbiota, potentially inducing a dysbiotic microbiota associated with a disease state. This increased understanding of the gut microbiota might potentially contribute to targeted intervention...

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sung Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the functional importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that performs folding, modification, and trafficking of secretory and membrane proteins to the Golgi compartment, the maintenance of ER homeostasis in insulin-secreting β-cells is very important. When ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER generates adaptive signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to maintain homeostasis of this organelle. However, if homeostasis fails to be restored, the ER initiates death signaling pathways. New observations suggest that both chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, known as important causative factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt ER homeostasis to induce unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review examines how the UPR pathways, induced by high glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), interact to disrupt ER function and cause β-cell dysfunction and death. PMID:22443930

  11. Lixisenatide for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an increasing health problem worldwide. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are an expanding drug class that target several of the pathophysiological traits of T2DM. Lixisenatide is a GLP-1 receptor agonist in development for once......-daily treatment of T2DM. Areas covered: Pharmacological, preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating the applicability of lixisenatide for the treatment of T2DM are reviewed. Available data and pending clinical development are summarized, critically appraised and compared to competitor drugs. The most...... relevant papers and meeting abstracts published up to November 2010 are used as sources for this review. Expert opinion: Efficacy and safety in T2DM are demonstrated with lixisenatide in monotherapy and in combination with metformin. However, limited data with the intended once-daily 20 µg subcutaneous...

  12. Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) DC. polysaccharide ameliorates hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia and vascular inflammation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Yan, Junyan; Li, Kaicheng; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Cheng, Weinan; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-04-22

    Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) DC. (RG) has been widely used as traditional Chinese herbal medicine for treatment of diabetes and its complications. The polysaccharide fraction of RG has been proposed to possess hypoglycemic effect by intraperitoneal administration, however, the mechanisms responsible for the hypoglycemic effect of RG polysaccharide (RGP) remain poorly understood. Here we studied the anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effect of oral administration of a purified RGP and its underlying mechanisms in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The preliminary structure of RGP was determined by GC and FT-IR. Mice were injected with STZ to induce type 1 diabetes. RGP at doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg/day was orally administered to mice for 4 weeks, and metformin was used as positive control. After 4 weeks, the blood biochemical parameters, the pancreatic insulin contents, in vitro insulin secretion, the hepatic glycogen contents and mRNA expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK) were assayed. RGP was composed of rhamnose, arabinose, mannose, glucose and galactose in the molar ratio of 1.00:1.26:0.73:16.45:30.40 with the average molecular weight of 63.5 kDa. RGP administration significantly decreased the blood levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and increased the blood levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and insulin in diabetic mice, concurrent with increases in body weights and pancreatic insulin contents. The in vitro study revealed that RGP significantly enhanced both basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretions, as well as islet insulin contents in the pancreatic islets of diabetic mice. Moreover, RGP reversed the increased mRNA expression of PEPCK and the reduced glycogen contents in the liver of diabetic mice. Furthermore, RGP exhibited potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, as evidenced by the decreased blood levels of TNF-α, IL-6, monocyte

  13. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, May M; Haddad, Mera F; Gammoh, Yazan S

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is considered an important factor for early diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness of diabetic retinopathy among a sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Jordan. The study period was from August to December 2015. The sample was selected randomly from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the general population in three main cities of Jordan (Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa). A questionnaire was distributed to 237 participants with diabetes to assess their awareness and knowledge of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. The questionnaire included questions to assess awareness about diabetic retinopathy, sources of knowledge about the disease, and patients' knowledge and compliance with available treatments and routine eye examinations. Patients were also questioned about the barriers that may interfere with early eye examination. A total of 237 participants (107 [45.1%] females and 130 [54.9%] males) with type 2 diabetes were interviewed. Mean age±SD for the study population was 54.51±10.28 years. Of the study population, 88.2% were aware that diabetes can affect the eyes and 81% reported that diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. Higher level of patients' awareness of diabetic retinopathy was related to higher level of formal education (pdiabetic retinopathy as reported by 47.3% patients was general practitioners. Patients' compliance with diabetes management was relatively high; however, their compliance with routine retinal assessment was poor, with only a total of 29.5% of participants having had an eye examination in the previous year. Awareness of the nature and consequences of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes in Jordan is relatively high. However, patients' motivation to undergo retinal assessment was poor in the sample, thus hindering early diagnosis and management.

