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Sample records for study physiologically structured

  1. Brain tissues atrophy is not always the best structural biomarker of physiological aging: A multimodal cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Andrea; Caligiuri, Maria Eugenia; Péran, Patrice; Sabatini, Umberto; Cosentino, Carlo; Amato, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a voxel-based multiple regression analysis of different magnetic resonance image modalities, including anatomical T1-weighted, T2* relaxometry, and diffusion tensor imaging. Quantitative parameters sensitive to complementary brain tissue alterations, including morphometric atrophy, mineralization, microstructural damage, and anisotropy loss, were compared in a linear physiological aging model in 140 healthy subjects (range 20-74 years). The performance of different predictors and the identification of the best biomarker of age-induced structural variation were compared without a priori anatomical knowledge. The best quantitative predictors in several brain regions were iron deposition and microstructural damage, rather than macroscopic tissue atrophy. Age variations were best resolved with a combination of markers, suggesting that multiple predictors better capture age-induced tissue alterations. These findings highlight the importance of a combined evaluation of multimodal biomarkers for the study of aging and point to a number of novel applications for the method described.

  2. Development of the field of structural physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUJIYOSHI, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Electron crystallography is especially useful for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins — key molecules with important functions in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique for analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that closely simulate their natural biological environment. Utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium-cooled specimen stages that were developed through a personal motivation to understand the functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, the structures of membrane proteins can be analyzed at a higher than 3 Å resolution. This review covers four objectives. First, I introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, I recount some of the struggles involved in developing cryo-electron microscopes. Third, I review the structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins mainly by electron crystallography using cryo-electron microscopes. Finally, I discuss multifunctional channels named “adhennels” based on structures analyzed using electron and X-ray crystallography. PMID:26560835

  3. Space Physiology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, A. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Boda, W. L.; Ertl, A. C.; Schneider, S. M.; Hutchinson, K. J.; Lee, S. M.; Murthy, G.; Putcha, L.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations suggest that exercise in space to date has lacked sufficient loads to maintain musculoskeletal mass. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) produces a force at the feet equal to the product of the LBNP and body cross-sectional area at the waist. Supine exercise within 50-60 mm Hg LBNP improves tolerance to LBNP and produces forces similar to those occurring during upright posture on Earth. Thus, exercise within LBNP may help prevent deconditioning of astronauts by stressing tissues of the lower body in a manner similar to gravity and also, may provide a safe and effective alternative to centrifugation in terms of cost, mass, volume, and power usage. We hypothesize that supine treadmill exercise during LBNP at one body weight (50-60 mm Hg LBNP) will provide cardiovascular and musculoskeletal loads similar to those experienced while upright in lg. Also, daily supine treadmill running in a LBNP chamber will maintain aerobic fitness, orthostatic tolerance, and musculoskeletal structure and function during bed rest (simulated microgravity).

  4. Molluscan hemocyanin: structure, evolution, and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Sanae; Matsui, Takashi; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2017-12-12

    Most molluscs have blue blood because their respiratory molecule is hemocyanin, a type-3 copper-binding protein that turns blue upon oxygen binding. Molluscan hemocyanins are huge cylindrical multimeric glycoproteins that are found freely dissolved in the hemolymph. With molecular masses ranging from 3.3 to 13.5 MDa, molluscan hemocyanins are among the largest known proteins. They form decamers or multi-decamers of 330- to 550-kDa subunits comprising more than seven paralogous functional units. Based on the organization of functional domains, they assemble to form decamers, di-decamers, and tri-decamers. Their structure has been investigated using a combination of single particle electron cryo-microsopy of the entire structure and high-resolution X-ray crystallography of the functional unit, although, the one exception is squid hemocyanin for which a crystal structure analysis of the entire molecule has been carried out. In this review, we explain the molecular characteristics of molluscan hemocyanin mainly from the structural viewpoint, in which the structure of the functional unit, architecture of the huge cylindrical multimer, relationship between the composition of the functional unit and entire tertiary structure, and possible functions of the carbohydrates are introduced. We also discuss the evolutionary implications and physiological significance of molluscan hemocyanin.

  5. Structure-Function Relations in Physiology Education: Where's the Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E.; Gardner, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such…

  6. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in

  7. Morphological, physiological and biochemical studies on Pyricularia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-02-28

    Magnaporthe grisea) causes significant yield loss in Ethiopia. This study was conducted to isolate, identify and characterize the pathogen (using morphological, physiological and biochemical methods). Methodology and ...

  8. Physiological Studies of the Hyperkinetic Child I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, James H.; And Others

    Reported were results of the first year of a 3-year physiological study of the hyperkinetic child. The male subjects were 6 to 9 years of age, attending school, without sensory defects, 80 or above in Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Full Scale, off medication for 3 months prior to testing, and diagnosed as hyperactive.…

  9. Structure-function relations in physiology education: Where's the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E; Gardner, Stephanie M

    2017-06-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such as structure-function relations, selectively neglect mechanisms by not mentioning this term explicitly. We explored how students characterized mechanisms and functions to shed light on how students make sense of these terms. Students characterized mechanisms as 1 ) processes that occur at levels of organization lower than that of functions; and 2 ) as detailed events with many steps involved. We also found that students produced more variability in how they characterized functions compared with mechanisms: students characterized functions in relation to multiple levels of organization and multiple definitions. We interpret these results as evidence that students see mechanisms as holding a more narrow definition than used in the biological sciences, and that students struggle to coordinate and distinguish mechanisms from functions due to cognitive processes germane to learning in many domains. We offer the instructional suggestion that we scaffold student learning by affording students opportunities to relate and also distinguish between these terms so central to understanding physiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Hypoxia and inactivity related physiological changes precede or take place in absence of significant rearrangements in bacterial community structure: The PlanHab randomized trial pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Šket

    Full Text Available We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the randomized crossover design of run-in (5 day and experimental phases (21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR, hypoxic bed rest (HBR and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, with balanced fluid and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2 and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4000 m simulated altitude, respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal environment such as defecation frequency, intestinal electrical conductivity (IEC, sterol and polyphenol content and diversity, indole, aromaticity and spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM were measured (64 variables. The structure and diversity of bacterial microbial community was assessed using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Inactivity negatively affected frequency of defecation and in combination with hypoxia increased IEC (p < 0.05. In contrast, sterol and polyphenol diversity and content, various characteristics of DOM and aromatic compounds, the structure and diversity of bacterial microbial community were not significantly affected over time. A new in-house PlanHab database was established to integrate all measured variables on host physiology, diet, experiment, immune and metabolic markers (n = 231. The observed progressive decrease in defecation frequency and concomitant increase in IEC suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state towards the developed symptoms of low magnitude obesity-related syndromes was dose dependent on the extent of time spent in inactivity and preceded or took place in absence of significant rearrangements in bacterial microbial community. Species B. thetaiotamicron, B. fragilis, B

  11. OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED PRACTICAL EXAMINATION AS AN ASSESSMENT TOOL IN PHYSIOLOGY

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    Fasna K. A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Assessment is the process by which the teacher and the student gain knowledge about student progress. The conventional practical examination is beset with several problems. The Objective Structured Practical Examination (OSPE can assess clinical skills, knowledge and attitude in an appropriate, stepwise, methodical, objective and time-orientated manner. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted to introduce the concept of OSPE to first year undergraduate medical students and to evaluate student’s feedback about OSPE as an assessment tool in physiology practicals. OSPE module was introduced for 60 first year MBBS students and practical examination was conducted by means of OSPE. Student’s perception towards OSPE was assessed by means of their response to a standard questionnaire. RESULTS 83% of students felt OSPE as a good form of evaluation tool for the practical exercise and most of them opined that structured pattern of evaluation covers the appropriate cognitive domain in assessing the appropriate knowledge and comprehension. 90% felt it to be useful than the conventional examination pattern. CONCLUSION The students’ feedback shows that OSPE is an acceptable useful assessment tool for practical skills.

  12. STUDY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF INDIAN BOXERS

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    Gulshan Lal Khanna

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of Indian National boxers as well as to assess the cardiovascular adaptation to graded exercise and actual boxing round. Two different studies were conducted. In the first study [N = 60, (junior boxers below-19 yrs, n = 30, (senior boxers-20-25 yrs, n = 30] different morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. In the second study (N = 21, Light Weight category- <54 kg, n = 7; Medium weight category <64 kg, n = 7 and Medium heavy weight category <75 kg, n = 7 cardiovascular responses were studied during graded exercise protocol and actual boxing bouts. Results showed a significantly higher (p < 0.05 stature, body mass, LBM, body fat and strength of back and grip in senior boxers compared to juniors. Moreover, the senior boxers possessed mesomorphic body conformation where as the juniors' possessed ectomorphic body conformation. Significantly lower (p < 0.05 aerobic capacity and anaerobic power were noted in junior boxers compared to seniors. Further, significantly higher (p < 0.05 maximal heart rates and recovery heart rates were observed in the seniors as compared to the juniors. Significantly higher maximum heart rates were noted during actual boxing compared to graded exercise. Blood lactate concentration was found to increase with the increase of workload during both graded exercise and actual boxing round. The senior boxers showed a significantly elevated (p < 0.05 levels of hemoblobin, blood urea, uric acid and peak lactate as compared to junior boxers. In the senior boxers significantly lower levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride and LDLC were observed as compared to junior boxers. No significant change has been noted in HDLC between the groups. The age and level of training in boxing has significant effect on Aerobic, anaerobic component. The study of physiological responses during graded exercise

  13. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  14. Biochemical, structural, and physiological characteristics of vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segami, Shoji; Asaoka, Mariko; Kinoshita, Satoru; Fukuda, Mayu; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2018-03-09

    Proton-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) actively translocates protons across membranes coupled with the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). H+-PPase, which is composed of a single protein and uses a simple compound as a substrate, has been recognized as a new type of ion pump in addition to the P-, F-, and V-type ion translocating ATPases. H+- and Na+-PPases are distributed in various organisms including plants, parasitic protozoa, Archaebacteria, and bacteria, but are not present in animals or yeast. Vacuolar H+-PPase has dual functions in plant cells: hydrolysis of cytosolic PPi to maintain the levels of PPi and translocation of protons into vacuoles to maintain the acidity of the vacuolar lumen. Acidification performed with the vacuolar type H+-ATPase and H+-PPase is essential to maintain acidic conditions, which are necessary for vacuolar hydrolytic enzymes and for supplying energy to secondary active transporters. Recent studies using loss-of-function mutant lines of H+-PPase and complementation lines with soluble PPases have emphasized the physiological importance of the scavenging role of PPi. An overview of the main features of H+-PPases present in the vacuolar membrane is provided in terms of tissue distribution in plants, intracellular localization, structure-function relationship, biochemical potential as a proton pump, and functional stability.

  15. Reproducibility of Quantitative Structural and Physiological MRI Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    metabolites with percent standard deviation Cramer- Rao lower bounds ≤20% were included in statistical analyses. One subject’s MRI#1 and one sub...relative to the mean as it is calculated as the standard deviation nor- malized by the average between visits. MRD provides information about the...inherent technical and physiological consistency of these measurements. This longitudinal study examined the variance and reproducibility of commonly

  16. Linking vegetation structure, function and physiology through spectroscopic remote sensing

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    Serbin, S.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Shiklomanov, A. N.; Rogers, A.; Desai, A. R.; Kruger, E. L.; Townsend, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem process models require detailed information on ecosystem states and canopy properties to properly simulate the fluxes of carbon (C), water and energy from the land to the atmosphere and assess the vulnerability of ecosystems to perturbations. Current models fail to adequately capture the magnitude, spatial variation, and seasonality of terrestrial C uptake and storage, leading to significant uncertainties in the size and fate of the terrestrial C sink. By and large, these parameter and process uncertainties arise from inadequate spatial and temporal representation of plant traits, vegetation structure, and functioning. With increases in computational power and changes to model architecture and approaches, it is now possible for models to leverage detailed, data rich and spatially explicit descriptions of ecosystems to inform parameter distributions and trait tradeoffs. In this regard, spectroscopy and imaging spectroscopy data have been shown to be invaluable observational datasets to capture broad-scale spatial and, eventually, temporal dynamics in important vegetation properties. We illustrate the linkage of plant traits and spectral observations to supply key data constraints for model parameterization. These constraints can come either in the form of the raw spectroscopic data (reflectance, absorbtance) or physiological traits derived from spectroscopy. In this presentation we highlight our ongoing work to build ecological scaling relationships between critical vegetation characteristics and optical properties across diverse and complex canopies, including temperate broadleaf and conifer forests, Mediterranean vegetation, Arctic systems, and agriculture. We focus on work at the leaf, stand, and landscape scales, illustrating the importance of capturing the underlying variability in a range of parameters (including vertical variation within canopies) to enable more efficient scaling of traits related to functional diversity of ecosystems.

  17. Diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy: incidence of physiologic variants of joint structures

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    Martin Mikek

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroscopy first described by Burman already in 1930, has evolved only in last 15 years to become a common accepted diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in treatment of different shoulder conditions. Parallely to the advances in arthroscopic operative techniques also our knowledge about arthroscopic shoulder anatomy expanded and many physiologic variants in anatomical structures have been identified in glenohumeral joint. It is very important to be familiar with those when performing shoulder arthroscopy, since in some cases they can easily be mistaken for pathologic lesions which can lead to unnecessary and potentially harmful operative procedures.Methods: We prospectively evaluated arthroscopic shoulder anatomy in 54 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies performed for different shoulder conditions in our practice. In all patients diagnostic arthroscopy was performed following the SCOI protocol described by Snyder. With regard to the anatomy variants described in literature and its importance in shoulder arthroscopy, special attention was focused on three regions of glenohumeral joint: long head of biceps tendon with its anchor and adjacent superior labrum, anterior joint capsule with glenohumeral ligaments and subscapularis tendon and on anterior labrum. The incidence of the observed anatomical variants was calculated. The most common combinations of anatomy variants were described and schematically presented.Results: The most significant anatomical variant observed in the region of long head of biceps tendon, biceps anchor and superior labrum was sublabral sulcus that was observed in 17% of shoulders. The region of anterior capsule with glenohumeral ligaments and subscapularis tendon showed greatest anatomical variability, especially the MGHL and the IGHL were very variably expressed and in some cases also absent. In the region of anterior labrum two significant anatomical variants were observed, one of them sublabral hole

  18. Cognitive flexibility and undergraduate physiology students: increasing advanced knowledge acquisition within an ill-structured domain.

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    Rhodes, Ashley E; Rozell, Timothy G

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive flexibility is defined as the ability to assimilate previously learned information and concepts to generate novel solutions to new problems. This skill is crucial for success within ill-structured domains such as biology, physiology, and medicine, where many concepts are simultaneously required for understanding a complex problem, yet the problem consists of patterns or combinations of concepts that are not consistently used or needed across all examples. To succeed within ill-structured domains, a student must possess a certain level of cognitive flexibility: rigid thought processes and prepackaged informational retrieval schemes relying on rote memorization will not suffice. In this study, we assessed the cognitive flexibility of undergraduate physiology students using a validated instrument entitled Student's Approaches to Learning (SAL). The SAL evaluates how deeply and in what way information is processed, as well as the investment of time and mental energy that a student is willing to expend by measuring constructs such as elaboration and memorization. Our results indicate that students who rely primarily on memorization when learning new information have a smaller knowledge base about physiological concepts, as measured by a prior knowledge assessment and unit exams. However, students who rely primarily on elaboration when learning new information have a more well-developed knowledge base about physiological concepts, which is displayed by higher scores on a prior knowledge assessment and increased performance on unit exams. Thus students with increased elaboration skills possibly possess a higher level of cognitive flexibility and are more likely to succeed within ill-structured domains. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Senescence Marker Protein 30: Insights Linking Structural, Enzymatic, and Physiological Functions

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    Chakraborti, Subhendu; Bahnson, Brian J. (Delaware)

    2010-05-25

    Human senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30), which functions enzymatically as a lactonase, hydrolyzes various carbohydrate lactones. The penultimate step in vitamin-C biosynthesis is catalyzed by this enzyme in nonprimate mammals. It has also been implicated as an organophosphate hydrolase, with the ability to hydrolyze diisopropyl phosphofluoridate and other nerve agents. SMP30 was originally identified as an aging marker protein, whose expression decreased androgen independently in aging cells. SMP30 is also referred to as regucalcin and has been suggested to have functions in calcium homeostasis. The crystal structure of the human enzyme has been solved from X-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.4 {angstrom}. The protein has a 6-bladed {beta}-propeller fold, and it contains a single metal ion. Crystal structures have been solved with the metal site bound with either a Ca{sup 2+} or a Zn{sup 2+} atom. The catalytic role of the metal ion has been confirmed by mutagenesis of the metal coordinating residues. Kinetic studies using the substrate gluconolactone showed a k{sub cat} preference of divalent cations in the order Zn{sup 2+} > Mn{sup 2+} > Ca{sup 2+} > Mg{sup 2+}. Notably, the Ca{sup 2+} had a significantly higher value of K{sub d} compared to those of the other metal ions tested (566, 82, 7, and 0.6 {micro}m for Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+}, respectively), suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+}-bound form may be physiologically relevant for stressed cells with an elevated free calcium level.

  20. Directed case study method for teaching human anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, W H; Wright, A W

    1996-06-01

    A mastery of human anatomy and physiology requires a familiarity with a vast number of details about the human body. A directed method of case analysis is described that helps students deepen and solidify their understanding of anatomical and physiological facts, concepts, and principles. The successful case had four distinctive features as follows: clear learning objectives, a concise and informative scenario, straightforward and didactic questions, and an emphasis on information readily available to the student. A directed case study is presented, and its salient features are described. A procedure for integrating case analyses into an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course is outlined. Student response to this type of case study suggests that this method improves the ease of learning, the depth of learning, and an appreciation of the relevance of and a curiosity about anatomy and physiology. The addition of case analyses to a two-semester integrated course in anatomy and physiology was also associated with an improvement in exam performance. The regular use of directed case analysis is a valuable addition to the traditional methods of lecture, textbook reading, and laboratory for the teaching of human anatomy and physiology.

  1. Bioenergetic and physiological studies of hyperthermophilic archaea. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    This project focuses on physiological and bioenergetic characteristics of two representative hyperthermophilic archaea: Thermococcus litoralis (T{sub opt} 88 C) and Pyrococcus furiosus (T{sub opt} 98 C). Both are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs which grow in the presence or absence of reducible sulfur compounds. T. litoralis was studied in relation to information previously developed for P. furiosus: effect of sulfur reduction on bioenergetics, preferred fermentation patterns, tungsten requirement, etc. A defined medium was developed for T. litoralis consisting of amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides. This serves as the basis for continuous culture studies probing metabolic response to media changes. P. furiosus and T. litoralis have also been found to produce a polysaccharide in the presence of maltose and yeast extract. The composition and chemical structure of this polysaccharide was investigated as well as the metabolic motivation for its production. A novel and, perhaps, primitive intracellular proteolytic complex (previously designated as protease S66) in P. furiosus was isolated and the gene encoding the subunit of the complex was cloned, sequenced and the protease expressed in active form in Eschericia coli. Among other issues, the role of this complex in protein turnover and stress response was examined in the context of this organism in addition to comparing it to other complexes in eubacterial and eukaryotic cells. Biochemical characteristics of the protease have been measured in addition to examining other proteolytic species in P. furiosus.

  2. The physiology of the normal human breast: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dixie; Gordon, Eva J; Casano, Ashley; Lahti, Sarah Michelle; Nguyen, Tinh; Preston, Alex; Tondre, Julie; Wu, Kuan; Yanase, Tiffany; Chan, Henry; Chia, David; Esfandiari, Mahtash; Himmel, Tiffany; Love, Susan M

    2011-12-01

    The physiology of the nonlactating human breast likely plays a key role in factors that contribute to the etiology of breast cancer and other breast conditions. Although there has been extensive research into the physiology of lactation, few reports explore the physiology of the resting mammary gland, including mechanisms by which compounds such as hormones, drugs, and potential carcinogens enter the breast ducts. The purpose of this study was to explore transport of exogenous drugs into ductal fluid in nonlactating women and determine if their concentrations in the fluid are similar to those observed in the breast milk of lactating women. We selected two compounds that have been well characterized during lactation, caffeine and cimetidine. Caffeine passively diffuses into breast milk, but cimetidine is actively transported and concentrated in breast milk. After ingestion of caffeine and cimetidine, 14 nonlactating subjects had blood drawn and underwent ductal lavage at five time points over 12 h to measure drug levels in the fluid and blood. The concentrations of both caffeine and cimetidine in lavage fluid were substantially less than those observed in breast milk. Our results support recent evidence that the cimetidine transporter is not expressed in the nonlactating mammary gland, and highlight intriguing differences in the physiology and molecular transport of the lactating and nonlactating breast. The findings of this exploratory study warrant further exploration into the physiology of the nonlactating mammary gland to elucidate factors involved in disease initiation and progression.

  3. The physiological basis and application of renal radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    A knowledge of the basic physiology of the kidney is essential for an understanding of the application of radionuclide studies in clinical practice. A knowledge of the physiology of the kidney allows one to develop physiological models that are isomorphic and then apply the appropriate type of data analysis in relationship to these models. In this way mistakes in the type of analysis can be avoided and a strong basis for the interpretation of renal radionuclide studies in health and disease is thereby provided. Methods for measuring total renal function, the contribution of each kidney to total renal function, the presence or absence of obstructive nephropathy and the determination of the relative flows to the cortical and juxtamedullary nephrons are given as examples of this approach. (author)

  4. Polyploidy and the relationship between leaf structure and function: implications for correlated evolution of anatomy, morphology, and physiology in Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Yarkhunova, Yulia; Vidal, Katherine; Ewers, Brent E; Weinig, Cynthia

    2017-01-05

    Polyploidy is well studied from a genetic and genomic perspective, but the morphological, anatomical, and physiological consequences of polyploidy remain relatively uncharacterized. Whether these potential changes bear on functional integration or are idiosyncratic remains an open question. Repeated allotetraploid events and multiple genomic combinations as well as overlapping targets of artificial selection make the Brassica triangle an excellent system for exploring variation in the connection between plant structure (anatomy and morphology) and function (physiology). We examine phenotypic integration among structural aspects of leaves including external morphology and internal anatomy with leaf-level physiology among several species of Brassica. We compare diploid and allotetraploid species to ascertain patterns of phenotypic correlations among structural and functional traits and test the hypothesis that allotetraploidy results in trait disintegration allowing for transgressive phenotypes and additional evolutionary and crop improvement potential. Among six Brassica species, we found significant effects of species and ploidy level for morphological, anatomical and physiological traits. We identified three suites of intercorrelated traits in both diploid parents and allotetraploids: Morphological traits (such as leaf area and perimeter) anatomic traits (including ab- and ad- axial epidermis) and aspects of physiology. In general, there were more correlations between structural and functional traits for allotetraploid hybrids than diploid parents. Parents and hybrids did not have any significant structure-function correlations in common. Of particular note, there were no significant correlations between morphological structure and physiological function in the diploid parents. Increased phenotypic integration in the allotetraploid hybrids may be due, in part, to increased trait ranges or simply different structure-function relationships. Genomic and chromosomal

  5. A quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, K.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable. (orig.)

  6. What about getting physiological information into dynamic gamma camera studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuru, A.; Nickles, R. J.; Holden, J. E.; Polcyn, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A general technique has been developed for the multiplexing of time dependent analog signals into the individual frames of a gamma camera dynamic function study. A pulse train, frequency-modulated by the physiological signal, is capacitively coupled to the preamplifier servicing anyone of the outer phototubes of the camera head. These negative tail pulses imitate photoevents occuring at a point outside of the camera field of view, chosen to occupy a data cell in an unused corner of the computer-stored square image. By defining a region of interest around this cell, the resulting time-activity curve displays the physiological variable in temporal synchrony with the radiotracer distribution. (author)

  7. Physiological vagility: correlations with dispersal and population genetic structure of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Hedrick, Michael S; Hancock, Thomas V

    2014-01-01

    Physiological vagility represents the capacity to move sustainably and is central to fully explaining the processes involved in creating fine-scale genetic structure of amphibian populations, because movement (vagility) and the duration of movement determine the dispersal distance individuals can move to interbreed. The tendency for amphibians to maintain genetic differentiation over relatively short distances (isolation by distance) has been attributed to their limited dispersal capacity (low vagility) compared with other vertebrates. Earlier studies analyzing genetic isolation and population differentiation with distance treat all amphibians as equally vagile and attempt to explain genetic differentiation only in terms of physical environmental characteristics. We introduce a new quantitative metric for vagility that incorporates aerobic capacity, body size, body temperature, and the cost of transport and is independent of the physical characteristics of the environment. We test our metric for vagility with data for dispersal distance and body mass in amphibians and correlate vagility with data for genetic differentiation (F'(ST)). Both dispersal distance and vagility increase with body size. Differentiation (F'(ST)) of neutral microsatellite markers with distance was inversely and significantly (R2=0.61) related to ln vagility. Genetic differentiation with distance was not significantly related to body mass alone. Generalized observations are validated with several specific amphibian studies. These results suggest that interspecific differences in physiological capacity for movement (vagility) can contribute to genetic differentiation and metapopulation structure in amphibians.

  8. Fibrosis: a structural modulator of Sinoatrial Node physiology and dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Csepe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Heart rhythm is initialized and controlled by the Sinoatrial Node (SAN, the primary pacemaker of the heart. The SAN is a heterogeneous multi-compartment structure characterized by clusters of specialized cardiomyocytes, enmeshed within strands of connective tissue or fibrosis. Intranodal fibrosis is emerging as an important modulator of structural and functional integrity of the SAN pacemaker complex. In adult human hearts, fatty tissue and fibrosis insulate the SAN from the hyperpolarizing effect of the surrounding atria while electrical communication between the SAN and right atrium is restricted to discrete SAN conduction pathways. The amount of fibrosis within the SAN is inversely correlated with heart rate, while age and heart size are positively correlated with fibrosis. Pathological upregulation of fibrosis within the SAN may lead to tachycardia-bradycardia arrhythmias and cardiac arrest, possibly due to SAN reentry and exit block, and is associated with atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias, heart failure and myocardial infarction. In this review, we will discuss current literature on the role of fibrosis in normal SAN structure and function, as well as the causes and consequences of SAN fibrosis upregulation in disease conditions.

  9. Study skills in anatomy and physiology: Is there a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Polly R; Barger, J Bradley; Schutte, Audra F

    2016-01-01

    Many factors influence the way individual students study, including but not limited to: previous coursework, attitudes toward the class (motivation, intimidation, risk, etc.), metacognition, and work schedules. However, little of this research has involved medical students. The present article asks the question, "Do individual medical students study differently for different classes?" Study skills surveys were given to United States medical students at an allopathic medical school and an osteopathic medical school. Students were surveyed near the end of their first year gross anatomy course and again near the end of their first year physiology course. Survey items included Likert scale and open-ended questions about study habits and basic demographic information. The survey responses were correlated with each student's final grade percentages in the courses. Analysis revealed that the four most common study habits were reviewing lecture notes, taking practice examinations, completing learning exercises, and making drawings and diagrams. The two surveys (anatomy and physiology) from each individual were also compared to see if students reported different study habits in anatomy versus physiology. A negative correlation was found between changing study habits between courses and final anatomy grade percentages. Additional analyses suggest that those students who do change their study habits between courses are increasing the number of study strategies that they attempt. This increase in the number of study strategies attempted may not allow the student to reach the same depth of understanding as their colleagues who utilize fewer strategies. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Salt effect on physiological, biochemical and anatomical structures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... In this study, we evaluated the salt concentration effect on plant growth, mineral composition, ... absence of salt. This was accompanied by an increase in the length of palisade cells, and the width of spongy collenchyma lacuna. The stem had a subquadrangular shape .... formation was recorded at 470 nm.

  11. Quantification of human lung structure and physiology using hyperpolarized 129Xe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yulin V; Quirk, James D; Ruset, Iulian C; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Hersman, F William; Woods, Jason C

    2014-01-01

    To present in vivo, human validation of a previously proposed method to measure key pulmonary parameters related to lung microstructure and physiology. Some parameters, such as blood-air barrier thickness, cannot be measured readily by any other noninvasive modality. Healthy volunteers (n = 12) were studied in 1.5T and 3T whole body human scanners using hyperpolarized xenon. Xenon uptake by lung parenchyma and blood was measured using a chemical shift saturation recovery sequence. Both dissolved-xenon peaks at 197 ppm and 217-218 ppm were fitted against a model of xenon exchange (MOXE) as functions of exchange time. Parameters related to lung function and structure can be obtained by fitting to this model. The following results were obtained from xenon uptake (averaged over all healthy volunteers): surface-area-to-volume ratio = 210 ± 50 cm(-1) ; total septal wall thickness = 9.2 ± 6.5 μm; blood-air barrier thickness = 1.0 ± 0.3 μm; hematocrit = 27 ± 4%; pulmonary capillary blood transit time = 1.3 ± 0.3 s, in good agreement with literature values from invasive experiments. More detailed fitting results are listed in the text. The initial in vivo human results demonstrate that our proposed methods can be used to noninvasively determine lung physiology by simultaneous quantification of a few important pulmonary parameters. This method is highly promising to become a versatile screening method for lung diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Climate, physiological tolerance and sex-biased dispersal shape genetic structure of Neotropical orchid bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uribe, Margarita M; Zamudio, Kelly R; Cardoso, Carolina F; Danforth, Bryan N

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the impact of past climatic events on the demographic history of extant species is critical for predicting species' responses to future climate change. Palaeoclimatic instability is a major mechanism of lineage diversification in taxa with low dispersal and small geographical ranges in tropical ecosystems. However, the impact of these climatic events remains questionable for the diversification of species with high levels of gene flow and large geographical distributions. In this study, we investigate the impact of Pleistocene climate change on three Neotropical orchid bee species (Eulaema bombiformis, E. meriana and E. cingulata) with transcontinental distributions and different physiological tolerances. We first generated ecological niche models to identify species-specific climatically stable areas during Pleistocene climatic oscillations. Using a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear markers, we inferred calibrated phylogenies and estimated historical demographic parameters to reconstruct the phylogeographical history of each species. Our results indicate species with narrower physiological tolerance experienced less suitable habitat during glaciations and currently exhibit strong population structure in the mitochondrial genome. However, nuclear markers with low and high mutation rates show lack of association with geography. These results combined with lower migration rate estimates from the mitochondrial than the nuclear genome suggest male-biased dispersal. We conclude that despite large effective population sizes and capacity for long-distance dispersal, climatic instability is an important mechanism of maternal lineage diversification in orchid bees. Thus, these Neotropical pollinators are susceptible to disruption of genetic connectivity in the event of large-scale climatic changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Influence of phosphorus availability on the community structure and physiology of cultured biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Chun; Qin, Hongjie; Li, Yinxia; Zheng, Jiaoli; Peng, Chengrong; Li, Dunhai

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms have important effects on nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems. However, publications about the community structure and functions under laboratory conditions are rare. This study focused on the developmental and physiological properties of cultured biofilms under various phosphorus concentrations performed in a closely controlled continuous flow incubator. The results showed that the biomass (Chl a) and photosynthesis of algae were inhibited under P-limitation conditions, while the phosphatase activity and P assimilation rate were promoted. The algal community structure of biofilms was more likely related to the colonization stage than with the phosphorus availability. Cyanobacteria were more competitive than other algae in biofilms, particularly when cultured under low P levels. A dominance shift occurred from non-filamentous algae in the early stage to filamentous algae in the mid and late stages under P concentrations of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.6 mg/L. However, the total N content, dry weight biomass and bacterial community structure of biofilms were unaffected by phosphorus availability. This may be attributed to the low respiration rate, high accumulation of extracellular polymeric substances and high alkaline phosphatase activity in biofilms when phosphorus availability was low. The bacterial community structure differed over time, while there was little difference between the four treatments, which indicated that it was mainly affected by the colonization stage of the biofilms rather than the phosphorus availability. Altogether, these results suggested that the development of biofilms was influenced by the phosphorus availability and/or the colonization stage and hence determined the role that biofilms play in the overlying water. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Dynamics of a physiologically structured population in a time-varying environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, Irene Louise Torpe; Starke, Jens; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically structured population models have become a valuable tool to model the dynamics of populations. In a stationary environment such models can exhibit equilibrium solutions as well as periodic solutions. However, for many organisms the environment is not stationary, but varies more...... or less regularly. In order to understand the interaction between an external environmental forcing and the internal dynamics in a population, we examine the response of a physiologically structured population model to a periodic variation in the food resource. We explore the addition of forcing in two...... cases: (A) where the population dynamics is in equilibrium in a stationary environment, and (B) where the population dynamics exhibits a periodic solution in a stationary environment. When forcing is applied in case A, the solutions are mainly periodic. In case B the forcing signal interacts...

  15. Physiological Studies of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gunda

    medium and (specific) acidification activity in milk in response to the extracellular pH (pHex) during batch fermentations and in response to stress during downstream processing and storage as frozen, freeze- and spray-dried cells. In this PhD thesis, in situ flow cytometric viability assessment...... fermentation, downstream processing and storage in the absence of a protectant. However, storing freeze-dried L. lactis cells at 30 °C negatively affected the culturability and acidification activity. The reactivation of freeze-dried cells in fermentation medium prior to flow cytometric viability assessment...... industrial production by employing flow cytometry for viability assessment, cell size comparison, intracellular pH (pHi) determination and cell sorting. The physiological studies of L. lactis were complemented by examining the growth behavior, glucose consumption, lactate production, culturability on solid...

  16. Insights from Systems Biology in Physiological Studies: Learning from Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Imenez Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology presents an integrated view of biological systems, focusing on the relations between elements, whether functional or evolutionary, and providing a rich framework for the comprehension of life. At the same time, many low-throughput experimental studies are performed without influence from this integrated view, whilst high-throughput experiments use low-throughput results in their validation and interpretation. We propose an inversion in this logic, and ask which benefits could be obtained from a holistic view coming from high-throughput studies―and systems biology in particular―in interpreting and designing low-throughput experiments. By exploring some key examples from the renal and adrenal physiology, we try to show that network and modularity theory, along with observed patterns of association between elements in a biological system, can have profound effects on our ability to draw meaningful conclusions from experiments.

  17. Study on physiological characteristics of winter wheat in drought land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man Huimin; Yu Guohua; Zhan Shumin; Liu Xin; Zhang Guoshu

    1995-01-01

    Physiological characteristics of winter wheat cultivated in drought land was studied. The results showed that with precipitation of 1 m in the growing period of wheat, it was feasible to use drought cultivation techniques, i.e., increasing the application of P, K and Zn, maintaining the present application of N and increasing the density of wheat plants, to increase the ability of photosynthesis in the parts from the top inter-node above, and a 4900 kg/hm 2 or more of grain yield was obtained. 14 C-assimilate transportation from different parts to grain in drought and irrigating cultivation conditions were 83. 73% and 75.31% respectively. The proline content in flag leaf and the chlorophyll content in the parts from the top inter-node above with drought cultivation were significantly higher than those with normal cultivation

  18. Physiological Studies of the Brain: Implications for Science Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, William K.

    1982-01-01

    Speculates that physiological changes resulting from repeated, long-term stimulation in human and laboratory animal brains are related to short- and long-term memory processes. Describes a physiological-based model which may explain many current learning theory principles and can serve as a foundation for developing new learning theories based on…

  19. Rice Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.A. Counce; Davidi R. Gealy; Shi-Jean Susana Sung

    2002-01-01

    Physiology occurs tn physical space through chemical reactions constrained by anatomy and morphology, yet guided by genetics. Physiology has been called the logic of life. Genes encode structural and fimcdonal proteins. These proteins are subsequently processed to produce enzymes that direct and govern the biomechanical processes involved in the physiology of the...

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence and physiological and structural indices acquired from hyperspectral imagery as compared with carbon fluxes measured with eddy covariance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarco-Tejada, P.J.; Morales Sierra, A.; Testi, L.; Villalobos, F.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the assessment of the spatio-temporal trends of chlorophyll fluorescence, narrow-band physiological indices, and structural indices acquired with a hyperspectral imager flown over a flux tower in a canopy characterized by small seasonal structural changes and a

  1. Study Progress of Physiological Responses in High Temperature Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K.; Zheng, G. Z.; Bu, W. T.; Wang, Y. J.; Lu, Y. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Certain workers are exposed to high temperatures for a long time. Heat stress will result in a series of physiological responses, and cause adverse effects on the health and safety of workers. This paper summarizes the physiological changes of cardiovascular system, core temperature, skin temperature, water-electrolyte metabolism, alimentary system, neuroendocrine system, reaction time and thermal fatigue in high temperature environments. It can provide a theoretical guidance for labor safety in high temperature environment.

  2. Gonadotropins studies in female egyptian subjects under different physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nabarawy, F.S.; Megahed, Y.M.; Ibrahim, M.

    2002-01-01

    This study is concerned with the role of the hypothalamic hypophyseal regulatory hormonal mechanisms in the control of gonadal secretions in a selected normal egyptian female subjects with varying ages under different physiological conditions. The study allowed precise definition of the modulator influence of a number of key factors triggering appropriate alteration in circulating serum levels of FSH and LH determined by IRMA technique in pre-pubertal female children (9-11), post-pubertal adolescents females (13-16). Adult married females (27-33) and post-menopausal (58-63). The levels of FSH and LH were increased markedly with age but children less than 11 years old had only nocturnal increase in levels of FSH (p.O.I) and LH(P< 0.001). post-pubertal aged girls had significant nocturnal elevation only of LH levels (P< 0.001), adult married females did not exhibit significant difference in gonadotropin concentrations. whereas significant elevation in FSH and LH levels (P<0.001) in post-menopausal females were observed

  3. Aspergillus niger biofilms for celulasas production: some structural and physiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretty K. Villena

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger biofilms developed on polyester cloth were evaluated considering two aspects related to the growth on surfaces: structure and physiological behavior focused on cellulase production. The biofilm structure was assessed by using electron scanning microphotographs from inoculation and adsorption to 120 h growth. The microphotographs show that biofilm formation can be divided into three phases: 1 Adhesion, which is strongly increased by Aspergillus spore hydrophobicity; 2 Initial growth and development phase from spore germination, that begins 4 to 10 h after inoculation and continues up to 24 h when almost all available surface has been colonized; 3 Maturation phase in which biomass density is highly increased from 48 h after inoculation until 120 h growth when an internal channel organization that assures medium flow through biofilm is clearly evident as it is frequently reported for bacterial biofilms.Biofilm cellulolytic enzyme activity and productivity were also evaluated, being up to 40% and 55%, respectively, higher than that attained by freely suspended cultures. These results are in agreement with the behavior of most surface living microorganisms, which generally show a higher metabolic activity because of a differential gene expression. This work is a first attempt to understand the structure and physiology of industrial filamentous fungal biofilms as a response to the scarce available information in comparison with the vast and detailed information related to bacterial and pathogenic yeast biofilms.

  4. Inverse problem for a physiologically structured population model with variable-effort harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrusyak Ruslan V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the inverse problem of determining how the physiological structure of a harvested population evolves in time, and of finding the time-dependent effort to be expended in harvesting, so that the weighted integral of the density, which may be, for example, the total number of individuals or the total biomass, has prescribed dynamics. We give conditions for the existence of a unique, global, weak solution to the problem. Our investigation is carried out using the method of characteristics and a generalization of the Banach fixed-point theorem.

  5. Singular structure of polarization images of bile secret in diagnostics of human physiological state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, A. G.; Fediv, A. I.; Marchuk, Yu. F.

    2009-07-01

    There have been theoretically analyzed the ways of the formation of the polarization singularities of the biological tissues images of various morphological structures. There have been also experimentally examined the coordinate distributions of a single and doubly degenerated polarization singularities of the physiologically normal and pathologically changed biological tissues. There have been determined the statistical criteria of diagnostics of the kidney tissue collagenous disease (the 3rd and the 4th statistical moments of the linear density singularity points). It was found out that the process of the pathological change of the kidney tissue morphology leads to the formation of the self-similar (fractal) distribution of the polarization singularities of its image.

  6. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRöhrle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modelling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modelling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibres and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behaviour of single muscle fibres within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenisation. The effect of homogenisation has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibres and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modelling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behaviour ranging from motor unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  7. Zebrafish as a model system to study the physiological function of telomeric protein TPP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Xie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized chromatin structures at the end of chromosomes. Telomere dysfunction can lead to chromosomal abnormalities, DNA damage responses, and even cancer. In mammalian cells, a six-protein complex (telosome/shelterin is assembled on the telomeres through the interactions between various domain structures of the six telomere proteins (POT1, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1, and functions in telomere maintenance and protection. Within the telosome, TPP1 interacts directly with POT1 and TIN2 and help to mediate telosome assembly. Mechanisms of telomere regulation have been extensively studied in a variety of model organisms. For example, the physiological roles of telomere-targeted proteins have been assessed in mice through homozygous inactivation. In these cases, early embryonic lethality has prevented further studies of these proteins in embryogenesis and development. As a model system, zebrafish offers unique advantages such as genetic similarities with human, rapid developmental cycles, and ease of manipulation of its embryos. In this report, we detailed the identification of zebrafish homologues of TPP1, POT1, and TIN2, and showed that the domain structures and interactions of these telosome components appeared intact in zebrafish. Importantly, knocking down TPP1 led to multiple abnormalities in zebrafish embryogenesis, including neural death, heart malformation, and caudal defect. And these embryos displayed extensive apoptosis. These results underline the importance of TPP1 in zebrafish embryogenesis, and highlight the feasibility and advantages of investigating the signaling pathways and physiological function of telomere proteins in zebrafish.

  8. Study on stomach physiological functions by electroacupuncturing at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To explore the effect and mechanism on the physiological functions of stomach by electroacupunctue at zusanli (STOMACH-36), the changes of the gastric electrical frequency and amplitude, and the flux of gastric juice secretion were observed with modern apparatus, when electroacupuncture at zusanli was administered ...

  9. Physiological and genetic studies towards biofuel production in cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to contribute to the optimization of the cyanobacterial cell factory and to increase the production of cellulose as a biofuel (precursor) via a physiological and a transgenic approach. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the current state of cyanobacterial biofuel

  10. Functional attenuation of human sperm by novel, non-surfactant spermicides: precise targeting of membrane physiology without affecting structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajeev K; Jain, Ashish; Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Mitra, Kalyan; Batra, Sanjay; Gupta, Gopal

    2010-05-01

    We have attempted to identify structural, physiological and other targets on human sperm vulnerable to the spermicidal action of two novel series of non-detergent molecules, reported to irreversibly immobilize human sperm in spermicide treatment. Post-ejaculation tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm proteins (immunoblotting) was a marker for functional integrity. Disulfide esters of carbothioic acid (DSE compounds) caused complete sperm attenuation at > or =0.002% concentration with hyper-polarization of sperm membrane potential (P or =0.03% for spermicidal action and caused disrupted outer acrosomal membrane structure, depolarization of membrane potential (P or =0.05% and involved complete breakdown of structural and physiological membrane integrity with ROS generation (P spermicides caused functional attenuation of sperm without inhibiting motor energetics. Unlike N-9, DSE-37 (vaginal dose, 200 microg) completely inhibited pregnancy in rats and vaginal epithelium was unchanged (24 h,10 mg). The study reveals a unique mechanism of action for DSE spermicides. DSE-37 holds promise as a safe vaginal contraceptive. CDRI Communication No. 7545.

  11. Developing quantitative physiological phenotypes of sleep apnea for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkness, J P; McGinley, B M; Sgambati, F P; Patil, S P; Smith, P L; Schwartz, A R; Schneider, H

    2011-01-01

    Existing physiological databases have not been sufficiently detailed to provide relevant and important information for characterizing the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea. Critical collapsing pressure (P(CRIT)) is a standard method for determining upper airway patency during sleep, however is labor intensive and prohibits large-scale studies. Based on previously published data indicating R(US) does not significantly vary between groups, our aim was to develop an approach to estimate the P(CRIT) from airflow at atmospheric pressure (V(atm)). In a dataset of 126 subjects, where P(CRIT) and R(US) were measured using standard techniques. We then determined the minimum sample size required to estimate the R(US) mean and variance by utilizing a bootstrap procedure (30 times for n=3 to 126). We first estimated the minimum number of subjects needed for obtaining a group for a two-tailed (z=1.96) standard error for R(US) in the population. Then in 75 individuals, quantitative estimates of airflow were obtained at atmospheric pressure. Using the estimated R(US) and atmospheric, we determined an estimated P(CRIT) (ЄP(CRIT)). Bland-Altman plots were generated to determine the agreement between the measured P(CRIT) and ЄP(CRIT). For the entire population the mean ± SEM R(US) was 23 ± 1 cmH(2)O/L/s (± 95% CI: 21, 25). ~40 subjects represent the minimum sample required to estimate the population variance within ± 2 SEM. In the subsample with atmospheric flow measurements, a linear regression model (ЄP(CRIT) [cmH(2)O] = V(@PN) [L/s]x-23[cmH(2)O/L/s]), ЄP(CRIT) ranged from 0 to -9.6 cmH(2)O. In the Bland-Altman analysis there was no mean difference between the measured P(CRIT) and ЄP(CRIT) (-0.01 cmH(2)O; p=0.8) with upper and lower limits of agreement at ± 2.3 cmH(2)O. The variance of upstream resistance approaches a constant value in groups with approximately 40 subjects. Utilizing a fixed up-stream resistance to estimate P(CRIT) from the airflow at

  12. Physiological enhancement of factors in factor analysis of dynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M.; Surova, H.; Marikova, E.; Michalova, K.; Karny, M.; Dienstbier, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic radionuclide studies provides their decomposition into the images and time-activity curves corresponding to the underlying dynamic structures. The method is based on the analysis of study variance and on the subsequent differential imaging of its principal components into a simplified factor space. By changing the amount and the composition of the variance processed in the analysis it is possible to enhance the factors that are important for diagnosis while the less important factors can be suppressed. In our report, a short theoretical review of the problem is given and illustrated by the analysis of dynamic cholescintigraphy. It is shown that a suitable choice of region and/or the temporal interval of interest enables the differential evaluation of such intrahepatic compartments, which could not be observed without enhancement. (orig.)

  13. The heterogeneity and spatial patterning of structure and physiology across the leaf surface in giant leaves of Alocasia macrorrhiza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available Leaf physiology determines the carbon acquisition of the whole plant, but there can be considerable variation in physiology and carbon acquisition within individual leaves. Alocasia macrorrhiza (L. Schott is an herbaceous species that can develop very large leaves of up to 1 m in length. However, little is known about the hydraulic and photosynthetic design of such giant leaves. Based on previous studies of smaller leaves, and on the greater surface area for trait variation in large leaves, we hypothesized that A. macrorrhiza leaves would exhibit significant heterogeneity in structure and function. We found evidence of reduced hydraulic supply and demand in the outer leaf regions; leaf mass per area, chlorophyll concentration, and guard cell length decreased, as did stomatal conductance, net photosynthetic rate and quantum efficiency of photosystem II. This heterogeneity in physiology was opposite to that expected from a thinner boundary layer at the leaf edge, which would have led to greater rates of gas exchange. Leaf temperature was 8.8°C higher in the outer than in the central region in the afternoon, consistent with reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration caused by a hydraulic limitation to the outer lamina. The reduced stomatal conductance in the outer regions would explain the observed homogeneous distribution of leaf water potential across the leaf surface. These findings indicate substantial heterogeneity in gas exchange across the leaf surface in large leaves, greater than that reported for smaller-leafed species, though the observed structural differences across the lamina were within the range reported for smaller-leafed species. Future work will determine whether the challenge of transporting water to the outer regions can limit leaf size for plants experiencing drought, and whether the heterogeneity of function across the leaf surface represents a particular disadvantage for large simple leaves that might explain their

  14. [Effect of mechanical grinding of Sphagnum on the structure and physiological state of bacterial communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovol'skaya, T G; Golovchenko, A V; Yakushev, A V; Manucharova, N A; Yurchenko, E N

    2014-01-01

    The microcosm method was used to demonstrate an increase in bacterial numbers and drastic changes in the taxonomic structure of saprotrophic bacteria as a result of mechanical grinding of Sphagnum moss. Ekkrisotrophic agrobacteria predominant in untreated moss were replaced by hydrolytic bacteria. Molecular biological approaches revealed such specific hydrolytic bacteria as Janthinobacterium agaricum and Streptomyces purpurascens among the dominant taxa. The application of kinetic technique for determination of the physiological state of bacteria in situ revealed higher functional diversity of hydrolytic bacteria in ground moss than in untreated samples. A considerable decrease of the C/N ratio in ground samples of living Sphagnum incubated using the microcosm technique indicated decomposition of this substrate.

  15. HUMAN PARAOXONASE-1 (PON1): GENE STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION, PROMISCUOUS ACTIVITIES AND MULTIPLE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, is believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. PMID:25965560

  16. Structural and physiological MRI correlates of occult cerebrovascular disease in late-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanby, Martha F; Al-Bachari, Sarah; Makin, Fadiyah; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Parkes, Laura M; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset epilepsy (LOE), with onset after 50 years of age, is often attributed to underlying occult cerebrovascular disease. LOE is associated with a three-fold increase in subsequent stroke risk, therefore it is important to improve our understanding of pathophysiology. In this exploratory study, we aimed to determine whether established structural magnetic resonance imaging markers and novel physiological imaging markers of occult cerebrovascular disease were more common in patients with LOE than age-matched controls. Sixteen patients with LOE (mean age ± SD: 67.6 ± 6.5 years) and 15 age-matched control subjects (mean age: 65.1 ± 3.9 years) underwent a 3 T MRI scan protocol. T1-weighted images and T2-weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were used to determine cortical grey matter volume and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume respectively, whilst multiple delay time arterial spin labelling (ASL) images were collected at rest and during a hypercapnic challenge. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial arrival time (AAT) were calculated from ASL data under both normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions. Cerebrovascular reactivity was also calculated for both CBF and AAT relative to the change in end-tidal CO2. Patients with LOE were found to have significantly lower cortical volume than control subjects (33.8 ± 3.8% of intracranial volume vs. 38.0 ± 5.5%, p = 0.02) and significantly higher WMH volume (1339 ± 1408 mm3 vs. 514 ± 481 mm3, p = 0.047). Baseline whole brain AAT was found to be significantly prolonged in patients with LOE in comparison to control subjects (1539 ± 129 ms vs. 1363 ± 167 ms, p = 0.005). Voxel-based analysis showed the significant prolongation of AAT to be predominantly distributed in the frontal and temporal lobes. Voxel-based morphometry showed the lower cortical volume to be localised primarily to temporal lobes. No significant differences in CBF or cerebrovascular reactivity were found between the two

  17. Teaching Physiology Online: Successful Use of Case Studies in a Graduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotti, Giovanni; Beneski, John T.; Knabb, Maureen T.

    2013-01-01

    To address the need for greater flexibility in access to higher education, an online graduate course in physiology using case studies was developed and offered in summer 2012. Topics in both animal and human physiology were organized as modules that contained a case study with questions, a prerecorded online lecture, and three research journal…

  18. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  19. Postpartum physiology, psychology and paediatric follow up study (P4 Study) - Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gregory K; Roberts, Lynne; Mangos, George; Henry, Amanda; Pettit, Franziska; O'Sullivan, Anthony; Homer, Caroline S E; Craig, Maria; Harvey, Samuel B; Brown, Mark A

    2016-10-01

    Women who have had hypertension in pregnancy are at greater risk of long term cardiovascular disease (CVD). Little is known about their cardiovascular risk postpartum or the effects on the woman's mental health and the outcomes of their infants. In this project we will study the physiological and psychological health of women and the physical health and development of their infants six months, two years and five years after birth. We will establish normal blood pressure (BP) and metabolic function for women who were normotensive in pregnancy and use these to assess women who had gestational hypertension (GH) or preeclampsia (PE). Women will be asked to participate if they have given birth in the preceding six months. They will be excluded if they had diabetes, hypertension, renal or other serious maternal disease prior to pregnancy or congenital anomaly in the pregnancy. We will recruit 292 women who were normotensive and their babies, 100 who had GH and 100 who had PE and their babies. They will be assessed at six months, two and five years after birth. At each assessment mothers will have their blood pressure (BP) assessed peripherally with a liquid crystal sphygmomanometer and 24h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), and centrally with non-invasive applanation tonometry. Additional physiological testing will include: body composition; energy balance; vascular compliance; cardiac function; liver and renal function, lipids and biochemistry; glucose and insulin; and urinalysis. Psychological status will be assessed with validated self-report questionnaires for depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mother-infant bonding. The babies will have a medical examination by a paediatrician at each assessment. Their behavioural development will be assessed with an Ages and Stages Questionnaire completed by their mother at each assessment and a developmental assessment by a child psychologist at two and five years. This study will re

  20. Determinants of disparities between perceived and physiological risk of falling among elderly people: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbaere, Kim; Close, Jacqueline C T; Brodaty, Henry; Sachdev, Perminder; Lord, Stephen R

    2010-08-18

    To gain an understanding of elderly people's fear of falling by exploring the prevalence and determinants of perceived and physiological fall risk and to understand the role of disparities in perceived and physiological risk in the cause of falls. Prospective cohort study. Community sample drawn from eastern Sydney, Australia. 500 men and women aged 70-90 years. Baseline assessment of medical, physiological, and neuropsychological measures, with physiological fall risk estimated with the physiological profile assessment, and perceived fall risk estimated with the falls efficacy scale international. Participants were followed up monthly for falls over one year. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that perceived and physiological fall risk were both independent predictors of future falls. Classification tree analysis was used to split the sample into four groups (vigorous, anxious, stoic, and aware) based on the disparity between physiological and perceived risk of falling. Perceived fall risk was congruent with physiological fall risk in the vigorous (144 (29%)) and aware (202 (40%)) groups. The anxious group (54 (11%)) had a low physiological risk but high perceived fall risk, which was related to depressive symptoms (P=0.029), neurotic personality traits (P=0.026), and decreased executive functioning (P=0.010). The stoic group (100 (20%)) had a high physiological risk but low perceived fall risk, which was protective for falling and mediated through a positive outlook on life (P=0.001) and maintained physical activity and community participation (P=0.048). Many elderly people underestimated or overestimated their risk of falling. Such disparities between perceived and physiological fall risk were primarily associated with psychological measures and strongly influenced the probability of falling. Measures of both physiological and perceived fall risk should be included in fall risk assessments to allow tailoring of interventions for preventing falls in

  1. Analysis of heterogeneity and epistasis in physiological mixed populations by combined structural equation modelling and latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, A.; Werge, Thomas Mears

    2008-01-01

    syndrome", which is known to be a heterogeneous and polygenic condition with a clinical endpoint (type 2 diabetes mellitus). In the model presented here, genetic factors were not included and no genetic model is assumed except that genes operate in networks. The impact of stratification of the study......BACKGROUND: Biological systems are interacting, molecular networks in which genetic variation contributes to phenotypic heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is traditionally modelled as a dichotomous trait (e.g. affected vs. non-affected). This is far too simplistic considering the complexity...... and genetic variations of such networks. METHODS: In this study on type 2 diabetes mellitus, heterogeneity was resolved in a latent class framework combined with structural equation modelling using phenotypic indicators of distinct physiological processes. We modelled the clinical condition "the metabolic...

  2. Medical student attitudes toward kidney physiology and nephrology: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, John K; Sparks, Matthew A; Lehrich, Ruediger W

    2016-11-01

    Interest in nephrology among trainees is waning in the USA. Early perceptions and attitudes to subject matter can be linked to the quality of pre-clinical curricula. We wanted to explore these attitudes in the setting of modern curriculum redesign. We utilized Q methodology to understand first-year medical student attitudes after an innovative kidney physiology curriculum redesign that focuses on blending multiple learning methods. First-year medical students were invited to take a Q sort survey at the conclusion of a kidney physiology course. Students prioritized statements related to their understanding of kidney physiology, learning preferences, preferred course characteristics, perceived clinical relevance of kidney physiology, and interest in nephrology as a career. Factor analysis was performed to identify different student viewpoints. At the conclusion of our modified course, all students (n = 108) were invited to take the survey and 44 (41%) Q sorts were returned. Two dominant viewpoints were defined according to interest in nephrology. The Potentials are students who understand kidney physiology, perceive kidney physiology as clinically relevant, attend class sessions, utilize videos, and are willing to shadow a nephrologist. The Uninterested are students who are less satisfied with their kidney physiology knowledge, prefer to study alone with a textbook, avoid lectures, and are not interested in learning about nephrology. In an updated renal physiology course, students that use multiple learning methods also have favorable attitudes toward learning kidney physiology. Thus, modern curriculum changes that accommodate a variety of learning styles may promote positive attitudes toward nephrology.

  3. Medical Student Attitudes towards Kidney Physiology and Nephrology: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, John K.; Sparks, Matthew A.; Lehrich, Ruediger W.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in nephrology among trainees is waning in the US. Early perceptions and attitudes to subject matter can be linked to the quality of pre-clinical curricula. We wanted to explore these attitudes in the setting of modern curriculum redesign. We utilized Q methodology to understand first-year medical student attitudes after an innovative kidney physiology curriculum redesign that focuses on blending multiple learning methods. First-year medical students were invited to take a Q sort survey at the conclusion of a kidney physiology course. Students prioritized statements related to their understanding of kidney physiology, learning preferences, preferred course characteristics, perceived clinical relevance of kidney physiology, and interest in nephrology as a career. Factor analysis was performed to identify different student viewpoints. At the conclusion of our modified course, all students (n = 108) were invited to take the survey and 44 (41%) Q sorts were returned. Two dominant viewpoints were defined according to interest in nephrology. The Potentials are students who understand kidney physiology, perceive kidney physiology as clinically relevant, attend class sessions, utilize videos, and are willing to shadow a nephrologist. The Uninterested are students who are less satisfied with their kidney physiology knowledge, prefer to study alone with a textbook, avoid lectures, and are not interested in learning about nephrology. In an updated renal physiology course, students that use multiple learning methods also have favorable attitudes towards learning kidney physiology. Thus, modern curriculum changes that accommodate a variety of learning styles may promote positive attitudes toward nephrology. PMID:27758129

  4. Studies of photodynamic therapy: Investigation of physiological mechanisms and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Josephine Helen

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment for a range of malignant and benign lesions using light activated photosensitising drugs in the presence of molecular oxygen. PDT causes tissue damage by a combination of processes involving the production of reactive oxygen species (in particular singlet oxygen). Since the PDT cytotoxic effect depends on oxygen, monitoring of tissue oxygenation during PDT is important for understanding the basic physiological mechanisms and dosimetry of PDT. This thesis describes the use of non-invasive, optical techniques based on visible light reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of oxy- to deoxyhaemoglobin ratio or haemoglobin oxygen saturation (HbSat). HbSat was monitored at tissue sites receiving different light dose during aluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine (AIS2PC) PDT. Results are presented on real time PDT-induced changes in HbSat in normal tissue (rat liver) and experimental tumours, and its correlation with the final biological effect under different light regimes, including fractionated light delivery. It was found to some extent that changes in HbSat could indicate whether the tissue would be necrotic after PDT and it was concluded that online physiological dosimetry is feasible for PDT. The evaluation of a new photosensitiser for PDT called palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (WST09) has been carried out in normal and tumour tissue in vivo. WST09 was found to exert a strong PDT effect but was active only shortly after administration. WST09 produced substantial necrosis in colonic tumours whilst only causing a small amount of damage to the normal colon under certain conditions indicating a degree of selectivity. Combination therapy with PDT for enhancing the extent of PDT-induced damage has been investigated in vivo by using the photochemical internalisation (PCI) technique and Type 1 mechanism enhanced phototoxicity with indole acetic acid (IAA). PCI of gelonin using AIS2PC PDT in vivo after systemic administration of

  5. Effect of Weave Structure on Thermo-Physiological Properties of Cotton Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sheraz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the relationship between fabric weave structure and its comfort properties. The two basic weave structures and four derivatives for each selected weave structure were studied. Comfort properties, porosity, air permeability and thermal resistance of all the fabric samples were determined. In our research the 1/1 plain weave structure showed the highest thermal resistance making it suitable for cold climatic conditions. The 2/2 matt weave depicted the lowest thermal resistance which makes it appropriate for hot climatic conditions.

