WorldWideScience

Sample records for study dose definition

  1. On the definition of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before. - Highlights: • A stringent definition of absorbed dose is given. • This requires the definition of an irradiation and a suitable probability space. • A stringent definition is important for an understanding of the concept absorbed dose

  2. The definition of the individual dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, Margarete

    1986-01-01

    A brief note examines the choice of the present definition of the individual dose equivalent, the new operational dosimetry quantity for external exposure. The consequences of the use of the individual dose equivalent and the danger facing the individual dose equivalent, as currently defined, are briefly discussed. (UK)

  3. A new definition for acoustic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duck, F A

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a recent proposal for definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate. Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Its time-derivative, acoustic dose-rate, Q m , in W kg -1 is central to the prediction of both rate of temperature rise and radiation force. These quantities have spatial and temporal dependency, depending on the local field parameters (acoustic pressure, particle velocity, intensity) and local material properties (absorption coefficient, α a , and mass density, ρ 0 ). Spatial and/or temporal averaging can be applied where appropriate. For plane-wave monochromatic conditions in a homogeneous medium, Q m =2α a I/ρ 0 , (I is the time-averaged intensity), a simple expression which may also incorporate frequency dependencies of energy deposition. Acoustic dose and acoustic does-rate are exact analogues for Specific Absorption and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), quantities central to radiofrequency (RF) and microwave dosimetry. Acoustic dosimetry in the presence of tissue/gas interfaces remains a considerable challenge.

  4. Reliability of individual doses relating to the epidemiological studies on nuclear industry workers in Japan (1). Historical changes on definition of radiation dose, historical changes on technical standards of measurement and radiation workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, Takao; Ishiguro, Hideharu; Kawada, Yasushi; Minami, Kentaro; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    Records of radiation workers collected in the Research Organization for Information of Science and Technology, concerning individual doses from 1957 to 1992 were used for epidemiological studies for obtaining the scientific information of the effect of low dose radiation. Since many changes were made on definition of radiation dose, dosimetry technology and so on during such a long time period, reliability of recorded individual doses and of their measurement should be evaluated for validation, which is the purpose of this paper. Followings were discussed and validation was made. Historical changes on standards for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and ICRU Report, and changes of law concerning radiation dose in Japan and of dose standards. Changes on dosimetry for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and working place dosimetry, trends of investigations for introduction of measured practical doses, ICRU sphere as a receptor, and introduction of measured practical doses. Characteristics of radiation field and radiation exposure: Radiation source and characteristics of radiation field; Research and development organizations for atomic power, atomic power plants, facilities for nuclear fuel, Classification of radiation works and characteristics of the exposure; BWR, PWR, GCR. Changes on the standards of individual dosemeter and on its use: method to use individual dosemeter and its installation, measurement of individual dose and Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS); Standard of the film badge for X and gamma rays, Standard of the film badge for neutron, Standard for thermoluminescence dosemeter, and changes on selection of the major apparatus and on its use. (K.H.)

  5. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.

  6. On uncertainties in definition of dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The author has entertained always the doubt that in a neutron field, if the measured value of the absorbed dose with a tissue equivalent ionization chamber is 1.02±0.01 mGy, may the dose equivalent be taken as 10.2±0.1 mSv. Should it be 10.2 or 11, but the author considers it is 10 or 20. Even if effort is exerted for the precision measurement of absorbed dose, if the coefficient being multiplied to it is not precise, it is meaningless. [Absorbed dose] x [Radiation quality fctor] = [Dose equivalent] seems peculiar. How accurately can dose equivalent be evaluated ? The descriptions related to uncertainties in the publications of ICRU and ICRP are introduced, which are related to radiation quality factor, the accuracy of measuring dose equivalent and so on. Dose equivalent shows the criterion for the degree of risk, or it is considered only as a controlling quantity. The description in the ICRU report 1973 related to dose equivalent and its unit is cited. It was concluded that dose equivalent can be considered only as the absorbed dose being multiplied by a dimensionless factor. The author presented the questions. (K.I.)

  7. A Monte Carlo study of the impact of the choice of rectum volume definition on estimates of equivalent uniform doses and the volume parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvinnsland, Yngve; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Dahl, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Calculations of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values for the rectum are difficult because it is a hollow, non-rigid, organ. Finding the true cumulative dose distribution for a number of treatment fractions requires a CT scan before each treatment fraction. This is labour intensive, and several surrogate distributions have therefore been suggested, such as dose wall histograms, dose surface histograms and histograms for the solid rectum, with and without margins. In this study, a Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the relationships between the cumulative dose distributions based on all treatment fractions and the above-mentioned histograms that are based on one CT scan only, in terms of equivalent uniform dose. Furthermore, the effect of a specific choice of histogram on estimates of the volume parameter of the probit NTCP model was investigated. It was found that the solid rectum and the rectum wall histograms (without margins) gave equivalent uniform doses with an expected value close to the values calculated from the cumulative dose distributions in the rectum wall. With the number of patients available in this study the standard deviations of the estimates of the volume parameter were large, and it was not possible to decide which volume gave the best estimates of the volume parameter, but there were distinct differences in the mean values of the values obtained

  8. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  9. Study on the Construction of a High-definition Whole-body Voxel Model based on Cadaver's Color Photographic Anatomical Slice Images and Monte Carlo Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun

    2007-08-01

    Ajou University School of Medicine made the serially sectioned anatomical images from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) Project in Korea. The VKH images, which are the high-resolution color photographic images, show the organs and tissues in the human body very clearly at 0.2 mm intervals. In this study, we constructed a high-quality voxel model (VKH-Man) with a total of 30 organs and tissues by manual and automatic segmentation method using the serially sectioned anatomical image data from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) project in Korea. The height and weight of VKH-Man voxel model is 164 cm and 57.6 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.875 x 1.875 x 2 mm 3 . However, this voxel phantom can be used to calculate the organ and tissue doses of only one person. Therefore, in this study, we adjusted the voxel phantom to the 'Reference Korean' data to construct the voxel phantom that represents the radiation workers in Korea. The height and weight of the voxel model (HDRK-Man) that is finally developed are 171 cm and 68 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.981 x 1.981 x 2.0854 mm 3 . VKH-Man and HDRK-Man voxel model were implemented in a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code for calculation of the organ and tissue doses in various irradiation geometries. The calculated values were compared with each other to see the effect of the adjustment and also compared with other computational models (KTMAN-2, ICRP-74 and VIP-Man). According to the results, the adjustment of the voxel model was found hardly affect the dose calculations and most of the organ and tissue equivalent doses showed some differences among the models. These results shows that the difference in figure, and organ topology affects the organ doses more than the organ size. The calculated values of the effective dose from VKH-Man and HDRK-Man according to the ICRP-60 and upcoming ICRP recommendation were compared. For the other radiation geometries (AP, LLAT, RLAT) except for PA

  10. Hotspots Definition Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Pater, F.; Brinkman, S.; Schellekens, E.

    2010-03-01

    In the Dutch research programme Climate changes Spatial Planning (CcSP) many scientific projects are carried out. They often take a multidisciplinary approach to the climate issue. However, more attention needed to be given to embedding the programme into practice. Therefore, the board decided to start a hotspot programme. A hotspot was defined as a pilot project in a sector, place or region in which spatial planning and climate change play an important role in the physical shape and land use of the area and where conflicts of interest are found between these and other factors. The hotspot programme started with a definition study. This report is the result of this study. The goal of the study was to identify, describe and evaluate possible hotspots. In two workshops with policy-makers from national and regional governments, consultancy firms and nature conservation organizations, a large number of potential hotspots were identified. Fifteen were selected after the workshops took place and described in detail. The selection was done using a set of conditional criteria, criteria that all had to be met. Two potential hotspots were withdrawn after the selection. Since the Board of the CcSP programme expressed its interest in financing six to seven hotspots, a prioritization was made, using prioritizing criteria. Also the potential hotspots were assessed looking at regional distribution, thematic coverage and target groups. After this assessment and an analysis of the hotspots taking some other factors into account (eg. some hotspots were very similar or one could easily be incorporated in another one) five hotspots were selected: Kampen, Biesbosch-Haringvliet, Zuidplaspolder, Delta Waters and Tilburg. Options to fill the last two places were: Grounds for Change, Noordoostpolder, Oude Vaart Valley and Arnhem/Nijmegen (KAN). For these remaining potential hotspots draft terms of reference were drawn as basis for a project proposals. These terms of reference are added to

  11. VSCE technology definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, R. A.; Hunt, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Refined design definition of the variable stream control engine (VSCE) concept for advanced supersonic transports is presented. Operating and performance features of the VSCE are discussed, including the engine components, thrust specific fuel consumption, weight, noise, and emission system. A preliminary engine design is presented.

  12. Proposed Rectal Dose Constraints for Patients Undergoing Definitive Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Linda W.; Xia Ping; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Akazawa, Michelle; Scala, Matthew; Pickett, Barby M.S.; Hsu, I-C.; Speight, Joycelyn; Roach, Mack

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although several institutions have reported rectal dose constraints according to threshold toxicity, the plethora of trials has resulted in multiple, confusing dose-volume histogram recommendations. A set of standardized, literature-based constraints for patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer would help guide the practice of prostate RT. The purpose of this study was to develop these constraints, demonstrate that they are achievable, and assess the corresponding rectal toxicity. Methods and Materials: An extensive literature search identified eight key studies relating dose-volume histogram data to rectal toxicity. A correction factor was developed to address differences in the anatomic definition of the rectum across studies. The dose-volume histogram constraints recommended by each study were combined to generate the constraints. The data from all patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT were then compared against these constraints. Acute rectal toxicity was assessed. Results: A continuous, proposed rectal dose-constraint curve was generated. Intensity-modulated RT not only met this constraint curve, but also was able to achieve at least 30-40% lower dose to the rectum. The preliminary clinical results were also positive: 50% of patients reported no acute bowel toxicity, 33% reported Grade 1 toxicity, and 17% reported Grade 2 toxicity. No patients reported Grade 3-4 acute rectal toxicity. Conclusions: In this study, we developed a set of proposed rectal dose constraints. This allowed for volumetric assessment of the dose-volume relationship compared with single dose-volume histogram points. Additional research will be performed to validate this threshold as a class solution for rectal dose constraints

  13. Dose-to-man studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Dose-to-Man Studies focused on developing computer data handling and computer modules which permit easy, rapid assessment of the dose to southeastern United States populations from routine or accidental releases of radionuclides to atmospheric and stream systems

  14. Terms and definitions in the field of radiological technique. Dose quantities and units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The standard gives the terms and definitions of concepts, dose quantities and units. The radiation field condition 'secondary electron equilibrium', which forms part of the definition of standard ion dose, is given more precisely. The term 'free in air' is used in its original meaning, i.e. characterization of measuring conditions excluding avoidable stray radiation, which deviates from DIN 6814, part 3/06.72. Dosemeters for measurement of standard ion dose of air kerma are calibrated 'free in air', but this calibration condition is not part of the quantity definition. The quantities standard ion dose or air kerma therefore can also be measured in any other material. The qunatitative relationships between standard ion dose and the quantities 'exposure' and air kerma, as given in the ICRU publication 33 'Quantities and Units' (1980), are explained. The standard introduces the SI units Gray (for energy dose), Sievert (for dose equivalent), and Becquerel (for the activity of a radioactive substance). As the change to the SI units conceals the approximated equality of the numerical values of the standrd ion dose of photon radiation in roentgen, of the energy dose for soft tissue in rad, and of the dose equivalent in rem, new definitions are given in accordance with ICRU 33 for the quantities specified dose rate, dose rate constant, and area exposure product. These definitions use the terms 'energy dose' and 'kerma'. The dose concepts applied in the field of radiation protection, especially ambient dose and individual dose, are defined as dose equivalents in compliance with the Radiation Protection Ordinance. The relevant sections present information on the conversion of standard ion dose values to the corresponding values of kerma, energy dose, or dose equivalent. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toita, Takafumi, E-mail: b983255@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Radiology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBT of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were

  16. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant.

  17. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant

  18. Does initial 45Gy of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduce late complications in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer? A cohort control study using definitive chemoradiotherapy with high-dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Liang, Ji-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Yeh, Lian-Shung; Chang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Wu-Chou; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Comparing initial 45 Gy of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and non-IMRT in terms of the late toxicities associated with advanced cervical cancer that has also been treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy and high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB). This retrospective study included 320 stage IB2-IIIB cervical cancer patients treated with CCRT (83 IMRT and 237 non-IMRT). The two groups had similar stage and HDRICB ratings. Following 45 Gy to the pelvis, HDRICB of 24 Gy in four courses was prescribed. Late toxicities, including rectal complications (RC), bladder complications (BC) and non-rectal intestinal injury (NRRII), were scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of the complications. With a median follow-up duration of 33 and 77 months for IMRT and non-IMRT, 33 patients had Grade 2 or higher late RC (7.2% IMRT, 11.4% non-IMRT), whereas that for BC was 40 (9.6% IMRT, 13.5% non-IMRT) and for NRRII was 48 (12.0% IMRT, 16.0% non-IMRT). The cumulative rate for total grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities was 8.4% and 11.8% (p = 0.33). IMRT did not reduce the OR for all endpoints; however, the ORs for rectum and bladder reference doses to Point A were associated with RC and BC. Locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with initial 45Gy of pelvic IMRT and HDRICB have similar treatment-related late toxicities as those treated with non-IMRT. Optimization of the brachytherapy scheme is essential to minimize late toxicities

  19. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  20. Doses in mammography. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez P, F.; Acosta R, N.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Benavente, T.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Poma, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mammography is the most important method to detect lesions in the breast with this technique one can detect small tumours before clear clinical symptoms appear. Mammographic image of require high quality standards due that the extremely low contrast between the normal and pathological areas in the breast, eg.g., they have similar attenuation and absorption coefficient. The x-ray mammographic systems, used in this study are Senographe 500t and Senographe DMR, a detector with a RadCal ionization chambers calibrated to the qualities of mammographic x-ray beams, and a breast simulator that is a phantoms of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of several thicknesses with the equivalence of 50% of the glandular tissue. The results obtained indicate that the values of doses at the entrance surface of a breast (DES) are greater the reference value 20 mGy to 5,0 cm of PMMA and the values of the mean glandular dose (MGD) exceed the reference value of 2,1 mGy for 5,1 cm of compressed thick breast. We consider that the values high of the EDS and MGD are due that the x-ray systems no meeting in good condition or for used of x-ray spectra no suitable, so is recommendable be carried out test of quality control to the x-ray systems and also realize studies, or characterize the of x-ray mammographic spectra

  1. Definitive intraoperative very high-dose radiotherapy for localized osteosarcoma in the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Natsuo; Kokubo, Masaki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Nagata, Yasushi; Sasai, Keisuke; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Toguchida, Junya; Nakamura, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and adverse effects in patients with osteosarcoma treated with very high-dose definitive intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), with the intention of saving the affected limb. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients with osteosarcoma in their extremities were treated with definitive IORT. The irradiation field included the tumor plus an adequate wide margin and excluded the major vessels and nerves. Forty-five to 80 Gy of electrons or X-rays were delivered. The median follow-up of the surviving patients was 124 months. Results: The cause-specific and relapse-free 5-year survival rate was 50% and 43%, respectively. Distant metastasis developed in 23 patients; 19 died and 4 were alive for >10 years. Nine local recurrences were found 4-29 months after IORT in the affected limb. No radiation-induced skin reaction or nerve palsy was observed in the patients treated with X-rays. Experiments using phantoms also confirmed that the scatter dose was below the toxic level in the IORT setting with X-rays. Conclusions: Very high-dose definitive IORT combined with preventive nailing and chemotherapy appeared to be a promising quality-of-life-oriented alternative to treating patients with osteosarcomas in the extremities, although the problem of recurrences from the surrounding unirradiated soft tissue remains to be solved

  2. A comparison of dose-volume constraints derived using peak and longitudinal definitions of late rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R.; Andreyev, Jervoise; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Accurate reporting of complications following radiotherapy is an important part of the feedback loop to improve radiotherapy techniques. The definition of toxicity is normally regarded as the maximum or peak (P) grade of toxicity reported over the follow-up period. An alternative definition (integrated longitudinal toxicity (ILT)) is proposed which takes into account both the severity and the duration of the complication. Methods and materials: In this work, both definitions of toxicity were used to derive dose-volume constraints for six specific endpoints of late rectal toxicity from a cohort of patients who received prostate radiotherapy in the MRC RT01 trial. The dose-volume constraints were derived using ROC analysis for 30, 40, 50, 60, 65 and 70 Gy. Results: Statistically significant dose-volume constraints were not derived for all dose levels tested for each endpoint and toxicity definition. However, where both definitions produced constraints, there was generally good agreement. Variation in the derived dose-volume constraints was observed to be larger between endpoints than between the two definitions of toxicity. For one endpoint (stool frequency (LENT/SOM)) statistically significant dose-volume constraints were only derived using ILT. Conclusions: The longitudinal definition of toxicity (ILT) produced results consistent with those derived using peak toxicity and in some cases provided additional information which was not seen by analysing peak toxicity alone.

  3. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Bohr, C. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D{sub mean}, D{sub max} and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D{sub mean} to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target

  4. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R.; Bohr, C.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D mean , D max and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D mean to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target volume

  5. Volumes and doses for external radiotherapy - Definitions and recommendations; Volum og doser i ekstern straaleterapi - Definisjoner og anbefalinger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levernes, Sverre (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report contains definitions of volume and dose parameters for external radiotherapy. In addition the report contains recommendations for use, documentation and minimum reporting for radiotherapy of the individual patient.(Author)

  6. Cardiac toxicity and radiation dose to the heart in definitive treated non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Brink, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    In this retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, we did not find a correlation between high mean-dose to three different volumes of the heart (left ventricle, both ventricles or whole heart) and cardiac toxicity defined as having an cardiac event after radiotherapy start. This is not as shown in studies with other diseases treated with radiotherapy. Darby et al. recently published a review concerning radiation related heart disease. They reported a significantly worse survival beyond ten years for breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Some studies reported mortality from heart disease increased by 27%. In Hodgkin lymphoma patients an increased risk value of three to five for cardiac morbidity in general compared to general population and relative risk of death from myocardial infarction compared with general population in range 2 to 4. There may be several possible reasons why we did not experience a significant toxicity despite the high doses we delivered to the heart compared with patients receiving RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Only relative few NSCLC patients live long enough to experience cardiac disease either due to lung cancer itself or comorbidity as a competitive risk factor. In our study the five year survival was 15% leaving very few patients at risk for developing cardiac disease. Without long-term survivors cardiac toxicity does not seem to be a problem, and this suggests that we should aim to increase tumour control by administrating larger doses of radiotherapy to the tumour and/or by adding concurrent chemotherapy. However, the latter may increase the risk of cardiac toxicity by itself, and the results given in present study, may not be extrapolated to this situation. Another reason might be that if NSCLC patients develop dyspnoea, chest pain, etc. it is interpreted as being due to a relapse of lung cancer and not cardiac disease. There are several studies indicating that

  7. Science Mission Definition Studies for TROPIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of mission definition studies for solar electric propulsion missions that have been carried out over the last approximately three years. The major output from the studies has been two proposals which were submitted to NASA in response to Announcements of Opportunity for missions and an ongoing Global Magnetospheric Dynamics mission study. The bulk of this report consists of copies of the proposals and preliminary materials from the GMD study that will be completed in the coming months.

  8. Radiation dose measurement in gastrointestinal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Elzaki, M.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Barium studies investigations (barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema) are the basic routine radiological examination, where barium sulphate suspension is introduced to enhance image contrast of gastrointestinal tracts. The aim of this study was to quantify the patients' radiation doses during barium studies and to estimate the organ equivalent dose and effective dose with those procedures. A total of 33 investigations of barium studies were measured by using thermoluminescence dosemeters. The result showed that the patient entrance surface doses were 12.6±10, 44.5±49 and 35.7±50 mGy for barium swallow, barium meal, follow through and enema, respectively. Effective doses were 0.2, 0.35 and 1.4 mSv per procedure for barium swallow, meal and enema respectively. Radiation doses were comparable with the previous studies. A written protocol for each procedure will reduce the inter-operator variations and will help to reduce unnecessary exposure. (authors)

  9. Comparison of different contouring definitions of the rectum as organ at risk (OAR) and dose-volume parameters predicting rectal inflammation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer: which definition to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Mirko; Brannath, Werner; Brückner, Matthias; Wagner, Dirk; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Temme, Nils; Hermann, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this retrospective planning study was to find a contouring definition for the rectum as an organ at risk (OAR) in curative three-dimensional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer (PCa) with a predictive correlation between the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and rectal toxicity. In a pre-study, the planning CT scans of 23 patients with PCa receiving definitive EBRT were analyzed. The rectum was contoured according to 13 different definitions, and the dose distribution was correlated with the respective rectal volumes by generating DVH curves. Three definitions were identified to represent the most distinct differences in the shapes of the DVH curves: one anatomical definition recommended by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and two functional definitions based on the target volume. In the main study, the correlation between different relative DVH parameters derived from these three contouring definitions and the occurrence of rectal toxicity during and after EBRT was studied in two consecutive collectives. The first cohort consisted of 97 patients receiving primary curative EBRT and the second cohort consisted of 66 patients treated for biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Rectal toxicity was investigated by clinical investigation and scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Candidate parameters were the volume of the rectum, mean dose, maximal dose, volume receiving at least 60 Gy (V 60 ), area under the DVH curve up to 25 Gy and area under the DVH curve up to 75 Gy in dependence of each chosen rectum definition. Multivariable logistic regression considered other clinical factors such as pelvine lymphatics vs local target volume, diabetes, prior rectal surgery, anticoagulation or haemorrhoids too. In Cohort 1 (primary EBRT), the mean rectal volumes for definitions "RTOG", planning target volume "(PTV)-based" and "PTV-linked" were 100 cm 3 [standard deviation (SD) 43 cm 3 ], 60

  10. Comments on 'Reconsidering the definition of a dose-volume histogram'-dose-mass histogram (DMH) versus dose-volume histogram (DVH) for predicting radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Plataniotis, Georgios A; Gorka, Magdalena Adamus; Lind, Bengt K

    2006-01-01

    In a recently published paper (Nioutsikou et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 L17) the authors showed that the use of the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept is a more accurate descriptor of the dose delivered to lung than the traditionally used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept. Furthermore, they state that if a functional imaging modality could also be registered to the anatomical imaging modality providing a functional weighting across the organ (functional mass) then the more general and realistic concept of the dose-functioning mass histogram (D[F]MH) could be an even more appropriate descriptor. The comments of the present letter to the editor are in line with the basic arguments of that work since their general conclusions appear to be supported by the comparison of the DMH and DVH concepts using radiobiological measures. In this study, it is examined whether the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept deviated significantly from the widely used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept regarding the expected lung complications and if there are clinical indications supporting these results. The problem was investigated theoretically by applying two hypothetical dose distributions (Gaussian and semi-Gaussian shaped) on two lungs of uniform and varying densities. The influence of the deviation between DVHs and DMHs on the treatment outcome was estimated by using the relative seriality and LKB models using the Gagliardi et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 46 373) and Seppenwoolde et al (2003 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 55 724) parameter sets for radiation pneumonitis, respectively. Furthermore, the biological equivalent of their difference was estimated by the biologically effective uniform dose (D-bar) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) concepts, respectively. It is shown that the relation between the DVHs and DMHs varies depending on the underlying cell density distribution and the applied dose distribution. However, the range of their deviation in terms of

  11. A randomized, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover, definitive QT study of the effects of APF530 exposure, high-dose intravenous granisetron, and moxifloxacin on QTc prolongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Jay W; Moon, Thomas E; O’Boyle, Erin; Dietz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory concern about potential QT-interval prolongation by serotonin-receptor antagonist antiemetics prompted product-label changes. The first-generation serotonin-receptor antagonist granisetron is available in oral (PO), intravenous (IV), and transdermal formulations. APF530 is a formulation that provides sustained release of granisetron when administered as a single subcutaneous (SC) injection. The Phase I study reported here evaluated effects of APF530 on electrocardiographic intervals. This single-site, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover trial randomized healthy men and women to receive varying sequences of APF530 1 g SC, granisetron 50 μg/kg IV, moxifloxacin 400 mg PO, and placebo. Subjects were assessed for 49 hours after each treatment. The primary objective was to evaluate differences between baseline-adjusted, heart rate-corrected QT-interval change using the Fridericia rate correction (dQTcF) for APF530 1 g SC and placebo. Electrocardiograms were performed at various times throughout the assessment period. Pharmacokinetics and safety were evaluated. The upper one-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) for mean baseline-adjusted dQTcF at each post-dose time point between APF530 and placebo excluded 10 ms, indicating that APF530 1 g SC had no clinically significant effect on QTcF. Maximum observed QTcF change was 4.15 ms (90% CI, 0.94 to 7.36) at Hour 3. No clinically significant changes in other electrocardiogram intervals were observed. APF530 SC pharmacokinetics were as expected, with slow absorption (maximum plasma concentration 35.8 ng/mL, median time to maximum plasma concentration 11.1 hours) and slow elimination (mean half-life 18.6 hours; systemic clearance 20.2 L/hour) of granisetron versus the expected early peak concentration and elimination of granisetron IV. APF530 SC was well tolerated. Adverse events, most commonly constipation and SC injection-site reactions, were generally mild and quickly resolved. APF530 1 g SC did

  12. A randomized, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover, definitive QT study of the effects of APF530 exposure, high-dose intravenous granisetron, and moxifloxacin on QTc prolongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason JW

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jay W Mason,1 Thomas E Moon,2 Erin O’Boyle,3 Albert Dietz41Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Tarizona eHealth Services, Inc., San Carlos, CA, 3AP Pharma, Redwood City, CA, 4Spaulding Clinical Research, West Bend, WI, USABackground: Regulatory concern about potential QT-interval prolongation by serotonin-receptor antagonist antiemetics prompted product-label changes. The first-generation serotonin-receptor antagonist granisetron is available in oral (PO, intravenous (IV, and transdermal formulations. APF530 is a formulation that provides sustained release of granisetron when administered as a single subcutaneous (SC injection. The Phase I study reported here evaluated effects of APF530 on electrocardiographic intervals.Methods: This single-site, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover trial randomized healthy men and women to receive varying sequences of APF530 1 g SC, granisetron 50 μg/kg IV, moxifloxacin 400 mg PO, and placebo. Subjects were assessed for 49 hours after each treatment. The primary objective was to evaluate differences between baseline-adjusted, heart rate-corrected QT-interval change using the Fridericia rate correction (dQTcF for APF530 1 g SC and placebo. Electrocardiograms were performed at various times throughout the assessment period. Pharmacokinetics and safety were evaluated.Results: The upper one-sided 95% confidence interval (CI for mean baseline-adjusted dQTcF at each post-dose time point between APF530 and placebo excluded 10 ms, indicating that APF530 1 g SC had no clinically significant effect on QTcF. Maximum observed QTcF change was 4.15 ms (90% CI, 0.94 to 7.36 at Hour 3. No clinically significant changes in other electrocardiogram intervals were observed. APF530 SC pharmacokinetics were as expected, with slow absorption (maximum plasma concentration 35.8 ng/mL, median time to maximum plasma concentration 11.1 hours and slow elimination (mean half-life 18.6 hours

  13. Clinical results of definitive-dose (50 Gy/25 fractions) preoperative chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Osamu; Yasuda, Takushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical results of definitive-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks for unresectable esophageal cancer were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were unresectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with T4b or mediastinal lymph nodes invading to the trachea or aorta. Radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks was combined concurrently with two courses of FP therapy (CDDP 70 mg/m 2 + 5-FU 700 mg/m 2 /d x 5 days: day 1-5, day 29-33). Tumor response was evaluated 4 weeks after completion of RT. Subtotal esophagectomy was planned 6-8 weeks after RT. Thirty patients (26 male and 4 female) aged from 50-78 years (median 66) were enrolled between 2008 and 2011. The clinical stages according to the 7th edition of UICC were stages II/III/IV, 1/23/6; T1/2/3/4, 1/1/4/24; and N0/1/2/3, 3/25/1/1. All 30 patients completed RT of 50 Gy/ 25 fractions. Initial tumor responses were 21 patients with resectable disease, 7 with unresectable disease, and 2 with progressive disease. Subtotal esophagectomy was performed in 18 (60%) of the 30 patients. Pathological complete response was obtained in five (28%) patients. There were two patients with hospitalization death after surgery (11%). Six of the 7 patients who still had unresectable disease were treated with 1-3 courses of docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU. Three patients treated without surgery showed long-term survival. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate for the 30 patients were 70 and 49%, respectively. Definitive-dose preoperative CRT was feasible, and is a promising treatment strategy for unresectable esophageal cancer. (author)

  14. Toward a definition of a threshold for harmless doses to the anal-sphincter region and the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Abany, Massoud; Helgason, Asgeir R.; Agren Cronqvist, Anna-Karin; Lind, Bengt; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Wersaell, Peter; Lind, Helena; Qvanta, Eva; Steineck, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dysfunction caused by unwanted radiation to the anal-sphincter region and the rectum. Methods and materials: A questionnaire assessing bowel symptoms, sexual function, and urinary symptoms was sent to 72 patients with clinically localized prostatic adenocarcinoma treated by external beam radiation therapy at the Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, in Stockholm, Sweden, 2-4 years after treatment. The mean percentage dose-volume histograms for patients with and without the specific symptom were calculated. Results: Of the 65 patients providing information, 9 reported fecal leakage, 10 blood and mucus in stools, 10 defecation urgency, and 7 diarrhea or loose stools. None of the 19 and 13 patients who received, respectively, a dose of ≥35 Gy to ≤60% or ≥40 Gy to ≤40% of the anal-sphincter region volume reported fecal leakage (p < 0.05). In dose-volume histograms, a statistically significant correlation was found between radiation to the anal-sphincter region and the risk of fecal leakage in the interval 45-55 Gy. There was also a statistically significant correlation between radiation to the rectum and the risk of defecation urgency and diarrhea or loose stools in the interval 25-42 Gy. No relationship was found between anatomic rectal wall volume and the investigated late effects. Conclusions: Although the limited data in this study prevent the definition of a conclusive threshold regarding volume and dose to the anal-sphincter region and untoward morbidity, it seems that careful monitoring of unnecessary irradiation to this area should be done because it can potentially help reduce the risk of adverse effects, such as fecal leakage. Future studies should pay more attention to the anal-sphincter region and help to more rigorously define its radiotherapeutic tolerance

  15. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  16. Terms and definitions in the field of radiological technique. Dose quantities and units. Begriffe und Benennungen in der radiologischen Technik. Dosisgroessen und Dosiseinheiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The standard gives the terms and definitions of concepts, dose quantities and units. The radiation field condition 'secondary electron equilibrium', which forms part of the definition of standard ion dose, is given more precisely. The term 'free in air' is used in its original meaning, i.e. characterization of measuring conditions excluding avoidable stray radiation, which deviates from DIN 6814, part 3/06.72. Dosemeters for measurement of standard ion dose of air kerma are calibrated 'free in air', but this calibration condition is not part of the quantity definition. The quantities standard ion dose or air kerma therefore can also be measured in any other material. The qunatitative relationships between standard ion dose and the quantities 'exposure' and air kerma, as given in the ICRU publication 33 'Quantities and Units' (1980), are explained. The standard introduces the SI units Gray (for energy dose), Sievert (for dose equivalent), and Becquerel (for the activity of a radioactive substance). As the change to the SI units conceals the approximated equality of the numerical values of the standrd ion dose of photon radiation in roentgen, of the energy dose for soft tissue in rad, and of the dose equivalent in rem, new definitions are given in accordance with ICRU 33 for the quantities specified dose rate, dose rate constant, and area exposure product. These definitions use the terms 'energy dose' and 'kerma'. The dose concepts applied in the field of radiation protection, especially ambient dose and individual dose, are defined as dose equivalents in compliance with the Radiation Protection Ordinance. The relevant sections present information on the conversion of standard ion dose values to the corresponding values of kerma, energy dose, or dose equivalent.

  17. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: Daniel.krauss@beaumont.edu

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  18. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  19. Remarks and suggestions concerned with formulation of the definition of quantity ''committed dose'' and quantity ''radiation burden'' useful in estimates of population exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwik, T.

    1990-01-01

    The paper contains remarks to the definitions of the quantity ''commited dose'' given in the publications of the ICRP. The suggestions are presented on the mode of formulating the definition of the quantity ''commited dose'' and the definition of the quantity denoted hitherto by the symbol H 50 . The other suggestions deal with introduction of the quantity ''radiation burden'', assigned for use in assessments of irradiation expressed ''per caput'' of population. 9 refs. (author)

  20. Image quality of low-dose CCTA in obese patients: impact of high-definition computed tomography and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Cathérine; Fuchs, Tobias A; Fiechter, Michael; Stehli, Julia; Stähli, Barbara E; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2013-10-01

    The accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in obese persons is compromised by increased image noise. We investigated CCTA image quality acquired on a high-definition 64-slice CT scanner using modern adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Seventy overweight and obese patients (24 males; mean age 57 years, mean body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) were studied with clinically-indicated contrast enhanced CCTA. Thirty-five patients underwent a standard definition protocol with filtered backprojection reconstruction (SD-FBP) while 35 patients matched for gender, age, body mass index and coronary artery calcifications underwent a novel high definition protocol with ASIR (HD-ASIR). Segment by segment image quality was assessed using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = moderate, 4 = non-diagnostic) and revealed better scores for HD-ASIR compared to SD-FBP (1.5 ± 0.43 vs. 1.8 ± 0.48; p ASIR as compared to 1.4 ± 0.4 mm for SD-FBP (p ASIR (388.3 ± 109.6 versus 350.6 ± 90.3 Hounsfield Units, HU; p ASIR vs. SD-ASIR respectively). Compared to a standard definition backprojection protocol (SD-FBP), a newer high definition scan protocol in combination with ASIR (HD-ASIR) incrementally improved image quality and visualization of distal coronary artery segments in overweight and obese individuals, without increasing image noise and radiation dose.