  14. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  15. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Choi, Youn-Hee; Won, Kyu-Chang; Moon, Jun Sung; Merchant, Anwar T; Lee, Hee-Kyung

    2013-11-07

    Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI), Russell's periodontal index and papillary bleeding index. Information on sociodemographic factors, oral hygiene behavior, duration and compliance to self management of diabetes, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose(FBG) were collected by interview and hospital medical records. Statistically, independent t-test, an analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-squared test and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes-related factors and periodontal health. Periodontal parameters including the number of missing teeth and papillary bleeding index were significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes. CPI was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and HbA1C. And Russell's periodontal index was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG, HbA1C and compliance to self management of diabetes. Results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that the duration of diabetes showed significant positive correlation with all of the periodontal health parameters, except for missing teeth. HbA1c was correlated with Russell's periodontal and papillary bleeding index. FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes were correlated with missing teeth and papillary bleeding index respectively. Diabetes-related factors such as duration of

  16. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Methods Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI), Russell’s periodontal index and papillary bleeding index. Information on sociodemographic factors, oral hygiene behavior, duration and compliance to self management of diabetes, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose(FBG) were collected by interview and hospital medical records. Statistically, independent t-test, an analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-squared test and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes-related factors and periodontal health. Results Periodontal parameters including the number of missing teeth and papillary bleeding index were significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes. CPI was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and HbA1C. And Russell’s periodontal index was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG, HbA1C and compliance to self management of diabetes. Results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that the duration of diabetes showed significant positive correlation with all of the periodontal health parameters, except for missing teeth. HbA1c was correlated with Russell's periodontal and papillary bleeding index. FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes were correlated with missing teeth and papillary bleeding index respectively. Conclusions

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Dysregulation in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Bunn, Robert C.; Moreau, Cynthia S.; Cockrell, Gael E.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Coleman, Hannah N.; Frindik, J. Paul; Kemp, Stephen F.; Fowlkes, John L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 may contribute pathologically to the development of diabetes complications, including diabetic retinopathy and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Our objective was to explore whether systemic MMP-2 dysregulation could be demonstrated in type 1 diabetes and to determine how MMP-2 concentration relates to disease status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this cross-sectional study, MMP-2 concentrations and MMP-2 activity were measured in plasma and limed urine samples from 93 type 1 diabetic and 50 healthy control subjects, aged 14–40 years. Relationships between MMP-2 concentrations in these biological fluids and subject characteristics (sex, age, and duration of type 1 diabetes), indexes of glycemic control (A1C, fasting plasma glucose, and continuous glucose monitoring system average daily glucose), and measurements of renal function (urinary albumin excretion and glomerular filtration rate} were examined. RESULTS Urine and plasma MMP-2 concentrations and plasma MMP-2 activity were all significantly elevated in type 1 diabetic subjects compared with those in control subjects. Urine MMP-2 concentrations, in particular, were correlated with several clinical parameters that infer increased risk for diabetic comorbidity and specifically for diabetic nephropathy, including higher A1C, longer duration of disease, evidence of renal hyperfiltration, and the presence of microalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS Urine and plasma MMP-2 concentrations are dysregulated in type 1 diabetes; urinary excretion of MMP-2, in particular, might provide a unique biomarker of diabetes-induced intrarenal pathologic processes. PMID:17563344

  18. Disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Docet, María F; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2011-11-15