  6. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  7. Fitting C 2 Continuous Parametric Surfaces to Frontiers Delimiting Physiologic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to fit C 2 continuous parametric surfaces to scattered geometric data points forming frontiers delimiting physiologic structures in segmented images. Such mathematical representation is interesting because it facilitates a large number of operations in modeling. While the fitting of C 2 continuous parametric curves to scattered geometric data points is quite trivial, the fitting of C 2 continuous parametric surfaces is not. The difficulty comes from the fact that each scattered data point should be assigned a unique parametric coordinate, and the fit is quite sensitive to their distribution on the parametric plane. We present a new approach where a polygonal (quadrilateral or triangular) surface is extracted from the segmented image. This surface is subsequently projected onto a parametric plane in a manner to ensure a one-to-one mapping. The resulting polygonal mesh is then regularized for area and edge length. Finally, from this point, surface fitting is relatively trivial. The novelty of our approach lies in the regularization of the polygonal mesh. Process performance is assessed with the reconstruction of a geometric model of mouse heart ventricles from a computerized tomography scan. Our results show an excellent reproduction of the geometric data with surfaces that are C 2 continuous. PMID:24782911

  8. Cardiac structure and function in humans: a new cardiovascular physiology laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another “hands-on” experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle, we developed protocols to illustrate the changes in cardiac and vascular function that occur with changes in posture, venous return, and graded exercise. We use medical student volunteers and a professional echocardiographer to generate and acquire data, respectively. In small-group sessions, we developed an interactive approach to discuss the data and to make a large number of calculations from a limited number of measurements. The sequence of cardiac events and cardiac structure in vivo were illustrated with the volunteers lying down, standing, and then with their legs raised passively above the heart to increase venous return. Volunteers were then asked to peddle the bicycle to achieve steady-state heart rates of 110 and 150 beats/min. Data were collected in all these states, and calculations were performed and used as the basis of a small-group discussion to illustrate physiological principles. Information related to a surprisingly large number of cardiovascular control mechanisms was derived, and its relevance to cardiovascular dysfunction was explored. This communication describes our experience in developing a new cardiovascular control laboratory to reinforce didactic material presented in lectures and small-group sessions. PMID:19745049

  9. The physiological structure of human C-reactive protein and its complex with phosphocholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D; Pepys, M B; Wood, S P

    1999-02-15

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is the classical acute phase reactant, the circulating concentration of which rises rapidly and extensively in a cytokine-mediated response to tissue injury, infection and inflammation. Serum CRP values are routinely measured, empirically, to detect and monitor many human diseases. However, CRP is likely to have important host defence, scavenging and metabolic functions through its capacity for calcium-dependent binding to exogenous and autologous molecules containing phosphocholine (PC) and then activating the classical complement pathway. CRP may also have pathogenic effects and the recent discovery of a prognostic association between increased CRP production and coronary atherothrombotic events is of particular interest. The X-ray structures of fully calcified C-reactive protein, in the presence and absence of bound PC, reveal that although the subunit beta-sheet jellyroll fold is very similar to that of the homologous pentameric protein serum amyloid P component, each subunit is tipped towards the fivefold axis. PC is bound in a shallow surface pocket on each subunit, interacting with the two protein-bound calcium ions via the phosphate group and with Glu81 via the choline moiety. There is also an unexpected hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the ligand. The structure shows how large ligands containing PC may be bound by CRP via a phosphate oxygen that projects away from the surface of the protein. Multipoint attachment of one planar face of the CRP molecule to a PC-bearing surface would leave available, on the opposite exposed face, the recognition sites for C1q, which have been identified by mutagenesis. This would enable CRP to target physiologically and/or pathologically significant complement activation. The hydrophobic pocket adjacent to bound PC invites the design of inhibitors of CRP binding that may have therapeutic relevance to the possible role of CRP in atherothrombotic events.

  10. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  11. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying, E-mail: zhouying@moon.ibp.ac.cn

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  12. Structural Studies of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest and the most physiologically important membrane protein family that recognizes a variety of environmental stimuli, and are drug targets in the treatment of numerous diseases. Recent progress on GPCR structural studies shed light on molecular mechanisms of GPCR ligand recognition, activation and allosteric modulation, as well as structural basis of GPCR dimerization. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of GPCRs and structural insights of different aspects of GPCR biological functions.

  13. Book Reviews The Physiology of Reproduction Long-term Studies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    area of biology, and, for example, in the field of repro- duction, there are individual books on the ovary, the testis, the biology of the spermatozoon, structure and function of the placenta and so on. The authors and edi- tors of The Physiology of Reproduction have successfully moved away from this trend and, in one book, ...

  14. Nuclear structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.B.

    1992-01-01

    New results are reported for the decay and nuclear orientation of 114,116 I and 114 Sb as well as data for the structure of daughter nuclides 114,116 Te. New results for IBM-2 calculations for the structure of 126 Xe are also reported. A new approach to the problem of the underproduction of A = 120 nuclides in the astrophysical r-process is reported

  15. Estimation of the physiological mechanical conditioning in vascular tissue engineering by a predictive fluid-structure interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Claudia; Bianchi, Elena; Pellegata, Alessandro Filippo; Dubini, Gabriele; Mantero, Sara

    2017-08-01

    The in vitro replication of physiological mechanical conditioning through bioreactors plays a crucial role in the development of functional Small-Caliber Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels. An in silico scaffold-specific model under pulsatile perfusion provided by a bioreactor was implemented using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach for viscoelastic tubular scaffolds (e.g. decellularized swine arteries, DSA). Results of working pressures, circumferential deformations, and wall shear stress on DSA fell within the desired physiological range and indicated the ability of this model to correctly predict the mechanical conditioning acting on the cells-scaffold system. Consequently, the FSI model allowed us to a priori define the stimulation pattern, driving in vitro physiological maturation of scaffolds, especially with viscoelastic properties.

  16. Physiology of man and animals in the Tenth Five-Year Plan: Proceedings of the Thirteenth Congress of the I. P. Pavlov All-Union Physiological Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Research in the field of animal and human physiology is reviewed. The following topics on problems of physiological science and related fields of knowledge are discussed: neurophysiology and higher nervous activity, physiology of sensory systems, physiology of visceral systems, evolutionary and ecological physiology, physiological cybernetics, computer application in physiology, information support of physiological research, history and theory of development of physiology. Also discussed were: artificial intelligence, physiological problems of reflex therapy, correlation of structure and function of the brain, adaptation and activity, microcirculation, and physiological studies in nerve and mental diseases.

  17. Diving physiology of seabirds and marine mammals: Relevance, challenges and some solutions for field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Russel D; Enstipp, Manfred R

    2016-12-01

    To fully understand how diving seabirds and marine mammals balance the potentially conflicting demands of holding their breath while living their lives underwater (and maintaining physiological homeostasis during exercise, feeding, growth, and reproduction), physiological studies must be conducted with animals in their natural environments. The purpose of this article is to review the importance of making physiological measurements on diving animals in field settings, while acknowledging the challenges and highlighting some solutions. The most extreme divers are great candidates for study, especially in a comparative and mechanistic context. However, physiological data are also required of a wide range of species for problems relating to other disciplines, in particular ecology and conservation biology. Physiological data help with understanding and predicting the outcomes of environmental change, and the direct impacts of anthropogenic activities. Methodological approaches that have facilitated the development of field-based diving physiology include the isolated diving hole protocol and the translocation paradigm, and while there are many techniques for remote observation, animal-borne biotelemetry, or "biologging", has been critical. We discuss issues related to the attachment of instruments, the retrieval of data and sensing of physiological variables, while also considering negative impacts of tagging. This is illustrated with examples from a variety of species, and an in-depth look at one of the best studied and most extreme divers, the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). With a variety of approaches and high demand for data on the physiology of diving seabirds and marine mammals, the future of field studies is bright. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: Setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J.; Gunning, A. P.; Ridout, M. J.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein ( β -lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a pre-formed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β -lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  19. Studies on the reproductive physiology of the Vicuna (Vicugna vicugna)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquieta, B.; Tojas, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The vicuna (Vicugna vicugna) is a wild South American camelid found in the Andean altiplano. Apart from information on its niche in the ecology of the altiplano and its behaviour in the wild, little is known about its reproduction, health and nutrition. The aim of the present research was to acquire knowledge on the reproductive processes considered essential in order to design rational management schemes for conservation and exploitation. The general objective was to characterize the endocrinology of the vicuna reproductive cycle, both in the male and the female, relating the data to behaviour and seasonal changes. Captive experimental vicuna, in sex and age groupings similar to their natural social structure, were confined in corrals in the Lauca National Park, Region I of Chile at an altitude of 4470 m above sea level. Feeding was based on ad libitum supplies of alfalfa hay and water. Mean plasma progesterone (P 4 ) found in individually confined females was 1.26±1.11 nmol/L; in females grouped with intact males, P 4 levels were 2.61±0.99, 4.93±3.07 and 7.62±2.99 nmol/L in yearling, non-pregnant and pregnant animals respectively. In females kept with vasectomized males, mean P 4 values found 12 h after mating were 0.53±0.49 nmol/L, increasing to 10.26±3.81 nmol/L on day 8. Plasma oestradiol concentrations were generally very low and not detectable by the RIA techniques used. Plasma testosterone concentration in males ranged from 0.35 to 126.6 nmol/L. Although high values were more frequently found during the summer, there was no statistical difference between mean monthly testosterone values in the year, except for February, which was higher. Mating marks were found from mid-February until early August, being most intense in March. (author). 19 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  20. Physiological studies of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. causing collar rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro studies were conducted on the effect of temperature, pH levels, carbon, nitrogen and amino acids on the mycelial growth and biomass production of Sclerotium rofsii Sacc. causing collar rot of mint. The results reveal that the growth of S. rolfsii was maximum at 30°C which was reduced significantly below 20°C and ...

  1. Measuring Effects of Reflectionon Learning: A Physiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen

    2014-01-01

    As an economical and feasible intervention, reflection demands learners using critical thinking to examine presented information, questioning its validity, and drawing conclusions based on the resulting ideas during a learning process. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effects of

  2. Measuring Effects of Reflection on Learning – A Physiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen; Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    As an economical and feasible intervention, reflection demands learners using critical thinking to examine presented information, questioning its validity, and drawing conclusions based on the resulting ideas during a learning process. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effects

  3. Antioxidative and physiological studies on Colocasia esculentum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of arsenic on Colocasia esculentum. Rhizomes were grown in pots containing 2.5 kg of garden soil with increasing concentration of arsenic. Arsenic accumulation was more in shoots compared to roots at higher concentrations. High arsenic concentration caused ...

  4. Study Skills in Anatomy and Physiology: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Polly R.; Barger, J. Bradley; Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Many factors influence the way individual students study, including but not limited to: previous coursework, attitudes toward the class (motivation, intimidation, risk, etc.), metacognition, and work schedules. However, little of this research has involved medical students. The present article asks the question, "Do individual medical…

  5. Contribution to the study of the physiological behaviour of taurine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bascheri, Marie-Claude

    1960-10-01

    This document reports an academic work based on the use of the isotopic dilution method to measure the taurine concentration in various organs belonging to a frog, a rabbit and a partridge. The author also studied some modalities of taurine distribution in the rabbit (apparent volume of taurine distribution, assessment of the exchangeable taurine mass), and the taurine excretion by the kidney [fr

  6. Physiological studies of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. causing collar rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUTHUKUMAR

    2013-12-04

    Dec 4, 2013 ... In vitro studies were conducted on the effect of temperature, pH levels, carbon, nitrogen and amino .... incubation period. Liquid medium. Erlenmeyer flasks (250 ml) containing 50 ml of potato dextrose broth were sterilized, inoculated and incubated at different ..... Growth of Sclerotium rolfsii of chick pea as.

  7. Cell Structure Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrom, James V.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use microscopes and digital images to examine Elodea, a fresh water plant, before and after the process of plasmolysis, identify plant cellular structures before and after plasmolysis, and calculate the size of the plant's vacuole. (ASK)

  8. Response of a physiological controller for ventricular assist devices during acute patho-physiological events: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Anastasios; Pergantis, Panagiotis; Ochsner, Gregor; Amacher, Raffael; Krabatsch, Thomas; Falk, Volkmar; Meboldt, Mirko; Daners, Marianne Schmid

    2017-11-27

    The current paper analyzes the performance of a physiological controller for turbodynamic ventricular assist devices (tVADs) during acute patho-physiological events. The numerical model of the human blood circulation implemented on our hybrid mock circulation was extended in order to simulate the Valsalva maneuver (VM) and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). The performance of an end-diastolic volume (EDV)-based physiological controller for VADs, named preload responsive speed (PRS) controller was evaluated under VM and PVCs. A slow and a fast response of the PRS controller were implemented by using a 3 s moving window, and a beat-to-beat method, respectively, to extract the EDV index. The hemodynamics of a pathological circulation, assisted by a tVAD controlled by the PRS controller were analyzed and compared with a constant speed support case. The results show that the PRS controller prevented suction during the VM with both methods, while with constant speed, this was not the case. On the other hand, the pump flow reduction with the PRS controller led to low aortic pressure, while it remained physiological with the constant speed control. Pump backflow was increased when the moving window was used but it avoided sudden undesirable speed changes, which occurred during PVCs with the beat-to-beat method. In a possible clinical implementation of any physiological controller, the desired performance during frequent clinical acute scenarios should be considered.

  9. Physiological and molecular studies of deep-sea fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, P.

    it to survive under such extreme conditions (Iwahashi et al, 2003; Domitrovic et al, 2006). In my study, I tried to isolate total RNA from yeast cells after giving shocks of elevated hydrostatic pressure and low temperature according to manufacturer protocol... of yeast adopted for survival. Summary 142    5.3 Future directions �� Assessment of biological activity of fungi in the deep-sea sediments by the application of functional genomics. �� Improvise isolation...

  10. [Study on physiological characteristics of seed germination of Ephedra sinica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seqinbateer; Khasbagan; Wurina; Wei, Xian-Jun

    2009-05-01

    To study the characteristics of the Ephedra sinica seed germination, to provide a basis for its cultivation. The seed germination inhibitive substances were studied by water washing method; the seed vigor was determined by TTC method and red ink method, the influence of growth substances to seed germination was studied by agar medium cultivation, and the influence of different sand burying depth on seed germination was studied by sand medium cultivation. The seed germination rates of dry seeds, seeds as 12 h soaking with distilled water, 12 h washing by water and with ensheathe phyllary were 44%, 61%, 79.9% and 0%. Treated with 40 mg/L GA, the seed germination enhanced significantly as the maximum seed germination rate was 94% after 2 d. Treated with 40 mg/L IAA and 40 mg/L 6-BA, the seed germination delayed as the maximum seed germination rate appeared after 7 d, and the difference of seed germination index between treated and CK was significant (Pseed germination rate gradually increased. But above 6 cm, when the depth increased, the seed germination rate gradually decreased. Moreover, as the sand burying depth increased, the root length changed in parabola-shaped and the stem length increased, but the root top radio decreased. The phyllary and seed of Ephedra sinica contain some seed germination inhibitors, adequate water washing, dealing with GA and so on can improve the seed germination rate and speed up the seed germination. Appropriate deep sand burying can also improve seed germination and seedling emergence of Ephedra sinica.

  11. Ergonomics study on mobile phones for thumb physiology discomfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendero, J. M. S.; Doon, M. E. R.; Quiogue, K. C. A.; Soneja, L. C.; Ong, N. R.; Sauli, Z.; Vairavan, R.

    2017-09-01

    The study was conducted on Filipino undergraduate college students and aimed to find out about the significant factors associated with mobile phone usage and its effect on thumb pain.A correlation-prediction analysisand Multiple Linear Regression was adopted and used as the main tool in determining the significant factors and coming up with predictive models on thumb related pain. With the use of the software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences or SPSS in conducting linear regression, 2 significant factors on thumb-related pain (percentage of time using portrait as screen orientation when text messaging, amount of time playing games using one hand in a day) were found.

  12. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrooz, A. R. M. Nabiul; Hussain, Saber M.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2014-12-01

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.

  13. Physiological oral melanin pigmentation in a South African sample: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilana, Aubrey; Khammissa, Razia A G; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2017-11-01

    Physiological oral melanin pigmentation is genetically determined, more frequently affecting people with darker skin. It can involve any oral mucosal site, but predominantly the gingiva. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and to characterize the clinical features of physiological oral melanin pigmentation in a South African population sample. A trainee in the discipline of periodontology and oral medicine interviewed all participants and examined the oral soft tissues. The diagnosis of physiological oral melanin pigmentation was based on clinical findings and on the history reported by the patient. A predetermined list of exclusion criteria was applied. The study population comprised 430 participants, of whom 319 (74%) were black, 55 (13%) Indian, 54 (12.5%) white, and two (0.5%) were mixed race. A total of 182 participants were diagnosed with physiological oral melanin pigmentation. The overall prevalence of physiological oral melanin pigmentation in the ethnically-mixed study population was 42%: 54% of blacks were affected, 16% of Indians, and 21% of whites. The female (101): male (81) ratio was 1.2:1; the gingiva was the site most frequently affected (73%). The total number of oral mucosal sites with physiological oral melanin pigmentation in the study population was 263; 68% of participants had one, 22% had two, 7% had three, and 3% had four sites affected. There was no significant association between the number of sites affected and sex or age. In this study of a South African population sample, the prevalence of physiological oral melanin pigmentation was higher in blacks than in Indians or whites, and the gingiva was the oral mucosal site most frequently affected. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Studies on the physiology of microbial degradation of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, R.; Apajalahti, J.; Salkinoja-Salonen, M.

    1985-03-01

    The requirements and conditions for pentachlorophenol (PCP) biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture was studied. The effects of oxygen, nutrients, additional carbon sources, pH and temperature are described. Up to 90% of PCP was degraded into CO/sub 2/ and inorganic chloride in 1 week at an input concentration of <600 ..mu..M. Degradation continued when pO/sub 2/ was lowered to 0.0002 atm but ceased when pO/sub 2/ was further decreased to 0.00002 atm. Supplementary carbon sources, such as phenol, hydroxybenzoic acids or complex nutrients did not affect the biodegradation, but the presence of ammonium salts enhanced the rate of PCP degradation without affecting the yield of CO/sub 2/. The degrading organisms were shown to be procaryotic mesophiles; no degradation was shown at temperatures below +8/sup 0/ and above +50/sup 0/C. The optimum pH for degradation was from 6.4 to 7.2 and at higher pH value (8.4) degradation was inhibited more than at lower pH (5.6).

  15. Developing an Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Work-Integrated Learning in Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Fiona; Moore, Keri; Mildon, Sally; Jones, Philip

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a valid method to assess the key competencies of the exercise physiology profession acquired through work-integrated learning (WIL). In order to develop a competency-based assessment, the key professional tasks needed to be identified and the test designed so students' competency in different tasks and settings could be…

  16. Integrating ecological insight derived from individual-based simulations and physiologically structured population models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisbet, R.M.; Martin, B.T.; de Roos, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Two contrasting approaches are widely used to derive population dynamics as an emergent property deriving from the physiology and behavior of individual organisms. "Individual-based models" (IBMs) are computer simulations where the "state" (e.g., age, size) of each individual in a population is fol-

  17. Actinide structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, N.W.; Flanders, D.J.; Brown, D.

    1985-01-01

    The crystal structures of the title compounds, [MO 2 (bipy)(NO 3 ) 2 ] [M = U (1) or Np (2)] and [MO 2 (bipy)(CH 3 COO) 2 ] [M = U (3) or Np (4)] (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridyl) have been determined using X-ray diffraction techniques. Complexes (1) and (2) are isomorphous and isostructural crystallising in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c; (3) and (4) are also isomorphous and isostructural, crystallising in the monoclinic system, space group P2 1 /n. All four complexes exhibit hexagonal-bipyramidal co-ordination about the central metal atom. Values are presented for the following: the M-O bond lengths in the MO 2 2+ cations; the M-O distances in the bidentate oxy-anions; and the M-N distances for the bidentate 2,2'-pyridyl group. The anomalous increase in the M-N distance between complexes (3) and (4) is attributed to overcrowding around the NpO 2 2+ ion. (U.K.)

  18. Case Studies in a Physiology Course on the Autonomic Nervous System: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of case studies on the autonomic nervous system in a fourth-semester physiology course unit for Pharmacy students is described in this article. This article considers how these case studies were developed and presents their content. Moreover, it reflects on their implementation and, finally, the reception of such a transformation…

  19. A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Mikkel G.; Raket, Lars Lau; Hagen, Casper P.

    2015-01-01

    , pubertal development and the presence of gynaecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Results: 52 of 106 boys (49 developed gynaecomastia of which 10 (19 presented with intermittent gynaecomastia. Boys with physiological gynaecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who......Context: Physiological gynaecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, though this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. Objective: This study aimed to describe the frequency...... of physiological gynaecomastia, and to determine possible etiological factors (e.g. auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal set-up. Design, Settings and Participants: A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8–16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of “the COPENHAGEN Puberty...

  20. Age Differences in Interhemispheric Interactions: Callosal Structure, Physiological Function, and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett W Fling

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a fundamental gap in understanding how brain structural and functional network connectivity are interrelated, how they change with age, and how such changes contribute to older adults’ sensorimotor deficits. Recent neuroimaging approaches including resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI have been used to assess brain functional (fcMRI and structural (DTI network connectivity, allowing for more integrative assessments of distributed neural systems than in the past. Declines in corpus callosum size and microstructure with advancing age have been well documented, but their contributions to age deficits in unimanual and bimanual function are not well defined. Our recent work implicates age-related declines in callosal size and integrity as a key contributor to unimanual and bimanual control deficits. Moreover, our data provide evidence for a fundamental shift in the balance of excitatory and inhibitory interhemispheric processes that occurs with age, resulting in age differences in the relationship between functional and structural network connectivity. Training studies suggest that the balance of interhemispheric interactions can be shifted with experience, making this a viable target for future interventions.

  1. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afrooz, A. R. M. Nabiul [The University of Texas, Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Hussain, Saber M. [Wright-Patterson AFB, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: navid.saleh@utexas.edu [The University of Texas, Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.Graphical Abstract.

  2. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afrooz, A. R. M. Nabiul; Hussain, Saber M.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2014-01-01

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.Graphical Abstract

  3. Physiological and ultra-structural changes in tomato seedlings induced by lead

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes, Caroline Leivas; Marini, Patrícia; Fernando, Juliana Aparecida; Moraes, Dario Munt de; Castro, Luis Antônio Suita de; Lopes, Nei Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the changes in seed viability, early growth, content of photosynthetic pigments and ultra-structural changes of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill seedlings caused by lead. Seeds were exposed to different concentrations of lead acetate (zero; 0.25; 0.5 and 0.75 mM). Percent germination and seedling emergence decreased as Pb concentration increased. In the same way, root length, dry mass and aerial parts also decreased as concentrations of Pb were increased, where...

  4. Physiological Heterogeneity: Fractals Link Determinism and Randomness in Structures and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial variation in concentrations or flows within an organ and temporal variation in reaction rates or flows appear to broaden as one refines the scale of observation. How can we characterize heterogeneity independently of scale? Fractals come to our rescue! A system is fractal if its features adhere to the same rules through a succession of different scales. Fractals efficiently describe many types of observations, geometric and kinetic, and help to integrate physiological knowledge. PMID:20871797

  5. A physiological study of the US Navy surface decompression procedure and some modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, M.; Booth, L. [Houlder Diving Research Facility, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    Studies were performed after hyperbaric exposure for a period of 30 minutes at a depth of 50 metres. Differences were noted in the physiological response to decompression from this exposure when the USN surface decompression procedure was compared with the standard air decompression procedure. The principle, and most significant difference was an increase in the granulocyte count measured six hours post dive. Many perturbations in physiology were noted as being common to both tables. These included: manifestations of decompression sickness; presence of detected circulating venous gas emboli; and acceleration of plasma I{sup 125} fibrinogen turnover. (author)

  6. A Physiological Case Study of a Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Player: Reflective Practise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaper, Nicholas J.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the physiological changes caused by long-term training in a world class female tennis player in preparation for a major championship. Additionally, we aim to describe the training interventions and determine a suitable cooling strategy that was to be used at the 2004 Paralympic Games. The athlete underwent regular physiological assessment during 2003-2004. Physiological measures involved body composition, submaximal and peak oxygen uptake and key variables associated with maximal sprinting. In addition, a suitable match-play cooling intervention and hydration strategy was also explored. Body composition improved over the course of the study. Aerobic capacity fell by 21%, yet the submaximal physiological variables such as lactate profile and pushing economy improved. The trade off of aerobic capacity was perhaps noticeably counter-balanced with the maintenance of the peak sprinting speed and improvement found in the fatigue profile across ten repeated sprints. The extensive training programme was responsible for these changes and these adaptations resulted in a more confident athlete, in peak physical condition leading into the Paralympic Games. It is difficult to appreciate the extent to which this work had an impact on tennis performance given the skill requirements of wheelchair tennis and this warrants future attention. Key points Physiological adaptations were apparent over the two-year training period. The training emphasis resulted in a reduction in aerobic capacity, yet an improvement in repetitive sprint performance was seen leading into the Major competition. An effective cooling technique was identified that could be used during wheelchair tennis performance. The athlete and coaches were complimentary to the physiological support provided, which resulted in a more confident athlete at the Paralympic Games. PMID:24149542

  7. Overcoming the challenges of studying conservation physiology in large whales: a review of available methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kathleen E.; Moore, Michael J.; Rolland, Rosalind M.; Kellar, Nicholas M.; Hall, Ailsa J.; Kershaw, Joanna; Raverty, Stephen A.; Davis, Cristina E.; Yeates, Laura C.; Fauquier, Deborah A.; Rowles, Teresa K.; Kraus, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Large whales are subjected to a variety of conservation pressures that could be better monitored and managed if physiological information could be gathered readily from free-swimming whales. However, traditional approaches to studying physiology have been impractical for large whales, because there is no routine method for capture of the largest species and there is presently no practical method of obtaining blood samples from free-swimming whales. We review the currently available techniques for gathering physiological information on large whales using a variety of non-lethal and minimally invasive (or non-invasive) sample matrices. We focus on methods that should produce information relevant to conservation physiology, e.g. measures relevant to stress physiology, reproductive status, nutritional status, immune response, health, and disease. The following four types of samples are discussed: faecal samples, respiratory samples (‘blow’), skin/blubber samples, and photographs. Faecal samples have historically been used for diet analysis but increasingly are also used for hormonal analyses, as well as for assessment of exposure to toxins, pollutants, and parasites. Blow samples contain many hormones as well as respiratory microbes, a diverse array of metabolites, and a variety of immune-related substances. Biopsy dart samples are widely used for genetic, contaminant, and fatty-acid analyses and are now being used for endocrine studies along with proteomic and transcriptomic approaches. Photographic analyses have benefited from recently developed quantitative techniques allowing assessment of skin condition, ectoparasite load, and nutritional status, along with wounds and scars from ship strikes and fishing gear entanglement. Field application of these techniques has the potential to improve our understanding of the physiology of large whales greatly, better enabling assessment of the relative impacts of many anthropogenic and ecological pressures. PMID:27293590

  8. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  9. Stressed out? Associations between perceived and physiological stress responses in adolescents : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ormel, Johan; Bosch, Nienke M.; Bouma, Esther M. C.; Van Roon, Arie M.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Riese, Harriette

    Studies regarding the interrelation of perceived and physiological stress indices have shown diverging results. Using a population sample of adolescents (N=715, 50.9% girls, mean age 16.11 years, SD=0.59), we tested three hypotheses: (1) perceived responses during social stress covary with

  10. Development of a chicken enterocyte culture to study its functional physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a method to culture chicken intestinal enterocytes, the cells that absorb and form protective barriers against enteric bacteria, to study their functional physiologies. Using intestinal villi, harvested from day old broiler chicks, the enterocytes were isolated by sequential digestion ...

  11. Physiological studies on cultivar-specific resistance of tomato plants to Cladosporium fulvum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrastructural and physiological aspects of cultivar-specific resistance of tomato against Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Fulvia fulva) are subject of this thesis.

    The ultrastructural study described in the first paper was meant as an introduction to a

  12. Physiology of adaptation of first-year students to studies at higher educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikhina, A V

    2011-07-01

    Changes in anthropometric and hematological values and parameters of cardiovascular function indicated sufficiently effective adaptation of first-year students to studies at higher educational institutions. On the other hand, a certain strain of the physiological optimum caused by examination stress was found in the students.

  13. 3-Dimensional Physiologic Postural Range of the Mandible: A Computerized-Assisted Technique—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Shewman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated that while the mandible assumes its resting position in space, antagonistic muscles should assume minimal muscle activity within a spatial range. This zone of mandibular rest has been mapped using physiologic parameters of muscle activity and incisal spatial kinematics. This case study expands on previous research by monitoring incisal and posterior jaw position and includes lateral pterygoid muscle activity, thus allowing for determining the spatial range including additional relevant coordinates and muscle activity. Four positions were evaluated: a maximum physiologic open position, a maximum physiologic closed position, physiologic rest position, and maximum physiologic protrusion position. Within the physiologic zone of rest formed by these 4 positions, the vertical and anterior borders of the envelope of function may be documented for the incisal and posterior mandible in true 3-dimensional fashion to assist the clinician in determining a physiologic interocclusal freeway space and vertical dimension of occlusion. Advantages and limitations are discussed.

  14. [Physiological and structural modifications induced by cadmium-calcium interaction in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila Zoghlami, Latifa; Djebali, Wahbi; Chaïbi, Wided; Ghorbel, Mohamed Habib

    2006-09-01

    Tomato seedlings (Lycopersicon esculentum), initially cultivated in a basic nutrient solution during 12 days, were treated with increasing CdCl(2) concentrations for 10 days. The results showed that cadmium inhibited the weight growth depending on the metal concentration and the plant organ. In the presence of 20 microM CdCl(2), the addition of calcium, 0.1 to 10 mM of CaCl(2) in the culture medium, improved especially the biomass production and the mineral composition of the plants in concomitance with an increase in the contents of photosynthetic pigments. Histological study at the hypocotyle level revealed that cadmium (20 microM) induced a restriction of the tissue territories as well as meristem formations differentiating in a root structure. At this concentration, the addition of CaCl(2) (5 microM) was characterized by an opposite effect with absence of meristem structures. The overall results suggest that the alteration of some plant growth process after exposure to cadmium can be attenuated by an adequate calcium contribution in culture medium.

  15. Are submarine groundwater discharges affecting the structure and physiological status of rocky intertidal communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piló, D; Barbosa, A B; Teodósio, M A; Encarnação, J; Leitão, F; Range, P; Krug, L A; Cruz, J; Chícharo, L

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the impacts of submarine groundwater discharges (SGD) on a rocky intertidal community of South Portugal, during April-November 2011. Chlorophyll-a concentration was higher at the SGD site in respect to the Reference site. Epibenthic community structure differed between sites, with an increase in Chthamalus spp. and a decrease in macroalgae coverage at the SGD site. The abundance and body size of Mytilus galloprovincialis were consistently higher at the SGD site. During mid-spring, under potentially higher SGD and less favorable conditions for coastal phytoplankton, the ecophysiological condition of M. galloprovincialis and G. umbilicalis was also higher at the SGD site. These beneficial effects on filter-feeders and herbivores probably resulted from local increases in prey availability, supported by SGD-driven nutrient inputs. Conversely, P. depressa was not favoured by SGD, probably due to a lower dependency on algae as food. The analysis of epibenthic community structure and ecophysiological condition represents a promising approach to disentangle the ecological impacts of SGD on intertidal ecosystems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of high environmental ammonia on the structure of rainbow trout hierarchies and the physiology of the individuals therein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, Josias M B; Wood, Chris M

    2018-02-01

    Our goals were: (i) to determine whether sublethal concentrations of water-borne ammonia would prevent the formation of a dominance hierarchy, or alter its structure, in groups of 4 juvenile trout; (ii) to investigate the behavioral and physiological responses of individuals of different social rank exposed to a concentration of ammonia that still allowed hierarchy formation. Social hierarchies were created by using a technique in which a food delivery system that created competition also served to isolate individual fish for respirometry. Groups of 4 fish were exposed to elevated ammonia (NH 4 HCO 3 ) 12 h before first feeding; aggression was recorded by video camera during morning feedings. Experimental ammonia concentrations were 700, 1200 and 1500 μmol L -1 at pH 7.3, 12 °C (9.8, 16.8, and 21.0 mg L -1 as total ammonia-N, or 0.0515, 0.0884, and 0.1105 mg L -1 as NH 3 -N). Aggression was severely reduced by 1200 and abolished by 1500 μmol L -1 total ammonia, such that hierarchies did not form. However, groups exposed to 700 μmol L -1 total ammonia still formed stable hierarchies but displayed lower levels of aggression in comparison to control hierarchies. Exposure continued for 11 days. Physiological parameters were recorded on day 5 (end of period 1) and day 10 (end of period 2), while feeding and plasma cortisol were measured on day 11. In control hierarchies, dominant (rank 1) trout generally exhibited higher growth rates, greater increases in condition factor, higher food consumption, and lower cortisol levels than did fish of ranks 2, 3, and 4. In comparison to controls, the 700 μmol L -1 total ammonia hierarchies generally displayed lower growth, lower condition factor increases, lower O 2 consumption, lower cortisol levels, but similar feeding patterns, with smaller physiological differences amongst ranks during period 1. Effects attenuated during period 2, as aggression and physiological measures returned towards

  17. Study of a viscoplastic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahbouhi, A.F.; Cousin, M.; Jullien, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    This study concerns the thermoplastic behavior of metallic structures under cyclic thermal loading. This work aims to bring about a contribution to the experimental plan as well as to the numerical modelisation aspect of the viscoplastic behavior of the structures. This experimental device allows the variation of the thermal loading story especially the duration of the cycle and the fixed temperature time. The numerical analysis of the viscoplastic behavior of the structures was carried out by treating the plastic strains independently of the creep strains. The comparison of the experimental and numerical results brings about important elements concerning the numerical analysis of the viscoplastic behavior of such structures. (orig.)

  18. Nasal epithelial cells can act as a physiological surrogate for paediatric asthma studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendran Thavagnanam

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Differentiated paediatric epithelial cells can be used to study the role of epithelial cells in asthma. Nasal epithelial cells are easier to obtain and may act as a surrogate for bronchial epithelium in asthma studies. We assessed the suitability of nasal epithelium from asthmatic children to be a surrogate for bronchial epithelium using air-liquid interface cultures. METHODS: Paired nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatic children (n = 9 were differentiated for 28 days under unstimulated and IL-13-stimulated conditions. Morphological and physiological markers were analysed using immunocytochemistry, transepithelial-electrical-resistance, Quantitative Real-time-PCR, ELISA and multiplex cytokine/chemokine analysis. RESULTS: Physiologically, nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic children exhibit similar cytokine responses to stimulation with IL-13 compared with paired bronchial epithelial cells. Morphologically however, nasal epithelial cells differed significantly from bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatic patients under unstimulated and IL-13-stimulated conditions. Nasal epithelial cells exhibited lower proliferation/differentiation rates and lower percentages of goblet and ciliated cells when unstimulated, while exhibiting a diminished and varied response to IL-13. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that morphologically, nasal epithelial cells would not be a suitable surrogate due to a significantly lower rate of proliferation and differentiation of goblet and ciliated cells. Physiologically, nasal epithelial cells respond similarly to exogenous stimulation with IL-13 in cytokine production and could be used as a physiological surrogate in the event that bronchial epithelial cells are not available.

  19. Using ecology to inform physiology studies: implications of high population density in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Amy E M; Edmunds, Nicholas B; Ferraro, Shannon; Heffell, Quentin; Merritt, Gillian M; Pakkala, Jesse J; Schilling, Cory R; Schorno, Sarah

    2015-03-15

    Conspecific density is widely recognized as an important ecological factor across the animal kingdom; however, the physiological impacts are less thoroughly described. In fact, population density is rarely mentioned as a factor in physiological studies on captive animals and, when it is infrequently addressed, the animals used are reared and housed at densities far above those in nature, making the translation of results from the laboratory to natural systems difficult. We survey the literature to highlight this important ecophysiological gap and bring attention to the possibility that conspecific density prior to experimentation may be a critical factor influencing results. Across three taxa: mammals, birds, and fish, we present evidence from ecology that density influences glucocorticoid levels, immune function, and body condition with the intention of stimulating discussion and increasing consideration of population density in physiology studies. We conclude with several directives to improve the applicability of insights gained in the laboratory to organisms in the natural environment. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. A PHYSIOLOGICAL CASE STUDY OF A PARALYMPIC WHEELCHAIR TENNIS PLAYER: REFLECTIVE PRACTISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Diaper

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the physiological changes caused by long-term training in a world class female tennis player in preparation for a major championship. Additionally, we aim to describe the training interventions and determine a suitable cooling strategy that was to be used at the 2004 Paralympic Games. The athlete underwent regular physiological assessment during 2003-2004. Physiological measures involved body composition, submaximal and peak oxygen uptake and key variables associated with maximal sprinting. In addition, a suitable match-play cooling intervention and hydration strategy was also explored. Body composition improved over the course of the study. Aerobic capacity fell by 21%, yet the submaximal physiological variables such as lactate profile and pushing economy improved. The trade off of aerobic capacity was perhaps noticeably counter-balanced with the maintenance of the peak sprinting speed and improvement found in the fatigue profile across ten repeated sprints. The extensive training programme was responsible for these changes and these adaptations resulted in a more confident athlete, in peak physical condition leading into the Paralympic Games. It is difficult to appreciate the extent to which this work had an impact on tennis performance given the skill requirements of wheelchair tennis and this warrants future attention

  1. Chlorobium Tepidum: Insights into the Structure, Physiology, and Metabolism of a Green Sulfur Bacterium Derived from the Complete Genome Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Chew, Aline Gomez Maqueo; Li, Hui

    2003-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria are obligate, anaerobic photolithoautotrophs that synthesize unique bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and a unique light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome. One organism, Chlorobium tepidum, has emerged as a model for this group of bacteria primarily due to its relative...... ease of cultivation and natural transformability. This review focuses on insights into the physiology and biochemistry of the green sulfur bacteria that have been derived from the recently completed analysis of the 2.15-Mb genome of Chl. tepidum. About 40 mutants of Chl. tepidum have been generated...

  2. Light intensity influences variations in the structural and physiological traits in the leaves of Iris pumila L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuleta Ana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient light significantly influences the structural and physiological characteristics of Iris pumila leaves. A random sample of Iris clones native to an exposed site at the Deliblato Sands, Serbia was partially covered with a neutral screen that transmitted 35% of daylight, so that each clone experienced reduced and full sunlight at the same time. The sun-exposed leaves were significantly thicker, had greater stomatal density, exhibited higher lipid peroxidation, increased activities of SOD, APX, CAT enzymes and higher contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants (anthocyanins and phenols and water deficit relative to shade-leaves. The activities of GR, GPX, and GST enzymes was unaffected by the irradiance level.

  3. The Beneficial Effects of Applied Physiology Study Guides on Dentistry Students’ Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Keyhanmanesh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies have shown that study guides are effective tools that recognize students’ educational needs and help teachers to attain satisfactory results. Unfortunately, this effective learning tool has not been used in the coursework and teaching of basic sciences in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Therefore, this study was proposed to evaluate the effects of a study guide in an applied physiology course on the overall learning quality of dental students.Methods: In this semi-quasi experimental study, 45 dental and 63 medical students in an Applied Physiology course were included. A study guide was given to the dental students at the beginning of the course. At the end of the course, a final examination was held for both groups separately using the OSCE method. The medical and dental students’ final scores were compared using a T-test with SPSS v.16 software. A 34-question Likert-scaled questionnaire was prepared by researchers to evaluate the experimental group’s opinion about the effects of the study guide on their learning.Results: The final exam score of the dental students was 18.01±1.57, and it was 17.94±1.42 for the medical students. The final score of both groups was not different significantly (p=0.804. Based upon the questionnaire, the dental students believed that study guide significantly improved their knowledge and skills in applied physiology (Mean= 61.12±13.7. Conclusion: Use of a study guide improves both the attitude and knowledge of dental students in the applied physiology course.

  4. RLS adaptive filtering for physiological interference reduction in NIRS brain activity measurement: a Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Sun, J W; Rolfe, P

    2012-01-01

    The non-invasive measurement of cerebral functional haemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments is often affected by physiological interference. The suppression of this interference is crucial for reliable recovery of brain activity measurements because it can significantly affect the signal quality. In this study, we present a recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm for adaptive filtering to reduce the magnitude of the physiological interference component. To evaluate it, we implemented Monte Carlo simulations based on a five-layer slab model of a human adult head with a multidistance source–detector arrangement, of a short pair and a long pair, for NIRS measurement. We derived measurements by adopting different interoptode distances, which is relevant to the process of optimizing the NIRS probe configuration. Both RLS and least mean squares (LMS) algorithms were used to attempt the removal of physiological interference. The results suggest that the RLS algorithm is more capable of minimizing the effect of physiological interference due to its advantages of faster convergence and smaller mean squared error (MSE). The influence of superficial layer thickness on the performance of the RLS algorithm was also investigated. We found that the near-detector position is an important variable in minimizing the MSE and a short source–detector separation less than 9 mm is robust to superficial layer thickness variation. (paper)

  5. RLS adaptive filtering for physiological interference reduction in NIRS brain activity measurement: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Sun, J W; Rolfe, P

    2012-06-01

    The non-invasive measurement of cerebral functional haemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments is often affected by physiological interference. The suppression of this interference is crucial for reliable recovery of brain activity measurements because it can significantly affect the signal quality. In this study, we present a recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm for adaptive filtering to reduce the magnitude of the physiological interference component. To evaluate it, we implemented Monte Carlo simulations based on a five-layer slab model of a human adult head with a multidistance source-detector arrangement, of a short pair and a long pair, for NIRS measurement. We derived measurements by adopting different interoptode distances, which is relevant to the process of optimizing the NIRS probe configuration. Both RLS and least mean squares (LMS) algorithms were used to attempt the removal of physiological interference. The results suggest that the RLS algorithm is more capable of minimizing the effect of physiological interference due to its advantages of faster convergence and smaller mean squared error (MSE). The influence of superficial layer thickness on the performance of the RLS algorithm was also investigated. We found that the near-detector position is an important variable in minimizing the MSE and a short source-detector separation less than 9 mm is robust to superficial layer thickness variation.

  6. The UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8: From Structure to Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gareth I.

    2014-01-01

    Low doses of UV-B light (280 to 315 nm) elicit photomorphogenic responses in plants that modify biochemical composition, photosynthetic competence, morphogenesis, and defense. UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B by regulating transcription of a set of target genes. UVR8 differs from other known photoreceptors in that it uses specific Trp amino acids instead of a prosthetic chromophore for light absorption during UV-B photoreception. Absorption of UV-B dissociates the UVR8 dimer into monomers, initiating signal transduction through interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of UVR8 and its interaction with other signaling pathways, the molecular mechanism of UVR8 photoreception, how the UVR8 protein initiates signaling, how it is regulated, and how UVR8 regulates transcription of its target genes. PMID:24481075

  7. Are physiological attributes of jockeys predictors of falls? A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hitchens, P; Blizzard, L; Jones, G; Day, L; Fell, J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This pilot study describes the physiological attributes of jockeys and track-work riders in Tasmania and investigates whether these attributes are associated with falls. Methods All jockeys and track-work riders licensed in Tasmania were invited to participate. The study group consisted of eight jockeys (two female, six male) and 20 track-work riders (14 female, six male). Measures of anthropometry, balance, reaction time, isometric strength, vertical jump, glycolytic and aerobic f...

  8. Metabolomics of Ramadan fasting: an opportunity for the controlled study of physiological responses to food intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening techniques that analyze the metabolic endpoints of biological processes can identify the contributions of genetic predisposition and environmental factors to the development of common diseases. Studies applying controlled physiological challenges can reveal dysregulation in metabolic responses that may be predictive for or associated with these diseases. However, large-scale epidemiological studies with well controlled physiological challenge conditions, such as extended fasting periods and defined food intake, pose logistic challenges. Culturally and religiously motivated behavioral patterns of life style changes provide a natural setting that can be used to enroll a large number of study volunteers. Here we report a proof of principle study conducted within a Muslim community, showing that a metabolomics study during the Holy Month of Ramadan can provide a unique opportunity to explore the pre-prandial and postprandial response of human metabolism to nutritional challenges. Up to five blood samples were obtained from eleven healthy male volunteers, taken directly before and two hours after consumption of a controlled meal in the evening on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan, and after an over-night fast several weeks after Ramadan. The observed increases in glucose, insulin and lactate levels at the postprandial time point confirm the expected physiological response to food intake. Targeted metabolomics further revealed significant and physiologically plausible responses to food intake by an increase in bile acid and amino acid levels and a decrease in long-chain acyl-carnitine and polyamine levels. A decrease in the concentrations of a number of phospholipids between samples taken on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan shows that the long-term response to extended fasting may differ from the response to short-term fasting. The present study design is scalable to larger populations and may be extended to the study of the metabolic response in defined patient

  9. Use of animal models for space flight physiology studies, with special focus on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Animal models have been used to study the effects of space flight on physiological systems. The animal models have been used because of the limited availability of human subjects for studies to be carried out in space as well as because of the need to carry out experiments requiring samples and experimental conditions that cannot be performed using humans. Experiments have been carried out in space using a variety of species, and included developmental biology studies. These species included rats, mice, non-human primates, fish, invertebrates, amphibians and insects. The species were chosen because they best fit the experimental conditions required for the experiments. Experiments with animals have also been carried out utilizing ground-based models that simulate some of the effects of exposure to space flight conditions. Most of the animal studies have generated results that parallel the effects of space flight on human physiological systems. Systems studied have included the neurovestibular system, the musculoskeletal system, the immune system, the neurological system, the hematological system, and the cardiovascular system. Hindlimb unloading, a ground-based model of some of the effects of space flight on the immune system, has been used to study the effects of space flight conditions on physiological parameters. For the immune system, exposure to hindlimb unloading has been shown to results in alterations of the immune system similar to those observed after space flight. This has permitted the development of experiments that demonstrated compromised resistance to infection in rodents maintained in the hindlimb unloading model as well as the beginning of studies to develop countermeasures to ameliorate or prevent such occurrences. Although there are limitations to the use of animal models for the effects of space flight on physiological systems, the animal models should prove very valuable in designing countermeasures for exploration class missions of the future.

  10. Metabolomics of Ramadan fasting: an opportunity for the controlled study of physiological responses to food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sweety; Krug, Susanne; Skurk, Thomas; Halama, Anna; Stank, Antonia; Artati, Anna; Prehn, Cornelia; Malek, Joel A; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Adamski, Jerzy; Hauner, Hans; Suhre, Karsten

    2014-06-06

    High-throughput screening techniques that analyze the metabolic endpoints of biological processes can identify the contributions of genetic predisposition and environmental factors to the development of common diseases. Studies applying controlled physiological challenges can reveal dysregulation in metabolic responses that may be predictive for or associated with these diseases. However, large-scale epidemiological studies with well controlled physiological challenge conditions, such as extended fasting periods and defined food intake, pose logistic challenges. Culturally and religiously motivated behavioral patterns of life style changes provide a natural setting that can be used to enroll a large number of study volunteers. Here we report a proof of principle study conducted within a Muslim community, showing that a metabolomics study during the Holy Month of Ramadan can provide a unique opportunity to explore the pre-prandial and postprandial response of human metabolism to nutritional challenges. Up to five blood samples were obtained from eleven healthy male volunteers, taken directly before and two hours after consumption of a controlled meal in the evening on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan, and after an over-night fast several weeks after Ramadan. The observed increases in glucose, insulin and lactate levels at the postprandial time point confirm the expected physiological response to food intake. Targeted metabolomics further revealed significant and physiologically plausible responses to food intake by an increase in bile acid and amino acid levels and a decrease in long-chain acyl-carnitine and polyamine levels. A decrease in the concentrations of a number of phospholipids between samples taken on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan shows that the long-term response to extended fasting may differ from the response to short-term fasting. The present study design is scalable to larger populations and may be extended to the study of the metabolic response in defined patient

  11. Meta-analysis of digital game and study characteristics eliciting physiological stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert-Jan; Van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Digital games have been used as stressors in a range of disciplines for decades. Nonetheless, the underlying characteristics of these stressors and the study in which the stressor was applied are generally not recognized for their moderating effect on the measured physiological stress responses. We have therefore conducted a meta-analysis that analyzes the effects of characteristics of digital game stressors and study design on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in studies carried out from 1976 to 2012. In order to assess the differing quality between study designs, a new scale is developed and presented, coined reliability of effect size. The results show specific and consistent moderating functions of both game and study characteristics, on average accounting for around 43%, and in certain cases up to 57% of the variance found in physiological stress responses. Possible cognitive and physiological processes underlying these moderating functions are discussed, and a new model integrating these processes with the moderating functions is presented. These findings indicate that a digital game stressor does not act as a stressor by virtue of being a game, but rather derives its stressor function from its characteristics and the methodology in which it is used. This finding, together with the size of the associated moderations, indicates the need for a standardization of digital game stressors. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  12. Learning about brain physiology and complexity from the study of the epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Garcia-Cairasco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a complex system, which produces emergent properties such as those associated with activity-dependent plasticity in processes of learning and memory. Therefore, understanding the integrated structures and functions of the brain is well beyond the scope of either superficial or extremely reductionistic approaches. Although a combination of zoom-in and zoom-out strategies is desirable when the brain is studied, constructing the appropriate interfaces to connect all levels of analysis is one of the most difficult challenges of contemporary neuroscience. Is it possible to build appropriate models of brain function and dysfunctions with computational tools? Among the best-known brain dysfunctions, epilepsies are neurological syndromes that reach a variety of networks, from widespread anatomical brain circuits to local molecular environments. One logical question would be: are those complex brain networks always producing maladaptive emergent properties compatible with epileptogenic substrates? The present review will deal with this question and will try to answer it by illustrating several points from the literature and from our laboratory data, with examples at the behavioral, electrophysiological, cellular and molecular levels. We conclude that, because the brain is a complex system compatible with the production of emergent properties, including plasticity, its functions should be approached using an integrated view. Concepts such as brain networks, graphics theory, neuroinformatics, and e-neuroscience are discussed as new transdisciplinary approaches dealing with the continuous growth of information about brain physiology and its dysfunctions. The epilepsies are discussed as neurobiological models of complex systems displaying maladaptive plasticity.

  13. A Moodle-based blended learning solution for physiology education in Montenegro: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Natasa; Popovic, Tomo; Rovcanin Dragovic, Isidora; Cmiljanic, Oleg

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluates the impact of web-based blended learning in the physiology course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Montenegro. The two main goals of the study were: to determine the impact of e-learning on student success in mastering the course, and to assess user satisfaction after the introduction of e-learning. The study compared a group of students who attended the physiology course before, with a group of students who attended the physiology course after the Moodle platform was fully implemented as an educational tool. Formative and summative assessment scores were compared between these two groups. The impact of high vs. low Moodle use on the assessment scores was analyzed. The satisfaction among Moodle users was assessed by the survey. The study found that attendance of face-to-face lectures had a positive impact on academic performance. The introduction of Moodle in the presented model of teaching increased interest of students, attendance of face-to-face lectures, as well as formative and summative scores. High frequency of Moodle use was not always associated with better academic performance, suggesting that the introduction of a new method of teaching was most likely equally accepted by low- and high-achieving students. Most of the students agreed that Moodle was easy to use and it complemented traditional teaching very well, but it could not completely replace traditional face-to-face lectures. The study supports continuing the use of web-based learning in a form of blended learning for physiology, as well as for other courses in medical education.

  14. Observed and simulated effect of plant physiology and structure on land surface energy fluxes and soil conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Sen; Rihani, Jehan; Langensiepen, Matthias; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    The parameterization of stomatal conductance and leaf area index (LAI) in land surface models largely influence simulated terrestrial system states. While stomatal conductance mainly controls transpiration, latent heat flux, and root-water-uptake, LAI impacts additionally the radiative energy exchange. Thus both affect canopy evaporation and transpiration and land surface energy and water fluxes as a whole. Common parameterizations of stomatal conductance follow either semi-mechanistic forms based on photosynthesis (Ball-Berry Type (BB)) or forms which consider environmental factors such as impact of light, temperature, humidity and soil moisture (Jarvis-Stewart Type (JS)). Both approaches differ also in the interpretation of humidity effects and light-use efficiency. While soil moisture plays an important role for root-water-uptake there is no clear conclusion yet about how soil moisture interacts with stomata activity. Values for LAI can be obtained from field measurements, satellite estimates or modelling and are used as an essential model input. While field measurements are very time consuming and only represent single points, satellite estimates may have biases caused by variable albedo and sensor limitations. Representing LAI within land surface models requires complex schemes in order to represent all processes contributing to plant growth. We use the Terrestrial System Modelling Platform (TerrSysMP) over the Rur watershed in Germany for studying the influence of plant physiology and structure on the state of the terrestrial system. The Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (TR32) extensively monitors this catchment for almost a decade. The land surface (CLM3.5) and the subsurface (ParFlow) modules of TerrSysMP are conditioned based on satellite-retrieved land cover and the soil map from FAO and forced with a high-resolution reanalysis by DWD. For studying the effect of plant physiology, the Ball-Berry-Leuning, and Jarvis-Stewart stomatal

  15. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Tondo

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+ reductases (FNRs are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•O(2(-. Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762 as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv

  16. Using the reconstructed genome-scale human metabolic network to study physiology and pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism plays a key role in many major human diseases. Generation of high-throughput omics data has ushered in a new era of systems biology. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions provide a platform to interpret omics data in a biochemically meaningful manner. The release of the global human metabolic network, Recon 1, in 2007 has enabled new systems biology approaches to study human physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. There are currently over 20 publications that utilize Reco...

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Growth, Sex Steroids, and IGF-1 in Boys With Physiological Gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieritz, Mikkel G; Rakêt, Lars L; Hagen, Casper P; Nielsen, John E; Talman, Maj-Lis M; Petersen, Jørgen H; Sommer, Stefan H; Main, Katharina M; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Physiological gynecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, although this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. This study aimed to describe the frequency of physiological gynecomastia and to determine possible etiological factors (eg, auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal setup. A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8-16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study. The boys were examined every 6 months during an 8-year follow-up. Median number of examinations was 10 (2-15). Blood samples were analyzed for FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, SHBG, inhibin B, anti-Müllerian hormone, IGF-1, and IGF binding protein-3 by immunoassays. Auxological parameters, pubertal development, and the presence of gynecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Fifty-two of 106 boys (49%) developed gynecomastia, of which 10 (19%) presented with intermittent gynecomastia. Boys with physiological gynecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who did not develop gynecomastia (13.5 versus 13.9 years, P = .027), and they had significantly higher serum levels of IGF-1 (P = .000), estradiol (P = .013), free testosterone (P Gynecomastia is frequent in pubertal boys. Increased IGF-1 levels and pubertal growth appear to be associated, whereas changes in estrogen to testosterone ratio seem negligible.

  18. Phantom movements from physiologically inappropriate muscles: A case study with a high transhumeral amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Julie; Hugosdottir, Rosa; Kamavuako, Ernest N

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with high-level amputation have a great need for functional prostheses because of their vast functional deficits. Conventional techniques are considered inappropriate for high-level amputees due to the lack of physiologically appropriate muscles. This study investigates how accurate phantom movements (PMs) can be classified from physiologically inappropriate muscles. The study involves a case study of a 42-year-old transhumeral amputee. Suitable PMs and best electrode configuration were identified using the sequential forward selection method and brute-force technique. Using linear discriminant analysis, the best PMs (elbow extension/flexion, wrist supination/pronation) and rest were classified with error ranging from 3% to 0.18% when using 3 to 8 EMG channels respectively. A completion rate of 93 % was obtained during a targeted achievement control test in a virtual reality environment. This case indicates that a proximal transhumeral amputee can generate muscle activation patterns related to distinct PMs; and these PMs can be decoded from physiologically inappropriate muscles.

  19. Natural history and physiological determinants of changes in glucose tolerance in a non-diabetic population: the RISC Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, E; Natali, A; Muscelli, E

    2011-01-01

    The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area.......The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area....

  20. Grandma's TUM-my Trouble: A Case Study in Renal Physiology and Acid-Base Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Ann T.