  1. Dose-effect relationship and risk factors for vaginal stenosis after definitive radio(chemo)therapy with image-guided brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer in the EMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A; Lindegaard, Jacob C

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose To identify risk factors for vaginal stenosis and to establish a dose–effect relationship for image-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Materials/Methods Patients from the ongoing EMBRACE study with prospectively assessed morbidity (CTCAEv3.0) at baseline ...

  2. Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by definitive high-dose radiotherapy or surgery for operable thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masao, Murakami; Yasumasa, Kuroda; Yosiaki, Okamoto; Koichi, Kono; Eisaku, Yoden; Fusako, Kusumi; Kiyoshi, Hajiro; Satoru, Matsusue; Hiroshi, Takeda

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the esophageal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between June 1989 and May 1996, forty patients with operable squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus (stage 0 to III: UICC 1987), aged 45 to 78 (mean:64), were enrolled in a study of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by definitive high-dose radiotherapy (CRT group) or surgery (CRT-S group). Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of 44Gy in 40 fractions for 4 weeks (2.2Gy/2Fr./day) through 10MVX rays, with one or two courses of cisplatin (80-150mg/body, mean:90mg/m 2 , day 1, bolus injection) and 5-fluorouracil (500-1500mg/body/day, mean:600mg/m 2 , day 1-4, continuous infusion). After completion of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, clinical complete response (CR) was observed in 16 patients, partial response (PR) in 22, and no change (NC) in 2. Thirty responding patients (CR:16, PR:14) entered in CRT group, and 10 non-responding patients (PR:8, NC:2) followed by surgery (CRT-S group). A cumulative median dose of 66Gy for Tis,T1 and 71Gy for T2-T4 tumor with/without high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy, and one to three courses of chemotherapy were delivered in CRT group. Intraoperative radiotherapy for abdominal lymphatic system and postoperative supraclavicular irradiation were added in CRT-S group. Results: Clinical CR rate at the completion of treatment showed 90% in CRT group, and pathological CR rate 10% in CRT-S group. The overall median survival was 45 months, survival at 1, 2, 3 years being 100%, 72%, 56%, respectively. Loco-regional failure was observed in 7 patients (all in CRT group), distant failure in 6 (3 in CRT group, 3 in CRT-S group) and loco-regional with distant failure in 1 (CRT group). Four patients of loco-regional recurrence in CRT group were salvaged by surgery. Overall survival at 2-, 3-years for CRT vs. CRT-S group was 72%, 64% vs. (1(1)); 100

  3. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design

  4. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  5. Comparative study of eye dose and chest dose received during radiopharmaceutical production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chindarkar, A.S.; Chavan, S.V.; Sawant, D.K.; Sahoo, L.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Sneha, C.; Sachdev, S.S.; Dey, A.C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical laboratory, BRIT, Vashi produces different radiopharmaceuticals of 131 I, 153 Sm, 99 Mo/ 99m Tc and 177 Lu. Principle gamma energies of these isotopes vary from 103 to 740 KeV and their maximum beta energies vary from 384 to 1214 KeV. In the light of the revised eye lens dose limit recommended in IAEA Basic Safety Standard Interim Edition No. GSR Part 3 (IAEA-2011), the study of radiation dose for eye lens was carried out using CaSO 4 : Dy based Thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). This TLD was worn at center of the forehead to measure eye lens dose. This TLD dose was then compared with chest TLD dose to deduce any correlation between these TLD doses. These TLD doses were assessed on quarterly basis. Eight quarter data of these TLD doses were compared

  6. On revision of definition of doses for radiation protection in ICRP 1990 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Michio

    1995-01-01

    The recommendation of ICRP is to give the guideline to the organizations and experts concerned to radiation protection including regulatory authorities on the basic rule which becomes the basis of proper radiation protection, and the radiation protection in respective countries has been carried out, respecting this ICRP recommendation. In 1990, ICRP revised this basic recommendation, and published as Publication 60. In this 1990 recommendation, as the matters that give impact to the dose evaluation of external exposure, the introduction of the new concept of dose, namely radiation weighting factor and equivalent dose, the revision of radiation quality factor and so on are enumerated. As to the 1990 recommendation, absorbed dose and organ dose, radiation weighting factor, equivalent dose, effective dose, quality factor-LET relation, the summation with the former quantities and the operational quantity of ICRU are described. The reason why radiation weighting factor and equivalent dose were introduced are discussed, including the inference of the author. (K.I.)

  7. A study on gamma dose rate in Seoul (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Hyun; Kim, Chang Kyun; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Jeong Min

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out gamma dose rate in Seoul, from January to December in 2000, and the following results were achieved : The annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was 17.24 μR/hr as average. The annual gamma dose rate in subway of Seoul was 14.96 μR/hr as average. The highest annual gamma dose rate was Dong-daemon ku. Annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was higher autumn than winter

  8. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.Y.; Tung, C.J.; Lee, C.C.; Lin, M.H.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm 2 . The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm 3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm 3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows

  9. Contribution to the study of fluoride dosing by using a membrane selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, Jean de

    1972-01-01

    As the method of dosing fluoride ions by precipitation with lead fluorochloride is not very satisfying, the author reports the study of a new process for the dosing of the fluorine ion by using a selective electrode. After some generalities on selective electrodes (principle, types, operation principle) and some recalls and definitions (Galvani and Volta potential, stability constants of complexes, principles of diffusion in solids), the author reports the study of the diffusion potential in glass membranes, the study of the membrane potential, and the study of the ion exchange equilibrium. He presents methods of calculation of selectivity coefficients of membrane electrodes, and the reports experiments performed in laboratory

  10. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  11. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr

  12. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zoga, Eleni; Strouthos, Iosif; Butt, Saeed Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [de

  13. Definition of dose intensity (DI), average relative DI and effective DI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberto, P.

    1995-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of cancer chemotherapy is related to the dose and to the amount of drug delivered per time unit. the significance of time in the effectiveness of a treatment program is frequently overlooked. The term of dose intensity (DI) is used to define the drug dose delivered per time unit and is expressed as mg/m 2 per week. A delay in the sequence of treatment cycles decreases the DI in the DI in the same proportion as a reduction of dose. Average relative DI corresponds to the mean DI of combined agents and is expressed as a fraction of a similar combination selected as a standard. Di is useful to compare the dose actually received with the prescribed dose. The relation of DI with tumor response or survival has not been fully demonstrated. A threshold DI level for therapeutic activity is evident. Above this threshold, a linear relationship of DI and effectiveness is not obvious, particularly regarding high-dose chemotherapy. The term of DI is more useful in its principle than in the significance of its calculated value. (authors). 19 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  14. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  15. An epidemiological study for the reduction of population radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamo, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    The correlation of tube voltage with patient exposure was studied using effective dose as an indicator of dose reduction in intraoral radiography. The results were as follows: l. The salivary gland tissues contributed the most to the effective dose of intraoral radiography. 2. In the 50 to 90 kV range, there was no appreciable correlation between tube voltage and effective dose. 3. Therefore, it was suggested that adjusting the tube voltage for maximum image quality does not effect radiation protection. 4. This study reconfirmed the fact that increases in voltages up to 90 kV reduce skin doses. (author)

  16. Dose reduction and optimization studies (ALARA) at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been commissioned by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at LWR plants. These studies have the following objectives: identify high-dose maintenance tasks; identify dose-reduction techniques; examine incentives for dose reduction; evaluate cost-effectiveness and optimization of dose-reduction techniques; and compile an ALARA handbook on data, engineering modifications, cost-effectiveness calculations, and other information of interest to ALARA practioners

  17. Young age under 60 years is not a contraindication to treatment with definitive dose escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klayton, Tracy L.; Ruth, Karen; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Kutikov, Alexander; Chen, David Y.T.; Sobczak, Mark; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is widely believed that younger prostate cancer patients are at greater risk of recurrence following radiotherapy (RT). Methods: From 1992 to 2007, 2168 (395 age ⩽60) men received conformal RT alone for prostate cancer at our institution (median dose = 76 Gy, range: 72–80). Multivariable analysis (MVA) was used to identify significant predictors for BF and PCSM. Cumulative incidence was estimated using the competing risk method (Fine and Gray) for BF (Phoenix definition) and PCSM to account for the competing risk of death. Results: With a median follow-up of 72.2 months (range: 24.0–205.1), 8-year BF was 27.1% for age ⩽60 vs. 23.7% for age >60 (p = 0.29). Eight-year PCSM was 3.0% for age ⩽60 vs. 2.0% for age >60 (p = 0.52). MVA for BF identified initial PSA [adjusted HR = 1.7 (PSA 10–20), 2.6 (PSA >20), p 12 months), p < 0.01] as significant, but not age or ADT <12 months. MVA for PCSM identified Gleason score [adjusted HR = 3.0 (G8–10), p = 0.01] and T-stage [adjusted HR = 8.7 (T3-4), p < 0.01] as significant, but not age, PSA, or ADT. Conclusion: This is the largest, most mature study of younger men treated with RT for prostate cancer that confirms young age is not prognostic for BF.

  18. Terms and definitions in the field of radiological technique. Dose quantities and units. Draft. Begriffe und Benennungen in der radiologischen Technik. Dosisgroessen und Dosiseinheiten. Entwurf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-01

    This draft standard contains the definitions of the terms, quantities, and units important in dosimetry, while the methods of measurement and calculation are dealt with in other standards. Other than the standard of June 1972, this revised draft standard introduces the SI units of the energy dose, the Gray, and of the activity of a radioactive substance, the Becquerel. Important new measuring quantities are the standard energy dose and the dose equivalent index. The terms local dose and personnel dose are redefined in agreement with the Radiation Protection Ordinance of October 13, 1976.

  19. Terms and definitions in the field of radiological technique. Dose quantities and units. Draft. Begriffe und Benennungen in der radiologischen Technik. Dosisgroessen und Dosiseinheiten. Entwurf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-01

    The standard contains the definitions of terms, quantities and units important in dosimetry, while other standards deal with the measurement and calculation methods. As against the June 1972 edition, this amended standard introduces the SI units of the energy dose, the Gray (Gy), and of the activity of a radioactive substance, the Becquerel (Bq). Important new measuring quantities are the standard energy dose and the equivalent dose index. The terms local dose and personnel dose are redefined in accordance with the Radiation Protection Ordinance of Oct. 13th, 1976.

  20. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  1. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Lundemann, Michael; Hollensen, Christian; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Kjær, Andreas; McEvoy, Fintan J; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N 4 )-methylsemithiocarbazone (Cu-ATSM) using spontaneous clinical canine tumor models. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans of five spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas were obtained; FDG on day 1 and 64 Cu-ATSM on day 2 and 3 (approx. 3 and 24 hours pi.). Sub-volumes for dose escalation were defined by a threshold-based method for both tracers and five dose escalation levels were formed in each sub-volume. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were optimized based on the dose escalation regions for each scan for a total of three dose plans for each dog. The prescription dose for the GTV was 45 Gy (100%) and it was linearly escalated to a maximum of 150%. The correlations between dose painting plans were analyzed with construction of dose distribution density maps and quality volume histograms (QVH). Correlation between high-dose regions was investigated with Dice correlation coefficients. Comparison of dose plans revealed varying degree of correlation between cases. Some cases displayed a separation of high-dose regions in the comparison of FDG vs. 64 Cu-ATSM dose plans at both time points. Among the Dice correlation coefficients, the high dose regions showed the lowest degree of agreement, indicating potential benefit of using multiple tracers for dose painting. QVH analysis revealed that FDG-based dose painting plans adequately covered approximately 50% of the hypoxic regions. Radiotherapy plans optimized with the current approach for cut-off values and dose region definitions based on FDG, 64 Cu-ATSM 3 h and 24 h uptake in canine tumors had different localization of the regional dose escalation levels. This indicates that 64 Cu-ATSM at two

  2. Radiation dose to the patient in radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    In medical radionuclide studies, the radiation risk has to be considered in addition to the general risk of administering a pharmaceutical. As radiation exposure is an essential factor in radiation risk estimation, some aspects of internal dose calculation, including radiation risk assessments, are treated. The formalism of current internal dose calculation is presented. The input data, especially the residence time and the absorbed dose per transformation, their origin and accuracy are discussed. Results of internal dose calculations for the ten most frequently used radionuclide studies are presented as somatically effective dose equivalents. The accuracy of internal dose calculation is treated in detail by considering the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical, the phantoms used for dose calculations, the absorbed dose per transformation, the administered activity, and the transfer of the dose, calculated for a phantom, to the patient. The internal dose calculated for a reference phantom may be assumed to be in accordance with the actual patient dose within a range described by a factor of about two to three. Finally, risk estimates for nuclear medicine procedures are quantified, being generally of sixth order. The radiation risk from the radioiodine test is comparably higher, but probably lower than calculated according to the UNSCEAR risk coefficients. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results and to improve the quantification of the radiation risk from the medical use of radionuclides. (author)

  3. Definition of the dose(tempo)-distribution in the biological irradiation-facility of the RIVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, F.J.M.

    1990-02-01

    The RIVM biological irradiation facility (BBF) for the irradiation of biological samples and small animals is a self shielded device and can be safely operated in an existing laboratory environment. There are two 137 Cs sources (15TBq) in a bilateral geometry to give maximum dose uniformity. The easily accessible irradiation chamber is housed in a rotating lead shielding. The dosimetry of BBF was performed by the Dosimetry Section of the RIVM. Experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose in plastic tubes filled with water and the dose distribution over the tube-holder. Separate experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose during the rotation of the irradiation chamber and to check the irradiation timer. For the experiments LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) extruded ribbons were used. The TLDs were calibrated in a collimated beam of 137 Cs gamma rays. The determination of the absorbed dose in water was based on a users biological irradiation set up. The TLDs were individually sealed in thin plastic foil and put in plastic tubes filled for 1/3 with water. The tubes were vertically placed in the tube-holder and placed in the centre of the irradiation chamber. The results show that the absorbed dose in water (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.97 Gy/timer-unit, with a total uncertainty of 7 percent (1σ). During the rotation of the irradiation chamber the absorbed dose (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.38 Gy, with a total uncertainty of 15 percent (1σ). The variation of the dose distribution was determined at 15 different measurement points distributed over the tube-holder. The dosis in the measurement point in the centre of the tube-holder was taken as reference value. The maximum observed deviation over the other 14 measurement points amounts to -16 percent of it. The BBF-timer was checked against a special timer. The results indicate that within a range from 2-11 'timer-units' no differences are present. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 fotos

  4. Life sciences payload definition and integration study, task C and D. Volume 2: Payload definition, integration, and planning studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Life Sciences Payload Definition and Integration Study was composed of four major tasks. Tasks A and B, the laboratory definition phase, were the subject of prior NASA study. The laboratory definition phase included the establishment of research functions, equipment definitions, and conceptual baseline laboratory designs. These baseline laboratories were designated as Maxi-Nom, Mini-30, and Mini-7. The outputs of Tasks A and B were used by the NASA Life Sciences Payload Integration Team to establish guidelines for Tasks C and D, the laboratory integration phase of the study. A brief review of Tasks A and B is presented provide background continuity. The tasks C and D effort is the subject of this report. The Task C effort stressed the integration of the NASA selected laboratory designs with the shuttle sortie module. The Task D effort updated and developed costs that could be used by NASA for preliminary program planning.

  5. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P standard deviation: CECT versus PET/CT 32.48 cm(3) ± 36.63 versus 32.21 cm(3) ± 37.09; P > 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal

  6. Time and dose-related changes in lung perfusion after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Khalil, Azza A; Møller, Ditte S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine radiation-induced changes in regional lung perfusion per dose level in 58 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients receiving chemo-radiotherapy (RT) of minimum 60 Gy we...

  7. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos [J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Zoga, Eleni [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Strouthos, Iosif [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Butt, Saeed Ahmed [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassende Darstellung relevanter Literatur zur interstitiellen High-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie als Salvage-Modalitaet (sHDR-BRT) bei der Behandlung des lokal rezidivierten Prostatakarzinoms nach vorausgegangener definitiver Radiotherapie (RT). In der PubMed-Datenbank wurde eine Literaturrecherche mit den Suchbegriffen ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' durchgefuehrt. Zwischen den Jahren 2000 und 2016 wurden 51 Publikationen identifiziert. Die biochemische Kontrolle (BC) sowie das assoziierte Toxizitaetsprofil waren onkologische Hauptpunkte in der Analyse der beruecksichtigten Literatur. Von onkologischen Ergebnissen und Toxizitaeten berichteten 11 Publikationen bei einer medianen Nachbeobachtungszeit von 4-191 Monaten. Eine Variabilitaet von Dosis- und Fraktionierungsregimen wurde beschrieben mit totalen physikalischen Dosen von 19,0 Gy in 2 Fraktionen bis zu 42,0 Gy in 6 Fraktionen

  8. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  9. Intradermal Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: A Preclinical Dose-Finding Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial...

  10. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; Brambilla, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Medical Physics; Pia, F. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Otolaryngology; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Medical Sciences; Krengli, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Translational Medicine and BRMA

    2013-03-15

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose {>=} 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles {>=} 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  11. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L.; Brambilla, M.; Pia, F.; University of 'Piemonte Orientale', Novara; Krengli, M.; University of 'Piemonte Orientale', Novara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose ≥ 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles ≥ 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  12. Dose intercomparison studies for standardization of high-dose dosimetry in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Hoang Hoa; Duong Nguyen Dinh; Kojima, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Irradiation Center of the Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (IC-VAEC) is planning to establish a traceability system for high-dose dosimetry and to provide high-dose standards as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) level in Vietnam. For countries which do not have a standard dosimetry laboratory, the participation in the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the most common means to verify own dosimetry performance with a certain uncertainty. This is, however, only one-direction dose intercomparison with evaluation by IAEA including unknown parameter at participant laboratories. The SSDL level laboratory should have traceability as well as compatibility, ability to evaluate uncertainties of its own dosimetry performance by itself In the present paper, we reviewed our dosimetry performance through two-way dose intercomparison studies and self-evaluation of uncertainty in our dosimetry procedure. The performance of silver dichromate dosimeter as reference transfer dosimeter in IC-VAEC was studied through two-way blind dose intercomparison experiments between the IC-VAEC and JAERI. As another channel of dose intercomparison with IAEA, alanine dosimeters issued by IDAS were simultaneously irradiated with the IC-VAEC dichromate dosimeters at IC-VAEC and analyzed by IAEA. Dose intercomparison between IC-VAEC and JAERI results into a good agreement (better than ±2.5%), and IDAS results also show similar agreement within ±3.0%. The uncertainty was self-estimated on the basis of the JAERI alanine dosimetry, and a preliminary value of about 1.86% at a 68% confidence level is established. The results from these intercomparisons and our estimation of the uncertainty are consistent. We hope that our experience is valuable to other countries which do not have dosimetry standard laboratories and/or are planning to establish them. (author)

  13. Intradermal inactivated poliovirus vaccine: a preclinical dose-finding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2015-05-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial vaccine doses induced antibodies at titers comparable to those after immunization with full human dose delivered intramuscularly. The results suggest that intradermal delivery of IPV may lead to dose-sparing effect and reduction of the vaccination cost. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Study of teflon pads as high doses dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Maria Ines; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the Teflon, which is used as a binder in the manufacture of dosimetric tablets, for the feasibility of this material as high dose dosemeter. In this paper we used the technique of thermally stimulated luminescence (OSL) to characterize the dosimetric properties of Teflon. Teflon samples were exposed to different doses of radiation, using a source of gamma radiation ( 60 Co). It was obtained dose-response curve between 100 Gy to 50 kGy and reproducibility of OSL response. The preliminary results show that Teflon is a useful material to high dose dosimetry

  15. Estimation of dose and exposure at sentinel node study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beslic, N.; Begic, A.; Begovic-Hadzimuratovic, S.; Drazeta, Z.; Beganovic, A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose end exposure in staff involved in sentinel node procedure for breast cancer patients. The Institute of Nuclear Medicine in Sarajevo uses a protocol for lymphoscintigraphy of the sentinel node whereby 13 MBq of 9 9mT c nanocoll are used. In this study, we measured radiation doses and exposure of a nuclear medicine physician and a technologist, as well as a surgeon performing sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy and biopsy. Dose and exposure were calculated using the equation in which we have gamma constant for 9 9mT c. Calculations were made for different times of exposure and distance. In Table 1. we estimated the dose and exposure during sentinel node study. Radiation levels were very low and the most exposed hospital staff performing sentinel node study were nuclear medicine physicians. The doses on the hands of surgeons were negligible 8 hours after exposure.(author)

  16. Mars power system concept definition study. Volume 1: Study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary top level study was completed to define power system concepts applicable to Mars surface applications. This effort included definition of power system requirements and selection of power systems with the potential for high commonality. These power systems included dynamic isotope, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell, sodium sulfur battery, photovoltaic, and reactor concepts. Design influencing factors were identified. Characterization studies were then done for each concept to determine system performance, size/volume, and mass. Operations studies were done to determine emplacement/deployment maintenance/servicing, and startup/shutdown requirements. Technology development roadmaps were written for each candidate power system (included in Volume 2). Example power system architectures were defined and compared on a mass basis. The dynamic isotope power system and nuclear reactor power system architectures had significantly lower total masses than the photovoltaic system architectures. Integrated development and deployment time phasing plans were completed for an example DIPS and reactor architecture option to determine the development strategies required to meet the mission scenario requirements.

  17. Studies of absorbed dose determinations and spatial dose distributions for high energy proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Takeshi

    1982-01-01

    Absolute dose determinations were made with three types of ionization chamber and a Faraday cup. Methane based tissue equivalent (TE) gas, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, air were used as an ionizing gas with flow rate of 10 ml per minute. Measurements were made at the entrance position of unmodulated beams and for a beam of a spread out Bragg peak at a depth of 17.3 mm in water. For both positions, the mean value of dose determined by the ionization chambers was 0.993 +- 0.014 cGy for which the value of TE gas was taken as unity. The agreement between the doses estimated by the ionization chambers and the Faraday cup was within 5%. Total uncertainty estimated in the ionization chamber and the Faraday cup determinations is 6 and 4%, respectively. Common sources of error in calculating the dose from ionization chamber measurements are depend on the factors of ion recombination, W value, and mass stopping power ratio. These factors were studied by both experimentally and theoretically. The observed values for the factors show a good agreement to the predicted one. Proton beam dosimetry intercomparison between Japan and the United States was held. Good agreement was obtained with standard deviation of 1.6%. The value of the TE calorimeter is close to the mean value of all. In the proton spot scanning system, lateral dose distributions at any depth for one spot beam can be simulated by the Gaussian distribution. From the Gaussian distributions and the central axis depth doses for one spot beam, it is easy to calculate isodose distributions in the desired field by superposition of dose distribution for one spot beam. Calculated and observed isodose curves were agreed within 1 mm at any dose levels. (J.P.N.)

  18. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  19. Radiation dose reduction for CT lung cancer screening using ASIR and MBIR: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B; Ai, Hua; Fox, Patricia S; Godoy, Myrna Cobos Barco; Munden, Reginald F; de Groot, Patricia M; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-03-06

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the radiation dosage associated with computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening while maintaining overall diagnostic image quality and definition of ground-glass opacities (GGOs). A lung screening phantom and a multipurpose chest phantom were used to quantitatively assess the performance of two iterative image reconstruction algorithms (adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)) used in conjunction with reduced tube currents relative to a standard clinical lung cancer screening protocol (51 effective mAs (3.9 mGy) and filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction). To further assess the algorithms' performances, qualitative image analysis was conducted (in the form of a reader study) using the multipurpose chest phantom, which was implanted with GGOs of two densities. Our quantitative image analysis indicated that tube current, and thus radiation dose, could be reduced by 40% or 80% from ASIR or MBIR, respectively, compared with conventional FBP, while maintaining similar image noise magnitude and contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative portion of our study, which assessed reader preference, yielded similar results, indicating that dose could be reduced by 60% (to 20 effective mAs (1.6 mGy)) with either ASIR or MBIR, while maintaining GGO definition. Additionally, the readers' preferences (as indicated by their ratings) regarding overall image quality were equal or better (for a given dose) when using ASIR or MBIR, compared with FBP. In conclusion, combining ASIR or MBIR with reduced tube current may allow for lower doses while maintaining overall diagnostic image quality, as well as GGO definition, during CT lung cancer screening.

  20. Solar dynamic power system definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Wayne E.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1988-01-01

    The solar dynamic power system design and analysis study compared Brayton, alkali-metal Rankine, and free-piston Stirling cycles with silicon planar and GaAs concentrator photovoltaic power systems for application to missions beyond the Phase 2 Space Station level of technology for all power systems. Conceptual designs for Brayton and Stirling power systems were developed for 35 kWe and 7 kWe power levels. All power systems were designed for 7-year end-of-life conditions in low Earth orbit. LiF was selected for thermal energy storage for the solar dynamic systems. Results indicate that the Stirling cycle systems have the highest performance (lowest weight and area) followed by the Brayton cycle, with photovoltaic systems considerably lower in performance. For example, based on the performance assumptions used, the planar silicon power system weight was 55 to 75 percent higher than for the Stirling system. A technology program was developed to address areas wherein significant performance improvements could be realized relative to the current state-of-the-art as represented by Space Station. In addition, a preliminary evaluation of hardenability potential found that solar dynamic systems can be hardened beyond the hardness inherent in the conceptual designs of this study.

  1. Radiation doses to children during modified barium swallow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, Kelly A.; McMahon, Sandra M.; Long, Gillian; Bunch, Judith A.; Pandeya, Nirmala; Coakley, Kerry S.; Chang, Anne B.

    2007-01-01

    There are minimal data on radiation doses to infants and children undergoing a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. To document screening times, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses to children undergoing MBS and to determine factors associated with increased screening times and effective dose. Fluoroscopic data (screening time, DAP, kVp) for 90 consecutive MBS studies using pulse fluoroscopy were prospectively recorded; effective dose was calculated and data were analyzed for effects of behavior, number of swallow presentations, swallowing dysfunction and medical problems. Mean effective dose for the entire group was 0.0826 ± 0.0544 mSv, screening time 2.48 ± 0.81 min, and DAP 28.79 ± 41.72 cGy cm 2 . Significant differences were found across three age groups (≤1.0, >1.0-3.0 and >3.0 years) for effective dose (mean 0.1188, 0.0651 and 0.0529 mSv, respectively; P < 0.001), but not for screening time or DAP. Effective dose was correlated with screening time (P 0.007), DAP (P < 0.001), number of swallow presentations (P = 0.007), lower age (P = 0.017), female gender (P = 0.004), and height (P < 0.001). Screening time was correlated with total number of swallow presentations (P < 0.001) and DAP (P < 0.001). Screening times, DAP, effective dose, and child and procedural factors associated with higher effective doses are presented for children undergoing MBS studies. (orig.)

  2. Identifying the most successful dose (MSD) in dose-finding studies in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; O'Quigley, John

    2006-01-01

    For a dose finding study in cancer, the most successful dose (MSD), among a group of available doses, is that dose at which the overall success rate is the highest. This rate is the product of the rate of seeing non-toxicities together with the rate of tumor response. A successful dose finding trial in this context is one where we manage to identify the MSD in an efficient manner. In practice we may also need to consider algorithms for identifying the MSD which can incorporate certain restrictions, the most common restriction maintaining the estimated toxicity rate alone below some maximum rate. In this case the MSD may correspond to a different level than that for the unconstrained MSD and, in providing a final recommendation, it is important to underline that it is subject to the given constraint. We work with the approach described in O'Quigley et al. [Biometrics 2001; 57(4):1018-1029]. The focus of that work was dose finding in HIV where both information on toxicity and efficacy were almost immediately available. Recent cancer studies are beginning to fall under this same heading where, as before, toxicity can be quickly evaluated and, in addition, we can rely on biological markers or other measures of tumor response. Mindful of the particular context of cancer, our purpose here is to consider the methodology developed by O'Quigley et al. and its practical implementation. We also carry out a study on the doubly under-parameterized model, developed by O'Quigley et al. but not

  3. Sodium phenylbutyrate in Huntington's disease: a dose-finding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Penelope; Lovrecic, Luca; Krainc, Dimitri

    2007-10-15

    Transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease (HD) is mediated in part by aberrant patterns of histone acetylation. We performed a dose-finding study in human HD of sodium phenylbutyrate (SPB), a histone deacetylase inhibitor that ameliorates the HD phenotype in animal models. We used a dose-escalation/de-escalation design, using prespecified toxicity criteria and standard clinical and laboratory safety measures. The maximum tolerated dose was 15 g/day. At higher doses, toxicity included vomiting, lightheadedness, confusion, and gait instability. We saw no significant laboratory or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Gene expression changes in blood suggested an inverse dose-response. In conclusion, SPB at 12 to 15 g/day appears to be safe and well-tolerated in human HD. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  4. Micro-dosing for early biokinetic studies in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, K.; Sydoff, M.; Mattsson, S.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-dosing is a new concept in drug development that-if implemented in the pharmaceutical industry-would mean that new drugs can be tested earlier in humans than done today. The human micro-dosing concept-or 'Phase 0'-may offer improved candidate selection, reduced failure rates in the drug development line and a reduction in the use of laboratory animals in early drug development, factors which will help to speed up drug development and also reduce the costs. Micro-dosing utilises sub-pharmacological amounts of the substance to open opportunities for early studies in man. Three technologies are used for micro-dosing: accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), positron emission tomography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This paper focuses on the principle of AMS and discusses the current status of micro-dosing with AMS. (authors)

  5. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  6. Dose response study of PVA-Fx gel for three dimensional dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindha, S.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Shen, Bin; Saw, Cheng B.

    2001-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques involve complex field arrangements using conformal and intensity modulated radiation that requires three dimensional treatment planning. The verification of these plans poses even more challenge. In 1984, Gore et al., proposed that ferrous gel dosimeters combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to measure three dimensional radiation dose distributions. Since then, there has been much interest in the development of gel dosimetry to aid the determination of three dimensional dose distributions during field arrangements. In this work, preparation and study of the MR characteristics of a PVA-Fx gel reported in the literature is presented

  7. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments. VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤ 8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D99%), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found. For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the 4DCT, the interplay effect

  8. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D 99% ), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the

  9. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecatti, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author) [pt

  10. Dose response of rat retinal microvessels to proton dose schedules used clinically: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, John O.; Mao, Xiao W.; McMillan, Paul J.; Gouloumet, Vanessa L.; Oeinck, Steven C.; Grove, Roger; Yonemoto, Leslie T.; Slater, Jerry D.; Slater, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: This preclinical rat pilot study quantifies retinal microvessel, endothelial, and pericyte population changes produced by proton irradiation Methods and Materials: The left eyes of rats were irradiated with single doses of 8, 14, 20, and 28 Gy protons; right eyes, with two fractions. Animals were euthanized, and eyes were removed; elastase digests were prepared, and cell populations were counted in sample fields. Results were compared with unirradiated controls. Results: Progressive time- and dose-dependent endothelial cell loss occurred following all schedules. Cell loss was significantly different from control values (p 0 phase of the mitotic cycle. 28 Gy produced photoreceptor cell loss. Conclusion: The retinal digest is an elegant bioassay to quantify the microvessel population response. Single- and split-dose schedules appear to yield similar outcomes, in terms of endothelial cell density

  11. An effective dose of ketamine for eliminating pain during injection of propofol: a dose response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Wang, Q; Yu, Y Y; Wang, W S

    2013-09-01

    Ketamine can completely eliminate pain associated with propofol injection. However, the effective dose of ketamine to eliminate propofol injection pain has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effective dose of ketamine needed to eliminate pain in 50% and 95% of patients (ED50 and ED95, respectively) during propofol injections. This study was conducted in a double-blinded fashion and included 50 patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy under general anesthesia. The initial dose of ketamine used in the first patient was 0.25mg/kg. The dosing modifications were in increments or decrements of 0.025 mg/kg. Ketamine was administered 15 seconds before injecting propofol (2.5mg/kg), which was injected at a rate of 1mL/s. Patients were asked to rate their pain during propofol injection every 5s econds using a 0-3 pain scale. The highest pain score was recorded. The ED50, ED95 and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined by probit analyses. The dose of ketamine ranged from 0.175 to 0.275 mg/kg. The ED50 and ED95 of ketamine for eliminating pain during propofol injection were 0.227 mg/kg and 0.283 mg/kg, respectively (95%CI: 0.211-0.243 mg/kg and 0.26-0.364 mg/kg, respectively). Ketamine at an approximate dose of 0.3mg/kg was effective in eliminating pain during propofol injection. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose profile study in head CT scans using radiochromic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladino G, A. M.; Prata M, A., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Diagnostic images of computed tomography generate higher doses than other methods of diagnostic radiology using X-ray beam attenuation. Clinical applications of CT have been increased by technological advances, what leads to a wide variety of scanner in the Brazilian technological pool. It has been difficult to implement dose reduction strategies because of the lack of proper guidance on computed tomography examinations. However, CT scanners allow adjusting acquisition parameter according to the patients physical profile and diagnostic application for which the scan is intended. The knowledge of the dose distribution is important because changes in image acquisition parameters may provide dose reduction. In this study, it was used a cylindrical head phantom in PMMA with 5 openings, what allows dose measurement in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model of 64 channels, the central slice of the head phantom was irradiated and the absorbed doses were measured using a pencil ionization chamber. Radiochromic film strips were placed in the peripheral and in the central region of the head phantom and was performed a scan of 10 cm in the phantom central region. The scan was performed using the head scanning protocol of the radiobiology service, with a voltage of 120 kV. After scanning, the radiochromic film strips were digitalized and their digital images were used to have the dose longitudinal profiles. The dose values recorded have variation in a range of 18.66 to 23.57 mGy. In the results it was compared the dose index values obtained by the pencil chamber measurement to the dose longitudinal profiles recorded by the film strips. (Author)

  13. Dose profile study in head CT scans using radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladino G, A. M.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Diagnostic images of computed tomography generate higher doses than other methods of diagnostic radiology using X-ray beam attenuation. Clinical applications of CT have been increased by technological advances, what leads to a wide variety of scanner in the Brazilian technological pool. It has been difficult to implement dose reduction strategies because of the lack of proper guidance on computed tomography examinations. However, CT scanners allow adjusting acquisition parameter according to the patients physical profile and diagnostic application for which the scan is intended. The knowledge of the dose distribution is important because changes in image acquisition parameters may provide dose reduction. In this study, it was used a cylindrical head phantom in PMMA with 5 openings, what allows dose measurement in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model of 64 channels, the central slice of the head phantom was irradiated and the absorbed doses were measured using a pencil ionization chamber. Radiochromic film strips were placed in the peripheral and in the central region of the head phantom and was performed a scan of 10 cm in the phantom central region. The scan was performed using the head scanning protocol of the radiobiology service, with a voltage of 120 kV. After scanning, the radiochromic film strips were digitalized and their digital images were used to have the dose longitudinal profiles. The dose values recorded have variation in a range of 18.66 to 23.57 mGy. In the results it was compared the dose index values obtained by the pencil chamber measurement to the dose longitudinal profiles recorded by the film strips. (Author)

  14. Developing a Framework for Analyzing Definitions: A Study of "The Feynman Lectures"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chee Leong; Chu, Hye-Eun; Yap, Kueh Chin

    2014-01-01

    One important purpose of a definition is to explain the meaning of a word. Any problems associated with a definition may impede students' learning. However, research studies on the definitional problems from the perspective of physics education are limited. Physics educators may not be aware of the nature and extent of definitional problems.…

  15. Field study to evaluate radiation doses in dental practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, W.; Scheurer, C.