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for disordered eating behaviors (DEB). Due to the fact that type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and adolescence, the coexistence of eating disorders (ED) and diabetes often affects adolescents and young adults. Since weight management during this state of development can be especially difficult for those with type 1 diabetes, some diabetics may restrict or omit insulin, a condition known as diabulimia, as a form of weight control. It has been clearly shown that ED in type 1 diabetics are associated with impaired metabolic control, more frequent episodes of ketoacidosis and an earlier than expected onset of diabetes-related microvascular complications, particularly retinopathy. The management of these conditions requires a multidisciplinary team formed by an endocrinologist/diabetologist, a nurse educator, a nutritionist, a psychologist and, frequently, a psychiatrist. The treatment of type 1 diabetes patients with DEB and ED should have the following components: diabetes treatment, nutritional management and psychological therapy. A high index of suspicion of the presence of an eating disturbance, particularly among those patients with persistent poor metabolic control, repeated episodes of ketoacidosis and/or weight and shape concerns are recommended in the initial stage of diabetes treatment, especially in young women. Given the extent of the problem and the severe medical risk associated with it, more clinical and technological research aimed to improve its treatment is critical to the future health of this at-risk population.

  19. Diabetes Impairs Wnt3 Protein-induced Neurogenesis in Olfactory Bulbs via Glutamate Transporter 1 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Tamami; Hidaka, Ryo; Fujimaki, Shin; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive function. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibit a loss of neurogenesis and deficits in behavioral tasks involving spatial learning and memory; thus, impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to diabetes-associated cognitive deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that adult neurogenesis generally occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the subventricular zone, and the olfactory bulbs (OB) and is defective in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that OB neurogenesis and associated behaviors would be affected in diabetes. In this study, we show that inhibition of Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in the OB causes several behavioral deficits in STZ-induced diabetic rats, including impaired odor discrimination, cognitive dysfunction, and increased anxiety. Notably, the sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters and excitatory amino acid transporters that localize to GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals decreased in the OB of diabetic rats. Moreover, GAT1 inhibitor administration also hindered Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in vitro Collectively, these data suggest that STZ-induced diabetes adversely affects OB neurogenesis via GABA and glutamate transporter systems, leading to functional impairments in olfactory performance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mehravar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Diabetes self-management can reduce complications and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 562 Iranian patients older than 30 years of age with type 2 diabetes who received treatment at the Diabetes Research Center of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were identified. The participants were enrolled and completed questionnaires between January and April 2014. Patients’ diabetes self-management was assessed as an independent variable by using the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire translated into Persian. The outcomes were the microvascular complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, identified from the clinical records of each patient. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs between diabetes self-management and the microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant association was found between the diabetes self-management sum scale and neuropathy (adjusted OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.92, p=0.01. Additionally, weak evidence was found of an association between the sum scale score of diabetes self-management and nephropathy (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.05, p=0.09. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, a lower diabetes self-management score was associated with higher rates of nephropathy and neuropathy.

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastra, Guido; Syed, Sofia; Kurukulasuriya, L Romayne; Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R

    2014-03-01

    Patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic renal disease. Factors involved in the pathogenesis of both hypertension and type 2 diabetes include inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress, inflammation, impaired insulin-mediated vasodilatation, augmented sympathetic nervous system activation, altered innate and adaptive immunity, and abnormal sodium processing by the kidney. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is a key therapeutic strategy in the treatment of hypertension in type 2 diabetes. Emerging therapies for resistant hypertension as often exists in patients with diabetes, include renal denervation and carotid body denervation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lavkulhydratdiæt til patienter med type 2-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Kampmann, Eva-Marie; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Recently, low-carbohydrate diets have increased in popularity as a method to achieve glycaemic control and weight loss in Type 2 diabetes patients. However, there is a lack of consistency and long-term results in existing studies on patients with Type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address current...... knowledge of low-carbohydrate diets and how they affect glycaemic control, diabetic dyslipidaemia, weight and markers of cardiovascular risk, and our aim is to aid medical practitioners in guiding patients with Type 2 diabetes who wish to try a low-carbohydrate diet in order to take control of their disease....