    2015-01-01

    This case study involves the role of the kidneys in regulating blood pH and electrolytes. The case was used near the end of a two-semester Human Anatomy and Physiology course sequence, during the time when renal physiology was under study. Groups of two to three students were given the case and associated information (lab values, etc.). Students…

  1. Report of the special committee for the study of physiological effects of radon in human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the committee for the study of physiological effects of radon in human based on the presentation in the meetings by the members in the period, 1996-1998. The methods to estimate the exposed dose of radon (Rn) have been considerably improved now. But it is necessary to consider living conditions such as housing conditions, respiratory ratio as well as physical measurements such as Rn concentration, its balance factor, the ratio of non-absorbed component, for accurate evaluation of the physiological effects of Rn. This committee was established aiming to investigate the physiological effects of Rn in human bodies and solve the problems in this area. In a period from 1996 to 1998, meeting was held nine times by the committee. The respective main themes were as follows: the purpose of this committee and the plans of activities in future for the first meeting, indoor Rn level and balance factor for the second, outdoor Rn level and aerosol of its daughter nuclides for the third, respiratory air movement model for the 4th, Rn inhalation, epidemiological study of Rn for the 5th, epidemiological study of Rn for the 6th, problems in Rn level survey for the 7th, behaviors of Rn and its daughter nuclides in occupational environment for 9th, and variance in dose calibration factor and biological effects of α-ray for 10th. At present, dose evaluation and risk evaluation for Rn exposure include considerable uncertainty. Accurate dose evaluation for Rn is necessary to determine the limitation dose for human bodies to repress the physiological effects. (M.N.)

  2. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  3. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  4. Canopy structure and physiology related to rootstock vigour in early-ripening peach cultivar Flordastar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motisi, A.; Grutta, I.; Pernice, F.; Caruso, T.

    2005-01-01

    Canopy architectural and eco-physiological traits were measured on five-year-old early-ripening peach cv Flordastar trees grafted on GF 677 and MrS 2/5 rootstocks. Data are reported both on measurements performed directly on the trees, for branches and twigs characters, and on the fractal dimension (D), estimated by the 'box counting' method taken from digital images of Winter-dormant trees, adopted as an indicator of canopy complexity. Results are discussed in relation to the modification of the canopy microclimate as a consequence of the effects of rootstock on tree architecture and water consumption, the latter measured by using sap flow (HPV) probes. A lower degree of canopy complexity was observed in trees grafted onto MrS 2/5 and this, in turn, was related to a higher degree of aerodynamic contact of the tree with the atmosphere (expressed in terms of leaf boundary conductance) and to a higher solar radiation intensity along the canopy profile. These differences did not affect fruit quality in terms of size, red skin over-colour and soluble solid content. In MrS 2/5, the higher light availability at all levels along canopy profile was related to a moderate water deficit status, even under full-irrigation conditions, as evidenced by the lower stem water potential (below -1.3 MPa) and by a lower transpiration rate (about one-half of the values observed on GF 677). At tree-level, MrS 2/5 had a daily water consumption that, also in relation to the lower leaf area per tree, resulted as low as 25% of the values observed on GF 677. The latter, even carrying a significantly higher leaf area and higher water consumption, never showed apparent symptoms of water deficit [it

  5. Structural modifications in the arterial wall during physiological aging and as a result of diabetes mellitus in a mouse model: are the changes comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, G; Bulckaen, H; Gaxatte, C; Boulanger, E; Béraud, G; Creusy, C; Puisieux, F; Fontaine, P

    2011-04-01

    Vascular accelerated aging represents the major cause of morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes mellitus. In the present study, our aim was to compare premature functional and morphological changes in the arterial wall resulting from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus in mice over a short-term period with those that develop during physiological aging. The effect of aminoguanidine (AG) on the prevention of these alterations in the diabetic group was also analyzed. The vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh) in the mouse was tested in isolated segments of phenylephrine (Phe)-precontracted aorta at 2, 4 and 8 weeks (wk) of STZ-induced diabetes and compare to 12- and 84-wk-old mice. Aortic structural changes were investigated, and receptor for AGE (RAGE) aortic expression was quantified by western blot. Compared to the 12-wk control group (76 ± 5%), significant endothelium-dependant relaxation (EDR) impairment was found in the group of 12-wk-old mice, which underwent a 4-wk diabetes-inducing STZ treatment (12wk-4WD) (52 ± 4%; P aging preventive effect on the structural changes of the arterial wall. Our study compared EDR linked to physiological aging with that observed in the case of STZ-induced diabetes over a short-term period, and demonstrated the beneficial effect of AG. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The application of mass and energy conservation laws in physiologically structured population models of heterotrophic organisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, S.A.L.M.; Kooi, B.W.; Hallam, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    Rules for energy uptake, and subsequent utilization, form the basis of population dynamics and, therefore, explain the dynamics of the ecosystem structure in terms of changes in standing crops and size distributions of individuals. Mass fluxes are concomitant with energy flows and delineate

  7. The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen. Studies on physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the physiological basis for the clinical use of serum PIIINP as a marker of the deposition rate of type III collagen. The assumption was that the serum concentration of PIIINP would reflect the turnover of type III collagen and thus directly reflect......-venous shunt in conscious pigs was developed. Double and triple isotope tracer techniques were used for kinetic studies in the animal model and in cultures of tubule cells. The rat model with the induction of granulation tissue was used to investigate catabolic states. The anabolic state was studied in humans...

  8. Monitoring water stress and fruit quality in an orange orchard under regulated deficit irrigation using narrow-band structural and physiological remote sensing indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagakis, S.; González-Dugo, V.; Cid, P.; Guillén-Climent, M. L.; Zarco-Tejada, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    altered canopy structure. In such cases, PRI570 was more affected than PRI515 by the structural changes caused by sustained water stress throughout the season. Both PRI formulations were proven to serve as pre-visual water stress indicators linked to fruit quality TSS and TA parameters (r2 = 0.69 for PRI515 vs TSS; r2 = 0.58 vs TA). In contrast, the chlorophyll (R700/R670) and structural indices (NDVI, RDVI, MTVI) showed poor relationships with fruit quality and water status levels (r2 = 0.04 for NDVI vs TSS; r2 = 0.19 vs TA). The two PRI formulations showed strong relationships with the field-measured fruit quality parameters in September, the beginning of stage III, which appeared to be the period most sensitive to water stress and the most critical for assessing fruit quality in citrus. Both PRI515 and PRI570 showed similar performance for the two scales assessed (sunlit crown and entire crown), demonstrating that within-crown component separation is not needed in citrus tree crowns where the shaded vegetation component is small. However, the simulation conducted through spatial resampling on tree + soil aggregated pixels revealed that the physiological indices were highly affected by soil reflectance and between-tree shadows, showing that for TSS vs PRI515 the relationship dropped from r2 = 0.69 to r2 = 0.38 when aggregating soil + crown components. This work confirms a previous study that demonstrated the link between PRI570, water stress, and fruit quality, while also making progress in assessing the new PRI formulation (PRI515), the within-crown shadow effects on the physiological indices, and the need for high resolution imagery to target individual tree crowns for the purpose of evaluating the effects of water stress on fruit quality in citrus.

  9. Physiology and microbial community structure in soil at extreme water content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, Eva; Elhottová, Dana; Tříska, Jan; Šantrůčková, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2005), s. 161-166 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/99/1410; GA ČR(CZ) GA526/99/P033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : microbial community structure * soils * extreme water content Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  10. The application of mass and energy conservation laws in physiologically structured population models of heterotrophic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman; Kooi; Hallam

    1999-04-07

    Rules for energy uptake, and subsequent utilization, form the basis of population dynamics and, therefore, explain the dynamics of the ecosystem structure in terms of changes in standing crops and size distributions of individuals. Mass fluxes are concomitant with energy flows and delineate functional aspects of ecosystems by defining the roles of individuals and populations. The assumption of homeostasis of body components, and an assumption about the general structure of energy budgets, imply that mass fluxes can be written as weighted sums of three organizing energy fluxes with the weight coefficients determined by the conservation law of mass. These energy fluxes are assimilation, maintenance and growth, and provide a theoretical underpinning of the widely applied empirical method of indirect calorimetry, which relates dissipating heat linearly to three mass fluxes: carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption and N-waste production. A generic approach to the stoichiometry of population energetics from the perspective of the individual organism is proposed and illustrated for heterotrophic organisms. This approach indicates that mass transformations can be identified by accounting for maintenance requirements and overhead costs for the various metabolic processes at the population level. The theoretical background for coupling the dynamics of the structure of communities to nutrient cycles, including the water balance, as well as explicit expressions for the dissipating heat at the population level are obtained based on the conservation law of energy. Specifications of the general theory employ the Dynamic Energy Budget model for individuals. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Comparative study of Newtonian physiological blood flow through normal and stenosed carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Matiur; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Mamun, Khairuzzaman; Akhter, Most. Nasrin

    2017-06-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to investigate Newtonian physiological flows behavior on three dimensional idealized carotid artery (CA) and single stenosed (75% by area) carotid artery(SCA). The wall vessel is set as rigid during simulation. Bifurcated blood vessel are simulated by using three-dimensional flow analysis. Physiological and parabolic velocity profiles are set out to fix the conditions of inlet boundaries of artery. In other hand, physiological waveform is an important part of compilation and it is successfully done by utilization of Fourier series having sixteen harmonics. The investigation has a Reynolds number range of 94 to 1120. Low Reynolds number k — ω model has been used as governing equation. The investigation has been carried out to characterize the flow behavior of blood in two geometry, namely, (i) Normal carotid artery (CA) and (ii) Stenosed carotid artery (SCA). The Newtonian model has been used to study the physics of fluid. The findings of the two models are thoroughly compared in order to observe there behavioral sequence of flows. The numerical results were presented in terms of velocity, pressure, wall shear stress distributions and cross sectional velocities as well as the streamlines contour. Stenosis disturbs the normal pattern of blood flow through the artery as reduced area. At stenosis region velocity and peak Reynolds number rapidly increase and Reynolds number reach transitional and turbulent region. These flow fluctuation and turbulence have bad effect to the blood vessel which makes to accelerate the progress of stenosis.

  12. SMARTer for magnetic structure studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - ter was installed at the Neutron Scattering Laboratory (NSL), National Nuclear Energy. Agency of Indonesia – BATAN in Serpong, Indonesia and has performed the experiment for studying the magnetic structures of Cu(NiFe), CuCo and ...

  13. SMARTer for magnetic structure studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SMARTer, a 36-meter small angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer was installed at the Neutron Scattering Laboratory (NSL), National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia – BATAN in Serpong, Indonesia and has performed the experiment for studying the magnetic structures of Cu(NiFe), CuCo and FeSiBNbCu ...

  14. Correlative physiological and morphological studies of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors in cat's glabrous skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iggo, A; Ogawa, H

    1977-01-01

    1. A total of fifty-four mechanoreceptor afferent units with fast conducting axons in the tibial nerve innervating the glabrous skin of the hind leg were isolated in anaesthetized cats. 2. Twenty-six rapidly adapting units (RA), eighteen slowly adapting units (SA) and ten Pacinian corpuscle units (PC) were differentiated from each other mainly on the presence of the off response in RA and PC units to a ramp stimulation, the persistence of discharges of the SA units during steady pressure on the receptive field and the classical tuning curve seen in the PC units. A few PC units in the hairy skin were also studied for comparison. 3. Lamellated corpuscles were found histologically in the skin of the receptive field of RA units and identified as Krause's corpuscle of cylindrical type by their superficial location in the cutaneous tissue and their structure revealed by electron microscopy. 4. Physiological characteristics of RA units to various forms of mechanical stimulation were studied and compared with those of the other two kinds of units. SA units had the lowest critical slope among three groups and PC units the highest. 5. The discharge pattern of RA and PC units to a ramp stimulation was found to be time-locked, whereas with SA unites only the first spike appeared at a fixed latency from the start of stimulation. 6. Some RA units showed a tuning curve which was flat from 10 to 200 Hz. Those with narrowly tuned curves had a best turning frequency at around 20 Hz. They were easily differentiated from the SA and PC units. SA units were tuned best at 5 HZ or less, and PC units at around 200 HZ. 7. The relation between the indentation velocity and amplitude of the ramp and the spike discharges was analysed in eleven RA units. In most cases the relation between identation velocity and maximum instataneous frequency was found to be best fit with a power function although other kinds of functions (linear, logarithmic, and logarithmic hyperbolic tangent) could also fit

  15. A comparative study of students' performance in preclinical physiology assessed by multiple choice and short essay questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyebola, D D; Adewoye, O E; Iyaniwura, J O; Alada, A R; Fasanmade, A A; Raji, Y

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the performance of medical students in physiology when assessed by multiple choice questions (MCQs) and short essay questions (SEQs). The study also examined the influence of factors such as age, sex, O/level grades and JAMB scores on performance in the MCQs and SEQs. A structured questionnaire was administered to 264 medical students' four months before the Part I MBBS examination. Apart from personal data of each student, the questionnaire sought information on the JAMB scores and GCE O' Level grades of each student in English Language, Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. The physiology syllabus was divided into five parts and the students were administered separate examinations (tests) on each part. Each test consisted of MCQs and SEQs. The performance in MCQs and SEQs were compared. Also, the effects of JAMB scores and GCE O/level grades on the performance in both the MCQs and SEQs were assessed. The results showed that the students performed better in all MCQ tests than in the SEQs. JAMB scores and O' level English Language grade had no significant effect on students' performance in MCQs and SEQs. However O' level grades in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics had significant effects on performance in MCQs and SEQs. Inadequate knowledge of physiology and inability to present information in a logical sequence are believed to be major factors contributing to the poorer performance in the SEQs compared with MCQs. In view of the finding of significant association between performance in MCQs and SEQs and GCE O/level grades in science subjects and mathematics, it was recommended that both JAMB results and the GCE results in the four O/level subjects above may be considered when selecting candidates for admission into the medical schools.

  16. The use of team-based, guided inquiry learning to overcome educational disadvantages in learning human physiology: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathner, Joseph A; Byrne, Graeme

    2014-09-01

    The study of human bioscience is viewed as a crucial curriculum in allied health. Nevertheless, bioscience (and particularly physiology) is notoriously difficult for undergraduates, particularly academically disadvantaged students. So endemic are the high failure rates (particularly in nursing) that it has come to be known as "the human bioscience problem." In the present report, we describe the outcomes for individual success in studying first-year human physiology in a subject that emphasises team-based active learning as the major pedagogy for mastering subject learning outcomes. Structural equation modeling was used to develop a model of the impact team learning had on individual performance. Modeling was consistent with the idea that students with similar academic abilities (as determined by tertiary entrance rank) were advantaged (scored higher on individual assessment items) by working in strong teams (teams that scored higher in team-based assessments). Analysis of covariance revealed that students who studied the subject with active learning as the major mode of learning activities outperformed students who studied the subject using the traditional didactic teaching format (lectures and tutorials, P = 0.000). After adjustment for tertiary entrance rank (via analysis of covariance) on two individual tests (the final exam and a late-semester in-class test), individual student grades improved by 8% (95% confidence interval: 6-10%) and 12% (95% confidence interval: 10-14%) when students engaged in team-based active learning. These data quantitatively support the notion that weaker students working in strong teams can overcome their educational disadvantages. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  17. Structure of a physiologically based biokinetic model for use in 14C and organically bound tritium dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillians, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) dosimetry models for beta emitters like 3 H and 14 C must include rapid turnover compartments which, while they may be minor in terms of dose commitment, can dominate bioassay measurements at early times after intake. In this paper a consistent PBBK model structure will be described for use in dose assessments for organic 14 C and organically bound tritium (OBT), and also for 14 CO 2 , based on the literature of human carbon metabolism, and on direct measurements of human excretion. CO 2 /HCO 3 - is a central compartment in carbon metabolism. The 14 CO 2 biokinetic model described in ICRP Publication 80 for the calculation of dose coefficients was found to omit early components of excretion necessary for the accurate interpretation of bioassay results. Recommendations on the requirements on dosimetry models for intakes of 14 C and OBT are made. (author)

  18. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  19. Physiological and perceptual responses to three consecutive official matches in female boxer. A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obmiński Zbigniew

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the physiological cost of three consecutive official boxing fights played during a 3-day tournament and two non-contact specific drills against handheld pads of the same time-profile as the contest, 4 × 2 minutes with 1-minute intervals between them. This assessment was based on the determination of selected hormones and metabolites in the blood sampled directly prior to the contests and throughout short-term post-contest recovery.

  20. Physiological and evolutionary studies of NAP systems in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Fengping; Xu, Jun; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Xiao, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Most of the Shewanella species contain two periplasmic nitrate reductases (NAP-α and NAP-β), which is a unique feature of this genus. In the present study, the physiological function and evolutionary relationship of the two NAP systems were studied in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3. Both of the WP3 nap gene clusters: nap-α (napD1A1B1C) and nap-β (napD2A2B2) were shown to be involved in nitrate respiration. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that NAP-β originated earlier than N...

  1. [Biochemical, physiological, and enzymatic study of 78 strains of Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori isolated from gastroduodenal biopsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, J; Alomar, P

    1990-03-01

    A biochemical, physiological and enzymatic study of 78 C. pylori strains isolated from gastroduodenal biopsies is reported. All strains were positive in the oxidase, catalase and urease tests. 97.4% produced SH2 in the lead acetate band and 79.4% showed beta-hemolytic activity in sheep blood agar. In the antibiotic selection tests, C. pylori was characterized to be resistant to nalidixic acid and sensitive to cefalotin . The enzymatic study demonstrated the presence of acid and alkaline phosphatases. This finding and the urease test give C. pylori a define bacteriological character which differentiate it from the remaining campylobacteria.

  2. A study on soil structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuylenborgh, van J.

    1947-01-01

    As soils differ in capacity to form a structure, it is necessary to distinguish between intrinsic structure and actual structure. Intrinsic structure is the capacity of a soil to form a certain structure. Actual structure is the structure of the soil at a certain moment.

    Using experiments and

  3. Structural Narratology and Interdisciplinary Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi Kalesar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between structural narratology and interdisciplinary studies. We will try to answer two main questions: What factors have been effective in narratology’s orientation toward interdisciplinary studies? Is this tendency the result of a possibility in narration or a methodological necessity? The movement of narratology to interdisciplinary is observable not only in new narratological tendencies but also in changes in structural theories. Therefore, this article will trace the roots of this tendency in the revises and critiques of these theories until 1970s. By tracing these changes it can be realized that the theories of structural narrotology have broken with idea of independence and self-sufficiency of literature and embraced other disciplines. The main factors in these changes are: attention to cultural elements and reading process in the perception of narrative structure. These considerations have been accompanied by some results; first, the main targets of narratology changed from investigating textual properties to reading and understanding the narration process; second, some disciplines and fields related to culture and mind studies found their way into narratology.

  4. The 4-vessel Sampling Approach to Integrative Studies of Human Placental Physiology In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Ane M; Holm, Maia B; Roland, Marie C P; Horne, Hildegunn; Michelsen, Trond M; Haugen, Guttorm; Henriksen, Tore

    2017-08-02

    The human placenta is highly inaccessible for research while still in utero. The current understanding of human placental physiology in vivo is therefore largely based on animal studies, despite the high diversity among species in placental anatomy, hemodynamics and duration of the pregnancy. The vast majority of human placenta studies are ex vivo perfusion studies or in vitro trophoblast studies. Although in vitro studies and animal models are essential, extrapolation of the results from such studies to the human placenta in vivo is uncertain. We aimed to study human placenta physiology in vivo at term, and present a detailed protocol of the method. Exploiting the intraabdominal access to the uterine vein just before the uterine incision during planned cesarean section, we collect blood samples from the incoming and outgoing vessels on the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta. When combining concentration measurements from blood samples with volume blood flow measurements, we are able to quantify placental and fetal uptake and release of any compound. Furthermore, placental tissue samples from the same mother-fetus pairs can provide measurements of transporter density and activity and other aspects of placental functions in vivo. Through this integrative use of the 4-vessel sampling method we are able to test some of the current concepts of placental nutrient transfer and metabolism in vivo, both in normal and pathological pregnancies. Furthermore, this method enables the identification of substances secreted by the placenta to the maternal circulation, which could be an important contribution to the search for biomarkers of placenta dysfunction.

  5. Applications of Fluorine-18 in Biological Studies with Special Reference to Bone and Thyroid Physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.

    1963-01-01

    At the authors laboratories fluorine-18 was applied during the last three years to a great variety of problems in biology and medicine. Methods were developed to prepare fluorine by each of the O 18 (p, n), O 16 (H 3 , n) and F 18 (n, 2n) reactions. Radiofluorine-labelled compounds were prepared by isotopic exchange, by synthesis, by recoil labelling and by retention of fluorine in fluoro-organic compounds undergoing the (n, 2n) reaction. Special low- level counting techniques were developed to cope with the low activities of tracer amounts of organic fluoro-compounds. Fluoride-18 ions were applied to studies in bone physiology. It was found that F - follows calcium in many aspects of its physiological behaviour; the accumulation ol F in bone was found to increase under the influence of vitamin D and of testosterone, whereas cortizone and estrogens diminished the extent of fluoride accretion. The pattern of distribution of fluorine in the organism was modified when administered in the form of a cationic complex. Fluorine-18 labelled YF ++ or ZF +3 were found to follow the pattern of distribution of the parent cations. Fluoroborate ions were shown to accumulate in the thyroid gland to an extent comparable to that of iodide ions. Fluoroborate ions do not undergo any organic binding in the thyroid, and their uptake is a specific, indication of the function of the 'trapping stage' in the gland. Fluorine-18 labelled fluoroborate has been applied to a variety of problems in thyroid physiology. It has been shown that TSH diminishes the uptake of BF 4 - in the first few hours after administration and enhances it after 24 h. The inhibitory action of iron, copper, zinc, cadmium, fluoride, thiocyanate and other ions on the iodine uptake was simulated by BF 4 - ; thus the trapping stage was shown to be involved. In an analogous series of experiments sulphydryl- containing compounds, as well as azide ions, were found to enhance the trapping of fluoroborate, although they

  6. Physiological and Proteomic Investigations to Study the Response of Tomato Graft Unions under Temperature Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Wei, Hao; Chen, Yuze; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is an established practice for asexual propagation in horticultural and agricultural crops. The study on graft unions has become of interest for horticulturists using proteomic and genomic techniques to observe transfer of genetic material and signal transduction pathways from root to shoot and shoot to root. Another reason to study the graft unions was potentially to observe resistance against abiotic stresses. Using physiological and proteomic analyses, we investigated graft unions (rootstock and scions) of tomato genotypes exposed to standard-normal (23/23 and 25/18°C day/night) and high-low temperatures (30/15°C day/night). Graft unions had varied responses to the diverse temperatures. High-low temperature, but not standard-normal temperature, induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of H2O2 and O2-1 in rootstock and scions. However, the expression of many cell protection molecules was also induced, including antioxidant enzymes and their immunoblots, which also show an increase in their activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The graft interfaces thus actively defend against stress by modifying their physiological and proteomic responses to establish a new cellular homeostasis. As a result, many proteins for cellular defense were regulated in graft unions under diverse temperature, in addition to the regulation of photosynthetic proteins, ion binding/transport proteins, and protein synthesis. Moreover, biomass, hardness, and vascular transport activity were evaluated to investigate the basic connectivity between rootstock and scions. Our study provides physiological evidence of the grafted plants' response to diverse temperature. Most notably, our study provides novel insight into the mechanisms used to adapt the diverse temperature in graft unions (rootstock/scion).

  7. Binaural beat technology in humans: a pilot study to assess psychologic and physiologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Calabrese, Carlo; Zwickey, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Binaural beat technology (BBT) products are sold internationally as personal development and health improvement tools. Producers suggest benefit from regular listening to binaural beats including reduced stress and anxiety, and increased focus, concentration, motivation, confidence, and depth in meditation. Binaural beats are auditory brainstem responses that originate in the superior olivary nucleus as a result of different frequency auditory stimuli provided to each ear. Listeners to binaural beat "hear" a beat at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the applied tones. The objectives of this pilot study were to gather preliminary data on psychologic and physiologic effects of 60 days daily use of BBT for hypothesis generation and to assess compliance, feasibility, and safety for future studies. Uncontrolled pilot study. Eight healthy adults participated in the study. Participants listened to a CD with delta (0-4 Hz) binaural beat frequencies daily for 60 days. Psychologic and physiological data were collected before and after a 60-day intervention. PSYCHOLOGIC: Depression (Beck Depression Inventory-2), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), mood (Profile of Mood States), absorption (Tellegen Absorption Scale) and quality of Life (World Health Organization-Quality of Life Inventory). PHYSIOLOGICAL: Cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, melatonin, insulin-like growth factor-1, serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, weight, blood pressure, high sensitivity C-reactive protein. There was a decrease in trait anxiety (p = 0.004), an increase in quality of life (p = 0.03), and a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-1 (p = 0.01) and dopamine (p = 0.02) observed between pre- and postintervention measurements. Binaural beat technology may exhibit positive effect on self-reported psychologic measures, especially anxiety. Further research is warranted to explore the effects on anxiety using a larger, randomized and controlled trial.

  8. Physiological and Proteomic Investigations to Study the Response of Tomato Graft Unions under Temperature Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    Full Text Available Grafting is an established practice for asexual propagation in horticultural and agricultural crops. The study on graft unions has become of interest for horticulturists using proteomic and genomic techniques to observe transfer of genetic material and signal transduction pathways from root to shoot and shoot to root. Another reason to study the graft unions was potentially to observe resistance against abiotic stresses. Using physiological and proteomic analyses, we investigated graft unions (rootstock and scions of tomato genotypes exposed to standard-normal (23/23 and 25/18°C day/night and high-low temperatures (30/15°C day/night.Graft unions had varied responses to the diverse temperatures. High-low temperature, but not standard-normal temperature, induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the form of H2O2 and O2-1 in rootstock and scions. However, the expression of many cell protection molecules was also induced, including antioxidant enzymes and their immunoblots, which also show an increase in their activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX. The graft interfaces thus actively defend against stress by modifying their physiological and proteomic responses to establish a new cellular homeostasis. As a result, many proteins for cellular defense were regulated in graft unions under diverse temperature, in addition to the regulation of photosynthetic proteins, ion binding/transport proteins, and protein synthesis. Moreover, biomass, hardness, and vascular transport activity were evaluated to investigate the basic connectivity between rootstock and scions.Our study provides physiological evidence of the grafted plants' response to diverse temperature. Most notably, our study provides novel insight into the mechanisms used to adapt the diverse temperature in graft unions (rootstock/scion.

  9. Structural studies on proton/protonation of the protein molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yukio; Kida, Akiko; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Keiichi; Murakami, Takuto; Umino, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yanagisawa, Yasutake; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Hidaka, Yuji; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Mitsutoshi; Nakanishi, Takeyoshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports three studies involved in the analysis of protons and protonation at physiologically active sites in protein molecules. (1) 'Elucidation of the higher-order structure formation and activity performing mechanism of yeast proteasome.' With an aim to apply to anti-cancer drugs, this study performed the shape analysis of the total structure of 26S proteasome using small-angle X-ray scattering to clarify the complex form where controlling elements bonded to the both ends of 20S catalyst body, and analyzed the complex structure between the active sites of 20S and inhibitor (drug). (2) 'Basic study on the neutron experiment of biomolecules such as physiologically active substances derived from Natto-bacteria.' This study conducted the purification, crystallization, and X-ray analysis experiment of nattokinase; high-grade purification and solution experiment of vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7); and Z-DNA crystal structure study related to the neutron crystal analysis of DNA as another biomolecule structure study. (3) 'Functional evaluation on digestive enzymes derived from Nephila clavata.' As an Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibril formation model, this study carried out elucidation on the fibrosis and fiber-forming mechanism of the traction fiber of Nephila clavata, and the functional analysis of its degrading enzyme. (A.O.)

  10. On the interpretation of the independent components underlying the abdominal phonogram: a study of their physiological relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-González, A; James, C J

    2012-01-01

    Recorded by positioning a sensitive acoustic sensor over the maternal womb, the abdominal phonogram is a signal that contains valuable information for foetal surveillance (e.g. heart rate), which is hidden by maternal and environmental sources. To recover such information, previous work used single-channel independent component analysis (SCICA) to separate the abdominal phonogram into statistically independent components (ICs) that, once acquired, must be objectively associated with the real sources underlying the abdominal phonogram—either physiological or environmental. This is a typical challenge for blind source separation methodologies and requires further research on the signals of interest to find a suitable solution. Here, we have conducted a joint study on 75 sets of ICs by means of statistical, spectral, complexity and time-structure analysis methods. As a result, valuable and consistent characteristics of the components separated from the abdominal phonogram by SCICA have been revealed: (1) the ICs are spectrally disjoint and sorted according to their frequency content, (2) only the ICs with lower frequency content present strong regular patterns and (3) such regular patterns are driven by well-known physiological processes given by the maternal breathing rate, the maternal heart rate and the foetal heart rate. This information was so promising that it has been used in current work for automatic classification of ICs and recovery of the traces of the physiological sources underlying the abdominal phonogram. Future work will look for the extraction of information useful for surveillance (e.g. heart rate), not only about foetal well-being, but also about maternal condition. (paper)

  11. Aromatherapy for reducing colonoscopy related procedural anxiety and physiological parameters: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pei-Hsin; Peng, Yen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ou, Ming-Chiu

    2010-01-01

    Colonoscopy is generally tolerated, some patients regarding the procedure as unpleasant and painful and generally performed with the patient sedated and receiving analgesics. The effect of sedation and analgesia for colonoscopy is limited. Aromatherapy is also applied to gastrointestinal endoscopy to reduce procedural anxiety. There is lack of information about aromatherapy specific for colonoscopy. In this study, we aimed to performed a randomized controlled study to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on relieve anxiety, stress and physiological parameters of colonoscopy. A randomized controlled trail was carried out and collected in 2009 and 2010. The participants were randomized in two groups. Aromatherapy was then carried out by inhalation of Sunflower oil (control group) and Neroli oil (Experimental group). The anxiety index was evaluated by State Trait Anxiety Inventory-state (STAI-S) score before aromatherapy and after colonoscopy as well as the pain index for post-procedural by visual analogue scale (VAS). Physiological indicators, such as blood pressure (systolic and diastolic blood pressure), heart rate and respiratory rate were evaluated before and after aromatherapy. Participates in this study were 27 subjects, 13 in control group and 14 in Neroli group with average age 52.26 +/- 17.79 years. There was no significance of procedural anxiety by STAI-S score and procedural pain by VAS. The physiological parameters showed a significant lower pre- and post-procedural systolic blood pressure in Neroli group than control group. Aromatic care for colonoscopy, although with no significant effect on procedural anxiety, is an inexpensive, effective and safe pre-procedural technique that could decrease systolic blood pressure.

  12. Multiple Forms of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Animals: Structural Determinants and Physiological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Bunik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH of animal cells is usually considered to be a mitochondrial enzyme. However, this enzyme has recently been reported to be also present in nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. These extramitochondrial localizations are associated with moonlighting functions of GDH, which include acting as a serine protease or an ATP-dependent tubulin-binding protein. Here, we review the published data on kinetics and localization of multiple forms of animal GDH taking into account the splice variants, post-translational modifications and GDH isoenzymes, found in humans and apes. The kinetic properties of human GLUD1 and GLUD2 isoenzymes are shown to be similar to those published for GDH1 and GDH2 from bovine brain. Increased functional diversity and specific regulation of GDH isoforms due to alternative splicing and post-translational modifications are also considered. In particular, these structural differences may affect the well-known regulation of GDH by nucleotides which is related to recent identification of thiamine derivatives as novel GDH modulators. The thiamine-dependent regulation of GDH is in good agreement with the fact that the non-coenzyme forms of thiamine, i.e., thiamine triphosphate and its adenylated form are generated in response to amino acid and carbon starvation.

  13. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudits, Dénes; Török, Katalin; Cseri, András; Paul, Kenny; Nagy, Anna V; Nagy, Bettina; Sass, László; Ferenc, Györgyi; Vankova, Radomira; Dobrev, Petre; Vass, Imre; Ayaydin, Ferhan

    2016-03-01

    The biomass productivity of the energy willow Salix viminalis as a short-rotation woody crop depends on organ structure and functions that are under the control of genome size. Colchicine treatment of axillary buds resulted in a set of autotetraploid S. viminalis var. Energo genotypes (polyploid Energo [PP-E]; 2n = 4x = 76) with variation in the green pixel-based shoot surface area. In cases where increased shoot biomass was observed, it was primarily derived from larger leaf size and wider stem diameter. Autotetraploidy slowed primary growth and increased shoot diameter (a parameter of secondary growth). The duplicated genome size enlarged bark and wood layers in twigs sampled in the field. The PP-E plants developed wider leaves with thicker midrib and enlarged palisade parenchyma cells. Autotetraploid leaves contained significantly increased amounts of active gibberellins, cytokinins, salicylic acid, and jasmonate compared with diploid individuals. Greater net photosynthetic CO2 uptake was detected in leaves of PP-E plants with increased chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. Improved photosynthetic functions in tetraploids were also shown by more efficient electron transport rates of photosystems I and II. Autotetraploidization increased the biomass of the root system of PP-E plants relative to diploids. Sections of tetraploid roots showed thickening with enlarged cortex cells. Elevated amounts of indole acetic acid, active cytokinins, active gibberellin, and salicylic acid were detected in the root tips of these plants. The presented variation in traits of tetraploid willow genotypes provides a basis to use autopolyploidization as a chromosome engineering technique to alter the organ development of energy plants in order to improve biomass productivity. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Structure and cellular physiology of Ca2+ stores in invertebrate photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, B; Baumann, O

    1995-10-01

    Invertebrate microvillar photoreceptors contain an extensive, morphologically continuous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that comprises several distinct subregions. Most prominent is the smooth submicrovillar ER, a sponge-like cisternal network underneath the photoreceptive microvillar membrane. The submicrovillar ER spatially separates the microvilli and a narrow space of submicrovillar cytoplasm from the remaining cell body, and, thus, defines a transduction compartment. In bee and locust photoreceptors, the shape and position of these submicrovillar ER cisternae is maintained by interaction with actin filaments. The structural layout of the ER is either rather static, or, in some invertebrate species, the ER undergoes dramatic rearrangements during illumination. The submicrovillar ER has a high Ca content in dark-adapted cells (47.5 mmol/kg dry weight in bee photoreceptors), and acts as a source and sink for Ca2+ mobilized by illumination. About 50% of the Ca content is released by a 3 s, non-saturating light stimulus, and an almost equimolar amount of Mg is taken up to maintain electroneutrality within the ER. Ca2+ release is initiated by Ins(1,4,5)P3. In addition, the submicrovillar ER contains a heparin-insensitive, caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release pathway in bee photoreceptors. Both the Ins(1,4,5)P3-dependent and the ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release mechanism are modulated by cytosolic Ca2+, but at different Ca2+ concentrations. The presence of two release pathways with different Ca2+ sensitivities may be a prerequisite for highly localized, exceptionally fast and large Ca2+ elevations during the illumination of invertebrate photoreceptors.

  15. Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO) - a case study of text mining assisted ontology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological cascades is of great interest to quantitative biologists. Biomedical text has been a rich source for quantitative information. Gathering quantitative parameters and values from biomedical text is one significant challenge in the early steps of computational modeling as it involves huge manual effort. While automatically extracting such quantitative information from bio-medical text may offer some relief, lack of ontological representation for a subdomain serves as impedance in normalizing textual extractions to a standard representation. This may render textual extractions less meaningful to the domain experts. In this work, we propose a rule-based approach to automatically extract relations involving quantitative data from biomedical text describing ion channel electrophysiology. We further translated the quantitative assertions extracted through text mining to a formal representation that may help in constructing ontology for ion channel events using a rule based approach. We have developed Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO) by integrating the information represented in closely related ontologies such as, Cell Physiology Ontology (CPO), and Cardiac Electro Physiology Ontology (CPEO) and the knowledge provided by domain experts. The rule-based system achieved an overall F-measure of 68.93% in extracting the quantitative data assertions system on an independently annotated blind data set. We further made an initial attempt in formalizing the quantitative data assertions extracted from the biomedical text into a formal representation that offers potential to facilitate the integration of text mining into ontological workflow, a novel aspect of this study. This work is a case study where we created a platform that provides formal interaction between ontology development and text mining. We have achieved partial success in extracting quantitative assertions from the biomedical text and formalizing them in ontological

  16. Cardiac structural and hemodynamic changes associated with physiological heart hypertrophy of pregnancy are reversed postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Soban; Nadadur, Rangarajan; Iorga, Andrea; Amjedi, Marjan; Matori, Humann; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2012-10-15

    Pregnancy is associated with ventricular hypertrophy and volume overload. Here we investigated whether late pregnancy is associated with cardiac structural and hemodynamic changes, and if these changes are reversed postpartum. Female mice (C57BL/6) were used in nonpregnant diestrus (NP), late-pregnant (LP), or 7-day postpartum (PP7) stages. Echocardiography and cardiac catheterization were performed to monitor cardiac hemodynamics. Transcript expression of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor, cardiac fetal gene osteopontin, cardiac extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes matrix metalloproteinase-2, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-15 and -17 were assessed by RT-PCR. Masson trichrome staining for cardiac fibrosis and endothelial marker CD31 immunostaining for angiogenesis were performed. Heart hypertrophy in LP was fully reversed in PP7 (heart weight: NP = 114 ± 4 mg; LP = 147 ± 2 mg; PP7 = 117 ± 8 mg, P vs. PP7). LP had elevated left ventricular (LV) pressure (119 ± 5 mmHg in LP vs. 92 ± 7 mmHg in NP, P P vs. LP). LP had increased LV contractility (maximal rate of increase of LV pressure = 6,664 ± 297 mmHg/s in LP vs. 4,294 ± 568 mmHg/s in NP, P P vs. LP). LV ejection fraction was reduced in LP (LP = 58 ± 1% vs. NP = 70 ± 4%, P P vs. LP). Myocardial angiogenesis was significantly increased in LP (capillary density = 1.25 ± 0.02 vs. 0.95 ± 0.01 capillaries/myocyte in NP, P P vs. LP). Vascular endothelial growth factor was upregulated in LP (LP = 1.4 ± 0.1 vs. NP = 1 ± 0.1, normalized to NP, P P vs. LP). There was no increase in cardiac fibrosis in LP. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 transcript levels were downregulated in LP (LP = 0.47 ± 0.03 vs. NP = 1 ± 0.01, normalized to NP, P P vs. LP). In conclusion, pregnancy-induced heart hypertrophy is associated with transient cardiac dysfunction, increased cardiac angiogenesis, lack of fibrosis, and decreased expression of remodeling enzymes that are reversed postpartum.

  17. The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen. Studies on physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the physiological basis for the clinical use of serum PIIINP as a marker of the deposition rate of type III collagen. The assumption was that the serum concentration of PIIINP would reflect the turnover of type III collagen and thus directly reflect...... the inflammatory response. For the study we assessed commercially available RIAs and optimised one of them. Porcine PIIINP was purified and compared with human PIIINP. The application of a gentle iodination procedure made it possible to perform tracer studies. An experimental model consisting of a thoracic duct......-venous shunt in conscious pigs was developed. Double and triple isotope tracer techniques were used for kinetic studies in the animal model and in cultures of tubule cells. The rat model with the induction of granulation tissue was used to investigate catabolic states. The anabolic state was studied in humans...

  18. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor F; Hallik, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Extensive within-canopy light gradients importantly affect the photosynthetic productivity of leaves in different canopy positions and lead to light-dependent increases in foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (AA). However, the controls on AA variations by changes in underlying traits are poorly known. We constructed an unprecedented worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types, and analyzed within-canopy variations in 12 key foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits by quantitative separation of the contributions of different traits to photosynthetic acclimation. Although the light-dependent increase in AA is surprisingly similar in different plant functional types, they differ fundamentally in the share of the controls on AA by constituent traits. Species with high rates of canopy development and leaf turnover, exhibiting highly dynamic light environments, actively change AA by nitrogen reallocation among and partitioning within leaves. By contrast, species with slow leaf turnover exhibit a passive AA acclimation response, primarily determined by the acclimation of leaf structure to growth light. This review emphasizes that different combinations of traits are responsible for within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types, and solves an old enigma of the role of mass- vs area-based traits in vegetation acclimation. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Use of phenotype microarrays to study the effect of acquisition of resistance to antimicrobials in bacterial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reales-Calderon, Jose A; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    It is widely accepted that the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobials confers a fitness cost. Different works have shown that the effect of acquiring resistance in bacterial physiology may be more specific than previously thought. Study of these specific changes may help to predict the outcome of resistant organisms in different ecosystems. In addition to changing bacterial physiology, acquisition of resistance either increases or reduces susceptibility to other antimicrobials. In the current article, we review recent information on the effect of acquiring resistance upon bacterial physiology, with a specific focus on studies using phenotype microarray technology. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogeny and physiology of bacteria important for floc structure and settling properties in activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, T. R.

    . I dette Ph.D. studie blev flokstyrken undersøgt af forskellige probe-definerede bakterier ved hjælp af shearbehandling kombineret med FISH. Der blev påvist en stor forskel i styrke samt kolloid-kemiske egenskaber hos de forskellige populationer. Betaproteobacteria dannede de stærkeste mikrokolonier...... identificeret og en specific genprobe blev designet til at ramme disse bakterier efter at fluorescrende in situ hybridisering (FISH)-mærkede mikrokolonier blev mikromanipuleret og yderligt analyseret ved hjælp af 16S rRNA cyklusen. De viste sig at være meget hyppige flok-dannere, der denitrificerer med kun få...... tilhører fylum TM7, og dens meget karakteristiske epiflora blev studeret ved hjælp af mikroautoradiografi kombineret med FISH. Type 0041 viste sig at være meget alsidig med hensyn til substratoptag, hvilket forklarer dens hyppige udbredelse i mange aktiv-slamanlæg. Resultaterne i dette Ph.D. studie har...

  1. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. Subject areas include: the effects of environmental pollutants on homeostasis of the hematopoietic system; pollutant effects on steroid metabolism; pollutant effects on pulmonary macrophages; effects of toxic gases on lung cells; the development of immunological methods for assessing lung damage at the cellular level; the response of erythropoietin concentration to various physiological changes; and the study of actinide metabolism in monkey skeletons

  2. A study of student perceptions of learning transfer from a human anatomy and physiology course in an allied health program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Leigh S.

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First the study was designed to determine student perceptions regarding the perceived degree of original learning from a human anatomy and physiology course, and the student perception of the use of the knowledge in an allied health program. Second, the intention of the study was to establish student beliefs on the characteristics of the transfer of learning including those factors which enhance learning transfer and those that serve as barriers to learning transfer. The study participants were those students enrolled in any allied health program at a community college in a Midwest state, including: nursing, radiology, surgical technology, health information technology, and paramedic. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed from the responses to the survey. A sub-group of participants were chosen to participate in semi-structured formal interviews. From the interviews, additional qualitative data were gathered. The data collected through the study demonstrated student perception of successful transfer experiences. The students in the study were able to provide specific examples of learning transfer experienced from the human anatomy and physiology course in their allied health program. Findings also suggested students who earned higher grades in the human anatomy and physiology course perceived greater understanding and greater use of the course's learning objectives in their allied health program. The study found the students believed the following learning activities enhances the transfer of learning: (1) Providing application of the information or skills being learned during the instruction of the course content enhances the transfer of learning. (2) Providing resource materials and activities which allow the students to practice the content being taught facilitates the transfer of learning. The students made the following recommendations to remove barriers to the transfer of learning: (1

  3. Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Uncertainty and Variability in Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: Key Issues and Case Studies. This report summarizes some of the recent progress in characterizing uncertainty and variability in physi...

  4. Structural studies of ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessel Andersen, N.

    1993-12-01

    The structural and superconducting properties of high temperature superconductors have been studied experimentally and by computer simulation technique. The oxygen ordering in the CuO x basal plane of the high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x has been studied by Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the socalled ASYNNNI model (Asymmetric Next Nearest Neighbor Interaction model), and the formation of specific domains of the two orthorhombic ordered oxygen phases, Ortho-I and Ortho-II, as function of the oxygen stoichiometry, x, has been related to the superconducting transition temperature, T c (x), via a Minimal Model. A similar relation has been established between the temporal variation of T c (t) and structural oxygen ordering during relaxation following a quench from high temperatures. By neutron diffraction studies on single crystalline YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.4 the presence of short range domains of the Ortho-II type structure has been established, and the degree of ordering has been found to scale with the observed T c according to the expectations from the established Minimal Model. From neutron diffraction studies on Pb 2 Sr 2 Re 1-x Cu 3 O 8 (RE=Y and Ho) the transition from non-superconducting to superconducting samples with increasing Ca-stoichiometry has been related to the change in the Cu bond valence in the superconducting CuO 2 -planes. X-ray diffraction with Euler four-circle technique and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) have been used to identify structural defects in epitaxial YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x thin films produced on MgO (1 0 0) and SrTiO 3 (1 0 0) substrates by laser ablation. The results supply an explanation for the differences in the observed critical current densities, and may be used for optimizing the film production process. A computer-controlled gasvolumetric and a gas-mixing flow system for sample preparation of high temperature superconductors, and studies of oxygen equilibrium pressure and bulk oxygen diffusion have been

  5. Human sperm head vacuoles are physiological structures formed during the sperm development and maturation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nagayoshi, Motoi; Tanaka, Izumi; Kusunoki, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    To clarify whether human sperm vacuoles affected intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) success rates. Retrospective study. A private infertility clinic. Spermatozoa and spermatids were obtained from 11 normozoospermic, 10 oligozoospermic or asthenozoospermic, 4 obstructive azoospermic, and 3 nonobstructive azoospermic men. Differential interference contrast observation and intracytoplasmic injection of morphologically selected sperm. Incidence, size, and position of vacuoles of sperm cells were recorded. Ability of fertilization and blastocyst development were compared between cells with and without vacuoles. More than 97.4% of ejaculated, 87.5% of epididymal, 87.5% of testicular spermatozoa, and more than 90.0% of Sc-Sd2 spermatids had vacuoles of various sizes. The incidence of vacuoles on ejaculated cells was significantly higher than that on the other types of cells, but there was no difference between sperm from normozoospermic men and those from the other donors. Removal of plasma membrane and/or acrosome did not affect the incidence of vacuoles. Although more than 60% of spermatozoa had small vacuoles in the acrosomal regions, 52.6% of Sb1-2 spermatids had large vacuoles. After injection of a motile spermatozoon with large and small vacuoles, 60.9% and 85.7% of metaphase II oocytes could be normally fertilized, respectively, and almost half of the zygotes developed to the blastocyst stage. When using sperm without vacuoles, the fertilization rate was 80.0%, but only 25% of them developed to the blastocyst stage. Human sperm head vacuoles did not affect ICSI outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. biochemical and physiological studies on adult women suffering from obesity and/or some liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Naser, H.F.O.

    2004-01-01

    this study investigates the biochemical and physiological studies on adult women suffering from obesity and/or some liver diseases.100 women in premenopausal period (between 30-45 years) were divided into 5 groups:group(1) control, group(2) obese,group (3) HCV non-obese, group(4) HCV obese and group (5) other liver diseases. the obtained results indicated that, for all female-studied groups there were very highly significant differences in weight, body mass index, waist ,hip circumferences, while ,there were non-significant differences in height and waist hip ratio.also there were very highly significant differences in AST, ALT,Alkaline phosphatase,GGT,bilirubin, these results may be due to hepatic injury and metabolic dysfunction. there were very highly significant differences in HDL,triglycerides and total lipids, whereas it was significant difference in cholesterol and non-significant for LDL, these differences might be contributed to obesity and hepatitis virus C infection

  7. Timing effects of heat-stress on plant physiological characteristics and growth: a field study with prairie vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic agricultural, economic and ecological impacts. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS treatment at different timing in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5 ºC were applied to 12 1m2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb at different growing stages. During and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (Pn, quantum yield of photosystem II (ФPSII, stomatal conductance (gs, and internal CO2 level (Ci of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species was determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii, indicated by negative heat stress effect on both physiological and growth responses. There were significant timing effect of heat stress on the two species, with greater reductions in the photosynthesis and productivity occurred when heat stress was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that heat stress, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe heat stress occur in the future.

  8. Structural studies of bee melittin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, D.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Tsui, F.

    1980-10-01

    The question of how proteins refold in passing from an aqueous phase to an amphipathic environment such as a membrane is beig addressed by a structural study of bee melittin. Melittin is the toxic, main protein of bee venom, and has been shown by others to integrate into natural and synthetic membranes and to lyse a variety of cells. This function is presumably related to its unusual sequence. Except for charges at the N-terminus and at lysine 7, the first 20 residues are largely apolar. In contrast, the last six residues contain four charges and two polar residues.

  9. Applying systems biology methods to the study of human physiology in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsay M; Thiele, Ines

    2013-03-22

    Systems biology is defined in this review as 'an iterative process of computational model building and experimental model revision with the aim of understanding or simulating complex biological systems'. We propose that, in practice, systems biology rests on three pillars: computation, the omics disciplines and repeated experimental perturbation of the system of interest. The number of ethical and physiologically relevant perturbations that can be used in experiments on healthy humans is extremely limited and principally comprises exercise, nutrition, infusions (e.g. Intralipid), some drugs and altered environment. Thus, we argue that systems biology and environmental physiology are natural symbionts for those interested in a system-level understanding of human biology. However, despite excellent progress in high-altitude genetics and several proteomics studies, systems biology research into human adaptation to extreme environments is in its infancy. A brief description and overview of systems biology in its current guise is given, followed by a mini review of computational methods used for modelling biological systems. Special attention is given to high-altitude research, metabolic network reconstruction and constraint-based modelling.

  10. Applying systems biology methods to the study of human physiology in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology is defined in this review as ‘an iterative process of computational model building and experimental model revision with the aim of understanding or simulating complex biological systems’. We propose that, in practice, systems biology rests on three pillars: computation, the omics disciplines and repeated experimental perturbation of the system of interest. The number of ethical and physiologically relevant perturbations that can be used in experiments on healthy humans is extremely limited and principally comprises exercise, nutrition, infusions (e.g. Intralipid), some drugs and altered environment. Thus, we argue that systems biology and environmental physiology are natural symbionts for those interested in a system-level understanding of human biology. However, despite excellent progress in high-altitude genetics and several proteomics studies, systems biology research into human adaptation to extreme environments is in its infancy. A brief description and overview of systems biology in its current guise is given, followed by a mini review of computational methods used for modelling biological systems. Special attention is given to high-altitude research, metabolic network reconstruction and constraint-based modelling. PMID:23849719

  11. Study of physiology of visual cortex activated by rotating grating with functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Ping; Shao Qing; Zhang Zhiqiang; Lu Guangming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To research the physiology of visual cortex activated by rotating grating with functional-MRI (fMRI), and to identify the components of the activation. Methods: Functional MRI was performed in 9 healthy volunteers by using GRE-EPI sequences on a 1.5 T MR scanner. In the block designing, rotating grating, static grating, and luminance were plotted as task states, while static grating, luminance, and darkness were set as control states. The stimuli tasks included six steps. Imaging processing and statistical analysis was carried out off-line using SPM99 in single-subject method. Results: Some respective areas of visual cortex were activated by the various stimuli information supplied by rotating grating. The strong activation in the middle of occipital lobe located at primary vision area was related to the stimuli of white luminance. Its average maximum points were at 13, -98, -2 and 11, -100, -41 The bilateral activations of Brodmann 19th area located at MT area were related to visual motion perception. Its average maximum points were at 46, -72, -2 and -44, -74, 0. The mild activation in the middle of occipital lobe was related to form perception. Its average maximum points were at -12, -98, -6 and -16, -96, -6. Conclusion: The plotting of control state is important in bock design. The effective visual information of rotating grating includes components of luminance, visual motion perception, and form perception. FMRI has potential as a tool for studying the basic physiology of visual cortex. (authors)

  12. The effect of choice on the physiology of emotion: an affective startle modulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevsky, Alexander; Gard, David E

    2012-04-01

    The affective startle modulation task has been an important measure in understanding physiological aspects of emotion and motivational responses. Research utilizing this method has relied primarily on a 'passive' viewing paradigm, which stands in contrast to everyday life where much of emotion and motivation involves some active choice or agency. The present study investigated the role of choice on the physiology of emotion. Eighty-four participants were randomized into 'choice' (n=44) or 'no-choice' (n=40) groups distinguished by the ability to choose between stimuli. EMG eye blink responses were recorded in both anticipation and stimulus viewing. Results indicated a significant attenuation of the startle magnitude in choice condition trials (relative to no-choice) across all picture categories and probe times. We interpret these findings as an indication that the act of choice may decrease one's defensive response, or conversely, lacking choice may heighten the defensive response. Implications for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  14. Teaching of human physiology. A study with speech therapy students about the theme ‘homeostasis’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Souza Galvão

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was made with the purpose of understanding the learning process of first-year Speech Therapy students under the discipline General Physiology. The research of the theme homeostasis involved a sample of these students and teaching actions about this subject with the use of teaching resources. The nature of the study is a qualitative one based on the Ausubelian theoretical matrix in which teaching actions involve progressive differentiation and integrative reconciliation, articulation between concepts and ideas traditionally produced and taught in a fragmentary manner. The results obtained show that students develop more scientific ideas about biological phenomena, in particular homeostasis, that they start to take a more active part in the (reconstruction of personal knowledge and in the development of a new school curriculum; that they overcome the knowledge fragmentation which makes understanding, representing and teaching knowledge itself harder nowadays.