    1984-05-01

    An inexpensive and simple test device was developed and used in a field study to evaluate entrance dose, dose to an intra-oral film, filtration and field size under routine conditions in more than 150 dental practices. The test device consists of two films of different speed and a set of 5 thin copper filters for a filter analytical determination of the radiation quality. Dentists voluntarily participating in the study were asked to expose the test device like they usually do when examining a molar tooth. The main result was the evidence of a significant dose reduction compared to the findings of similar studies performed in 1970 and 1976. This reduction is due to a general shift to lower values and a complete disappearance of values above 45 mGy (5 R) which in 1970 were still more than 15%. In the same way the number of facilities showing insufficient filtration or collimation had decreased. Nevertheless, a large spread of dose values could still be observed, ranging from less than 0.45 mGy (50 mR) to more than 26 mGy (3 R), for the entrance dose. The most striking result, however, was that such an important parameter like the speed of the films used at the respective unit turned out to have no impact on the entrance dose. (orig./HP)

  16. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Thomas; Baumann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [de

  17. Dose finding study of granisetron in patients receiving high-dose cisplatin chemotherapy. The Granisetron Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, A.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of three different doses of granisetron (2 micrograms kg-1, group A; 10 micrograms kg-1, group B; 40 micrograms kg-1, group C) were compared in a randomised, double-blind study of 157 patients due to receive high-dose cisplatin therapy (mean dose > 97 mg m-2). In each group, up to two 3 mg rescue doses of granisetron were allowed if more than mild nausea or vomiting occurred. In group A 30.8%, in group B 61.5% and in group C 67.9% of patients were complete responders (i.e. no vomiting or nothing worse than mild nausea) during the first 24 h. These differences are significant between groups A and B, and A and C. There were no statistically significant differences in any efficacy variable between the 10 micrograms kg-1 and 40 micrograms kg-1 groups, although in each case the trend favoured the higher dose. Additional rescue doses resulted in resolved or improved symptoms in 95.3% for the first rescue dose and 93.3% for the second. Over the 7 days of the study, 82.7%, 82.7% and 86.8% of patients in groups A, B and C respectively were treated with granisetron alone. Headache was the most common side-effect, reported by 9.6% of patients; the majority of headaches were mild. There was no difference between the treatment groups regarding the adverse event rate. We concluded that prophylactic doses of 10 or 40 micrograms kg-1 lead to a safe and satisfactory degree of control of nausea and vomiting induced by high-dose cisplatin. PMID:8180032

  18. Occupational dose measurement in interventional cardiology, dosimetry comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.M.A.

    2008-05-01

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart disease. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Therefore workers in interventional cardiology are expected to receive high doses. This study overviews the status of occupational exposure at the three cardiology centers at three different hospitals in Khartoum compared with that received by workers at other medical practices (radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology) in the Institute of Nuclear and Technology (INMO) at El Gezira. The TLD Harshaw 6600 reader was used in the assessment of effective dose for Hp (10). Two TLDs were used by each worker at the three cardiology centres, one worn under a protective apron and the other worn outside and above the apron as specified by the ICRP. Each worker at the other sections was facilitated with one dosimeter to be worn on the chest. The annual doses received by 14 cardiologists, 13 nurses and 9 technologists at the three cardiology centres were in the range: (0.84-4.77), (0.15-2.08), (0.32-1.10) mSv respectively. In the INMO the annual doses received by 7 doctors, 5 nurses and 14 technologists were in the range: (0.12-0.51), (0.11-0.65), (0.03-1.39) mSv respectively. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. The study also indicated that doses received by workers in interventional cardiology, in particular the cardiologists are high compared to that received at the other medical sections.(Author)

  19. Once-daily dosing of saquinavir and low-dose ritonavir in HIV-1-infected individuals: a pharmacokinetic pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heeswijk, R. P.; Veldkamp, A. I.; Mulder, J. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Lange, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of a once-daily dosing regimen of saquinavir soft gelatin capsules in combination with a low dose of ritonavir in HIV-1-infected individuals. Open-label, multi-dose, pharmacokinetic pilot study. Seven HIV-1-infected individuals who were treated with

  20. Mars power system concept definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Rockwell International's Rocketdyne Division on NASA Contract No. NAS3-25808 (Task Order No. 16) entitled 'Mars Power System Definition Study'. This work was performed for NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC). The report is divided into two volumes as follows: Volume 1 - Study Results; and Volume 2 - Appendices. The results of the power system characterization studies, operations studies, and technology evaluations are summarized in Volume 1. The appendices include complete, standalone technology development plans for each candidate power system that was investigated.

  1. Comparative study of dose descriptor in pediatric computed tomography exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finatto, Jerusa Dalbosco; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da; Froner, Ana Paula Pastre; Pimentel, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the dose descriptor, volumetric Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI), a pediatric patients sample undergoing to skull CT, comparing the results with the diagnostic reference levels of the literature. Were collected volumetric CTDI values of all skull CT exams performed retrospectively in children of 0-10 years of age in a period of 12 months in a large hospital size. Patients, in a total of 103, were divided into four groups, where the criterion of separation used was age, trying to use the same division used in international references dose descriptors. In all acquisitions we used the pediatric protocol and the Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) available on the equipment. The CDTI values, with and without the use of AEC for pediatric studies, were compared. There was a reduction of approximately 100% in the absorbed dose value due to the use of the AEC. From the data collected and analyzed in this work, it is concluded that the use of dose reduction systems is relevant, such as the Care Dose, to maintain volumetric CTDI values within the reference levels. Also it is important the observation of range of children age to the appropriate choice of parameters used in the test protocol. The values obtained are according to the diagnostic reference levels from the literature

  2. A systematic study on factors affecting patient dose, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Akiyoshi; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Utsumi, Hiromoto; Ota, Masaji; Nakanishi, Takashi

    1979-01-01

    In the study of possible reduction in irradiation dose to patients during medical treatments, the following two methods can be considered: (1) To obtain absorbed doses for each part of a body in diagnostic X-ray examinations. (2) To obtain data on factors such as the tube voltage which may affect patient dose. There are a number of reports both at home and abroad concerning the above (1), but very few reports are available concerning the above (2). Moreover, most of them are on fragmentary aspects of each factor and no systematic reports have been made. For this reason, we have taken up, as factors affecting the patient dose, the field size, the tube voltage, and by checking them again, we wanted to obtain some systematic data. Our aim has been fully attained by conducting an experiment. In the ICRP's Publ. 26 issued last year, the idea of the critical organ which had not been fully elucidated in the Publ. 9 was abandoned. As a result, assessment of the irradiation doses has become more rational and the total risk for an individual was obtained. In Japan, the idea proposed in the Publ. 9 is adopted. Therefore, in this paper, we will raise some questions regarding the assessment of the irradiation doses, pointing out at the same time the rationality of the idea put forward in Publ. 26. (author)

  3. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  4. Innovative design for a phase 1 trial with intra-patient dose escalation: The Crotoxin study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Medioni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crotoxin has a broad antitumor activity but has shown frequent neurotoxic toxicity. To induce tolerance and limit this toxicity, we propose a new design with intra-patient dose escalation. Methods: A new Dose Limiting Toxicity definition was used. The concept of Target Ceiling Dose was introduced. Results: Dose Limiting Toxicity was the inability to dose escalate twice. Target Ceiling Dose was the highest planned dose to be administered to a patient and could change for patients along time. Recommended Dose was defined similarly as in a (3 + 3 conventional design. Conclusion: This innovant design was used and the clinical trial is now closed for inclusions. Results will be presented later. Keywords: Clinical trial, Phase 1, Intra-patient dose escalation, Cancer

  5. Dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity: case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slikker, William; Andersen, Melvin E.; Bogdanffy, Matthew S.; Bus, James S.; Cohen, Steven D.; Conolly, Rory B.; David, Raymond M.; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Dorman, David C.; Gaylor, David W.; Hattis, Dale; Rogers, John M.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Swenberg, James A.; Wallace, Kendall

    2004-01-01

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed with increasing exposures, signaling the emergence of new modalities of toxic tissue injury at these higher doses. Therefore, dose-dependent transitions in principal mechanisms of toxicity may occur, and could have significant impact on the interpretation of reference data sets for risk assessment. To illustrate the existence of dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity, a group of academic, government, and industry scientists, formed under the leadership of the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI), developed a series of case studies. These case studies included acetaminophen, butadiene, ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, manganese, methylene chloride, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), progesterone/hydroxyflutamide, propylene oxide, vinyl acetate, vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, and zinc. The case studies formed the basis for technical discourse at two scientific workshops in 2003

  6. [Immortal time bias in pharmacoepidemiological studies: definition, solutions and examples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faillie, Jean-Luc; Suissa, Samy

    2015-01-01

    Among the observational studies of drug effects in chronic diseases, many of them have found effects that were exaggerated or wrong. Among bias responsible for these errors, the immortal time bias, concerning the definition of exposure and exposure periods, is relevantly important as it usually tends to wrongly attribute a significant benefit to the study drug (or exaggerate a real benefit). In this article, we define the mechanism of immortal time bias, we present possible solutions and illustrate its consequences through examples of pharmacoepidemiological studies of drug effects. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. Sensitivity of dose-finding studies to observation errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; O'Quigley, John

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of Phase I designs is to estimate the MTD (maximum tolerated dose, in practice a dose with some given acceptable rate of toxicity) while, at the same time, minimizing the number of patients treated at doses too far removed from the MTD. Our purpose here is to investigate the sensitivity of conclusions from dose-finding designs to recording or observation errors. Certain toxicities may go undetected and, conversely, certain non-toxicities may be incorrectly recorded as dose-limiting toxicities. Recording inaccuracies would be expected to have an influence on final and within trial recommendations and, in this paper, we study in greater depth this question. We focus, in particular on three designs used currently; the standard '3+3' design, the grouped up-and-down design [M. Gezmu, N. Flournoy, Group up-and-down designs for dose finding. Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference 2006; 136 (6): 1749-1764.] and the continual reassessment method (CRM, [J. O'Quigley, M. Pepe, L. Fisher, Continual reassessment method: a practical design for phase 1 clinical trials in cancer. Biometrics 1990; 46 (1): 33-48.]). A non-toxicity incorrectly recorded as a toxicity (error of first kind) has a greater influence in general than the converse (error of second kind). These results are illustrated via figures which suggest that the standard '3+3' design in particular is sensitive to errors of the second kind. Such errors can have a very important impact on drug development in that, if carried through to the Phase 2 and Phase 3 studies, we can significantly increase the probability of failure to detect efficacy as a result of having delivered an inadequate dose.

  8. Pulsed total dose damage effect experimental study on EPROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yinhong; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Keying; Wang Yuanming; He Baoping

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, memory radiation effect study mainly focus on functionality measurement. Measurable parameters is few in china. According to the present situation, threshold voltage testing method was presented on floating gate EPROM memory. Experimental study of pulsed total dose effect on EPROM threshold voltage was carried out. Damage mechanism was analysed The experiment results showed that memory cell threshold voltage negative shift was caused by pulsed total dose, memory cell threshold voltage shift is basically coincident under steady bias supply and no bias supply. (authors)

  9. Study of total ionization dose effects in electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidhin, T.S.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Gour, Aditya; Behera, R.P.; Jayanthi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation effects in electronic devices are a major challenge in the dependable application developments of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The main radiation effects are total ionization dose (TID) effects, displacement damage dose (DDD) effects and single event effects (SEE). In this study, we are concentrating on TID effects in electronic devices. The focus of the study is mainly on SRAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) along with that the devices of our interest are voltage regulators, flash memory and optocoupler. The experiments are conducted by exposing the devices to gamma radiation in power off condition and the degradation in the performances are analysed

  10. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been devised to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats, and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines have been reviewed, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to human is discussed

  11. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have devised a method to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, researchers have reviewed some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to humans is discussed

  12. Assessment of radioactive residues arising from radiolabel instability in a multiple dose tissue distribution study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatter, J.G. [Pharmacia Corp., Peapack, NJ (United States); Sams, J.P.; Easter, J.A. [Pharmacia Corp., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    2003-05-01

    Our study objectives were to quantitatively determine the effect of radiolabel instability on terminal phase radioactive tissue residues in a multiple dose tissue distribution study, to quantitatively compare tissue residue artifacts (non drug-related radioactivity) from two chemically-distinct radiolabel locations, and to conduct a definitive multiple dose tissue distribution study using the better of the two radiolabeled compounds. We compared the excretion and tissue distribution in rats of [{sup 14}C]linezolid, radiolabeled in two different locations, after 7 consecutive once daily [{sup 14}C] oral doses. The radiolabels were in the acetamide (two carbon) and oxazolidinone (isolated carbon) functional groups. Terminal phase tissue residue and excretion data were compared to data from rats dosed orally with [{sup 14}C]sodium acetate. Drug-related radioactivity was excreted rapidly over 24 h. After a single dose, the acetamide and oxazolidinone radiolabel sites both gave 3% of dose as exhaled {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. After 7 daily [{sup 14}C] oral doses, terminal phase radioactive tissue residues were higher from the acetamide radiolabel, relative to the oxazolidinone radiolabel, and were primarily not drug-related. In the definitive tissue distribution study, low concentrations of drug-related radioactivity in skin and thyroid were observed. We conclude that although small amounts of radiolabel instability do not significantly affect single dose tissue radioactivity C{sub max} and area under the curve (AUC), artifacts arising from radiolabel instability can prolong the apparent terminal phase half life and complicate study data interpretation. When possible, it is always preferable to use a completely stable radiolabel site. (author)

  13. Assessment of radioactive residues arising from radiolabel instability in a multiple dose tissue distribution study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatter, J.G.; Sams, J.P.; Easter, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Our study objectives were to quantitatively determine the effect of radiolabel instability on terminal phase radioactive tissue residues in a multiple dose tissue distribution study, to quantitatively compare tissue residue artifacts (non drug-related radioactivity) from two chemically-distinct radiolabel locations, and to conduct a definitive multiple dose tissue distribution study using the better of the two radiolabeled compounds. We compared the excretion and tissue distribution in rats of [ 14 C]linezolid, radiolabeled in two different locations, after 7 consecutive once daily [ 14 C] oral doses. The radiolabels were in the acetamide (two carbon) and oxazolidinone (isolated carbon) functional groups. Terminal phase tissue residue and excretion data were compared to data from rats dosed orally with [ 14 C]sodium acetate. Drug-related radioactivity was excreted rapidly over 24 h. After a single dose, the acetamide and oxazolidinone radiolabel sites both gave 3% of dose as exhaled 14 CO 2 . After 7 daily [ 14 C] oral doses, terminal phase radioactive tissue residues were higher from the acetamide radiolabel, relative to the oxazolidinone radiolabel, and were primarily not drug-related. In the definitive tissue distribution study, low concentrations of drug-related radioactivity in skin and thyroid were observed. We conclude that although small amounts of radiolabel instability do not significantly affect single dose tissue radioactivity C max and area under the curve (AUC), artifacts arising from radiolabel instability can prolong the apparent terminal phase half life and complicate study data interpretation. When possible, it is always preferable to use a completely stable radiolabel site. (author)

  14. Doses for post-Chernobyl epidemiological studies: are they reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Chumak, Vadim; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bouville, André

    2016-09-01

    On 26 April 2016, thirty years will have elapsed since the occurrence of the Chernobyl accident, which has so far been the most severe in the history of the nuclear reactor industry. Numerous epidemiological studies were conducted to evaluate the possible health consequences of the accident. Since the credibility of the association between the radiation exposure and health outcome is highly dependent on the adequacy of the dosimetric quantities used in these studies, this paper makes an effort to overview the methods used to estimate individual doses and the associated uncertainties in the main analytical epidemiological studies (i.e. cohort or case-control) related to the Chernobyl accident. Based on the thorough analysis and comparison with other radiation studies, the authors conclude that individual doses for the Chernobyl analytical epidemiological studies have been calculated with a relatively high degree of reliability and well-characterized uncertainties, and that they compare favorably with many other non-Chernobyl studies. The major strengths of the Chernobyl studies are: (1) they are grounded on a large number of measurements, either performed on humans or made in the environment; and (2) extensive effort has been invested to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the dose estimates. Nevertheless, gaps in the methodology are identified and suggestions for the possible improvement of the current dose estimates are made.

  15. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  16. Indirect effects in community ecology: Their definition, study and importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, S Y

    1991-07-01

    The diversity of indirect interactions that can occur within communities is large. Recent research on indirect interactions is scattered in the literature under numerous labels. The definition of indirect effects is an important aspect of their study, and clarifies some of the subtle differences among indirect effects found in natural communities. Choosing which species to study, how to manipulate species and for what duration, which attributes to measure and, finally, which analytical techniques to use are all problems facing the community ecologist. Ultimately, we are striving for the best means of determining the relative importance of direct and indirect effects in structuring communities. Copyright © 1991. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Application of radio-thermoluminescence to the experimental study of the dose equivalent index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Elvira-Beatriz

    1980-01-01

    First, the Systems of dose limitation proposed by the ICRP since 1965 are analysed. The notion of 'critical organ' is replaced by the system based on the effective dose equivalent (ICRP 77). In the same document, the 'dose equivalent index' (H I ) is suggested as a secondary limit. Here, its first definition, later modifications, advantages, and inconveniences are discussed. The second part of the study is devoted to the experimental determination of H I for X and gamma (Co 60 ) beams by radioluminescent (RTL) dosimetry. In order to take into account the different chromatic relative sensitivities of the detectors used lithium fluoride (powder and pellets), lithium borate (pellets) and calcium sulfate activated by dysprosium (powder) these latter are measured within the (10-1250) keV energy range. With the help of the preceding values and the results of the RTL measurements carried out inside the ICRU spherical phantom, the corresponding absorbed doses are deduced in order to calculate H I . (author) [fr

  18. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  19. Advance of study on hormesis of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    There have been growing interests in recent years over the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on human. The paper gives a brief review on the LDR studies, which include LDR-induced hormesis and adaptive response, LDR experiments in vivo or in vitro and epidemiologic investigation, and clinical applications of LDR as well

  20. An experimental Toxoplasma gondii dose response challenge model to study therapeutic or vaccine efficacy in cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B W J Cornelissen

    Full Text Available High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10, and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application.

  1. Estimate of dose in interventional radiology: a study of cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, N.; Braz, D.; Lopes, R.; Vallim, M.; Padilha, L.; Azevedo, F.; Barroso, R.

    2006-01-01

    Values of absorbed dose taken by patients and professionals involved in interventional radiology can be significant mainly for the reason of these proceedings taking long time of fluoroscopy There are many methods to estimate and reduce doses of radiation in the interventional radiology, particularly because the fluoroscopy is responsible for the high dose contribution in the patient and in the professional. The aim of this work is the thermoluminescent dosimetry to estimate the dose values of the extremities of the professionals involved in the interventional radiology and the product dose-area was investigated using a Diamentor. This evaluation is particularly useful for proceedings that interest multiple parts of the organism. In this study were used thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF:Mg, Ti - Harshaw) to estimate the dose values of the extremities of the professionals and to calibrate them. They were irradiated with X rays at 50 mGy, in Kerma in air and read in the reader Harshaw-5500. The product dose-area (D.A.P.) were obtained through the Diamentor (M2-P.T.W.) calibrated in Cgy.cm 2 fixed in the exit of the X-rays tube. The patients of these study were divided in three groups: individuals submitted to proceedings of embolization, individuals submitted to cerebral and renal arteriography and individuals submitted to proceedings of Transjungular Inthahepatic Porta Systemic Stent Shunt (TIPS). The texts were always carried out by the same group: radiologist doctor), an auxiliary doctor and a nursing auxiliary. The section of interventional radiology has an Angiostar Plus Siemens equipment type arc C, in which there is trifocal Megalix X-ray tube and a intensifier of image from Sirecon 40-4 HDR/33 HDR. In this work the dose estimated values were 137.25 mSv/year for the doctors, 40.27 mSv/year for the nursing and 51.95 mSv/year for the auxiliary doctor and they are below the rule, but in this study it was not taken in consideration the emergency texts as they were

  2. Beyond the traditional definition of breakthrough pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Antonio; Gentili, Marta; Iorno, Vittorio; Mammucari, Massimo; Tufaro, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Marzia; Sabato, Alessandro Fabrizio

    2013-03-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) is traditionally defined as a transitory pain flare in opioid-treated patients with chronic background pain. This definition has, however, been challenged in recent years. This study aimed to analyze BTP prevalence in different pain conditions. This was a prospective, non-interventional, observational study conducted from June to September 2011 in two Italian pain treatment reference centres. Consecutive patients aged >18 years with oncological or non-oncological pain were eligible for this study; background pain was acute/ subacute (3 months). The characteristics of pain were evaluated by means of a structured interview by physicians, and patients were asked to complete a dedicated clinical study form. The following outcomes were assessed: chronic pain duration (in patients with chronic pain), BTP prevalence, and number and severity of daily BTP episodes. All outcomes were assessed in four populations of patients with: (a) chronic oncological pain; (b) chronic non-oncological pain; (c) non-chronic oncological pain; (d) non-chronic non-oncological pain. The correlation between BTP and gender was also investigated. Of 1,270 patients with chronic pain, 1,086 had non-oncological pain (85.5%). Most patients (68.6%) with non-oncological pain were female (P = 0.001). Pain duration was significantly longer in non-oncological pain versus oncological pain groups (P = 0.002). BTP prevalence was lower in non-oncological patients (P definition. BTP frequency and severity is similar in oncological and non-oncological pain.

  3. Healthy ageing in the Nun Study: definition and neuropathologic correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyas, Suzanne L; Snowdon, David A; Desrosiers, Mark F; Riley, Kathryn P; Markesbery, William R

    2007-11-01

    Although the concept of healthy ageing has stimulated considerable interest, no generally accepted definition has been developed nor has its biological basis been determined. To develop a definition of healthy ageing and investigate its association with longevity and neuropathology. Analyses were based on cognitive, physical, and post-mortem assessments from 1991 to 1998 in the Nun Study, a longitudinal study of ageing in participants 75+ years at baseline. We defined three mutually exclusive levels of healthy ageing (excellent, very good, and good) based on measures of global cognitive function, short-term memory, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, and self-rated function. Mortality analyses were based on 636 participants; neuropathologic analyses were restricted to 221 who had died and were autopsied. Only 11% of those meeting criteria for the excellent level of healthy ageing at baseline subsequently died, compared with 24% for the very good, 39% for the good, and 60% for the remaining participants. Survival curves showed significantly greater longevity with higher levels of healthy ageing. The risk of not attaining healthy ageing, adjusted for age, increased two-fold in participants with brain infarcts alone, six-fold in those with Alzheimer neuropathology alone, and more than thirteen-fold in those with both brain infarcts and Alzheimer neuropathology. The biological validity of our definition of healthy ageing is supported by its strong association with mortality and longevity. Avoiding Alzheimer and stroke neuropathology is critical to the maintenance of healthy ageing, and the presence of both pathologies dramatically decreases the likelihood of healthy ageing.

  4. Early observed transient prostate-specific antigen elevations on a pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and fractionated MRI guided High Dose Rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K; Godette, Denise J; Stall, Bronwyn R; Coleman, C Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Ménard, Cynthia; Guion, Peter; Susil, Robert C; Citrin, Deborah E; Ning, Holly; Miller, Robert W; Ullman, Karen; Smith, Sharon; Crouse, Nancy Sears

    2006-01-01

    To report early observation of transient PSA elevations on this pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Eleven patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer received MRI guided HDR brachytherapy (10.5 Gy each fraction) before and after a course of external beam radiotherapy (46 Gy). Two patients continued on hormones during follow-up and were censored for this analysis. Four patients discontinued hormone therapy after RT. Five patients did not receive hormones. PSA bounce is defined as a rise in PSA values with a subsequent fall below the nadir value or to below 20% of the maximum PSA level. Six previously published definitions of biochemical failure to distinguish true failure from were tested: definition 1, rise >0.2 ng/mL; definition 2, rise >0.4 ng/mL; definition 3, rise >35% of previous value; definition 4, ASTRO defined guidelines, definition 5 nadir + 2 ng/ml, and definition 6, nadir + 3 ng/ml. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 18–36 mo). During follow-up, the incidence of transient PSA elevation was: 55% for definition 1, 44% for definition 2, 55% for definition 3, 33% for definition 4, 11% for definition 5, and 11% for definition 6. We observed a substantial incidence of transient elevations in PSA following combined external beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Such elevations seem to be self-limited and should not trigger initiation of salvage therapies. No definition of failure was completely predictive

  5. Towards more reliable automated multi-dose dispensing: retrospective follow-up study on medication dose errors and product defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palttala, Iida; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Honkanen, Outi; Suominen, Risto; Antikainen, Osmo; Hirvonen, Jouni; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2013-03-01

    To date, little is known on applicability of different types of pharmaceutical dosage forms in an automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. The purpose of the present study was to identify and further investigate various process-induced and/or product-related limitations associated with multi-dose dispensing process. The rates of product defects and dose dispensing errors in automated multi-dose dispensing were retrospectively investigated during a 6-months follow-up period. The study was based on the analysis of process data of totally nine automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing systems. Special attention was paid to the dependence of multi-dose dispensing errors/product defects and pharmaceutical tablet properties (such as shape, dimensions, weight, scored lines, coatings, etc.) to profile the most suitable forms of tablets for automated dose dispensing systems. The relationship between the risk of errors in dose dispensing and tablet characteristics were visualized by creating a principal component analysis (PCA) model for the outcome of dispensed tablets. The two most common process-induced failures identified in the multi-dose dispensing are predisposal of tablet defects and unexpected product transitions in the medication cassette (dose dispensing error). The tablet defects are product-dependent failures, while the tablet transitions are dependent on automated multi-dose dispensing systems used. The occurrence of tablet defects is approximately twice as common as tablet transitions. Optimal tablet preparation for the high-speed multi-dose dispensing would be a round-shaped, relatively small/middle-sized, film-coated tablet without any scored line. Commercial tablet products can be profiled and classified based on their suitability to a high-speed multi-dose dispensing process.

  6. Early termination of prostate cancer hyperfractionated dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D; Porter, Arthur T; Kocheril, Paul; Grignon, David; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to determine the maximum tolerable dose of hyperfractionated radiation in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3-T4 Nx, 0, 1 M0 and/or Gleason Score ≥ 8) were treated on the first two steps of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum dose of 78Gy to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) including the prostate, seminal vesicle and a 5mm margin at 1.3Gy b.i.d. The second group (24 patients) received a minimum dose to the CTV of 82.8Gy at 1.15Gy b.i.d. Twenty eight patients received neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with their radiation (8 of 25 patients at 78Gy and 20 of 24 patients at 82.8Gy). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG grading scale. Efficacy was evaluated by PSA levels and ultrasound guided biopsies. Median follow up was 36 and 18 months for the 78Gy and 82.8Gy dose levels, respectively. Results: No grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity was noted. At 36 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 GI and GU toxicity were 16 and 20%, respectively. Twelve to 18 months following radiation, 41 patients (86%) underwent ultrasound guided biopsy. At 78Gy, 60% of 20 patients had a biopsy which was negative or showed a marked therapeutic effect. At 82.8Gy, these combined rates were 95% in the 21 patients who had biopsies. Nine patients (50%) who did not receive neo-adjuvant hormones had positive biopsies. No patient who received neo-adjuvant hormones plus 78Gy (5 patients) or 82.8Gy (18 patients) had a positive biopsy. Conclusion: Proceeding to the next dose level (87.4Gy) was justified by the lack of severe chronic toxicity. However, in view of the high rate of histologic sterilization when hyperfractionated irradiation was given in conjunction with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, it was felt to be unethical to

  7. A study on mice exposure dose for low-dose gamma-irradiation using glass dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Son, Tae Gen; Kim, Jung Ki; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kang, Yeong Rok [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Sang Hee [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The low dose radiation is done for a long period, thus researchers have to know the exact dose distribution for the irradiated mouse. This research has been conducted in order to find out methods in transmitting an exact dose to mouse in a mouse irradiation experiment carried out using {sup 137}C{sub s} irradiation equipment installed in the DIRAMS (Dongnam Institution of Radiological and Medical Sciences) research center. We developed a single mouse housing cage and shelf with adjustable geometric factors such as distance and angle from collimator. The measurement of irradiated dose showed a maximal 42% difference of absorbed dose from the desired dose in the conventional irradiation system, whereas only 6% difference of the absorbed dose was measured in the self-developed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi mice housing showed much difference of the absorbed dose in between head and body, compared to single mouse housing in the conventional irradiation system. This research may allow further research about biological effect assessment for the low dose irradiation using the self-developed mouse apartment to provide more exact doses which it tries to transmit, and to have more reliability for the biological analysis results.

  8. The experimental study and clinical application on the detection of pulmonary nodules with low-dose multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaohua; Ma Daqing; Zhang Zhongjia; Ji Jingling; Zhang Yansong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary nodules ,especially nodules ≤5 mm, in variable low-doses, and to evaluate the imaging quality of low-dose MSCT. Methods: Six postmortem specimens of patients with pneumoconiosis after necropsy were fixed at end-inspiratory volume. The fixed specimens were examined by using MSCT with standard dose (130 mA) and low-dose (50, 30, 10 mA, respectively). Low-dose MSCT scans of 40 asymptomatic volunteers and 60 patients with pulmonary metastasis were also examined with 30 mA. The numbers of pulmonary nodules less than 5 mm at standard-dose and different low-dose were recorded. Nodules were assessed by diagnostic confidence ('definite nodule', 'questionable nodule', and 'definite not nodule'). The number of images with artifact in specimens and in 40 volunteers and 60 patients with pulmonary metastasis were recorded. Results: In specimen's study, the Kappa values of groups of low-dose (50, 30, 10 mA) were 0.515, 0.242, and 0.154, respectively. The group of 50 mA had a good coincidence with standard-dose group by U test. The sensitivity of group 50, 30, 10 mA was 88.0%, 78.4%, and 75.0%, respectively. The positive predictive values of which were 98%, 94%, and 93%, respectively. The correction rates of which were 85%, 73%, and 69%, respectively. In specimens' images, subtle linear artifact was showed only in paravertebral lung field in 21 images of 31 at the group of 10 mA. Linear artifacts that affected small nodule detection were showed in lung apexes in 3 of 100 subjects. Conclusion: Low-dose MSCT is expected to improve early detection of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules less than 5 mm could be reliably detected at 50 mA tube current in specimens. Low-dose CT (30 mA) showed satisfactory imaging quality in our study. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer may be applied if situation permits. (authors)

  9. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented for all dogs employed in current life-span dose effect studies with inhaled 239 PuO 2 , and 239 Pu nitrate. Information is presented on the estimated initial alveolar deposition, based on external thorax counts and on estimated lung weights at time of exposure. Information is also provided on the current interpretation of the most prominent clinical-pathological features associated with the death of animals

  10. Biokinetic study of 131I following ablation dose administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, A.C.H.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Lucena, E.A.; Dantas, B.M.; Rebelo, A.M.O.; Mello, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this investigation is to study biokinetics from internally 131 I deposited for thyroid cancer patients during radioiodine therapy (2 to 3 days), after ablation dose administration (3.7 GBq). These data will help in the elaboration of a metabolic model, which will permit absorbed dose assessment for this specific case, since the biokinetic models for iodine available in scientific literature can not be applied to thyroidectomized patient's studies. Material and Methods: Four females patients, between 22 and 50 years old, without metastases, between 1.9 to 6% of remnant thyroid tissue uptake, agreed to contribute to this study. For the in vivo bioassay, periodical measurements were performed along internment time (2 to 3 days), just after Na 131 I dose administration (3.7 GBq). For this, we used the counting system for Nuclear Medicine model 13S002, IEN/CNEN- Brazil, which was adapted with lead filters, in order to allow the work with high rate counting. The measurements were performed in two geometries: thyroid region and thigh. Results: For each patient, we have done approximately 26 measurements for both geometries, starting at the first hour following dose administration until the release from hospital of patient. The results of counting rate (cps) were plotted against time (h). The measurements suggest a relation between remnant thyroid tissue uptake values and the time where counting rates start decreasing. In addition, it was observed a correlation between remnant thyroid tissue radioactive burdens and the circulating iodine through time. Conclusion: It is necessary to follow-up a greater number of patients aiming to confirm the observed correlations and with a greater number of measurements during the first 24 hours, in other to delimit the time range of increasing and decreasing counting rate

  11. Intra-voxel heterogeneity influences the dose prescription for dose-painting with radiotherapy: a modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit, S.F.; Dekker, A.L.A.J.; Seigneuric, R.; Murrer, L.H.P.; Riel, van N.A.W.; Nordsmark, M.; Overgaard, J.; Lambin, Ph.; Wouters, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the potential of dose redistribution by incorporating estimates of oxygen heterogeneity within imaging voxels for optimal dose determination. Cellular oxygen tension (pO2) distributions were estimated for imaging-size-based voxels by solving oxygen

  12. Population dose from nuclear medicine studies (DOMNES). Contribution of Project DOMNES to Dose Datemed2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, M. L.; Ruiz, A.; Ferrer, N.; Alonso Farto, J. C.; Alvarez, C.; Rodriguez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The DOMNES Project is created in 2001 to carry out a survey on nuclear medicine procedures used in the Spanish health centers, their frequency and the doses given to patients. In addition, it reports information to Dose Data Project Med 2, focusing on radiology exams. (Author)

  13. Single dose toxicity and biodistribution studies of [18F] fluorocholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Danielle C.; Santos, Priscilla F.; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B. da; Souza, Cristina M.; Campos, Liliane C.; Ferreira, Enio; Araujo, Marina R.; Cassali, Geovanni D.