  3. Diabetes care provider perceptions on family challenges of pediatric type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric healthcare providers' perspectives on barriers to diabetes self-management among youth with type 1 diabetes and strategies to overcome them were explored qualitatively. Family conflict about diabetes care was viewed as a common problem, addressable by behavioral interventions to improve co...

  4. Biomarkers and prediction models for type 2 diabetes and diabetes related outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Ouder worden, overgewicht, diabetes in de familie en een inactieve leefstijl verhogen het risico op type 2 diabetes. Gelukkig kan diabetes ook voorkomen of uitgesteld worden, door bijvoorbeeld gezond te eten en te bewegen. Uitstel betekent ook uitstel van complicaties, zoals hartproblemen en

  5. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bostak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of type II diabetes mellitus and carries with it the threat of blindness. Accurate information regarding the incidence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors is important in the prevention of its development and of the visual impairment caused by this complication. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We have also evaluated the association of diabetic retinopathy with clinical and biochemical variables. In a cross-sectional study, 152 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus were referred from two outpatient clinics in Tehran for ophthalmologic exam to detect retinopathy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed and data regarding risk factors were extracted from routine medical records. Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. The overall prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 13.8 %( 21 cases: three cases with microaneurysm only, 10 with mild, 5 with moderate and 2 with severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only one patient had advanced proliferative retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with age, duration of disease, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure. Diabetic retinopathy is common in newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus patients. Ophthalmologic consultation is essential at the time of diagnosis for all patients.

  6. Screening for type 2 diabetes in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, P.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    The presented studies were conducted within the framework of the international ADDITION study (Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care), a randomised controlled trial in 3,057 screen-detected type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of ADDITION is to evaluate whether screening for type 2 diabetes in general practice is feasible and subsequent intensified, multifactorial treatment beneficial. Intensified treatment consisted of pharmacolo...

  7. Type 2 diabetes: postprandial hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ajikumar V Aryangat; John E Gerich

    2010-01-01

    Ajikumar V Aryangat, John E GerichUniversity of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USAAbstract: Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for both the microvascular and macrovascular complications in  patients with type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the cardiovascular results of large outcomes trials in diabetes and presents new evidence on the role of hyperglycemia, with particular emphasis on postprandial hyperglycemia, in adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabet...

  8. Association of depression with type 2 diabetes and relevant factors

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Kalantari; Alireza Jafarinezhad; Behzad Zohrevand

    2014-01-01

    Background : Based on the high prevalence of diabetes and depression in Rasht, we conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence of depression in type 2 diabetic patients, and its association with glycemic control, chronic complications, and some clinical and paraclinical parameters in this northern state of Iran. Materials and Methods : Beck depression inventory was used for evaluating depression on 90 type 2 diabetics and 90 healthy controls selected. Information on demographic and clinic...

  9. Sexual Dysfunction in Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Enzlin, Paul; Rosen, Raymond; Wiegel, Markus; Brown, Jeanette; Wessells, Hunter; Gatcomb, Patricia; Rutledge, Brandy; Chan, Ka-Ling; Cleary, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors associated with sexual dysfunction in a well-characterized cohort of women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study was conducted in women enrolled in the long-term Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, a North American study of men and women with type 1 diabetes. At year 10 of the EDIC study, 652 female participants were invited to complete a validated self-report mea...

  10. Heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Balsamo Gardim; Oliveira, Bruno Affonso P. de; Aline Fernanda B. Bernardo; Rayana Loch Gomes; Francis Lopes Pacagnelli; Roselene Modolo R. Lorençoni; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To gather current information about the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus on children's cardiac autonomic behavior.DATA SOURCES: The search of articles was conducted on PubMed, Ibecs, Medline, Cochrane, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro databases using the MeSH terms: "autonomic nervous system", "diabetes mellitus", "child", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", "sympathetic nervous system" and "parasympathetic nervous system", and their respective versions in Portuguese (DeCS). Articles published f...