  15. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser-and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large-scale ab initio calculations. Typical examples are the following: lifetime measurements in the neon isoelectronic sequence; multiplexed decay curve measurements of Li-like Si XII; and isoelectronic specification of intershell resonance and intercombination decay rates using measured transition probabilities and spectroscopically determined singlet-mixing amplitudes

  16. Rapid Acute Physiology Score versus Rapid Emergency Medicine Score in Trauma Outcome Prediction; a Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Nakhjavan-Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rapid acute physiology score (RAPS and rapid emergency medicine score (REMS are two physiologic models for measuring injury severity in emergency settings. The present study was designed to compare the two models in outcome prediction of trauma patients presenting to emergency department (ED.Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, the two models of RAPS and REMS were compared regarding prediction of mortality and poor outcome (severe disability based on Glasgow outcome scale of trauma patients presenting to the EDs of 5 educational hospitals in Iran (Tehran, Tabriz, Urmia, Jahrom and Ilam from May to October 2016. The discriminatory power and calibration of the models were calculated and compared using STATA 11.Results: 2148 patients with the mean age of 39.50±17.27 years were studied (75.56% males. The area under the curve of REMS and RAPS in predicting in-hospital mortality were calculated to be 0.93 (95% CI: 0.92-0.95 and 0.899 (95% CI: 0.86-0.93, respectively (p=0.02. These measures were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.94 and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83-0.90, respectively, regarding poor outcome (p=0.001. The optimum cut-off point in predicting outcome was found to be 3 for REMS model and 2 for RAPS model. The sensitivity and specificity of REMS and RAPS in the mentioned cut offs were 95.93 vs. 85.37 and 77.63 vs. 83.51, respectively, in predicting mortality. Calibration and overall performance of the two models were acceptable.Conclusion: The present study showed that adding age and level of arterial oxygen saturation to the variables included in RAPS model can increase its predictive value. Therefore, it seems that REMS could be used for predicting mortality and poor outcome of trauma patients in emergency settings

  17. Structural studies of cyanobacterial PSII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Fonseca, Paula Cristina Alves

    2001-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the photosynthetic transmembrane protein-pigment complex which utilises light energy to drive the splitting of water and release of oxygen, a unique reaction in biological systems. The determination of the structure of PSII at high resolution is required in order to understand its mechanisms of reaction. For this reason, methods have been developed to purify highly active PSII complexes from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongate These complexes have been studied by high resolution electron microscopy, using both single particle analysis and electron crystallography. A 30A three-dimensional map of the cyanobacterial PSII complex was obtained by single particle analysis. The comparison of this map with structural data from the spinach PSII core dimer revealed that both complexes share similar overall size and shape. These data also allowed a discussion on the organisation and positioning of the extrinsic lumenal proteins within the cyanobacterial PSII complex. A Synechococcus elongatus PSII projection map, at a resolution of 20A, was determined by image processing of two-dimensional crystals formed by the in vitro reconstitution method. This was the first projection map obtained by electron crystallography of a cyanobacterial highly active PSII complex, with all the extrinsic subunits retained. The analysis of this map and its comparison with a 10A three-dimensional map recently obtained from the spinach PSII core dimer revealed a similar organisation of the main transmembrane subunits. Moreover, at the level of resolution of the present data it is possible to identify differences which can be related to the content and organisation of the small subunits forming the PSII complex from both organisms. Cytochrome b559, an important but incompletely understood PSII subunit, was purified and subjected to crystallisation trials in order to aid the interpretation of intermediate resolution PSII structural data. Small crystals were

  18. The Physiological Functions and Structural Determinants of Catalytic Bias in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases CpI and CpII of Clostridium pasteurianum Strain W5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse B. Therien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The first generation of biochemical studies of complex, iron-sulfur-cluster-containing [FeFe]-hydrogenases and Mo-nitrogenase were carried out on enzymes purified from Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5. Previous studies suggested that two distinct [FeFe]-hydrogenases are expressed differentially under nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. As a result, the first characterized [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CpI is presumed to have a primary role in central metabolism, recycling reduced electron carriers that accumulate during fermentation via proton reduction. A role for capturing reducing equivalents released as hydrogen during nitrogen fixation has been proposed for the second hydrogenase, CpII. Biochemical characterization of CpI and CpII indicated CpI has extremely high hydrogen production activity in comparison to CpII, while CpII has elevated hydrogen oxidation activity in comparison to CpI when assayed under the same conditions. This suggests that these enzymes have evolved a catalytic bias to support their respective physiological functions. Using the published genome of C. pasteurianum (strain W5 hydrogenase sequences were identified, including the already known [NiFe]-hydrogenase, CpI, and CpII sequences, and a third hydrogenase, CpIII was identified in the genome as well. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments were performed in order to analyze transcript abundance of the hydrogenases under diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic growth conditions. There is a markedly reduced level of CpI gene expression together with concomitant increases in CpII gene expression under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Structure-based analyses of the CpI and CpII sequences reveal variations in their catalytic sites that may contribute to their alternative physiological roles. This work demonstrates that the physiological roles of CpI and CpII are to evolve and to consume hydrogen, respectively, in concurrence with their catalytic activities in vitro, with Cp

  19. The Physiological Functions and Structural Determinants of Catalytic Bias in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases CpI and CpII of Clostridium pasteurianum Strain W5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therien, Jesse B.; Artz, Jacob H.; Poudel, Saroj; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Noone, Seth M.; Adams, Michael W. W.; King, Paul W.; Bryant, Donald A.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of biochemical studies of complex, iron-sulfur-cluster-containing [FeFe]-hydrogenases and Mo-nitrogenase were carried out on enzymes purified from Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5). Previous studies suggested that two distinct [FeFe]-hydrogenases are expressed differentially under nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. As a result, the first characterized [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CpI) is presumed to have a primary role in central metabolism, recycling reduced electron carriers that accumulate during fermentation via proton reduction. A role for capturing reducing equivalents released as hydrogen during nitrogen fixation has been proposed for the second hydrogenase, CpII. Biochemical characterization of CpI and CpII indicated CpI has extremely high hydrogen production activity in comparison to CpII, while CpII has elevated hydrogen oxidation activity in comparison to CpI when assayed under the same conditions. This suggests that these enzymes have evolved a catalytic bias to support their respective physiological functions. Using the published genome of C. pasteurianum (strain W5) hydrogenase sequences were identified, including the already known [NiFe]-hydrogenase, CpI, and CpII sequences, and a third hydrogenase, CpIII was identified in the genome as well. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments were performed in order to analyze transcript abundance of the hydrogenases under diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic growth conditions. There is a markedly reduced level of CpI gene expression together with concomitant increases in CpII gene expression under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Structure-based analyses of the CpI and CpII sequences reveal variations in their catalytic sites that may contribute to their alternative physiological roles. This work demonstrates that the physiological roles of CpI and CpII are to evolve and to consume hydrogen, respectively, in concurrence with their catalytic activities in vitro, with CpII capturing excess

  20. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic modeling of zearalenone and its metabolites: application to the Jersey girl study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZEA, a fungal mycotoxin, and its metabolite zeranol (ZAL are known estrogen agonists in mammals, and are found as contaminants in food. Zeranol, which is more potent than ZEA and comparable in potency to estradiol, is also added as a growth additive in beef in the US and Canada. This article presents the development and application of a Physiologically-Based Toxicokinetic (PBTK model for ZEA and ZAL and their primary metabolites, zearalenol, zearalanone, and their conjugated glucuronides, for rats and for human subjects. The PBTK modeling study explicitly simulates critical metabolic pathways in the gastrointestinal and hepatic systems. Metabolic events such as dehydrogenation and glucuronidation of the chemicals, which have direct effects on the accumulation and elimination of the toxic compounds, have been quantified. The PBTK model considers urinary and fecal excretion and biliary recirculation and compares the predicted biomarkers of blood, urinary and fecal concentrations with published in vivo measurements in rats and human subjects. Additionally, the toxicokinetic model has been coupled with a novel probabilistic dietary exposure model and applied to the Jersey Girl Study (JGS, which involved measurement of mycoestrogens as urinary biomarkers, in a cohort of young girls in New Jersey, USA. A probabilistic exposure characterization for the study population has been conducted and the predicted urinary concentrations have been compared to measurements considering inter-individual physiological and dietary variability. The in vivo measurements from the JGS fall within the high and low predicted distributions of biomarker values corresponding to dietary exposure estimates calculated by the probabilistic modeling system. The work described here is the first of its kind to present a comprehensive framework developing estimates of potential exposures to mycotoxins and linking them with biologically relevant doses and biomarker

  1. Physiologically-Based Toxicokinetic Modeling of Zearalenone and Its Metabolites: Application to the Jersey Girl Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Royce, Steven G.; Alexander, Jocelyn A.; Buckley, Brian; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Zarbl, Helmut; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA), a fungal mycotoxin, and its metabolite zeranol (ZAL) are known estrogen agonists in mammals, and are found as contaminants in food. Zeranol, which is more potent than ZEA and comparable in potency to estradiol, is also added as a growth additive in beef in the US and Canada. This article presents the development and application of a Physiologically-Based Toxicokinetic (PBTK) model for ZEA and ZAL and their primary metabolites, zearalenol, zearalanone, and their conjugated glucuronides, for rats and for human subjects. The PBTK modeling study explicitly simulates critical metabolic pathways in the gastrointestinal and hepatic systems. Metabolic events such as dehydrogenation and glucuronidation of the chemicals, which have direct effects on the accumulation and elimination of the toxic compounds, have been quantified. The PBTK model considers urinary and fecal excretion and biliary recirculation and compares the predicted biomarkers of blood, urinary and fecal concentrations with published in vivo measurements in rats and human subjects. Additionally, the toxicokinetic model has been coupled with a novel probabilistic dietary exposure model and applied to the Jersey Girl Study (JGS), which involved measurement of mycoestrogens as urinary biomarkers, in a cohort of young girls in New Jersey, USA. A probabilistic exposure characterization for the study population has been conducted and the predicted urinary concentrations have been compared to measurements considering inter-individual physiological and dietary variability. The in vivo measurements from the JGS fall within the high and low predicted distributions of biomarker values corresponding to dietary exposure estimates calculated by the probabilistic modeling system. The work described here is the first of its kind to present a comprehensive framework developing estimates of potential exposures to mycotoxins and linking them with biologically relevant doses and biomarker measurements

  2. Are physiological attributes of jockeys predictors of falls? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchens, P; Blizzard, L; Jones, G; Day, L; Fell, J

    2011-06-23

    Objectives This pilot study describes the physiological attributes of jockeys and track-work riders in Tasmania and investigates whether these attributes are associated with falls. Methods All jockeys and track-work riders licensed in Tasmania were invited to participate. The study group consisted of eight jockeys (two female, six male) and 20 track-work riders (14 female, six male). Measures of anthropometry, balance, reaction time, isometric strength, vertical jump, glycolytic and aerobic fitness, flexibility and body composition were conducted. Tests were designed to assess specific aspects of rider fitness and performance relevant to horse racing. For a subset of participants (n=14), the authors obtained information on falls and injuries. The authors used Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios. Results Jockeys had better balance, a faster mean reaction time, a lower fatigue index and a higher estimated $${\\stackrel{.}{\\hbox{ V }}\\hbox{ O }}_{2\\hbox{ max }}$$ than their track-work riding counterparts. Jockeys were also younger and smaller in stature than track-work riders, and when differences in body mass were taken into account, they had a greater muscular strength and muscular (alactic) power. Important factors found to be associated with falls were lower aerobic and anaerobic fitness, greater muscular strength and power, and riding with the full foot in the stirrup irons compared with riding on the ball of the foot. Conclusion This pilot study shows that physiological attributes of jockeys and track-work riders can predict their risk of falling and are measurable using methods feasible for large-scale fieldwork.

  3. High-pressure modulation of the structure of the bacterial photochemical reaction center at physiological and cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Kangur, Liina; Lõhmus, Ants; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-07-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence response to external high pressure of the reaction center membrane chromoprotein complex from the wild-type non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using the native pigment cofactors as local molecular probes of the reaction center structure at physiological (ambient) and cryogenic (79 K) temperatures. In detergent-purified complexes at ambient temperature, abrupt blue shift and accompanied broadening of the special pair band was observed at about 265 MPa. These reversible in pressure features were assigned to a pressure-induced rupture of a lone hydrogen bond that binds the photo-chemically active L-branch primary electron donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactor to the surrounding protein scaffold. In native membrane-protected complexes the hydrogen bond rupture appeared significantly restricted and occurred close to about 500 MPa. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the special pair hydrogen bond in isolate complexes was estimated to be equal to about 12 kJ mol-1. In frozen samples at cryogenic temperatures the hydrogen bond remained apparently intact up to the maximum utilized pressure of 600 MPa. In this case, however, heterogeneous spectral response of the cofactors from the L-and M-branches was observed due to anisotropic build-up of the protein structure. While in solid phase, the special pair fluorescence as a function of pressure exactly followed the respective absorption spectrum at a constant Stokes shift, at ambient temperature, the two paths began to deviate strongly from one other at the hydrogen bond rupture pressure. This effect was tentatively interpreted by different emission properties of hydrogen-bound and hydrogen-unbound special pair exciton states.

  4. Physiological, structural and molecular traits activated in strawberry plants after inoculation with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense REC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Molina, M F; Lovaisa, N C; Salazar, S M; Martínez-Zamora, M G; Díaz-Ricci, J C; Pedraza, R O

    2015-05-01

    The plant growth-promoting strain REC3 of Azospirillum brasilense, isolated from strawberry roots, prompts growth promotion and systemic protection against anthracnose disease in this crop. Hence, we hypothesised that A. brasilense REC3 can induce different physiological, structural and molecular responses in strawberry plants. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study these traits activated in Azospirillum-colonised strawberry plants, which have not been assessed until now. Healthy, in vitro micropropagated plants were root-inoculated with REC3 under hydroponic conditions; root and leaf tissues were sampled at different times, and oxidative burst, phenolic compound content, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, callose deposition, cell wall fortification and gene expression were evaluated. Azospirillum inoculation enhanced levels of soluble phenolic compounds after 12 h post-inoculation (hpi), while amounts of cell wall bound phenolics were similar in inoculated and control plants. Other early responses activated by REC3 (at 24 hpi) were a decline of lipid peroxidation and up-regulation of strawberry genes involved in defence (FaPR1), bacterial recognition (FaFLS2) and H₂O₂ depuration (FaCAT and FaAPXc). The last may explain the apparent absence of oxidative burst in leaves after bacterial inoculation. Also, REC3 inoculation induced delayed structural responses such as callose deposition and cell wall fortification (at 72 hpi). Results showed that A. brasilense REC3 is capable of exerting beneficial effects on strawberry plants, reinforcing their physiological and cellular characteristics, which in turns contribute to improve plant performance. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. Insights into cadmium induced physiological and ultra-structural disorders in Juncus effusus L. and its remediation through exogenous citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najeeb, Ullah; Jilani, Ghulam; Ali, Shafaqat; Sarwar, Muhammad; Xu Ling; Zhou, Weijun

    2011-01-01

    This study appraised cadmium (Cd) toxicity stress in wetland plant Juncus effusus, and explored its potential for Cd phytoextraction through chelators (citric acid and EDTA). Cadmium altered morphological and physiological attributes of J. effusus as reflected by growth retardation. Citric acid in the presence of 100 μM Cd significantly countered Cd toxicity by improving plant growth. Elevated Cd concentrations reduced translocation factor that was increased under application of both chelators. Citric acid enhanced Cd accumulation, while EDTA reduced its uptake. Cadmium induced oxidative stress modified the antioxidative enzyme activity. Both levels of citric acid (2.5 and 5.0 mM) and lower EDTA concentration (2.5 mM) helped plants to overcome oxidative stress by enhancing their antioxidative enzyme activities. Cadmium damaged the root cells through cytoplasmic shrinkage and metal deposition. Citric acid restored structure and shape of root cells and eliminated plasmolysis; whereas, EDTA exhibited no positive effect on it. Shoot cells remained unaffected under Cd treatment alone or with citric acid except for chloroplast swelling. Only EDTA promoted starch accumulation in chloroplast reflecting its negative impact on cellular structure. It concludes that Cd and EDTA induce structural and morphological damage in J. effusus; while, citric acid ameliorates Cd toxicity stress.

  6. Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic Modelling as a Tool to Support Risk Assessment: Three Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Mielke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present three case studies of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK modelling in regulatory risk assessment. (1 Age-dependent lower enzyme expression in the newborn leads to bisphenol A (BPA blood levels which are near the levels of the tolerated daily intake (TDI at the oral exposure as calculated by EFSA. (2 Dermal exposure of BPA by receipts, car park tickets, and so forth, contribute to the exposure towards BPA. However, at the present levels of dermal exposure there is no risk for the adult. (3 Dermal exposure towards coumarin via cosmetic products leads to external exposures of two-fold the TDI. PBTK modeling helped to identify liver peak concentration as the metric for liver toxicity. After dermal exposure of twice the TDI, the liver peak concentration was lower than that present after oral exposure with the TDI dose. In the presented cases, PBTK modeling was useful to reach scientifically sound regulatory decisions.

  7. Physiological studies in aerobic batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Ronnow, B.

    2000-01-01

    Physiological studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene were carried out in aerobic batch cultivations on glucose-galactose mixtures and on the disaccharide melibiose, which is hydrolyzed by the enzyme melibiase (Mel1, EC 3.2.1.22) into a glucose and a galactose moiety....... The strains examined (T200, T256, M24, and TH1) were all derived from the bakers' and distillers' strain of S. cerevisiae, DGI 342. All the strains showed a significant higher ethanol yield when growing on glucose, and half the biomass yield, compared with growth on galactose. The maximum specific uptake...... rates were 2.5-3.3-fold higher on glucose than on galactose for all the strains examined, and hence, ethanol production was pronounced on glucose due to respiro-fermentative metabolism. The T256 strain and the T200 strain having the MEL1 gene inserted in the HXK2 locus and the LEU2 locus, respectively...

  8. The Importance of Physiologically Relevant Cell Lines for Studying Virus–Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hare

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Viruses interact intimately with the host cell at nearly every stage of replication, and the cell model that is chosen to study virus infection is critically important. Although primary cells reflect the phenotype of healthy cells in vivo better than cell lines, their limited lifespan makes experimental manipulation challenging. However, many tumor-derived and artificially immortalized cell lines have defects in induction of interferon-stimulated genes and other antiviral defenses. These defects can affect virus replication, especially when cells are infected at lower, more physiologically relevant, multiplicities of infection. Understanding the selective pressures and mechanisms underlying the loss of innate signaling pathways is helpful to choose immortalized cell lines without impaired antiviral defense. We describe the trials and tribulations we encountered while searching for an immortalized cell line with intact innate signaling, and how directed immortalization of primary cells avoids many of the pitfalls of spontaneous immortalization.

  9. A multi-factor model of panic disorder: results of a preliminary study integrating the role of perfectionism, stress, physiological anxiety and anxiety sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Wood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Panic disorder (PD is a highly prevalent and disabling mental health problem associated with different factors including perfectionism, stress, physiological anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity regarding physical concerns; however, no studies have analyzed the joint relationship between these factors and PD in a multi-factor model using structural equation modeling. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect data on these factors and self-reported DSM-IV past-year PD symptoms in a large sample of the general population (N=936. Results: Perceived stress had a significant effect in increasing physiological anxiety, which in turn had an important association with physical concerns. Perfectionism and perceived stress had an indirect relation with past year PD via the mediator role of physiological anxiety and physical concerns. Physical concerns, on one hand, seemed to mediate the impact between perfectionism and PD and, on the other, partially mediated the role between physiological anxiety and PD. Conclusions: Although there is considerable evidence on the association between each of these factors and PD, this model can be considered a broader and productive framework of research on the nature and treatment of PD.

  10. Computational Study of Non-Physiological Hemodynamics in the Cephalic Arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Kevin; Boghosian, Michael; Mahmoudzadeh, S. M. Javid; Hammes, Mary

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are performed for the flow in a two-dimensional geometry created from radiological images and Doppler flow measurements of the cephalic arch in dialysis patients with a brachiocephalic fistula (surgically placed direct arterial-venous connection). The simulations are performed before insertion of the fistula and at subsequent time intervals as the cephalic vein arterializes over a period of three to six months. A mature fistula, with increased diameter and flow rate, can exhibit Reynolds numbers that are more than one order of magnitude larger than that of the pre-fistula vein. We evaluate the effect of this increased (physiologically abnormal) Reynolds number on flow structures and wall shear stresses through the curved cephalic arch, which is a site prone to stenosis in fistula patients. The long-term goal is to investigate if the development of initimal hyperplasia and stenoses correlates with wall shear stresses or other hemodynamic variables obtained using computational hemodynamics. Research supported by the National Institute of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01DK090769.

  11. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Nasal Physiology Jeremiah A. Alt, MD, PhD Noam Cohen, MD, ... control the inflammation. CONCLUSION An understanding of the physiology of the nose is critical to understand nasal ...

  12. Study of the rod style SFRFQ structure

    CERN Document Server

    Yan Xue Qing; Chen J

    2002-01-01

    There is a problem about upper limit of energy in the RFQ structure, although it is a wonderful low-energy-suited high current accelerating structure. After proposing an improved rod style SFRFQ structure without reversed field, the author studies its energy gain and transverse motion. The rod style SFRFQ structure is roughly compared with diaphragm SFRFQ structure

  13. Chelatococcus thermostellatus sp. nov., a new thermophile for bioplastic synthesis: comparative phylogenetic and physiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammad H A; Lebbe, Liesbeth; Willems, Anne; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    The poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB, accumulating thermophilic strain MW9(T), isolated from an aerobic organic waste treatment plant, was characterized by detailed physiological and phylogenetic studies. The strain is a Gram-stain-negative, rod shaped, non-spore forming member of Alphaproteobacteria. It shows optimum growth at 50 °C. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the strain together with five very similar isolates, was affiliated to the genus Chelatococcus (Ibrahim et al. in J Appl Microbiol 109:1579-1590, 2010). Rep-PCR genomic fingerprints and partial dnaK gene sequence also revealed that these isolates are very similar, but differ from other Chelatococcus type strains. The major fatty acids were similar to those of other strains of the genus Chelatococcus. DNA-DNA hybridization of strain MW9(T) with Chelatococcus species type strains revealed 11.0-47.7 % relatedness. G+C content of DNA was 67.1 mol%, which is comparable with the other strains of Chelatococcus species. The physiological and phenotypic characteristics of the new strain MW9(T) are sufficient to differentiate it from previously described species in the genus Chelatococcus. Strain MW9(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Chelatococcus, for which the name Chelatococcus thermostellatus is proposed. The type strain is MW9(T) (=LMG 27009(T) = DSM 28244(T)). Compared to known Chelatococcus strains, strain MW9(T) could be a potent candidate for bioplastic production at elevated temperature.

  14. Dentate control pathways of cortical motor activity. Anatomical and physiological studies in rat: comparative considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angaut, P; Cicirata, F

    1990-07-01

    The dentato-thalamocortical projections have been studied in albino rats using anatomical and physiological approaches. The anatomical analysis reveals that the dentatothalamic input to the ventral thalamus and the thalamocortical projection from this region onto the motor cortical area have a complex topographical arrangement. The corticothalamic reverberating pathways, both direct and through a relay in the nucleus reticularis thalami, are also roughly arranged in register with the same topographical pattern. This arrangement has been reconciled with that of the motor cortex, as determined by the motor effects of intracortical microstimulations. From this is inferred a somatotopical arrangement of the cerebellar nucleus lateralis, or dentate. These observations are confirmed by the results of our physiological analysis. The movements obtained with direct microstimulations of the nucleus lateralis affect either one joint (simple movements) or, more seldom, several joints (complex movements) of the same limb. A rough rostrocaudal arrangement is found in the nucleus lateralis: the caudocentral regions of the nucleus contain the representation of the musculature of forelimb and head, whereas the hindlimb is represented in the rostralmost part of the nucleus. A more complex organization is found to be related to the three cytoarchitectonic subdivisions of the nucleus lateralis. The main, large-celled part of the nucleus is engaged in the control of the large skeletal musculature. The dorsolateral hump is involved in mouth and peri-oral activities. The ventral, parvocellular, subnucleus is involved in fine exploratory movements of vibrissae, eyes, and forelimb wrist and fingers. The implication of the dentato-thalamocortical pathways in the cortical motor activities in the rat is discussed with attention to the dentate control of the "voluntary" motricity in primates.

  15. Physiological Activity of Spinal Cord in Children: An 18F-FDG PET-CT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taralli, Silvia; Leccisotti, Lucia; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Castaldi, Paola; de Waure, Chiara; Mancuso, Agostino; Rufini, Vittoria

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective study. To evaluate, in a pediatric population, F-Fluoro-deoxy-glucose (F-FDG) metabolic activity of normal spinal cord and to assess the correlation with demographic, clinical, and environmental variables. F-FDG uptake of normal spinal cord is variable in children. The knowledge of physiological metabolism of spinal cord is essential to distinguish normal from pathological findings by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). We retrospectively evaluated F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans from a total of 167 pediatric patients (97 males; 3.9-18.9 yr) divided into 4 age groups (0-4.9 yr, 5-9.9 yr, 10-14.9 yr, and 15-18.9 yr), excluding those submitted to previous or recent therapeutic procedures influencing spinal cord metabolism or with central nervous system diseases. Spinal cord was divided into 3 levels (C1-C7; D1-D6; and D7-L1), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of each cord level was measured. Correlations between SUVmax and spinal cord level, age, body weight, sex, type of disease, and season were statistically assessed. Median SUVmax was similar and significantly (P spinal cord levels. A positive and significant association between SUVmax and body weight, female sex, and Hodgkin lymphoma was found. No significant association with season was observed. By multivariate analysis, only weight and female sex remained significant. Knowledge of physiological F-FDG spinal cord activity in children is essential for a correct interpretation of positron emission tomography-computed tomography, especially in oncologic pediatric patients to avoid potential pitfalls. N/A.

  16. Outdoor thermal physiology along human pathways: a study using a wearable measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu; Shi, Rui; de Dear, Richard

    2015-05-01

    An outdoor summer study on thermal physiology along subjects' pathways was conducted in a Japanese city using a unique wearable measurement system that measures all the relevant thermal variables: ambient temperature, humidity, wind speed ( U) and short/long-wave radiation ( S and L), along with some physio-psychological parameters: skin temperature ( T skin), pulse rate, subjective thermal sensation and state of body motion. U, S and L were measured using a globe anemo-radiometer adapted use with pedestrian subjects. The subjects were 26 healthy Japanese adults (14 males, 12 females) ranging from 23 to 74 years in age. Each subject wore a set of instruments that recorded individual microclimate and physiological responses along a designated pedestrian route that traversed various urban textures. The subjects experienced varying thermal environments that could not be represented by fixed-point routine observational data. S fluctuated significantly reflecting the mixture of sunlit/shade distributions within complex urban morphology. U was generally low within urban canyons due to drag by urban obstacles such as buildings but the subjects' movements enhanced convective heat exchanges with the atmosphere, leading to a drop in T skin. The amount of sweating increased as standard effective temperature (SET*) increased. A clear dependence of sweating on gender and body size was found; males sweated more than females; overweight subjects sweated more than standard/underweight subjects. T skin had a linear relationship with SET* and a similarly clear dependence on gender and body size differences. T skin of the higher-sweating groups was lower than that of the lower-sweating groups, reflecting differences in evaporative cooling by perspiration.

  17. Baroreflex physiology studied in healthy subjects with very infrequent muscle sympathetic bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, André; Crossman, Alexandra A.; Beightol, Larry A.; Tahvanainen, Kari U. O.; Kuusela, Tom A.; Ertl, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Because it is likely that, in healthy human subjects, baroreflex mechanisms operate continuously, independent of experimental interventions, we asked the question, In what ways might study of unprovoked, very infrequent muscle sympathetic bursts inform baroreflex physiology? We closely examined arterial pressure and R-R interval responses of 11 supine healthy young subjects to arterial pressure ramps triggered by large isolated muscle sympathetic bursts. We triggered data collection sweeps on the beginnings of sympathetic bursts and plotted changes of arterial pressure (finger volume clamp or intra-arterial) and R-R intervals occurring before as well as after the sympathetic triggers. We estimated baroreflex gain from regression of R-R intervals on systolic pressures after sympathetic bursts and from the transfer function between cross-spectra of systolic pressure and R-R intervals at low frequencies. Isolated muscle sympathetic bursts were preceded by arterial pressure reductions. Baroreflex gain, calculated with linear regression of R-R intervals on systolic pressures after bursts, was virtually identical to baroreflex gain, calculated with the cross-spectral modulus [mean and (range): 24 (7–43) vs. 24 (8–45) ms/mmHg], and highly significant, according to linear regression (r2 = 0.91, P = 0.001). Our results indicate that 1) since infrequent human muscle sympathetic bursts are almost deterministically preceded by arterial pressure reductions, their occurrence likely reflects simple baroreflex physiology, and 2) the noninvasive low-frequency modulus reliably reproduces gains derived from R-R interval responses to arterial pressure ramps triggered by infrequent muscle sympathetic bursts. PMID:23195626

  18. Atomic force microscopy study of nano-physiological response of ladybird beetles to photostimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Guz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insects are of interest not only as the most numerous and diverse group of animals but also as highly efficient bio-machines varying greatly in size. They are the main human competitors for crop, can transmit various diseases, etc. However, little study of insects with modern nanotechnology tools has been done. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we applied an atomic force microscopy (AFM method to study stimulation of ladybird beetles with light. This method allows for measuring of the internal physiological responses of insects by recording surface oscillations in different parts of the insect at sub-nanometer amplitude level and sub-millisecond time. Specifically, we studied the sensitivity of ladybird beetles to light of different wavelengths. We demonstrated previously unknown blindness of ladybird beetles to emerald color (∼500nm light, while being able to see UV-blue and green light. Furthermore, we showed how one could study the speed of the beetle adaptation to repetitive flashing light and its relaxation back to the initial stage. CONCLUSIONS: The results show the potential of the method in studying insects. We see this research as a part of what might be a new emerging area of "nanophysiology" of insects.

  19. Characterization and inhibitive study of gel-grown hydroxyapatite crystals at physiological temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Bharat; Joshi, Mihir; Vaidya, Ashok

    2008-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite is very useful for various biomedical applications, due to its chemical similarity with mineralized bone of human. Hydroxyapatite is also responsible for arthropathy (joint disease). In the present study, the growth of hydroxyapatite crystals was carried out by using single-diffusion gel growth technique in silica hydro gel media, at physiological temperature. The growth of hydroxyapatite crystals under slow and controlled environment in gel medium can be simulated in a simple manner to the growth in human body. The crystals, formed in the Liesegang rings, were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR and dielectric study. The diffusion study is also carried out for the hydroxyapatite crystals using the moving boundary model. The inhibitive influence of various Ayurvedic medicinal plant extracts such as Boswellia serrata gum resin , Tribulus terrestris fruits, Rotula aquatica roots, Boerhaavia diffusa roots and Commiphora wightii, on the growth of hydroxyapatite was studied. Roots of R. aquatica and B. diffusa show some inhibition of the hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro. This preclinical study will be helpful to design the therapy for prevention of hydroxyapatite-based ailments.

  20. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical and physiological study of the phenomenon of blindness after local irradiaton of animal heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakov, I.B.; Davydov, B.I.; Razgovorov, B.L.; Kordenko, A.N.; Fedorov, V.P.; Abramov, M.M.; Sapozhnikov, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    A number of radiobiological, ophtalmological, pharmacological, biochemical, neurobistological, and electron microscopic methods has been used to study certain likey mechanisms of sight disturbance arising after gamma-irradiation of animal head. The radiobiological effect observed is a complicated polyethiological phenomenon, reflecting multiple structural and functional effects in central nervous system. The main of these effects are the disturbance in integrative activity of neural structures resulting from damaging the synapses of nervous cells, changes in hydratation and electrolythic profile of brain as a result of shift in hematoencephalic barrier permeability, and, finally, disturbance in functioning of cholinereactive structures of central nervous system

  2. Study of quark structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, F.T.; Flaminio, E.; Lai, K.; Metcalf, M.; Wang, L.

    1977-01-01

    The quark structure functions of the proton are determined through a combined analysis of the reactions pN → ll-barX and eN → eX. The valence-quark structure function of the pion is also given by analyzing the πN → μμ-barX data measured by the Branson et al

  3. Study on human physiological parameters for monitoring of mental works in the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Ken-ichi; Yoshino, Kenji; Ishii, Keiichiro; Nakasa, Hiroyasu; Shigeta, Sadayoshi.

    1982-01-01

    To prevent outbreaks of the wrong operation and judgement in the nuclear power plant, human conditions of body and mind should be taken into consideration particularly for the mental works such as inspection and monitoring. To estimate human conditions quantitatively by the measurement of human physiological parameters, this paper presents the following experimental results. (1) Physiological parameters are estimated from both sides of biological meanings and the applicability to field works. (2) Time variation of the parameters is investigated in mental simulation tests in order to select a good indicator of mental fatigue. (3) Correlation analysis between mental fatigue indexes and physiological parameters shows that the heart rate is a best indicator. (author)

  4. Perfringolysin O as a useful tool to study human sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocognoni, Cristián A; De Blas, Gerardo A; Heuck, Alejandro P; Belmonte, Silvia A; Mayorga, Luis S

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate perfringolysin O, a cholesterol-dependent pore-forming cytolysin, as a tool to study several aspects of human sperm physiology. Prospective study. Basic research laboratory. Human semen samples with normal parameters obtained from healthy donors. Interaction of recombinant perfringolysin O with human spermatozoa. Assessment of perfringolysin O binding to spermatozoa, tests for acrosome and plasma membrane integrity, and acrosomal exocytosis assays. Perfringolysin O associated with human spermatozoa at 4°C. The binding was sensitive to changes in cholesterol concentrations and distribution occurring in the plasma membrane of these cells during capacitation. When perfringolysin O-treated sperm were incubated at 37°C, the plasma membrane became permeable, whereas the acrosome membrane remained intact. Permeabilized spermatozoa were able to respond to exocytic stimuli. The process was inhibited by proteins that interfere with membrane fusion, indicating that large molecules, including antibodies, were able to permeate into the spermatozoa. PFO is a useful probe to assess changes in the amount and distribution of the active sterol fraction present in the sperm plasma membrane. The toxin can be used for the efficient and selective permeabilization of this membrane, rendering a flexible experimental model suitable for studying molecular processes occurring in the sperm cytoplasm. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Case Studies in Physiology: Ventilation and perfusion in a giraffe-does size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Görel; Röken, Bengt; Hedin, Eva-Maria; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2016-12-01

    The trachea in the giraffe is long but narrow, and dead space ventilation is considered to be of approximately the same size as in other mammals. Less is known about the matching between ventilation and lung blood flow. The lungs in the giraffe are large, up to 1 m high and 0.7 m wide, and this may cause considerable ventilation/perfusion (V A /Q) mismatch due to the influence of gravitational forces, which could lead to hypoxemia. We studied a young giraffe under anesthesia using the multiple inert gas elimination technique to analyze the VA/Q distribution and arterial oxygenation and compared the results with those obtained in other species of different sizes, including humans. V A /Q distribution was broad but unimodal, and the shunt of blood flow through nonventilated lung regions was essentially absent, suggesting no lung collapse. The V A /Q match was as good as in the similarly sized horse and was even comparable to that in smaller sized animals, including rabbit and rat. The match was also similar to that in anesthetized humans. Arterial oxygenation was essentially similar in all studied species. The findings suggest that the efficiency of V A /Q matching is independent of lung size in the studied mammals that vary in weight from less than 1 to more than 400 kg. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. A study on CCDTL structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Xu Taoguang; Xu Wenwu; Zhou Linong

    2002-01-01

    The CCDTL (Coupled Cavity Drift Tube Linac) structure presented by Los Alamos Lab is a new structure for proton's velocity from 0.1 c to 0.5 c. The CCDTL aluminium and copper model are manufactured. The final OFHC (Oxygen Free High Conductivity) model consists of four accelerating cavities and three coupling cavities. There is only one drift tube in the accelerating cavity, so one accelerating cavity has two accelerating gaps. The model was made and tuned. The basic characteristics of the structure such as cavity frequency, dispersion curve, coupling, field profile are measured

  7. Differences in Copper Absorption and Accumulation between Copper-Exclusion and Copper-Enrichment Plants: A Comparison of Structure and Physiological Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Xishi; Li, Shuhuan; Guo, Pan; Shen, Zhenguo; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Yahua

    2015-01-01

    Differences in copper (Cu) absorption and transport, physiological responses and structural characteristics between two types of Cu-resistant plants, Oenothera glazioviana (Cu-exclusion type) and Elsholtzia haichowensis (Cu-enrichment type), were investigated in the present study. The results indicated the following: (1) After 50 μM Cu treatment, the Cu ratio in the xylem vessels of E. haichowensis increased by 60%. A Cu adsorption experiment indicated that O. glazioviana exhibited greater resistance to Cu, and Cu absorption and the shoot/root ratio of Cu were significantly lower in O. glazioviana than in E. haichowensis. (2) An analysis of the endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) variance and exogenous ABA treatment demonstrated that the ABA levels of both plants did not differ; exogenous ABA treatment clearly reduced Cu accumulation in both plants. (3) The leaf stomatal density of O. glazioviana was significantly less than that of E. haichowensis. Guard cells in E. haichowensis plants were covered with a thick cuticle layer, the epidermal hair was more numerous and longer, and the number of xylem conduits in the root was small. (4) The transpiration rate and the stomatal conductance of O. glazioviana were both significantly lower than those of E. haichowensis, regardless of whether the plants were treated with Cu. Taken together, these results indicate that the differences in the structural characteristics between these two plant species, particularly in the characteristics related to plant transpiration, are important factors that govern whether plants acquire or exclude Cu.

  8. Differences in Copper Absorption and Accumulation between Copper-Exclusion and Copper-Enrichment Plants: A Comparison of Structure and Physiological Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fu

    Full Text Available Differences in copper (Cu absorption and transport, physiological responses and structural characteristics between two types of Cu-resistant plants, Oenothera glazioviana (Cu-exclusion type and Elsholtzia haichowensis (Cu-enrichment type, were investigated in the present study. The results indicated the following: (1 After 50 μM Cu treatment, the Cu ratio in the xylem vessels of E. haichowensis increased by 60%. A Cu adsorption experiment indicated that O. glazioviana exhibited greater resistance to Cu, and Cu absorption and the shoot/root ratio of Cu were significantly lower in O. glazioviana than in E. haichowensis. (2 An analysis of the endogenous abscisic acid (ABA variance and exogenous ABA treatment demonstrated that the ABA levels of both plants did not differ; exogenous ABA treatment clearly reduced Cu accumulation in both plants. (3 The leaf stomatal density of O. glazioviana was significantly less than that of E. haichowensis. Guard cells in E. haichowensis plants were covered with a thick cuticle layer, the epidermal hair was more numerous and longer, and the number of xylem conduits in the root was small. (4 The transpiration rate and the stomatal conductance of O. glazioviana were both significantly lower than those of E. haichowensis, regardless of whether the plants were treated with Cu. Taken together, these results indicate that the differences in the structural characteristics between these two plant species, particularly in the characteristics related to plant transpiration, are important factors that govern whether plants acquire or exclude Cu.

  9. The development of a consensus statement on normal physiologic birth: a modified Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Holly Powell; Cheyney, Melissa; Lawlor, Mary; Myers, Suzy; Schuiling, Kerri; Tanner, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing consensus on a definition of, and best practices for, normal physiologic birth in the United States. Evidence supports the use of physiologic birth practices, yet a working definition of this term has been elusive. We began by convening a task force of 21 individuals from 3 midwifery organizations and various childbirth advocacy and consumer groups. A modified Delphi approach was utilized to achieve consensus around 2 research questions: 1) What is normal physiologic birth? and 2) What practices most effectively support its achievement? Answers to these questions were collected anonymously from task force members during multiple phases that included a preliminary briefing, an initial face-to-face roundtable, 9 iterative Delphi rounds, and reciprocal feedback from a wider audience of stakeholders at national and international conferences. Content analysis identified specific statements and concepts in the first Delphi round, which were subsequently ranked in following rounds. An initial draft was constructed based on the priorities that emerged and presented for feedback to peers and childbirth advocates whose comments were incorporated into the final document. Four key themes were identified from our initial questions; these provided the framework for the document: 1) definitions of normal physiologic birth, 2) mechanisms and outcomes of normal physiologic birth, 3) factors that influence normal physiologic birth, and 4) recommendations for increasing normal physiologic birth. These areas comprised the final sections in the multi-organizational consensus statement. The modified Delphi approach we employed allowed for the development of a consensus statement that will serve as a template for education, practice, and future research in maternity care. The completion of this statement marks the beginning of a project to promote systemic changes that support normal physiologic birth, and thus, have the potential to

  10. Attentional and physiological processing of food images in functional dyspepsia patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Seon; Preissl, Hubert; Giel, Katrin; Schag, Kathrin; Enck, Paul

    2018-01-23

    The food-related behavior of functional dyspepsia has been attracting more interest of late. This pilot study aims to provide evidence of the physiological, emotional, and attentional aspects of food processing in functional dyspepsia patients. The study was performed in 15 functional dyspepsia patients and 17 healthy controls after a standard breakfast. We measured autonomic nervous system activity using skin conductance response and heart rate variability, emotional response using facial electromyography, and visual attention using eyetracking during the visual stimuli of food/non-food images. In comparison to healthy controls, functional dyspepsia patients showed a greater craving for food, a decreased intake of food, more dyspeptic symptoms, lower pleasantness rating of food images (particularly of high fat), decreased low frequency/high frequency ratio of heart rate variability, and suppressed total processing time of food images. There were no significant differences of skin conductance response and facial electromyography data between groups. The results suggest that high level cognitive functions rather than autonomic and emotional mechanisms are more liable to function differently in functional dyspepsia patients. Abnormal dietary behavior, reduced subjective rating of pleasantness and visual attention to food should be considered as important pathophysiological characteristics in functional dyspepsia.

  11. Physiological and evolutionary studies of NAP systems in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Fengping; Xu, Jun; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Xiao, Xiang

    2011-05-01

    Most of the Shewanella species contain two periplasmic nitrate reductases (NAP-α and NAP-β), which is a unique feature of this genus. In the present study, the physiological function and evolutionary relationship of the two NAP systems were studied in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3. Both of the WP3 nap gene clusters: nap-α (napD1A1B1C) and nap-β (napD2A2B2) were shown to be involved in nitrate respiration. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that NAP-β originated earlier than NAP-α. Tetraheme cytochromes NapC and CymA were found to be the major electron deliver proteins, and CymA also served as a sole electron transporter towards nitrite reductase. Interestingly, a ΔnapA2 mutant with the single functional NAP-α system showed better growth than the wild-type strain, when grown in nitrate medium, and it had a selective advantage to the wild-type strain. On the basis of these results, we proposed the evolution direction of nitrate respiration system in Shewanella: from a single NAP-β to NAP-β and NAP-α both, followed by the evolution to a single NAP-α. Moreover, the data presented here will be very useful for the designed engineering of Shewanella for more efficient respiring capabilities for environmental bioremediation.

  12. Physiological and cytokine response to acute exercise under hypoxic conditions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Fábio S; Lemos, Valdir A; Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Dos Santos, Ronaldo V; Tufik, Sergio; Zagatto, Alessandro M; de Souza, Claudio T; Pimentel, Gustavo D; De Mello, Marco T

    2017-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that exercise in hypoxia situations induces a cytotoxicity effects. However, the cytokines participation in this condition is remaining unknown. Thus, the aim the present study was to evaluate physiological parameters and inflammatory profiles in response to acute exercise after five hours of hypoxic conditions. Fourteen healthy men were distributed randomly into two groups: normoxic exercise (N.=7) and hypoxic exercise (N.=7). All volunteers were blinded to the protocol. Initially, all subjects were submitted to chamber normobaric in a room fitted for altitude simulations of up to 4500 m, equivalent to a barometric pressure of 433 mmHg. All analyses began at 7:00 a.m. and was maintained for 5 hours; the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 13.5%. The groups began a 60-minute session of physical exercise starting at 11:00 a.m., at 50% of peak VO2 (50% VO2peak). Blood was collected for cytokine analysis in the morning upon waking, before the 60-minute exercise session and immediately thereafter. The heart rate during 60 minutes' exercise training was significantly increased in both exercise groups (Pexercise (Pexercise, significant increases were found for IL-1ra and IL-10 under hypoxic conditions (Pexercise performance in hypoxic conditions can promotes early inflammatory response, leads for immunosuppression state.

  13. Effects of reduced food intake for 4 weeks on physiological parameters in toxicity studies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Junya; Izumi, Tomoko; Ogawa, Bunichiro; Ban, Yoshiki; Takagi, Hironori; Sasaki, Minoru; Tsutsumi, Shunsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to clarify the effects of reduced feeding on physiological parameters in dogs to enable appropriate evaluations of the safety and toxicity of test compounds. We measured alkaline phosphatase isozymes and the circulating blood volume, as well as clinical signs, body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, electrocardiography, organ weight, and histopathology, in male beagle dogs fed a diet consisting of 300 g/day or 150 g/day for 4 weeks. There were no abnormal clinical signs in any of the dogs. In the 150-g/day feeding group, a decreased alkaline phosphatase 3 suggesting effects on the bone and a decreased circulating blood volume associated with body weight loss were observed. Additionally, the following changes were also observed in the 150-g/day group: a decrease in body weight; hematologic changes including decreases in white blood cells, neutrophils, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and reticulocytes; blood chemical changes including decreases in aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and calcium and an increase in the creatinine at week 1 or thereafter; electrocardiographic changes including a decrease in the heart rate, a prolonged QRS duration and the occurrence of a second-degree atrioventricular block at week 3 or thereafter; and pathological changes including decreases in the weights of the liver and thymus, a decrease in hepatocyte rarefaction, and thymic atrophy. These results provide useful information for assessing the safety of compounds in toxicological studies, enabling direct treatment effects and secondary changes caused by decreased food intake to be distinguished.

  14. A dynamic artificial gastrointestinal system for studying the behavior of orally administered drug dosage forms under various physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanquet, S.; Zeijdner, E.; Beyssac, E.; Meunier, J.-P.; Denis, S.; Havenaar, R.; Alric, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential of a dynamic, multicompartmental in vitro system simulating the human stomach and small intestine (TIM-1) for studying the behavior of oral drug dosage forms under various physiological gastrointestinal conditions. Methods. Two

  15. [Regional differences in ikigai (reason(s) for living) in elderly people--relationship between ikigai and family structure, physiological situation and functional capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Tanji; Shinkai, Shoji

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is a) to make a comparative study of the existence of ikigai (reason(s) for living) in elderly people and its relevance to their family structure, physiological situation and functional capacity in both rural areas and metropolitan suburban areas, and b) position basic research into the structure of ikigai in the near future, by clarifying several related factors, from which the concept of ikigai may be defined. The meaning of the word "ikigai" in Japanese is difficult to express exactly, and specialists in gerontology have varying definitions. If ikigai were translated from Japanese into English, it could be "reason(s) for living", "self-actualization", "meaning of life" and/or "purpose in life". In this paper, ikigai is used to mean "feeling of being alive now and/or individual motivation for living". As of October 2000, we studied 1,544 people aged 65 years and over living in town Y of Niigata Prefecture (rural area), and as of January 2001, we studied 1,002 people in the same age group in town H of Saitama Prefecture (metropolitan suburban area). The above investigations revealed the following characteristics:--(a) Regarding the percentages of persons having or not having ikigai, there were no significant differences between the rural area and the metropolitan suburban area. (b) In both areas, the 3 factors of self-rated level of health, intellectual activeness and social roles, were associated with having ikigai. (c) In the rural area, the family structure was strongly associated with having ikigai, but gender or generation were irrelevant. (d) In the metropolitan suburban area, the hospitalization experience of men was strongly associated with ikigai. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation with generation. In this regard, while the contents of ikigai are seldom examined in detail, clarification of the structure of ikigai should be worked out in the next stage of the study, using covariance structure analysis. In addition the

  16. Microfluidic device for rapid solution exchange to study kinetics of cell physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Howard; Honnatti, Meghana; Gillis, Kevin

    2006-11-01

    Exchanging the extracellular solution of the cell rapidly (less than 10ms) is an important requirement in study the kinetics of cell physiology. A microfluidic device is developed to exchange the solution around the cells as they flow through a junction at the intersection of two microfluidic channels. The solution exchange time is measured experimentally by fluorescently labeling the cell surface membranes with a styryl dye, FM1-43 or FM 2-10, and then observing the time course of cell fluorescence decay following the rapid drop in the extracellular concentration of the FM dye that occurs as the cell flows past the fluidic junction. A numerical model is developed to guide the experimental design of microfluidic device. In the model, the motion of a single cell through a fluid junction is simulated and the mixing process of the solutions is solved. The model also includes the kinetics of departitioning of FM dyes from the cell membrane. The departitioning time constants for the FM dyes are determined from fitting the measured data of the cell fluorescence decay. This departitioning kinetics is important as FM dyes are commonly used to label cell membranes for the purpose of measuring the release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles via exocytosis and the subsequent reuptake of vesicular membrane by endocytosis.

  17. Physiological Study of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Strains in a Novel Chemically Defined Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervaux, Christian; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2000-01-01

    We developed a chemically defined medium called milieu proche du lait (MPL), in which 22 Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) strains exhibited growth rates ranging from 0.55 to 1 h−1. MPL can also be used for cultivation of other lactobacilli and Streptococcus thermophilus. The growth characteristics of L. bulgaricus in MPL containing different carbon sources were determined, including an initial characterization of the phosphotransferase system transporters involved. For the 22 tested strains, growth on lactose was faster than on glucose, mannose, and fructose. Lactose concentrations below 0.4% were limiting for growth. We isolated 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutants from strains CNRZ397 and ATCC 11842. CNRZ397-derived mutants were all deficient for glucose, fructose, and mannose utilization, indicating that these three sugars are probably transported via a unique mannose-specific-enzyme-II-like transporter. In contrast, mutants of ATCC 11842 exhibited diverse phenotypes, suggesting that multiple transporters may exist in that strain. We also developed a protein labeling method and verified that exopolysaccharide production and phage infection can occur in MPL. The MPL medium should thus be useful in conducting physiological studies of L. bulgaricus and other lactic acid bacteria under well controlled nutritional conditions. PMID:11097906

  18. Comparative studies on the physiological ecology of five euryhaline Gammarus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulnheim, H P

    1979-12-01

    Comparative investigations on the physiological capacities of Gammarus locusta (L.), G. oceanicus Segerstråle, G. salinus Spooner, G. zaddachi Sexton and G. duebeni duebeni Liljeborg obtained from German coastal and estuarine areas were carried out under uniform experimental conditions. In order to assess the adaptation of these species to the abiotic conditions of their particular habitats, the following criteria were examined: (a) oxygen consumption as related to temperature, (b) time course of acclimation to a new steady state of metabolic rate following sudden temperature changes, (c) resistance to oxygen deficiency, and (d) resistance to aerial exposure. Considerable interspecific differences were found among the five amphipods studied. G. locusta reveals the highest O 2 uptake rates and longest thermal acclimation periods as well as lowest resistance capacities to oxyten depletion and air exposure. The other species occupy an intermediate position as indicated in the above-cited order, but contrast with G. duebeni which exhibits comparatively high resistance capacities. The significance of the findings obtained is discussed in relation to the environmental requirements of the five crustaceans considered.

  19. Physiological studies of environmental pollutants. Final report, September 1, 1975--March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengemann, F.W.; Wentworth, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Physiological studies of environmental pollutants are reported in which a major emphasis is on factors involved in the secretion of these materials into milk. Elements of concern relate to the energy production field, both nuclear and non-nuclear. The distribution of 207 Bi, 203 Pb, 210 Po, and 201 Tl between milk, urine, and feces of lactating goats was determined after oral and intravenous administration. Data is presented showing that these elements are poorly absorbed and in consequence appear in milk in only small amounts. However levels in goats appear to be greater than in cows. Experiments relating to mammary transfer of non-actinide series elements are summarized. Included are observations of significant temperature effects on radioiodine transfer, sites and rates of resorption of iodine, zinc, and calcium from the mammary gland, and the use of radio indicators in determining in vivo milk volume. Experiments with zinc have provided blood level, secretion, and balance data necessary for modeling zinc metabolism in lactating goats. A method is presented for compartmental analysis of models involving a pool of cycling volume such as the mammary gland

  20. Physiological studies of environmental pollutants. Final report, September 1, 1975--March 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengemann, F W; Wentworth, R A

    1978-01-01

    Physiological studies of environmental pollutants are reported in which a major emphasis is on factors involved in the secretion of these materials into milk. Elements of concern relate to the energy production field, both nuclear and non-nuclear. The distribution of /sup 207/Bi, /sup 203/Pb, /sup 210/Po, and /sup 201/Tl between milk, urine, and feces of lactating goats was determined after oral and intravenous administration. Data is presented showing that these elements are poorly absorbed and in consequence appear in milk in only small amounts. However levels in goats appear to be greater than in cows. Experiments relating to mammary transfer of non-actinide series elements are summarized. Included are observations of significant temperature effects on radioiodine transfer, sites and rates of resorption of iodine, zinc, and calcium from the mammary gland, and the use of radio indicators in determining in vivo milk volume. Experiments with zinc have provided blood level, secretion, and balance data necessary for modeling zinc metabolism in lactating goats. A method is presented for compartmental analysis of models involving a pool of cycling volume such as the mammary gland.

  1. Magnetic structures: neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouree-Vigneron, F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is often an unequivocal method for determining magnetic structures. Here we present some typical examples, stressing the sequence through experiments, data analysis, interpretation and modelisation. Two series of compounds are chosen: Tb Ni 2 Ge 2 and RBe 13 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er). Depending on the nature of the elements, the magnetic structures produced can be commensurate, incommensurate or even show a transition between two such phases as a function of temperature. A model, taking magnetic exchange and anisotropy into account, will be presented in the case of commensurate-incommensurate magnetic transitions in RBe 13

  2. SMARTer for magnetic structure studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, magnetism in solid state physics and condensed matter research is an important application of neutron scattering. The. SANS technique probing structures on the nanometer scale finds applications in micromagnetism, magnetic clusters embedded in a solid nonmagnetic matrix, mag- netic clusters suspended in fluids ...

  3. STUDIES ON DETERMINATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL LEVELS OF ZINC IONS IN THE PHARYNGEAL TONSILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Nogaj

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The zinc is one of the most important microelements. Element this conditions has corrected the functioning the nervous system of, immunological, sense of taste and smell. It the weakness of activity was manifested was the shortage of zinc and children’s motive development. The aim of this study was samples of pharyngeal tonsils from children living on Malopolska Region, Silesia and village (made up the area of reference of Southern Poland. We investigated population 95 children, in this 40 girls (42% and 55 boys (58% in age from 2 till 15 years (average 6,8 years. The content of zinc was determined by ICP – AES method. Average the content of zinc in pharyngeal tonsils in whole studied children’s population carried out 74,51 µg/g. The statistical differences were not affirmed among average (the average geometrical content of ions of zinc in studied come from girls – 73,15 µg/g and the boys – 75,49 µg/g. The differences between sex appear, in case of ranges of changes, at boys range this it is clearly larger (55,86–97,59 µg/g in comparison to girls (58,34–88,68 µg/g how also near comparison of content answering 95 percentylowi (the incidental resulting with large environmental exposition contents it in the pharyngeal boys’ tonsils is larger – (87,73 µg/g in comparison to young girls (81,98 µg/g. It was established, on basis of report of changes quotient content zinc in pharyngeal tonsils in function of changes of content zinc in air dust, the physiological quantities of zinc in pharyngeal tonsil on level 42 µg/g.

  4. Fall risk in Chinese community-dwelling older adults: A physiological profile assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siong, Kar-Ho; Kwan, Marcella Mun-San; Lord, Stephen R; Lam, Andrew Kwok-Cheung; Tsang, William Wai-Nam; Cheong, Allen Ming-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The short-form Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) is increasingly used in clinical practice for assessing fall risk in older people. However, a normative database is only available for Caucasian populations. The purpose of the present study was to develop a normative database for Hong Kong Chinese older people and examine the fall risk profile of this population. A total of 622 participants aged 60-95 years were recruited. Participants underwent the PPA (containing tests of contrast sensitivity, proprioception, quadriceps strength, reaction time and sway), and composite fall risk scores were computed. Participants were then followed up for falls for 1 year. Quadriceps strength and lower limb proprioception scores were comparable with those reported for Caucasian populations. However, contrast sensitivity, simple reaction time and postural sway scores were relatively poor. The average composite fall risk score was 1.7 ± 1.5, showing a "moderate" fall risk when compared with the Caucasian norms. Despite the relatively poor physical performances and moderately high fall risk scores, the incidence of one plus falls in the 1-year follow-up period was just 16.4%, with just 2.6% reporting two plus falls. The area under the curve for composite fall risk scores in discriminating fallers from non-fallers was 0.53 (95% CI 0.45-0.60). Despite poorer performance in PPA tests, the incidence of prospective falls in a Hong Kong Chinese population was low. In consequence, the PPA could not discriminate well between fallers and non-fallers. The present study provided normality data for short-form PPA measures for older Chinese people as a reference for further studies. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Instrumentation enabling study of plant physiological response to elevated night temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarpley Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global climate warming can affect functioning of crops and plants in the natural environment. In order to study the effects of global warming, a method for applying a controlled heating treatment to plant canopies in the open field or in the greenhouse is needed that can accept either square wave application of elevated temperature or a complex prescribed diurnal or seasonal temperature regime. The current options are limited in their accuracy, precision, reliability, mobility or cost and scalability. Results The described system uses overhead infrared heaters that are relatively inexpensive and are accurate and precise in rapidly controlling the temperature. Remote computer-based data acquisition and control via the internet provides the ability to use complex temperature regimes and real-time monitoring. Due to its easy mobility, the heating system can randomly be allotted in the open field or in the greenhouse within the experimental setup. The apparatus has been successfully applied to study the response of rice to high night temperatures. Air temperatures were maintained within the set points ± 0.5°C. The incorporation of the combination of air-situated thermocouples, autotuned proportional integrative derivative temperature controllers and phase angled fired silicon controlled rectifier power controllers provides very fast proportional heating action (i.e. 9 ms time base, which avoids prolonged or intense heating of the plant material. Conclusion The described infrared heating system meets the utilitarian requirements of a heating system for plant physiology studies in that the elevated temperature can be accurately, precisely, and reliably controlled with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors.

  6. Thimerosal changes protein conformation and increase the rate of fibrillation in physiological conditions: Spectroscopic studies using bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João César N; da Silva, Isabella M; Braga, Taniris C; de Fátima, Ângelo; Figueiredo, Isis M; Santos, Josué Carinhanha Caldas

    2018-02-21

    The interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and thimerosal (TM), an organomercury compound widely employed as a preservative in vaccines, was investigated simulating physiological conditions and using different spectroscopic techniques. The results, employing molecular fluorescence showed the interaction occurs by static quenching through electrostatic forces (ΔH  0), spontaneously (ΔG = -4.40 kJ mol -1 ) and with a binding constant of 3.24 × 10 3  M -1 . Three-dimensional fluorescence studies indicated that TM causes structural changes in the polypeptide chain of the BSA, confirmed by circular dichroism that showed an increase in α-helix (from 43.9 to 47.8%) content after interaction process. Through synchronized fluorescence and employing bilirubin as a protein site marker, it was confirmed the preferential interaction of TM in the subdomain IB of BSA. The interaction mechanism proposed in this work is based on the reaction of TM with BSA through of free Cys34 residue, forming the adduct BSA-HgEt with the thiosalicylic acid release, which possibly interacts electrostatically with positive side chain amino acids of the modified protein. Finally, it was proven that both TM and EtHgCl accelerate the protein fibrillation kinetics in 42 and 122%, respectively, indicating the toxicity of these compounds in biological systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  8. Molecular and Integrative Physiological Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia: The Paradigm of Cardiovascular Studies in Rodents using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinides, Christakis; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To-this-date, the exact molecular, cellular, and integrative physiological mechanisms of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Published evidence indicates that anesthetic effects are multifocal and occur in a time-dependent and coordinated manner, mediated via central, local, and peripheral pathways. Their effects can be modulated by a range of variables, and their elicited end-effect on the integrative physiological response is highly variable. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular sites of anesthetic action with a focus on the paradigm of isoflurane (ISO) - the most commonly used anesthetic nowadays - and its use in prolonged in vivo rodent studies using imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also presents established evidence for normal ranges of global and regional physiological cardiac function under ISO, proposes optimal, practical methodologies relevant to the use of anesthetic protocols for MRI and outlines the beneficial effects of nitrous oxide supplementation.

  9. A study on self-incompatibility and its physiological causes in mango (Mangifera indica L.) Cv. Dashehari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.M.; Singh, R.N.; Rathore, D.S.

    1974-01-01

    In studies on the physiological causes of self-incompatibility in mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Dashehari, both self and cross-pollinated fruitlets were analysed for auxin-like substances at different states of their growth. It was found that cross-pollinated fruitlets act as a stronger physiological sink as compared to self-pollinated ones. Activity measurement and autoradiography of leaves and fruitlets at different stages of their growth indicated that the mobility of 32 P was more towards cross-pollinated fruitlets than that of self-pollinated ones. (author)

  10. Physiological Age Structure and Leishmania spp. Detection in Phlebotomus (Larroussius) orientalis (Parrot, 1936) (Diptera: Psychodidae) at an Endemic Focus of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebresilassie, Araya; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Kirstein, Oscar David; Aklilu, Essayas; Yared, Solomon; Tekie, Habte; Balkew, Meshesha; Warburg, Alon; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre-Michael, Teshome

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani is endemic in northern Ethiopia, where P. orientalis is the most important presumed vector. This study was designed to determine the physiological age structure and the occurrence of Leishmania infection in the vector of VL in Tahtay Adiyabo district, northern Ethiopia. Sand flies were collected using CDC light traps from peridomestic and agricultural fields between May 2011 and April 2012 and P. orientalis females were dissected for age determination and detection of Leishmania promastigotes. Sand flies were also analyzed for L. donovani detection using molecular methods. Of 1,282 P. orientalis examined for abdominal stages and age characterization, 66.2%, 28.2%, 4.1%, and 1.6% were unfed, freshly fed, half-gravid, and gravid. Parous rate in unfed females was 34.1% and 35.4% in peridomestic and agricultural fields, respectively. Out of 921 P. orientalis females dissected, one specimen (0.1%) was found naturally infected with promastigotes. Five pools (25 females) of unfed P. orientalis were also found with DNA of Leishmania spp. In particular, a single P. orientalis was positive for L. donovani (0.5%). Based on this and other evidences (abundance, human blood feeding, and xenodiagnostic studies), P. orientalis is the principal vector of VL in this endemic focus.

  11. Structural studies on actinides carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benetollo, F.; Bombieri, G.; Herrero, J.A.; Rojas, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis, thermal behaviour and crystal structure of lithium glutaratehydrogenglutaratedioxouranate(VI) tetrahydrate is described. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2 1 /n. The two glutarato ligands behave differently; one is bridging the uranyl groups in infinite chains running approximately in the a axis direction, the second is bridging the uranyl and the lithium ions. The carboxylic groups are chelated on the uranium and monodentate on the lithium. The structure is linked through a network of hydrogen bonding involving water molecules and oxygen atoms from the carboxylato groups. The geometry around the uranium is approximately hexagonal bipyramidal while the lithium is tetrahedrally coordinated with one glutarate oxygen and 3 water oxygens. (author)

  12. Smart sensor: a platform for an interactive human physiological state recognition study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gorochovik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a concept of making interactive human state recognition systems based on smart sensor design. The token measures on proper ADC signal processing had significantly lowered the interference level. A more reliable way of measuring human skin temperature was offered by using Maxim DS18B20 digital thermometers. They introduced a more sensible response to temperature changes compared to previously used analog LM35 thermometers. An adaptive HR measuring algorithm was introduced to suppress incorrect ECG signal readings caused by human muscular activities. User friendly interactive interface for touch sensitive GLCD screen was developed to present real time physiological data readings both in numerals and graphics. User was granted an ability to dynamically customize data processing methods according to his needs. Specific procedures were developed to simplify physiological state recording for further analysis. The introduced physiological data sampling and preprocessing platform was optimized to be compatible with “ATmega Oscilloscope” PC data collecting and visualizing software.