    2013-01-01

    [ 18 F]Fluorocholine ( 18 FCH) is a valuable tool for non-invasive diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET). This radiotracer has been proven to be highly effective in detecting recurrences and staging prostate cancer, diagnoses brain, breast, and esophageal tumors and also hepatocellular carcinoma. The higher uptake of fluorocholine by malignant tumors results from increased choline kinase activity due to accelerated cell multiplication and membrane formation. According to the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), radiopharmaceuticals have to be registered before commercialization. The aim of this work was to evaluate single dose toxicity and biodistribution of 18 FCH in mice, since preclinical safety studies are required for register. Experimental procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee on Animal Use (CEUA-IPEN/SP). Single dose toxicity and biodistribution studies were conducted in Swiss mice. No signs of toxicity were observed during clinical trial. No changes in the parameters which were examined, such as: body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology parameters or lesions microscopic were noted. Biodistribution results indicated high physiological tracer uptake in kidney, liver and heart 30 min after injection. Lower activities were recorded in other organs/tissues: pancreas, intestine, spleen, bone, bladder, muscle, brain and blood. Initial preclinical investigations showed no toxic effects of 18 FCH at investigated doses and a biodistribution profile very similar to other reports in literature. This information is essential to support future human trials. (author)

  14. Case studies can support definitions of workplace innovation in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaas, F.; Žiauberytė-Jakštienė, R.; Oeij, P.R.

    2017-01-01

    Many practitioners find it problematic to understand and describe workplace innovation (WPI). Whereas there are well-known definitions of WPI, these remain highly abstract. We argue that, for practitioners, case examples of WPI best practices can be a valuable addition to these definitions. In this

  15. Studies of workers exposed to low doses of external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1991-04-01

    Currently, several epidemiologic studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to low levels of radiation are being conducted, and include studies of workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. This paper focuses on studies that evaluate the possible adverse effects resulting from external exposure to radiation. The radiation risk estimates that have been used to establish radiation protection standards for workers and others have been obtained mainly from studies of persons exposed at high doses and dose rates. However, questions remain with regard to the extrapolation process that has been necessary for estimating low-level radiation risks. Occupational studies provide a direct assessment of risk based on data on persons exposed at the actual levels of interest. If current risk estimates are correct, these studies have very little chance of detecting risk, but can still be used to provide useful upper limits on risks. The studies are also adequate to detect serious underestimation of risks. 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. A study on the scattered dose in portable chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Seon; Lee, Hwan Hyung

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to survey the present status of portable radiography and the result of free space scattered dose rate when taking a radiography at the general hospital or the university hospital in Taejon city. The results were as follows; The number of cases using portable radiography for three years increased to averages 16.2%, 7.7% per year from January 1st in 1996 to December 31st in 1998. The average of distance of adjacent patients was 219.1 cm at the ward. For portable chest radiography, the free space scattered dose rate was 10.5 mSv/hr at 50 cm distance, 1.8 mSv/hr at 100 cm distance, and 0.2 mSv/hr at 200 cm distance. Therefore, in case of portable chest radiography at the ward, the average of distance of adjacent patients is 219.1 cm, so it dose not have influence on the adjacent patient. But during the portable radiography, a guardian who is close to the patient, doctor, nurse and radiologic technologists has to set up the shield to prevent from the unnecessary radiation or the distance should be as great as possible from the mobile X-ray equipment

  17. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  18. A new study on the effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.; Jammet, H.

    1986-01-01

    A study conducted by prof. Rose has investigated mortality among 39540 employees of the UKAEA, from 1946 to 1978. The three main points are: 1. General mortality and mortality from malignant diseases are lower than in the population of England and Wales (74 and 79 per cent respectively), thus showing no major difference between workers monitored for exposure to radiation and other workers. 2. For monitored workers, the only death cause for which there is a statistically significant correlation with radiation exposure is prostate cancer; there are many cases especially in workers with doses exceeding 0.05 Sv (5 rem) and monitored for tritium. Such a correlation has never been found in any other epidemiologic survey of workers exposed to low-level doses, Hanford (USA) workers especially; conversely, mortality from either multiple myeloma or pancreas cancer is not found here. These facts plead for a cautious interpretation of the results as a whole. 3. A linear representation of the variations of leukemia and cancer mortality vs exposure results in lines, the slopes of which are 3 times higher than those of the lines adopted by ICRP; however, the 95% confidence intervals (-2.7 + 12.4 and -22 + 52.5) are such that the results are compatible with a null effect (slope 0) and even with a benefic effect (negative slope). They are therefore compatible with ICRP estimations. A recent attempt to evaluate the two main investigations on low-dose occupational exposures (UKAEA and Hanford) suggests a dose-response relationship very near that of ICRP [fr

  19. Patient dose in image guided radiotherapy: Monte Carlo study of the CBCT dose contribution

    OpenAIRE

    Leotta, Salvatore; Amato, Ernesto; Settineri, Nicola; Basile, Emilia; Italiano, Antonio; Auditore, Lucrezia; Santacaterina, Anna; Pergolizzi, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Image Guided RadioTherapy (IGRT) is a technique whose diffusion is growing thanks to the well-recognized gain in accuracy of dose delivery. However, multiple Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans add dose to patients, and its contribution has to be assessed and minimized. Aim of our work was to evaluate, through Monte Carlo simulations, organ doses in IGRT due to CBCT and therapeutic MV irradiation in head-neck, thorax and pelvis districts. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GAMOS ...

  20. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  1. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart

  2. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart.

  3. Towards tracer dose reduction in PET studies: Simulation of dose reduction by retrospective randomized undersampling of list-mode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Würslin, Christian; Seith, Ferdinand; Schäfer, Jürgen F; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of tracer dose regimes in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a trade-off between diagnostic image quality and radiation exposure. The challenge lies in defining minimal tracer doses that still result in sufficient diagnostic image quality. In order to find such minimal doses, it would be useful to simulate tracer dose reduction as this would enable to study the effects of tracer dose reduction on image quality in single patients without repeated injections of different amounts of tracer. The aim of our study was to introduce and validate a method for simulation of low-dose PET images enabling direct comparison of different tracer doses in single patients and under constant influencing factors. (18)F-fluoride PET data were acquired on a combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. PET data were stored together with the temporal information of the occurrence of single events (list-mode format). A predefined proportion of PET events were then randomly deleted resulting in undersampled PET data. These data sets were subsequently reconstructed resulting in simulated low-dose PET images (retrospective undersampling of list-mode data). This approach was validated in phantom experiments by visual inspection and by comparison of PET quality metrics contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), background-variability (BV) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measured and simulated PET images for different activity concentrations. In addition, reduced-dose PET images of a clinical (18)F-FDG PET dataset were simulated using the proposed approach. (18)F-PET image quality degraded with decreasing activity concentrations with comparable visual image characteristics in measured and in corresponding simulated PET images. This result was confirmed by quantification of image quality metrics. CRC, SNR and BV showed concordant behavior with decreasing activity concentrations for measured and for corresponding simulated PET images. Simulation of dose

  4. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. of Radiation Oncology/Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas [Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [German] In der modernen Radioonkologie muessen Toleranzdosisgrenzen fuer die Risikoorgane (''organs at risk'', OAR) zur Behandlungsplanung, besonders aber zur Gestaltung klinischer Studien, herangezogen werden

  5. Radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: volume definition and patient selection. Annecy 1998 international Association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) Workshop recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Loubeyre, P.; Van houtte, P.; Scalliet, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chemo-radiation is the standard treatment of unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, with a mean dose of 60-66 Gy, excluding escalation dose schemes. The standard treated volume includes primary tumor, ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes, supraclavicular and contralateral nodes as well, regardless of the node status. This work tries to answer the question of the optimal volume to be treated. Drainage routes analysis is in favor of large volumes, while toxicity analysis favors small volumes. Combined modality treatment may increase the observed toxicity. The optimal volume definition is difficult, and requires available conformal therapy tools. Patients selection is another important issue. A volume definition is then attempted, based on the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Annecy workshop experience, highlighting the inter-observers discrepancies, and suggests basic recommendations to harmonize volume definition. (author)

  6. Neuromuscular dose-response studies: determining sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Lien, C A; Naguib, M

    2011-02-01

    Investigators planning dose-response studies of neuromuscular blockers have rarely used a priori power analysis to determine the minimal sample size their protocols require. Institutional Review Boards and peer-reviewed journals now generally ask for this information. This study outlines a proposed method for meeting these requirements. The slopes of the dose-response relationships of eight neuromuscular blocking agents were determined using regression analysis. These values were substituted for γ in the Hill equation. When this is done, the coefficient of variation (COV) around the mean value of the ED₅₀ for each drug is easily calculated. Using these values, we performed an a priori one-sample two-tailed t-test of the means to determine the required sample size when the allowable error in the ED₅₀ was varied from ±10-20%. The COV averaged 22% (range 15-27%). We used a COV value of 25% in determining the sample size. If the allowable error in finding the mean ED₅₀ is ±15%, a sample size of 24 is needed to achieve a power of 80%. Increasing 'accuracy' beyond this point requires increasing greater sample sizes (e.g. an 'n' of 37 for a ±12% error). On the basis of the results of this retrospective analysis, a total sample size of not less than 24 subjects should be adequate for determining a neuromuscular blocking drug's clinical potency with a reasonable degree of assurance.

  7. Studies on the chronic effect of lower dose level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.G.; Yun, E.S.; Chung, I.Y.; Yun, M.S.; Chae, H.S.; Lee, J.Y.

    1982-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the chronic hazard of Co-60 low dose radiation on ICR mice. There is now considerable evidence from human studies that age, both at exposure to radiation and at observation for risk, can be major determinant of radiation induced cancer risk. For this reason, ICR mice at different ages such as below were exposed to 60m rads/week, 500m rads/week and 60 rads/biweek whole body Co-60 radiation at a dose rate of 3.6 rads/min. ICR mice were irradiated during pregnant period, from 1st week to 3rd week, from 3rd week to 52nd week, from 6th week to 52nd week, and from 22nd week to 52nd week after the birth. All experimental mice were autopsied immediately after being sacrificed at 52nd week. All major organs were examined grossly and weighed. After fixation histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. Blood cells W.B.C., R.B.C., Hb-from eye's vein were counted by hemocytometer and hemometer. (Author)

  8. Radiation dose of staff during positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, Takenori; Shoji, Yasuaki; Hagami, Eiichi; Aizawa, Yasuo; Onodera, Hiroshi; Kan, Mikio; Sasaki, Nobuo; Toyoshima, Eiji; Sugawara, Shigeki

    1989-04-01

    In this paper, the radiation dose of the PET staff including blood sampling operators (medical doctors), PET operators (radio technologists), nurses, blood analysts (medical technologists), radiochemists and cyclotron operators in the cyclotron-PET unit was evaluated. The dose was measured using the film-badges for whole body and TLD ring-badges for fingers. These data were obtained from June, 1986 to May, 1987. In the average dose per month, those with the highest dose were radiochemists. The whole body dose was 1.08 mSv (108 mrem) for /gamma/-ray, 520 /mu/Sv (52 mrem) for /beta/-ray and the dose for fingers, 7.6mSv (760 mrem). The total dose per year both for /gamma/ and /beta/-ray was 19.2 mSv (1.92 rem) for whole body and 91.2 mSv (9.12 rem) for fingers. The staff with the lowest whole body dose for /gamma/-ray per month was blood analysts whose dose was 30 /mu/Sv (3 mrem). For the staff consisting of doctors, radiotechnologists and nurses, the whole body dose per month was 70-170/mu/Sv (7-17 mrem) for /gamma/-ray, 20 /mu/Sv (2 mrem) for /beta/-ray and the dose for fingers per month was 210-540 /mu/Sv (21-54 mrem). For cyclotron operators, the dose was 90 /mu/Sv (9 mrem) for /gamma/-ray, 30 /mu/Sv (3 mrem) for /beta/-ray and the dose for fingers was 160 /mu/Sv (16 mrem). For cyclotron operators and radiochemists, the whole body dose for the neutron ray was measured by solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD), but the dose was found to be negligible. (author).

  9. Continued Benefit to Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Across Multiple Definitions of High-Risk Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and androgen deprivation (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008 at University of Michigan Medical Center, 718 men were consecutively treated with EBRT to at least 75 Gy. Seven definitions of high-risk prostate cancer, applying to 11–33% of patients, were evaluated. Biochemical failure (BF), salvage ADT use, metastatic progression, and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Each high-risk definition was associated with increased BF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8–3.9, p < 0.0001), salvage ADT use (HR 3.9–6.3, p < 0.0001), metastasis (HR 3.7–6.6, p < 0.0001), and PCSM (HR 3.7–16.2, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, an increasing number of high-risk features predicted worse outcome. Adjuvant ADT yielded significant reductions in both metastases (HR 0.19–0.38, p < 0.001) and PCSM (HR 0.38–0.50, p < 0.05) for all high-risk definitions (with the exception of clinical Stage T3–4 disease) but improved BF only for those with elevated Gleason scores (p < 0.03, HR 0.25–0.48). When treated with ADT and dose-escalated EBRT, patients with Gleason scores 8 to 10, without other high-risk features, had 8-year freedom from BF of 74%, freedom from distant metastases of 93%, and cause-specific survival of 92%, with salvage ADT used in 16% of patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant ADT results in a significant improvement in clinical progression and PCSM across multiple definitions of high-risk disease even with dose-escalated EBRT. There is a subset of patients, characterized by multiple high-risk features or the presence of Gleason Pattern 5, who remain at significant risk for metastasis and PCSM despite current treatment.

  10. Reducing dose in head CT: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Diaz, M.; Carvalho, A. E.; Andrade, M. E.; Khoury, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Thirty two head CT scans were acquired employing an anthropomorphic phantom which contains small lesions in posterior fosse, using 2 scanners, one with 64 slices 'Siemens Sensation' and other with 6 slices P hilip Brilliance . Parameters as Tube current (I [mA]), Collimation (C [mm]), spectrum energy (kVp) and dynamic range were changed during studies, looking for the optimal acquisition/processing conditions which permit both, good lesion detectability and the lowest dose. Air kerma (mGy) was measured with a ionization chamber and the air kerma index (Ca,100 [mGy]) was calculated as dose index. Image quality was analyzed by 5 expert criteria using a 5 points-scale (1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=very good, 5=excellent) and also using 5 Figure of merit in the spatial and frequency domains: Contrast C(%), Contrast to Noise Ratio CNR, Signal to Noise Ratio SNR, Normalized Mean Square Error (NMSE) and the Spectral Distance (SD). Objective and subjective results were correlated. We observed that doses can be diminished until a 25% respect to the usual practice with both technologies, diminishing mainly the mAs, without affecting lesion detection. As a result, we propose an optimized protocol for each scanner as follow: The use of 250 mAs, 120 kVp and the collimation of 6 slices x 1.50 mm per rotation to detect the lesions in posterior fosse with good image quality for the Philips Brilliance 6 tested, while 150 mAs, 100 kVp and slice thickness of 3 mm were needed with the Siemens Sensation 64. (Author)

  11. Doses optimization to patients in computed tomography studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trujillo Z, F. E.

    2010-09-01

    in recent years the number of studies of computed tomography has been increased, as well as the technology and methodology of these, while the radiological protection to the patient has not advanced to the same step. The IAEA has implemented the Patients Radiation Protection projects, where one of the areas of more interest is the computed tomography. The present work is a brief summary of the actions to realize for the doses optimization imparted to the patients, obtaining an appropriate diagnostic quality in the images at the same time; as it was presented in the course of the project C-RLA/9/067-001. The results that were obtained between Image Quality and Dose by Radiation that is imparted to the patient are shown, as well s the exposition factors that influence in these, according to the project C-RLA/9/067-001. The main actions for the dose optimization are using tension optimized protocols (kV), of load (m As), of collimation/cut thickness, of inclination of the gantry, of the pitch/displacement by rotation, of the reconstruction algorithm (kernel), according to the diagnostic objective to reach and to the patient physical characteristics (like weight and age), as well as to use protections to shield the sensitive organs (mainly those that do not have clinical interest for the procedure). Conclusion: To establish or to begin to implement, insofar as possible, the IAEA recommendations, relating to the clinical practice of the hospitals in Mexico and to the available equipment s type. (Author)

  12. Survey Definitions of Gout for Epidemiologic Studies: Comparison With Crystal Identification as the Gold Standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalbeth, N.; Schumacher, H.R.; Fransen, J.; Neogi, T.; Jansen, T.L; Brown, M.; Louthrenoo, W.; Vazquez-Mellado, J.; Eliseev, M.; McCarthy, G.; Stamp, L.K.; Perez-Ruiz, F.; Sivera, F.; Ea, H.K.; Gerritsen, M.; Scire, C.A.; Cavagna, L.; Lin, C.; Chou, Y.Y.; Tausche, A.K.; Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, G. da; Janssen, M; Chen, J.H.; Cimmino, M.A.; Uhlig, T.; Taylor, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the best-performing survey definition of gout from items commonly available in epidemiologic studies. METHODS: Survey definitions of gout were identified from 34 epidemiologic studies contributing to the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC) genome-wide association study.

  13. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  14. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm 3 Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT

  15. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Yang, Jie [Pinnacle Health - Fox Chase Regional Cancer Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  16. Patient dose in image guided radiotherapy: Monte Carlo study of the CBCT dose contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Leotta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Image Guided RadioTherapy (IGRT is a technique whose diffusion is growing thanks to the well-recognized gain in accuracy of dose delivery. However, multiple Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans add dose to patients, and its contribution has to be assessed and minimized. Aim of our work was to evaluate, through Monte Carlo simulations, organ doses in IGRT due to CBCT and therapeutic MV irradiation in head-neck, thorax and pelvis districts. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GAMOS (Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations, reproducing an Elekta Synergy medical linac operating at 6 and 10 MV photon energy, and we set up a scalable anthropomorphic model. After a validation by comparison with the experimental quality indexes, we evaluated the average doses to all organs and tissues belonging to the model for the three cases of irradiated district. Scattered radiation in therapy is larger than that diffused by CBCT by one to two orders of magnitude.

  17. The MSFC Collaborative Engineering Process for Preliminary Design and Concept Definition Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, Jack; Jones, David; Hopkins, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative engineering process developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Concepts Office for performing rapid preliminary design and mission concept definition studies for potential future NASA missions. The process has been developed and demonstrated for a broad range of mission studies including human space exploration missions, space transportation system studies and in-space science missions. The paper will describe the design team structure and specialized analytical tools that have been developed to enable a unique rapid design process. The collaborative engineering process consists of integrated analysis approach for mission definition, vehicle definition and system engineering. The relevance of the collaborative process elements to the standard NASA NPR 7120.1 system engineering process will be demonstrated. The study definition process flow for each study discipline will be will be outlined beginning with the study planning process, followed by definition of ground rules and assumptions, definition of study trades, mission analysis and subsystem analyses leading to a standardized set of mission concept study products. The flexibility of the collaborative engineering design process to accommodate a wide range of study objectives from technology definition and requirements definition to preliminary design studies will be addressed. The paper will also describe the applicability of the collaborative engineering process to include an integrated systems analysis approach for evaluating the functional requirements of evolving system technologies and capabilities needed to meet the needs of future NASA programs.

  18. Estimation of the optimal dosing regimen of escitalopram in dogs: A dose occupancy study with [11C]DASB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Olivia; Van Laeken, Nick; Polis, Ingeborgh; Dockx, Robrecht; Vlerick, Lise; Dobbeleir, Andre; Goethals, Ingeborg; Saunders, Jimmy; Sadones, Nele; Baeken, Chris; De Vos, Filip; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2017-01-01

    Although the favourable characteristics of escitalopram as being the most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and having an increased therapeutic efficacy via binding on an additional allosteric binding site of the serotonin transporter, its dosing regimen has not yet been optimized for its use in dogs. This study aimed to estimate the optimal dosing frequency and the required dose for achieving 80% occupancy of the serotonin transporters in the basal ganglia. The dosing frequency was investigated by determining the elimination half-life after a four day oral pre-treatment period with 0.83 mg/kg escitalopram (3 administrations/day) and a subsequent i.v. injection 0.83 mg/kg. Blood samples were taken up to 12 hours after i.v. injection and the concentration of escitalopram in plasma was analysed via LC-MSMS. The dose-occupancy relationship was then determined by performing two PET scans in five adult beagles: a baseline PET scan and a second scan after steady state conditions were achieved following oral treatment with a specific dose of escitalopram ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mg/kg/day. As the elimination half-life was determined to be 6.7 hours a dosing frequency of three administrations a day was proposed for the second part of the study. Further it was opted for a treatment period of four days, which well exceeded the minimum period to achieve steady state conditions. The optimal dosing regimen to achieve 80% occupancy in the basal ganglia and elicit a therapeutic effect, was calculated to be 1.85 mg/kg/day, divided over three administrations. Under several circumstances, such as insufficient response to other SSRIs, concurrent drug intake or in research studies focused on SERT, the use of escitalopram can be preferred over the use of the already for veterinary use registered fluoxetine, however, in case of long-term treatment with escitalopram, regularly cardiac screening is recommended.

  19. Low dose ionizing radiation exposure and cardiovascular disease mortality: cohort study based on Canadian national dose registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, J. M.; Band, P. R.; Ashmore, P. J.; Jiang, H.; Shilnikova, N. S.; Tait, V. K.; Krewski, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337 397 individuals (169 256 men and 168 141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. Material and Methods: Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The emerging evidence of excess risk of CVDs after exposure to doses well below those previously considered as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the cohort consisted of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers) as well as medical, dental and industrial workers. The mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. Results: During the study period (1951 - 1995), as many as 3 533 deaths from cardiovascular diseases have been identified (3 018 among men and 515 among women). In the cohort, CVD mortality was significantly lower than in the general population of Canada. The cohort showed a significant dose response both among men and women. Risk estimates of CVD mortality in the NDR cohort, when expressed as excess relative risk per unit dose, were higher than those in most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Conclusions: The study has demonstrated a strong positive association between radiation dose and the risk of CVD mortality. Caution needs to be exercised when interpreting these results, due to the potential bias introduced by dosimetry uncertainties, the possible record linkage errors, and especially by the lack of adjustment for non-radiation risk factors. (authors)

  20. Study of dose distribution in high energy photon beam used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafaravavy, R.; Raoelina Andriambololona; Bridier, A.

    2007-01-01

    The dose distribution in a medium traversed by a photon beam depends on beam energy, field size and medium nature. Percent depth dose (PDD), Dose Profile (DP) and Opening Collimator Factor (OCF) curves will be established to study this distribution. So, the PDD curves are composed by tree parts: the build-up region, the maximal dose and the quasi-equilibrium region. The maximum dose depth and the dose in depth increase with increasing photon beam energy but the dose surface decreases. The PDD increases with increasing field size.

  1. Studying and measuring the gamma radiation doses in Homs city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofaan, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    The gamma radiation dose was measured in Homs city by using many portable dosimeters (electronic dosimeter and Geiger-Muller). The measurements were carried out in the indoor and outdoor buildings, for different time period, through one year (1999-2000). High purity germanium detector with low back ground radiation (HpGe) was used to determine radiation element contained in some building and the surrounding soil. The statistical analysis laws were applied to make sure that the measured dose distribution around average value is normal distribution. The measurement indicates that the gamma indoor dose varies from 312μSv/y to 511μSv/y, with the average annual dose of 385μSv/y. However the gamma outdoor dose rate varies from 307μSv/y to 366μSv/y with an average annual dose 385μSv/y. The annual outdoor gamma radiation dose is about %16 lower than the outdoor dose in Homs City. These measurements have indicated that environmental gamma doses in Homs City are relatively low. This is because that most of the soils and rocks in the area are limestone. (author)

  2. Occupational eye lens doses in interventional cardiology. A multicentric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, R M; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Pifarré, X; Ordiales, J M; Rovira, J J; Carrera, F; Goicolea, J; Fernández-Ortiz, A

    2016-01-01

    New European regulation regarding radiological protection of workers and more specifically the new occupational dose limit for the eye lens recently reduced to 20 mSv yr −1 may affect interventional cardiologists. This paper presents a set of measurements of occupational doses performed in five interventional cardiology centres and then compared with the new dose limit. The measurement of occupational doses was performed over the apron at chest level using electronic dosemeters recording H p (10). In one of the centres, scatter dose at goggles was also measured with optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters calibrated in terms of H p (0.07). An average H p (10) over the apron of 46 μSv/procedure was measured for cardiologists. Lower doses were noted in other professionals like second cardiologists, nurses or anaesthetists. Procedures for valvular and other structural heart diseases involved the highest occupational doses, averaging over 100 μSv/procedure. Important differences in occupational doses among centres may be indicative of different radiation protection habits. The new occupational dose limit for the eye lens is likely to be exceeded by those among the interventionalists who do not use protection tools (ceiling suspended screen and/or goggles) even with standard workloads. (paper)

  3. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: Retrospective Evaluation of Doses in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 Mice Carcinogenicity Studies: Recommendation to Eliminate High Doses at Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) in Future Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H

    2015-07-01

    High doses in Tg.rasH2 carcinogenicity studies are usually set at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), although this dose selection strategy has not been critically evaluated. We analyzed the body weight gains (BWGs), mortality, and tumor response in control and treated groups of 29 Tg.rasH2 studies conducted at BioReliance. Based on our analysis, it is evident that the MTD was exceeded at the high and/or mid-doses in several studies. The incidence of tumors in high doses was lower when compared to the low and mid-doses of both sexes. Thus, we recommend that the high dose in male mice should not exceed one-half of the estimated MTD (EMTD), as it is currently chosen, and the next dose should be one-fourth of the EMTD. Because females were less sensitive to decrements in BWG, the high dose in female mice should not exceed two-third of EMTD and the next dose group should be one-third of EMTD. If needed, a third dose group should be set at one-eighth EMTD in males and one-sixth EMTD in females. In addition, for compounds that do not show toxicity in the range finding studies, a limit dose should be applied for the 26-week carcinogenicity studies. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  4. Analysis of agreement among definitions of metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic Turkish adults: a methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersot Thomas P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to explore the agreement among World Health Organization (WHO, European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR, National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, American College of Endocrinology (ACE, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of the metabolic syndrome. Methods 1568 subjects (532 men, 1036 women, mean age 45 and standard deviation (SD 13 years were evaluated in this cross-sectional, methodological study. Cardiometabolic risk factors were determined. Insulin sensitivity was calculated by HOMA-IR. Agreement among definitions was determined by the kappa statistic. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were used to compare multiple groups. Results The agreement between WHO and EGIR definitions was very good (kappa: 0.83. The agreement between NCEP, ACE, and IDF definitions was substantial to very good (kappa: 0.77–0.84. The agreement between NCEP or ACE or IDF and WHO or EGIR definitions was fair (kappa: 0.32–0.37. The age and sex adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 38% by NCEP, 42% by ACE and IDF, 20% by EGIR and 19% by WHO definition. The evaluated definitions were dichotomized after analysis of design, agreement and prevalence: insulin measurement requiring definitions (WHO and EGIR and definitions not requiring insulin measurement (NCEP, ACE, IDF. One definition was selected from each set for comparison. WHO-defined subjects were more insulin resistant than subjects without the metabolic syndrome (mean and SD for log HOMA-IR, 0.53 ± 0.14 vs. 0.07 ± 0.23, respectively, p 0.05, but lower log HOMA-IR values (p Conclusion The metabolic syndrome definitions that do not require measurement of insulin levels (NCEP, ACE and IDF identify twice more patients with insulin resistance and increased Framingham risk scores and are more useful than the definitions that require measurement of insulin levels (WHO and EGIR.

  5. [Evaluation of Organ Dose Estimation from Indices of CT Dose Using Dose Index Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, Akiko; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Akio

    Direct measurement of each patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) is not possible. Most methods to estimate patient organ dose is using Monte Carlo simulation with dedicated software. However, dedicated software is too expensive for small scale hospitals. Not every hospital can estimate organ dose with dedicated software. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the simple method of organ dose estimation using some common indices of CT dose. The Monte Carlo simulation software Radimetrics (Bayer) was used for calculating organ dose and analysis relationship between indices of CT dose and organ dose. Multidetector CT scanners were compared with those from two manufactures (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Using stored patient data from Radimetrics, the relationships between indices of CT dose and organ dose were indicated as each formula for estimating organ dose. The accuracy of estimation method of organ dose was compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulation using the Bland-Altman plots. In the results, SSDE was the feasible index for estimation organ dose in almost organs because it reflected each patient size. The differences of organ dose between estimation and simulation were within 23%. In conclusion, our estimation method of organ dose using indices of CT dose is convenient for clinical with accuracy.

  6. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Target volume definition and treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja; Nitsche, Mirko; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2017-01-01

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 x 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 x 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis ''inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV'' and ''night pain before LD-EBRT'' were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while ''initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT'' was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling ''initial increase in pain'' was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while ''night pain'' was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT ''night pain'' and ''inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV'' were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed. (orig.) [de

  7. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  8. Definitions of Physical Concepts: A Study of Physics Teachers' Knowledge and Views. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal; Lehavi, Yaron

    2006-01-01

    A study was made of the ability of a population of high-school physics teachers to define physics concepts and of their views regarding the importance of such definitions. It was found possible to arrange the definitions accumulated in categories, and the classification so obtained was consonant with that of the philosophy of science. Although the…

  9. Comparing definitions in guidelines and written standards - a case study: 'Trueness'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavese, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of a repository initiated by IMEKO TC21 to allow the comparison of different definitions and use of the same term or concept in written standards and guidelines available internationally. The method used is illustrated for a case study: the critical concept of 'trueness' and its definitions.

  10. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  11. Sibutramine in weight control: a dose-ranging, efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, M; Rubio, A; Golik, A; Byrne, L; Scheinbaum, M L

    1991-09-01

    We tested the safety and efficacy of sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, and placebo on weight loss. Medication was added to caloric restriction, behavior modification, and exercise in a parallel-group, double-blind clinical trial. Participants were 130% to 180% of ideal body weight and in good health. The study lasted 12 weeks over Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. Weight loss during 8 weeks of study medication was: placebo, 1.4 +/- 2.1 kg (n = 19); 5 mg sibutramine, 2.9 +/- 2.3 kg (n = 18); and 20 mg sibutramine, 5.0 +/- 2.7 kg (n = 18) (p less than 0.05 sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, versus placebo; p less than 0.05 sibutramine, 20 mg versus 5 mg). There is a significant dose-effect relationship. Five participants left the study before completion, all because of adverse events; placebo (one patient), 5 mg sibutramine (one patient), and 20 mg sibutramine (three patients). Sleep difficulties were noted by eight participants (20 mg sibutramine, seven patients; 5 mg, one patient; and placebo, no patients). Six of 21 participants receiving 20 mg complained of irritability, unusual impatience, or "excitation." Sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, added to a multimodal program assisted participants in losing weight.

  12. Repeated dose studies with pure Epigallocatechin-3-gallate demonstrated dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity with associated dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Balaji; Jayavelu, Subramani; Murhekar, Kanchan; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2016-01-01

    EGCG (Epigallocatechin-3-gallate) is the major active principle catechin found in green tea. Skepticism regarding the safety of consuming EGCG is gaining attention, despite the fact that it is widely being touted for its potential health benefits, including anti-cancer properties. The lack of scientific data on safe dose levels of pure EGCG is of concern, while EGCG has been commonly studied as a component of GTE (Green tea extract) and not as a single active constituent. This study has been carried out to estimate the maximum tolerated non-toxic dose of pure EGCG and to identify the treatment related risk factors. In a fourteen day consecutive treatment, two different administration modalities were compared, offering an improved [i.p (intraperitoneal)] and limited [p.o (oral)] bioavailability. A trend of dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity was observed particularly with i.p treatment and EGCG increased serum lipid profile in parallel to hepatotoxicity. Fourteen day tolerable dose of EGCG was established as 21.1 mg/kg for i.p and 67.8 mg/kg for p.o. We also observed that, EGCG induced effects by both treatment routes are reversible, subsequent to an observation period for further fourteen days after cessation of treatment. It was demonstrated that the severity of EGCG induced toxicity appears to be a function of dose, route of administration and period of treatment.

  13. Visual Perception Studies in CT images obtained lo low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adame Brooks, D.; Miller-Clemente, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper has as aims to describe a strategy to evaluate the diagnostic quality of obtained images of method for dose reduction, with the purpose of determining the dose value or values from which the image quality is significantly degraded making it insufficient for the diagnostic. To complement and have an estimate of the quality of the images we established a group of measures of objective type, and the diagnostic quality of the images was evaluated through a group of observers using the analysis ROC and LROC. For ROC and LROC analyzes the behavior of the area under the curve in relation to the four proposed dose levels was obtained. For high dose levels, detection was good. The values of area under the curve decreased as the dose rate decreased, falling to values indicating low accuracy in diagnosis. This result indicates that the area under the curve decreases by the dose rate. We conclude that the objective quality measures selected are representative of the changes that occur in the resulting image and provided information on changes in the perception of observers. The experiments ROC and LROC allowed determine the range of dose values from which the image degradation causes a low accuracy in the diagnostic. (Author)

  14. Dose delivery study for a novel compact proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Kim Melanie

    2014-01-15

    Proton therapy has played an important role in the treatment of cancer with radiation therapy for more than 60 years. Active spot scanning to deliver highly conformal dose to the tumor has been developed. However, the availability of proton therapy to the patients is still limited, partly, due to the high costs and sizes of large proton therapy centers. Therefore, a novel compact proton single room facility based on a linear accelerator mounted on a gantry has been proposed, named TULIP (TUrning LInac for Proton therapy). This accelerator allows for active energy variation on a milliseconds time scale. This work aims to assess the possibilities of dose delivery with TULIP to exploit its beneficial features with respect to dose delivery. We developed a software tool, simulating the dose delivery to the tumor. By means of this software tool, we assessed different delivery methods and found 3D spot scanning to be superior to rotational dose delivery with regard to dose and irradiation time. In a second part, we expanded the investigations to dose delivery to moving targets. Due to fast energy variation, we found TULIP to be preferably suitable for rescanning, confirmed by irradiation times of only a few minutes.