  11. Surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleckas, A; Venclauskas, L; Wallenius, V; Lönroth, H; Fändriks, L

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, and most of the cases are type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity is well established, and surgical treatment is widely used for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim was to present current knowledge about the possible mechanisms responsible for glucose control after surgical procedures and to review the surgical treatment results. Medical literature was searched for the articles presenting the impact of surgical treatment on glycemic control, long-term results, and possible mechanisms of action among obese individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery depends on the definition of the remission used. Complete remission rate after surgery with the new criteria is lower than was considered before. Randomized controlled studies demonstrate that surgery is superior to best medical treatment for the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The recurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery is observed in up to 40% of cases with ≥ 5 years of follow-up. Despite the recurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in this group, better glycemic control and lower risk of macrovascular complications are present. Incretin effects on glycemic control after bariatric surgery are well described, but the role of other possible mechanisms (bile acids, microbiota, intestinal gluconeogenesis) in humans is unclear. Surgery is an effective treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese patients. The most optimal surgical procedure for the treatment of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is still to be established. More research is needed to explore the mechanisms of glycemic control after bariatric surgery. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  12. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Eun-Kyong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Choi, Youn-Hee; Won, Kyu-Chang; Moon, Jun Sung; Merchant, Anwar T; Lee, Hee-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    ... self management and periodontal health status. Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI...

  13. Increased mean platelet volume in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Coşkun Yenigün

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Platelet functions have important roles in the development of vascular complications in diabetic patients. Platelets with increased volume have increased activity compared to smaller ones; therefore, mean platelet volume (MPV is used as a marker for platelet activity. In the present study, we evaluated MPV in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM and its associations with diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Methods: Consecutive type II diabetic patients were screened from outpatient clinic of Internal Medicine Department of Diskapı Yıldırım Beyazıt Education and Researsch Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. A total of 48 patients with type II DM and 30 age and gender matched healthy subjects constituted the study population. For all subjects a complete blood count including MPV, fasting blood glucose level and lipid parameters were studied. In diabetic patients, duration of diabetes and HbA1C level, presence of microvascular and macrovascular complications were noted additively. Mean platelet volume was compared between diabetic patients and healthy counterparents. Then, among diabetic patients, MPV was compared between the ones with and without microvascular and macrovascular complications. Results: Mean platelet volume was found significantly higher in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic healthy subjects. Diabetic patients with at least one of the microvascular complications had significantly higher MPV than those without microvascular damage.Higher MPV levels have also been shown in diabetics with macrovascular complications compared to the ones without macrovascular disease. Conclusion: Mean platelet volume was found to be higher in type II diabetics and those having any of microvascular or macrovascular diabetic complications.

  14. Low 25-hydroxyvitamin d and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in decreased insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance, hallmarks of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We tested the hypothesis that low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population....

  15. Efficacy of standardised herbal extracts in type 1 diabetes - an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the hypoglycemic activity of Withania somnifera Dunal, Allium sativum Linn., Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult, Ferula foetida (Bunge.) Reg. and Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. extracts have been studied in an experimental model of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes was induced in albino rats by a single ...

  16. Audit on stillbirths in women with pregestational type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Mathiesen, Elisabeth Reinhardt; Ovesen, Per Glud

    2003-01-01

    To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment.......To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment....

  17. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2014-06-10

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  18. Breast-feeding and childhood-onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders.......To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders....

  19. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 1 diabetes is a serious, debilitating disease, with life-threatening complications, and the financial burden associated with the management of this disease is enormous. Early diagnosis and intervention can improve morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, in Africa, type 1 diabetes is poorly characterised, and there is ...

  20. Abnormalities of antroduodenal motility in type I diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samsom, M.; Jebbink, R. J.; Akkermans, L. M.; van Berge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the present study, a recently developed manometric technique was used to study antroduodenal motility in ambulant type I diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In 12 patients with type I diabetes, antroduodenal manometry was performed for 20 h during the fasting period and the