  13. Structure studies of macromolecular systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Dušková, Jarmila; Kolenko, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 136 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA MŠk 1K05008 Keywords : structure * X-ray diffraction * synchrotron Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  14. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Coan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously mapped hypertension-related insulin resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs to rat chromosomes 4, 12 and 16 using adipocytes from F2 crosses between spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, and subsequently identified Cd36 as the gene underlying the chromosome 4 locus. The identity of the chromosome 12 and 16 genes remains unknown. To identify whole-body phenotypes associated with the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions, we generated and characterised new congenic strains, with WKY donor segments introgressed onto an SHR genetic background, for the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions. We found a >50% increase in insulin sensitivity in both the chromosome 12 and 16 strains. Blood pressure and left ventricular mass were reduced in the two congenic strains consistent with the congenic segments harbouring SHR genes for insulin resistance, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Integrated genomic analysis, using physiological and whole-genome sequence data across 42 rat strains, identified variants within the congenic regions in Upk3bl, RGD1565131 and AABR06087018.1 that were associated with blood pressure, cardiac mass and insulin sensitivity. Quantitative trait transcript analysis across 29 recombinant inbred strains showed correlation between expression of Hspb1, Zkscan5 and Pdgfrl with adipocyte volume, systolic blood pressure and cardiac mass, respectively. Comparative genome analysis showed a marked enrichment of orthologues for human GWAS-associated genes for insulin resistance within the syntenic regions of both the chromosome 12 and 16 congenic intervals. Our study defines whole-body phenotypes associated with the SHR chromosome 12 and 16 insulin-resistance QTLs, identifies candidate genes for these SHR QTLs and finds human orthologues of rat genes in these regions that associate with related human traits. Further study of these genes in the congenic strains will lead to robust identification of the

  15. Effect of Parkinson's Disease on the Production of Structured and Unstructured Speaking Tasks: Respiratory Physiologic and Linguistic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jessica E.; Darling, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of cognitive-linguistic deficits and respiratory physiologic changes on respiratory support for speech in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) using two speech tasks: reading and extemporaneous speech. Method: Five women with PD, 9 men with PD, and 14 age- and sex-matched control participants read a passage and…

  16. Academic Performance in Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes: A 2-Yr Study of Academic Motivation and Grade Expectation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic…

  17. Parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and vitamin D 1974: Present status of physiological studies and analysis of calcium homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, J. T., Jr.; Swenson, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    The role of parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and vitamin D in the control of calcium and bone metabolism was studied. Particular emphasis was placed on the physiological adaptation to weightlessness and, as a potential model for this purpose, on the immobilization characteristic of space flight or prolonged bed rest. The biosynthesis, control of secretion, and metabolism of these hormonal agents is considered.

  18. Physiological Measurements as Validation of Alertness Observations: An Exploratory Case Study of Three Individuals with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, Vera; Vlaskamp, Carla; Vos, Pieter; Maes, Bea; Ruijssenaars, Wied

    2012-01-01

    Although observation largely takes into account the needs and abilities of individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities, several difficulties are related to this assessment method as well. Our aim in this study was to investigate what possibilities the use of physiological measurements make available to validate alertness…

  19. Knowledge on the subject of human physiology among Polish high school students--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinczewska, Helena; Rozwadowska, Joanna; Traczyk, Anna; Majda, Szymon; Wysocki, Michał; Grabowski, Kamil; Kopeć, Sylwia; Głowacki, Roman; Węgrzyn, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-01-01

    In most cases the only knowledge an individual will receive with regards to their own body and its proper functioning is during their high school education. The aim of this study was to evaluate high school students' knowledge about basic physiology. The research was carried out in five, randomly chosen high schools in Krakow, Poland. Young people in the age of 17-19 years were asked to fill in the questionnaire designed by the authors. The first part of the survey included personal data. The second part contained 20 close-ended questions assessing students' knowledge about the basics of human physiology. Question difficulty varied from easy through average, and up to difficult. The maximum number of points to achieve was 20. One-thousand-and eighty-three (out of 1179 invited--91.86%) Polish high school students (63.25% female) filled in a 20-item questionnaire constructed by the authors regarding basic human physiology. The mean age of the group was 17.66 ± 0.80 years. The mean score among the surveyed was 10.15 ± 3.48 (range 0-20). Only 26.04% of students achieved a grade of 60% or more, and only one person obtained the highest possible score. Females achieved significantly better scores than males (10.49 ± 3.38 vs. 9.56 ± 3.56; p physiology, obtained better results than those in their third year who had already finished the biology course (10.70 ± 3.27 vs. 9.81 ± 3.74 respectively; p physiology (10.70 ± 3.27 vs. 9.63 ± 2.74 respectively; p = 0.003). Over 23% of students did not know that mature red blood cells do not have cell nuclei and a similar number of them answered that humans have 500,000 erythrocytes in 1 mm3 of blood. Over 32% believed that plasma does not participate in the transport of respiratory gases, and 31% believed that endocrine glands secrete hormones within their immediate vicinity and into the blood. Our research has shown that young people, especially men, often lack basic physiological knowledge needed to make conscious and

  20. Psycho-Physiological Associates of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients with Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Yim Wah

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality among patients with respiratory diseases and is often regarded as a difficult symptom to control in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Previous studies have found an association of psychological and physiological factors with dyspnea among patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases. However, symptom management of hospitalized patients with ILDs has been hampered by difficulty in priority, since they are often admitted with multiple psycho-physiological needs. This study examined the prevalence of dyspnea and the psycho-physiological factors associated with it among hospitalized Chinese patients with ILDs. We studied 165 hospitalized patients with ILDs recruited consecutively over three months in a public hospital in Guangzhou, China. Dyspnea and common psycho-physiological factors, including cough symptoms, activity capacity, lung function, physical and mental health status, and anxiety and depression symptoms, were measured. By ordered logistic regression, level of dyspnea statistically significantly affected performance in a six-minute walk test and physical functioning in work or other regular daily activities in hospitalized patients with ILDs. Respiratory rehabilitation with an appropriate intensity of exercise training or other strategies for enhancing the physical functioning of this population with moderate and severe levels of dyspnea should be prioritized. PMID:29064440

  1. Psycho-Physiological Associates of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients with Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Hua; Mak, Yim Wah

    2017-10-24

    Dyspnea has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality among patients with respiratory diseases and is often regarded as a difficult symptom to control in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Previous studies have found an association of psychological and physiological factors with dyspnea among patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases. However, symptom management of hospitalized patients with ILDs has been hampered by difficulty in priority, since they are often admitted with multiple psycho-physiological needs. This study examined the prevalence of dyspnea and the psycho-physiological factors associated with it among hospitalized Chinese patients with ILDs. We studied 165 hospitalized patients with ILDs recruited consecutively over three months in a public hospital in Guangzhou, China. Dyspnea and common psycho-physiological factors, including cough symptoms, activity capacity, lung function, physical and mental health status, and anxiety and depression symptoms, were measured. By ordered logistic regression, level of dyspnea statistically significantly affected performance in a six-minute walk test and physical functioning in work or other regular daily activities in hospitalized patients with ILDs. Respiratory rehabilitation with an appropriate intensity of exercise training or other strategies for enhancing the physical functioning of this population with moderate and severe levels of dyspnea should be prioritized.

  2. A Study of the Effectiveness of Sensory Integration Therapy on Neuro-Physiological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher; Reynolds, Kathleen Sheena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sensory integration theory proposes that because there is plasticity within the central nervous system (the brain is moldable) and because the brain consists of systems that are hierarchically organised, it is possible to stimulate and improve neuro-physiological processing and integration and thereby increase learning capacity.…

  3. Dependence of nociceptive detection thresholds on physiological parameters and capsaicin-induced neuroplasticity: a computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, H.; Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; Doll, Robert; Buitenweg, Jan R.; van Gils, Stephanus A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging

  4. Harsh discipline in toddlerhood. A longitudinal study on maternal physiological and behavioral predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, Katharina Jacomina

    2012-01-01

    In the current thesis we investigate both maternal sensitivity and physiological reactivity to infant crying as potential early indicators of later harsh discipline. In sum, we found that highly sensitive mothers in dyadic interactions with their 3-month old infants showed greater HR reactivity and

  5. Recent improvements in small angle x-ray diffraction for the study of muscle physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reconditi, Massimo

    2006-10-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction is one of the most important unresolved problems in biology and biophysics. Notwithstanding the great advances of recent years, it is not yet known in detail how the molecular motor in muscle, the class II myosin, converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into work by interacting with its track, the actin filament; neither is it understood how the high efficiency in energy conversion depends on the cooperative action of myosin motors working in parallel along the actin filament. Research in muscle contraction involves the combination of mechanical, biochemical and structural methods in studies that span from tissue to single molecule. Therefore, more than for any other research field, progress in the comprehension of muscle contraction at the molecular level is related to, and in turn contributes to, the advancement of methods in biophysics. This review will focus on the progress achieved by time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from muscle, an approach made possible by the highly ordered arrangement of both the contractile proteins myosin and actin in the ca 2 µm long structural unit, the sarcomere, that repeats along the whole length of the muscle cell. Among time-resolved structural techniques, SAXS has proved to be the most powerful method of investigation, as it allows the molecular motor to be studied in situ, in intact single muscle cells, where it is possible to combine the structural study with fast mechanical methods that synchronize the action of the molecular motors. The latest development of this technique allows Angstrom-scale measurements of the axial movement of the motors that pull the actin filament towards the centre of the sarcomere, by exploiting the x-ray interference between the two arrays of myosin motors in the two halves of the sarcomere.

  6. Recent improvements in small angle x-ray diffraction for the study of muscle physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reconditi, Massimo [Universita di Firenze, Lab di Fisiologia - DBAG, c/o Dip. di Fisica, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction is one of the most important unresolved problems in biology and biophysics. Notwithstanding the great advances of recent years, it is not yet known in detail how the molecular motor in muscle, the class II myosin, converts the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into work by interacting with its track, the actin filament; neither is it understood how the high efficiency in energy conversion depends on the cooperative action of myosin motors working in parallel along the actin filament. Research in muscle contraction involves the combination of mechanical, biochemical and structural methods in studies that span from tissue to single molecule. Therefore, more than for any other research field, progress in the comprehension of muscle contraction at the molecular level is related to, and in turn contributes to, the advancement of methods in biophysics. This review will focus on the progress achieved by time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from muscle, an approach made possible by the highly ordered arrangement of both the contractile proteins myosin and actin in the ca 2 {mu}m long structural unit, the sarcomere, that repeats along the whole length of the muscle cell. Among time-resolved structural techniques, SAXS has proved to be the most powerful method of investigation, as it allows the molecular motor to be studied in situ, in intact single muscle cells, where it is possible to combine the structural study with fast mechanical methods that synchronize the action of the molecular motors. The latest development of this technique allows Angstrom-scale measurements of the axial movement of the motors that pull the actin filament towards the centre of the sarcomere, by exploiting the x-ray interference between the two arrays of myosin motors in the two halves of the sarcomere.

  7. Yoga Practice Improves Physiological and Biochemical Status at High Altitudes: A Prospective Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himashree, Gidugu; Mohan, Latika; Singh, Yogesh

    2016-09-01

    Context • High altitude (HA) is a psychophysiological stressor for natives of lower altitudes. Reducing the morbidity and optimizing the performance of individuals deployed in an HA region has been attempted and reported with varied results. Objective • The present study intended to explore the effects of comprehensive yogic practices on the health and performance of Indian soldiers deployed at HAs. Design • The research team designed a prospective, randomized, case-control study. The study was done at Karu, Leh, India, at an altitude of 3445 m. Participants • Fully acclimatized soldiers in the Indian army were randomly selected from those posted to HA regions (ie, altitudes >3000 m). Intervention • The soldiers were divided into 2 groups of equal size. The first group, the control group, carried out the routine activities for physical training in the Indian army. The second group, the intervention group practiced a comprehensive yoga package, including physical asanas, pranayama, and meditation, and did not perform the physical training that the first group did. Both groups were monitored during their activities. Outcome Measures • A wide and comprehensive range of anthropometrical, physiological, biochemical, and psychological parameters were measured: (1) height and weight; (2) body fat percentage (BFP); (3) heart rate (HR); (4) respiratory rate (RR); (5) systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DPB); (6) peripheral saturation of oxygen; (7) end tidal CO2 (EtCO2); (8) chest expansion; (9) pulmonary function; (10) physical work capacity (VO2Max); (11) hematological variables; (12) lipid profile; (13) serum urea; (14) creatinine; (15) liver enzymes; (16) blood glucose; and (17) anxiety scores. Measurements were made at baseline and postintervention. Results • Two-hundred soldiers took part in the study. The yoga group showed a significant improvement in health indices and performance as compared with the control group. They had lower weights, BFPs, RRs

  8. Physiological responding to stress in middle-aged males enriched for longevity: a social stress study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Steffy W M; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen; Westendorp, Rudi; Oei, Nicole Y L

    2016-01-01

    Individuals enriched for familial longevity display a lower prevalence of age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular- and metabolic diseases. Since these diseases are associated with stress and increased cortisol levels, one of the underlying mechanisms that may contribute to healthy longevity might be a more adaptive response to stress. To investigate this, male middle-aged offspring from long-lived families (n = 31) and male non-offspring (with no familial history of longevity) (n = 26) were randomly allocated to the Trier Social Stress Test or a control condition in an experimental design. Physiological (cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate) and subjective responses were measured during the entire procedure. The results showed that Offspring had lower overall cortisol levels compared to Non-offspring regardless of condition, and lower absolute cortisol output (AUCg) during stress compared to Non-Offspring, while the increase (AUCi) did not differ between groups. In addition, systolic blood pressure in Offspring was lower compared to Non-offspring during the entire procedure. At baseline, Offspring had significantly lower systolic blood pressure and reported less subjective stress than Non-offspring and showed a trend towards lower heart rate. Offspring from long-lived families might thus be less stressed prior to potentially stressful events and consequently show overall lower levels in physiological responses. Although attenuated physiological responding cannot be ruled out, lower starting points and a lower peak level in physiological responding when confronted with an actual stressor, might already limit damage due to stress over a lifetime. Lower physiological responding may also contribute to the lower prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and other stress-related diseases in healthy longevity.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on the light sensing elements of the retina. [Structural and physiological effects of carbon, helium, and neon ions on rods and cones of salamanders and mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malachowski, M.J.

    1978-07-01

    This investigation was undertaken to quantitate possible morphological and physiological effects of particles of high linear energy transfer on the retina, in comparison with x-ray effects. The particles used were accelerated atomic nuclei of helium, carbon, and neon at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon. For morphological studies, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy were used. Physiological studies consisted of autoradiographic data of the rate of incorporation of labeled protein in the structures (opsin) of the outer segment of visual cells. Structural changes were found in the nuclei, as well as the inner and outer segments of visual cells, rods and cones. At a low dose of 10 rad, x rays and helium had no statistically significant morphological effects, but carbon and neon beams did cause significant degeneration of individual cells, pointing to the existence of a linear dose--effect relationship. At high doses of several hundred rads, a Pathologic Index determined the relative biological effectiveness of neon against alpha particles to have a value of greater than 6. The severity of effects per particle increased with atomic number. Labeling studies demonstrated a decreased rate of incorporation of labeled proteins in the structural organization of the outer segments of visual rods. The rate of self-renewal of visual rod discs was punctuated by irradiation and the structures themselves were depleted of amino acids. A model of rod discs (metabolic and catabolic) was postulated for correlated early and late effects to high and low doses.

  10. A case study of infant physiologic response to skin-to-skin contact following surgery for complex congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tondi M.; Ludington-Hoe, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants with complex congenital heart disease requiring surgical intervention within the first days or weeks of life may be the most seriously ill infants needing intensive nursing and medical care immediately after birth. Skin to skin contact (SSC) is well-accepted and practiced as a positive therapeutic intervention in premature infants, but is not routinely offered to infants in cardiac intensive care units. Physiologic effects of SSC in the congenital heart disease population must be examined before recommending incorporation of SSC into standard care routines. Objective The purpose of this case study was to describe the physiologic response to a single session of SSC in an 18-day-old infant with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Methods Repeated measures of heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and temperature were recorded 30 minutes prior to SSC, during SSC (including interruptions for bottle and breast feedings), and 10 minutes after SSC was completed. Results All physiologic parameters were clinically acceptable throughout the 135-minute observation. Conclusion This case study provides beginning evidence that SSC is safe in full-term infants following surgery for complex congenital heart disease. Further research with a larger sample is needed to examine effects of SSC on infant physiology before surgery and earlier in the postoperative time period as well as on additional outcomes such as length of stay, maternal-infant interaction, and neurodevelopment. PMID:25325374

  11. Comparative study on agro-physiology of sugarcane (saccharum officinarum l.) genotypes at different irrigation co-efficient values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, Z.; Mehmood, S.

    2015-01-01

    Drought is the primary factor limiting sugarcane growth and physiological development under the climatic conditions of Pakistan; especially in those areas where without supplemental irrigation, productivity is not possible. Lack of detailed information regarding the performance of cane varieties under drought during formative stage and poor selection breeding program played key role in limiting cane productivity. The proposed study was conducted to investigate the genetic response of different cultivars viz., CSSG-676, CSSG-668, HoSG-795, HoSG-529, NSG-59 and HSF- 240 (standard) regarding the physiological development of sugarcane and its productivity at different irrigation co-efficient levels (100%, 80% and 60%). This study elucidates that moisture has a pronounced impact on the physiological attributes of sugarcane and proper irrigation scheduling with 20 no. of irrigations were reported best in-term of better germination (69.65%), leaf area index (7.13), crop growth rate (8.44), net assimilation rate (1.06) and chlorophyll contents (5.98). Similarly in case of genomic response, NSG-59 was reported significant best as compared to all other test cultivars in term of better physiological performance, showing significant higher leaf area index, crop growth rate, chlorophyll contents and water use efficiency that maximized the crop growth and resulted in higher net assimilation rate. Higher proline contents (1.59) produced in NSG-59 also made it best under drought conditions. (author)

  12. Early Port-Related Structure Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael

    2013-12-01

    This paper examines three of Australia's earliest port-related structure studies. Excavations conducted in 1984 and 1994 in vastly different circumstances, with markedly different oceanographic conditions, progressing through quite different substrates, were joined with 1993-1994 overview of all the port structures along the coast of Western Australia. Providing a better appreciation of submerged port-related structure studies as a bona fide part of maritime archaeology, these three studies and have ramifications for future work both in Australia and overseas.

  13. The Use of Team-Based, Guided Inquiry Learning to Overcome Educational Disadvantages in Learning Human Physiology: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathner, Joseph A.; Byrne, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The study of human bioscience is viewed as a crucial curriculum in allied health. Nevertheless, bioscience (and particularly physiology) is notoriously difficult for undergraduates, particularly academically disadvantaged students. So endemic are the high failure rates (particularly in nursing) that it has come to be known as "the human…

  14. Study of local structure by DAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuki, Jun-ichiro

    1997-01-01

    We will describe a rather new X-ray structural technique, Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS), in which the Bragg diffraction intensities of a fixed momentum transfer is measured as a function of the incident X-ray energy. This technique can provide the same short-range structural information as XAFS. Because DAFS combines the capabilities of diffraction and XAFS into a single technique, it has two enhanced sensitivities compared to the separate technique. These are 'spatial selectivity' and 'site selectivity'. In this chapter semiconductor interface structure study as an example for spatial selectivity and structural study of high Tc superconductor as an example for site selectivity will be shown. (author)

  15. Synthesis, structure and reactivity studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    parameter exchange functional in conjunction with Lee–Yang–Parr correlation functional. (B3LYP) has been employed in this study.19 Stuttgart–. Dresden effective core potential (ECP), representing. 19 core electrons, along with valence basis set, ...

  16. The acute effects of graded physiological strain on soccer kicking performance: a randomized, controlled cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radman, Ivan; Wessner, Barbara; Bachl, Norbert; Ruzic, Lana; Hackl, Markus; Prpic, Tomislav; Markovic, Goran

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the acute effects of graded physiological strain on soccer kicking performance. Twenty-eight semi-professional soccer players completed both experimental and control procedure. The experimental protocol incorporated repeated shooting trials combined with a progressive discontinuous maximal shuttle-run intervention. The initial running velocity was 8 km/h and increasing for 1 km/h every 3 min until exhaustion. The control protocol comprised only eight subsequent shooting trials. The soccer-specific kicking accuracy (KA; average distance from the ball-entry point to the goal center), kicking velocity (KV), and kicking quality (KQ; kicking accuracy divided by the time elapsed from hitting the ball to the point of entry) were evaluated via reproducible and valid test over five individually determined exercise intensity zones. Compared with baseline or exercise at intensities below the second lactate threshold (LT2), physiological exertion above the LT2 (blood lactate > 4 mmol/L) resulted in meaningful decrease in KA (11-13%; p soccer kicking performance. The results suggest that high-intensity physiological exertion above the player's LT2 impairs soccer kicking performance. In contrast, light to moderate physiological stress appears to be neither harmful nor beneficial for kicking performance.

  17. Isolation, purification and studies on radiation induced biochemical and physiological changes of bovine growth hormone in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Salam, H.M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Growth hormone has a great importance in the field of animal physiology. Bovine growth hormone was extracted by alteration of the hydrogen ion concentration of phosphate buffer extract of frozen pituitary glands. The extracted bovine growth hormone has similar absorption peaks at UV and infrared spectra, bands of the same location on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis plate and had a molecular weight exactly as the standard bovine growth hormone and equal to 20.9 KD. Labelling of bovine growth hormone with 131 I was carried out with fast and least expensive method. The biological and physiological effects of labelled and non labelled bovine growth hormone were studied on rabbits. The labelled bovine growth hormone decreased the biological and physiological effects of the hormone. Bovine growth hormone (unlabelled) and different effects on growth performance traits, body chemical composition (water, fat,protein and ash), and also on the serum biochemical parameters. We conclude that the bovine growth hormone affects on the biological and physiological properties but this depends on the dose, type of delivery of hormone, time of treatment, and the diet content of the animal. 6 tabs., 13.2 figs., 110 refs

  18. PhysioNet: a research resource for studies of complex physiologic and biomedical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, G B; Mark, R G; Goldberger, A L

    2000-01-01

    PhysioNet (http://www.physionet.org/) is a web-based resource supplying well-characterized physiologic signals and related open-source software to the biomedical research community. Inaugurated in September 1999 under the auspices of the NIH's National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), PhysioNet provides an on-line forum for free dissemination and exchange of research data and software, with facilities for cooperative analysis of data and evaluation of new analytic methods. As of September 2000, PhysioBank, the data archive made available via PhysioNet, contained roughly 35 gigabytes of recorded signals and annotations. PhysioNet is a public service of the Research Resource for Complex Physiologic Signals, a cooperative project initiated by researchers at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, Boston University, McGill University, and MIT.

  19. Applying systems biology methods to the study of human physiology in extreme environments

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Lindsay M; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology is defined in this review as ‘an iterative process of computational model building and experimental model revision with the aim of understanding or simulating complex biological systems’. We propose that, in practice, systems biology rests on three pillars: computation, the omics disciplines and repeated experimental perturbation of the system of interest. The number of ethical and physiologically relevant perturbations that can be used in experiments on healthy humans is e...

  20. A viewpoint on considering physiological principles to study stress resistance and resilience with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Seals, Douglas R; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2017-09-01

    Adaptation to stress is identified as one of the seven pillars of aging research. Our viewpoint discusses the importance of the distinction between stress resistance and resilience, highlights how integration of physiological principles is critical for further understanding in vivo stress resistance and resilience, and advocates for the use of early warning signs to prevent a tipping point in stress resistance and resilience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical Student Attitudes towards Kidney Physiology and Nephrology: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, John K.; Sparks, Matthew A.; Lehrich, Ruediger W.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in nephrology among trainees is waning in the US. Early perceptions and attitudes to subject matter can be linked to the quality of pre-clinical curricula. We wanted to explore these attitudes in the setting of modern curriculum redesign. We utilized Q methodology to understand first-year medical student attitudes after an innovative kidney physiology curriculum redesign that focuses on blending multiple learning methods. First-year medical students were invited to take a Q sort surv...

  2. Study of Psychological (and Associated Physiological) Effects on a Tank Crew Resulting from Being Buttoned Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    Exercise ," JournaL of Applied Physiology, 1961, 16, 997. 127 for eight hours without interruption, 35 percent of maximum aerobic capa- city could be...Psychological Stress: Stress, Self - Esteem , and Attitudes, Technical Report No. 12, Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, November 1970. Hicks...were unacclimatized paratroopera par- ticipating in combat exercises in Panama. As can be seen from the research described in the preceding para- graphs

  3. The regulation of coralline algal physiology, an in situ study of Corallina officinalis (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, Christopher James; Perkins, Rupert; Voller, Matthew; Yallop, Marian Louise; Brodie, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    Calcified macroalgae are critical components of marine ecosystems worldwide, but face considerable threat both from climate change (increasing water temperatures) and ocean acidification (decreasing ocean pH and carbonate saturation). It is thus fundamental to constrain the relationships between key abiotic stressors and the physiological processes that govern coralline algal growth and survival. Here we characterize the complex relationships between the abiotic environment of roc...

  4. A Multi-Scale Study on the Role of Trace Metals on Physiological and Pathological Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelkamp, Derek

    The work in this thesis provides mulit-scale contributions towards understanding the effects of trace metals on the pathological mineralization process relating to both the development of healthy bone tissue, the diseased state of osteoporosis, and microcalcifications which develop in breast cancers. A protein level study was performed on ECM protein fibronectin, which plays a role in cell adhesion. The protein studies showed zinc interactions with fibronectin and its fragment, anastellin, to influence protein structure. Zinc is also shown to decrease cell migration in vitro, which may be influenced by changes in fibronectin ECM structure. The effects of osteoporosis on micronutrient composition in vivo were examined using the technique of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) in an ovariectomized rat model. Compared to healthy bone, subtle difference are observed in zinc and iron in osteoporotic rat bones, showing micronutrients may play an important role in healthy bone regulation. Effects of micronutrient zinc was used to inhibit microcalcification formation in breast cancers. Microcalcifications have been linked malignancy of breast cancers, but the process of microcalcification formation has yet to be well understood. In this work, exogenous zinc is used to inhibit microcalcification formation, and metastatic potential in both a 2D and 3D spheroid environment. A novel in vitro self-assembled three dimensional multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model for the study of breast cancer microcalcifications was developed for this experiment. A MCTS model for studying breast cancer microcalcifications has potential to be used in drug discovery, or for basic research applications studying mechanisms of microcalcification formation, which are still not fully understood. Taken together this study uses a multi-scale approach to gain a better understanding of micronutrients involved in pathological mineralization.

  5. 1990 Volvo Award in experimental studies. The dependence of intervertebral disc mechanical properties on physiologic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, T S; Holm, S H; Hansson, T H; Spengler, D M

    1990-08-01

    In vivo creep-recovery and disc pressure measurements were performed on the lumbar spine of immature and mature swine. The creep-recovery measurements were performed using a custom materials testing apparatus designed to apply static or dynamic loads to the spine of anesthetized animals. A series of three separate experiments were performed to assess the effects of: (I) animal death, (II) graded injury to the disc anulus, and (III) respiratory mechanics on the biomechanical response of the porcine L1-L3 vertebral unit (VU). In Experiments I and II, creep rate, modulus, and viscosity parameters were computed using a three-parameter solid rheological analysis of the displacement-time response recorded during the application of a 300-N load. In Experiment III, the effects of respiratory volume and frequency changes on disc pressure were assessed in the unloaded, statically loaded, and immobilized porcine VU. Our results indicated that the adult VU tended to be stiffer, deform or creep more slowly, and had a significantly higher viscosity than the VU of immature pigs. The results of Experiment I demonstrated that the biomechanical response for the VU was significantly altered by the death of the animal; the VU of the living animal (adolescent or mature) was more compliant and deformed at a faster rate than the VU of the same animal after death. Disc injury produced changes in stiffness, viscosity, and creep rate analogous to that of aging, and on the basis of the graded injuries created in this study, it appears that a small defect in the annulus is just as deleterious as removing a large section of anular material. The results of Experiment III indicated that respiration plays an important role in the normal, in vivo mechanical and nutritional behavior of the porcine VU. Altogether, these results demonstrate that, in the absence of normal physiologic conditions, one may not be able to reliably predict the mechanical response of the lumbar spine, and suggest that

  6. Binaural beat technology in humans: a pilot study to assess neuropsychologic, physiologic, and electroencephalographic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Calabrese, Carlo; Zwickey, Heather; Zajdel, Dan

    2007-03-01

    When two auditory stimuli of different frequency are presented to each ear, binaural beats are perceived by the listener. The binaural beat frequency is equal to the difference between the frequencies applied to each ear. Our primary objective was to assess whether steady-state entrainment of electroencephalographic activity to the binaural beat occurs when exposed to a specific binaural beat frequency as has been hypothesized. Our secondary objective was to gather preliminary data on neuropsychologic and physiologic effects of binaural beat technology. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled crossover experiment in 4 healthy adult subjects. Subjects were randomized to experimental auditory stimulus of 30 minutes of binaural beat at 7 Hz (carrier frequencies: 133 Hz L; 140 Hz R) with an overlay of pink noise resembling the sound of rain on one session and control stimuli of the same overlay without the binaural beat carrier frequencies on the other session. Data were collected during two separate sessions 1 week apart. Neuropsychologic and blood pressure data were collected before and after the intervention; electroencephalographic data were collected before, during, and after listening to either binaural beats or control. Neuropsychologic measures included State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Profile of Mood States, Rey Auditory Verbal List Test, Stroop Test, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test. Spectral and coherence analysis was performed on the electroencephalogram (EEG), and all measures were analyzed for changes between sessions with and without binaural beat stimuli. There were no significant differences between the experimental and control conditions in any of the EEG measures. There was an increase of the Profile of Mood States depression subscale in the experimental condition relative to the control condition (p = 0.02). There was also a significant decrease in immediate verbal memory recall (p = 0.03) in the experimental condition compared to control

  7. A mathematical model of physiological processes and its application to the study of aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, A. R.; Walford, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of a physiological system which, after displacement, returns by homeostatic mechanisms to its original condition can be described by a simple differential equation in which the "recovery time" is a parameter. Two such systems, which influence one another, can be linked mathematically by the use of "coupling" or "feedback" coefficients. These concepts are the basis for many mathematical models of physiological behavior, and we describe the general nature of such models. Next, we introduce the concept of a "fatal limit" for the displacement of a physiological system, and show how measures of such limits can be included in mathematical models. We show how the numerical values of such limits depend on the values of other system parameters, i.e., recovery times and coupling coefficients, and suggest ways of measuring all these parameters experimentally, for example by monitoring changes induced by X-irradiation. Next, we discuss age-related changes in these parameters, and show how the parameters of mortality statistics, such as the famous Gompertz parameters, can be derived from experimentally measurable changes. Concepts of onset-of-aging, critical or fatal limits, equilibrium value (homeostasis), recovery times and coupling constants are involved. Illustrations are given using published data from mouse and rat populations. We believe that this method of deriving survival patterns from model that is experimentally testable is unique.

  8. The effects of wrist motion and hand orientation on muscle forces: A physiologic wrist simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshan S; Middleton, Claire; Gurdezi, Sabahat; Horwitz, Maxim D; Kedgley, Angela E

    2017-07-26

    Although the orientations of the hand and forearm vary for different wrist rehabilitation protocols, their effect on muscle forces has not been quantified. Physiologic simulators enable a biomechanical evaluation of the joint by recreating functional motions in cadaveric specimens. Control strategies used to actuate joints in physiologic simulators usually employ position or force feedback alone to achieve optimum load distribution across the muscles. After successful tests on a phantom limb, unique combinations of position and force feedback - hybrid control and cascade control - were used to simulate multiple cyclic wrist motions of flexion-extension, radioulnar deviation, dart thrower's motion, and circumduction using six muscles in ten cadaveric specimens. Low kinematic errors and coefficients of variation of muscle forces were observed for planar and complex wrist motions using both novel control strategies. The effect of gravity was most pronounced when the hand was in the horizontal orientation, resulting in higher extensor forces (pforces were also affected by the direction of rotation during circumduction. The peak force of flexor carpi radialis was higher in clockwise circumduction (p=0.017), while that of flexor carpi ulnaris was higher in anticlockwise circumduction (p=0.013). Thus, the physiologic wrist simulator accurately replicated cyclic planar and complex motions in cadaveric specimens. Moreover, the dependence of muscle forces on the hand orientation and the direction of circumduction could be vital in the specification of such parameters during wrist rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural studies on Miocene kerogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almendros, G.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.; Martin, F.; Alvarez-Ramis, C.

    1988-04-01

    The different characteristics of organic matter in Miocene sediment from Portazgo (Madrid, Spain) were studied by several physicochemical techniques. Then g.c.-m.s. was applied to bitumen and to oxidation degradation products of the insoluble organic residue. Both the palaeobotanic study and the composition of the bitumen fraction suggest an important contribution of vascular plants in the sediment; a predominance of odd-numbered alkanes, of straight-chain aliphatic compounds, and of high molecular weight homologues of the series were observed. The degradation methods employed yielded large proportions of aliphatic chains, but aromatic compounds amounted to approx. 25 wt% of the degradation products, suggesting a significant contribution of lignin. In addition to the degradation with potassium persulphate followed by alkaline permanganate oxidation, by depolymerization perborate was also applied. The latter degradation method yielded aromatic acids and polymethylene compounds, and residual kerogen was transformed into an alkali-soluble polymer, which can be studied by the usual techniques for humic acids. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natera, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    The physiological characteristics of man depend on the intake, metabolism and excretion of stable elements from food, water, and air. The physiological behavior of natural radionuclides and radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing and from the utilization of nuclear energy is believed to follow the pattern of stable elements. Hence information on the normal physiological processes occurring in the human body plays an important role in the assessment of the radiation dose received by man. Two important physiological parameters needed for internal dose determination are the pulmonary function and the water balance. In the Coordinated Research Programme on the characterization of Asian population, five participants submitted data on these physiological characteristics - China, India, Japan, Philippines and Viet Nam. During the CRP, data on other pertinent characteristics such as physical and dietary were simultaneously being collected. Hence, the information on the physiological characteristics alone, coming from the five participants were not complete and are probably not sufficient to establish standard values for the Reference Asian Man. Nonetheless, the data collected is a valuable contribution to this research programme

  11. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  12. [The study of physiological effect of fruit and vegetable powders in animal experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryachkina, S Ya; Ladnova, O L; Godunov, O A; Kholodova, E N; Lazareva, T N

    2016-01-01

    The results of the study of the mineral and vitamin composition of fruit and vegetable powders, as well as their influence on the clinical and physiological parameters in laboratory animals (body weight, behavior patterns, functional state of the cardiovascular and nervous systems, general clinical and biochemical parameters of blood) were obtained. The study was performed on white Wistar rats initial body weight 190±20 g that were previously kept in quarantine for 5 days. One control group and six experimental groups (6 animals in each) were formed. Within 28 days animals from experimental groups were administered the diet supplemented with fruit or vegetable powder (carrot, squash, beet, apples, cabbage, pumpkin) in an amount of 3% by weight of the feed. When carrot powder was consumed, amplification processes of catabolism of proteins, fats and carbohydrates, as evidenced by an increase in blood levels of bilirubin, activity of alkaline phosphatase, GGT, LDH and significant reduction of cholesterol and triglyceride level occurred. In animals that received zucchini powder, body weight increased by 15.6% compared to the initial, as well as the activation of the immune response, enhance of carbohydrate metabolism (urea level and AST activity decreased under normal blood level of total protein, albumin fraction, bilirubin, creatinine, and LDH and ALT activity) and fat metabolism (cholesterol and triglyceride level reducing) was observed. Consumption of beet powder caused an increase in the number of red blood cells and platelets, elevated protein and fat metabolism (decrease in albumin, bilirubin, creatinine and urea level at normal parameters of total protein, glucose, AST activity, marked decrease in the level of triglycerides and cholesterol), had a stimulating effect on the heart (blood pressure and pulse rate increased). Consumption of apple powder caused the activation of the immune response, improved blood formation, activated energy metabolism (decrease in

  13. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Jennifer E., E-mail: Jennifer2.May@uwe.ac.uk; Morse, H. Ruth, E-mail: Ruth.Morse@uwe.ac.uk; Xu, Jinsheng, E-mail: Jinsheng.Xu@uwe.ac.uk; Donaldson, Craig, E-mail: Craig.Donaldson@uwe.ac.uk

    2012-09-15

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  14. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Jennifer E.; Morse, H. Ruth; Xu, Jinsheng; Donaldson, Craig

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  15. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Greiner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studies of vascular cell responses under well-defined, controllable culture conditions. These advancements are paving the way for a deeper understanding of vascular cell biology and materials–cell interaction. Here, we review previous work focusing on the interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs with materials having micro- and nanostructured surfaces. We summarize fabrication techniques for surface topographies, materials, geometries, biochemical functionalization, and mechanical properties of such materials. Furthermore, various studies on vascular cell behavior and their biological responses to micro- and nanostructured surfaces are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of cell morphology and motility, cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, and signal transduction pathways of vascular cells. We finalize with a short outlook on potential interesting future studies.

  16. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  17. Cholesterol as a modifying agent of the neurovascular unit structure and function under physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Ewelina; Steliga, Aleksandra; Lietzau, Grażyna; Kowiański, Przemysław

    2017-08-01

    The brain, demanding constant level of cholesterol, precisely controls its synthesis and homeostasis. The brain cholesterol pool is almost completely separated from the rest of the body by the functional blood-brain barrier (BBB). Only a part of cholesterol pool can be exchanged with the blood circulation in the form of the oxysterol metabolites such, as 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) and 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC). Not only neurons but also blood vessels and neuroglia, constituting neurovascular unit (NVU), are crucial for the brain cholesterol metabolism and undergo precise regulation by numerous modulators, metabolites and signal molecules. In physiological conditions maintaining the optimal cholesterol concentration is important for the energetic metabolism, composition of cell membranes and myelination. However, a growing body of evidence indicates the consequences of the cholesterol homeostasis dysregulation in several pathophysiological processes. There is a causal relationship between hypercholesterolemia and 1) development of type 2 diabetes due to long-term high-fat diet consumption, 2) significance of the oxidative stress consequences for cerebral amyloid angiopathy and neurodegenerative diseases, 3) insulin resistance on progression of the neurodegenerative brain diseases. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the cholesterol influence upon functioning of the NVU under physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. High pressure structural studies of conjugated molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Torkkeli, Mika; Scherf, Ullrich

    2018-01-01

    This chapter highlights high pressure GPa level structural studies of conjugated polymers and their analogues: conjugated oligomers and molecules, and rigid rod polymers. Attention is placed on our recent studies of polyfluorenes.......This chapter highlights high pressure GPa level structural studies of conjugated polymers and their analogues: conjugated oligomers and molecules, and rigid rod polymers. Attention is placed on our recent studies of polyfluorenes....

  19. Nonlinear fractals: applications in physiology and ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zueva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractal geometry and nonlinear dynamics have applications in the field of biology and medicine. Many complex structures of living systems reveal fractal-like geometry. Among them, nonlinearity of human anatomic structures and physiologic functions are of special interest. Here, we review several multidisciplinary studies that demonstrate multi-scale nonlinear complexity of physiological functions and fractal geometry of anatomical structures of a healthy human including retina. With ageing and diseases, these entities become simpler or more complex. Pathologic conditions contribute to highly periodic dynamics of processes that dominates on a time scale. Nonlinear dynamics application in ophthalmology and physiology of visual system can be promoted by the studies of fractal flickeringbackground and its impact on retina and visual cortex electrical activity. The next step will be the development of novel electrophysiological diagnostics and visual system impairment treatment

  20. A Physiological Approach to the Study of Pseudopod Extension in the Amoeboid Sperm of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Fraire-Zamora, Juan Jose

    2009-01-01

    Fertilization is the process in which both the spermatozoon and the oocyte must undergo a myriad of physiological changes resulting in successful fusion to produce progeny. Spermatozoa are highly motile cells that must reach the oocyte in the environment where fertilization takes place and in this regard the study of acquisition of motility in sperm cells is important to understand sperm-egg interactions. In the case of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, fertilization takes place in the her...

  1. Study of exposure to cold stress and body physiological responses in auto mechanic employees in Hamadan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Saedpanah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous exposure to cold air is considered to be a hazardous agent in the workplace in cold seasons. This study aimed to determine the level of cold stress and relation with physiological responses in auto mechanic employees. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the winter of 1395 on auto mechanic employees in Hamadan city. Physiological responses during daily activity were measured in accordance with ISO 9886 standard method. Environmental air measures like air temperature and air velocity were measured simultaneously and cold stress indexes were also determined. Data was analyzed using SPSS 21 software. Result: The result showed that mean wind chill index, equivalent chill temperature and required clothing insulation were 489.97±47.679 kcal/m2.h, 13.78± 1.869 0c and 2.04 ± 0.246 clo, respectively. According to the results of cold stress indexes, the studied employees are exposed to cold stress. Pearson correlation test showed that there are significant relationship between cold stress indexes with physiological responses (p<0.05, however, IREQ min showed more correlation than the others.  There is also a significant relationship between body fat percentage and deep temperature (p<0.05, r=0.314. Conclusion: The result confirmed that IREQ min index has high validity for estimation of cold stress among auto mechanic employees. Moreover, the increase of body fat percentage leads to an increase of cold tolerance power of employees.

  2. Current Practices in the Delivery of Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michele M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify current practices for the delivery of exercise physiology content at the undergraduate level. An anonymous 22-item survey was sent to instructors of exercise physiology to collect information concerning the structure of course offerings and instructional practices. One hundred ten instructors responded to…

  3. A physiology-based inverse dynamic analysis of human gait using sequential convex programming: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, F; Demeulenaere, B; Swevers, J; De Schutter, J; Jonkers, I

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an enhanced version of the previously proposed physiological inverse approach (PIA) to calculate musculotendon (MT) forces and evaluates the proposed methodology in a comparative study. PIA combines an inverse dynamic analysis with an optimisation approach that imposes muscle physiology and optimises performance over the entire motion. To solve the resulting large-scale, nonlinear optimisation problem, we neglected muscle fibre contraction speed and an approximate quadratic optimisation problem (PIA-QP) was formulated. Conversely, the enhanced version of PIA proposed in this paper takes into account muscle fibre contraction speed. The optimisation problem is solved using a sequential convex programing procedure (PIA-SCP). The comparative study includes PIA-SCP, PIA-QP and two commonly used approaches from the literature: static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC). SO and CMC make simplifying assumptions to limit the computational time. Both methods minimise an instantaneous performance criterion. Furthermore, SO does not impose muscle physiology. All methods are applied to a gait cycle of six control subjects. The relative root mean square error averaged over all subjects, ε(RMS), between the joint torques simulated from the optimised activations and the joint torques obtained from the inverse dynamic analysis was about twice as large for SO (ε(RMS) = 86) as compared with CMC (ε(RMS) = 39) and PIA-SCP (ε(RMS) = 50). ε(RMS) was at least twice as large for PIA-QP (ε(RMS) = 197) than for all other methods. As compared with CMC, muscle activation patterns predicted by PIA-SCP better agree with experimental electromyography (EMG). This study shows that imposing muscle physiology as well as globally optimising performance is important to accurately calculate MT forces underlying gait.

  4. Study of structural reliability of existing concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druķis, P.; Gaile, L.; Valtere, K.; Pakrastiņš, L.; Goremikins, V.

    2017-10-01

    Structural reliability of buildings has become an important issue after the collapse of a shopping center in Riga 21.11.2013, caused the death of 54 people. The reliability of a building is the practice of designing, constructing, operating, maintaining and removing buildings in ways that ensure maintained health, ward suffered injuries or death due to use of the building. Evaluation and improvement of existing buildings is becoming more and more important. For a large part of existing buildings, the design life has been reached or will be reached in the near future. The structures of these buildings need to be reassessed in order to find out whether the safety requirements are met. The safety requirements provided by the Eurocodes are a starting point for the assessment of safety. However, it would be uneconomical to require all existing buildings and structures to comply fully with these new codes and corresponding safety levels, therefore the assessment of existing buildings differs with each design situation. This case study describes the simple and practical procedure of determination of minimal reliability index β of existing concrete structures designed by different codes than Eurocodes and allows to reassess the actual reliability level of different structural elements of existing buildings under design load.

  5. Recruitment, Methods, and Descriptive Results of a Physiologic Assessment of Latino Farmworkers: The California Heat Illness Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane C; Castro, Javier; Armitage, Tracey L; Vega-Arroyo, Alondra J; Moyce, Sally C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Bennett, Deborah H; Jones, James H; Kjellstrom, Tord; Schenker, Marc B

    2017-07-01

    The California heat illness prevention study (CHIPS) devised methodology and collected physiological data to assess heat related illness (HRI) risk in Latino farmworkers. Bilingual researchers monitored HRI across a workshift, recording core temperature, work rate (metabolic equivalents [METs]), and heart rate at minute intervals. Hydration status was assessed by changes in weight and blood osmolality. Personal data loggers and a weather station measured exposure to heat. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to collect demographic and occupational information. California farmworkers (n = 588) were assessed. Acceptable quality data was obtained from 80% of participants (core temperature) to 100% of participants (weight change). Workers (8.3%) experienced a core body temperature more than or equal to 38.5 °C and 11.8% experienced dehydration (lost more than 1.5% of body weight). Methodology is presented for the first comprehensive physiological assessment of HRI risk in California farmworkers.

  6. Structures and functions of insect arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (iaaNAT; a key enzyme for physiological and behavioral switch in arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu eHiragaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of N-acetyltransfeases (NATs seems complex. Vertebrate arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT has been extensively studied since it Leads to the synthesis of melatonin, a multifunctional neurohormone prevalent in photoreceptor cells, and is known as as a chemical token of the night. Melatonin also serves as a scavenger for reactive oxygen species. This is also true with invertebrates. NAT therefore has distinct functional implications in circadian function, as timezymes (aaNAT, and also xenobiotic reactions (arylamine NAT or simply NAT. NATs belong to a broader enzyme group, the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily. Due to low sequence homology and a seemingly fast rate of structural differentiation, the nomenclature for NATs can be confusing. The advent of bioinformatics, however, has helped to classify this group of enzymes; vertebrates have two distinct subgroups, the timezyme type and the xenobiotic type, which has a wider substrate range including imidazolamine, pharmacological drugs, environmental toxicants and even histone. Insect aaNAT (iaaNAT form their own clade in the phylogeny, distinct from vertebrate aaNATs. Arthropods are unique, since the phylum has exoskeleton in which quinones derived from N-acetylated monoamines function in coupling chitin and arthropodins. Monoamine oxidase (MAO activity is limited in insects, but NAT-mediated degradation prevails. However, unexpectedly iaaNAT occurs not only among arthropods but also among basal deuterostomia, and is therefore more apomorphic. Our analyses illustrate that iaaNATs has unique physiological roles but at the same time it plays a role in a timezyme function, at least in photoperiodism. Photoperiodism has been considered as a function of circadian system but the detailed molecular mechanism is not well understood. We propose a molecular hypothesis for photoperiodism in Antheraea pernyi based on the transcription regulation of NAT interlocked by the

  7. Studying multisensory processing and its role in the representation of space through pathological and physiological crossmodal extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane eJacobs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of crossmodal extinction has brought a considerable contribution to our understanding of how the integration of stimuli perceived in multiple sensory modalities is used by the nervous system to build coherent representations of the space that directly surrounds us. Indeed, by revealing interferences between stimuli in a disturbed system, extinction provides an invaluable opportunity to investigate the interactions that normally exist between those stimuli in an intact system. Here, we first review studies on pathological crossmodal extinction, from the original demonstration of its existence, to its role in the exploration of the multisensory neural representation of space and the current theoretical accounts proposed to explain the mechanisms involved in extinction and multisensory competition. Then, in the second part of this paper, we report recent findings showing that physiological multisensory competition phenomena resembling clinical crossmodal extinction exist in the healthy brain. We propose that the development of a physiological model of sensory competition is fundamental to deepen our understanding of the cerebral mechanisms of multisensory perception and integration. In addition, a similar approach to develop a model of physiological sensory competition in nonhuman primates should allow combining functional neuroimaging with more invasive techniques, such as transient focal lesions, in order to bridge the gap between works done in the two species and at different levels of analysis.

  8. Biochemical and physiological modifications in tissues of Sardina pilchardus: spatial and temporal patterns as a baseline for biomonitoring studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Silva Nunes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sardina pilchardus is a marine species common in the North Atlantic Ocean, and is subjected to diffuse anthropogenic chemical contamination and seasonal fluctuations in biotic and abiotic parameters that may alter its physiology and condition. Biological material is easily available through commercial fisheries, which could facilitate its use as a bioindicator species. The aim of the present work was to address its potential inclusion in biomonitoring studies, considering a combinatory approach through the use of enzymatic biomarkers and somatic indices, by assessing spatial and temporal patterns in a metapopulation along the west coast of Portugal. Our results showed significant variability of the biochemical and physiological profile of the fish, mainly concordant between sampling sites. Large differences for most markers were found across periods of the year, showing the importance of seasonality, which was mostly related to the reproductive cycle. Hence, environmental scientists should acknowledge seasonality as a strong driving force for physiological adaptations, influencing biochemical markers that are normally used to identify effects of chemical contamination. The here-obtained set of data suggests that S. pilchardus may be successfully included in oceanic biomonitoring studies, when one considers that the contribution of seasonal factors may exceed the influence of eventual anthropogenic contamination.

  9. Identification and characterization of contrasting sunflower genotypes to early leaf senescence process combining molecular and physiological studies (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gialdi, A I; Moschen, S; Villán, C S; López Fernández, M P; Maldonado, S; Paniego, N; Heinz, R A; Fernandez, P

    2016-09-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex mechanism ruled by multiple genetic and environmental variables that affect crop yields. It is the last stage in leaf development, is characterized by an active decline in photosynthetic rate, nutrients recycling and cell death. The aim of this work was to identify contrasting sunflower inbred lines differing in leaf senescence and to deepen the study of this process in sunflower. Ten sunflower genotypes, previously selected by physiological analysis from 150 inbred genotypes, were evaluated under field conditions through physiological, cytological and molecular analysis. The physiological measurement allowed the identification of two contrasting senescence inbred lines, R453 and B481-6, with an increase in yield in the senescence delayed genotype. These findings were confirmed by cytological and molecular analysis using TUNEL, genomic DNA gel electrophoresis, flow sorting and gene expression analysis by qPCR. These results allowed the selection of the two most promising contrasting genotypes, which enables future studies and the identification of new biomarkers associated to early senescence in sunflower. In addition, they allowed the tuning of cytological techniques for a non-model species and its integration with molecular variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparative Study of Physiological Monitoring with a Wearable Opto-Electronic Patch Sensor (OEPS for Motion Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alzahrani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study in physiological monitoring between a wearable opto-electronic patch sensor (OEPS comprising a three-axis Microelectromechanical systems (MEMs accelerometer (3MA and commercial devices. The study aims to effectively capture critical physiological parameters, for instance, oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate and heart rate variability, as extracted from the pulsatile waveforms captured by OEPS against motion artefacts when using the commercial probe. The protocol involved 16 healthy subjects and was designed to test the features of OEPS, with emphasis on the effective reduction of motion artefacts through the utilization of a 3MA as a movement reference. The results show significant agreement between the heart rates from the reference measurements and the recovered signals. Significance of standard deviation and error of mean yield values of 2.27 and 0.65 beats per minute, respectively; and a high correlation (0.97 between the results of the commercial sensor and OEPS. T, Wilcoxon and Bland-Altman with 95% limit of agreement tests were also applied in the comparison of heart rates extracted from these sensors, yielding a mean difference (MD: 0.08. The outcome of the present work incites the prospects of OEPS on physiological monitoring during physical activities.

  11. Crystal structure of Bacillus fastidious uricase reveals an unexpected folding of the C-terminus residues crucial for thermostability under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juan; Wang, Lu; Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Xiaolan; Liu, Lin; Xie, Yanling; Liu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yunsheng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Deqiang; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus fastidious uricase (BF uricase) containing 322 amino acid residues exhibited high stability under physiological conditions. Its crystal structure was solved to 1.4-Å resolution, showing homotetramer containing two homodimers. After the intersubunit antiparallel β-sheet in its homodimer, each subunit had a total of 18 C-terminus residues forming an α-helix (Q305-A313) and random coil (S314-L322) on surface to bury other two α-helices (I227-T238 and I244-R258). In comparison, reported crystal structures of Arthrobacter globiformis and Aspergillus flavus uricases had atomic coordinates of only some C-terminus residues, while the crystal structures of all the other uricases accessible before September 2014 missed atomic coordinates of all their C-terminus residues, after the intersubunit antiparallel β-sheets. In each homodimer of BF uricase, H-bonds were found between E311 and Y249 and between Y319 and D257; electrostatic interaction networks were found to surround D307 plus R310 and intersubunit R3, K312 plus D257, E318 plus K242, and L322 plus R258. Amino acid mutations that disrupted those interactions when R3 and D307 were reserved caused moderate decreases of activity at pH 9.2 while negligible decreases of activity at pH 7.4, but destroyed stability at pH 7.4 while slightly decreased stability at pH 9.2. Such structural information guided the fusion of 6His-tag to the C-terminus of the mutant L322D with SNSNSN as a linker to reserve the activity and stability. Hence, the folding of the C-terminus residues is crucial for thermal stability of BF uricase under physiological conditions; these new structural insights are valuable for molecular engineering of uricases.

  12. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An extensive theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 3-amino-4- methoxy benzamide (3A4MBA) was undertaken using density functional theoretical (DFT) method. The possibility of formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was identified from structural parameter analysis and confirmed ...

  13. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An extensive theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 3-amino-4- methoxy benzamide (3A4MBA) was undertaken using density functional theoretical (DFT) method. The possibility of formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was identified from structural parameter analysis and confirmed ...

  14. Association between Berg Balance, Physiological Profile Assessment and Physical Activity, Physical Function and Body Composition: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, D J; Berry, H L; Waddington, G; Anson, J

    2016-01-01

    Falls are of great concern to older adults and costly to the health system. In addition the relationship between falls risk and falls risk predictor characteristics is complex. This study aimed to explore the relationship between two objective fall-risk measures tools, the Physiological Profile Assessment and the Berg Balance Scale and to determine how an individual's sex, level of physical function, health-related and body composition characteristics impact these objective falls risk measures. A cross-sectional, observational study. 245 community-dwelling older adults (M age=68.12 years, SD=6.21; 69.8% female). Participants were assessed for falls-risk (Physiological Profile Assessment and the Berg Balance Scale), physical activity, physical functional and body composition characteristics. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were calculated to examine bivariate relationships and hierarchical multiple linear regression modelling was used to estimate the contribution of each predictor in explaining variance in falls-risk. In females, there was a weak association between the two objective falls-risk measures (r =-0.17 p falls in the previous 12 months explained 6% of variance in Physiological Profile Assessment scores, with bone density of the lumbar spine contributing a further 1%. In males and females, variance in the Berg Balance Scale showed that age (25%) and physical function (16% for females, 28% for males) contributed significantly to the explaining variance in the falls-risk measure. Sex differences are apparent and as such males and females should be assessed (and potentially treated) differently with regards to falls risk. Results indicate that both falls risk assessment tools measure aspects of balance but are not interchangeable. The Berg Balance Scale may be more discriminative in older, less functioning adults and the Physiological Profile Assessment is more useful in assessing falls risk in females.

  15. Temporary forced oral breathing affects neonates oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination, diaphragm muscles structure and physiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padzys, Guy Stéphane; Omouendze, Linda Priscillia

    2014-11-01

    We studied adaptation of diaphragm, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination to forced oral breathing (lasting for only 4 days) following reversible bilateral nasal obstruction performed on day 8 post-natal male rats. Diaphragm myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination and hormones level were analysed during nasal obstruction period. Diaphragm muscle showed significant increases in adult isoforms (MHC 1, 2a) in oral breathing group versus control. Reversible nasal obstruction was associated with a decrease of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination. Nasal obstruction period was associated with reduced growth of the olfactory bulbs and an initial decrease in lung growth. One day after implementing nasal obstruction, basal corticosterone levels had increased (by over 1000). Oral breathing was also associated with a lower level of thyroid hormone. We conclude that a 4 day nasal obstruction period in young rats leads to hormonal changes and to Diaphragm myosin heavy chain structural adaptation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Physiologically Distributed Loading Patterns Drive the Formation of Zonally Organized Collagen Structures in Tissue-Engineered Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetzer, Jennifer L; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2016-07-01

    The meniscus is a dense fibrocartilage tissue that withstands the complex loads of the knee via a unique organization of collagen fibers. Attempts to condition engineered menisci with compression or tensile loading alone have failed to reproduce complex structure on the microscale or anatomic scale. Here we show that axial loading of anatomically shaped tissue-engineered meniscus constructs produced spatial distributions of local strain similar to those seen in the meniscus when the knee is loaded at full extension. Such loading drove formation of tissue with large organized collagen fibers, levels of mechanical anisotropy, and compressive moduli that match native tissue. Loading accelerated the development of native-sized and aligned circumferential and radial collagen fibers. These loading patterns contained both tensile and compressive components that enhanced the major biochemical and functional properties of the meniscus, with loading significantly improved glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation 200-250%, collagen accumulation 40-55%, equilibrium modulus 1000-1800%, and tensile moduli 500-1200% (radial and circumferential). Furthermore, this study demonstrates local changes in mechanical environment drive heterogeneous tissue development and organization within individual constructs, highlighting the importance of recapitulating native loading environments. Loaded menisci developed cartilage-like tissue with rounded cells, a dense collagen matrix, and increased GAG accumulation in the more compressively loaded horns, and fibrous collagen-rich tissue in the more tensile loaded outer 2/3, similar to native menisci. Loaded constructs reached a level of organization not seen in any previous engineered menisci and demonstrate great promise as meniscal replacements.