  15. Dose delivery study for a novel compact proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Kim Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Proton therapy has played an important role in the treatment of cancer with radiation therapy for more than 60 years. Active spot scanning to deliver highly conformal dose to the tumor has been developed. However, the availability of proton therapy to the patients is still limited, partly, due to the high costs and sizes of large proton therapy centers. Therefore, a novel compact proton single room facility based on a linear accelerator mounted on a gantry has been proposed, named TULIP (TUrning LInac for Proton therapy). This accelerator allows for active energy variation on a milliseconds time scale. This work aims to assess the possibilities of dose delivery with TULIP to exploit its beneficial features with respect to dose delivery. We developed a software tool, simulating the dose delivery to the tumor. By means of this software tool, we assessed different delivery methods and found 3D spot scanning to be superior to rotational dose delivery with regard to dose and irradiation time. In a second part, we expanded the investigations to dose delivery to moving targets. Due to fast energy variation, we found TULIP to be preferably suitable for rescanning, confirmed by irradiation times of only a few minutes.

  16. Close contact dose: a radioiodine therapy case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchyna, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: External radiation dose rates were measured immediately post administration and periodically thereafter at 0.3 and 1.0 m from a patient who received a 555 MBq therapeutic dose of I-131. The dose received by the partner during the close contact period of sleep was measured with an anthropomorphic RANDO phantom representing a standard man with ICRP60 organs critical for dosimetry. RANDO occupied the same bed as the patient at a skin to skin distance of 30 cm with up to 30 TLD rods (1 x 1 x 6mm, LiF:Mg) inserted at critical organ positions within the phantom. The measurements were compared with empirical estimates provided by the Close Contact Dose Spreadsheet (Cormack and Shearer, 1998). The measured external dose rate of 19.3microSv/hr obtained immediately post administration rose slightly, to 26.3microSv/hr during the first 12 hours, however subsequently demonstrated a slow decrease. The TLDs embed- ded in RANDO recorded a dose of 0.24mSv during the hours of sleep. The total dose received by the partner over the two days was 0.29mSv, which compared favourably with a figure of 0.31mSv obtained by the Close Contact Dose Spreadsheet. The doses received demonstrate the validity of restricting patient partner contact during the hours of sleep within the first few days post administration. Monitoring of the bedroom, bed linen, bathroom, toilet and personal effects showed slight levels of contamination ranging from background to 20 cps. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B; Grossbach, A; Gruber-Rouh, T; Zangos, S; Vogl, Th J; Eichler, K

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26-292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic errors and additional need for CT. Instead, a single abdominal low-dose

  18. Study on the evaluation of radiation doses in dental radiography. Doses and risks due to dental full mouth examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, K [Kanagawa Dental Coll., Yokosuka (Japan)

    1980-09-01

    Radiation doses and possible biological risks due to dental full mouth examination (adult: 10-film technique, child: 6-film technique) were evaluated based on preliminary experiments and statistical surveillance of patients' records. Dosimetrical studies were performed by using head and neck phantoms and a dental x-ray tube. Radiation doses were measured by x-ray films and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For the obtained doses of skin, eyes, thyroid gland and bone marrow, the biological risk of leukemia and thyroid cancer was discussed on the statistical basis of patients at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital. The major findings were as follows: The total number of patients who recieved full mouth x-ray examination at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital in 1978 was 1,099. The number of male patients was 382 (3,804 films) and that of female patients was 717 (7,138 films). In both sexes, the number of patients was the greatest in the group of 8 - 14 years of age. The collective doses of bone marrow due to full mouth 10-film examination performed at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital in 1978 were approximately 6.0 rad, which could induce leukemia with a probability of 1/8,000. The collective doses of thyroid gland were approximately 13 rad, which could induce lethal thyroid cancer with a probability of 1/15,000. The radiation dose due to the dental radiography for examination at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital was proved to be apparently below the level that could actually induce radiation injuries. But the collective radiation doses due to dental examination in Japan as a whole were approximately 8,000 times greater than that in Kanagawa Dental College Hospital.

  19. Does the Reliability of Reporting in Injury Surveillance Studies Depend on Injury Definition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Matthew; Williams, Sean; Kemp, Simon P.T.; Fuller, Colin; Taylor, Aileen; Brooks, John; Trewartha, Grant; Stokes, Keith

    2018-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate definition for injury in injury surveillance studies is essential to ensure a balance among reporting reliability, providing an accurate representation of injury risk, and describing the nature of the clinical demand. Purpose: To provide guidance on the choice of injury definition for injury surveillance studies by comparing within- and between-team variability in injury incidence with >24-hour and >7-day time-loss injury definitions in a large multiteam injury surveillance study. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Injury data were reported for 2248 professional rugby union players from 15 Premiership Rugby clubs over 12 seasons. Within-team percentage coefficient of variation and mean between-team standard deviation (expressed as a percentage coefficient of variation) in injury incidence rates (injuries per 1000 player match hours) were calculated. For both variables, a comparison was made between >24-hour and >7-day injury incidence rates in terms of the magnitude of the observed effects. Results: The overall mean incidence across the population with a >24-hour time-loss injury definition was approximately double the reported incidence with the >7-day definition. There was a 10% higher between-team variation in match injury incidence rates with the >24-hour time-loss definition versus the >7-day definition. Conclusion: There was a likely higher degree of between-team variation in match injury incidence rates with a >24-hour time-loss definition than with a >7-day definition of injury. However, in professional sports settings, it is likely that the benefits of using a more inclusive definition of injury (improved understanding of clinical demand and the appropriate and accurate reporting of injury risk) outweigh the small increase in variation in reporting consistency. PMID:29581994

  20. Competing Definitions of Schizophrenia: What Can Be Learned From Polydiagnostic Studies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Lennart Bertil; Parnas, Josef

    2006-01-01

    not a product of explicit conceptual analyses and empirical studies but defined through consensus with the purpose of improving reliability. The validity status of current definitions and of their predecessors remains unclear. The so-called "polydiagnostic approach" applies different definitions of a disorder...... to the same patient sample in order to compare these definitions on potential validity indicators. We reviewed 92 polydiagnostic sz studies published since the early 1970s. Different sz definitions show a considerable variation concerning frequency, concordance, reliability, outcome, and other validity...... measures. The DSM-IV and the ICD-10 show moderate reliability but both definitions appear weak in terms of concurrent validity, eg, with respect to an aggregation of a priori important features. The first-rank symptoms of Schneider are not associated with family history of sz or with prediction of poor...

  1. Competing definitions of schizophrenia: what can be learned from polydiagnostic studies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Lennart B; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    of explicit conceptual analyses and empirical studies but defined through consensus with the purpose of improving reliability. The validity status of current definitions and of their predecessors remains unclear. The so-called "polydiagnostic approach" applies different definitions of a disorder to the same...... patient sample in order to compare these definitions on potential validity indicators. We reviewed 92 polydiagnostic sz studies published since the early 1970s. Different sz definitions show a considerable variation concerning frequency, concordance, reliability, outcome, and other validity measures....... The DSM-IV and the ICD-10 show moderate reliability but both definitions appear weak in terms of concurrent validity, eg, with respect to an aggregation of a priori important features. The first-rank symptoms of Schneider are not associated with family history of sz or with prediction of poor outcome...

  2. Improve definition of titanium tandems in MR-guided high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer using proton density weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yanle; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Mutic, Sasa; Richardson, Susan; Gay, Hiram A; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2013-01-01

    For cervical cancer patients treated with MR-guided high dose rate brachytherapy, the accuracy of radiation delivery depends on accurate localization of both tumors and the applicator, e.g. tandem and ovoid. Standard T2-weighted (T2W) MRI has good tumor-tissue contrast. However, it suffers from poor uterus-tandem contrast, which makes the tandem delineation very challenging. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of using proton density weighted (PDW) MRI to improve the definition of titanium tandems. Both T2W and PDW MRI images were obtained from each cervical cancer patient. Imaging parameters were kept the same between the T2W and PDW sequences for each patient except the echo time (90 ms for T2W and 5.5 ms for PDW) and the slice thickness (0.5 cm for T2W and 0.25 cm for PDW). Uterus-tandem contrast was calculated by the equation C = (S u -S t )/S u , where S u and S t represented the average signal in the uterus and the tandem, respectively. The diameter of the tandem was measured 1.5 cm away from the tip of the tandem. The tandem was segmented by the histogram thresholding technique. PDW MRI could significantly improve the uterus-tandem contrast compared to T2W MRI (0.42±0.24 for T2W MRI, 0.77±0.14 for PDW MRI, p=0.0002). The average difference between the measured and physical diameters of the tandem was reduced from 0.20±0.15 cm by using T2W MRI to 0.10±0.11 cm by using PDW MRI (p=0.0003). The tandem segmented from the PDW image looked more uniform and complete compared to that from the T2W image. Compared to the standard T2W MRI, PDW MRI has better uterus-tandem contrast. The information provided by PDW MRI is complementary to those provided by T2W MRI. Therefore, we recommend adding PDW MRI to the simulation protocol to assist tandem delineation process for cervical cancer patients

  3. Comparative study about doses and radiological protection in gastrointestinal fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneravo, L.V.; Borges, J.C.; Carlos, M.T.; Koch, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Institute of the National Nuclear Energy Commission (IRD/CNEN) and the Radiodiagnostic Service of the Rio de Janeiro Federal University Hospital, have been engaged in the development of quality control programs applied to radiodiagnostics, one of them concerning gastrointestinal fluoroscopy. Since fluoroscopy examinations normally deal with high doses, they represent an important fraction of public exposure. They deserve special attention and the risks to patients should be considered individually, not only as a population statistics. Another target should be the search for procedures that reduce doses to patients and, therefore, reduce dose to medical staff involved. This work describes steps followed and results obtained in the estimation of doses for patients and physicians. Investigated examinations were esophagography, gastroduodenal seriographic and colon with double contrast media, using conventional equipment with fluorescent screens, carried on by physicians engaged in the first year of medical residence. (authors). 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. Study of dose profile in TC scanning of cranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Junior, R.L.; Oliveira, A.H.; Mourao, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper it was obtained a dose distribution profile in computerized tomography, when a head simulator object, cylindrical and manufactured in PMMA, were swiped by using the clinical protocol or this device routine. The doses were determined with radiochromic films placed at the four cardinal points and the Center, taking as reference one of object faces. The films were calibrated with pencil ionization chamber in a independent experiment where the obtained doses in the chamber, when a unique central cut or the object were obtained, were confronted with the gray scales on the irradiated films in a similar manner, revealing he factors of conversion mGy.Gray tones -1 which made possible the determination of doses in all the scanning

  5. A systematic study on factors affecting patient dose, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Akiyoshi; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Utsumi, Hiromoto; Ota, Masaji; Nakanishi, Takashi

    1979-01-01

    In the preceding report, we dealt with the field size and the tube voltage. This paper covers the differences in patient dose due to the focus to film distance (FFD), the patient thickness and whether the grid is used or not. Regarding the FFD, 100 cm is most commonly employed except in X-ray examinations of the chest, but from the viewpoint of the patient dose, this requires special consideration as to whether there is any theoretical basis for it. The patient thickness has a great bearing on the patient dose, but there is an individual difference, and it is almost impossible to change it artificially. However, there has been no detailed report on the relation between the patient thickness and the patient dose, therefore, this report treats of such relationship as well. Concerning the grid, consideration is given to the exposure times (Bucky factor). (author)

  6. Does the Reliability of Reporting in Injury Surveillance Studies Depend on Injury Definition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Matthew; Williams, Sean; Kemp, Simon P T; Fuller, Colin; Taylor, Aileen; Brooks, John; Trewartha, Grant; Stokes, Keith

    2018-03-01

    Choosing an appropriate definition for injury in injury surveillance studies is essential to ensure a balance among reporting reliability, providing an accurate representation of injury risk, and describing the nature of the clinical demand. To provide guidance on the choice of injury definition for injury surveillance studies by comparing within- and between-team variability in injury incidence with >24-hour and >7-day time-loss injury definitions in a large multiteam injury surveillance study. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Injury data were reported for 2248 professional rugby union players from 15 Premiership Rugby clubs over 12 seasons. Within-team percentage coefficient of variation and mean between-team standard deviation (expressed as a percentage coefficient of variation) in injury incidence rates (injuries per 1000 player match hours) were calculated. For both variables, a comparison was made between >24-hour and >7-day injury incidence rates in terms of the magnitude of the observed effects. The overall mean incidence across the population with a >24-hour time-loss injury definition was approximately double the reported incidence with the >7-day definition. There was a 10% higher between-team variation in match injury incidence rates with the >24-hour time-loss definition versus the >7-day definition. There was a likely higher degree of between-team variation in match injury incidence rates with a >24-hour time-loss definition than with a >7-day definition of injury. However, in professional sports settings, it is likely that the benefits of using a more inclusive definition of injury (improved understanding of clinical demand and the appropriate and accurate reporting of injury risk) outweigh the small increase in variation in reporting consistency.

  7. Diagnosis of cerebral metastases by means of standard doses of Gadobutrol versus a high-dose protocol. Intraindividual evaluation of a phase-II high-dose study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Friebe, C.E.; Balzer, T.; Mack, M.G.; Steiner, S.; Schedel, H.; Pegios, W.; Lanksch, W.; Banzer, D.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    In a clinical phase-II study 20 patients who had been diagnosed as having brain metastases with CT or MRT were studied prospectively with Gadobutrol, a new nonionic, low osmolality contrast agent. Each patient received an initial injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight and an additional dose of 0.2 mmol/kg Gadobutrol 10 min later. Spinecho images were obtained before and after the two applications of Gadobutrol. Dynamic scanning (Turbo-FLASH) was performed for 3 min after each injection of the contrast agent. Both quantitative and qualitative data were intraindividually evaluated. The primary tumor was a bronchial carcinoma in 11 cases; in 9 other cases there were different primary tumors. Forty-eight hours after the use of Gadobutrol there were no adverse signs in the clinical examination, vital signs or blood and urine chemistry. Statistical analysis (Friedman test and Wilcoxon test) of the C/N ratios between tumor and white matter, percentage enhancement, and visual assessment rating revealed statistically significant superiority of high-dose Gadobutrol injection in comparison to the standard dose. The percentage enhancement increased on average from 104% after 0.1 mmol/kg to 162% after 0.3 mmol/kg Gadobutrol. Qualitative delineation and contrast of the lesions increased significantly. The use of high-dose Gadobutrol improved the detection of 36 additional lesions in 6 patients. (orig./VHE) [de

  8. Repeated dose studies with pure Epigallocatechin-3-gallate demonstrated dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity with associated dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Ramachandran

    Full Text Available EGCG (Epigallocatechin-3-gallate is the major active principle catechin found in green tea. Skepticism regarding the safety of consuming EGCG is gaining attention, despite the fact that it is widely being touted for its potential health benefits, including anti-cancer properties. The lack of scientific data on safe dose levels of pure EGCG is of concern, while EGCG has been commonly studied as a component of GTE (Green tea extract and not as a single active constituent. This study has been carried out to estimate the maximum tolerated non-toxic dose of pure EGCG and to identify the treatment related risk factors. In a fourteen day consecutive treatment, two different administration modalities were compared, offering an improved [i.p (intraperitoneal] and limited [p.o (oral] bioavailability. A trend of dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity was observed particularly with i.p treatment and EGCG increased serum lipid profile in parallel to hepatotoxicity. Fourteen day tolerable dose of EGCG was established as 21.1 mg/kg for i.p and 67.8 mg/kg for p.o. We also observed that, EGCG induced effects by both treatment routes are reversible, subsequent to an observation period for further fourteen days after cessation of treatment. It was demonstrated that the severity of EGCG induced toxicity appears to be a function of dose, route of administration and period of treatment. Keywords: EGCG, Green tea, Serum lipids, Dose dependant toxicity, Route dependant toxicity, Liver toxicity, Dyslipidemia

  9. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert; Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Choy, Edwin; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  10. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman, E-mail: peyman.kabolizadeh@beaumont.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choy, Edwin [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  11. Estimation of the optimal dosing regimen of escitalopram in dogs: A dose occupancy study with [11C]DASB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Taylor

    Full Text Available Although the favourable characteristics of escitalopram as being the most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and having an increased therapeutic efficacy via binding on an additional allosteric binding site of the serotonin transporter, its dosing regimen has not yet been optimized for its use in dogs. This study aimed to estimate the optimal dosing frequency and the required dose for achieving 80% occupancy of the serotonin transporters in the basal ganglia. The dosing frequency was investigated by determining the elimination half-life after a four day oral pre-treatment period with 0.83 mg/kg escitalopram (3 administrations/day and a subsequent i.v. injection 0.83 mg/kg. Blood samples were taken up to 12 hours after i.v. injection and the concentration of escitalopram in plasma was analysed via LC-MSMS. The dose-occupancy relationship was then determined by performing two PET scans in five adult beagles: a baseline PET scan and a second scan after steady state conditions were achieved following oral treatment with a specific dose of escitalopram ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mg/kg/day. As the elimination half-life was determined to be 6.7 hours a dosing frequency of three administrations a day was proposed for the second part of the study. Further it was opted for a treatment period of four days, which well exceeded the minimum period to achieve steady state conditions. The optimal dosing regimen to achieve 80% occupancy in the basal ganglia and elicit a therapeutic effect, was calculated to be 1.85 mg/kg/day, divided over three administrations. Under several circumstances, such as insufficient response to other SSRIs, concurrent drug intake or in research studies focused on SERT, the use of escitalopram can be preferred over the use of the already for veterinary use registered fluoxetine, however, in case of long-term treatment with escitalopram, regularly cardiac screening is recommended.

  12. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Target volume definition and treatment outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander [Federal Armed Forces Hospital Westerstede, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Westerstede (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Core Facility Quality Management and Health Technology Assessment in Transplantation, Integrated Research and Treatment Center Transplantation (IFB-Tx), Hannover (Germany); Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); University of Schleswig Holstein, Campus Kiel, Department of Radiotherapy, Karl-Lennert Cancer Center, Kiel (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Center for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology Bremen and Westerstede, Westerstede (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 x 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 x 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis ''inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV'' and ''night pain before LD-EBRT'' were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while ''initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT'' was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling ''initial increase in pain'' was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while ''night pain'' was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT ''night pain'' and ''inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV'' were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed. (orig.) [German] In der Behandlung des

  13. Preclinical Study of 68Ga-DOTATOC: Biodistribution Assessment in Syrian Rats and Evaluation of Absorbed Dose in Human Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Mojdeh; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Ramazani, Ali; Jalilian, Amir Reza

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-68 DOTA-DPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -Octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTATOC) has been applied by several European centers for the treatment of a variety of human malignancies. Nevertheless, definitive dosimetric data are yet unavailable. According to the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, researchers are investigating the safety and efficacy of this radiotracer to meet Food and Drug Administration requirements. The aim of this study was to introduce the optimized procedure for 68 Ga-DOTATOC preparation, using a novel germanium-68 ( 68 Ge)/ 68 Ga generator in Iran and evaluate the absorbed doses in numerous organs with high accuracy. The optimized conditions for preparing the radiolabeled complex were determined via several experiments by changing the ligand concentration, pH, temperature and incubation time. Radiochemical purity of the complex was assessed, using high-performance liquid chromatography and instant thin-layer chromatography. The absorbed dose of human organs was evaluated, based on biodistribution studies on Syrian rats via Radiation Absorbed Dose Assessment Resource Method. 68 Ga-DOTATOC was prepared with radiochemical purity of >98% and specific activity of 39.6 MBq/nmol. The complex demonstrated great stability at room temperature and in human serum at 37°C at least two hours after preparation. Significant uptake was observed in somatostatin receptor-positive tissues such as pancreatic and adrenal tissues (12.83 %ID/g and 0.91 %ID/g, respectively). Dose estimations in human organs showed that the pancreas, kidneys and adrenal glands received the maximum absorbed doses (0.105, 0.074 and 0.010 mGy/MBq, respectively). Also, the effective absorbed dose was estimated at 0.026 mSv/MBq for 68 Ga-DOTATOC. The obtained results showed that 68 Ga-DOTATOC can be considered as an effective agent for clinical PET imaging in Iran.

  14. Study on fine quartz pre-dose techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.L.; Stokes, M.J.; Wang Weida; Xia Junding

    1996-01-01

    When using the pre-dose technique in ceramic dating, it is essential to add a calibration dose and to eliminate the background dose. For doing this measurement the sample requires multiple activation following multiple administration of a test dose to induce simulated 'ancient' thermoluminescence (TL). However, the procedures introduce many factors that are difficultly corrected. The authors compare existing two kinds of measurement procedures and proposes a new procedure involving single activation following a single test dose administration. An experiment using the single activation procedure is carried out with natural fine quartz where the results obtained exhibit only 0.07 relative error. It appears that this new procedure increases the precision of the ancient TL measurement by about 0.04 and 0.11 over those of existing two kinds of procedures. In addition this method can give realistic values in TL dating for relatively 'young' samples aged tens to hundreds of years where the standard high temperature TL method is relatively insensitive

  15. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates

  16. The Definition and Treatment of Bulimarexia in College Women--A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskind-Ledahl, Marlene; White, William C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A study of college women suffering from bulimarexia, a cyclical eating disorder characterized by bingeing/purging behaviors and abnormally low self-esteem, indicates the importance of sociocultural factors in female role definition. (JMF)

  17. Study on cellular survival adaptive response induced by low dose irradiation of 153Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong

    1999-01-01

    The present study engages in determining whether low dose irradiation of 153 Sm could cut down the responsiveness of cellular survival to subsequent high dose exposure of 153 Sm so as to make an inquiry into approach the protective action of adaptive response by second irradiation of 153 Sm. Experimental results indicate that for inductive low dose of radionuclide 153 Sm 3.7 kBq/ml irradiated beforehand to cells has obvious resistant effect in succession after high dose irradiation of 153 Sm 3.7 x 10 2 kBq/ml was observed. Cells exposed to low dose irradiation of 153 Sm become adapted and therefore the subsequent cellular survival rate induced by high dose of 153 Sm is sufficiently higher than high dose of 153 Sm merely. It is evident that cellular survival adaptive response could be induced by pure low dose irradiation of 153 Sm only

  18. Public involvement in the dose reconstruction study: the colorado story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Norma C.; Lockhart, Ann J.

    2000-01-01

    Public involvement was a critical component for building awareness, trust, and credibility for the dose reconstruction study for the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility in Colorado. The research team developed a process to inform, involve, and encourage public participation over the nine-year study period. Key affected and interested groups with a legitimate stake in the study were identified and invited to identify concerns and offer suggestions for the study. In many cases, the public actually provided direction for the research. Many issues were studied more in-depth as result of public concern. Proactive community outreach was undertaken; quarterly public meetings and workshops were held to inform the public about the study's progress and to hear their comments. Quarterly newsletters were mailed to stake holders. A speaker's bureau was established and more than 50 presentations were made to 1,500 community members in various civic, business, neighborhood, and technical groups. Fact sheets, citizen summaries of technical reports, technical topic papers, and a video were developed to provide a complete overview of the studies and the findings at the conclusion of the project. The video was provided to local cable television stations, and publications were taken to local libraries. A web site was developed to allow the public to readily access information and to order technical reports. Public comments on draft technical reports were solicited; questions and concerns were addressed and investigated. The staff answered citizen calls, and the research team responded in writing to more than 200 issues raised by very concerned citizens. In addition, a citizen's group was formed in 1992 to conduct an independent study of plutonium levels found in soil samples collected around Rocky Flats. Made up of homeowners, public interest groups, local health departments, interested citizens, and Health Advisory Panel members, the committee arranged for sampling and analysis of

  19. Entyvio lengthen dose-interval study: lengthening vedolizumab dose interval and the risk of clinical relapse in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Webber; Lynch, Nicole; Bampton, Peter; Chang, Jeff; Chung, Alvin; Florin, Timothy; Hetzel, David J; Jakobovits, Simon; Moore, Gregory; Pavli, Paul; Radford-Smith, Graham; Thin, Lena; Baraty, Brandon; Haifer, Craig; Yau, Yunki; Leong, Rupert W L

    2018-07-01

    Vedolizumab (VDZ), an α4β7 anti-integrin antibody, is efficacious in the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). In the GEMINI long-term safety study, enrolled patients received 4-weekly VDZ. Upon completion, patients were switched to 8-weekly VDZ in Australia. The clinical success rate of treatment de-escalation for patients in remission on VDZ has not been described previously. To determine the proportion of patients who relapsed after switching from 4 to 8-weekly VDZ, the mean time to relapse, and the recapture rate when switching back to 8-weekly dosing. This was a retrospective, observational, multicenter study of patients previously recruited into GEMINI long-term safety in Australia. Data on the demographics and biochemical findings were collected. There were 34 patients [23 men, mean age 49.1 (±13.1) years] and their mean disease duration was 17.6 (±8.5) years. The mean 4-weekly VDZ infusion duration was 286.5 (±48.8) weeks. A total of five (15%) patients relapsed on dose-interval increase (4/17 UC, 1/17 CD) at a median duration from dose interval lengthening to flare of 14 weeks (interquartile range=6-25). Eighty percent (4/5) of patients re-entered remission following dose-interval decrease back to 4-weekly. No clinical predictors of relapse could be determined because of the small cohort size. The risk of patients relapsing when switching from 4 to 8-weekly VDZ ∼15% and is similar between CD and UC. Dose-interval decrease recaptures 80% of patients who relapsed. Therapeutic drug monitoring of VDZ may be of clinical relevance.

  20. A Cohort Study of Preoperative Single Dose Versus Four Doses of Antibiotics for Patients With Non-Complicated Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah H. Al Janaby

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To Test the efficacy of single preoperative dose of Cefotaxime 1gm and Metronidazole 500mg in reducing the surgical site infections (SSIs after open appendectomy in patients with non-complicated appendicitis (NCA Place and Duration of Study: Al Hilla General Teaching Hospital, Babel Governorate-Iraq, from January 2013 to January 2014. Patients & Methods: 100 patients, who underwent appendectomy for NCA and fulfilled the selection criteria, were randomized into two groups. The patients in group A received a single dose of pre-operative antibiotics (Cefotaxime sodium and metronidazole, while the group B patients received three more dose of the same antibiotics postoperatively. Patients of both groups were followed-up for 30 days to assess the postoperative infective complications. Results: Group A had 48, while group B comprised of 52 patients. The groups were comparable in the baseline characteristics. Statistically, P value in rates of SSIs between both the groups was 0.9182. None of the patients developed intra-abdominal collection. Conclusion: Single dose of pre-operative antibiotics (Cefotaxime and metronidazole was sufficient in reducing the SSIs after appendectomy for NPA. Postoperative antibiotics did not add an appreciable clinical benefit in these patients. Key words: Preoperative antibiotics, Appendectomy, Surgical site infection, Non-complicated appendicitis Abbreviations: SSI: Surgical Site Infection, NCA: non-complicated appendicitis CDC Center of Disease Control.

  1. Chinese herbal dose in ancient and modern times: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shimin

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate dose guarantees Chinese herb's safety and effectiveness. There are adult dose criteria for Chinese herbs in decoction in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (2010 Edition) at present. But Chinese herbs have been frequently used in much higher doses than the dose criteria. This study has been conducted to test the dependability of the dose criteria. Twenty Chinese herbs were selected as representatives and their adult doses in decoction in Bei Ji Qian Jin Yao Fang, a famous ancient literature, have been reviewed and compared with those in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (2010 Edition). The adult dose criteria for all these 20 Chinese herbs in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (2010 Edition) haven't covered those in Bei Ji Qian Jin Yao Fang. Furthermore, maximal adult doses in the dose criteria are much lower than those in Bei Ji Qian Jin Yao Fang. The dose criteria in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (2010 Edition) are not comprehensive enough. Studying ancient literatures is an effective method to gain precious Chinese herbs' dose data and helps for new dose criteria's establishment in the future.

  2. Design and statistical considerations for studies evaluating the efficacy of a single dose of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Gonzalez, Paula; Kreimer, Aimee R; Gail, Mitchell H

    2018-05-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause about 70% of all cervical cancers. Clinical trials have demonstrated that three doses of either commercially available HPV vaccine, Cervarix ® or Gardasil ®, prevent most new HPV 16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions. Based on evidence of immunological non-inferiority, 2-dose regimens have been licensed for adolescents in the United States, European Union, and elsewhere. However, if a single dose were effective, vaccine costs would be reduced substantially and the logistics of vaccination would be greatly simplified, enabling vaccination programs in developing countries. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Agencia Costarricense de Investigaciones Biomédicas (ACIB) are conducting, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a large 24,000 girl study to evaluate the efficacy of a 1-dose regimen. The first component of the study is a four-year non-inferiority trial comparing 1- to 2-dose regimens of the two licensed vaccines. The second component is an observational study that estimates the vaccine efficacy (VE) of each regimen by comparing the HPV infection rates in the trial arms to those in a contemporaneous survey group of unvaccinated girls. In this paper, we describe the design and statistical analysis for this study. We explain the advantage of defining non-inferiority on the absolute risk scale when the expected event rate is near 0 and, given this definition, suggest an approach to account for missing clinic visits. We then describe the problem of estimating VE in the absence of a randomized placebo arm and offer our solution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Analysis and planning of dose-finding studies with active control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helms, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In the clinical development of radiopharmaceuticals the dose finding plays an important role. The contribution is focused on the evaluation and planning of dose finding studies with active control. It is of primary interest to find the lowest dose that yields the same efficacy as the active control. Besides the target dose confidence intervals are of importance to describe the quality of the target dose estimation. The calculation of case numbers and the determination of the dose steps to be studied are challenging under practical conditions. The contribution covers the demonstration of the statistical model the parameter estimation and the asymptotic properties based on maximum likelihood theory, the spline-based evaluation of nonlinear dose finding studies with active control and the planning of design and number of cases.

  4. Oncological outcomes from trimodality therapy receiving definitive doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (≥60 Gy and factors influencing consideration for surgery in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A.L. Vyfhuis, MD PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Trimodality treatment significantly improves survival and FFR in patients with LA-NSCLC when definitive doses of radiation with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are employed. We identified important demographic features that predict the use of surgical intervention in patients with stage III NSCLC.

  5. College Students' Definitions of Intimate Partner Violence: A Comparative Study of Three Chinese Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yanpeng; Sun, Ivan Y; Farmer, Ashley K; Lin, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Although a large number of studies have been conducted worldwide to examine various aspects of intimate partner violence (IPV), comparative study of people's views on such violence in Chinese societies has been scarce. Using survey data collected from more than 850 college students in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, this study specifically assessed the impact of attitudes toward gender role and violence, personal and vicarious experience, demographic characteristics, and locality on students' definitions of IPV. The Taiwanese students were most likely to define a broader range of abusive behavior as IPV, followed by Hong Kong and Beijing students. Gender role and violence attitudes appeared to be most important predictors of IPV definitions. College students who supported the notion of male dominance were more likely to have a narrower definition of IPV, whereas those who viewed domestic violence as crime were more inclined to have a broader definition of IPV. Implications for future research and policy were discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under spinal anesthesia: comparative study between conventional-dose and low-dose hyperbaric bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imbelloni LE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni1, Raphael Sant'Anna2, Marcos Fornasari2, José Carlos Fialho21Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medecine Nova Esperança, Hospital de Mangabeira, João Pessoa, 2Hospital Rio Laranjeiras, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has the advantages of causing less postoperative pain and requiring a short hospital stay, and therefore is the treatment of choice for cholelithiasis. This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia using hyperbaric bupivacaine given as a conventional dose by lumbar puncture or as a low-dose by thoracic puncture.Methods: A total of 140 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease were randomized to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum under spinal anesthesia using either conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia (hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg and fentanyl 20 mg or low-dose thoracic spinal anesthesia (hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and fentanyl 20 µg. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two treatment groups.Results: All procedures were completed under spinal anesthesia, with no cases needing conversion to general anesthesia. Values for time for block to reach the T3 dermatomal level, duration of motor and sensory block, and hypotensive events were significantly lower with low-dose bupivacaine. Postoperative pain was higher for low-dose hyperbaric bupivacaine at 6 and 12 hours. All patients were discharged after 24 hours. Follow-up 1 week postoperatively showed all patients to be satisfied and to be keen advocates of spinal anesthesia.Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed successfully under spinal anesthesia. A small dose of hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and 20 µg fentanyl provides adequate spinal anesthesia for laparoscopy and, in comparison with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15% and fentanyl 20 µg, causes markedly

  7. Study of dose effect relationship at low doses for non quantitative reactions of skin intestinal mucosa and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the biological reactions observed in animal experiments or in clinical studies are non quantitative and they only allow assessing an inequality between the effects produced by different irradiations. The method used in non quantitative studies is actually based on the relative contribution of irreparable events and reparable to the cell killing. It provides for the cell population involved in non quantitative biological effects some data which can be expressed in term of a cell survival curve. Such data can be useful in Radiation therapy particularly for maximizing the difference between biological effects by a proper choice of the fraction size. The initial part of the cell survival curve, within the range of doses actually used appears to be a straight exponential. This should allow the extrapolation to very low doses in the range of interest to Radiation Protection

  8. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, B.; Grossbach, A.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, Th. J.; Eichler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Results: Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26–292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). Conclusion: X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic

  9. A study of radiation exposure dose in young dental patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    1983-01-01

    In order to clarify the trend in dental radiography for young patients up to 18 years old and the accompanying radiation exposures, surveys were made at Fukuoka Dental College Hospital and thirty-five dental offices in Fukuoka city and Kitakyushu city. Each kind of radiography increased in average number with age and 16-18 group was given 4.60 times of radiography of one kind or another in the clinic of college hospital. In the dental offices, the number of radiography taken was about one-fourth that of the clinic of college hospital. Although exposure dose varies with exposure factors, distance and angle of exposure, in addition to time factor, were found to affect doses subtly. In the clinic of college hospital the average of estimated doses to organs per person per year were 105.4 mrad (25.2 mrad for 5-year-old children) in the salivary gland, 55.9 mrad (18.9 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 52.1 mrad (15.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of the eye and 52.2 mrad (8.7 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In the dental offices, the same average of estimated doses to organs were 40.5 mrad (7.4 mrad for 5-year-old) in the salivary gland, 17.4 mrad (8.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 12.2 mrad (6.1 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of eye and 13.1 mrad (1.3 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In all kinds of radiograpy, the estimated doses in genital glands were in μrad. In the dental offices, both the percentage of young patients to all patients and the radiographing rate were lower as compared with those in the clinic of college hospital. The estimated doses were also lower at one-half to one-fifth and those by age and by organ were found to be one-tenth or lower. (J.P.N.)