  17. A regime map for secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow through a bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Shannon M.; Caldwell, Kirin; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Secondary flow structures are known to affect wall shear stress, which is closely related to atherogenesis and drug particle deposition. A regime map provides a framework to examine phase-wise variations in secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow waveforms under conditions of a fixed Womersley number (4.2) and curvature ratio (1/7). Experimental PIV data were acquired at the 90-degree location in a 180-degree curved test section of a bent tube model for curved arteries using a blood analog working fluid. Coherent structure detection was performed using a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) and further analysis was carried out by grouping similar secondary flow structures at a fixed secondary Reynolds numbers. Phase-locked, planar vorticity fields over one period of inflow waveform revealed size, structure and strength similarities in secondary flow morphologies during the acceleration and deceleration phases. The utility of the new regime map lies in the a priori identification of pulsatile secondary flow structures, eliminating the need for exhaustive experimentation or computing, requiring only flow rate measurements that are easily acquired under clinical conditions. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  18. Physiological and proteome studies of responses to heat stress during grain filling in contrasting wheat cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Dinler, Burcu Seckin; Vignjevic, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Experiments to explore physiological and biochemical differences of the effects of heat stress in ten wheat (Triticum aestivum L) cultivars have been performed. Based on the response of photosynthesis rates, cell membrane lipid peroxide concentrations and grain yield to heat, six cultivars were...... compared to sensitive cultivars under heat stress. The tolerant cv. '810' and the sensitive cv. '1039' were selected for further proteome analysis of leaves. Proteins related to photosynthesis, glycolysis, stress defence, heat shock and ATP production were differently expressed in leaves of the tolerant...... and sensitive cultivar under heat stress in relation to the corresponding control. The abundance of proteins related to signal transduction, heat shock, photosynthesis, and antioxidants increased, while the abundance of proteins related to nitrogen metabolism decreased in the tolerant cv. '810' under heat...

  19. Tolerance and physiological correlates of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in COPD: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vivodtzev

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES of the lower limbs is an emerging training strategy in patients with COPD. The efficacy of this technique is related to the intensity of the stimulation that is applied during the training sessions. However, little is known about tolerance to stimulation current intensity and physiological factors that could determine it. Our goal was to find potential physiological predictors of the tolerance to increasing NMES stimulation intensity in patients with mild to severe COPD.20 patients with COPD (FEV1 = 54±14% pred. completed 2 supervised NMES sessions followed by 5 self-directed sessions at home and one final supervised session. NMES was applied simultaneously to both quadriceps for 45 minutes, at a stimulation frequency of 50 Hz. Spirometry, body composition, muscle function and aerobic capacity were assessed at baseline. Cardiorespiratory responses, leg discomfort, muscle fatigue and markers of systemic inflammation were assessed during or after the last NMES session. Tolerance to NMES was quantified as the increase in current intensity from the initial to the final NMES session (ΔInt.Mean ΔInt was 12±10 mA. FEV1, fat-free-mass, quadriceps strength, aerobic capacity and leg discomfort during the last NMES session positively correlated with ΔInt (r = 0.42 to 0.64, all p≤0.06 while post/pre NMES IL-6 ratio negatively correlated with ΔInt (r = -0.57, p = 0.001. FEV1, leg discomfort during last NMES session and post/pre IL-6 ratio to NMES were independent factors of variance in ΔInt (r2 = 0.72, p = 0.001.Lower tolerance to NMES was associated with increasing airflow obstruction, low tolerance to leg discomfort during NMES and the magnitude of the IL-6 response after NMES.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00809120.

  20. Sexual victimization history, depression, and task physiology as predictors of sexual revictimization: results from a 6-month prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Jonathan C; Wilson, Laura C; Patriquin, Michelle A; Scarpa, Angela

    2015-02-01

    The current study examined depression and physiological reactivity to a sexual threat task as longitudinal predictors of sexual revictimization in women with sexual victimization histories. The sample included 14 young adult women (M(age) = 19.15) who reported child sexual abuse. Heart rate and root mean square of the successive differences were measured at baseline and during the presentation of sexual victimization-related words during an Emotional Stroop task. Results indicated that women who reported a greater history of childhood sexual abuse and adult sexual victimization were at increased risk for sexual revictimization 6 months after initial data collection. Furthermore, even after accounting for their childhood and adult sexual victimization histories and depression symptoms, women who exhibited reduced, or blunted, physiological activity during the sexual victimization stimuli of the Stroop task were more likely to report sexual revictimization during the 6-month follow-up. The findings suggest that sexual victimization survivors may benefit from interventions that address physiological blunting and the recognition of sexual threat cues in their environment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bente...

  2. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaik, Shahnoor S.; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H

    2016-01-01

    high levels of some important stress-related metabolites and potentially protective metabolites, possibly to elude deleterious effects. Investigations on starch molecular structure revealed significant increase in starch phosphate and amylose content in HP and AO respectively with obvious differences...

  3. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  4. Physiology of the entorhinal and perirhinal projections to the hippocampus studied by current source density analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, K J; Wu, K; Peloquin, P; Kloosterman, F; Leung, L S

    2000-06-01

    Evoked field potentials and current-source-density analysis were used to study the olfactory, entorhinal, and perirhinal projections to the hippocampus. In urethane-anesthetized rats, various structures were electrically stimulated, and evoked potentials were mapped using glass micropipettes or multichannel silicon probes. Stimulation of the olfactory bulb, lateral olfactory tract, piriform cortex, amygdala-entorhinal transition, lateral entorhinal cortex, or lateral perforant path (LPP) evoked an outer molecular layer sink (inferred distal dendritic excitation) in the dentate gyrus, with progressively decreasing onset latency. Medial perforant path (MPP) stimulation evoked a middle molecular layer sink (mid-dendritic excitation) in the dentate gyrus. LPP and MPP were also inferred to monosynaptically excite the distal dendrites of CA3, often resulting in a population spike in CA3. CA3 spiking, in turn, was often followed by excitation at the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. LPP and MPP evoked distal dendritic sinks but no population spikes in CA1. Stimulation of the perirhinal cortex activated a sink in the subiculum/CA1 border without activating the dentate gyrus. In addition, reverberatory activity through a hippocampal-entorhinal-hippocampal pathway may be activated by MPP or CA3 stimulation. It is suggested that the parallel projections of the entorhinal and perirhinal inputs to the distal dendrites of hippocampal principal neurons enhance local and distributed processing as characterized by CA3 to dentate gyrus feedback, and hippocampal-entorhinal reverberation.

  5. Ecology of Exercise in Wild Fish: Integrating Concepts of Individual Physiological Capacity, Behavior, and Fitness Through Diverse Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownscombe, Jacob W; Cooke, Steven J; Algera, Dirk A; Hanson, Kyle C; Eliason, Erika J; Burnett, Nicholas J; Danylchuk, Andy J; Hinch, Scott G; Farrell, Anthony P

    2017-08-01

    Wild animals maximize fitness through certain behaviors (e.g., foraging, mating, predator avoidance) that incur metabolic costs and often require high levels of locomotor activity. Consequently, the ability of animals to achieve high fitness often relies on their physiological capacity for exercise (aerobic scope) and/or their ability to acquire and utilize energy judiciously. Here, we explore how environmental factors and physiological limitations influence exercise and metabolism in fish while foraging, migrating to spawning grounds, and providing parental care. We do so with three case studies that use a number of approaches to studying exercise in wild fish using biologging and biotelemetry platforms. Bonefish (Albula vulpes) selectively use shallow water tropical marine environments to forage when temperatures are near optimal for aerobic scope and exercise capacity. Bonefish energy expenditure at upper thermal extremes is maximal while activity levels diminish, likely caused by reduced aerobic scope. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) reproductive migrations frequently involve passage through hydraulically challenging areas, and their ability to successfully pass these regions is constrained by their physiological capacity for exercise. Aerobic scope and swim performance are correlated with migration difficulty among sockeye salmon (O. nerka) populations; however, depletion of endogenous energy stores can also limit migration success. In another example, male smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) allocate a significant amount of energy to nest-guarding behaviors to protect their developing brood. Smallmouth bass body size, endogenous energy reserves, and physiological state influence nest-guarding behaviors and reproductive success. We suggest that in some scenarios (e.g., bonefish foraging, Pacific salmon dam passage) metabolic capacity for exercise may be the strongest determinant of biological fitness, while in others (e.g., long distance salmon migration

  6. Change in skin physiological parameters in space--report on and results of the first study on man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronnier, H; Wiebusch, M; Heinrich, U

    2008-01-01

    Astronauts often show skin reactions in space. Systematic tests, e.g. with noninvasive skin physiological test methods, have not yet been done. In an interdisciplinary cooperation, a test series with skin physiological measurements was carried out before, during and after a long-term mission in the International Space Station. The hydration of the stratum corneum (Corneometer), transepidermal water loss (Tewameter), and the surface structure of the skin (SkinVisiometer) were measured. In order to record cutaneous states, the suction elasticity was measured (Cutometer), and an ultrasound measurement with 20 MHz (DermaScan) was also made. In addition, one measuring field of the two inner forearms was treated with a skin care emulsion. There were indications of a delayed epidermal proliferation of the cells, which would correspond to the clinical symptoms. Hydration and TEWL values are improved by respective skin care. On the cutaneous level, the elasticity measurements and the ultrasound picture showed results which correspond to a significant loss of elasticity of the skin. Further examinations are necessary to validate these preliminary results. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The regulation of coralline algal physiology, an in situ study of Corallina officinalis (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Christopher James; Perkins, Rupert; Voller, Matthew; Yallop, Marian Louise; Brodie, Juliet

    2017-10-01

    Calcified macroalgae are critical components of marine ecosystems worldwide, but face considerable threat both from climate change (increasing water temperatures) and ocean acidification (decreasing ocean pH and carbonate saturation). It is thus fundamental to constrain the relationships between key abiotic stressors and the physiological processes that govern coralline algal growth and survival. Here we characterize the complex relationships between the abiotic environment of rock pool habitats and the physiology of the geniculate red coralline alga, Corallina officinalis (Corallinales, Rhodophyta). Paired assessment of irradiance, water temperature and carbonate chemistry, with C. officinalis net production (NP), respiration (R) and net calcification (NG) was performed in a south-western UK field site, at multiple temporal scales (seasonal, diurnal and tidal). Strong seasonality was observed in NP and night-time R, with a Pmax of 22.35 µmol DIC (g DW)-1 h-1, Ek of 300 µmol photons m-2 s-1 and R of 3.29 µmol DIC (g DW)-1 h-1 determined across the complete annual cycle. NP showed a significant exponential relationship with irradiance (R2 = 0.67), although was temperature dependent given ambient irradiance > Ek for the majority of the annual cycle. Over tidal emersion periods, dynamics in NP highlighted the ability of C. officinalis to acquire inorganic carbon despite significant fluctuations in carbonate chemistry. Across all data, NG was highly predictable (R2 = 0.80) by irradiance, water temperature and carbonate chemistry, providing a NGmax of 3.94 µmol CaCO3 (g DW)-1 h-1 and Ek of 113 µmol photons m-2 s-1. Light NG showed strong seasonality and significant coupling to NP (R2 = 0.65) as opposed to rock pool water carbonate saturation. In contrast, the direction of dark NG (dissolution vs. precipitation) was strongly related to carbonate saturation, mimicking abiotic precipitation dynamics. Data demonstrated that C. officinalis is adapted to both long

  8. Identification of halophile bacteria from salt deserts of Iran and study some of their physiological traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Safdarian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Halophiles and halotolerant microorganisms are some of the extremophiles that are able to grow in medium containing sodium chloride and have adapted to life in salinity environments. Halophiles bacteria in saline soils by maintaining the food chain, decomposition of organic matter and improvement of soil structure and fertility improve soil conditions. Materials and methods: In order to isolate the halotoletant bacteria, from the halophyte rhizosphere, four desert areas in Golestan province were sampled. To check the Extremophile of isolates, their resistance was tested for resistant to salinity, drought, temperature and PH. Also, plant growth promoting traits were measured. Results: Fromforty-five strains which were isolated, three strains (G3, G6 and G14 have demonstrated the ability of resistance to 35% salt. Isolates G6 and G3 phosphate solubiliziation power of 301 and 201 ppm, respectively. Isolated G6 micrograms produced auxin 20/7 Mg/ ml. G14 and G6 grow at 50 °C, pH = 10 and osmotic potential -0 /7MPa. While G3 strain grows at 50 °C, pH = 7/ 5 and osmotic potential -0/49. The three strains of the bacterial genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas, respectively. Discussion and conclusion: In this study, isolates due to the growth in concentrations of salt and saturated salt tolerance of extreme environmental conditions and are likely halotolerant or halophile bacteria and its potential for use in various fields of biotechnology including biotech, industrial enzyme production and biological fertilizers for saline soil improvement.

  9. Physiological and Histological Studies on the Effect of Echinacea purpurea in Gamma Irradiated Male Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riad, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of mammals to ionizing radiations induces injury to different organs, which cause changes in the structure and function of cellular components, resulting in tissue damage and death. The present study has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of Echinacea Purpurea (E. purpurea) as a protective and therapeutic agent against radiation hazards. E. Purpurea was administered daily to male albino rats by oral gavages at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight during 4 weeks either pre or post- whole body gamma-irradiation with 3 Gy. Pre-treated animals were sacrificed three days post-irradiation and post-treated animals were sacrificed three days post the last dose of E Purpurea. The results showed that γ-irradiation provoked a significant decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities and glutathione (GSH) content concomitant with a significant increase of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) level in the liver and testis. Oxidative stress in both tissues was associated with histopathological changes. Examination of sections in the liver of irradiated rats through light microscope (x400) showed swelling of some liver cells with marked vacuolation of their cytoplasm, necrotic cells with pyknotic or karyolytic nuclei and dilated blood sinusoids. In the testis, destructed and degenerated seminiferous tubules, and degenerated and ruptured interstitial cells. Supplementation of rats with E. Purpurea either pre- or post-irradiation has significantly modulated γ-irradiation induced injury to both tissues. Moreover, significant improvement was recorded in serum glucose, lipid profile, and testosterone levels, and transaminases activity. However, administration of E. Purpurea before irradiation was more efficient in reducing radiation damage than after irradiation, which could be attributed to its antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties.

  10. Sulfur mustard inhalation induced respiratory lesions in guinea pigs: Physiological, biochemical, and histological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allon, N.; Gilat, E.; Amir, A.; Fishbine, E.; Liani, H.

    1993-05-13

    Inhalation exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) vapor causes long term damage to the respiratory system. The lesions were characterized by specific physiological, biochemical and histopathological methods. Awake 128 guinea-pigs (GP) were exposed for 10 min to SM (1200-1700 microns x min/1). Respiratory parameters were monitored per animal before, during and after the exposure using plethysmography. Biochemical and histological evaluations were performed at different time intervals for up to 7 days post exposure. SM inhalation resulted in a decrease in both respiratory rate and minute volume, and in an increase in tidal volume. These changes occurred immediately after the onset of exposure and lasted for up to 7 days. The changes in the respiratory parameters were accompanied by a massive reduction in O2 diffusion capacity. Evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid indicated neutrophil infiltration, an increase in the protein content, and in the activity of both lysosomal enzymes and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) in the alveolar space. In addition, a decrease in glutathione content was observed one day post exposure in the BAL fluid and the lung whereas an increase in lung glutathione content was observed 6 days later. Histological evaluation of the lungs and trachea revealed severe lesions in both tissues. Recovery was incomplete 7 days post exposure. The detailed characterization of the effect of SM inhalation offers a reliable model for the evaluation of potential therapies against SM exposure.

  11. Physiologic responses to exercise of irradiated and nonirradiated Shetland Ponies: a five-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Physiologic responses of irradiated and nonirradiated Shetland ponies to controlled exercise were measured over a period of 5 years. The 5-year test began when the ponies were 3 years old and 5 months after they were exposed to 650 R of 60 Co gamma radiation. Significant differences in heart rates, respiratory rates, and rectal temperatures were demonstrated between irradiated and nonirradiated ponies when subjected to exercise and high ambient temperatures. In the irradiated group, heart rates were usually slower, especially during recovery immediately after exercise, and respiratory rates and rectal temperatures were higher than these rates were in the nonirradiated group when exercising in ambient temperature of 29.5 C. Exhaustive exercise did not amplify any of the differences which were apparent with moderate exercise. From a general viewpoint, the irradiated ponies performed work as efficiently as did the nonirradiated ponies. Early changes in blood-cell concentrations after irradiation were similar to those which have been observed in other large animal species. Time required for the various types of blood cells to return to base line values ranged between 3 months and 3 years

  12. Physiologic responses to exercise of irradiated and nonirradiated Shetland ponies: a five-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Physiologic responses of irradiated and nonirradiated Shetland Ponies to controlled exercise were measured over a period of 5 years. The 5-year test began when the ponies were 3 years old and 5 months after they were exposed to 650 R of 60 Co gamma radiation. Significant differences in heart rates, respiratory rates, and rectal temperatures were demonstrated between irradiated and nonirradiated ponies when subjected to exercise and high ambient temperatures. In the irradiated group, heart rates were usually slower, especially during recovery immediately after exercise, and respiratory rates and rectal temperatures were higher than these rates were in the nonirradiated group when exercising in ambient temperature of 29.5 C. Exhaustive exercise did not amplify any of the differences which were apparent with moderate exercise. From a general viewpoint, the irradiated ponies performed work as efficiently as did the nonirradiated ponies. Early changes in blood-cell concentrations after irradiation were similar to those which have been observed in other large animal species. Time required for the various types of blood cells to return to base line values ranged between 3 months and 3 years. (U.S.)

  13. Phenolic metabolites in carnivorous plants: Inter-specific comparison and physiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Repčáková, Klára

    2012-03-01

    Despite intensive phytochemical research, data related to the accumulation of phenols in carnivorous plants include mainly qualitative reports. We have quantified phenolic metabolites in three species: Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula and Nepenthes anamensis in the "leaf" (assimilatory part) and the "trap" (digestive part). For comparison, commercial green tea was analysed. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities in Dionaea and Nepenthes were higher in the trap than in the leaf while the opposite was found in Drosera. Soluble phenols and majority of phenolic acids were mainly accumulated in the trap among species. Flavonoids were abundant in Drosera and Dionaea traps but not in Nepenthes. Phenolic acids were preferentially accumulated in a glycosidically-bound form and gallic acid was the main metabolite. Green tea contained more soluble phenols and phenolic acids but less quercetin. In vitro experiments with Drosera spathulata revealed that nitrogen deficiency enhances PAL activity, accumulation of phenols and sugars while PAL inhibitor (2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid) depleted phenols and some amino acids (but free phenylalanine and sugars were elevated). Possible explanations in physiological, biochemical and ecological context are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Demographic, Physiologic, and Psychosocial Correlates of Physical Activity in Structured Exercise and Sports Among Low-Income, Overweight Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Daniel P; Chomitz, Virginia R; Chui, Kenneth K H; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Economos, Christina D

    2015-01-01

    To describe correlates of physical activity (PA) in structured exercise and structured sports sessions among low-income, overweight children participating in a community-based PA program. A total of 93 children (55% male; 91% Hispanic) aged 8-14 years were included. Participants wore pedometers in a sample of 10 of 59 total sessions offered; mean steps per minute were calculated for structured exercise and sports sessions. Separate multivariable regression models tested associations between steps per minute in exercise and sports sessions and 5 potential correlates: baseline body mass index z-score, aerobic fitness (Progressive Aerobic Cardiorespiratory Endurance Run laps), perceived athletic competence (Harter self-perception profile), sex, and age. Only age (ß = -2.9; P = .02) significantly predicted steps per minute in exercise sessions. Age (ß = -4.3; P = .007), fitness (ß = 0.45; P = .03), and male sex (ß = 8.7; P = .02) significantly predicted steps per minute in sports. In structured exercise and sports, perceived competence may not influence overweight and obese children's PA. However, girls and older or less fit children may engage less actively, especially in sports. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Volutin granules of Eimeria parasites are acidic compartments and have physiological and structural characteristics similar to acidocalcisomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; Gomes, Fabio; Maciel, Luis Renato Maia; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia; Plattner, Helmut; Hentschel, Joachim; Kawazoe, Urara; Barrabin, Hector; de Souza, Wanderley; DaMatta, Renato Augusto; Miranda, Kildare

    2012-01-01

    The structural organization of parasites has been the subject of investigation by many groups and has lead to the identification of structures and metabolic pathways that may represent targets for anti-parasitic drugs. A specific group of organelles named acidocalcisomes has been identified in a number of organisms, including the apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium, where they have been shown to be involved in cation homeostasis, polyphosphate metabolism, and osmoregulation. Their structural counterparts in the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria have not been fully characterized. In this work, the ultrastructural and chemical properties of acidocalcisomes in Eimeria were characterized. Electron microscopy analysis of Eimeria parasites showed the dense organelles called volutin granules similar to acidocalcisomes. Immunolocalization of the vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase, considered as a marker for acidocalcisomes, showed labeling in vesicles of size and distribution similar to the dense organelles seen by electron microscopy. Spectrophotometric measurements of the kinetics of proton uptake showed a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase activity. X-ray mapping revealed significant amounts of Na, Mg, P, K, Ca, and Zn in their matrix. The results suggest that volutin granules of Eimeria parasites are acidic, dense organelles and possess structural and chemical properties analogous to those of other acidocalcisomes, suggesting a similar functional role in these parasites. PMID:21699625

  16. Advances in soil-structure interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    It is utmost important that lifeline infrastructures (such as bridges, hospitals, power plants, dams etc.) are safe and functional during earthquakes as damage or collapse of these structures may have far reaching implications. A lifeline's failure may hamper relief and rescue operations required just after an earthquake and secondly its indirect economical losses may be very severe. Therefore, safety of these structures during earthquakes is vital. Further, damage to nuclear facilities during earthquake may lead to disaster. These structures should be designed adequately taking into account all the important issues. Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) is one of the design issues, which is often overlooked and even in some cases ignored. The effects of dynamic SSI are well understood and practiced in the nuclear power industry (for large foundations of the nuclear containment structures) since sixties. However, in last decade, there are many advances in techniques of SSI and those need to be incorporated in practice. Failures of many structures occurred during the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge, California earthquakes and the 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake due to SSI or a related issue. Many jetties had failed in Andaman and Nicobar islands due to Sumatra earthquake and ensuing tsunamis. It is because of this recent experience that the importance of SSI on dynamic response of structures during earthquakes has been fully realized. General belief that the SSI effects are always beneficial for the structure is not correct. Some cases have been presented where it is shown that SSI effects are detrimental for the stability of the structure. This paper addresses the effects of dynamic SSI on the response of the structures and explains its importance. Further advances in SSI studies have been discussed

  17. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  18. Physiological Aging Influence on Brain Hemodynamic Activity during Task-Switching: A fNIRS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Roberta; Cutini, Simone; Cerasa, Antonio; Gramigna, Vera; Olivadese, Giuseppe; Arabia, Gennarina; Quattrone, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Task-switching (TS) paradigm is a well-known validated tool useful for exploring the neural substrates of cognitive control, in particular the activity of the lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. This work is aimed at investigating how physiological aging influences hemodynamic response during the execution of a color-shape TS paradigm. A multi-channel near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to measure hemodynamic activity in 27 young (30.00 ± 7.90 years) and 11 elderly participants (57.18 ± 9.29 years) healthy volunteers (55% male, age range: (19-69) years) during the execution of a TS paradigm. Two holders were placed symmetrically over the left/right hemispheres to record cortical activity [oxy-(HbO) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) concentration] of the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the dorsal premotor cortex (PMC), and the dorso-medial part of the superior frontal gyrus (sFG). TS paradigm requires participants to repeat the same task over a variable number of trials, and then to switch to a different task during the trial sequence. A two-sample t -test was carried out to detect differences in cortical responses between groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of age on the prefrontal neural activity. Elderly participants were significantly slower than young participants in both color- ( p aging. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the HbO mean concentration of switching task in the PMC ( p = 0.01, β = -0.321) and of shape single-task in the sFG ( p = 0.003, β = 0.342) were the best predictors of age effects. Our findings demonstrated that TS might be a reliable instrument to gather a measure of cognitive resources in older people. Moreover, the fNIRS-related brain activity extracted from frontoparietal cortex might become a useful indicator of aging effects.

  19. Physiology of Ramadan fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Shokoufeh Bonakdaran

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emphasis of Islam on the importance of fasting, Muslims attempt to fast from dawn until sunset during the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting is associated with several benefits for normal and healthy individuals. However, it could pose high risks to the health of diabetic patients due to certain physiological changes. This study aimed to compare the physiological changes associated with fasting in healthy individuals and diabetic patients during Ramadan. Furthermore, we reviewed t...

  20. Structural Study of Polyethylene/Montmorillonite Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malicka, A.; Domka, L.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of modification of montmorillonite (with 3-amino- propyltrimethoxysilane or hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride) on the mechanical properties of the composites based on HDPE Hostalen ACP 5831 with the modified montmorillonite as filler, was studied. The structures of the fillers and nanocomposites were characterised by the scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study. The effect of the filler modification on the mechanical parameters of the nanocomposites and their structure was assessed on the basis of determination of the mechanical resistance, elongation at maximum tearing stress, bending strength, deformation at the maximum force and elasticity modulus on bending (three-point bending strength). (author)

  1. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  2. Influence of low stress handling during clinical visit on physiological and behavioural indicators in adult dogs: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Scalia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Low stress handling techniques or “Fear Free principles” in veterinary clinics are becoming an important research area aimed at improving small animal welfare, considering that the majority of dogs who undergo clinical examinations exhibit fear or anxiety signs. Objective of this study was to compare a number of physiological and behavioural indicators using low stress handling (LSH and traditional (TT techniques in order to assess whether the LSH approach had a positive impact on the dog’s welfare. Eight adult dogs were filmed while undergoing both LSH and TT visits (separated by a distance of seven weeks. The same usual sequence of events was followed for both visits (e. g. muzzle wearing, heart and lungs stethoscope examination, etc. except that 1 during the LSH visit, the dog was free to explore the environment (while receiving treats and play for five minutes before and after the visit 2 throughout the medical examination the veterinarians’ attitude and handling techniques were always aimed at preventing stress and guaranteeing the best physical support possible. The videos were then evaluated for the number of fear and stress signs the subjects showed. The examined physiological variables were respiration (breath/min, heart rate (HR and rectal temperature (RT. Physiological variables were analysed by t-Test for paired data while frequency of behavioural fear indicators by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Rectal temperature was within range in both groups but significantly higher (P<0.05 during LSH visit, while low head, lip licks and whale eye behaviours were significantly higher (P<0.05 during TT visit. These results suggest that low stress handling decreases frequency of some fear-related behaviours and could improve the quality of human-dog interactions. Future research that aims to replicate and further investigate these results in a large canine population is required.

  3. A novel bioreactor for mechanobiological studies of engineered heart valve tissue formation under pulmonary arterial physiological flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Boronyak, Steven M; Le, Trung; Holmes, Andrew; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Sacks, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The ability to replicate physiological hemodynamic conditions during in vitro tissue development has been recognized as an important aspect in the development and in vitro assessment of engineered heart valve tissues. Moreover, we have demonstrated that studies aiming to understand mechanical conditioning require separation of the major heart valve deformation loading modes: flow, stretch, and flexure (FSF) (Sacks et al., 2009, "Bioengineering Challenges for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering," Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 11(1), pp. 289-313). To achieve these goals in a novel bioreactor design, we utilized a cylindrical conduit configuration for the conditioning chamber to allow for higher fluid velocities, translating to higher shear stresses on the in situ tissue specimens while retaining laminar flow conditions. Moving boundary computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the flow field under combined cyclic flexure and steady flow (cyclic-flex-flow) states using various combinations of flow rate, and media viscosity. The device was successfully constructed and tested for incubator housing, gas exchange, and sterility. In addition, we performed a pilot experiment using biodegradable polymer scaffolds seeded with bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) at a seeding density of 5 × 10(6) cells/cm(2). The constructs were subjected to combined cyclic flexure (1 Hz frequency) and steady flow (Re = 1376; flow rate of 1.06 l/min (LPM); shear stress in the range of 0-9 dynes/cm(2) for 2 weeks to permit physiological shear stress conditions. Assays revealed significantly (P Engineered Tissue Formation: Implications for Engineered Heart Valve Tissues," Biomaterials, 27(36), pp. 6083-6095). The implications of this novel design are that fully coupled or decoupled physiological flow, flexure, and stretch modes of engineered tissue conditioning investigations can be readily accomplished with the inclusion of this device in experimental protocols on

  4. Physiological Aging Influence on Brain Hemodynamic Activity during Task-Switching: A fNIRS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Vasta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Task-switching (TS paradigm is a well-known validated tool useful for exploring the neural substrates of cognitive control, in particular the activity of the lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. This work is aimed at investigating how physiological aging influences hemodynamic response during the execution of a color-shape TS paradigm. A multi-channel near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS was used to measure hemodynamic activity in 27 young (30.00 ± 7.90 years and 11 elderly participants (57.18 ± 9.29 years healthy volunteers (55% male, age range: (19–69 years during the execution of a TS paradigm. Two holders were placed symmetrically over the left/right hemispheres to record cortical activity [oxy-(HbO and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR concentration] of the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, the dorsal premotor cortex (PMC, and the dorso-medial part of the superior frontal gyrus (sFG. TS paradigm requires participants to repeat the same task over a variable number of trials, and then to switch to a different task during the trial sequence. A two-sample t-test was carried out to detect differences in cortical responses between groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of age on the prefrontal neural activity. Elderly participants were significantly slower than young participants in both color- (p < 0.01, t = −3.67 and shape-single tasks (p = 0.026, t = −2.54 as well as switching (p = 0.026, t = −2.41 and repetition trials (p = 0.012, t = −2.80. Differences in cortical activation between groups were revealed for HbO mean concentration of switching task in the PMC (p = 0.048, t = 2.94. In the whole group, significant increases of behavioral performance were detected in switching trials, which positively correlated with aging. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the HbO mean concentration of switching task in the PMC (p = 0.01, β = −0.321 and of shape single-task in the sFG (p = 0.003, β = 0

  5. Academic performance in human anatomy and physiology classes: a 2-yr study of academic motivation and grade expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-03-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic motivation scale for HAP based on self-determination theory was administered in class during the first 3 wk of each semester. Students with higher grade point averages, who studied for longer hours and reported to be more motivated to succeed, did better academically in these classes. There was a significant relationship between students' scores on the adapted academic motivation scale and performance. Students were more extrinsically motivated to succeed in HAP courses than intrinsically motivated to succeed, and the analyses revealed that the most significant predictor of final grade was within the extrinsic scale (introjected and external types). Students' motivations remained stable throughout the course sequence. The data showed a significant relationship between HAP students' expected grade and their final grade in class. Finally, 65.5% of students overestimated their final grade, with 29% of students overestimating by two to four letter grades. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  6. Genome sequence of the highly weak-acid-tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii IST302, amenable to genetic manipulations and physiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Margarida; Münsterkötter, Martin; Peça, João; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2017-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most problematic spoilage yeast species found in the food and beverage industry particularly in acidic products, due to its exceptional resistance to weak acid stress. This article describes the annotation of the genome sequence of Z. bailii IST302, a strain recently proven to be amenable to genetic manipulations and physiological studies. The work was based on the annotated genomes of strain ISA1307, an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species, and the Z. bailii reference strain CLIB 213T. The resulting genome sequence of Z. bailii IST302 is distributed through 105 scaffolds, comprising a total of 5142 genes and a size of 10.8 Mb. Contrasting with CLIB 213T, strain IST302 does not form cell aggregates, allowing its manipulation in the laboratory for genetic and physiological studies. Comparative cell cycle analysis with the haploid and diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains BY4741 and BY4743, respectively, suggests that Z. bailii IST302 is haploid. This is an additional trait that makes this strain attractive for the functional analysis of non-essential genes envisaging the elucidation of mechanisms underlying its high tolerance to weak acid food preservatives, or the investigation and exploitation of the potential of this resilient yeast species as cell factory. © FEMS 2017.

  7. Fast Recognition of BCI-Inefficient Users Using Physiological Features from EEG Signals: A Screening Study of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaokang; Chen, Shugeng; Yao, Lin; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Jiang, Ning; Jia, Jie; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2018-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) based brain-computer interface (BCI) has been developed as an alternative therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, experimental evidence demonstrates that a significant portion (10-50%) of subjects are BCI-inefficient users (accuracy less than 70%). Thus, predicting BCI performance prior to clinical BCI usage would facilitate the selection of suitable end-users and improve the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation. In the current study, we proposed two physiological variables, i.e., laterality index (LI) and cortical activation strength (CAS), to predict MI-BCI performance. Twenty-four stroke patients and 10 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Each subject was required to perform two blocks of left- and right-hand MI tasks. Linear regression analyses were performed between the BCI accuracies and two physiological predictors. Here, the predictors were calculated from the electroencephalography (EEG) signals during paretic hand MI tasks (5 trials; approximately 1 min). LI values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with two-class BCI (left vs. right) performance (r = -0.732, p vs. idle) performance ( r = 0.641, p two-class BCI. The brain-switch BCI achieved a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 87.5% in the discrimination of BCI-inefficient users. These results demonstrated that the proposed BCI predictors were promising to promote the BCI usage in stroke rehabilitation and contribute to a better understanding of the BCI-inefficiency phenomenon in stroke patients.

  8. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  9. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  10. Experimental study of structural response to earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.W.; Bertero, V.V.; Bouwkamp, J.G.; Popov, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, methods, and some of the principal results obtained from experimental studies of the behavior of structures subjected to earthquakes are described. Although such investigations are being conducted in many laboratories throughout the world, the information presented deals specifically with projects being carried out at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center (EERC) of the University of California, Berkeley. A primary purpose of these investigations is to obtain detailed information on the inelastic response mechanisms in typical structural systems so that the experimentally observed performance can be compared with computer generated analytical predictions. Only by such comparisons can the mathematical models used in dynamic nonlinear analyses be verified and improved. Two experimental procedures for investigating earthquake structural response are discussed: the earthquake simulator facility which subjects the base of the test structure to acceleration histories similar to those recorded in actual earthquakes, and systems of hydraulic rams which impose specified displacement histories on the test components, equivalent to motions developed in structures subjected to actual'quakes. The general concept and performance of the 20ft square EERC earthquake simulator is described, and the testing of a two story concrete frame building is outlined. Correlation of the experimental results with analytical predictions demonstrates that satisfactory agreement can be obtained only if the mathematical model incorporates a stiffness deterioration mechanism which simulates the cracking and other damage suffered by the structure

  11. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Physiological effects of wearing respirators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T.O.; Raven, P.B.; Shafer, C.L.; Linnebur, A.C.; Bustos, J.M.; Wheat, L.D.; Douglas, D.D.

    1977-03-01

    Results of a study to determine what effect wearing a respirator has on worker performance, and which physiological parameters an industrial physician should consider when examining an employee who will be wearing a respirator while working are presented. (TFD)

  12. Experimental and computational study of thaumasite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtzová, Eva, E-mail: Eva.Scholtzova@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kucková, Lenka; Kožíšek, Jozef [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pálková, Helena [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tunega, Daniel [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute for Soil Science, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter-Jordanstrasse 82, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    The structure of thaumasite has been studied experimentally by means of a single crystal X-ray diffraction and FTIR methods, and theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) method. Very good agreement was achieved between calculated and experimental structural parameters. In addition, calculations offered the refinement of the positions of the hydrogen atoms. The detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds existing in the thaumasite structure has been performed. Several types of hydrogen bonds have been classified. The water molecules coordinating Ca{sup 2+} cation act as proton donors in moderate O-H···O hydrogen bonds formed with CO₃⁻²and SO₄⁻² anions. The multiple O-H···O hydrogen bonds exist among water molecules themselves. Finally, relatively weak hydrogen bonds form water molecules with the OH groups from the coordination sphere of the Si(OH)₆⁻² anion. Further, calculated vibrational spectrum allowed complete assignment of all vibrational modes which are not available from the experimental spectrum that has a complex structure with overlapped bands, especially below 1500 cm⁻¹. Highlights: • The thaumasite structure was studied experimentally and using DFT method. • We used DFT method for the refinement of the positions of hydrogen atoms. • A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds was done. • A complete assignment of all bands to particular types of vibrations was done.

  13. Psycho-physiological reactions to violent video gaming : Experimental studies of heart rate variability, cortisol, sleep and emotional reactions in teenage boys

    OpenAIRE

    Ivarsson, Malena

    2014-01-01

    Playing violent video games may provoke aggression. Psycho-physiological methods may provide knowledge about the underlying psychological processes. Most previous studies have been performed in laboratory settings at daytime with adults. Thus the aim of this thesis was to investigate psycho-physiological (autonomic and HPA related reactions), sleep-related and emotional responses in teenage boys to playing a violent and a non-violent video game at home before going to sleep. In Study I the au...

  14. Peanut lectin crystallography and macromolecular structural studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 6. Peanut lectin crystallography and macromolecular structural studies in India. M Vijayan. Perspectives Volume 32 Issue 6 September 2007 pp 1059-1066. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Structural study of concentrated micellar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemb, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the structure of concentrated soap-water binary micelles with a comparison of measurements of light, neutrons and X-ray scattering, and the relaxation induced by paramagnetic ions adsorbed at the interface. In the first part, the author discusses the specific sensitivity ranges of different experimental techniques, outlines the resolution which can be obtained with scattering experiments, and proposes a critical analysis of results published in the relevant literature. In a second part, the author discusses the compared results of the application of various techniques (magnetic resonance, X-light and neutron scattering) on the two most used model systems: sodium octanoate and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in solution. Then, the author addresses the case of ternary systems: study of the influence of the presence of a co-surfactant on the structure, study of the effect of interfacial charge on the micellar structure, use of the same previous quantitative methods to study the disturbances brought to the structure due to the presence of reactants [fr

  16. Case studies of steel structure failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bernasovský

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with some case studies of steel structure failures, which happened in Slovakia a few years ago. Features of cracking are illustrated on real cases of breakdowns in the transmission gas pipelines, at the cement works and in the petrochemical indus-try. All failures were caused by an incorrect technical approach. Possible remedial measures are proposed.

  17. THEORETICAL STUDY ON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THEORETICAL STUDY ON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRIARYLBORANE SUBSTITUTED BY THIOPHENE. ... Also, the 13C chemical shifts of the carbon atoms on the phenyl rings in these compounds are upfield relative to those of the same carbon atoms in the parent compound.

  18. SOME QUANTUM CHEMICAL STUDY ON THE STRUCTURAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    SOME QUANTUM CHEMICAL STUDY ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF. THREE UNSYMMETRICAL SCHIFF BASE LIGANDS. Iran Sheikhshoaie1*, VahidSaheb1 and Parisa Iranmanesh2. 1Department of Chemistry, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Iran. 2Department of Chemistry, Payame Nour University ...

  19. Austenitic and duplex stainless steels in simulated physiological solution characterized by electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocijan, Aleksandra; Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    A study of oxide layers grown on 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel in simulated physiological solution is presented here in order to establish the possibility of replacement of AISI 316 L with 2205 DSS in biomedical applications. The results of the potentiodynamic measurements show that the extent of the passive range significantly increased for DSS 2205 compared to AISI 316L stainless steel. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate electrochemical processes taking place on the steel surfaces. Oxide layers formed by electrochemical oxidation at different oxidation potentials were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their compositions were analyzed as a function of depth. The main constituents on both the investigated materials were Cr- and Fe-oxides. Atomic force microscopy topography studies revealed the higher corrosion resistance of the DSS 2205 compared to the AISI 316L under the chosen experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effect of Stimulative and Sedative Music Videos on Depressive Symptoms and Physiological Relaxation in Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Yu; Hsieh, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Music has been found to improve depressive symptoms and relaxation. However, few studies related to this issue have been conducted using music videos (MVs). The aim was to compare the effects of stimulative and sedative MVs on depressive symptoms and physiological relaxation (i.e., electromyography, heart rate variability, and skin conductance) in older adults with depressive symptoms. Using a 2-week crossover design, interventions alternated between watching a stimulative and sedative MV and vice versa. Each intervention lasted for 30 minutes on 1 day during the first week, and was then alternated to another intervention for 1 day during the following week. Stimulative MVs were more effective in treating depressive symptoms than sedative MVs. Stimulative and sedative MVs had beneficial effects on depressive symptoms and physiological relaxation compared with baseline data. These findings add new knowledge to the literature for health care providers to improve psychophysiological health in older adults with depressive symptoms. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(5):233-242.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Utilization of physiological and taxonomic fluorescent probes to study Lactobacilli cells and response to pH challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Magdalena A; Kocot, Aleksandra M; Nynca, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-11-01

    pH stress is recognized as an important feature for Lactobacillus in relation to lifestyle and commercial utility. Hence, this study aims to investigate the cell function of Lactobacilli cells subjected to pHs between 7.0 and 2.0. For this purpose, the Lactobacilli isolates of vegetable origin were first hybridized with fluorescent oligonucleotide rRNA probes for detecting Lactobacillus species. Then, cells were exposed to pH stress and labelled with fluorescent probes, carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and propidium iodine (PI), which provided the insight into esterase activity and membrane integrity of cells. Among isolates, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enabled us to specifically detect L. plantarum and L. brevis. Interestingly, FCM analysis revealed that at pHs between 7.0 and 4.0 the cell membrane was intact, while after the exposure at pH 3.0, and 2.0 became perturbed or impaired. Finally, L. brevis and L. plantarum differed from each other in fluorescence labeling behaviour and culturability. However, the results showed that the same standard protocol for labeling enables discrimination of subpopulations of tested species. Depending on the species, the substantial culturability loss was observed at pH 3.0 and 2.0. These results suggest that the taxonomic and physiological fluorescent probes could be suitable for in situ detection of specific bacteria and rapid assessment of the physiological status of cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Mapping QTLs regulating morpho-physiological traits and yield: case studies, shortcomings and perspectives in drought-stressed maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberosa, Roberto; Salvi, Silvio; Sanguineti, Maria Corinna; Landi, Pierangelo; Maccaferri, Marco; Conti, Sergio

    2002-06-01

    Comparative analysis of a number of studies in drought-stressed maize (Zea mays L.) reporting quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for abscisic acid concentration, root characteristics, other morpho-physiological traits (MPTs) and grain yield (GY) reveals their complex genetic basis and the influence of the genetic background and the environment on QTL effects. Chromosome regions (e.g. near umc11 on chromosome 1 and near csu133 on chromosome 2) with QTLs controlling a number of MPTs and GY across populations and conditions of different water supply have been identified. Examples are presented on the use of QTL information to elucidate the genetic and physiological bases of the association among MPTs and GY. The QTL approach allows us to develop hypotheses accounting for these associations which can be further tested by developing near isogenic lines (NILs) differing for the QTL alleles. NILs also allow for a more accurate assessment of the breeding value of MPTs and, in some cases, may allow for the map-based cloning of the gene(s) underlying the QTL. Although QTL analysis is still time-consuming and resource-demanding, its integration with genomics and post-genomics approaches (e.g. transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analyses) will play an increasingly important role for the identification and validation of candidate genes affecting MPTs and GY.

  3. Brain Activation in Response to Personalized Behavioral and Physiological Feedback From Self-Monitoring Technology: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Maxine E; Morgan, Paul S; Sherar, Lauren B; Kingsnorth, Andrew P; Magistro, Daniele; Esliger, Dale W

    2017-11-08

    The recent surge in commercially available wearable technology has allowed real-time self-monitoring of behavior (eg, physical activity) and physiology (eg, glucose levels). However, there is limited neuroimaging work (ie, functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) to identify how people's brains respond to receiving this personalized health feedback and how this impacts subsequent behavior. Identify regions of the brain activated and examine associations between activation and behavior. This was a pilot study to assess physical activity, sedentary time, and glucose levels over 14 days in 33 adults (aged 30 to 60 years). Extracted accelerometry, inclinometry, and interstitial glucose data informed the construction of personalized feedback messages (eg, average number of steps per day). These messages were subsequently presented visually to participants during fMRI. Participant physical activity levels and sedentary time were assessed again for 8 days following exposure to this personalized feedback. Independent tests identified significant activations within the prefrontal cortex in response to glucose feedback compared with behavioral feedback (Pbrain activation when compared with behavior. Participants reduced time spent sedentary at follow-up. Research on deploying behavioral and physiological feedback warrants further investigation. ©Maxine E Whelan, Paul S Morgan, Lauren B Sherar, Andrew P Kingsnorth, Daniele Magistro, Dale W Esliger. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 08.11.2017.

  4. Physiological-biochemical parameters and characteristics of seed coat structure in lupin seeds subjected to long storage at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka I. Piotrowicz-Cieślak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed vigour, viability, the contents of soluble carbohydrates, total protein, albumins, and globulins, as well as seed coat structure, were analysed in yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L. cv. Iryd seeds stored for 20 years at -14oC, 0oC or at room temperature (approx. +20oC. Seed storage at room temperature reduced viability (to 2% and increased seed leachate electroconductivity. Determinations of total proteins showed that protein content was significantly reduced in seeds stored at +20oC compared to the other storage regimens. Raffinose family oligosaccharides were the main soluble carbohydrates in seeds stored at 0oC and -14oC, whereas sucrose dominated in seeds stored at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of seed surface and seed coat sections revealed appearance of an amorphic layer on the surface of seeds stored at room temperature (not observed in other seeds and distinct shrinking of macrosclereid layer in seeds stored at -14oC. Macrosclereids layer in all seeds was 100 um thick and accounted for 60% of seed coat thickness. The obtained results suggest that for long term storage of lupin seeds at 0oC is the most advisable temperature if both costs of storage and seed storability are considered.

  5. Structural, physiological, and stable carbon isotopic evidence that the enigmatic Paleozoic fossil Prototaxites formed from rolled liverwort mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Linda E; Cook, Martha E; Hanson, David T; Pigg, Kathleen B; Graham, James M

    2010-02-01

    New structural, nutritional, and stable carbon isotope data may resolve a long-standing mystery-the biological affinities of the fossil Prototaxites, the largest organism on land during the Late Silurian to Late Devonian (420-370 Ma). The tree trunk-shaped specimens, of varying dimensions but consistent tubular anatomy, first formed prior to vascular plant dominance. Hence, Prototaxites has been proposed to represent giant algae, fungi, or lichens, despite incompatible biochemical and anatomical observations. Our comparative analyses instead indicate that Prototaxites formed from partially degraded, wind-, gravity-, or water-rolled mats of mixotrophic liverworts having fungal and cyanobacterial associates, much like the modern liverwort genus Marchantia. We propose that the fossil body is largely derived from abundant, highly degradation-resistant, tubular rhizoids of marchantioid liverworts, intermixed with tubular microbial elements. Our concept explains previously puzzling fossil features and is consistent with evidence for liverworts and microbial associates in Ordovician-Devonian deposits, extensive ancient and modern marchantioid mats, and modern associations of liverworts with cyanobacteria and diverse types of fungi. Our interpretation indicates that liverworts were important components of Devonian ecosystems, that some macrofossils and microfossils previously attributed to "nematophytes" actually represent remains of ancient liverworts, and that mixotrophy and microbial associations were features of early land plants.

  6. Microfluidic device to study cell transmigration under physiological shear stress conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    The development of new drug therapies relies on studies of cell transmigration in in vitro systems. Migration has traditionally been studied using two methods, the Boyden chamber and a shear flow chamber assay. Though, commonly applied in cell transmigration studies, they are far from imitating a...

  7. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles

  8. Rapid analysis of vessel elements (RAVE): a tool for studying physiologic, pathologic and tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Marc E; Peirce, Shayn M; Kelly, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of microvascular network structure is important in a myriad of emerging research fields including microvessel remodeling in response to ischemia and drug therapy, tumor angiogenesis, and retinopathy. To mitigate analyst-specific variation in measurements and to ensure that measurements represent actual changes in vessel network structure and morphology, a reliable and automatic tool for quantifying microvascular network architecture is needed. Moreover, an analysis tool capable of acquiring and processing large data sets will facilitate advanced computational analysis and simulation of microvascular growth and remodeling processes and enable more high throughput discovery. To this end, we have produced an automatic and rapid vessel detection and quantification system using a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) that vastly reduces time spent on analysis and greatly increases repeatability. Analysis yields numerical measures of vessel volume fraction, vessel length density, fractal dimension (a measure of tortuosity), and radii of murine vascular networks. Because our GUI is open sourced to all, it can be easily modified to measure parameters such as percent coverage of non-endothelial cells, number of loops in a vascular bed, amount of perfusion and two-dimensional branch angle. Importantly, the GUI is compatible with standard fluorescent staining and imaging protocols, but also has utility analyzing brightfield vascular images, obtained, for example, in dorsal skinfold chambers. A manually measured image can be typically completed in 20 minutes to 1 hour. In stark comparison, using our GUI, image analysis time is reduced to around 1 minute. This drastic reduction in analysis time coupled with increased repeatability makes this tool valuable for all vessel research especially those requiring rapid and reproducible results, such as anti-angiogenic drug screening.

  9. Rapid analysis of vessel elements (RAVE: a tool for studying physiologic, pathologic and tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc E Seaman

    Full Text Available Quantification of microvascular network structure is important in a myriad of emerging research fields including microvessel remodeling in response to ischemia and drug therapy, tumor angiogenesis, and retinopathy. To mitigate analyst-specific variation in measurements and to ensure that measurements represent actual changes in vessel network structure and morphology, a reliable and automatic tool for quantifying microvascular network architecture is needed. Moreover, an analysis tool capable of acquiring and processing large data sets will facilitate advanced computational analysis and simulation of microvascular growth and remodeling processes and enable more high throughput discovery. To this end, we have produced an automatic and rapid vessel detection and quantification system using a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI that vastly reduces time spent on analysis and greatly increases repeatability. Analysis yields numerical measures of vessel volume fraction, vessel length density, fractal dimension (a measure of tortuosity, and radii of murine vascular networks. Because our GUI is open sourced to all, it can be easily modified to measure parameters such as percent coverage of non-endothelial cells, number of loops in a vascular bed, amount of perfusion and two-dimensional branch angle. Importantly, the GUI is compatible with standard fluorescent staining and imaging protocols, but also has utility analyzing brightfield vascular images, obtained, for example, in dorsal skinfold chambers. A manually measured image can be typically completed in 20 minutes to 1 hour. In stark comparison, using our GUI, image analysis time is reduced to around 1 minute. This drastic reduction in analysis time coupled with increased repeatability makes this tool valuable for all vessel research especially those requiring rapid and reproducible results, such as anti-angiogenic drug screening.

  10. Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus as a Model for Studying Plant Physiological and Metabolic Responses to Environmental Stress Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolessi, Paola; Nicoletti, Marcello; Catoni, Rosangela; Puglielli, Giacomo; Toniolo, Chiara; Gratani, Loretta

    2015-12-01

    Variations in physiology and metabolic products of Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus along an altitudinal gradient (350-750 m.a.s.l.) within the Monti Lucretili Regional Natural Park (central Italy) were studied. The results showed that the phenol production was in relationship with the net photosynthetic rates and the chlorophyll content. In particular, the increasing caffeic acid (CA) content with altitude suggested its role in providing an additional photo-protection mechanism, by its ability to consume photochemical reducing power and acting as an alternative C-atom sink under high light conditions. The metabolic production was tested by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint analysis, highlighting the potential of this technique in biologic studies. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  11. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudits, Dénes; Török, Katalin; Cseri, András; Paul, Kenny; Nagy, Bettina; Sass, László; Ferenc, Györgyi; Vankova, Radomira; Dobrev, Petre; Vass, Imre; Ayaydin, Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    The biomass productivity of the energy willow Salix viminalis as a short-rotation woody crop depends on organ structure and functions that are under the control of genome size. Colchicine treatment of axillary buds resulted in a set of autotetraploid S. viminalis var. Energo genotypes (polyploid Energo [PP-E]; 2n = 4x = 76) with variation in the green pixel-based shoot surface area. In cases where increased shoot biomass was observed, it was primarily derived from larger leaf size and wider stem diameter. Autotetraploidy slowed primary growth and increased shoot diameter (a parameter of secondary growth). The duplicated genome size enlarged bark and wood layers in twigs sampled in the field. The PP-E plants developed wider leaves with thicker midrib and enlarged palisade parenchyma cells. Autotetraploid leaves contained significantly increased amounts of active gibberellins, cytokinins, salicylic acid, and jasmonate compared with diploid individuals. Greater net photosynthetic CO2 uptake was detected in leaves of PP-E plants with increased chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. Improved photosynthetic functions in tetraploids were also shown by more efficient electron transport rates of photosystems I and II. Autotetraploidization increased the biomass of the root system of PP-E plants relative to diploids. Sections of tetraploid roots showed thickening with enlarged cortex cells. Elevated amounts of indole acetic acid, active cytokinins, active gibberellin, and salicylic acid were detected in the root tips of these plants. The presented variation in traits of tetraploid willow genotypes provides a basis to use autopolyploidization as a chromosome engineering technique to alter the organ development of energy plants in order to improve biomass productivity. PMID:26729798

  12. Relationship Between Antihypertensive Medications and Cognitive Impairment: Part II. Review of Physiology and Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ruth; Schuchman, Mattan; Peters, Jean; Carlson, Michelle C; Yasar, Sevil

    2016-08-01

    There is an established association between hypertension and increased risk of poor cognitive performance and dementia including Alzheimer's disease; however, associations between antihypertensive medications (AHM) and dementia risk are less clear. An increased interest in AHM has resulted in expanding publications; however, none of the recent reviews provide comprehensive review. Our extensive review includes 24 mechanistic animal and human studies published over the last 5 years assessing relationship between AHM and cognitive function. All classes of AHM showed similar result patterns in animal studies. The mechanism by which AHM exert their effect was extensively studied by evaluating well-established pathways of AD disease process, including amyloid beta (Aβ), vascular, oxidative stress and inflammation pathways, but only few studies evaluated the blood pressure lowering effect on the AD disease process. Methodological limitations of the studies prevent comprehensive conclusions prior to further work evaluating AHM in animals and larger human observational studies, and selecting those with promising results for future RCTs.

  13. Quantifying structural and physiological controls on variation in canopy transpiration among planted pine and hardwood species in the southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelcy R. Ford; Robert M. Hubbard; James M. Vose

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that planted pine stands exhibit higher evapotranspiration (ET) and are more sensitive to climatic conditions compared with hardwood stands. Whether this is due to management and stand effects, biological effects or their interaction is poorly understood. We estimated growing season canopy- and sap flux-scaled leaf-level transpiration (Ec and...

  14. The emergence of Applied Physiology within the discipline of Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M

    2016-08-01

    Despite the availability and utilization of the physiology textbooks authored by Albrecht von Haller during the 18th century that heralded the modern age of physiology, not all physicians or physiologists were satisfied with its presentation, contents, or application to medicine. Initial reasons were fundamental disagreements between the "mechanists," represented by Boerhaave, Robinson, and von Haller, and the "vitalists," represented by the faculty and graduates of the Montpellier School of Medicine in France, notably, Bordeu and Barthez. Subsequently, objections originated from Europe, United Kingdom, and the United States in publications that focused not only on the teaching of physiology to medical and secondary students, but on the specific applications of the content of physiology to medicine, health, hygiene, pathology, and chronic diseases. At the turn of the 20th century, texts began to appear with applied physiology in their titles and in 1926, physician Samson Wright published a textbook entitled Applied Physiology that was intended for both medical students and the medical profession. Eleven years later, physicians Best and Taylor published The Physiological Basis of Medical Practice: A University of Toronto Texbook in Applied Physiology Although both sets of authors defined the connection between applied physiology and physiology, they failed to define the areas of physiology that were included within applied physiology. This was accomplished by the American Physiological Society (APS) Publications Committee in 1948 with the publication of the Journal of Appplied Physiology, that stated the word "applied" would broadly denote human physiology whereas the terms stress and environment would broadly include work, exercise, plus industrial, climatic and social factors. NIH established a study section (SS) devoted to applied physiology in 1964 which remained active until 2001 when it became amalgamated into other SSs. Before the end of the 20th century when

  15. Structural basis for the physiological temperature dependence of the association of VP16 with the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Douglas E; Gross, Sarah T; Girvin, Mark E; Wilson, Duncan W

    2005-05-01

    Critical events in the life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) are the binding of cytoplasmic capsids to cellular organelles and subsequent envelopment. Work from several laboratories suggests that these events occur as a result of a network of partially redundant interactions among the capsid surface, tegument components, and cytoplasmic tails of virally encoded glycoproteins. Consistent with this model, we previously showed that tegument protein VP16 can specifically interact with the cytoplasmic tail of envelope protein gH in vitro and in vivo when fused to glutathione S-transferase and to green fluorescent protein, respectively. In both instances, this association was strikingly temperature dependent: binding occurred only at 37 degrees C and not at lower temperatures. Here we demonstrate that virally expressed full-length gH and VP16 can be coimmunoprecipitated from HSV-infected cells and that this association is also critically dependent upon the physiological temperature. To investigate the basis of this temperature requirement, we performed one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on peptides with the sequence of the gH tail. We found that the gH tail is disorganized at temperatures permissive for binding but becomes structured at lower temperatures. Furthermore, a mutated tail unable to adopt this rigid conformation binds VP16 even at 4 degrees C. We hypothesize that the gH tail is unstructured under physiological conditions in order to maximize the number of potential tegument partners with which it may associate. Being initially disordered, the gH tail may adopt one of several induced conformations as it associates with VP16 or alternative components of the tegument, maximizing redundancy during particle assembly.

  16. Studies of physiology and the morphology of the cat LGN following proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reder, Chad S.; Moyers, Michael F.; Lau, Daryl; Kirby, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We have examined the effects of proton irradiation on the histologic and receptive field properties of thalamic relay cells in the cat visual system. The cat lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is a large structure with well-defined anatomical boundaries, and well-described afferent, efferent, and receptive field properties. Methods and Materials: A 1.0-mm proton microbeam was used on the cat LGN to determine short-term (3 months) and long-term (9 months) receptive field effects of irradiation on LGN relay cells. The doses used were 16-, 40-, and 60-gray (Gy). Results: Following irradiation, abnormalities in receptive field organization were found in 40- and 60-Gy short-term animals, and in all of the long-term animals. The abnormalities included 'silent' areas of the LGN where a visual response could not be evoked and other regions that had unusually large or small compound receptive fields. Histologic analysis failed to identify cellular necrosis or vascular damage in the irradiated LGN, but revealed a disruption in retinal afferents to areas of the LGN. Conclusions: These results indicate that microbeam proton irradiation can disrupt cellular function in the absence of obvious cellular necrosis. Moreover, the area and extent of this disruption increased with time, having larger affect with longer post-irradiation periods

  17. Radiation damage studies of nuclear structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum utilization of fuel in nuclear reactors is one of the important aspects for operating them economically. The main hindrance to achieve this higher burnups of nuclear fuel for the nuclear reactors is the possibility of the failure of the metallic core components during their operation. Thus, the study of the cause of the possibility of failure of these metallic structural materials of nuclear reactors during full power operation due to radiation damage, suffered inside the reactor core, is an important field of studies bearing the basic to industrial scientific views.The variation of the microstructure of the metallic core components of the nuclear reactors due to radiation damage causes enormous variation in the structure and mechanical properties. A firm understanding of this variation of the mechanical properties with the variation of microstructure will serve as a guide for creating new, more radiation-tolerant materials. In our centre we have irradiated structural materials of Indian nuclear reactors by charged particles from accelerator to generate radiation damage and studied the some aspects of the variation of microstructure by X-ray diffraction studies. Results achieved in this regards, will be presented. (author)

  18. Why can't rodents vomit? A comparative behavioral, anatomical, and physiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C Horn

    Full Text Available The vomiting (emetic reflex is documented in numerous mammalian species, including primates and carnivores, yet laboratory rats and mice appear to lack this response. It is unclear whether these rodents do not vomit because of anatomical constraints (e.g., a relatively long abdominal esophagus or lack of key neural circuits. Moreover, it is unknown whether laboratory rodents are representative of Rodentia with regards to this reflex. Here we conducted behavioral testing of members of all three major groups of Rodentia; mouse-related (rat, mouse, vole, beaver, Ctenohystrica (guinea pig, nutria, and squirrel-related (mountain beaver species. Prototypical emetic agents, apomorphine (sc, veratrine (sc, and copper sulfate (ig, failed to produce either retching or vomiting in these species (although other behavioral effects, e.g., locomotion, were noted. These rodents also had anatomical constraints, which could limit the efficiency of vomiting should it be attempted, including reduced muscularity of the diaphragm and stomach geometry that is not well structured for moving contents towards the esophagus compared to species that can vomit (cat, ferret, and musk shrew. Lastly, an in situ brainstem preparation was used to make sensitive measures of mouth, esophagus, and shoulder muscular movements, and phrenic nerve activity-key features of emetic episodes. Laboratory mice and rats failed to display any of the common coordinated actions of these indices after typical emetic stimulation (resiniferatoxin and vagal afferent stimulation compared to musk shrews. Overall the results suggest that the inability to vomit is a general property of Rodentia and that an absent brainstem neurological component is the most likely cause. The implications of these findings for the utility of rodents as models in the area of emesis research are discussed.

  19. CLIC Waveguide Damped Accelerating Structure Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dehler, M; Wuensch, Walter

    1996-01-01

    Studies of waveguide damped 30 GHz accelerating structures for multibunching in CLIC are described. Frequency discriminated damping using waveguides with a lowest cutoff frequency above the fundamental but below the higher order modes was considered. The wakefield behavior was investigated using time domain MAFIA computations over up to 20 cells and for frequencies up to 150 GHz. A configuration consisting of four T-cross-sectioned waveguides per cell reduces the transverse wake below 1% at typical CLIC bunch spacings.

  20. Psychological and physiological responses to stress: a review based on results from PET and MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira; Silva, Dilson [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas]. E-mail: ccortez@uerj.br

    2008-12-15

    A new application for the nuclear imaging techniques is the study of organic responses to stress. Neuroimaging techniques allow the assessment of brain activation changes in association with the metabolic responses to stress. In this paper, a review of general effects of the stress on organic activity is made, emphasizing important advances introduced by studies using PET and fMRI. The importance of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to onset the adequate psychical and organic responses to sustain the homeostasis during the stress is discussed, as well as the possibility of traumatic stressing experiences have negative effects on the brain. (author)

  1. Seismic Study of TMSR Graphite Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Derek; Huang Chao Chao

    2014-01-01

    Graphite plays an important role in the thorium based molten salt reactor (TMSR) nuclear energy system. The graphite core acts as reflector, moderator and structural material in the TMSR core. The graphite core assembly has hundreds of graphite bricks interconnected with graphite keys and dowels. In other words, the graphite core is a kind of discrete stack structure with highly nonlinear dynamic behaviour, and it will show totally different dynamics responses comparing with welded structure or bolted structure when subjected to the seismic loading. Hence it is important to investigate the dynamics characteristics of the TMSR graphite core assembly and to meet the seismic design requirement. The most popular way to investigate the nonlinearity of graphite core is to do finite element analyses. Due to the large number of nonlinear behaviour caused by contacts, collisions and impacts between the graphite bricks and keys, the computational costs on seismic analysis of the whole core would be very high. Many methods have been developed in the past 20 years to conquer this difficulty. In this work substructure method and finite element method have been used to study the dynamic behaviour of a stack of graphite bricks under seismic loading. The numerical results of these two methods will be compared. The results show that the super element method is an efficient method for graphite core seismic analyses. (author)

  2. Reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences between two types of winterfat (forage) seeds with physiological differences in low temperature tolerance using synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P; Wang, R; Bai, Y

    2005-11-30

    Winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) (forage seed) is a long-lived native shrub with superior forage quality for livestock and wildlife. The objectives of this study were to use advanced synchrotron technology [S-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR)] as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences in terms of protein secondary structures between the two types of winterfat (forage) seeds, which show physiological differences in low-temperature tolerances. This experiment was performed at beamline U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), U.S. Department of Energy (NSLS-BNL, New York). The results showed that with the synchrotron analytical technique (S-FTIR), the molecular structural-chemical makeup and characteristics of the winterfat seed tissues could be imaged and revealed. The protein secondary structures differed between the large and the small seed tissues. By using the multicomponent peaks modeling method, the results show that the large seeds contained no significant differences (P > 0.05) in percentage of beta-sheet (average 37.0%) and alpha-helix (average 24.1%). However, the large seeds contained a lower (P seed size variation and may affect germination behaviors.

  3. Fast Recognition of BCI-Inefficient Users Using Physiological Features from EEG Signals: A Screening Study of Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokang Shu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI based brain-computer interface (BCI has been developed as an alternative therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, experimental evidence demonstrates that a significant portion (10–50% of subjects are BCI-inefficient users (accuracy less than 70%. Thus, predicting BCI performance prior to clinical BCI usage would facilitate the selection of suitable end-users and improve the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation. In the current study, we proposed two physiological variables, i.e., laterality index (LI and cortical activation strength (CAS, to predict MI-BCI performance. Twenty-four stroke patients and 10 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Each subject was required to perform two blocks of left- and right-hand MI tasks. Linear regression analyses were performed between the BCI accuracies and two physiological predictors. Here, the predictors were calculated from the electroencephalography (EEG signals during paretic hand MI tasks (5 trials; approximately 1 min. LI values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with two-class BCI (left vs. right performance (r = −0.732, p < 0.001, and CAS values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with brain-switch BCI (task vs. idle performance (r = 0.641, p < 0.001. Furthermore, the BCI-inefficient users were successfully recognized with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 85.7% in the two-class BCI. The brain-switch BCI achieved a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 87.5% in the discrimination of BCI-inefficient users. These results demonstrated that the proposed BCI predictors were promising to promote the BCI usage in stroke rehabilitation and contribute to a better understanding of the BCI-inefficiency phenomenon in stroke patients.

  4. Case Study: Unfavorable But Transient Physiological Changes During Contest Preparation in a Drug-Free Male Bodybuilder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Andrew; Trexler, Eric T; Sprod, Lisa K

    2017-12-01

    Extreme body composition demands of competitive bodybuilding have been associated with unfavorable physiological changes, including alterations in metabolic rate and endocrine profile. The current case study evaluated the effects of contest preparation (8 months), followed by recovery (5 months), on a competitive drug-free male bodybuilder over 13 months (M1-M13). Serum testosterone, triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxine (T 4 ), cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin were measured throughout the study. Body composition (BodPod, dualenergy x-ray absorptiometry [DXA]), anaerobic power (Wingate test), and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were assessed monthly. Sleep was assessed monthly via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and actigraphy. From M1 to M8, testosterone (623-173 ng∙dL -1 ), T 3 (123-40 ng∙dL -1 ), and T 4 (5.8-4.1 mg∙dL -1 ) decreased, while cortisol (25.2-26.5 mg∙dL -1 ) and ghrelin (383-822 pg∙mL -1 ) increased. The participant lost 9.1 kg before competition as typical energy intake dropped from 3,860 to 1,724 kcal∙day -1 ; BodPod estimates of body fat percentage were 13.4% at M1, 9.6% at M8, and 14.9% at M13; DXA estimates were 13.8%, 5.1%, and 13.8%, respectively. Peak anaerobic power (753.0 to 536.5 Watts) and RMR (107.2% of predicted to 81.2% of predicted) also decreased throughout preparation. Subjective sleep quality decreased from M1 to M8, but objective measures indicated minimal change. By M13, physiological changes were largely, but not entirely, reversed. Contest preparation may yield transient, unfavorable changes in endocrine profile, power output, RMR, and subjective sleep outcomes. Research with larger samples must identify strategies that minimize unfavorable adaptations and facilitate recovery following competition.

  5. Sex differences in glucose levels: a consequence of physiology or methodological convenience? The Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, K; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Vaag, A

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether sex differences in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h post-OGTT plasma glucose (2hPG) and HbA(1c) could be explained by differences in body size and/or body composition between men and women in a general non-diabetic Danish population. Moreover, we aimed to study to wha...

  6. Study of physiological activity of microelements- and glutamine acid-containing chelate citrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Beshkenadze

    2017-06-01

    Study of skin-and-fur quality, after slaughter of rabbits, proved that here, again comparative advantage was shown by the animals of the first experimental group. Indices of the animals of the second experimental group exceed those of the control one, but legged behind those of the first group.

  7. Ecological and Physiological Studies of Gymnodinium catenatum in the Mexican Pacific: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine J. Band-Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a detailed analysis of the state of knowledge of studies done in Mexico related to the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralytic toxin producer. This species was first reported in the Gulf of California in 1939; since then most studies in Mexico have focused on local blooms and seasonal variations. G. catenatum is most abundant during March and April, usually associated with water temperatures between 18 and 25 ºC and an increase in nutrients. In vitro studies of G. catenatum strains from different bays along the Pacific coast of Mexico show that this species can grow in wide ranges of salinities, temperatures, and N:P ratios. Latitudinal differences are observed in the toxicity and toxin profile, but the presence of dcSTX, dcGTX2-3, C1, and C2 are usual components. A common characteristic of the toxin profile found in shellfish, when G. catenatum is present in the coastal environment, is the detection of dcGTX2-3, dcSTX, C1, and C2. Few bioassay studies have reported effects in mollusks and lethal effects in mice, and shrimp; however no adverse effects have been observed in the copepod Acartia clausi. Interestingly, genetic sequencing of D1-D2 LSU rDNA revealed that it differs only in one base pair, compared with strains from other regions.

  8. Psychosomatic Reactions and Physiological Effects of Infidelity among the Female Victims: A Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Asayesh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infidelity has detrimental effects on the mental and physical health of victims. The aim of the present study is to identify psychosomatic reactions and physical effects of infidelity on the victims. Method: a qualitative research was used in this study. The study population consisted of women who are victims of infidelity in Tehran. Participants were selected through purposive sampling and in-depth interviews had been conducted with 18 women with the experience of infidelity. Data analyzed by thematic analysis method. Findings: The results suggest that couples show different psychosomatic reactions to infidelity. Data analysis resulted in 12 main categories and 39 sub-categories. The main categories of psychosomatic reactions were as follows: 1. sleep and dream interruptions, 2. eating interruptions, 3. impaired brain function, 4. physical symptoms of anxiety and stress, 5. blood pressure problems, 6. hormonal interruptions, 7. signs of premature aging, 8. gastrointestinal problems, 9. respiratory and pulmonary problems, 10- visual problems, 11. cardiovascular problems, and 12. direct physical injuries. Discussion: Results of the present study revealed that infidelity is a psychological phenomenon with some physical effects. These effects are not experienced by all female victims alike. This suggests a different perception of female victims and its related processes that cause different patterns of psychosomatic reactions to the infidelity among them.

  9. Ecological and physiological studies of Gymnodinium catenatum in the Mexican Pacific: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band-Schmidt, Christine J; Bustillos-Guzmán, José J; López-Cortés, David J; Gárate-Lizárraga, Ismael; Núñez-Vázquez, Erick J; Hernández-Sandoval, Francisco E

    2010-06-23

    This review presents a detailed analysis of the state of knowledge of studies done in Mexico related to the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralytic toxin producer. This species was first reported in the Gulf of California in 1939; since then most studies in Mexico have focused on local blooms and seasonal variations. G. catenatum is most abundant during March and April, usually associated with water temperatures between 18 and 25 °C and an increase in nutrients. In vitro studies of G. catenatum strains from different bays along the Pacific coast of Mexico show that this species can grow in wide ranges of salinities, temperatures, and N:P ratios. Latitudinal differences are observed in the toxicity and toxin profile, but the presence of dcSTX, dcGTX2-3, C1, and C2 are usual components. A common characteristic of the toxin profile found in shellfish, when G. catenatum is present in the coastal environment, is the detection of dcGTX2-3, dcSTX, C1, and C2. Few bioassay studies have reported effects in mollusks and lethal effects in mice, and shrimp; however no adverse effects have been observed in the copepod Acartia clausi. Interestingly, genetic sequencing of D1-D2 LSU rDNA revealed that it differs only in one base pair, compared with strains from other regions.

  10. The parenteral nutritional regimen in pigs for basic studies in physiology of nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matkowitz, R.; Harting, W.; Souffrant, W.B.; Junghans, P.; Boerner, P.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental studies concerning a parenteral nutritional regimen were performed in pigs aiming at comparative metabolic investigations to evaluate clinically relevant problems within nutritional research. By means of the 15 N tracer technique the evaluation of the postoperative protein turnover was rendered possible by this animal model

  11. Physiological studies on the utilization of oleic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to microbody development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Melchior; Höhfeld, J.; Kunau, W.H.; Harder, W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the influence of specific growth conditions on the induction of β-oxidation enzymes and rate of microbody proliferation in S. cerevisiae by oleic acid. Of all conditions tested, highest enzyme levels and microbody numbers were achieved in glucose-limited continuous cultures, supplemented

  12. Study of Disease and Physiology in the 1979 Homing Study Hatchery Stocks: A Supplement to "Imprinting Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing", 1979 by Slatick, Gilbreath, and Walch.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, Anthony J.; Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1981-09-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration, is conducting research on imprinting salmon and steelhead for homing (Slatick et al. 1979, 1980; Novotny and Zaugg 1979). The studies were begun with little background knowledge of the effects of disease or certain physiological functions on imprinting and homing in salmonids. Consequently, work aimed at filling this void was begun by the authors in 1978 (Novotny and Zaugg 1979) and continued in 1979. In 1979, we examined random samples of normal populations of homing test fish at the hatcheries to determine the physiological readiness to migrate and adapt to seawater and general fish health. At the Manchester Marine Experimental Station, Manchester, Washington, we determined the survival of samples of the test fish maintained in marine net-pens after release from the hatcheries. Hatcheries and stocks sampled are listed in Table 1.

  13. Structured Empirical Evaluation of “Campbell’s Physiology Notes” and “Campbell’s Pathophysiology Notes”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Campbell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A three-country study was undertaken to assess the educational efficacy of two textbooks authored by the researcher. The same texts were distributed to groups of student nurses in the United Kingdom, Cambodia, and Kenya. A data collection tool was developed to obtain quantitative data and to ask open-ended questions on how useful readers found the texts to be. Quantitative data indicated that the books were useful in areas such as aiding understanding of scientific and medical terminology and helping nurses to assess their patients and understand nursing care. It was also found that simplified diagrams were a useful modality for communicating bioscientific concepts. Answers to open-ended questions indicated areas where the texts could be improved. Evidence for how useful bioscientific concepts can be to improving patient assessment and management was also identified. Significant agreement between quantitative data and answers to open-ended questions was noted. It was concluded that the same texts could have a significant degree of educational acceptance and efficacy in wildly differing cultural and national situations. This approach to resource production and distribution also forms a model other educationalists may choose to adopt.

  14. Physiological studies of fruit set in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnell, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The present study was initiated to test the hypothesis that hormones control fruit set by controlling the amount of assimilate transport and accumulation in fruit tissues. The objectives were to compare assimilate mobilization and accumulation in two treatments which induced fruit set; i.e. pollination and exogenous hormone application, versus a non-pollinated treatment which did not induce fruit set. Initial experiments revealed that several auxins which induce parthenocarpic set in June-bearing strawberries did not induce set in the day-neutral cultivar used in this study. The only auxin found which induced set with a single application was indoleacetic acid ethyl ester (Et-IAA). Subsequently, 14 C-Et-IAA was synthesized and the translocation and metabolism of this auxin was examined and correlated with fruit set and initial growth. Et-IAA transport out of the receptacle was not required for induction of set and growth

  15. Physiological studies of fruit set in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnell, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The present study was initiated to test the hypothesis that hormones control fruit set by controlling the amount of assimilate transport and accumulation in fruit tissues. The objectives were to compare assimilate mobilization and accumulation in two treatments which induced fruit set; i.e. pollination and exogenous hormone application, versus a non-pollinated treatment which did not induce fruit set. Initial experiments revealed that several auxins which induce parthenocarpic set in June-bearing strawberries did not induce set in the day-neutral cultivar used in this study. The only auxin found which induced set with a single application was indoleacetic acid ethyl ester (Et-IAA). Subsequently, /sup 14/C-Et-IAA was synthesized and the translocation and metabolism of this auxin was examined and correlated with fruit set and initial growth. Et-IAA transport out of the receptacle was not required for induction of set and growth.

  16. Sarcomere Imaging by Quantum Dots for the Study of Cardiac Muscle Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyu Kobirumaki-Shimozawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We here review the use of quantum dots (QDs for the imaging of sarcomeric movements in cardiac muscle. QDs are fluorescence substances (CdSe that absorb photons and reemit photons at a different wavelength (depending on the size of the particle; they are efficient in generating long-lasting, narrow symmetric emission profiles, and hence useful in various types of imaging studies. Recently, we developed a novel system in which the length of a particular, single sarcomere in cardiomyocytes can be measured at ~30 nm precision. Moreover, our system enables accurate measurement of sarcomere length in the isolated heart. We propose that QDs are the ideal tool for the study of sarcomere dynamics during excitation-contraction coupling in healthy and diseased cardiac muscle.

  17. The use of murine-derived fundic organoids in studies of gastric physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Michael A; Aihara, Eitaro; Feng, Rui; Engevik, Amy; Shroyer, Noah F; Ottemann, Karen M; Worrell, Roger T; Montrose, Marshall H; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Zavros, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Studies of gastric function and disease have been limited by the lack of extended primary cultures of the epithelium. An in vitro approach to study gastric development is primary mouse-derived antral epithelium cultured as three-dimensional spheroids known as organoids. There have been no reports on the use of organoids for gastric function. We have devised two unique gastric fundic-derived organoid cultures: model 1 for the expansion of gastric fundic stem cells, and model 2 for the maintenance of mature cell lineages. Both models were generated from single glands dissociated from whole fundic tissue and grown in basement membrane matrix (Matrigel) and organoid growth medium. Model 1 enriches for a stem cell-like niche via simple passage of the organoids. Maintained in Matrigel and growth medium, proliferating organoids expressed high levels of stem cell markers CD44 and Lgr5. Model 2 is a system of gastric organoids co-cultured with immortalized stomach mesenchymal cells (ISMCs). Organoids maintained in co-culture with ISMCs express robust numbers of surface pit, mucous neck, chief, endocrine and parietal cells. Histamine induced a significant decrease in intraluminal pH that was reversed by omeprazole in fundic organoids and indicated functional activity and regulation of parietal cells. Localized photodamage resulted in rapid cell exfoliation coincident with migration of neighbouring cells to the damaged area, sustaining epithelial continuity. Thus, we report the use of these models for studies of epithelial cell biology and cell damage and repair. PMID:25605613

  18. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  19. Hyperfine structure studies with the COMPLIS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, J E; Le Blanc, F; Lunney, M D; Obert, J; Oms, J; Putaux, J C; Roussière, B; Sauvage, J; Zemlyanoi, S G; Verney, D; Pinard, J; Cabaret, L A; Duong, H T; Huber, G; Krieg, M; Sebastian, V; Girod, M; Peru, S; Genevey, J; Ibrahim, F; Lettry, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    COMPLIS is an experimental facility designed to carry out spectroscopic studies on radioisotopes produced by disintegration of elements available at CERN's Booster-ISOLDE on-line isotope separator. During recent series of experimental runs, hyperfine structure measurements have yielded information on nuclear moments and deformations of platinum and iridium isotopes, For the first time, population by alpha -decay from Hg was exploited to investigate /sup 178/-/sup 181/Pt-the most neutron-deficient Pt isotopes yet studied. Successful measurements have recently been carried out on /sup 182-189/Ir. (10 refs).

  20. Effects of single moor baths on physiological stress response and psychological state: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier-Jarmer, M.; Frisch, D.; Oberhauser, C.; Immich, G.; Kirschneck, M.; Schuh, A.

    2017-11-01

    Moor mud applications in the form of packs and baths are widely used therapeutically as part of balneotherapy. They are commonly given as therapy for musculoskeletal disorders, with their thermo-physical effects being furthest studied. Moor baths are one of the key therapeutic elements in our recently developed and evaluated 3-week prevention program for subjects with high stress level and increased risk of developing a burnout syndrome. An embedded pilot study add-on to this core project was carried out to assess the relaxing effect of a single moor bath. During the prevention program, 78 participants received a total of seven moor applications, each consisting of a moor bath (42 °C, 20 min, given between 02:30 and 05:20 p.m.) followed by resting period (20 min). Before and after the first moor application in week 1, and the penultimate moor application in week 3, salivary cortisol was collected, blood pressure and heart rate were measured, and mood state (Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire) was assessed. A Friedman test of differences among repeated measures was conducted. Post hoc analyses were performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A significant decrease in salivary cortisol concentration was seen between pre- and post-moor bath in week 1 ( Z = -3.355, p = 0.0008). A non-significant decrease was seen between pre- and post-moor bath in week 3. Mood state improved significantly after both moor baths. This pilot study has provided initial evidence on the stress-relieving effects of single moor baths, which can be a sensible and recommendable therapeutic element of multimodal stress-reducing prevention programs. The full potential of moor baths still needs to be validated. A randomized controlled trial should be conducted comparing this balneo-therapeutic approach against other types of stress reduction interventions.

  1. Zinc Fertilization in Potato: A Physiological and Bio-chemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hirak Banerjee; Sukamal Sarkar; Prahlad Deb; Ivi Chakraborty; Sayan Sau; Krishnendu Ray

    2017-01-01

    Aims: More than 54% of soils in West Bengal are Zinc (Zn) deficient and therefore, Zn−fertilization is assumed to play a key role not only for increasing potato yield but also for combating wide spread deficiency of micronutrients (mainly Zn) in many potato growing areas of the state. Place and Duration of Study: A two-year field experiment was conducted during winter 2013-14 and 2014-15 at to assess the advantages of Zn nutrition in potato cv. Kufri Jyoti under alluvial soil (Entisols) o...

  2. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  3. Plasmonic nanogap structures studied via cathodoluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Stephen J.; Yan, Qigeng; Benamara, Mourad; Herzog, Joseph B.

    2017-08-01

    Cathodoluminescence makes use of the beam raster capabilities of a scanning electron microscope to excite electrons in a sample and collects the luminescent light to produce images or obtain spectra that can reveal useful information about the sample. This technique has been shown to be particularly interesting for studying the plasmonic oscillations of metallic nanostructures. A recently developed fabrication technique has allowed for the creation of sub-10 nm gaps between metallic nanostructures for use as plasmonically active samples that can be tailored for various potential applications. The high degree of control over the geometries capable of being fabricated via this nanomasking technique allow for unique types of structures that are otherwise difficult to fabricate. In this work, the plasmonic response of metallic structures separated by sub-10 nm gaps is studied via CL imaging. Hyperspectral images can demonstrate the effectiveness with which various geometries produce specific wavelength resonances. The results can be helpful in determining which structures are optimal for specific applications based on these resonances. Also, the images can help to guide future fabrication, as the plasmon modes become better understood.

  4. Manufacturing study of beryllium bonded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-01-01

    Manufacturing study has been conducted on Be-bonded structures employed in the first-wall panel of the blanket system for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating process has been used to bond the three materials. First, Cu-alloy and SS materials are bonded diffusively. Then, Be tiles are bonded to the pre-bonded structure under 20 MPa and at 560 degree C. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-Alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. Using the above bonding techniques, a partial mockup of a blanket first-wall panel with 16 Be tiles (with 50 mm in size) has been successfully manufactured. (author)

  5. Study on the physiological activities of gamma-irradiated seafood cooking drips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Eu Ri; Kim, Yeon Joo; Choi, Jong Il; Sung, Nak Yun; Jung, Pil Moon; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Seok; Yoon, Yo Han; Lee, Ju Woon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Yeoun [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    Cooking drips which were obtained as by-product after seafood processing in the food industries, still contain lost of proteins, carbohydrates, and other functional materials. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the biological activities of seafood cooking drips. When the cooking drips of Hizikia fusiformis, Enteroctopus dofleini and Thunnus thynnus were irradiated, the antioxidant activities, whitening effect, and angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibition activity of the ethanol extract from seafood cooking drips were all increased by gamma irradiation. This was because of the increased extraction efficiency of available compounds by irradiation. These results suggested that the seafood cooking drips, wasted as by-products, can be used as functional compounds with gamma irradiation treatment.

  6. Physiological studies of environmental pollutants. Progress report, September 1, 1975--May 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengemann, F.W.; Wentworth, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    In the past year we have looked at the transfer of some members of the actinide decay series into milk of goats. These were 210 Po, 203 Pb, 201 Tl and 207 Bi. All of these appeared in milk after oral ingestion but at levels less than 1 percent per liter. In addition we have looked at the transfer of 65 Zn into milk of goats after oral and I.V. doses; the experiments are incomplete at this time. In controlled temperature studies it was found that 6.6 times as much radioiodine was secreted into milk when goats were at 33 0 as opposed to 5 0 C. When radioiodine is put into the mammary gland the transfer from milk to body is rapid; more rapid than is the case for 65 Zn. The analysis of these data indicate the need for a model capable of handling expansion of a compartment

  7. Importance of radioimmunoassays in studies of physiological circadian rhythms of children in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolyuk, I.P.; Katricheva, L.V.; Kel'tsev, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of the circadian activity of the thyroid gland, adrenal gland and hypophysis in 42 children, of them 23 suffered from rheumatic fever, 11 from the articular and articular-visceral forms of rhematoid arthritis, and 8 children were practically healthy. The concentration of T 3 , T 4 , TTH, AKTH and hydrocortisone was determined in the blood serum using standard kits for in vitro diagnosis. Certain rhytmicality is noted in the functioning of the endocrine glands in healthy children. This rhythm is simultaneous with sleep. The circadian activity of the endocrine glands gets distorted in children with rheumatic diseases: the more severe the process the more marked desynchronosis. The same type of changes in the level of hormones in the blood of children with rheumatic fever and rheumatoid arthritis presupposes some identical mechanism of the compensatory-adaptive reaction of the body to disturbances of the hormonal homeostasis that shoud be considered in the treatment of such patients

  8. Psycological and physiological responses to stress: a review based on results from PET and MRI studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Martins Cortez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new application for the nuclear imaging techniques is the study of organic responses to stress. Neuroimaging techniques allow the assessment of brain activation changes in association with the metabolic responses to stress. In this paper, a review of general effects of the stress on organic activity is made, emphasizing important advances introduced by studies using PET and fMRI. The importance of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to onset the adequate psychical and organic responses to sustain the homeostasis during the stress is discussed, as well as the possibility of traumatic stressing experiences have negative effects on the brain.Uma nova aplicação para as técnicas de imagem nuclear é o estudo de respostas orgânicas ao estresse. Técnicas de neuroimagem permitem observar as mudanças da ativação cerebral associadas às respostas metabólicas ao estresse. Neste artigo, uma revisão dos efeitos do estresse sobre a atividade orgânica é feita, enfatizando importantes avanços introduzidos por estudos realizados com PET e fMRI. A importância do eixo hipotálamo-hipófise-adrenal para o disparo das respostas orgânicas e psíquicas para a manutenção da homeostasia durante o estresse é discutida, bem como a possibilidade de experiências estressantes traumáticas exercerem efeitos negativos sobre o cérebro.

  9. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing isometric force during knee extension. Results Sixty-nine healthy subjects were genotyped for the presence of the G and A (null alleles in the CNTF gene (n = 57 G/G, 12 G/A. They were tested using a dynamometer during submaximal isometric knee extension contractions that were from 10–50% of their maximal strength. During the contractions, the vastus medialis was studied using surface and intramuscular electromyography with spiked triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP area and mean firing rates (mFR from identified motor units. CNTF genotyping was performed using standard PCR techniques from DNA obtained from leucocytes of whole blood samples. The CNTF G/A genotype was associated with smaller SMUP area motor units and lower mFR at higher force levels, and fewer but larger units at lower force levels than G/G homozygotes. The two groups used motor units with different size and activation characteristics with increasing force generation. While G/G subjects tended to utilize larger motor units with increasing force, G/A subjects showed relatively less increase in size by using relatively larger units at lower force levels. At higher force levels, G/A subjects were able to generate more force per motor unit size suggesting more efficient motor unit function with increasing muscle force. Conclusion Differential motor unit responses were observed between CNTF genotypes at force levels utilized in daily activities.

  10. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwit, Robin A; Ling, Shari; Roth, Stephen; Stashuk, Daniel; Hurley, Ben; Ferrell, Robert; Metter, E Jeffrey

    2005-09-23

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing isometric force during knee extension. Sixty-nine healthy subjects were genotyped for the presence of the G and A (null) alleles in the CNTF gene (n = 57 G/G, 12 G/A). They were tested using a dynamometer during submaximal isometric knee extension contractions that were from 10-50% of their maximal strength. During the contractions, the vastus medialis was studied using surface and intramuscular electromyography with spiked triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP) area and mean firing rates (mFR) from identified motor units. CNTF genotyping was performed using standard PCR techniques from DNA obtained from leucocytes of whole blood samples. The CNTF G/A genotype was associated with smaller SMUP area motor units and lower mFR at higher force levels, and fewer but larger units at lower force levels than G/G homozygotes. The two groups used motor units with different size and activation characteristics with increasing force generation. While G/G subjects tended to utilize larger motor units with increasing force, G/A subjects showed relatively less increase in size by using relatively larger units at lower force levels. At higher force levels, G/A subjects were able to generate more force per motor unit size suggesting more efficient motor unit function with increasing muscle force. Differential motor unit responses were observed between CNTF genotypes at force levels utilized in daily activities.

  11. Bone physiology in human grafted and non-grafted extraction sockets--an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahles, Susanne; Nack, Claudia; Gratecap, Kerrin; Lage, Hermann; Nelson, John J; Nelson, Katja

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present immunohistological investigation was to define and compare the osteogenic potential with the vascularization of the provisional matrix in grafted and ungrafted extraction sockets after 4 and 12 weeks of healing. A total of 33 Patients (15 women, 18 men) with 65 extraction sites with a mean age of 54.4 years (30-73 years) participated in this study. After tooth extraction, the sockets were augmented with Bio-Oss collagen or non-augmented. At implant placement after 4 or 12 weeks bone biopsies were obtained. Within the specimens the osteogenic and endothelial potential of mesenchymal cells was analyzed in the provisional matrix using immunohistochemical analysis with three monoclonal antibodies Cbfa1/Runx2, Osteocalcin (OC), and CD31. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient, and the two-factorial analysis for repeated measurements. Of the 65 extraction sockets, 25 (13 non-augmented, 12 augmented) sites after 4 weeks healing time and 40 (19 non-augmented, 21 augmented) sites after 12 weeks healing time were involved in the study. No signs of acute or chronic inflammation were noted in any specimens. After 4 weeks, a median amount of 56% (10-85%) of Cbfa1 positive cells and a median amount of cells expressing OC of 21% (5-42%) were measured. A median CD31 score of 5 was observed. After 12 weeks, a median amount of 61% (19-90%) positive cells expressed by Cbfa1/Runx2 staining a median amount of OC positive cells of 9% (2-17%) was measured. The results at 12 weeks revealed a median score of CD31 positive cells of 3. Osteoblastic activity in the provisional matrix was highest after 4 weeks of healing period. The active zone of bone formation is found in the apical region of the extraction socket during the early healing phase, shifting to the coronal region after 12 weeks. A peak of osteoblast activity within the first weeks is followed by a reduction in mature

  12. Integrating Omics Technologies to Study Pulmonary Physiology and Pathology at the Systems Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Ramesh Pathak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assimilation and integration of “omics” technologies, including genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics has readily altered the landscape of medical research in the last decade. The vast and complex nature of omics data can only be interpreted by linking molecular information at the organismic level, forming the foundation of systems biology. Research in pulmonary biology/medicine has necessitated integration of omics, network, systems and computational biology data to differentially diagnose, interpret, and prognosticate pulmonary diseases, facilitating improvement in therapy and treatment modalities. This review describes how to leverage this emerging technology in understanding pulmonary diseases at the systems level -called a “systomic” approach. Considering the operational wholeness of cellular and organ systems, diseased genome, proteome, and the metabolome needs to be conceptualized at the systems level to understand disease pathogenesis and progression. Currently available omics technology and resources require a certain degree of training and proficiency in addition to dedicated hardware and applications, making them relatively less user friendly for the pulmonary biologist and clinicians. Herein, we discuss the various strategies, computational tools and approaches required to study pulmonary diseases at the systems level for biomedical scientists and clinical researchers.

  13. Physiological profile of a professional boxer preparing for Title Bout: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Israel; Hughes, Steven; Chapman, Dale W

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to (1) profile a professional boxer (23 years and 80 kg) with boxing-specific, muscle function, aerobic capacity and body composition tests, and (2) quantify how these measures varied during an 8-week preparation phase leading to, and post a state-Title Bout fought in the 76.2-kg class. A series of boxing-specific and muscle function tests were completed on 11 occasions: 9 prior and twice after the bout, each separated by approximately 2 weeks. The boxing test included 36 maximal punches (9 of each: lead and rear straights, lead and rear hooks) to a punching integrator measuring forces and velocity. Muscle function tests included countermovement jump, drop-jumps, isometric mid-thigh pull and isometric bench-press. Body composition was assessed using skin-fold measurements on three occasions and one dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Aerobic capacity was assessed using 2 VO2 max tests. Leading up to the bout, performance decreased in isometric mid-thigh pull (8%), isometric bench-press (5%), countermovement jump (15%) and impact forces in 3 of 4 punches (4%-7%). Whereas measures of dynamic and isometric muscle function remained depressed or unchanged post competition, punching forces (6%-15%) and aerobic power (6%) increased. Data suggest the athlete may have super-compensated following rest as fatigue dissipated and further adaptation occurred.

  14. Biochemical and Physiological Studies on the Effects of Senescence Leaves of Populus deltoides on Triticum vulgare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejinder Pal Khaket

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triticum vulgare (Wheat based products are the major dietary source of food in developing countries. In India, it grows in association with boundary plantations of Populus deltoids (poplar. During winter, poplar enters in dormancy which cause a heavy leaf fall at the time of wheat seed germination. Large number of poplar senescence leaves may adversely affect the wheat. Therefore, the present study was performed to examine the effect of senescence poplar leaves on wheat germ and some other biochemical parameters. Seed’s germination rate was determined by measuring root and shoot lengths, percent germination, germination index, and inhibition percentage. Biochemical parameters, namely, pigment, carbohydrate, protein, and phenol content, were estimated. Activities of catalase and polyphenol oxidase which are stress marker enzymes were also measured. Results revealed that germination and other biochemical parameters of wheat were severely affected by senescence poplar leaves even at very low concentration. So, intercropping of poplar along with wheat may be chosen carefully as wheat is the major dietary staple.

  15. Isolation, identification and physiological study of Lactobacillus fermentum LPB for use as probiotic in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reque Elizete de F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to isolate and identify microorganisms for probiotic use for chickens. Selection of strains included various criteria such as agreement with bio-safety aspects, viability during storage, tolerance to low pH/ gastric juice, bile, and antimicrobial activity. The strains were isolated from the crop, proventriculus, gizzard, ileum and caeca of chicken. Decimal dilution of the contents of these segments were mixed with MRS medium and incubated for 48 h at 37°C under anaerobiosis. The identity of the culture was based on characteristics of lactobacilli as presented in the Bergey?s Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, carrying out bacterioscopy (morphology, Gram stain, growth at 15 and 45°C, and fermentation of different carbon sources. Based on these criteria, Lactobacillus fermentum LPB was identified and tested for probiotic use for chickens. The isolate was evaluated for poultry feeds supplement. The results showed that in comparison to the presence and effects of antibiotics, L. fermentum LPB implantation resulted in a similar effect as that of antibiotics manifested by feed efficiency in growth of chicks.

  16. Genetic and physiological studies of antibiotic resistance in a clinical isolate of Streptococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    An erythromycin-sensitive clinical isolate of Streptococcus faecalis (CS-4B) generated intermediate-level erythromycin-resistant isolates ([CS-4B(S)] at a frequency of 4 x 10 -8 per cell. CS-4B(S) produces high-level erythromycin-resistant isolates [CS-4B(L)] at a very high frequency. The erythromycin-resistance is non-transferable, chromosomally located, and distinct from the well described erythromycin-resistance of the MLS type. The erythromycin-resistance of CS-4B(S) and CS-4B(L) is not due to an in vitro or in vivo alteration or inactivation of erythromycin. 14 C-erythromycin binds in vitro, as evaluated with sucrose gradients, to 70S ribosomes and 50S ribosomal subunits in CS-4B. Binding to CS-4B(L) ribosomes was barely detectable whereas CS-4B(S) ribosomes retained binding capacity. The binding studies on filter membranes revealed a substantial reduction of 14 C-erythromycin binding to CS-4B(S) ribosomes when compared to CS-4B ribosomes. The in vivo accumulation of 14 C-erythromycin in CS-4B and CS-4B(S) parallel the in vitro binding capacity of ribosomes indicating the apparent absence of a permeability barrier to erythromycin in CS-4B

  17. Genetic and physiological studies of antibiotic resistance in a clinical isolate of Streptococcus faecalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    An erythromycin-sensitive clinical isolate of Streptococcus faecalis (CS-4B) generated intermediate-level erythromycin-resistant isolates ((CS-4B(S)) at a frequency of 4 x 10/sup -8/ per cell. CS-4B(S) produces high-level erythromycin-resistant isolates (CS-4B(L)) at a very high frequency. The erythromycin-resistance is non-transferable, chromosomally located, and distinct from the well described erythromycin-resistance of the MLS type. The erythromycin-resistance of CS-4B(S) and CS-4B(L) is not due to an in vitro or in vivo alteration or inactivation of erythromycin. /sup 14/C-erythromycin binds in vitro, as evaluated with sucrose gradients, to 70S ribosomes and 50S ribosomal subunits in CS-4B. Binding to CS-4B(L) ribosomes was barely detectable whereas CS-4B(S) ribosomes retained binding capacity. The binding studies on filter membranes revealed a substantial reduction of /sup 14/C-erythromycin binding to CS-4B(S) ribosomes when compared to CS-4B ribosomes. The in vivo accumulation of /sup 14/C-erythromycin in CS-4B and CS-4B(S) parallel the in vitro binding capacity of ribosomes indicating the apparent absence of a permeability barrier to erythromycin in CS-4B.

  18. Physiological Study on the Relation of Heart Rate Variability in Ageing and Thyroid Hormone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed A. M. Shokr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate whether cardiac autonomic dysfunction in aging human might be related to an underlying thyroid disturbance. ageing has been associated with hypothyroidism and cardiac autonomic dysfunction. On the basis of body mass index (BMI, 150 patients were grouped into three groups (n = 50 48 years ± 2, 55 years ± 2 and 63 years ± 2. Electrocardiogram was recorded using PowerLab system and the time and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV were calculated. Fasting blood samples were drawn for measurement of serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, total thyroxin (T4 and total triiodothyronine (T3 concentrations. The levels of TSH, T4 and T3 were not significantly different between the groups. The frequency domain HRV parameter reflecting parasympathetic tone (high-frequency normalized units, HFnu was significantly reduced in aging third groups group. The parameters which reflect sympathetic activation (Heart rate, low-frequency normalized units; LFnu and the LF/HF ratio were significantly increased in the aging group. HFnu was significantly and negatively correlated with age, whereas LFnu and LF/HF ratio were significantly and positively correlated with the above mentioned parameters. No significant relationships were noted between the HRV parameters and the levels of TSH or thyroid hormones. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in aging human is not linked with underlying thyroid disturbance.

  19. Chemical And Physiological Studies On Drought Stress Tolerance Of Irradiated Communis Pear Using Tissue Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaied, N.S.; Ragab, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    The rooted in vitro irradiated pear rootstocks (Pyrus communis) were subjected to drought stress by using different concentrations of mannitol (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 gm/l), polyethylene glycol (PEG) at concentrations 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 % to culture medium and also agar at concentrations 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 gm/l to study their effects on tissue culture and chemical analysis and their tolerance to drought stress. The obtained results showed that the number of shoots, shoot length and number of leaves were higher at 20 and 40 gm/l mannitol. Increasing mannitol concentration enhanced the increase of chlorophyll b, reducing sugars, total indoles and total phenols up to the highest level at 100 gm/l. Adding PEG at concentration 2% to the culture medium encouraged significant increases in the number of shoots and number of leaves and increase chlorophyll a, and non-reducing sugars as well as significant decrease in number of shoots, shoots length, number of leaves, root length and number of roots with increasing agar concentrations to the culture medium. However, decreasing agar concentration in the culture medium induced increase in chlorophyll A and non-reducing sugar

  20. Physiological Studies On Response Of Grape Transplants To Mineral And Irradiated Organic Fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, M.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    This work was conducted during two successive seasons throughout 2008, 2009 and 2010 years under green house conditions. Three factorial experiments were included the 1st was dealing with investigating the effect of soil added compost rate (0.0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 %) and gamma irradiated compost dose (0.0, 5.0, 10.0 and 15.0 KGy). Where, two other experiments were devoted for studying the effect of soil applied compost (irradiated or un-irradiated) from one hand and the rate of either N (urea/ ammonium sulphate) or K (K 2 SO 4 ) fertilization rates from the other for 2nd and 3rd experiments, respectively. Obtained results could be summarized as follows: 1- Application of compost, in particular irradiated one at 10.0% was the most promising treatment in the 1st experiment, improved significantly all growth, leaf chlorophyll, stem total carbohydrates and leaf mineral composition especially macro elements (N, P and K). 2- All N or K soil applied reflected positively on the above mentioned measurements of Thompson seedless rooted cuttings with a relative tendency of variance occurred from one N or K treatment to another. 3- It can be concluded that compost application to coarse-textured soil improved it and reflected on plants. Irradiating compost with effective dose (10 KGy) greatly increased compost efficiency which could be reached the double.

  1. How the Brain May Have Shaped Muscle Anatomy and Physiology: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchlinski, Magdalena N; Hemingway, Holden W; Pastor, Juan; Omstead, Kailey M; Burrows, Anne M

    2018-03-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are often used to evaluate functional differences in locomotion. However, because there are energetic differences among muscle fiber cells, muscle fiber composition could be used to address evolutionary questions about energetics. Skeletal muscle is composed of two main types of fibers: Type I and II. The difference between the two can be reduced to how these muscle cells use oxygen and glucose. Type I fibers convert glucose to ATP using oxygen, while Type II fibers rely primarily on anaerobic metabolic processes. The expensive tissue hypothesis (ETH) proposes that the energetic demands imposed on the body by the brain result in a reduction in other expensive tissues (e.g., gastrointestinal tract). The original ETH dismisses the energetic demands of skeletal muscle, despite skeletal muscle being (1) an expensive tissue when active and (2) in direct competition for glucose with the brain. Based on these observations we hypothesize that larger brained primates will have relatively less muscle mass and a decrease in Type I fibers. As part of a larger study to test this hypothesis, we present data from 10 species of primates. We collected body mass, muscle mass, and biopsied four muscles from each specimen for histological procedures. We collected endocranial volumes from the literature. Using immunohistochemistry, a muscle fiber composition profile was created for each species sampled. Results show that larger brained primates have less muscle and fewer Type I fibers than primates with smaller brains. Results clarify the relationship between muscle mass and brain mass and illustrate how muscle mass could be used to address energetic questions. Anat Rec, 301:528-537, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Acute physiological response to indoor cycling with and without hydration; case and self-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Jiménez, A; Hernández-Torres, R P; Wall-Medrano, A; Torres-Durán, P V; Juárez-Oropeza, M A; Solis Ceballos, J A

    2013-01-01

    Oral rehydration drinks help maintain physical capacity and hydration during exercise. Evaluate, in a case and self-control study, the effectiveness of three hydration and exercise protocols on work capacity and physical and psychosomatic stress during indoor cycling (InC). 14 middle-aged eutrophic men participated in three controlled randomly and not sequentially hydration (~278 mL 6/c 15 min) and exercise (InC/90 min) protocols: No liquids, plain water, or sports drinks (SD). The response variables were: Body temperature (BT), heart rate (HR), and mean blood pressure (MBP). The covariables: Distance traveled (DT), ergometer resistance (R), body fat (BF), difference in body weight between tests (rBW), and age of the participants. The differences between protocols were evaluated using GLM Repeated Measures, the independence of associations by multiple linear regression. In non-liquids, the subjects showed higher BT, HR, and MBP than when they drank plain water or SD (p hydration protocols. BT was the most sensitive variable detected by the hydration status of the subjects. 34%, 99%, and 21% of the associated variance to HR, MBP, and BT was explained by DT + BT, BT + BF, and ΔBW + age + R + DT + BF, respectively. Liquid intake with or without electrolytes does not affect work capacity, and they are equally effective as hydration sources during =?90 min of InC at strong and very strong intensities. Body temperature is the most sensitive variable detected by the subject's hydration status during exercise. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Physiological functions should be considered as true end points of nutritional intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, L; van Gemert, W; Pichard, C; Soeters, P

    2005-08-01

    With the beginning of this millennium it has become fashionable to only follow 'evidence-based' practices. This generally-accepted approach cruelly negates experience or intelligent interpretation of pathophysiology. Another problem is that the great 'meta-analysts' of the present era only accept end points that they consider 'hard'. In the metabolic and nutritional field these end points are infection-related morbidity and mortality, and all other end points are considered 'surrogate'. The aim of this presentation is to prove that this claim greatly negates the contribution of more-fundamentally-oriented research, the fact that mortality has multifactorial causes, and that infection is a crude measure of immune function. The following problems should be considered: many populations undergoing intervention have low mortality, requiring studies with thousands of patients to demonstrate effects of intervention on mortality; nutrition is only in rare cases primary treatment, and in many populations is a prerequisite for survival rather than a therapeutic modality; once the effect of nutritional support is achieved, the extra benefit of modulation of the nutritional support regimen can only be modest; cost-benefit is not a valid end point, because the better it is done the more it will cost; morbidity and mortality are crude end points for the effect of nutritional intervention, and are influenced by many factors. In fact, it is a yes or no factor. In the literature the most important contributions include new insights into the pathogenesis of disease, the diminution of disease-related adverse events and/or functional improvement after therapy. In nutrition research the negligence of these end points has precluded the development and validation of functional end points, such as muscle, immune and cognitive functions. Disability, quality of life, morbidity and mortality are directly related to these functional variables. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to

  4. Subclinical Anal Sphincter Injuries Following Instrumental Delivery–A Physiological Analysis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girisha Balaraju

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIS has been reported in up to 25% patients and occult OASIS has been reported in up to 1.2%. Instrumental delivery has been considered a risk factor for OASIS. Aim: To compare the anal sphincter functions as assessed by Anorectal Manometry (ARM in asymptomatic patients following instrument delivery with those of patients who underwent Lower Segment Caesarian Section (LSCS after six months of delivery. Materials and Methods: Seventeen women who had instrumental delivery and thirteen who underwent elective cesarean section were recruited. Evaluation included a detailed history and physical examination, administration of the Cleveland Clinic Questionnaire and ARM to record the basal pressure, squeeze pressure, anorectal sensation and balloon expulsion time. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test. All calculations were done using the software SPSS 21.0. Results: We found statistically significant lower basal (34 ± 3.4 vs 60±2.3 mm hg, p<0.05 and squeeze pressures (56±4.1 vs 76±5.2 mm hg, p<0.05, and higher balloon expulsion time (58±2.9 s vs 19±1.8 seconds, p<0.05 in women with instrument delivery compared to LSCS. The rectal sensation was comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: Persistent subtle anal sphincter dysfunctions are common following instrument delivery compared to LSCS. The role of identifying these and preventing future incontinence in such women needs to be assessed in future studies.

  5. Physiological and Biophysical Studies on Gamma Irradiated Rat Treated with Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, G.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEAS) is an adrenal hormone, and is the most abundant circulatory steroid hormone in the body. Serum DHEAS concentration peaks at around age 25 years, displaying a significant decrease with age linked with some pathological changes. Objective: This study was performed to investigate the effect(s) of DHEAS oral administration, and its possible prophylactic and/or mitigating roles against γ-irradiation-induced disorders in the irradiated rat. Experimental Animals and Design: Five groups of male Albino rats were used: 1- Control: untreated group. 2- Irradiated: animals exposed to a single dose of whole-body γ-irradiation (6 Gy). 3- DHEAS group: given a single dose of DHEAS (20 mg/100 g b. wt.), intra gastrically. 4-DHEAS + Irrad. group: given a single dose of DHEAS, 2 hrs before irradiation. 5- Irrad.+ DHEAS group: given DHEAS, 2 hrs after irradiation. Blood and testicular tissue samples were collected after one day, one week and two weeks post irradiation or DHEAS treatment. Parameters Measured: Plasma levels of triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxin (T 4 ), thyrotropin (TSH), testosterone, acid phosphatase (ACP), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-Ch), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-Ch) were determined, and the atherogenic index (AI) was calculated. Reduced glutathione (GSH) content and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in blood and testes. A complete blood picture and some biophysical properties were also examined. Results: DHEAS administration pre-irradiation, and to a lesser magnitude, post-irradiation, improved the disturbances induced by irradiation in the plasma levels of the tested parameters: tT 3 , tT 4 , and TSH, testosterone and the lipid profile, showing almost normalization of the AI. Beneficial effects were also observed in the hematological picture, blood viscosity and conductivity. DHEAS elevated GSH levels and decreased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in blood

  6. Corrosion study of resorbable Ca60Mg15Zn25 bulk metallic glasses in physiological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Babilas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion activity of amorphous plates of Ca60Mg15Zn25 alloy was investigated. The biocompatible elements were selected for the alloy composition. The electrochemical corrosion and immersion tests were carried out in a multi-electrolyte fluid and Ringer's solution. Better corrosion behavior was observed for the samples tested in a multi-electrolyte fluid despite the active dissolution of Ca and Mg in Ringer's solution. The experimental results indicated that reducing concentration of NaCl from 8.6 g/dm3 for Ringer's solution to 5.75 g/dm3 caused the decrease of the corrosion rate. The volume of the hydrogen evolved after 480 min in Ringer's solution (40.1 ml/cm2 was higher in comparison with that obtained in a multi-electrolyte fluid (24.4 ml/cm2. The values of open-circuit potential (EOCP for the Ca60Mg15Zn25 glass after 1 h incubation in Ringer's solution and a multi-electrolyte fluid were determined to be −1553 and −1536 mV vs. a saturated calomel electrode (SCE. The electrochemical measurements indicated a shift of the corrosion current density (jcorr from 1062 μA/cm2 for the sample tested in Ringer's solution to 788 μA/cm2 for the specimen immersed in a multi-electrolyte fluid. The corrosion products analysis was conducted by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The corrosion products were identified to be CaCO3, Mg(OH2, CaO, MgO and ZnO. The mechanism of corrosion process was proposed and described based on the microscopic observations. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR also indicated that Ca(OH2, CaCO3, Zn(OH2 and Ca(Zn(OH32·2H2O mainly formed on the surface of the studied alloy. Keywords: Ca-based metallic glasses, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Corrosion resistance, Hydrogen evaluation

  7. Physiological Changes Following Competition in Male and Female Physique Athletes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Hirsch, Katie R; Campbell, Bill I; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate changes in body composition, metabolic rate, and hormones during postcompetition recovery. Data were collected from natural physique athletes (7 male/8 female) within one week before (T1) competition, within one week after (T2), and 4-6 weeks after (T3) competition. Measures included body composition (fat mass [FM] and lean mass [LM] from ultrasongraphy), resting metabolic rate (RMR; indirect calorimetry), and salivary leptin, testosterone, cortisol, ghrelin, and insulin. Total body water (TBW; bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy) was measured at T1 and T2 in a subsample (n = 8) of athletes. Significant (p T2 > T1), LM (T1 = 57.6 ± 13.9 kg, T2 = 59.4 ± 14.2, T3 = 59.3 ± 14.2; T2 and T3 > T1), and FM (T1 = 7.7 ± 4.4 kg, T2 = 8.0 ± 4.4, T3 = 10.0 ± 6.2; T3 > T1 and T2). TBW increased from T1 to T2 (Δ=1.9 ± 1.3 L, p < .01). RMR increased from baseline (1612 ± 266 kcal/day; 92.0% of predicted) to T2 (1881 ± 329, 105.3%; p < .01) and T3 (1778 ± 257, 99.6%; p < .001). Cortisol was higher (p < .05) at T2 (0.41 ± 0.31 μg/dL) than T1 (0.34 ± 0.31) and T3 (0.35 ± 0.27). Male testosterone at T3 (186.6 ± 41.3 pg/mL) was greater than T2 (148.0 ± 44.6, p = .04). RMR changes were associated (p ≤ .05) with change in body fat percent (ΔBF%; r = .59) and T3 protein intake (r= .60); male testosterone changes were inversely associated (p≤ .05) with ΔBF%, ΔFM, and Δweight (r=-0.81--0.88). TBW increased within days of competition. Precompetition RMR suppression appeared to be variable and markedly reversed by overfeeding, and reverted toward normal levels following competition. RMR and male testosterone increased while FM was preferentially gained 4-6 weeks postcompetition.

  8. Physiological constraints and energetic costs of diving behaviour in marine mammals: a review of studies using trained Steller sea lions diving in the open ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David A S; Hindle, Allyson G; Gerlinsky, Carling D; Goundie, Elizabeth; Hastie, Gordon D; Volpov, Beth L; Trites, Andrew W

    2017-01-01

    Marine mammals are characterized as having physiological specializations that maximize the use of oxygen stores to prolong time spent under water. However, it has been difficult to undertake the requisite controlled studies to determine the physiological limitations and trade-offs that marine mammals face while diving in the wild under varying environmental and nutritional conditions. For the past decade, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) trained to swim and dive in the open ocean away from the physical confines of pools participated in studies that investigated the interactions between diving behaviour, energetic costs, physiological constraints, and prey availability. Many of these studies measured the cost of diving to understand how it varies with behaviour and environmental and physiological conditions. Collectively, these studies show that the type of diving (dive bouts or single dives), the level of underwater activity, the depth and duration of dives, and the nutritional status and physical condition of the animal affect the cost of diving and foraging. They show that dive depth, dive and surface duration, and the type of dive result in physiological adjustments (heart rate, gas exchange) that may be independent of energy expenditure. They also demonstrate that changes in prey abundance and nutritional status cause sea lions to alter the balance between time spent at the surface acquiring oxygen (and offloading CO 2 and other metabolic by-products) and time spent at depth acquiring prey. These new insights into the physiological basis of diving behaviour further our understanding of the potential scope for behavioural responses of marine mammals to environmental changes, the energetic significance of these adjustments, and the consequences of approaching physiological limits.

  9. Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Impact Biopharmaceutics and Formulation Strategies in Drug Development-Industry Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Chung, John; van Asperen, Judith; Heimbach, Tycho

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in drug development and regulatory applications. Although most of the published examples have focused on aspects such as first-in-human (FIH) dose predictions or drug-drug interactions, several publications have highlighted the application of these models in the biopharmaceutics field and their use to inform formulation development. In this report, we present 5 case studies of use of such models in this biopharmaceutics/formulation space across different pharmaceutical companies. The case studies cover different aspects of biopharmaceutics or formulation questions including (1) prediction of absorption prior to FIH studies; (2) optimization of formulation and dissolution method post-FIH data; (3) early exploration of a modified-release formulation; (4) addressing bridging questions for late-stage formulation changes; and (5) prediction of pharmacokinetics in the fed state for a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class I drug with fasted state data. The discussion of the case studies focuses on how such models can facilitate decisions and biopharmaceutic understanding of drug candidates and the opportunities for increased use and acceptance of such models in drug development and regulatory interactions. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reveal Protein Molecular Structural-Chemical Differences Between Two Types of Winterfat (Forage) Seeds with Physiological Differences in Low Temperature Tolerance Using Synchrotron-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.; Wang, R.; Bai, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) (forage seed) is a long-lived native shrub with superior forage quality for livestock and wildlife. The objectives of this study were to use advanced synchrotron technology [S-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR)] as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences in terms of protein secondary structures between the two types of winterfat (forage) seeds, which show physiological differences in low-temperature tolerances. This experiment was performed at beamline U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS in Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL, U.S. Department of Energy (NSLS-BNL, New York). The results showed that with the synchrotron analytical technique (S-FTIR), the molecular structural-chemical makeup and characteristics of the winterfat seed tissues could be imaged and revealed. The protein secondary structures differed between the large and the small seed tissues. By using the multicomponent peaks modeling method, the results show that the large seeds contained no significant differences (P > 0.05) in percentage of β-sheet (average 37.0%) and α-helix (average 24.1%). However, the large seeds contained a lower (P < 0.05) percentage of β-turns (18.1 vs. 20.1%) and a lower (P < 0.05) ratio of β-turns to α-helices (0.8 vs. 0.9) and β-turns to β-sheets (0.5 vs. 0.6). Our results demonstrate the potential of highly spatially resolved synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy to reveal differences of structural molecular chemistry and protein secondary structures, which are associated with seed size variation and may affect germination behaviors

  11. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  12. Nucleon structure study by virtual compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Breton, V.; Fonvielle, H.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Quemener, G.; Ravel, O.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Boeglin, W.U.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M.; Edelhoff, R.; Friedrich, J.; Geiges, R.; Jennewein, P.; Kahrau, M.; Korn, M.; Kramer, H.; Krygier, K.W.; Kunde, V.; Liesenfeld, A.; Merle, K.; Neuhausen, R.; Offermann, E.A.J.M.; Pospischil, T.; Rosner, G.; Sauer, P.; Schmieden, H.; Schardt, S.; Tamas, G.; Wagner, A.; Walcher, T.; Wolf, S.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to study nucleon structure by Virtual Compton Scattering using the reaction p(e,e'p)γ with the MAMI facility. We will detect the scattered electron and the recoil proton in coincidence in the high resolution spectrometers of the hall A1. Compton events will be separated from the other channels (principally π 0 production) by missing-mass reconstruction. We plan to investigate this reaction near threshold. Our goal is to measure new electromagnetic observables which generalize the usual magnetic and electric polarizabilities. (authors). 9 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Structures and the Hydrogen Bonding Abilities of Estrogens Studied by Supersonic Jet/laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Estrone, estradiol, estriol are known as endogenous estrogen which have the same steroidal frame with different substituent, leading to difference of physiological activity upon the formation of hydrogen bond with estrogen receptor. In the present study, structures of estrogens and their hydrated clusters in a supersonic jet have been studied by various laser spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory calculation to study how the difference of substituents affects their hydrogen bonding ability. Infrared spectra in the OH stretching region indicate a formation of intramolecular hydrogen-bond in estriol, which may lead to weaker physiological activity among the three estrogens. We also measured electronic and infrared spectra of 1:1 hydrated clusters of estrogen. The results show a switch of stable hydration site from the phenolic OH group to the five member ring by substituting one more OH group.