  10. A simulation study on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chin-cheng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Lee, Chung-chi; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the tissue heterogeneity on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate both depth and radial profiles of the radiation dose in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms, respectively. The results are compared with the dose distribution calculated using the mathematical model of Gamma Plan, the treatment planning system of the gamma knife. The skull and sinus heterogeneity were simulated by a Teflon shell and an air shell, respectively. It was found that the tissue heterogeneity caused significant perturbation on the absolute depth dose at the focus as well as on the depth-dose distribution near the phantom surface and/or at the interface but little effect on the radial dose distribution. The effect of the beam aperture on the depth-dose distribution was also investigated in this study. (author)

  11. Study of dose calculation and beam parameters optimization with genetic algorithm in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chaomin; Tang Mutao; Zhou Linghong; Lv Qingwen; Wang Zhuoyu; Chen Guangjie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the construction of dose calculation model and the method of automatic beam parameters selection in IMRT. Methods: The three-dimension convolution dose calculation model of photon was constructed with the methods of Fast Fourier Transform. The objective function based on dose constrain was used to evaluate the fitness of individuals. The beam weights were optimized with genetic algorithm. Results: After 100 iterative analyses, the treatment planning system produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distributions. Conclusion: the throe-dimension convolution dose calculation model of photon gave more accurate results than the conventional models; genetic algorithm is valid and efficient in IMRT beam parameters optimization. (authors)

  12. Reconsidering the International Association for the Study of Pain definition of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Milton; Quintner, John; van Rysewyk, Simon

    2018-03-01

    The definition of pain promulgated by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) is widely accepted as a pragmatic characterisation of that human experience. Although the Notes that accompany it characterise pain as "always subjective," the IASP definition itself fails to sufficiently integrate phenomenological aspects of pain. This essay reviews the historical development of the IASP definition, and the commentaries and suggested modifications to it over almost 40 years. Common factors of pain experience identified in phenomenological studies are described, together with theoretical insights from philosophy and biology. A fuller understanding of the pain experience and of the clinical care of those experiencing pain is achievable through greater attention to the phenomenology of pain, the social "intersubjective space" in which pain occurs, and the limitations of language. Based on these results, a revised definition of pain is offered: Pain is a mutually recognizable somatic experience that reflects a person's apprehension of threat to their bodily or existential integrity.

  13. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) (χ 2 = 34.444, p 2 = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  14. Irradiation preservation study on Beijing roast duck by low dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiguo, Wang; Yongbao, Gu; Fengmei, Li [Beijing Normal Univ., BJ (China). Inst. of Low Energy Nuclear Physics; and others

    1989-02-01

    The irradiation technique combined with freezing has been used to control the microorganism in Beijing Roast Duck. Cobal-60 was chosen as {gamma}-ray source. The absorbed dose was 2 kGy on an average. After irrdiation, the microbe counts have reached the tolerable. Compared with untreated ducks, the irradiated ones showed no remarkable change in nutrition, chemistry, vitamin etc. It has been proved through test that the irradiated frozen Beijing Roast Duck is wholesome.

  15. Irradiation preservation study on Beijing roast duck by low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weiguo; Gu Yongbao; Li Fengmei

    1989-01-01

    The irradiation technique combined with freezing has been used to control the microorganism in Beijing Roast Duck. Cobal-60 was chosen as γ-ray source. The absorbed dose was 2 kGy on an average. After irrdiation, the microbe counts have reached the tolerable. Compared with untreated ducks, the irradiated ones showed no remarkable change in nutrition, chemistry, vitamin etc. It has been proved through test that the irradiated frozen Beijing Roast Duck is wholesome

  16. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 6: SPS technology requirements and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Volume 6 of the SPS Concept Definition Study is presented and also incorporates results of NASA/MSFC in-house effort. This volume includes a supporting research and technology summary. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are as follows: (1) Executive Summary; (2) SPS System Requirements; (3) SPS Concept Evolution; (4) SPS Point Design Definition; (5) Transportation and Operations Analysis; and Volume 7, SPS Program Plan and Economic Analysis.

  17. Studies on chronic effects of lower dose level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.G.; Yun, Y.S.; Yun, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    This experiment is being carried out to elucidate the chronic effects of Co 60 (γ-ray) - low doses irradiation on JCR mice at 3rd week, 6th week, and 5th month after their birth. Experimental mice at 3rd week of age have been irradiated with Co 60 - 60mR weekly, Co 60 - 500mR weekly and Co 60 - 61R biweekly at the dose rate of 60mR per second for 23 weeks until now. Co 60 - 61R irradiated mice were subdivided into Co 60 - alone group and Co 60 combined with red ginseng extracts group. In their survivor's rate and their body weight etc., no significant differences between control groups and test groups in these experimental mice. Experimented mice at 6 weeks and 5 months of age are also being irradiated with Co 60 in the same doses as the above for 14 weeks and 8 weeks until present. In these experimental groups, there are also no significant differences between control groups and experimental groups in their survivor's rate and their body weight

  18. An IMRT dose distribution study using commercial verification software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, M.; Liu, G.; Fernando, W.; Rykers, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of IMRT requires users to confirm that the isodose distributions and relative doses calculated by their planning system match the doses delivered by their linear accelerators. To this end the commercially available software, VeriSoft TM (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was trialled to determine if the tools and functions it offered would be of benefit to this process. The CMS Xio (Computer Medical System) treatment planning system was used to generate IMRT plans that were delivered with an upgraded Elekta SL15 linac. Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched in RW3 solid water (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used to measure the IMRT fields delivered with 6 MV photons. The isodose and profiles measured with the film generally agreed to within ± 3% or ± 3 mm with the planned doses, in some regions (outside the IMRT field) the match fell to within ± 5%. The isodose distributions of the planning system and the film could be compared on screen and allows for electronic records of the comparison to be kept if so desired. The features and versatility of this software has been of benefit to our IMRT QA program. Furthermore, the VeriSoft TM software allows for quick and accurate, automated planar film analysis.Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  19. Dose perturbation due to the presence of a prostatic urethral stent in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gez, E; Cederbaum, M; Yachia, D; Bar-Deroma, R; Kuten, A

    1997-01-01

    Temporary metallic intraprostatic stent is a new alternative treatment for patients with urinary obstructive syndrome caused by prostate cancer. Definitive radiotherapy is a treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer. This study evaluates in vitro the effect of a urethral intraprostatic metallic stent on the dose absorbed by the surrounding tissue. The study was designed to mimic the conditions under which the prostatic stent is placed in the body during pelvic irradiation. A urethral stent composed of a 50% nickel-50% titanium alloy (Uracoil-InStent) was imbedded in material mimicking normal tissue (bolus) at a simulated body depth of 10 cm. The distribution of the absorbed dose of irradiation was determined by film dosimetry using Kodak X-Omat V film. Irradiation was done in a single field at the isocenter of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a field size of 7 x 7 cm. The degree of film blackening was in direct proportion to the absorbed dose. The measurements showed an increase in dose of up to 20% immediately before the stent and a decrease of up to 18% immediately after the stent. These changes occurred within a range of 1-3 mm from both sides of the stent. In practice, irradiation in prostate cancer is given by two pairs of opposed co-axial fields; a total of four fields (Box Technique). The dose perturbations are partly cancelled in a pair of opposed beams resulting in a net variation of +/- 4%; therefore, the presence of the intraprostatic stent should not influence radiotherapy planning for prostate cancer.

  20. Word Definitional Skills in School age Persian Speaking Children: A Developmental Study on Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talieh Zarifian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Word definitional skills (WDSs were classified according to the quality of both semantic content and syntactic form. The aim of the present study was to investigate the syntactic development in WDSs in typically developing school- age children. Methods: In this cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study,  150 of typically developing school-age children participated by the  multistage sampling method in the second to sixth grade from primary schools in 1, 7 and 17 municipal  districts of Tehran. The definition skill was assessed with word definition task. The reliability was assessed by two independent values and the validity was determined by the content. The results were  analyzed by the SPSS (22th version  statistical software and with the method of independent- samples T test, univariate analysis of variance and Tukey test. Results: The form analysis revealed that all children use phrase/clause  or simple sentence, transitional form and Aristotelian form frequently, but by increasing the age, definitions were developed from simple syntactic structure into Aristotelian form, in fact mean score of the form in word definition was significantly increased by age (P<0.001. Discussion: Owing to the findings of this study, the development of word definitional skills in terms of form was developed from phrase/clause or simple sentence and transitional form responses into Aristotelian form. Also WDSs are closely related to academic success and the development of literacy.

  1. Consensus statement on injury definitions and data collection procedures for studies of injuries in rugby union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Colin W; Molloy, Michael G; Bagate, Christian; Bahr, Roald; Brooks, John H M; Donson, Hilton; Kemp, Simon P T; McCrory, Paul; McIntosh, Andrew S; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Quarrie, Kenneth L; Raftery, Martin; Wiley, Preston

    2007-01-01

    Wide variations in the definitions and methodologies used for studies of injuries in rugby union have created inconsistencies in reported data and made interstudy comparisons of results difficult. The International Rugby Board established a Rugby Injury Consensus Group (RICG) to reach an agreement on the appropriate definitions and methodologies to standardise the recording of injuries and reporting of studies in rugby union. The RICG reviewed the consensus definitions and methodologies previously published for football (soccer) at a meeting in Dublin in order to assess their suitability for and application to rugby union. Following this meeting, iterative draft statements were prepared and circulated to members of the RICG for comment; a follow‐up meeting was arranged in Dublin, at which time all definitions and procedures were finalised. At this stage, all authors confirmed their agreement with the consensus statement. The agreed document was presented to and approved by the International Rugby Board Council. Agreement was reached on definitions for injury, recurrent injury, non‐fatal catastrophic injury, and training and match exposures, together with criteria for classifying injuries in terms of severity, location, type, diagnosis and causation. The definitions and methodology presented in this consensus statement for rugby union are similar to those proposed for football. Adoption of the proposals presented in this consensus statement should ensure that more consistent and comparable results will be obtained from studies of injuries within rugby union. PMID:17452684

  2. The Category of Definiteness Indefiniteness through the Prism of Functional Approach to Language Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labetova Victoria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The studying of language phenomena with the emphasis on their functional component is topical for modern linguistics. This approach gives a boost to thinking over various (semantic, morphological, syntactic forms through the prism of their functional-semantic load. The analysis of the category of definiteness/indefiniteness from this point of view allows defining the actual theoretical categorial model and the system of its expressive means. Purpose: The aim of the article is to define the essence and the bounds of the category of definiteness/indefiniteness in the Ukrainian language and reveal its expressive potential. Results: The category of definiteness/indefiniteness is a universal category that is based on the symbiosis of psychic, cognitive and lingual spheres. Its functional potential is accumulated in cognitive and communicative fields so it is not restricted only to defining spheres of definiteness or indefiniteness. Not only do things or objects appear definite or indefinite in the process of communication or its interpretation but also their characteristics or properties may acquire these senses. The category of definiteness/indefiniteness correlates with other functional-semantic categories, which leads to its complicated and ramified field structure with diffuse and peripheral zones. Discussion: The studying of the widened structure of the functional-semantic field of definiteness/indefiniteness and organizing all possible (regular, typical, occasional, etc. means of its expression is a perspective approach. It is important to study the category of definiteness/indefiniteness in different types of discourse to reveal the logic of its functioning.

  3. What is desirable and feasible in dose reconstruction for application in epidemiological studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Anspaugh, L.; Beebe, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    Formal epidemiologic studies are intended to increase scientific knowledge about the quantitative risk that is associated with radiation exposure. Dosimetric data are needed for such studies. What dosimetric data are desirable? Doses are needed for a large number of people with a large gradation of radiation exposures in order to ensure a sufficient power for the epidemiological study. The characteristics of the desirable doses are, in some respects, different from those calculated for radiation protection purposes. The desirable data are: absorbed doses to the individual organs or tissues of interest, instead of effective doses; absorbed doses delivered over limited time periods, instead of committed doses; doses specific to the individuals that are subjects in the epidemiological studies, instead of average doses over population groups; and very accurate and precise doses. What dosimetric data are feasible? Most of the characteristics of the desirable dosimetric data are usually achievable. However, uncertainties can be fairly large and estimated with a large degree of subjectivity. Also, for practical reasons, it may not be feasible to estimate individual doses for all subjects

  4. Studies on reduction of dosimeter used in the product dose mapping process at Sinagama Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofian Ibrahim; Syuhada Ramli; Cosmos George; Zarina Mohd Nor; Kamarudin Buyong; Shahidan Yob; Nor Ishadi Ismail; Mohd Sidek Othman; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab; Mohd Khairul Azfar Ramli

    2012-01-01

    Product dose mapping is the determination of the best product loading configuration which will be used during routine sterilization. In product dose mapping, dosimeters are placed throughout products at strategic locations to determine the zones of minimum and maximum dose. On previous Sinagama's product dose mapping method, a total of 240 unit's ceric-cerous dosimeter been used for a tote. Based on the data obtained from Irradiator Dose Mapping Report in 2004 and data from recent studies, the number of dosimeter to be used in product dose mapping can be reduced to 28 units without sacrificing precision and accuracy of the dose mapping results. This also led changes of the placing dosimeter method from Plane system to Coordinate system. Reduction of 88 % on dosimeters usage will directly reduce the cost of expenses on dosimeter, time and labor. (author)

  5. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. (author)

  6. Comparison of image quality in head CT studies with different dose-reduction strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Nielsen, Rikke; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke

    The number of multi-detector CT examinations is increasing rapidly. They allow high quality reformatted images providing accurate and precise diagnosis at maximum speed. Brain examinations are the most commonly requested studies, and although they come at a lower effective dose than body CT, can...... account to a considerable radiation dose as many patients undergo repeated studies. Therefore, various dose-reduction strategies are applied such as automated tube current and voltage modulation and recently different iterative reconstruction algorithms. However, the trade-off of all dose......-reduction maneuvers is reduction of image quality due to image noise or artifacts. The aim of our study was therefore to find the best diagnostic images with lowest possible dose. We present results of dose- and image quality optimizing strategies of brain CT examinations at our institution. We compare sequential...

  7. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus......). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use...

  8. The study of mean glandular dose in mammography in Yazd and the factors affecting it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzarjomehri, F.; Mostaar, A.; Ghasemi, A.; Ehramposh, M. H.; Khosravi, H.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the mean glandular dose resulting from mammography examinations in Yazd, southeastern Iran and to identify the factors affecting it. Patients and Methods: This survey was conducted during May to December 2005 to estimate the mean glandular dose for women undergoing mammography and to report the distribution of dose. compressed breast thickness, glandular tissue content, and mammography technique used. The clinical data were collected from 946 mammograms taken from 246 women who were referred to four mammography centers. The mammography instruments in these centers were four modern units with a molybdenum anode and either molybdenum or rhodium filter. The exposure conditions of each mammogram were recorded. The breast glandular content of each mammogram was estimated by a radiologist. The mean glandular dose was calculated based on measuring the normalized entrance skin dose in air. half value layer, kVp, mAs, breast thickness and glandular content. Half value layer, kVp and entrance skin dose were measured by a solid-state detector. The analytical method of Sobol et al. was used for calculation of mean glandular dose . Results: The mean±SD mean glandular dose per film was.2±0.6 mGy for cranio caudal and 1.63±O.9 mGy for mediolateral oblique views. The mean±SD mean glandular dose per woman was 5.5 3.1.mGy. A positive correlation was found between the beam Half value layer with mean glandular dose (r=O.38) and the breast thickness with mean glandular dose (r=O.5). Conclusion: The mean±SD mean glandular dose per film of 1.42±0.8 mGy in present study was lower than most of similar reports. However, the mean mean glandular dose per woman was higher than that in other studies

  9. Relapse of imported Plasmodium vivax malaria is related to primaquine dose: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townell Nicola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relapsing Plasmodium vivax infection results in significant morbidity for the individual and is a key factor in transmission. Primaquine remains the only licensed drug for prevention of relapse. To minimize relapse rates, treatment guidelines have recently been revised to recommend an increased primaquine dose, aiming to achieve a cumulative dose of ≥6 mg/kg, i.e. ≥420 mg in a 70 kg patient. The aims of this study were to characterize the epidemiology of P. vivax infection imported into Queensland Australia, to determine the rates of relapse, to investigate the use of primaquine therapy, and its efficacy in the prevention of relapse. Methods A retrospective study was undertaken of laboratory confirmed P. vivax infection presenting to the two major tertiary hospitals in Queensland, Australia between January 1999 and January 2011. Primaquine dosing was classified as no dose, low dose ( Results Twenty relapses occurred following 151 primary episodes of P. vivax infection (13.2%. Relapses were confirmed among 3/21 (14.2%, 9/50 (18.0%, 1/54 (1.9% and 7/18 (38.9% of patients administered no dose, low dose, high dose and unknown primaquine dose respectively. High dose primaquine therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of relapse compared to patients who were prescribed low dose therapy (OR 11.6, 95% CI 1.5-519, p = 0.005. Conclusions Relapse of P. vivax infection is more likely in patients who received low dose primaquine therapy. This study supports the recommendations that high dose primaquine therapy is necessary to minimize relapse of P. vivax malaria.

  10. An experimental study for the reduction of population dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroi, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that to reduce the amount of X-ray exposure, it is absolutely necessary to limit the field size to the minimum needed for the purpose of examination and size of the object. However, as dental X-ray apparatuses are not fitted with movable collimators, a fixed field size is applied to all exposures of intraoral radiography that is most frequently used for the dental region. Therefore, as one means of reducing the field size, the development of a changeable diaphragm for use in intraoral radiography has been undertaken. Also measurements were made of critical organ doses by field size and a nationwide survey was carried out to ascertain the frequency of intraoral radiography, through which review was made of the degree of contribution the changeable diaphragm could bring about in reducing the population dose. Much effort has led to success in the building of a changeable diaphragm into a central ray indicating cone which permits easy tube head alignment and maintenace of a set focus-skin distance. It was also found that approximately 50% of all intraoral radiography performed in Japan could have been accomplished by smaller field sizes. (author)

  11. How common is domestic violence against women? The definition of partner abuse in prevalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, K; Roberts, G

    1998-02-01

    We systematically reviewed studies of the prevalence of domestic violence. Selected overseas community studies were compared with all Australian prevalence studies found to be published. Twelve-month prevalence estimates of partner abuse in Australia varied from 2.1 per cent to 28.0 per cent, depending mainly on the definition of domestic violence used in each study. Implications of the lack of a precise definition result in varying operationalised definitions of partner abuse, from all types of violence in relationships (including a single minor violent incident), through to only those violent incidents that are classified as a crime. Recommendations for any future prevalence studies in this field include the need to collect frequency data which reflected the fact that partner abuse against women is a complex behavioural phenomenon involving emotional, physical and sexual abuse against a partner, not just simply physical incidents.

  12. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congzheng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS CMOS image sensor (CIS with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB. The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  13. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Aurélien; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Éric; Sauget, Marc; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150×1×150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions.

  14. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, Aurelien; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Eric; Sauget, Marc; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150x1x150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions

  15. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Aurelien [University of Franche-Comte, IRMA/CREST Femto-ST, Portes du Jura, 4 place Tharradin, BP 71427, 25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); University of Franche-Comte, AND/LIFC, rue Engel Gros, 90016 Belfort (France)], E-mail: aurelien.vasseur@gmail.com; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Eric [University of Franche-Comte, IRMA/CREST Femto-ST, Portes du Jura, 4 place Tharradin, BP 71427, 25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); Sauget, Marc [University of Franche-Comte, IRMA/CREST Femto-ST, Portes du Jura, 4 place Tharradin, BP 71427, 25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); University of Franche-Comte, AND/LIFC, rue Engel Gros, 90016 Belfort (France); Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques [University of Franche-Comte, AND/LIFC, rue Engel Gros, 90016 Belfort (France)

    2008-04-15

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150x1x150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions.

  16. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2018-02-08

    In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD) industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CMOS image sensor (CIS) with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR) versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB). The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  17. A single institution study of radiation dose received from CT imaging: A comparison to Malaysian NDRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, N. D.; Shamsuri, S. B. M.; Tan, Y. W.; Razali, M. A. S. M.; Isa, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    Advancement of CT technology has led to an increase in CT scanning as it improves the diagnosis. However, it is important to assess health risk of patients associated with ionising radiation received from CT. This study evaluated current dose distributions at Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Malaysia and was used to establish Local Diagnostic Reference Level (LDRL). Dose indicators such as CT Dose Index (CTDIvol and CTDIw) and Dose-Length Product (DLP) were gathered for all routine CT examinations performed at the Imaging Unit, AMDI from January 2015 to June 2016. The first and third quartile values for each dose indicator were determined. A total of 364 CT studies were performed during that period with the highest number of cases being Thorax-Abdomen-Pelvis (TAP) study (57% of total study). The CTDIw ranged between 2.0 mGy to 23.4 mGy per procedure. DLP values were ranged between 94 mGy.cm to 1687 mGy.cm. The local dose data was compared with the national DRL to monitor the current CT practice at AMDI and LDRL will be established from the calculated third quartile values of dose distribution. From the results, some of the local dose values exceeded the Malaysian and further evaluation is important to ensure the dose optimisation for patients.

  18. A single institution study of radiation dose received from CT imaging: A comparison to Malaysian NDRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, N D; Shamsuri, S B M; Razali, M A S M; Isa, S M; Tan, Y W

    2017-01-01

    Advancement of CT technology has led to an increase in CT scanning as it improves the diagnosis. However, it is important to assess health risk of patients associated with ionising radiation received from CT. This study evaluated current dose distributions at Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Malaysia and was used to establish Local Diagnostic Reference Level (LDRL). Dose indicators such as CT Dose Index (CTDI vol and CTDI w ) and Dose-Length Product (DLP) were gathered for all routine CT examinations performed at the Imaging Unit, AMDI from January 2015 to June 2016. The first and third quartile values for each dose indicator were determined. A total of 364 CT studies were performed during that period with the highest number of cases being Thorax-Abdomen-Pelvis (TAP) study (57% of total study). The CTDI w ranged between 2.0 mGy to 23.4 mGy per procedure. DLP values were ranged between 94 mGy.cm to 1687 mGy.cm. The local dose data was compared with the national DRL to monitor the current CT practice at AMDI and LDRL will be established from the calculated third quartile values of dose distribution. From the results, some of the local dose values exceeded the Malaysian and further evaluation is important to ensure the dose optimisation for patients. (paper)

  19. Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Currents Blog Cancer Currents Blog Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug Subscribe April ... to this page included, e.g., “Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug was originally ...

  20. Definition of internal target volume and domestric study for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Zhang Li; Huang Xiaoyan; Cai Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional (4D) CT, and to compare the differences in target volume definition and dose distribution among 3D, 4D and respiratory-gated plans. Methods: 4DCT scanning was obtained for 12 patients with hepatocellular. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and normal tissues were contoured on all 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT images. The 3D, 4D and gated treatment plans were prepared for each patient using three different planning target volumes (PTVs): 1) PTV 3D was derived from a single CTV plus conventional margins; 2) PTV 4D was derived from ITV 4D , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus setup margins (SMs); 3) PT Gating was derived from ITV Gating , which encompassed 3 CTVs within gating-window at end-expiration plus SMs. The PTV volume and dose distribution were compared among different plans. Results: The PTV3D was the largest in all 12 patients, but still missed partial target volume in 5 patients when comparing with PTV4D. Both the 4D plans and the gated plans spared more normal tissues than the 3D plans, especially the liver. Without increasing normal tissue dose, the 4D plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from (50.8 ± 2.0) Gy (3D plans) to (54.7 ± 3.3) Gy, and the gated plans could further increase the dose to (58.0 ± 3.9) Gy. Conclusions: The 4DCT-based plans can ensure optimal target coverage with less irradiation of normal tissues and allow dose escalation when compared with 3D plans. Respiratory gated radiotherapy can further reduce the target volumes to spare more surrounding tissues, especially for patients with large extent of respiratory mobility. (authors)

  1. Patch test dose-response study of p-phenylenediamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosted, Heidi; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    The elicitation response in allergic contact dermatitis for the hair dye substance p-phenylenediamine (PPD) is dose dependent, but threshold concentrations have not previously been investigated. 15 PPD-sensitive patients participated in a serial dilution 48-hr patch test with PPD using 8...... concentrations of PPD ranging from 1 to 10 000 on the upper back. Petrolatum was applied as control. Three concentrations (50, 100 and 500 p.p.m. PPD) were also applied to the retroauricular area and on the lateral aspects of the upper arms. 14 of the 15 participants reacted to one or more of the test samples....... The threshold value for 10% of the tested persons (ED10) based on+or stronger reactions for PPD on the back was 38 p.p.m. (CI: 4.3-100). There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity of the three anatomical regions. The upper back is a suitable region for patch testing patients...

  2. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium oxide in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Buschbom, R.L.; Case, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    Beagle dogs given single exposure to 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs dying due to pulmonary fibrosis-induced insufficiency during the first 3 years after exposure was 1 to 12 μCi. One of these dogs had a pulmonary tumor. Three additional dogs with body burdens of 0.7 to 1.8 μCi died due to pulmonary neoplasia 4-1/2 years after exposure. None of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu have died during the first two postexposure years. After inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 lymphocytopenia was the earliest observed effect, occuring 0.5 to 2 years after deposition of greater than or equal to 80 nCi plutonium in the lungs

  3. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium oxide in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Buschbom, R.L.; Case, A.C.

    1977-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that died of pulmonary fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12 μCi. One of these dogs had a pulmonary tumor. Five additional dogs with body burdens of 0.7 to 1.8 μCi died due to pulmonary neoplasia 3 to 5 yr after exposure. None of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu have died during the first 3 postexposure yr. Lymphocytopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 , occurring 0.5 to 2 yr after deposition of greater than or equal to 80 nCi plutonium in the lungs

  4. Study on the method or reducing the operator's exposure dose from a C-Arm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Sik; Song, Jong Nam; Kim, Seung Ok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, C-Arm equipment is being used as we intend to verify the exposure dose on the operator by the scattering rays during the operation of the C-Arm equipment and to provide an effective method of reducing the exposure dose. Exposure dose is less than the Over Tube method utilizes the C-arm equipment Under Tube the scheme, The result showed that the exposure dose on the operator decreased with a thicker shield, and as the operator moved away from the center line. Moreover, as the research time prolongated, the exposure dose increased, and among the three affixed location of the dosimeter, the most exposure dose was measured at gonadal, then followed by chest and thyroid. However, in consideration of the relationship between the operator and the patient, the distance cannot be increased infinitely and the research time cannot be decreased infinitely in order to reduce the exposure dose. Therefore, by changing the thickness of the radiation shield, the exposure dose on the operator was able to be reduced. If you are using a C-Arm equipment discomfort during surgery because the grounds that the procedure is neglected and close to the dose of radiation shielding made can only increase. Because a separate control room cannot be used for the C-Arm equipment due to its characteristic, the exposure dose on the operator needs to be reduced by reinforcing the shield through an appropriate thickness of radiation shield devices, such as apron, etc. during a treatment

  5. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio; Kudo, Seiichi; Nishimura, Kazuya

    2001-01-01

    When we assume a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, it is required for rescue activity in the plant, accident management, repair work of failed parts and evaluation of employees to obtain radiation dose rate distribution or map in the plant and estimated dose value for the above works. However it might be difficult to obtain them accurately along the progress of the accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in the areas where the accident management is planned or the repair work is thought for safety-related equipments. In this work, we analyzed diffusion of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor plant, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system by modeling a specific part of components and buildings in the plant from this design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the followings: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate in any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including moving route and time for the accident management and the repair work is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these actions of the employees. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  6. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio [Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Kudo, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Kazuya [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    When we assume a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, it is required for rescue activity in the plant, accident management, repair work of failed parts and evaluation of employees to obtain radiation dose rate distribution or map in the plant and estimated dose value for the above works. However it might be difficult to obtain them accurately along the progress of the accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in the areas where the accident management is planned or the repair work is thought for safety-related equipments. In this work, we analyzed diffusion of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor plant, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system by modeling a specific part of components and buildings in the plant from this design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the followings: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate in any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including moving route and time for the accident management and the repair work is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these actions of the employees. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  7. Nationwide Study of Humidifier Disinfectant Lung Injury in South Korea, 1994-2011. Incidence and Dose-Response Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Domyung; Koh, Younsuck; Park, Dong-Uk; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Lim, Chae-Man; Hong, Soo-Jong; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Leem, Jong-Han; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Choi, Ye-Yong; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Lim, Sin-Ye; Chung, Eun-Hee; Cho, Young Ah; Chae, Eun Jin; Joh, Joon-Sung; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Kyu-Hong; Choi, Bo Youl; Gwack, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Humidifier disinfectant lung injury is an acute lung disease attributed to recurrent inhalation of certain disinfectant aerosols emitted from room humidifiers. An outbreak of this toxic lung injury occurred in South Korea from 1995 until all humidifier disinfectant products were recalled from the consumer market by the government in 2011. A nationwide study was conducted to ascertain and classify all potential cases of humidifier disinfectant lung injury in Korea and to assess dose-response relationships. By several mechanisms, clinicians and the general public were invited to report all suspected cases of humidifier disinfectant lung injury to public health officials in South Korea. A committee was convened to define diagnostic criteria based on pathologic, radiologic, and clinical findings for index cases, combined with assessment of environmental exposure to humidifier disinfectants. Clinical review and environmental assessments were performed and later combined to determine overall likelihood of disease for each study participant, classified as definite, probable, possible, or unlikely. Survival time from exposure to onset of symptoms was analyzed to assess dose-response relationships. Three broad categories of risk factors were examined: (1) biological susceptibility, (2) temporal cycle of exposure and recovery, and (3) spatial conditions and density of disinfectant. Of 374 possible cases identified and reviewed, 329 were unanimously classified by the diagnostic committee, as follows: 117 definite, 34 probable, 38 possible and 140 unlikely cases. A total of 62 individuals with definite or probable disease died. Risk factors examined for polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate exposure that were found to be significant in shortening survival included age 4 years or younger at onset, use of disinfectant for 7 days per week, airborne density of 800 μg/m(3) or more of disinfectant, and daily exposure 11 or more hours in duration. Dose-response analysis indicated

  8. Single and Multiple Ascending-dose Studies of Oral Delafloxacin: Effects of Food, Sex, and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Randall; Hunt, Thomas; Benedict, Michael; Paulson, Susan K; Lawrence, Laura; Cammarata, Sue; Sun, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is describe the results of 2 studies that examined the pharmacokinetic parameters, safety profile, and tolerability of single and multiple ascending doses of oral delafloxacin and the effects of food, sex, and age on oral delafloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters, safety profile, and tolerability. The first study contained 3 parts and used unformulated delafloxacin in a capsule. Part 1 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1200, and 1600 mg) ascending-dose study of oral delafloxacin in healthy men. Part 2 was a single-dose crossover study in which 20 men received 250 mg delafloxacin with or without food. Part 2 also included a parallel group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 16 women and 16 elderly men and women who were randomized (3:1) to receive 250 mg delafloxacin or placebo. Part 3 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple (100, 200, 400, 800, 1200 mg once daily for 5 days) ascending-dose study of oral delafloxacin in healthy men. The second study was a single-dose, randomized, 3-period crossover study in which participants received 900 mg delafloxacin (2 × 450-mg tablets) under fasted conditions, with a high-fat meal, or fasted with a high-fat meal 2 hours after dosing. Serial blood samples were collected, and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters of delafloxacin were determined. Delafloxacin Cmax and AUC0-∞ increased with increasing oral dose over the dose range of 50 to 1600 mg. The increases in delafloxacin AUC0-∞ were dose proportional at doses of ≥200 mg. Steady state was reached by day 3 of dosing with minimal accumulation of delafloxacin. The Cmax of delafloxacin was decreased slightly in the presence of food. No sex difference in delafloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters was observed. In the elderly men and women, mean delafloxacin Cmax and AUC0-∞ were 35% higher than observed for young adults, which could be partially explained by a decrease in

  9. Integrated source-risk model for radon: A definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laheij, G.M.H.; Aldenkamp, F.J.; Stoop, P.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of a source-risk model is to support policy making on radon mitigation by comparing effects of various policy options and to enable optimization of counter measures applied to different parts of the source-risk chain. There are several advantages developing and using a source-risk model: risk calculations are standardized; the effects of measures applied to different parts of the source-risk chain can be better compared because interactions are included; and sensitivity analyses can be used to determine the most important parameters within the total source-risk chain. After an inventory of processes and sources to be included in the source-risk chain, the models presently available in the Netherlands are investigated. The models were screened for completeness, validation and operational status. The investigation made clear that, by choosing for each part of the source-risk chain the most convenient model, a source-risk chain model for radon may be realized. However, the calculation of dose out of the radon concentrations and the status of the validation of most models should be improved. Calculations with the proposed source-risk model will give estimations with a large uncertainty at the moment. For further development of the source-risk model an interaction between the source-risk model and experimental research is recommended. Organisational forms of the source-risk model are discussed. A source-risk model in which only simple models are included is also recommended. The other models are operated and administrated by the model owners. The model owners execute their models for a combination of input parameters. The output of the models is stored in a database which will be used for calculations with the source-risk model. 5 figs., 15 tabs., 7 appendices, 14 refs