  14. Ethylenediurea as a potential tool in evaluating ozone phytotoxicity: a review study on physiological, biochemical and morphological responses of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Supriya

    2017-06-01

    Present-day climate change scenario has intensified the problem of continuously increasing ground-level ozone (O 3 ), which is responsible for causing deleterious effects on growth and development of plants. Studies involving use of ethylenediurea (EDU), a chemical with antiozonant properties, have given some promising results in evaluating O 3 injury in plants. The use of EDU is especially advantageous in developing countries which face a more severe problem of ground-level O 3 , and technical O 3 -induced yield loss assessment techniques like open-top chambers cannot be used. Recent studies have detected a hormetic response of EDU on plants; i.e. treatment with higher EDU concentrations may or may not show any adverse effect on plants depending upon the experimental conditions. Although the mode of action of EDU is still debated, it is confirmed that EDU remains confined in the apoplastic regions. Certain studies indicate that EDU significantly affects the electron transport chain and has positive impact on the antioxidant defence machinery of the plants. However, the mechanism of protecting the yield of plants without significantly affecting photosynthesis is still questionable. This review discusses in details the probable mode of action of EDU on the basis of available data along with the impact of EDU on physiological, biochemical, growth and yield response of plants under O 3 stress. Data regarding the effect of EDU on plant 'omics' is highly insufficient and can form an important aspect of future EDU research.

  15. Edaphic, structural and physiological contrasts across Amazon Basin forest–savanna ecotones suggest a role for potassium as a key modulator of tropical woody vegetation structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lloyd

    2015-11-01

    C / N ratios than nearby forest plots. These soil differences were also reflected in canopy averaged leaf traits with savanna trees typically having higher leaf mass per unit area but lower mass-based nitrogen (Nm and potassium (Km. Both Nm and Km also increased with declining mean annual precipitation (PA, but most area-based leaf traits such as leaf photosynthetic capacity showed no systematic variation with PA or vegetation type. Despite this invariance, when taken in conjunction with other measures such as mean canopy height, area-based soil exchangeable potassium content, [K]sa , proved to be an excellent predictor of several photosynthetic properties (including 13C isotope discrimination. Moreover, when considered in a multivariate context with PA and soil plant available water storage capacity (θP as covariates, [K]sa also proved to be an excellent predictor of stand-level canopy area, providing drastically improved fits as compared to models considering just PA and/or θP. Neither calcium, nor magnesium, nor soil pH could substitute for potassium when tested as alternative model predictors (ΔAIC > 10. Nor for any model could simple soil texture metrics such as sand or clay content substitute for either [K]sa or θP. Taken in conjunction with recent work in Africa and the forests of the Amazon Basin, this suggests – in combination with some newly conceptualised interacting effects of PA and θP also presented here – a critical role for potassium as a modulator of tropical vegetation structure and function.

  16. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  17. Thermal (dis)comfort experienced from physiological movements across indoor, transitional and outdoor spaces in Singapore: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Heng, Su; Chow, Winston

    2017-04-01

    Human thermal comfort research is important as climate discomfort can adversely affect both health and work productivity in cities; however, such biometeorological work in low-latitude urban areas is still relatively unstudied hitherto. In the tropical metropolis of Singapore, a suite of policies have been implemented aimed at improving environmental sustainability via increasing car-free commutes and pedestrian movement during work/school journeys, with the consequence that individuals will likely have increased personal exposure through a variety of spaces (and climates) during typical daily activities. As such, research into exploring the thermal (dis)comfort experienced during pedestrian movements across these indoor, outdoor and transitional (semi-outdoor) spaces would yield interesting applied biometerological insights. This pilot study thus investigates how pedestrian thermal comfort varies spatially across a university campus, and how the physical intensity of pedestrian travel affects thermal comfort across these spaces. Over a 10-week period, we profiled six students for both their objective and subjective pedestrian thermal comfort during traverses across different spaces. Data were obtained through use of (a.) of a heat stress sensor, (b.) a fitness tracker, and (b.) a questionnaire survey to record traverse measurements of the microclimate, their physiological data, and their perceived microclimate comfort respectively. Measured climate and physiological data were used to derive commonly-used thermal comfort indices like wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and physiological equivalent temperature (PET). Further, interviews were conducted with all six subjects at the end of the fieldwork period to ascertain details on individual acclimatization behavior and adaptation strategies. The results indicate that (a.) more than 50% of the microclimatic conditions within each indoor, semi-outdoor, and outdoor space exceeded heat stress thresholds of both PET and

  18. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  19. Physiology Flies with Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Amita

    2017-11-30

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology has been awarded to Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young for elucidating molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock. From studies beginning in fruit flies, we now know that circadian regulation pervades most biological processes and has strong ties to human health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chettiar, Uday K. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Liu, Zhengtong (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Thoreson, Mark D. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Shalaev, Vladimir M. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Drachev, Vladimir P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Nyga, Piotr (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  1. Psycho-physiological assessment of a prosthetic hand sensory feedback system based on an auditory display: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Jose

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic hand users have to rely extensively on visual feedback, which seems to lead to a high conscious burden for the users, in order to manipulate their prosthetic devices. Indirect methods (electro-cutaneous, vibrotactile, auditory cues have been used to convey information from the artificial limb to the amputee, but the usability and advantages of these feedback methods were explored mainly by looking at the performance results, not taking into account measurements of the user’s mental effort, attention, and emotions. The main objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of using psycho-physiological measurements to assess cognitive effort when manipulating a robot hand with and without the usage of a sensory substitution system based on auditory feedback, and how these psycho-physiological recordings relate to temporal and grasping performance in a static setting. Methods 10 male subjects (26+/-years old, participated in this study and were asked to come for 2 consecutive days. On the first day the experiment objective, tasks, and experiment setting was explained. Then, they completed a 30 minutes guided training. On the second day each subject was tested in 3 different modalities: Auditory Feedback only control (AF, Visual Feedback only control (VF, and Audiovisual Feedback control (AVF. For each modality they were asked to perform 10 trials. At the end of each test, the subject had to answer the NASA TLX questionnaire. Also, during the test the subject’s EEG, ECG, electro-dermal activity (EDA, and respiration rate were measured. Results The results show that a higher mental effort is needed when the subjects rely only on their vision, and that this effort seems to be reduced when auditory feedback is added to the human-machine interaction (multimodal feedback. Furthermore, better temporal performance and better grasping performance was obtained in the audiovisual modality. Conclusions The performance

  2. Physiologic strains in the lumbar spinal ligaments. An in vitro biomechanical study 1981 Volvo Award in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Goel, V K; Takata, K

    1982-01-01

    For understanding of the mechanical causes of low-back pain, knowledge of the biomechanics of the various spinal elements is essential. In this in vitro biomechanical study, in situ behavior of spinal ligaments of the L3-4 and L4-5 functional spinal units during physiologic activities was studied in a three-stage procedure. First, 72 load-displacement curves were obtained to determine the three-dimensional flexibility characteristics of the spinal units. Second, three-dimensional morphometric measurements were made of all the spinal ligament attachment points. Finally, a mathematical model was constructed to combine the flexibility and morphometric data and compute the ligament length changes and strains as functions of various spinal movements. In flexion movement, the interspinous and supra-spinous ligaments were found to be subjected to the highest strains, followed by the capsular ligaments and the ligamentum flavum. During extension, it is the anterior longitudinal ligament that has the maximum strain. In lateral bending, the contralateral transverse ligaments carried the highest strains, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were relatively unstrained. In rotation, the capsular ligaments were by far the most strained ligaments.

  3. Anatomical and physiologic characteristics to predict football ability. Report of study methods and correlations, University of Arkansas, 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J A; Brown, B; Micheli, R P; Coker, T P

    1980-01-01

    In a prospective study of 56 scholarship players at the University of Arkansas in 1976, 14 anatomical and physiologic measurements were carried out on each of the 56 players, to include certain orthopaedic strength, power, and balance tests, and compared to the coaches' subjective ratings of football ability in an effort to determine which characteristics best correlate to the athlete's true performance. The correlation matrix for the criterion measure and the predictor variables of selected anatomical strength, balance, and power measures are presented, and the results of the study indicate that genu varum (0.445) and tibial torsion (-0.33) had the highest correlation with the coaching criterion variable. The average tibial torsion was 42.6 for these scholarship athletes, while normal average tibial torsion among a nonscholarship group was 27.40 degrees. Other anatomical characteristics measured, as well as strength and power measure, could not reach the critical level of +/- 0.263 to be significant at the 0.05 level, although horsepower was close (0.255). The Margaria-Kalamen power test was significantly related to the 40-yard dash, and a moderately good measure of football ability.

  4. Study on inter-ethnic human differences in bioactivation and detoxification of estragole using physiologically based kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jia; Louisse, Jochem; Spenkelink, Bert; Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2017-09-01

    Considering the rapid developments in food safety in the past decade in China, it is of importance to obtain insight into what extent safety and risk assessments of chemicals performed for the Caucasian population apply to the Chinese population. The aim of the present study was to determine physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modeling-based predictions for differences between Chinese and Caucasians in terms of metabolic bioactivation and detoxification of the food-borne genotoxic carcinogen estragole. The PBK models were defined based on kinetic constants for hepatic metabolism derived from in vitro incubations using liver fractions of the two ethnic groups, and used to evaluate the inter-ethnic differences in metabolic activation and detoxification of estragole. The models predicted that at realistic dietary intake levels, only 0.02% of the dose was converted to the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole in Chinese subjects, whereas this amounted to 0.09% of the dose in Caucasian subjects. Detoxification of 1'-hydroxyestragole, mainly via conversion to 1'-oxoestragole, was similar within the two ethnic groups. The 4.5-fold variation in formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole accompanied by similar rates of detoxification may indicate a lower risk of estragole for the Chinese population at similar levels of exposure. The study provides a proof of principle for how PBK modeling can identify differences in ethnic sensitivity and provide a more refined risk assessment for a specific ethnic group for a compound of concern.

  5. A Brief History of Bacterial Growth Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moselio eSchaechter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, microbial physiology started when Leeuwenhoek became fascinated by observing a Vorticella beating its cilia, my point being that almost any observation of microbes has a physiological component. With the advent of modern microbiology in the mid 19th century, the field became recognizably distinctive with such discoveries as anaerobiosis, fermentation as a biological phenomenon, and the nutritional requirements of microbes. Soon came the discoveries of Winogradsky and his followers of the chemical changes in the environment that result from microbial activities. Later, during the first half of the 20th century, microbial physiology became the basis for much of the elucidation of central metabolism.Bacterial physiology then became a handmaiden of molecular biology and was greatly influenced by the discovery of cellular regulatory mechanisms. Microbial growth, which had come of age with the early work of Hershey, Monod, and others, was later pursued by studies on a whole cell level by what became known as the Copenhagen School. During this time, the exploration of physiological activities became coupled to modern inquiries into the structure of the bacterial cell.Recent years have seen the development of a further phase in microbial physiology, one seeking a deeper quantitative understanding of phenomena on a whole cell level. This pursuit is exemplified by the emergence of systems biology, which is made possible by the development of technologies that permit the gathering of information in huge amounts. As has been true through history, the research into microbial physiology continues to be guided by the development of new methods of analysis. Some of these developments may well afford the possibility of making stunning breakthroughs.

  6. Structural and magnetic study of ferrosmectics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsinet, Virginie

    1994-01-01

    The ferrosmectic phase is a new system obtained by combination of a lamellar phase of surfactants and of a ferro-fluid. In this research thesis, the author shows that the introduction of solid particles of ferro-fluid maintains the lamellar structure of the lyotropic phase. The structure of the ferrosmectic phase is studied by small angle X ray and neutron scattering. Differences displayed by scattering spectra whether the lamellar phase is doped or not, are interpreted by a modification of the inter-membrane potential due to the introduction of particles, whereas membranes are not much modified. It is noticed that the ferrosmectic phase presents spectacular distortion behaviours when submitted to low intensity magnetic field. These effects are interpreted within the framework of a model in terms of phase transitions. The author determines smectic elasticity constants of the ferrosmectic phase and their evolution with respect to the doping rate in solid particles. This is a first step for the understanding of microscopic behaviours which govern the stability of these hybrid phases in which fluid membranes and solid particles coexist [fr

  7. Changes in Student Motivational Structure During Adolescence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagey, William J.

    This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study of the motivational profiles of 524 students from grade 7 through the freshman year in college. A new Motivation Inventory was administered to all students. This instrument measures six classes of needs referred to by Abraham Maslow as physiological, safety, love and belonging, esteem,…

  8. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  9. Exposure to air pollution near a steel plant and effects on cardiovascular physiology: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Kauri, Lisa Marie; Mahmud, Mamun; Weichenthal, Scott; Cakmak, Sabit; Shutt, Robin; You, Hongyu; Thomson, Errol; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari; Broad, Gayle; Dales, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Iron and steel industry is an important source of air pollution emissions. Few studies have investigated cardiovascular effects of air pollutants emitted from steel plants. We examined the influence of outdoor air pollution in the vicinity of a steel plant on cardiovascular physiology in Sault Ste. Marie, Canada. Sixty-one healthy, non-smoking subjects (females/males=33/28, median age 22 years) spent 5 consecutive 8-hour days outdoors in a residential area neighbouring a steel plant, or on a college campus approximately 5 kilometres away from the plant, and then crossed over to the other site with a 9-day washout. Mid day, subjects underwent daily 30-minute moderate intensity exercise. Blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate were determined daily and post exercise at both sites. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) was determined at the site near the plant. Air pollution was monitored at both sites. Mixed-effects regressions were run for statistical associations, adjusting for weather variables. Concentrations of ultrafine particles, sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were 50-100% higher at the site near the plant than at the college site, with minor differences in temperature, humidity, and concentrations of particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in size (PM2.5) and ozone (O3). Resting pulse rate [mean (95% confidence interval)] was moderately higher near the steel plant [+1.53 bpm (0.31, 2.78)] than at the college site, male subjects having the highest pulse rate elevation [+2.77 bpm (0.78, 4.76)]. Resting systolic and diastolic BP and pulse pressure, and post-exercise BP and pulse rate were not significantly different between two sites. Interquartile range concentrations of SO2 (2.9 ppb), NO2 (5.0 ppb) and CO (0.2 ppm) were associated with increased pulse rate [0.19 bpm (-0.00, 0.38), 0.86 bpm (0.03, 1.68), and 0.11 bpm (0.00, 0.22), respectively], ultrafine particles (10,256 count/cm(3)) associated with increased pulse pressure [0.85 mmHg (0

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Study of IVGTT-Based Measures of First Phase Insulin Secretion Refines the Underlying Physiology of Type 2 Diabetes Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Andrew R; Jonsson, Anna; Jackson, Anne U

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the physiological mechanisms by which common variants predispose to type 2 diabetes requires large studies with detailed measures of insulin secretion and sensitivity. Here we performed the largest genome-wide association study of first-phase insulin secretion, as measured by intrav...

  11. Learning Style versus Time Spent Studying and Career Choice: Which Is Associated with Success in a Combined Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n?=?492) from the fall semester course completed…

  12. Identifying Demographic and Academic Issues that Influence the Passing or Failing of the Physiology Course in the Medicine Study Program of UCIMED (University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Vanegas-Pissa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available (This paper, product of a research project, analyzes some academic and demographic issues that might influence students passing or failing Physiology in the Licentiate Study Program in Medicine and Surgery at UCIMED (University of Medical Sciences between 2008 and 2011. This was a retrospective cohort study. We analyzed the grades obtained by the students who were taking Physiology for the first, second or third time during the research period, the semesters in which the grades were obtained, who passed or failed the course, their sociodemographic characteristics, and other courses passed or failed previously with their corresponding grades. For the data analysis, we used the Stata 13 software (Data Analysis and Statistical Software with a logistic regression model to determine the variables, which explain the passing or failing of the Physiology course. The results showed that the variables with a greater effect on the probability of p

  13. Organizational Justice and Physiological Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Japanese Employees: a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito; Eguchi, Hisashi; Miyaki, Koichi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence has shown that lack of organizational justice (i.e., procedural justice and interactional justice) is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) while biological mechanisms underlying this association have not yet been fully clarified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cross-sectional association of organizational justice with physiological CHD risk factors (i.e., blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, and triglyceride) in Japanese employees. Overall, 3598 male and 901 female employees from two manufacturing companies in Japan completed self-administered questionnaires measuring organizational justice, demographic characteristics, and lifestyle factors. They completed health checkup, which included blood pressure and serum lipid measurements. Multiple logistic regression analyses and trend tests were conducted. Among male employees, multiple logistic regression analyses and trend tests showed significant associations of low procedural justice and low interactional justice with high triglyceride (defined as 150 mg/dL or greater) after adjusting for demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors. Among female employees, trend tests showed significant dose-response relationship between low interactional justice and high LDL cholesterol (defined as 140 mg/dL or greater) while multiple logistic regression analysis showed only marginally significant or insignificant odds ratio of high LDL cholesterol among the low interactional justice group. Neither procedural justice nor interactional justice was associated with blood pressure or HDL cholesterol. Organizational justice may be an important psychosocial factor associated with increased triglyceride at least among Japanese male employees.

  14. Association Study between Lead and Zinc Accumulation at Different Physiological Systems of Cattle by Canonical Correlation and Canonical Correspondence Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmakar, Partha; Das, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Seema Sarkar; Karmakar, Sougata; Mazumdar, Debasis

    2010-01-01

    Pb pollution from automobile exhausts around highways is a persistent problem in India. Pb intoxication in mammalian body is a complex phenomenon which is influence by agonistic and antagonistic interactions of several other heavy metals and micronutrients. An attempt has been made to study the association between Pb and Zn accumulation in different physiological systems of cattles (n = 200) by application of both canonical correlation and canonical correspondence analyses. Pb was estimated from plasma, liver, bone, muscle, kidney, blood and milk where as Zn was measured from all these systems except bone, blood and milk. Both statistical techniques demonstrated that there was a strong association among blood-Pb, liver-Zn, kidney-Zn and muscle-Zn. From observations, it can be assumed that Zn accumulation in cattles' muscle, liver and kidney directs Pb mobilization from those organs which in turn increases Pb pool in blood. It indicates antagonistic activity of Zn to the accumulation of Pb. Although there were some contradictions between the observations obtained from the two different statistical methods, the overall pattern of Pb accumulation in various organs as influenced by Zn were same. It is mainly due to the fact that canonical correlation is actually a special type of canonical correspondence analyses where linear relationship is followed between two groups of variables instead of Gaussian relationship.

  15. Association Study between Lead and Zinc Accumulation at Different Physiological Systems of Cattle by Canonical Correlation and Canonical Correspondence Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Partha; Das, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Seema Sarkar; Karmakar, Sougata; Mazumdar, Debasis

    2010-10-01

    Pb pollution from automobile exhausts around highways is a persistent problem in India. Pb intoxication in mammalian body is a complex phenomenon which is influence by agonistic and antagonistic interactions of several other heavy metals and micronutrients. An attempt has been made to study the association between Pb and Zn accumulation in different physiological systems of cattles (n = 200) by application of both canonical correlation and canonical correspondence analyses. Pb was estimated from plasma, liver, bone, muscle, kidney, blood and milk where as Zn was measured from all these systems except bone, blood and milk. Both statistical techniques demonstrated that there was a strong association among blood-Pb, liver-Zn, kidney-Zn and muscle-Zn. From observations, it can be assumed that Zn accumulation in cattles' muscle, liver and kidney directs Pb mobilization from those organs which in turn increases Pb pool in blood. It indicates antagonistic activity of Zn to the accumulation of Pb. Although there were some contradictions between the observations obtained from the two different statistical methods, the overall pattern of Pb accumulation in various organs as influenced by Zn were same. It is mainly due to the fact that canonical correlation is actually a special type of canonical correspondence analyses where linear relationship is followed between two groups of variables instead of Gaussian relationship.

  16. The Influence of Urban Natural and Built Environments on Physiological and Psychological Measures of Stress— A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Beil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Environments shape health and well-being, yet little research has investigated how different real-world environmental settings influence the well-known determinant of health known as stress. Using a cross-over experimental design; this pilot study investigated the effect of four urban environments on physiological and psychological stress measures. Participants (N = 15 were exposed on separate days to one of the four settings for 20 min. These settings were designated as Very Natural; Mostly Natural; Mostly Built and Very Built. Visitation order to the four settings was individually randomized. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase; as well as self-report measures of stress; were collected before and after exposure to each setting. Gender was included as a variable in analysis; and additional data about environmental self-identity, pre-existing stress, and perceived restorativeness of settings were collected as measures of covariance. Differences between environmental settings showed greater benefit from exposure to natural settings relative to built settings; as measured by pre-to-post changes in salivary amylase and self-reported stress; differences were more significant for females than for males. Inclusion of covariates in a regression analysis demonstrated significant predictive value of perceived restorativeness on these stress measures, suggesting some potential level of mediation. These data suggest that exposure to natural environments may warrant further investigation as a health promotion method for reducing stress.

  17. Physiological effects of the form of nitrogen on corn root tips: a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, F.H.; Anderson, I.C.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological effects of different N forms (NO − 3 , NH + 4 , or a combination of both) on corn (Zea mays L.) root tips and leaves were studied by following 31 P signals with a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. With root tips, both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH could be measured, whereas with leaves, only vacuolar pH could be determined. The N treatments did not affect the cytoplasmic pH of corn root tips in contrast to proposals of previous workers. Leaf vacuolar pH was higher and root tip vacuolar pH lower with NO − 3 than with NH + 4 . Under anaerobic conditions, cytoplasmic pH was reduced because of lactic acid fermentation. Nitrate, an electron acceptor, delayed the acidification of the cytoplasm compartment because it represents an alternative way to reoxidize NADH. In conclusion, for the conditions of these experiments, the pH of the cytoplasm of corn root tips was not modified by the form of N absorbed; however, the pH of this compartment was affected by the form of N presented during development anaerobiosi. (author)

  18. Studies on the exercise physiology of draft horses performed in Japan during the 1950s and 1960s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Atsushi; Sugano, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Although the total number of horses raised in Japan dramatically decreased after World War II, because draft horses were still used for farm work in paddy fields and on farms during the period of the 1950s and 1960s, a performance test for selecting better draft horses was needed. In order to determine the most suitable size of draft horses for Japanese farm conditions, the working power of horses weighing from 185 to 622 kg was evaluated by performing an endurance test, several kinds of working power tests, and maximum pulling power tests. Oxygen consumption during draft exercise was measured by the Douglas bag method in order to evaluate effects of draft workload under the conditions of different types of work (14- and 18-cm plow depths, cultivator, and tillage), traction methods (shoulder traction, shoulder-trunk traction, and chest-trunk traction), walking speeds (40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 m/min), and depths of water (0, 18, 36, and 54 cm) on energy expenditure. The relationship between energy consumption and pulse rate during exercise was also evaluated. A study of a performance test for draft horses was conducted to establish a new approach for evaluating draft horse performance using heart rate as an index. For this study, a beat meter for measuring heart rate was developed, and experimental protocols were used to evaluate the relationship between heart rate and workload. Although the research results obtained from these studies do not have particular relevance in the current day, these studies are valuable for understanding the history of equine exercise physiology in Japan.

  19. Structure and Function Study of HIV and Influenza Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza virus are membrane-enveloped viruses causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and flu. The initial step of HIV and influenza virus infection is fusion between viral and host cell membrane catalyzed by the viral fusion protein gp41 and hemagglutinin (HA) respectively. However, the structure of gp41 and HA as well as the infection mechanism are still not fully understood. This work addresses (1) full length gp41 ectodomain and TM domain structure and function and (2) IFP membrane location and IFP-membrane interaction. My studies of gp41 protein and IFP can provide better understanding of the membrane fusion mechanism and may aid development of anti-viral therapeutics and vaccine. The full length ectodomain and transmembrane domain of gp41 and shorter constructs were expressed, purified and solubilized at physiology conditions. The constructs adopt overall alpha helical structure in SDS and DPC detergents, and showed hyperthermostability with Tm > 90 °C. The oligomeric states of these proteins vary in different detergent buffer: predominant trimer for all constructs and some hexamer fraction for HM and HM_TM protein in SDS at pH 7.4; and mixtures of monomer, trimer, and higher-order oligomer protein in DPC at pH 4.0 and 7.4. Substantial protein-induced vesicle fusion was observed, including fusion of neutral vesicles at neutral pH, which are the conditions similar HIV/cell fusion. Vesicle fusion by a gp41 ectodomain construct has rarely been observed under these conditions, and is aided by inclusion of both the FP and TM, and by protein which is predominantly trimer rather than monomer. Current data was integrated with existing data, and a structural model was proposed. Secondary structure and conformation of IFP is a helix-turn-helix structure in membrane. However, there has been arguments about the IFP membrane location. 13C-2H REDOR solid-state NMR is used to solve this problem. The IFP adopts major alpha

  20. The structure of perfectionism: a twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Federica; Aggen, Steven H; Neale, Benjamin M; Anderson, Charles B; Mazzeo, Suzanne E; Neale, Michael C; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2004-09-01

    Perfectionism may be a premorbid risk factor for eating disorders. Evidence of familial transmission suggests features of perfectionism may be genetically determined. This study examines the structure of perfectionism using classical twin design models. Independent (IP) and common (CP) pathway models are used to investigate the extent to which genetic and environmental factors can help to identify and differentiate three behavioral domains of perfectionism as measured by a shortened version of the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS) [Frost et al. (1990). Cognit. Ther. Res. 14: 449-468]. Three of the original subscales were included: Personal standards (PS), Doubts about actions (DA), Concern over mistakes (CM). We studied a sample of 1022 paired and unpaired female twins from the Mid-Atlantic Twin Registry. MZ correlations were consistently higher than DZ twin correlations for all three composite subscales. The multivariate independent pathway model provided a better fit to the twin correlations then did the more parsimonious common pathway model suggesting the pattern of familial resemblance for the three subscales is not well characterized by a unidimensional perfectionism factor. CM phenotypic variance was completely accounted for by common heritability influences in both the IP and CP models. Based on the IP model results, there was evidence that PS and CM but not DA shared some common genetic effects, with DA and CM sharing some common environmental factors. These multivariate twin modeling results support conceptualizations of perfectionism as a multidimensional construct. The biometric structural results for the three subscales examined here suggest CM is the core feature of Perfectionism with DA and PS serving as indicators of CM. Although not the best fitting model, the common pathway model estimated this behavioral domain to be isomorphic with the construct of perfectionism. The better fitting independent pathway model provided evidence of non

  1. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram) which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM) and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females) while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music). ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality) showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females) showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ) correlates with both function (increased network centrality) and structure (grey matter volume) of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  2. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music. ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens. Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ correlates with both function (increased network centrality and structure (grey matter volume of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  3. Cognitive function modifies the effect of physiological function on the risk of multiple falls--a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kara L; Blizzard, Leigh; Srikanth, Velandai K; Wood, Amanda; Thomson, Russell; Sanders, Lauren M; Callisaya, Michele L

    2013-09-01

    There is a poor understanding of the interplay between cognitive and physiological functions in leading to falls. We hypothesized that poorer physiological function would modify the effect of poorer cognitive function on increased risk of falling in older people. A range of cognitive (executive function/attention, memory, processing speed, and visuospatial ability) and physiological functions (vision, proprioception, sway, leg strength, reaction time) were measured using standardized tests in 386 randomly selected adults aged 60-86. Incident falls were recorded over 12 months. Log-multinomial regression was used to model the relationships and test for interactions between cognition and physiological function in explaining the risk of single or multiple falls. Overall, 94 people (24.4%) had a single fall, and 78 (20.2%) had multiple falls. No significant associations were observed between cognitive function and the risk of single falls. The risk of multiple falls was increased with poorer function in Stroop dot time (RR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.01, 1.05], p = .002) and Stroop word time (RR = 1.02 [1.01, 1.03], p = .001) and reduced with better function in Category Fluency (RR = 0.94 [0.91, 0.98], p = .001) and visuospatial function (RR = 0.95 [0.92, 0.98], p falls due to physiological impairments in community-dwelling older people may need to be tailored based on cognitive impairment, a key factor in their inability to compensate for physical decline.

  4. Imaging and structural studies of DNA–protein complexes and membrane ion channels

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2017-01-17

    In bio-imaging by electron microscopy, damage of the sample and limited contrast are the two main hurdles for reaching high image quality. We extend a new preparation method based on nanofabrication and super-hydrophobicity to the imaging and structural studies of nucleic acids, nucleic acid-protein complexes (DNA/Rad51 repair protein complex) and neuronal ion channels (gap-junction, K+ and GABA(A) channels) as paradigms of biological significance and increasing complexity. The preparation method is based on the liquid phase and is compatible with physiological conditions. Only in the very last stage, samples are dried for TEM analysis. Conventional TEM and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) were used to achieve a resolution of 3.3 and 1.5 angstrom, respectively. The EM dataset quality allows the determination of relevant structural and metrological information on the DNA structure, DNA-protein interactions and ion channels, allowing the identification of specific macromolecules and their structure.

  5. Studies of coal structure using carbene chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The object of this grant was to react coal, derivatized forms of coal, and solvent swelled coal with carbenes (divalent carbon species) under mild conditions. These carbenes were to be prepared by treating the coal with several diazo compounds and then thermally decomposing them at relatively low temperatures (80--130{degree}C). The carbenes were to be chosen to show varying selectively toward aromatic rings containing heteroatom functionalities and toward polynuclear aromatic systems. In some instances, where selectivities toward aromatic and heteroaromatic ring systems were not known, model studies were to be carried out. Because of the generally mild conditions employed and the good selectivity anticipated, and actually observed with one particular system, it was expected that this methodology would provide structural information about the coal, along with data on the extent of occurrence and type of aromatic systems. After carbene reactions, treatment of the coal samples was to include extractions and thermolysis. Physical studies included thermogravimetric analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) spectroscopy, gas chromatography, GC/MS and GC/FT-IR. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Physiological factors contributing to mobility loss over 9 years of follow-up—results from the InCHIANTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenholm, Sari; Shardell, Michelle; Bandinelli, Stefania; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-05-01

    Mobility is an essential aspect of everyday life and enables autonomy and participation. Although many risk factors for mobility loss have been previously described, their relative importance and independent contributions to the long-term risk of losing mobility have not been well defined. This study is based on 1,013 men and women aged ≥65 years enrolled in 1998-2000 and followed for 9 years through 2007-2008 in the population-based InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti, aging in the Chianti area) study. We considered 44 different measures assessed at baseline to explore six subsystems: (i) central nervous system, (ii) peripheral nervous system, (iii) muscles, (iv) bone and joints, (v) energy production and delivery, and (vi) perceptual system. The outcome was incident mobility loss defined as self-report of inability to walk 400 m or climb and descend 10 steps without help from another person. Random survival forest analysis was used to rank the candidate predictors by their importance. The most important physiological markers predicting mobility loss that emerged from the random survival forest modeling were older age among women (81-95 vs 65-68 years, hazard ratio [HR] 9.60 [95% CI 3.35, 27.50]), weaker ankle dorsiflexion strength (lowest vs highest quintile, HR 5.25 [95% CI 2.35, 11.72]), low hip flexion range of motion (lowest vs highest quintile, HR 2.30 [95% CI 1.20, 4.41]), presence of primitive reflexes (yes vs no, HR 1.47 [95% CI 1.03, 2.09]), and tremor (yes vs no, HR 1.91 [95% CI 1.18, 3.07]). Prevention of mobility loss with aging should focus on prevention and treatment of neuromuscular impairments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. BDR Tensile Structure Concept Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    expansion slab joints which form a regular pattern. Significant effort was made in an attempt to find a practically sound structural solution along this line...22314 bL;) UNCLASSIFIED * SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE When Date Entered) READ INSTRUCTIONS REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM ...particular, the so-called " tensegrity structures" patented by R. B. Fuller (Reference 2). Their structural behavior is quite unusual. Some of its relevant

  8. Anatomical and physiological differences between various species used in studies on the pharmacokinetics and toxicology of xenobiotics. A review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart LL de; Rompelberg CJM; Sips AJAM; Welink J; Engelen JGM van; LBM; CSR

    This is the first report of the project 'Selection of species and interspecies differences in relation to kinetics and dynamics of compounds'. An inventory was made of relevant physiological and anatomical characteristics of various species most commonly used in studies on pharmacokinetics and

  9. An overview of studies in structural mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.; Blay, N.; Broc, D.; Chaudat, T.; Feau, C.; Sollogoub, P.; Wang, F.; Baj, F.; Bung, H.; Combescure, D.; Lepareux, M.; Phalippou, C.; Bentejac, F.; Hourdequin, N.; Laporte, T.; Millard, A.; Nicolas, L.; Chapuliot, S.; Fissolo, A.; Gourdin, C.; Kayser, Y.; Marie, S.; Reytier, M.; Yuritzinn, T.; Magnaud, J.P.; Braillard, O.; Collard, B.; Gobillot, G.; Mori, V.; Vallory, J.; Pascal-Ribot, S.; Pluyette, E.; Berton, M.N.; Cabrillat, M.T.; Lejeail, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The present report gives an overview of the ongoing research programmes in structural mechanics at CEA/DEN. On the whole, these contributions are well representative of the research work performed, more oriented by engineering concerns than driven by pure academic goals. Fundamentally, the developed knowledge results in new methods and improved engineering and computational tools that can be used for CEA needs and transferred to industrial clients and partners. Basic research is carried out with the help of university laboratories, what allows CEA teams to identify the underlying problems and to address them in an adequate manner. Confrontation with other viewpoints and backgrounds takes place in international cooperative actions conducted with academic or industrial research centres, often giving rise to benchmarks. Due to the wide range of problems submitted to CEA/DEN, the R and D topics are numerous and the effort devoted to each of them is limited and sometimes not continuous. Basic research is of course more limited and needs thorough preparation in order to ensure that the key questions, which lock the progress, are really addressed.. Before to end, it is worth mentioning two original research actions which have begun: -) identification of medium state and representation of its variability by a probabilistic approach: this original approach couples inverse method an probability to obtain non directly measurable value from global effect on structures (for example deduce damage from the displacement of a loaded beam) and should be applied to non destructive identification of present state of nuclear reactor enclosures, -) a program of numerical simulations of fluid-elastic instability of a tube bundle submitted to cross flow has been initiated with an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian -ALE- finite element method to obtain a better knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon. From these simulations, the evolutions of pressure and velocity fields close to fluid

  10. Progress report on nuclear structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    In this report, new results are reported for the decay and nuclear orientation of 114,116 I and 114 Sb as well as data for the structure of daughter nuclides 114,116 Te. New results for IBM-2 calculations for the structure of 126 Xe are also reported. 6 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Incidence of non-physiologically complex surgical procedures performed in children: an Ontario population-based study of health administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Dexter, Franklin; Faraoni, David; Crawford, Mark W

    2018-01-01

    Quantification of surgical procedures undertaken by hospitals is necessary for informing resource allocation and modelling healthcare services. Our objective was to quantify the incidence, similarity, and diversity of non-physiologically complex surgical procedures performed at pediatric specialist hospitals and other hospitals performing pediatric surgery. We conducted a population-based cohort study of children aged 28 days to 18 yr who underwent surgery in the province of Ontario from 2007 to 2015 using healthcare administrative databases. We estimated the incidence of non-physiologically complex procedures (i.e., ≤ 7 basic units in the 2015 Ontario Health Insurance Plan Schedule of Benefits) performed in pediatric specialist hospitals and other hospitals performing pediatric surgery. We used Yue and Clayton's index and the effective number of common procedures (1/Herfindahl index) to quantify the similarity and diversity of pediatric surgical procedures performed in these hospital types. Overall, 830,830 pediatric surgical procedures were performed in 158 Ontario hospitals during the eight-year study period. Most surgical procedures performed at hospitals performing pediatric surgery were non-physiologically complex (vs 50%, P < 0.001). The incidence of non-physiologically complex procedures increased progressively each year at pediatric specialist hospitals and was associated with a reciprocal decline among the other hospitals. Comparing pediatric specialist hospitals with the other hospitals, the mean similarity index for non-physiologically complex procedures was less than moderate (0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51 to 0.54). The mean effective number of common non-physiologically complex procedures (i.e., the diversity) among the pediatric specialist hospitals was greater than at the other 154 hospitals performing pediatric surgery (65.3 vs 21.8 procedures, respectively; mean difference, 43.5; 95% CI, 42.2 to 44.8; P < 0.001). Non-physiologically

  12. Does Mental Health Status Influence Susceptibility to the Physiologic Effects of Air Pollution? A Population Based Study of Canadian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dales, Robert E; Cakmak, Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Both air pollution exposure and the presence of mental illness are associated with an increased risk of physical illness. To determine whether or not children with less favourable mental health are more susceptible to pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of ambient air pollution, compared to those who are mentally healthy. We carried out a cross-sectional study of 1,883 children between the ages of 6 and 17 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures population survey between 2007 and 2009. Subjects were assigned the air pollution values obtained from the National Air Pollution monitor closest to their neighborhood. Lung function, heart rate and blood pressure were stratified by indicators of mental health. The latter were ascertained by questions about feelings of happiness, a diagnosed mood disorder, and the emotional symptom subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Among those who reported a mood disorder, an interquartile increase in ozone was associated with increases in systolic and diastolic pressures of 3.8 mmHg (95% CI 1.6, 5.9) and 3.0mmHg (95%CI 0.9, 5.2) respectively, and a decreases in FVC of 7.6% (95% CI 2.9, 12.3). No significant changes in these variables were observed in those who did not report a mood disorder. Among those with unfavourable emotional symptoms, ozone was associated with a 6.4% (95% CI 1.7, 11.3) increase in heart rate, a 4.1% (95%CI 1.2, 7.1) increase in systolic blood pressure, and a 6.0% (95% CI 1.4, 10.6) decrease in FEVl. No significant effect was seen in these variables among those with no emotional symptoms. In the Canadian population, children who report mood disorders or unfavourable emotional symptoms appear to be more vulnerable to the adverse physiologic effects of air pollution.

  13. Criteria of choice in the planning of a solar radiation lamp arrangement, in climatic chambers for plant physiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materassi, A.; Fasano, G.; Vincenzi, M. De

    2006-01-01

    This technical note is an integration of the previous study: Climatic chambers for plant physiology: a new project concept. This note gives details regarding the planning of the lamp arrangement and demonstrates how mixing, in appropriate quantities, the radiative range of various types of lamps can give apparently contrasting results: to maximize radiation in maximum absorption range of chlorophylls and carotenoids; to minimize heat emission in the climatic chamber. With nine daylight fluorescent tubes, four sunlight metallic halide spotlights and nine red-blue fluorescent tubes, for a total of 562 W mE-2 (electric), mounted on the ceiling of a 2 m high chamber with a 4 square m surface area, on the chamber floor about 130 W mE-2 total solar radiation equivalent was obtained. This means a power emitted, in the bands of chlorophylls and carotenoids absorption, from a total solar radiation (black body of 5,500 K) of about 130 W mE-2. This radiation is sufficient to grow a large number of plant species. In the lamp arrangement there are seven other light fixtures, for fluorescent tubes, defined as auxiliary because tubes can be inserted which either integrate active radiation on the photoreceptors or produce particular spectral ranges. In the above cited work, fluorescent tubes producing in the ultraviolet B range were mounted in these auxiliary fixtures. Less thermal energy emitted in the climatic chamber means that it is possible to use a less powerful conditioning system and, thus, have lower costs of set-up and management. The efficiency of the lighting system is demonstrated by the fact that during 15 days of experimentation on 18-month-old, potted poplar plants (Populus alba), symptoms of insufficient light were not detected [it

  14. Physiologic effect of repeated adrenaline (epinephrine) doses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the cath lab setting: A randomised porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardig, Bjarne Madsen; Götberg, Michael; Rundgren, Malin; Götberg, Matthias; Zughaft, David; Kopotic, Robert; Wagner, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    This porcine study was designed to explore the effects of repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses on physiologic parameters during CPR. Thirty-six adult pigs were randomised to four injections of: adrenaline 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), adrenaline 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1) or saline control. The effect on systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CePP), end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry (SpO2), cerebral tissue oximetry (SctO2), were analysed immediately prior to each injection and at peak arterial systolic pressure and arterial blood gases were analysed at baseline and after 15 min. In the group given 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), there were increases in all arterial blood pressures at all 4 pressure peaks but CePP only increased significantly after peak 1. A decrease in ETCO2 following peak 1 and 2 was observed. SctO2 and SpO2 were lowered following injection 2 and beyond. In the group given a 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1), all ABP's increased at the first 4 pressure peaks but CePP only following 3 pressure peaks. Lower ETCO2, SctO2 and SpO2 were seen at peak 1 and beyond. In the two adrenaline groups, pH and Base Excess were lower and lactate levels higher compared to baseline as well as compared to the control. Repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses increased ABP's and to some extent also CePP, but significantly decreased organ and brain perfusion. The institutional protocol number: Malmö/Lund Committee for Animal Experiment Ethics, approval reference number: M 192-10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative physiology of a central hardwood old-growth forest canopy and forest gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. R. Gillespie; J. Waterman; K. Saylors

    1993-01-01

    Concerns of poor oak regeneration, changing climate, biodiversity patterns, and carbon cycling in the Central Hardwoods have prompted ecological and physiological studies of old-growth forests and their role in maintaining the landscape. To examine the effects of old-growth canopy structure on the physiological productivity of overstory and understory species, we...

  16. Environmental cues that induce the physiology of solid medium: a study on lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, N; Tarragó-Castellanos, M R; Barrios-González, J

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the main environmental factors that induce the special physiology displayed by fungi growing in solid culture-that is, higher secondary metabolite (SM) production-compared with those in submerged culture. Lovastatin-specific production (SP) was used as an indicator of the physiological status, and different model culture systems were used to evaluate the impact of potential solid-state fermentation (SSF) environmental stimuli. Direct contact with air was identified as an important stimulus. Cultures with two or more hours of exposure to air showed typical SSF lovastatin SP (1462% higher than cultures exposed for 0·08 h). Intermediate times of exposure generated intermediate physiological states. Support-related stimuli also induced higher lovastatin SP, even in a liquid environment (679% increase). Direct contact with air, as well as support-related stimuli, are major environmental cues that induce the physiology of solid medium. This knowledge is the starting point to investigate how these environmental cues are sensed and transduced, impacting SM and enzyme production. These results have important applied potential in new strategies to generate overproducing strains, as well as application in the design of novel production systems. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. A Study of the Physiological Factors Affecting the Nature of the Adult Learner in the Phoenix Air National Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, James Brison

    An investigation reviewed current literature in the field of physiological factors affecting the adult learning environment. These findings were compared to the academic learning environment at the Phoenix Air National Guard. The end product was a set of recommendations for management to implement in order to improve the learning climate for the…

  18. Collaborative Teaching Strategies Lead to Retention of Skills in Acid-Base Physiology: A 2-Yr Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jacob P.; Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Berg, Ronan M. G.

    2015-01-01

    A basic understanding of acid-base physiology is critical for the correct assessment of arterial blood gases in the clinical setting. In this context, collaborative teaching strategies in the undergraduate classroom setting may be useful, since it has been reported to enhance both transfer and retention of learned material in a time-efficient…

  19. Variation Principles and Applications in the Study of Cell Structure and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, Angelos C.; Miquel, Jaime; Ballard, Ralph C.; Johnson, John E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In this report we have attempted to show that "some reality lies concealed in biological variation". This "reality" has its principles, laws, mechanisms, and rules, only a few of which we have sketched. A related idea we pursued was that important information may be lost in the process of ignoring frequency distributions of physiological variables (as is customary in experimental physiology and gerontology). We suggested that it may be advantageous to expand one's "statistical field of vision" beyond simple averages +/- standard deviations. Indeed, frequency distribution analysis may make visible some hidden information not evident from a simple qualitative analysis, particularly when the effect of some external factor or condition (e.g., aging, dietary chemicals) is being investigated. This was clearly illustrated by the application of distribution analysis in the study of variation in mouse liver cellular and fine structure, and may be true of fine structural studies in general. In living systems, structure and function interact in a dynamic way; they are "inseparable," unlike in technological systems or machines. Changes in fine structure therefore reflect changes in function. If such changes do not exceed a certain physiologic range, a quantitative analysis of structure will provide valuable information on quantitative changes in function that may not be possible or easy to measure directly. Because there is a large inherent variation in fine structure of cells in a given organ of an individual and among individuals, changes in fine structure can be analyzed only by studying frequency distribution curves of various structural characteristics (dimensions). Simple averages +/- S.D. do not in general reveal all information on the effect of a certain factor, because often this effect is not uniform; on the contrary, this will be apparent from distribution analysis because the form of the curves will be affected. We have also attempted to show in this chapter that

  20. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.; Staffeldt, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of lifetime effects of ionizing radiation was at first directed almost exclusively toward effects on disease incidence and life-span, because these kinds of cumulative damage were the most prominent and serious late effects of ionizing radiation. The experimental program of our team on the effects of life-time gamma-ray exposure on the survival of mice and other rodent species was completed several years ago, but important analysis and modeling efforts continue. A report of one aspect of this analytical effort is included here. A life is measured better by a lifetime productivity score than by years alone. The importance of productivity measures of the toxic action of energy by-products is increased now that the fossil fuel products are receiving attention, because the inhaled combustion products, in particular, have their major effect on work performance and low-level chronic disease, instead of on life shortening by terminal cancer. The first stages of a program to develop simple measures of performance capacity in rodents, based on indices of energy metabolism, motor activity, and body temperature, are described. The quadratic relation of survival time to daily dose was studied for 15 mammalian species

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, theoretical study and luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phenanthroline) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray single crystal analysis and fluorescent analysis. Its crystal structure is monoclinic with space group 2/ and ...

  2. Structural studies of PrPSc

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Fernández, Ester

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of the structure of PrPSc continues to be one major challenge in prion research. Molecular basis of the biology of prion protein, such as the molecular mechanism of prion replication and aggregation, the species barrier and the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration will not be understood until the structure is solved. Given that high-resolution techniques such as NMR or X-ray crystallography cannot be used, a number of lower resolution analytical approaches have been attempted.

  3. Evolutionary plant physiology: Charles Darwin's forgotten synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J.

    2009-11-01

    Charles Darwin dedicated more than 20 years of his life to a variety of investigations on higher plants (angiosperms). It has been implicitly assumed that these studies in the fields of descriptive botany and experimental plant physiology were carried out to corroborate his principle of descent with modification. However, Darwin’s son Francis, who was a professional plant biologist, pointed out that the interests of his father were both of a physiological and an evolutionary nature. In this article, we describe Darwin’s work on the physiology of higher plants from a modern perspective, with reference to the following topics: circumnutations, tropisms and the endogenous oscillator model; the evolutionary patterns of auxin action; the root-brain hypothesis; phloem structure and photosynthesis research; endosymbioses and growth-promoting bacteria; photomorphogenesis and phenotypic plasticity; basal metabolic rate, the Pfeffer-Kleiber relationship and metabolic optimality theory with respect to adaptive evolution; and developmental constraints versus functional equivalence in relationship to directional natural selection. Based on a review of these various fields of inquiry, we deduce the existence of a Darwinian (evolutionary) approach to plant physiology and define this emerging scientific discipline as the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the functions of green, sessile organisms from a phylogenetic perspective.

  4. Evolutionary plant physiology: Charles Darwin's forgotten synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2009-11-01

    Charles Darwin dedicated more than 20 years of his life to a variety of investigations on higher plants (angiosperms). It has been implicitly assumed that these studies in the fields of descriptive botany and experimental plant physiology were carried out to corroborate his principle of descent with modification. However, Darwin's son Francis, who was a professional plant biologist, pointed out that the interests of his father were both of a physiological and an evolutionary nature. In this article, we describe Darwin's work on the physiology of higher plants from a modern perspective, with reference to the following topics: circumnutations, tropisms and the endogenous oscillator model; the evolutionary patterns of auxin action; the root-brain hypothesis; phloem structure and photosynthesis research; endosymbioses and growth-promoting bacteria; photomorphogenesis and phenotypic plasticity; basal metabolic rate, the Pfeffer-Kleiber relationship and metabolic optimality theory with respect to adaptive evolution; and developmental constraints versus functional equivalence in relationship to directional natural selection. Based on a review of these various fields of inquiry, we deduce the existence of a Darwinian (evolutionary) approach to plant physiology and define this emerging scientific discipline as the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the functions of green, sessile organisms from a phylogenetic perspective.

  5. Low socioeconomic status and disability in old age: evidence from the InChianti study for the mediating role of physiological impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Antonia K; Ferrucci, Luigi; Lauretani, Fulvio; Phillips, Caroline; Chang, Miran; Bandinelli, Stefania; Guralnik, Jack M

    2006-01-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) has been associated with increased risk of disability in later life. The purpose of this study was to determine if SES has an impact on mobility functioning and to explore which physiological impairments are also associated with SES and may explain its relationship with mobility. The study sample consisted of 1025 individuals aged 65 years or older residing in the Chianti area (Italy). Number of years of education was used as an indicator of SES. Mobility functioning was assessed using gait speed (400 m) and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Mobility-related physiological impairments were assessed with tests of executive functioning, nerve conduction velocity, muscle power, hip-ankle range of motion, Ankle-Brachial Index, and visual acuity. Linear regression models were used to study the association between number of years of education and mobility and to estimate the contribution of each of the selected physiological impairments to this association. Adjusting for age and sex, slower gait speed (1.16 vs 1.26 m/s, p vs 10.11, p =.006) were seen in persons with 5 years of total education. Leg power and executive function decreased the strength of the association between educational level and gait speed by more than 15%. Controlling for all selected impairments (full model) decreased the education-gait speed association by 49%. Low education continued to be significantly associated with gait speed (p <.01). Adjusting for all physiological impairments substantially reduced the low education-SPPB score association by 100%, and this association was no longer significant. Low SES is related to multiple physiological impairments, which explain a large amount of the association between education and gait limitations. Further work must be done to understand the mechanisms whereby low SES translates into the impairments that play an important role in mobility.

  6. In Silico Analysis for the Study of Botulinum Toxin Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play many important roles in biological function. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by structure modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most popular methods for protein structure modeling and characteristics. Here, we attempt to predict protein-protein complex structure and property using some of bioinformatic methods, and we focus botulinum toxin complex as target structure.

  7. Studies of the anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics of the Indian population for setting up a Reference Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, H.S.; Jaiswal, D.D. Parameswaran, M.; Krishnamony, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents Indian data on various human characteristics such as physical, anatomical, physiological and metabolic parameters. The knowledge of these parameters is required for dosimetric purposes and for developing, secondary radiation standards for occupational workers and the general public. The data reported are for the adult population, as well as for the younger population at the ages newborn, and 1, 5, 10 and 15 years. On the basis of the collection, collation and generation of the above data, the characteristics of the Reference Indian Man are proposed. The comparison of Indian data with that for ICRP Reference Man (representing the Caucasian population) shows that most of the physical, physiological and anatomical characteristics of the Indian population are smaller. The weights of a few smaller organs such as thyroid, testes, etc. are comparable and the daily intake of drinking water, the sweat rate and urine excretion rate etc. are higher than those for ICRP Reference man. (author)

  8. Towards more physiological manipulations of hormones in field studies: comparing the release dynamics of three kinds of testosterone implants, silastic tubing, time-release pellets and beeswax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Rene; Trappschuh, Monika; Gahr, Manfred; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Hormone manipulations are of increasing interest in the areas of physiological ecology and evolution, because hormones are mediators of complex phenotypic changes. Often, however, hormone manipulations in field settings follow the approaches that have been used in classical endocrinology, potentially using supra-physiological doses. To answer ecological and evolutionary questions, it may be important to manipulate hormones within their physiological range. We compare the release dynamics of three kinds of implants, silastic tubing, time-release pellets, and beeswax pellets, each containing 3mg of testosterone. These implants were placed into female Japanese quail, and plasma levels of testosterone measured over a period of 30 days. Testosterone in silastic tubing led to supraphysiological levels. Also, testosterone concentrations were highly variable between individuals. Time-release pellets led to levels of testosterone that were slightly supraphysiological during the first days. Over the period of 30 days, however, testosterone concentrations were more consistent. Beeswax implants led to a physiological increase in testosterone and a relatively constant release. The study demonstrated that hormone implants in 10mm silastic tubing led to a supraphysiological peak in female quail. Thus, the use of similar-sized or even larger silastic implants in males or in other smaller vertebrates needs careful assessment. Time-release pellets and beeswax implants provide a more controlled release and degrade within the body. Thus, it is not necessary to recapture the animal to remove the implant. We propose beeswax implants as an appropriate procedure to manipulate testosterone levels within the physiological range. Hence, such implants may be an effective alternative for field studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hallmarks in the study of respiratory physiology and the crucial role of Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (1743-1794).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanou, Marianna; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Androutsos, George

    2013-11-01

    From the early 17th century the advent of physical and chemical sciences developed two important movements toward the explanation of all vital phenomena: the Iatrochemical and Iatromechanical Schools. The important research of their representatives such as Jan Baptist van Helmont, John Mayow, Robert Boyle, Gian Alfonso Borelli, Richard Lower, and Albrecht von Haller, followed by the discovery of the atmospheric gases, provided a fecund soil for the leading work of Lavoisier in respiratory physiology.

  10. A Prospective Study of the Physiological and Neurobehavioral Effects of Ramadan Fasting in Preteen and Teenage Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Abdulaziz; Herrera, Christopher Paul; Almudahka, Fuad; Mansour, Rita

    2015-06-01

    Intermittent fasting during the month of Ramadan, although not obligatory, is commonly practiced by Muslim children. Our aim was to describe the effects of Ramadan fasting on various physiological and neurobehavioral measures in preteen and teenaged boys. We conduced a prospective cohort study during Ramadan, observed from August 9 to September 11, 2010. Eighteen healthy Muslim boys (mean age±standard deviation 12.6±1.5 years) were recruited and assessed before, during (1st and 4th weeks), and after Ramadan. Subjects were classified as preteens (aged 9 to 12 years) or teens (aged 13 to 15 years). On each clinic visit, participants completed a match-to-sample test, a spatial planning and working memory task, and a working memory capacity test using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Participants were also assessed for their sleep patterns, daily energy expenditure, and dietary intake. Body composition was determined using a dual-energy x-ray scan. Complete blood count, lipid profile analysis, and iron indices were conducted. We measured morphologic, metabolic, and neurobehavioral parameters. A linear mixed model was used to assess changes in outcome measures. Post hoc pairwise comparisons were performed as necessary with Bonferroni adjustment. Within 1 week of fasting, there was a drop in body fat only in preteens (P=0.001). Reported fat (P=0.004) and protein intake (P=0.037) was higher during Ramadan, but energy expenditure did not change. By the end of Ramadan, there was a significant reduction in hemoglobin (mean±standard error -0.48±0.4 mmol/L) and serum iron (-25.7±31.8 μg/dL [-4.6±5.7 μmol/L]) levels. During week 4, total sleep duration decreased by 1.8 hours. At week 4, performance on the spatial planning and working memory task and working memory capacity test increased significantly (P=0.002), while match-to-sample test performance declined in preteens only (P=0.045). Ramadan fasting was associated with significant changes in

  11. Clinical and Physiological Correlates of Irritability in Depression: Results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floor E. A. Verhoeven

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Irritable and nonirritable depressed patients differ on demographic and clinical characteristics. We investigated whether this extends to psychological and physiological measures. Method. We compared irritable and nonirritable unipolar depressed patients on symptomatology, personality, and (psychophysiological measures (cortisol, cholesterol, and heart rate variability. Symptomatology was reassessed after one year, and we also compared depressed patients who were irritable or non-irritable at both time points (Irr++ versus Irr−−. Results. Almost half (46%; N=420 of the sample was classified as irritable. These patients scored higher on depression severity, anxiety, hypomanic symptoms, and psychological variables. No differences were observed on physiological markers after correction for depression severity. The same pattern was found when comparing Irr++ and Irr−− groups. Conclusion. Irritable and non-irritable depressed patients differ on clinical and psychological variables, but not on the currently investigated physiological markers. The clinical relevance of the distinction and the significance of the hypomanic symptoms remain to be demonstrated.

  12. Optical and structural study of BST multilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Železný, Vladimír; Chvostová, Dagmar; Pajasová, Libuše; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Daniš, S.; Valvoda, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2010), 538-541 ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0591 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ellipsometry * structure * ferroelectric multilayers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2010

  13. Structural studies and antimicrobial properties of norcembrane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The compounds have shown moderate-to-high antimicrobial activities. The structure and the relative stereochemistry of the metabolite 1 have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Keywords. Diterpene; sinularia; stereochemistry; antimicrobial; crystallography. 1. Introduction. Soft corals have been recognized as a rich ...

  14. imide, crystal structure, thermal and dielectric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A new geminal di-cationic ionic liquid (IL) containing a central cationic unit methylidene capped by a basic functionality (imidazole) is synthesized. The