  10. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: Retrospective Evaluation of Doses in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 Mice Carcinogenicity Studies: Recommendation to Eliminate High Doses at Maximum Tolerated Dose in Future Studies. A Response to the Counterpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H

    2016-01-01

    We recently conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected from 29 Tg.rasH2 carcinogenicity studies conducted at our facility to determine how successful was the strategy of choosing the high dose of the 26-week studies based on an estimated maximum tolerated dose (MTD). As a result of our publication, 2 counterviews were expressed. Both counterviews illustrate very valid points in their interpretation of our data. In this article, we would like to highlight clarifications based on several points and issues they have raised in their papers, namely, the dose-level selection, determining if MTD was exceeded in 26-week studies, and a discussion on the number of dose groups to be used in the studies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio; Kudo, Seiichi; Nishimura, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    If a severe accident occurs in a pressurized water reactor plant, it is required to estimate dose values of operators engaged in emergency such as accident management, repair of failed parts. However, it might be difficult to measure radiation dose rate during the progress of an accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in areas where the emergency activities are required. In this study, we analyzed the transport of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system from this design study, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the following: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate at any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including access route and time for emergency activities is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these employee actions. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  12. Phase I dose-finding study of cabazitaxel administered weekly in patients with advanced solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumoleau, Pierre; Trigo, Jose Manuel; Isambert, Nicolas; Sémiond, Dorothée; Gupta, Sunil; Campone, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is approved in patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. This study evaluated a weekly cabazitaxel dosing regimen. Primary objectives were to report dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics were secondary objectives. Cabazitaxel was administered weekly (1-hour intravenous infusion at 1.5–12 mg/m2 doses) for the first 4 weeks of a 5-week cycle in patients with solid tumours. Monitoring of DLTs was used to determine the MTD and the recommended weekly dose. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. Two of six patients experienced DLTs at 12 mg/m 2 , which was declared the MTD. Gastrointestinal disorders were the most common adverse event. Eight patients developed neutropenia (three ≥ Grade 3); one occurrence of febrile neutropenia was reported. There were two partial responses (in breast cancer) and 13 patients had stable disease (median duration of 3.3 months). Increases in C max and AUC 0–t were dose proportional for the 6–12 mg/m 2 doses. The MTD of weekly cabazitaxel was 12 mg/m 2 and the recommended weekly dose was 10 mg/m 2 . The observed safety profile and antitumour activity of cabazitaxel were consistent with those observed with other taxanes in similar dosing regimens. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01755390

  13. Evaluation of the image quality criteria and study of doses in a mammography department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, Marcela Costa

    2009-01-01

    The mammographic image quality criteria published by European Commission were implemented in three mammography equipment of a same radiology department in a hospital of Sao Paulo city. Among the mammography equipment, two use the screen-film system and one of them uses the indirect digital system. During the data collection, it was noted the need to conduct a study about image rejection in each mammography equipment. Therefore, this study was realized and, after that, the results in each mammography equipment of image rejection and image percentage that present each quality criterion it were compared. At the same time of this studies, it was realized other study about surface entrance dose and average glandular dose. These doses it was estimated based on different methods published by different groups of researcher, for all combinations anode filter available in the equipment. To estimate the surface entrance dose following the methodology published in Avenue's' guide and the average glandular dose following the Wu' methodology, it was developed a phantom, in different thicknesses of acrylic, to simulate a breast. Finally, the image quality it was associated with the dose received by patient. The digital equipment shows better results in the evaluation of quality criteria, lower rate of image rejection and lower values of average glandular dose and surface entrance dose in all methods studied. But it is not sufficient, because is not adequate for patients with great breast. (author)

  14. A study of different dose calculation methods and the impact on the dose evaluation protocol in lung stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Takahiro; Furuya, Tomohisa; Ozawa, Shuichi; Ito, Kana; Kurokawa, Chie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Miura, Kohei

    2008-01-01

    AAA (analytical anisotropic algorithm) dose calculation, which shows a better performance for heterogeneity correction, was tested for lung stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT) in comparison to conventional PBC (pencil beam convolution method) to evaluate its impact on tumor dose parameters. Eleven lung SBRT patients who were treated with photon 4 MV beams in our department between April 2003 and February 2007 were reviewed. Clinical target volume (CTV) was delineated including the spicula region on planning CT images. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined by adding the internal target volume (ITV) and set-up margin (SM) of 5 mm from CTV, and then an multileaf collimator (MLC) penumbra margin of another 5 mm was also added. Six-port non-coplanar beams were employed, and a total prescribed dose of 48 Gy was defined at the isocenter point with four fractions. The entire treatment for an individual patient was completed within 8 days. Under the same prescribed dose, calculated dose distribution, dose volume histogram (DVH), and tumor dose parameters were compared between two dose calculation methods. In addition, the fractionated prescription dose was repeatedly scaled until the monitor units (MUs) calculated by AAA reached a level of MUs nearly identical to those achieved by PBC. AAA resulted in significantly less D95 (irradiation dose that included 95% volume of PTV) and minimal dose in PTV compared to PBC. After rescaling of each MU for each beam in the AAA plan, there was no revision of the isocenter of the prescribed dose required. However, when the PTV volume was less than 20 cc, a 4% lower prescription resulted in nearly identical MUs between AAA and PBC. The prescribed dose in AAA should be the same as that in PBC, if the dose is administered at the isocenter point. However, planners should compare DVHs and dose distributions between AAA and PBC for a small lung tumor with a PTV volume less than approximately 20 cc. (author)

  15. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.; Case, A.C.; Madison, R.M.; McShane, J.F.; Stevens, D.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Ragan, H.A.; Schirmer, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , and observed for life-span dose-effect relationship, died from radiation pneumonitis (four of five at the highest dosage level, in 14 to 25 mo postexposure; 1 of 20 at the medium-high dosage level, at 34 mo postexposure). There were also indications in these dogs of radiation osteosis, characterized by peritrabecular fibrosis. One dog, at 39 mo postexposure, has radiographic evidence of an osteosarcoma. Leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia and decreased numbers of circulating monocytes and eosinophils occurred at the two highest dosage levels, as previously reported (Annual Report, 1978). Twelve dogs given a single inhalation exposure to 238 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 showed a more rapid translocation of 238 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 to bone and liver than was observed for 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , but at 1 yr postexposure the percentage of the final body burden in bone and liver were similar for the two isotopes

  16. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium oxide in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Case, A.C.; Catt, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that died of pulmonary fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12 μCi. One of these dogs had a pulmonary tumor; nine additional dogs with body burdens of 0.6 to 1.8 μCi died due to pulmonary neoplasia 3 to 6 yr after exposure. Two of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu have died during the first 4 yr postexposure, due to bone and lung tumors, with body burdens at death of 10 μCi. Lymphocytopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 , occurring 0.5 to 2 yr after deposition of equal to or greater than 80 nCi plutonium in the lungs

  17. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium oxide in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Case, A.C.; Catt, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that died of pulmonary-fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12 μCi; one of these dogs had a pulmonary tumor. Seventeen additional dogs, with body burdens of 0.2 to 1.8 μCi, died due to pulmonary neoplasia 3 to 8 yr after exposure. Ten of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu have died during the first 5 1/2 yr postexposure due to bone and/or lung tumors; the body burden at death ranged from 1.5 to 10 μCi. Lymphopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 , occurring 0.5 to 2 yr after deposition of >80 nCi plutonium in the lungs

  18. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium oxide in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Busch, R.H.; Case, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that dies of pulmonary fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12 μCi; one of these dogs had a pulmonary tumor. Eleven additional dogs with body burdens of 0.6 to 1.8 μCi died due to pulmonary neoplasia 3 to 7 yr after exposure. Four of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu have died during the first 4 1/2 yr postexposure due to bone and/or lung tumors; the body burden at death ranged from 6 to 10 μCi. Lymphopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 , occurring 0.5 to 2 yr after deposition of greater than or equal to 80 nCi plutonium in the lungs

  19. Study of the equivalent dose distribution in organs and tissues using periapical odontological radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, H.F.S.; Cipeli, J.F.; Fortes, M.A.B.; Federico, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this article presents a study of the doses obtained in periapical odontological radiography in main tissues of the head, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of type TLD-700H applied to a anthropomorphic simulator. The results indicate that the skin and salivary glands received the highest doses and the risk of calculated injury was 1.44 x 10 -6 Sv -1 per radiograph

  20. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  1. Comparative Analysis of Institutional Policy Definitions of Plagiarism: A Pan-Canadian University Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This article shares the findings of a study investigating institutional policy definitions of plagiarism at twenty English-speaking Canadian universities. The types of primary sources consulted for this study included: (1) university academic calendars for 2016-2017, (2) institutional policies on academic misconduct, and (3) student academic codes…

  2. Characteristics and Determinants of Partial Remission in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Using the Insulin-Dose-Adjusted A1C Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Pecheur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the characteristics and determinants of partial remission (PR in Belgian children with type 1 diabetes (T1D, we analyzed records of 242 children from our center. Clinical and biological features were collected at diagnosis and during follow-up. PR was defined using the insulin-dose-adjusted A1C definition. PR occurred in 56.2% of patients and lasted 9.2 months (0.5 to 56.6. 25.6% of patients entered T1D with DKA, which correlated with lower PR incidence (17.6% versus 82.3% when no DKA. In our population, lower A1C levels at diagnosis were associated with higher PR incidence and in young children (0–4 years initial A1C levels negatively correlated with longer PR. Early A1C levels were predictive of PR duration since 34% of patients had long PRs (>1 year when A1C levels were ≤6% after 3 months whereas incidence of long PR decreased with higher A1Cs. C-peptide levels were higher in patients entering PR and remained higher until 3 years after diagnosis. Initial antibody titers did not influence PR except for anti-IA2 titers that correlated with A1C levels after 2 years. Presence of 2 versus 1 anti-islet antibodies correlated with shorter PR. PR duration did not influence occurrence of severe hypoglycemia or diabetes-related complications but was associated with lower A1C levels after 18 months. We show that, at diagnosis of T1D, parameters associated with β-cell mass reserve (A1C, C-peptide, and DKA correlate with the occurrence of PR, which affects post-PR A1C levels. Further research is needed to determine the long-term significance of PR.

  3. Absorbed dose/melting heat dependence studies for the PVDF homopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Pereira, Claubia

    2013-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of gamma irradiated Poly (vinylidene Fluoride) [PVDF] homopolymer has been studied in connection with the use of material in industrial high gamma dose measurement. Interaction between gamma radiation and PVDF leads to the radio-induction of C=O and conjugated C=C bonds, as it can be inferred from previous infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometric data. These induced defects result in a decrease of the polymer crystallinity that can be followed with DSC scans, by measuring the latent heat during the melting transition (Hmelt). After a systematic investigation, we have found that Hmelt is unambiguously related to the delivered doses ranging from 100 to 2,000 kGy of gamma radiation. One the other hand, further fading investigation analysis has proved that the Hmelt x Dose relationship can be fitted by an exponential function that remains constant for several months. Both the very large range of dose measurement and also the possibility of evaluating high gamma doses until five months after irradiation make PVDF homopolymers very good candidates to be investigated as commercial high gamma dose dosimeters. The high gamma dose irradiation facilities in Brazil used to develop high dose dosimeters are all devoted to industrial and medical purposes. Therefore, in view of the uncertainties involved in the dose measurements related to the electronic equilibrium correction factors and backscattering in the isodose curves used at the irradiation setup, a validation process is required to correctly evaluate the delivered absorbed doses. The sample irradiations were performed with a Co-60 source, at 12kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h, in the high gamma dose facilities at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The comparison of the curve of the Hmelt vs Dose is presented in this paper. (author)

  4. 3D calculation of absorbed dose for 131I-targeted radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedzadeh, E.; Sarkar, S.; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, A.; Ay, M. R.; Khosravi, H. R.; Loudos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various methods, such as those developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine or employing dose point kernels, have been applied to the radiation dosimetry of 131 I radionuclide therapy. However, studies have not shown a strong relationship between tumour absorbed dose and its overall therapeutic response, probably due in part to inaccuracies in activity and dose estimation. In the current study, the GATE Monte Carlo computer code was used to facilitate voxel-level radiation dosimetry for organ activities measured in an. 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patient. This approach allows incorporation of the size, shape and composition of organs (in the current study, in the Zubal anthropomorphic phantom) and intra-organ and intra-tumour inhomogeneities in the activity distributions. The total activities of the tumours and their heterogeneous distributions were measured from the SPECT images to calculate the dose maps. For investigating the effect of activity distribution on dose distribution, a hypothetical homogeneous distribution of the same total activity was considered in the tumours. It was observed that the tumour mean absorbed dose rates per unit cumulated activity were 0.65 E-5 and 0.61 E-5 mGY MBq -1 s -1 for the uniform and non-uniform distributions in the tumour, respectively, which do not differ considerably. However, the dose-volume histograms (DVH) show that the tumour non-uniform activity distribution decreases the absorbed dose to portions of the tumour volume. In such a case, it can be misleading to quote the mean or maximum absorbed dose, because overall response is likely limited by the tumour volume that receives low (i.e. non-cytocidal) doses. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry, and calculation of tumour DVHs, may lead to the derivation of clinically reliable dose-response relationships and therefore may ultimately improve treatment planning as well as response assessment for radionuclide

  5. Multiple dose study of the combined radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 (pimonidazole) and SR 2508 (etanidazole)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleehen, N.M.; Newman, H.F.; Maughan, T.S.; Workman, P.

    1989-01-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 and SR 2508 have different clinical toxicities. The former produces an acute but transient central nervous system syndrome, whereas the latter produces cumulative peripheral neuropathy. Following single dose studies, an escalating multiple dose schedule using both drugs in combination showed no unexpected adverse reactions at lower doses. This study identifies the clinical tolerance and pharmacokinetics when doses in the region of the maximal tolerated dose are given to 26 patients receiving infusions of 0.75 g/m2 Ro 03-8799 and 2 g/m2 SR 2508 three times per week. At 15 doses, 3/4 patients experienced WHO grade 2 peripheral neuropathy, whereas at 12 doses 1/9 developed grade 2 and 6/9 developed grade 1 neuropathies. This represents a lower dose of SR 2508 than can be given alone suggesting that some interaction between the two drugs does exist in terms of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic studies show no adverse interactions between the two drugs and minimal inter-patient variation. From bivariate analysis, cumulative AUC for Ro 03-8799 has the most significant correlation with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Tumor drug concentrations normalized to the administered dose show mean values of 34 micrograms/g Ro 03-8799 and 76 micrograms/g SR 2508 30 minutes after infusion. These could be expected to produce a single dose sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.5. The combination of the two sensitizers at the maximum tolerable dose may be expected to give an increased therapeutic efficacy over either drug alone

  6. Studies of health effects of low dose radiation and its application to medicare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Ishida, Kenji; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Koana, Takao; Magae, Junji; Watanabe, Masami; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    2008-01-01

    The articles contain following 7 topics of low dose radiation effects. Studies of Health Effects of Low dose Radiation and Its Application to Medicare'', describes the indication of Rn therapy and investigations of its usefulness mechanism mainly in Misasa Spa, Okayama Pref. ''Challenges for the Paradigm Shift (CRIEPI Studies)'', introduces studies against the paradigm that radiation dose is linearly and proportionally hazardous. ''Studies of High Background Radiation Area (CRIEPI Studies)'', describes global HBRA studies on chromosome affection and effect of smoking in HBRA. ''Is the Radiation Effect on Man Proportional to Dose? (CRIEPI Studies)'', describes studies of immature sperm irradiated at low dose against Linear-Non-threshold Theory (LNT) hypothesis. ''Induction of Radiation Resistance by Low Dose Radiation and Assessment of Its Effect in Models of Human Diseases (CRIEPI Studies)'', explains the adoptive response in radiation effect, suppression of carcinogenesis and immune regulation by previous low dose radiation in the mouse, and improvement of diabetes in the db/db mouse. ''Modulation of Biological Effects of Low Dose Radiation: Adoptive Response, Bystander Effect, Genetic Instability and Radiation Hormesis'', summarizes findings of each item. ''Cancer Treatment with Low dose Radiation to the Whole Body'', describes basic studies in the mouse tumor in relation to suppression of carcinogenesis and metastasis, immune activation and treatment, and successful clinical studies in patients with ovary, colon cancers and malignant lymphoma where survival has been significantly improved: a base of recent European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) clinical trials. The mechanism is essentially based on immune activation of patients to cure the disease. (R.T.)

  7. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  8. Low-Dose and Standard-Dose Unenhanced Helical Computed Tomography for the Assessment of Acute Renal Colic: Prospective Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Hwang, Im Kyung; Choi, Yo Won; Namkung, Sook; Kim, Heung Cheol; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Choi, Kuk Myung; Park, Ji Kang; Han, Tae Il; Kang, Weechang [Cheju National Univ. College of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of low-dose and standard-dose computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of ureteral stones. Material and Methods: Unenhanced helical CT was performed with both a standard dose (260 mAs, pitch 1.5) and a low dose (50 mAs, pitch 1.5) in 121 patients suspected of having acute renal colic. The two studies were prospectively and independently interpreted for the presence and location of ureteral stones, abnormalities unrelated to stone disease, identification of secondary signs, i.e. hydronephrosis and perinephric stranding, and tissue rim sign. The standard-dose CT images were interpreted by one reviewer and the low-dose CT images independently by two reviewers unaware of the standard-dose CT findings. The findings of the standard and low-dose CT scans were compared with the exact McNemar test. Interobserver agreements were assessed with kappa analysis. The effective radiation doses resulting from two different protocols were calculated by means of commercially available software to which the Monte-Carlo phantom model was given. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of standard-dose CT for detecting ureteral stones were 99%, 93%, and 98%, respectively, whereas for the two reviewers the sensitivity of low-dose CT was 93% and 95%, specificity 86%, and accuracy 92% and 94%. We found no significant differences between standard-dose and low-dose CT in the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing ureter stones ( P >0.05 for both). However, the sensitivity of low-dose CT for detection of 19 stones less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter was 79% and 68%, respectively, for the two reviewers. Low-dose CT was comparable to standard-dose CT in visualizing hydronephrosis and the tissue rim sign. Perinephric stranding was far less clear on low-dose CT. Low-dose CT had the same diagnostic performance as standard-dose CT in diagnosing alternative diseases. Interobserver agreement between the two low-dose CT reviewers in the diagnosis of

  9. Recommendations for the definition of clinical responder in insulin preservation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Craig A; Gitelman, Stephen E; Palmer, Jerry P

    2014-09-01

    Clinical responder studies should contribute to the translation of effective treatments and interventions to the clinic. Since ultimately this translation will involve regulatory approval, we recommend that clinical trials prespecify a responder definition that can be assessed against the requirements and suggestions of regulatory agencies. In this article, we propose a clinical responder definition to specifically assist researchers and regulatory agencies in interpreting the clinical importance of statistically significant findings for studies of interventions intended to preserve β-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. We focus on studies of 6-month β-cell preservation in type 1 diabetes as measured by 2-h-stimulated C-peptide. We introduce criteria (bias, reliability, and external validity) for the assessment of responder definitions to ensure they meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency guidelines. Using data from several published TrialNet studies, we evaluate our definition (no decrease in C-peptide) against published alternatives and determine that our definition has minimum bias with external validity. We observe that reliability could be improved by using changes in C-peptide later than 6 months beyond baseline. In sum, to support efficacy claims of β-cell preservation therapies in type 1 diabetes submitted to U.S. and European regulatory agencies, we recommend use of our definition. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  10. Studies of dose optimization and image quality in technological transition in mammography; Estudos de otimizacao de dose e qualidade de imagem em processos de transicao tecnologica em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furquim, Tania C.; Nersissian, Denise Y., E-mail: tfurquim@iee.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies in mammography may improve image quality; however, it may unnecessarily increase doses if optimization processes are not studied. In this work, radiation doses of the moment of transition of conventional to digital mammography have been analyzed. The presented data have been acquired from 2005 to 2009, in hospitals and clinics of Sao Paulo city, to 4 conventional and 5 digital equipment. The results show that even after optimization processes, new technologies still impart higher doses. Thus, individualized studies are needed when technological transitions occur, in order to maintain image quality without significant dose increase. (author)

  11. Goal Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Laurent, Alexis; Owsianiak, Mikołaj

    2018-01-01

    The goal definition is the first phase of an LCA and determines the purpose of a study in detail. This chapter teaches how to perform the six aspects of a goal definition: (1) Intended applications of the results, (2) Limitations due to methodological choices, (3) Decision context and reasons...... for carrying out the study, (4) Target audience , (5) Comparative studies to be disclosed to the public and (6) Commissioner of the study and other influential actors. The instructions address both the conduct and reporting of a goal definition and are largely based on the ILCD guidance document (EC...

  12. A preliminary study on the definitions and differences of main types of business arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Tiago Peixoto Gonçalves

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growth of competitiveness and market requirements, several companies have been jointly organized with the aim of forming partnerships, forming the so-called Business Arrangements, to ensure that competitive advantages are achieved. This article came from the need to review the definitions and differences between the main types of existing Business Arrangements, as in the literature have been used different nomenclatures and classifications, either in terms of how the Arrangement is managed, how it is organized, the according to which members carry out their activities, how is the flow of resources and information, the degree of coordination and interaction, the form of production organization, and the strategies adopted. It is a basic research, descriptive and literature, which sought to collect the relevant sources, definitions about each Arrangement to meet the goal of the article is to study the definitions and differences between the main types of Business Arrangements. The article is justified by the scarcity of uniform definitions in the literature that make it possible to visualize the differences between each of the types of Arrangements, especially those in which the definitions are more similar.

  13. Objectives and Model Payload Definition for NEO Human Mission Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, I.; Galvez, A.; Carpenter, J.

    2011-10-01

    ESA has supported studies on NEO threat assessment systems and deflection concepts in the context of the General Studies Programme and in close cooperation with the directorates of Technical and Quality Management and of the Scientific Programme. This work has made it possible to identify a project for Europe to make a significant - yet realistic - contribution to the international efforts in this field: the Don Quijote NEO technology demonstration mission. This paper describes what such a small mission can do to prepare future human exploration and what is the in-situ data that can be obtained through such a project.

  14. Competing Definitions of Schizophrenia: What Can Be Learned From Polydiagnostic Studies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Lennart Bertil; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    The contemporary diagnoses of schizophrenia (sz)—Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and International Classification of Diseases,10th Revision (ICD-10)—are widely considered as important scientific achievements. However, these algorithms were...... not a product of explicit conceptual analyses and empirical studies but defined through consensus with the purpose of improving reliability. The validity status of current definitions and of their predecessors remains unclear. The so-called "polydiagnostic approach" applies different definitions of a disorder...

  15. Study of radiation dose reduction of buildings of different sizes and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    The dependence of radiation dose reduction on the sizes and materials of buildings was studied by numerical analyses using the Monte Carlo simulation code, PHITS. The dose rates inside the buildings were calculated by simulating gamma-ray transport from radioactive cesium deposited at the ground surface. Three building models were developed: the wooden house, the open-space concrete building, and the thin-wall building, to study the effect of building size and construction material on dose reduction inside these structures. Here the floor-area sizes of the building models were varied to clarify the influence of building configuration on dose reduction. The results demonstrated that the dose rates inside the buildings linearly decreased with increasing floor area on a logarithmic scale for all types of buildings considered. The calculated dose distribution inside a building indicated that the distance from the outer walls was a determining factor for the dose rate at each position in the building. The obtained tendency was verified by comparison with data reflecting the dose reduction of typical buildings in Japan. (author)

  16. Study of the CT peripheral dose variation in a head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2009-01-01

    The computed tomography is frequently used for the brain diagnosis and it is responsible for the largest doses in the head among the X-ray examinations. Established indexes define a reference dose value for a scan routine; however the dose value has a longitudinal variation in the scan. The purpose of this study is to investigate the variation of the peripheral doses in the head scan using a polymethylmethacrylate head phantom. The studies were performed using two different computed tomography scanners in the option single slice with a routine of a head adult protocol (i.e. default protocol in the scanner software). Radiation doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter (LiF - TLD) rod model, distributed inside the PMMA head phantom in periphery and central area. The results allowed registering the variation dose curve, longitudinally the scan, for the peripheral area and to determine the MSAD value. The peripheral maximum dose value measured can be compared with the maximum dose value in the center of the phantom in each different routine (author)

  17. Evaluating the offensive definition zone in football: a case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New technological solutions have greatly improved match analysis systems for investigating players' performance. Nevertheless, there still remains a large gap in the collective analysis where improvements need to be made, mainly in the use of automated information gathering. Thus, the aim of this case study was to ...

  18. Performance of gout definitions for genetic epidemiological studies: analysis of UK Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadzow, Murray; Merriman, Tony R; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2017-08-09

    Many different combinations of available data have been used to identify gout cases in large genetic studies. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of case definitions of gout using the limited items available in multipurpose cohorts for population-based genetic studies. This research was conducted using the UK Biobank Resource. Data, including genome-wide genotypes, were available for 105,421 European participants aged 40-69 years without kidney disease. Gout definitions and combinations of these definitions were identified from previous epidemiological studies. These definitions were tested for association with 30 urate-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex, waist circumference, and ratio of waist circumference to height. Heritability estimates under an additive model were generated using GCTA version 1.26.0 and PLINK version 1.90b3.32 by partitioning the genome. There were 2066 (1.96%) cases defined by self-report of gout, 1652 (1.57%) defined by urate-lowering therapy (ULT) use, 382 (0.36%) defined by hospital diagnosis, 1861 (1.76%) defined by hospital diagnosis or gout-specific medications and 2295 (2.18%) defined by self-report of gout or ULT use. Association with gout at experiment-wide significance (P genetic epidemiological studies of gout.

  19. Preliminary Problem Definition Study on Munitions-Related Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    Thorium-230, Radium-226, Lead- 210 and Polonium - 210 by Plants," Radiat. Bot., 10(3), 293-295. Ernst, W. (1968), "Ecological Studies on Plants Grown on...dechlorane in the environment and its bioconcentration and biomagnifica- tion through the food chain. In mammals, dechlorane has been shown to be tei-atogenic...08 5. Phytotoxicity .o......................208 *6. Environmental Fate ....................... 210 7. Availability of Literature for

  20. Isotope effects: definitions and consequences for pharmacologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Langenhove, A.

    1986-01-01

    The use of stable isotope-labeled compounds for pharmacologic studies requires careful consideration of the nature of the stable isotope label (2H, 13C, 15N, 18O) and its position of incorporation in the molecule. When deuterium is used, improper positioning can lead to significant primary isotope effects. Primary isotope effects occur when the breaking of the bond to the heavy isotope is the rate-limiting step in a reaction (or metabolic transformation). A reaction will proceed slower for the molecule with the heavy isotope label because of the mass difference between the light and the heavy isotope. In addition to these primary isotope effects, smaller but nevertheless important secondary isotope effects, physicochemical isotope effects, active hydrogen/deuterium exchange, or isotope effects associated with either the enzyme-catalyzed biotransformation or the mass spectrometric ionization and fragmentation can be operative. In mechanistic studies, isotope effects are used to their advantage; however, in pharmacokinetic studies, the occurrence of isotope effects can lead to grossly misleading biologic and analytic results: the metabolism of the drug will differ when in vivo isotope effects are operative, and isotope effects occurring during the analysis procedure will obscure the true metabolic profile of the drug

  1. 34 CFR 660.4 - What definitions apply to the International Research and Studies Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply to the International Research and Studies Program? 660.4 Section 660.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH...

  2. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 7, phase 1: SPS and rectenna systems analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A systems definition study of the solar power satellite systems is presented. The design and power distribution of the rectenna system is discussed. The communication subsystem and thermal control characteristics are described and a failure analysis performed on the systems is reported.

  3. A comparative study on the elastic modulus of polyvinyl alcohol sponge using different stress-strain definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Alizadeh, Mansour; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-10-01

    There have been different stress-strain definitions to measure the elastic modulus of spongy materials, especially polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be implemented. This study was aimed to show how different results are given by the various definitions of stress-strain used, and to recommend a specific definition when testing spongy materials. A fabricated PVA sponge was subjected to a series of tensile tests in order to measure its mechanical properties. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) were used to determine the elastic modulus. The results revealed that the Almansi-Hamel strain definition exhibited the highest non-linear stress-strain relation and, as a result, may overestimate the elastic modulus at different stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress). The Green-St. Venant strain definition failed to address the non-linear stress-strain relation using different definitions of stress and invoked an underestimation of the elastic modulus values. Engineering stress and strain definitions were only valid for small strains and displacements, which make them impractical when analyzing spongy materials. The results showed that the effect of varying the stress definition on the maximum stress measurements was significant but not when calculating the elastic modulus. It is important to consider which stress-strain definition is employed when characterizing the mechanical properties of spongy materials. Although the true stress-true strain definition exhibits a non-linear relation, we favor it in spongy materials mechanics as it gives more accurate measurements of the material's response using the instantaneous values.

  4. Studying the potential of point detectors in time-resolved dose verification of dynamic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beierholm, A.R.; Behrens, C.F.; Andersen, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern megavoltage x-ray radiotherapy with high spatial and temporal dose gradients puts high demands on the entire delivery system, including not just the linear accelerator and the multi-leaf collimator, but also algorithms used for optimization and dose calculations, and detectors used for quality assurance and dose verification. In this context, traceable in-phantom dosimetry using a well-characterized point detector is often an important supplement to 2D-based quality assurance methods based on radiochromic film or detector arrays. In this study, an in-house developed dosimetry system based on fiber-coupled plastic scintillator detectors was evaluated and compared with a Farmer-type ionization chamber and a small-volume ionization chamber. An important feature of scintillator detectors is that the sensitive volume of the detector can easily be scaled, and five scintillator detectors of different scintillator length were thus employed to quantify volume averaging effects by direct measurement. The dosimetric evaluation comprised several complex-shape static fields as well as simplified dynamic deliveries using RapidArc, a volumetric-modulated arc therapy modality often used at the participating clinic. The static field experiments showed that the smallest scintillator detectors were in the best agreement with dose calculations, while needing the smallest volume averaging corrections. Concerning total dose measured during RapidArc, all detectors agreed with dose calculations within 1.1 ± 0.7% when positioned in regions of high homogenous dose. Larger differences were observed for high dose gradient and organ at risk locations, were differences between measured and calculated dose were as large as 8.0 ± 5.5%. The smallest differences were generally seen for the small-volume ionization chamber and the smallest scintillators. The time-resolved RapidArc dose profiles revealed volume-dependent discrepancies between scintillator and ionization chamber response

  5. Energy Efficient Engine program advanced turbofan nacelle definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, David C.; Wynosky, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced, low drag, nacelle configurations were defined for some of the more promising propulsion systems identified in the earlier Benefit/Cost Study, to assess the benefits associated with these advanced technology nacelles and formulate programs for developing these nacelles and low volume thrust reversers/spoilers to a state of technology readiness in the early 1990's. The study results established the design feasibility of advanced technology, slim line nacelles applicable to advanced technology, high bypass ratio turbofan engines. Design feasibility was also established for two low volume thrust reverse/spoiler concepts that meet or exceed the required effectiveness for these engines. These nacelle and thrust reverse/spoiler designs were shown to be applicable in engines with takeoff thrust sizes ranging from 24,000 to 60,000 pounds. The reduced weight, drag, and cost of the advanced technology nacelle installations relative to current technology nacelles offer a mission fuel burn savings ranging from 3.0 to 4.5 percent and direct operating cost plus interest improvements from 1.6 to 2.2 percent.

  6. Ports: Definition and study of types, sizes and business models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Roa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the world today there are thousands of port facilities of different types and sizes, competing to capture some market share of freight by sea, mainly. This article aims to determine the type of port and the most common size, in order to find out which business model is applied in that segment and what is the legal status of the companies of such infrastructure.Design/methodology/approach: To achieve this goal, we develop a research on a representative sample of 800 ports worldwide, which manage 90% of the containerized port loading. Then you can find out the legal status of the companies that manage them.Findings: The results indicate a port type and a dominant size, which are mostly managed by companies subject to a concession model.Research limitations/implications: In this research, we study only those ports that handle freight (basically containerized, ignoring other activities such as fishing, military, tourism or recreational.Originality/value: This is an investigation to show that the vast majority of the studied segment port facilities are governed by a similar corporate model and subject to pressure from the markets, which increasingly demand efficiency and service. Consequently, we tend to concession terminals to private operators in a process that might be called privatization, but in the strictest sense of the term, is not entirely realistic because the ownership of the land never ceases to be public

  7. Dose Prediction for surface nuclear explosions: case studies for Semipalatinsk and Lop Nur tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Dose prediction method RAPS after surface nuclear explosion has been developed by using the empirical dose function of USA nuclear test. This method which provides us external total dose, dose rate at any distant, at any time for any yield of nuclear explosion, is useful for radiation protection in case of nuclear events such as terrorism and nuclear war. The validity of RAPS has been confirmed by application to historical surface nuclear test explosions. The first test case study which was done for the first test explosion of the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site on August 29th 1949, shows a good agreement with luminescence dosimetry on a brick. This dose prediction method was applied nuclear tests in Lop Nur. The results indicate dangerous nuclear radiation influences including fatal risk in the wide Uygur area. (author)

  8. Feasibility study for the assessment of the exposed dose with TENORM added in consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Shin, Wook-Geun; Min, Chul Hee; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jae Ryong; Yoon, Seok-Won; Lee, Jiyon; Choi, Won-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Consumer products including naturally occurring radioactive material have been distributed widely in human life. The potential hazard of the excessively added technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in consumer products should be assessed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the organ equivalent dose and the annual effective dose with the usage of the TENORM added in paints. The activities of gammas emitted from natural radionuclides in the five types of paints were measured with the high-purity germanium detector, and the annual effective dose was assessed with the computational human phantom and the Monte Carlo method. The results show that uranium and thorium series were mainly measured over the five paints. Based on the exposure scenario of the paints in the room, the highest effective dose was evaluated as <1 mSv y -1 of the public dose limit. (authors)

  9. Study of a new glass matrix by thermoluminescent technique for high-dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pamela Z.; Carvalho, Gabriel S. Marchiori de; Cunha, Diego M. da; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P., E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Linda, V.E. Caldas [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    The thermoluminescence technique is widely used for both personal and for high-dose dosimetry. In this work, the thermoluminescence technique was utilized to study a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.30BaO.40B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%), irradiated with different doses in a {sup 60}Co source. The glow curves and the dose-response curve were obtained for radiation doses of 10, 50, 100, 200 e 700 Gy. The results showed that this new glass matrix has potential use in high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  10. Dosimetry studies with 32P source and correlation of skin and eye lens doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Munish; Gaonkar, U.P.; Koul, D.K.; Datta, D.; Saxena, S.K.; Kumar, Yogendra; Dash, A.

    2018-01-01

    Beta particles are one of the major contributors toward skin and eye lens doses at facilities handling beta sources. These sources find applications in industry, pharmaceuticals as well as in brachytherapy applications. The beta particles having maximum (E max ) energy > 0.07 MeV are capable of delivering skin dose whereas beta particles having maximum (E max ) energy > 0.7 MeV may also contribute towards dose to eye lens. Studies are performed using 32 P beta source as its maximum beta energy (E max ) is such that for sources having (E max ) of 1.71 MeV or beyond, there can be substantial contribution towards dose to eye lens even the dose limit recommended for skin is followed

  11. Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%. (note)

  12. Studies on chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by very low-dose exposure to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Moriya, Junko; Nakai, Sayaka

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of potential hazard from environmental tritium to man becomes very important with increasing the development of nuclear-power industry. However, little data are available as to the determination on the genetic effect of tritium especially at the low levels. The object of the present study is to obtain quantitative data for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes, as an indicator for genetic risk estimation, induced by tritium at very low dose levels. Leukocyte cultures of human peripheral blood were chronically exposed for 48h to tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine using a wide range of tritium doses, and aberrations in lymphocyte chromosomes at the first metaphases were examined. In the experimental conditions, the types of aberrations induced by radiation emitted from both tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine were mostly chromatid types, such as chromatid gaps and deletions. The dose-response relations for chromatid breaks per cell exhibited unusual dose-dependency in both cases. It was demonstrated that at higher dose range the yields of chromatid breaks increased linearly with dose, while those at lower dose range were significantly higher than would be expected by a downward extraporation from the linear relation. Partial-hit or partial-target kinetics events appeared at very low dose exposure. (author)

  13. A further study on the concept of top-up dose of spinal cord on rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan

    1993-01-01

    The concept of top-up dose has been used in the study on process of spinal cord repair in multiple radiation treatment in order to avoid cellular proliferation and animal loss. This study indicates that top up dose could be given 24 h or 6 weeks after completion of radiation treatment without significant difference of biological effects. It is suggested that the radiobiological effect could be reduced if 16 Gy of top-up dose is used in the multiple treatment instead of half of the number of treatment. A possible mechanism is discussed

  14. In vitro study of dose rate effect on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastykova, V.; Novotny, J. jr.; Vachelova, J.; Davidkova, M.; Liscak, R.

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to evaluate the radiobiological effect of the dose rate changes in Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) clinical conditions. In principle there are two reasons why dose rate on LGK is reduced during patient irradiation: 1) Co-60 sources decay with a half-life of 5.26 years and 2) using multiple iso-centers and conformal treatment plans (e.g. with blocked beams). This pilot study is an experimental work performed in vitro with medulloblastoma DAOY cells. Are there effects caused by low dose rate which could negatively influence the clinical outcome of the radiosurgery? (authors)

  15. Study of the dose rate measured by the radiological surveillance network of the Basque country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alegria, N.; Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The radiological Surveillance Network of the Basque Country, which is constituted by three stations located in Bilbao, Vitoria and San Sebastian, measures and records the dose date every 10 minutes. Some environmental parameters affect the behaviour of the dose rate. One of most important meteorological parameters is rain. So, it has been necessary to study separately the behaviour of dose rate in the absence of rain, defining that time as Dry Time, and the behaviour when it rains, designating that time as Wet Time. Previous studies have confirmed that dose rate values are fitted to normal distributions, and in those cases, Critical Limits can be calculated using Curie formulation. Every January, data recorded in previous year, two Critical Limits are obtained, one of them for dry time and other one for wet time, and both together define the Alarm Level for each radiological station. That Alarm Level is the reference value for dose rate. If some dose rate value is higher than the corresponding Alarm Level, the recorded values have to be studied in order to identify the origin or the cause of that value. In most cases, in which the dose rate is higher than the corresponding Alarm Level due to precipitation, occurs that when rain stops the dose rate value does not fall immediately to dry rime values, and then the Alarm Level which is now that for dry time is exceeded by the dose rate. So, those values can be considered a special group called Transition Area. The second part of the study tries to explain the cause and the behaviour of the values in the transition Area by means of the study of the behaviour of radon daughters in the atmosphere and their deposition onto the ground during rain intervals. To check the results several situations have been simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C. (authors)

  16. The continual reassessment method: comparison of Bayesian stopping rules for dose-ranging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, S; Chevret, S

    2001-10-15

    The continual reassessment method (CRM) provides a Bayesian estimation of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in phase I clinical trials and is also used to estimate the minimal efficacy dose (MED) in phase II clinical trials. In this paper we propose Bayesian stopping rules for the CRM, based on either posterior or predictive probability distributions that can be applied sequentially during the trial. These rules aim at early detection of either the mis-choice of dose range or a prefixed gain in the point estimate or accuracy of estimated probability of response associated with the MTD (or MED). They were compared through a simulation study under six situations that could represent the underlying unknown dose-response (either toxicity or failure) relationship, in terms of sample size, probability of correct selection and bias of the response probability associated to the MTD (or MED). Our results show that the stopping rules act correctly, with early stopping by using the two first rules based on the posterior distribution when the actual underlying dose-response relationship is far from that initially supposed, while the rules based on predictive gain functions provide a discontinuation of inclusions whatever the actual dose-response curve after 20 patients on average, that is, depending mostly on the accumulated data. The stopping rules were then applied to a data set from a dose-ranging phase II clinical trial aiming at estimating the MED dose of midazolam in the sedation of infants during cardiac catheterization. All these findings suggest the early use of the two first rules to detect a mis-choice of dose range, while they confirm the requirement of including at least 20 patients at the same dose to reach an accurate estimate of MTD (MED). A two-stage design is under study. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Case study on implementation of the dose constraint concept in optimization in working environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewska, Grazyna; Krajewski, Pawel [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, PL-03194, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    A case study of already fixed dose constrain values in nuclear medicine sector, indicated that, the practical implementation of ICRP principle of optimization ( Publication 103, ICRP, 2007) still hit on methodology problems due to lack of adequate numerous monitoring data of internal contamination and complicated mathematical formalism. In practice, to ensure that 'the likelihood of incurring exposure, the number of people exposed, and the magnitude of their individual doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable', the baseline of effective doses together with statistical distribution is required. Furthermore, as it has revealed in this study, doses PHP's generated with MC methods had un-regularly shapes, depending on random operations rather than routine procedures. The role of dose constraints for occupational exposures, was further elaborated in Publication 101 (ICRP, 2006) as 'the dose constraint is a value of individual dose used to limit the range of options considered in the process of optimization'. The revisions of the International Basic Safety Standards as well as the Euratom Basic Safety Standard Directive both aim to implement new ICRP recommendations and have requirements to use dose constraints, defined broadly along the lines provided by the ICRP, and suggest that values be selected from the bands recommended by the ICRP. These will be obligatory adopted in the national regulations by regulatory authorities of EU countries. However, due to accidental characteristics of monitoring data, the 95% confidence tail of the doses for the most highly exposed individuals is near the limit of 20 mSv per year. This is apparently observed in the particular endocrinology units dealing with I-131 therapy. One might concluded that dose limitation and optimization are viewed as sufficient for the management of occupational exposures and reasonably be achieved. (authors)

  18. A Monte Carlo study of macroscopic and microscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage cellular dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, P. A. K.; Thomson, Rowan M.

    2017-02-01

    This work investigates how doses to cellular targets depend on cell morphology, as well as relations between cellular doses and doses to bulk tissues and water. Multicellular models of five healthy and cancerous soft tissues are developed based on typical values of cell compartment sizes, elemental compositions and number densities found in the literature. Cells are modelled as two concentric spheres with nucleus and cytoplasm compartments. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the absorbed dose to the nucleus and cytoplasm for incident photon energies of 20-370 keV, relevant for brachytherapy, diagnostic radiology, and out-of-field radiation in higher-energy external beam radiotherapy. Simulations involving cell clusters, single cells and single nuclear cavities are carried out for cell radii between 5 and 10~μ m, and nuclear radii between 2 and 9~μ m. Seven nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions representative of animal cells are considered. The presence of a cytoplasm, extracellular matrix and surrounding cells can affect the nuclear dose by up to 13 % . Differences in cell and nucleus size can affect dose to the nucleus (cytoplasm) of the central cell in a cluster of 13 cells by up to 13 % (8 % ). Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that neither water nor bulk tissue are reliable substitutes for subcellular targets for incident photon energies  <50 keV: nuclear (cytoplasm) doses differ from dose-to-medium by up to 32 % (18 % ), and from dose-to-water by up to 21 % (8 % ). The largest differences between dose descriptors are seen for the lowest incident photon energies; differences are less than 3 % for energies ≥slant 90 keV. The sensitivity of results with regard to the parameters of the microscopic tissue structure model and cell model geometry, and the importance of the nucleus and cytoplasm as targets for radiation-induced cell death emphasize the importance of accurate models for cellular dosimetry studies.

  19. 34 CFR 658.4 - What definitions apply to the Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... International Studies and Foreign Language Program? 658.4 Section 658.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of... UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM General § 658.4 What definitions apply to the Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program? The definitions in 34 CFR 655.4 apply to this...

  20. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  1. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel's Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization

  2. Glandular dose in breast tomosynthesis examinations: Preliminary study with a sample of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, M.; Chevalier, M.; Calzado, A.; Valverde, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the mean glandular dose administered to a group of patients with a tomography system (Selenia Dimensions) service installed on a large hospital in which routine tests are done and screening. (Author)

  3. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, W L; Ung, N M; Wong, J H D; Ng, K H

    2016-01-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved. (paper)

  4. Studying the efficacy of escalated dose conformal radiation therapy in prostate carcinoma – Pakistan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Zamir

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Our data were comparable to international studies of dose escalation using 3D and beneficial as compared to conventional radiation therapy delivered by 2D in terms of biochemical failure rate and treatment related toxicity.

  5. Feasibility study of astronaut standardized career dose limits in LEO and the outlook for BLEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Bhardwaj, A.; Ferrari, Franco; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Lal, A. K.; Li, Yinghui; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Nymmik, Rikho; Panasyuk, Michael; Petrov, Vladislav; Reitz, Guenther; Pinsky, Lawrence; Muszaphar Shukor, Sheikh; Singhvi, A. K.; Straube, Ulrich; Tomi, Leena; Townsend, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    Cosmic Study Group SG 3.19/1.10 was established in February 2013 under the aegis of the International Academy of Astronautics to consider and compare the dose limits adopted by various space agencies for astronauts in Low Earth Orbit. A preliminary definition of the limits that might later be adopted by crews exploring Beyond Low Earth Orbit was, in addition, to be made. The present paper presents preliminary results of the study reported at a Symposium held in Turin by the Academy in July 2013. First, an account is provided of exposure limits assigned by various partner space agencies to those of their astronauts that work aboard the International Space Station. Then, gaps in the scientific and technical information required to safely implement human missions beyond the shielding provided by the geomagnetic field (to the Moon, Mars and beyond) are identified. Among many recommendations for actions to mitigate the health risks potentially posed to personnel Beyond Low Earth Orbit is the development of a preliminary concept for a Human Space Awareness System to: provide for crewed missions the means of prompt onboard detection of the ambient arrival of hazardous particles; develop a strategy for the implementation of onboard responses to hazardous radiation levels; support modeling/model validation that would enable reliable predictions to be made of the arrival of hazardous radiation at a distant spacecraft; provide for the timely transmission of particle alerts to a distant crewed vehicle at an emergency frequency using suitably located support spacecraft. Implementation of the various recommendations of the study can be realized based on a two pronged strategy whereby Space Agencies/Space Companies/Private Entrepreneurial Organizations etc. address the mastering of required key technologies (e.g. fast transportation; customized spacecraft design) while the International Academy of Astronautics, in a role of handling global international co-operation, organizes

  6. A drug utilisation study investigating prescribed daily doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and drug groups. Design. Retrospective drug utilisation study using data .... drugs that were prescribed 20 or fewer times during the period under ... occurs in women and men at different ages and with different severity. group. On average, men ...

  7. Image quality evaluation and patient dose assessment of medical fluoroscopic X-ray systems: A national study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economides, S.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Kalivas, N.; Kalathaki, M.; Simantirakis, G.; Tritakis, P.; Manousaridis, G.; Vogiatzi, S.; Kipouros, P.; Boziari, A.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the results from a survey conducted by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), during the period 1998-2003, in 530 public and private owned fluoroscopic X-ray systems in Greece. Certain operational parameters for conventional and remote control systems were assessed, according to a quality control protocol developed by GAEC on the basis of the current literature. Public (91.5%) and private (81.5%) owned fluoroscopic units exhibit high-contrast resolution values over 1 lp mm -1 . Moreover, 88.5 and 87.1% of the fluoroscopic units installed in the public and private sector, respectively, present Maximum Patient Entrance Kerma Rate values lower than 100 mGy min -1 . Additionally, 68.3% of the units assessed were found to perform within the acceptance limits. Finally, the third quartile of the Entrance Surface Dose Rate distribution was estimated according to the Dose Reference Level definition and found equal to 35 mGy min -1 . (authors)

  8. Definitions of love in a sample of British women: an empirical study using Q methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Simon; Stenner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Social psychological research has increasingly acknowledged that any pretensions to a singular theory of love should be replaced with a concern about its affirmation and what people actually say and do in love's name. Lee's (1977) love styles research and Sternberg's (1995) theory of love as a story are prime examples. Despite traditional definitions of love in western cultures being dominated by feminine images and tales of gender difference, however, the personal definitions and experiences of women have received comparatively little empirical attention, particularly in recent years and despite some well-documented changes in their cultural circumstances. This study remedies that situation through presentation of a Q methodological study in which a convenience sample of 59 British women were asked to Q sort 54 single-word descriptors of love to define love as they had experienced it. Factor analysis of the resulting Q sorts revealed six distinct definitions of love, interpreted as 'attraction, passion & romance', 'unconditional love', 'sex & fun', 'friendship & spirituality', 'a permanent commitment', and 'separate people, separate lives'. The six definitions are then discussed in terms of their allegiance to traditionally feminine and/or masculine values and as a means of highlighting the changing face of Britain's relational culture. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Feasibility study of radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter postal dose intercomparison for high energy photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Siyong; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Chung, Jin-Beom; Shin, Dong-Oh; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2009-01-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. In this study we evaluated whether the GRD would be suitable for external dosimetric audit program in radiotherapy. For this purpose, we introduced a methodology of the absorbed dose determination with the GRD by establishing calibration coefficient and various correction factors (non-linearity dose response, fading, energy dependence and angular dependence). A feasibility test of the GRD postal dose intercomparison was also performed for eight high photon beams by considering four radiotherapy centers in Korea. In the accuracy evaluation of the GRD dosimetry established in this study, we obtained within 1.5% agreements with the ionization chamber dosimetry for the 60 Co beam. It was also observed that, in the feasibility study, all the relative deviations were smaller than 3%. Based on these results, we believe that the new GRD system has considerable potential to be used for a postal dose audit program

  10. The Study of External Radiation Dose for Radiation Worker at PRSG-BATAN Serpong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarningsih; Mashudi; A Lilik W; Yosep S

    2012-01-01

    The study of External radiation dose for radiation worker at PRSG-BATAN Serpong has been carried out. The sample is taken from the System Reactor division (BSR), Operation Reactor division, (BOR) Safety division UPN, UJM and head of PRSG by setting Thermoluminescence Dosemeter (TLD) on the chest, then is detected by a tool TLD reader model 6600. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occupational exposure dose that has been accepted by the radiation worker for the last five years. The result in average doses at BSR is 0,99 mSv, BOR is 3,27 mSv, at BK is 0,69 mSv and UPN + UJM + head of PRSG is 0,03 mSv. The result highest doses at BSR is 6,58 mSv, BOR is 28,94 mSv, BK is 4,24 mSv, and UPN UJM Head of PRSG is 0,52 mSv. Dose interval radiation worker at PRSG BATAN ttd - 28,98 mSv. To overall the external personal dose acceptant for radiation worker at PRSG BATAN one below maximum permissible dose acceptant that allowed by BAPETEN, that is 20 mSv in average every year during five years. (author)

  11. A Monte Carlo Study of dose enhancement according to the enhancement agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chul Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Dose enhancement effects at megavoltage (MV) X and γ-ray energies, and the effects of different energy levels on incident energy, dose enhancement agents, and concentrations were analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations. Gold, gadolinium, Iodine, and iron oxide (Fe2O3) were compared as dose enhancement agents. For incident energy, 4, 6, 10 and 15 MV X-ray spectra produced by a linear accelerator and a Co60 γ-ray were used. The dose enhancement factor (DEF) was calculated using an ICRU Slab phantom for concentrations of 7, 18, and 30 mg/g. The DEF was higher at higher concentrations of dose enhancement agents and at lower incident energies. The calculated DEF ranged from 1.035 to 1.079, and dose enhancement effects were highest for iron oxide, followed by iodine, gadolinium, and gold. Thus, this study contributes to improving the therapeutic ratio by delivering larger doses of radiation to tumor volume, and provides data to support further in vivo and in vitro studies.

  12. Evaluation of radiation dose in pediatric head CT examination: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhasrina Nik Din, Nik; Zainon, Rafidah; Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose in pediatric head Computed Tomography examination. It was reported that decreasing tube voltage in CT examination can reduce the dose to patients significantly. A head phantom was scanned with dual-energy CT at 80 kV and 120 kV. The tube current was set using automatic exposure control mode and manual setting. The pitch was adjusted to 1.4, 1.45 and 1.5 while the slice thickness was set at 5 mm. The dose was measured based on CT Dose Index (CTDI). Results from this study have shown that the image noise increases substantially with low tube voltage. The average dose was 2.60 mGy at CT imaging parameters of 80 kV and 10 - 30 mAs. The dose increases up to 17.19 mGy when the CT tube voltage increases to 120 kV. With the reduction of tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV, the radiation dose can be reduced by 12.1% to 15.1% without degradation of contrast-to-noise ratio.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation study on dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sungkoo; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Chanhyeong; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2010-01-01

    Radiation dose enhancement by injection of a high atomic number (Z) material into tumor volumes has been studied for various radiation sources and different concentrations of gold nanoparticles. Brachytherapy employs low energy photons of less than ∼0.5 MeV, which indeed is the optimal energy range for radiation dose enhancement by introduction of high-Z material. The present study uses the MCNPX TM code to estimate the dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles for the four common brachytherapy sources ( 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 125 I, and 103 Pd). Additionally, cisplatin (H 6 Cl 2 N 2 Pt), a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug, was used to evaluate the dose enhancement. The simulated source models were evaluated with reference to the calculated TG-43 parameter values. The dose enhancement in the tumor region due to the gold nanoparticles and cisplatin was evaluated according to the dose enhancement factor (DEF). The maximum values of the average DEFs were found to be 1.03, 1.11, 3.43, and 2.17 for the 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 125 I, and 103 Pd sources, respectively. The dose enhancement values for the low-energy sources were significantly higher than those for the high-energy sources. The dose enhancement due to cisplatin was calculated by using the same approach and was found to be comparable to that of the gold nanoparticles. The maximum value of the average DEF for cisplatin was 1.12 for the 5% concentration level in water and a 192 Ir source. We confirmed that cisplatin could be applied to cancer therapy that combines chemotherapeutic drugs with radiation therapy. The results presented herein will be used to study dose enhancement in tumor regions using various radiation modalities with high atomic number materials.

  14. High-Definition Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Stent Imaging: a Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wen Jie; Chen, Ke Min; Pang, Li Fang; Zhang, Huang; Pan, Zi Lai [Rui Jin Hospital, Medical School, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shangha (China); Guo, Ying; Li, Jian Ying [Beijing Economic and Technology Development Area, Beijing (China)

    2012-01-15

    To assess the performance of a high-definition CT (HDCT) for imaging small caliber coronary stents ({<=} 3 mm) by comparing different scan modes of a conventional 64-row standard-definition CT (SDCT). A cardiac phantom with twelve stents (2.5 mm and 3.0 mm in diameter) was scanned by HDCT and SDCT. The scan modes were retrospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated helical and prospective ECG-triggered axial with tube voltages of 120 kVp and 100 kVp, respectively. The inner stent diameters (ISD) and the in-stent attenuation value (AVin-stent) and the in-vessel extra-stent attenuation value (AVin-vessel) were measured by two observers. The artificial lumen narrowing (ALN = [ISD - ISDmeasured]/ISD) and artificial attenuation increase between in-stent and in-vessel (AAI = AVin-stent - AVin-vessel) were calculated. All data was analyzed by intraclass correlation and ANOVA-test. The correlation coefficient of ISD, AVin-vessel and AVin-stent between the two observers was good. The ALNs of HDCT were statistically lower than that of SDCT (30 {+-} 5.7% versus 35 {+-} 5.4%, p < 0.05). HDCT had statistically lower AAI values than SDCT (15.7 {+-} 81.4 HU versus 71.4 {+-} 90.5 HU, p < 0.05). The prospective axial dataset demonstrated smaller ALN than the retrospective helical dataset on both HDCT and SDCT (p < 0.05). Additionally, there were no differences in ALN between the 120 kVp and 100 kVp tube voltages on HDCT (p = 0.05). High-definition CT helps improve measurement accuracy for imaging coronary stents compared to SDCT. HDCT with 100 kVp and the prospective ECG-triggered axial technique, with a lower radiation dose than 120 kVp application, may be advantageous in evaluating coronary stents with smaller calibers ({<=} 3 mm).

  15. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Candidate experiments definition and preliminary concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, R. V.; Hollinden, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The candidate definition studies on the zero-g cloud physics laboratory are covered. This laboratory will be an independent self-contained shuttle sortie payload. Several critical technology areas have been identified and studied to assure proper consideration in terms of engineering requirements for the final design. Areas include chambers, gas and particle generators, environmental controls, motion controls, change controls, observational techniques, and composition controls. This unique laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamics, electrical, or other type techniques to support the object under study. This report also covers the candidate experiment definitions, chambers and experiment classes, laboratory concepts and plans, special supporting studies, early flight opportunities and payload planning data for overall shuttle payload requirements assessments.

  16. Necessary accuracy of dose estimation during cohort epidemiologic study after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, M.Yu.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Khoshi, M.; Takada, Dzh.

    2003-01-01

    Effect of breadth of dose ranges on values of radiation risk was estimated. Ratios of observed numbers of mortalities because of leukemia in the cohort in 1950 - 1974 under deferent radiation dose to expected number of mortalities in this cohort only under background radiation were used as degree of risk. Data of cooperative Japan-American Program LSS (Life Span Study) were applied in the researches. It is established that required for the risk assessment with uncertainty 20 - 30 % the accuracy of dose estimation comprises 30 - 35 % in the range 1 - 5 rad and 5 - 10 % in the range 5 - 30 rad [ru

  17. Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yu; Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children are at a high risk of a positive oral food challenge (OFC). The present study aimed to evaluate whether the results of a very low-dose (VL) OFC would contribute to better wheat allergy management in this population. We retrospectively reviewed wheat-allergic subjects who underwent a VL OFC with 2 g of udon noodles (equivalent to 53 mg of wheat protein) and had a previous allergic reaction to management of some low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children from complete avoidance to partial wheat intake. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Definitions of medication-overuse headache in population-based studies and their implications on prevalence estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Maria L; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Case definitions of medication-overuse headache (MOH) in population-based research have changed over time. This study aims to review MOH prevalence reports with respect to these changes, and to propose a practical case definition for future studies based on the ICHD-3 beta....

  19. Analysis of risk factors for schizophrenia with two different case definitions: a nationwide register-based external validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Larsen, Janne T; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben B; Petersen, Liselotte

    2015-03-01

    Different case definitions of schizophrenia have been used in register based research. However, no previous study has externally validated two different case definitions of schizophrenia against a wide range of risk factors for schizophrenia. We investigated hazard ratios (HRs) for a wide range of risk factors for ICD-10 DCR schizophrenia using a nationwide Danish sample of 2,772,144 residents born in 1955-1997. We compared one contact only (OCO) (the case definition of schizophrenia used in Danish register based studies) with two or more contacts (TMC) (a case definition of at least 2 inpatient contacts with schizophrenia). During the follow-up, the OCO definition included 15,074 and the TMC 7562 cases; i.e. half as many. The TMC case definition appeared to select for a worse illness course. A wide range of risk factors were uniformly associated with both case definitions and only slightly higher risk estimates were found for the TMC definition. Choosing at least 2 inpatient contacts with schizophrenia (TMC) instead of the currently used case definition would result in almost similar risk estimates for many well-established risk factors. However, this would also introduce selection and include considerably fewer cases and reduce power of e.g. genetic studies based on register-diagnosed cases only. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  1. Dose-Escalation Study for Cardiac Radiosurgery in a Porcine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanck, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.blanck@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany); Bode, Frank [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Gebhard, Maximilian [Institute of Pathology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hunold, Peter [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Brandt, Sebastian [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Grossherr, Martin [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); University Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To perform a proof-of-principle dose-escalation study to radiosurgically induce scarring in cardiac muscle tissue to block veno-atrial electrical connections at the pulmonary vein antrum, similar to catheter ablation. Methods and Materials: Nine mini-pigs underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of heart function and electrophysiology assessment by catheter measurements in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). Immediately after examination, radiosurgery with randomized single-fraction doses of 0 and 17.5-35 Gy in 2.5-Gy steps were delivered to the RSPV antrum (target volume 5-8 cm{sup 3}). MRI and electrophysiology were repeated 6 months after therapy, followed by histopathologic examination. Results: Transmural scarring of cardiac muscle tissue was noted with doses ≥32.5 Gy. However, complete circumferential scarring of the RSPV was not achieved. Logistic regressions showed that extent and intensity of fibrosis significantly increased with dose. The 50% effective dose for intense fibrosis was 31.3 Gy (odds ratio 2.47/Gy, P<.01). Heart function was not affected, as verified by MRI and electrocardiogram evaluation. Adjacent critical structures were not damaged, as verified by pathology, demonstrating the short-term safety of small-volume cardiac radiosurgery with doses up to 35 Gy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with doses >32.5 Gy in the healthy pig heart can induce circumscribed scars at the RSPV antrum noninvasively, mimicking the effect of catheter ablation. In our study we established a significant dose-response relationship for cardiac radiosurgery. The long-term effects and toxicity of such high radiation doses need further investigation in the pursuit of cardiac radiosurgery for noninvasive treatment of atrial fibrillation.

  2. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs

  3. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, A J

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs.

  4. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqun; Qi, Guohai; Yin, Gang; Wang, Xianliang; Wang, Pei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Mingyong; Li, Jie; Kang, Shengwei; Liao, Xiongfei

    2014-12-16

    The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) technology. Four treatment plans were designed using Oncentra Masterplan TPS for each patient. Two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms, and two three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms. The DICOM-RT files of the treatment plans were exported to the Monte Carlo system to recalculate. The dose distributions of GTV, PTV and ipsilateral lung calculated by the TPS and MC were compared. For 3DCRT and IMRT plans, the mean dose differences for GTV between the CCC and MC increased with decreasing of the GTV volume. For IMRT, the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT. The CCC algorithm overestimated the GTV mean dose by approximately 3% for IMRT. For 3DCRT plans, when the volume of the GTV was greater than 100 cm(3), the mean doses calculated by CCC and MC almost have no difference. PBC shows large deviations from the MC algorithm. For the dose to the ipsilateral lung, the CCC algorithm overestimated the dose to the entire lung, and the PBC algorithm overestimated V20 but underestimated V5; the difference in V10 was not statistically significant. PBC substantially overestimates the dose to the tumour, but the CCC is similar to the MC simulation. It is recommended that the treatment plans for lung cancer be developed using an advanced dose calculation algorithm other than PBC. MC can accurately

  5. Simulated dose reduction by adding artificial noise to measured raw data: A validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, M.; Gunnarsson, M.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify and validate a noise simulation tool called Dose Tutor (VAMP GmbH) in terms of level and texture of the simulated noise. By adding artificial noise to measured computed tomography (CT) raw data, a scan acquired with a lower dose (mAs) than the actual one can be simulated. A homogeneous polyethylene phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were scanned for different mAs levels, tube voltages, slice thicknesses and reconstruction kernels. The simulated noise levels were compared with the noise levels in real transverse slice images actually acquired with corresponding mAs values. In general, the noise comparisons showed acceptable agreement in magnitude (<20% deviation in pixel standard deviation). Also, the calculated noise power spectra were similar, which indicates that the noise texture is correctly reproduced. In conclusion, this study establishes that the Dose Tutor might be a useful tool for estimating the dose reduction potential for CT protocols. (authors)

  6. Entrances skin dose distribution maps for interventional neuroradiological procedures: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2005-01-01

    Does estimation in interventional neuroradiology can be useful to limit skin radiation injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of entrance skin dose (ESD) maps in planning exposure condition optimisation. Thirteen cerebral angiography and five embolisation procedures were monitored, measuring ESD, dose-area product (DAP) and other operational parameters. A transmission ionisation chamber, simultaneously measuring air kerma and DAP, measured dose-related quantities. Data acquisition software collected dosimetric and geometrical data during the interventional procedure and provided a distribution map of ESD on a standard phantom digital image, with maximum value estimation. Values of 88-1710 mGy for maximum skin dose and 16.7-343 Gy cm 2 for DAP were found. These data confirm the possibility of deterministic effects during therapeutic interventional neuroradiological procedures like cerebral embolisation. ESD maps are useful to retrospectively study the exposure characteristics of a procedure and plan patient exposure optimisation. (authors)

  7. Ranitidine Can Potentiate The Prokinetic Effect Of Itopride At Low Doses- An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Aroosa Ishtiaq; Khan, Bushra Tayyaba; Khan, Asma; Khan, Qamar-Uz-Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Gastroparesis and GERD occur concomitantly in 40 percent of the cases. Prokinetic drugs and acid blockers are employed as the main treatment modality. Ranitidine is an acid blocker with additional prokinetic activity and Itopride is a known prokinetic drug. This study was designed to observe the synergistic potentiating prokinetic effect of Ranitidine on itopride on isolated duodenum of rabbits. Ranitidine (10-5-10-3) and itopride (10-6-10-5) were added in increasing concentrations to isolated duodenum of rabbits and contractions were recorded on PowerLab Data acquisition unit AHK/214. Cumulative dose response curves were constructed. The potentiating prokinetic effect of Ranitidine on itopride was seen by using a fixed dose of ranitidine and cumulatively enhancing doses of itopride on iWorx. Ranitidine and itopride produced a dose dependent reversible contraction of the isolated tissue of rabbits with ranitidine showing a max response of 0.124mV and itopride showing a maximum response of 0.131mV. Ranitidine was able to potentiate the prokinetic effect of itopride at low doses but at high dose the effect began to wane off. Ranitidine and itopride produce a statistically significant synergistic potentiating prokinetic effect at low doses in vitro.

  8. Tennessee Valley region study: potential year 2000 radiological dose to population resulting from nuclear facility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    A companion report, DOE/ET-0064/1, presents a geographic, cultural, and demographic profile of the Tennessee Valley Region study area. This report describes the calculations of radionuclide release and transport and of the resultant dose to the regional population, assuming a projected installed capacity of 220,000 MW in the year 2000, of which 144,000 MW would be nuclear. All elements of the fuel cycle were assumed to be in operation. The radiological dose was calculated as a one-year dose based on ingestion of 35 different food types as well as for nine non-food pathways, and was reported as dose to the total body and for six specific organs for each of four age groups (infant, child, teen, and adult). Results indicate that the average individual would receive an incremental dose of 7 x 10 -4 millirems in the year 2000 from the operation of nuclear facilities within and adjacent to the region, five orders of magnitude smaller than the dose from naturally occurring radiation in the area. The major contributor to dose was found to be tritium, and the most significant pathways were immersion in air, inhalation of air, transpiration of tritium (absorption through the skin), and exposure radionuclide-containing soil. 60 references

  9. Study on the evaluation method of radiation dose rate around spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1986-01-01

    This study aims at developing a simple calculation method which can evaluate radiation dose rate around casks with high accuracy in a short time. The method is based on a concept of the radiation shielding characteristics of cask walls. The concept was introduced to replace for ordinary radiation shielding calculation which requires a long calculation time and a large memory capacity of a computer in the matrix calculation. For the purpose of verifying the accuracy and reliability of the new method, it was applied to the analysis of the dose rate distribution around actual casks, which had been measured. The results of the analysis revealed that the newly proposed method was excellent for the forecast of radiation dose rate distribution around casks in view of the accuracy and calculation time. The short calculation time and high accuracy by the proposed method were attained by dividing the whole procedure of ordinary fine radiation shielding calculation into the calculation of radiation dose rate on a cask surface by the matrix expression of the characteristic function and the calculation of dose rate distribution using the simple analytical expression of dose rate distribution around casks. The effect of the heterogeneous array of spent fuel in different burnup state on dose rate distribution around casks was evaluated by this method. (Kako, I.)

  10. Positron annihilation studies of high dose Sb implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Beling, C.D.; Ho, K.; Takamura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The formation and evolution of vacancies and precipitates created by implantation of 60 keV, 2 x 10 16 cm -2 Sb + in pre-amorphized (0 0 1) Cz-Si is studied using the Doppler broadening (DB) and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) positron beam techniques. After implantation, samples were laser annealed (LTA) and subsequently thermal annealed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 1000 deg. C. Implantation-induced vacancy-type defects were detected up to a depth of 280 nm. After LTA, positron annihilation related to both Sb and remaining defects is observed in the first 100 nm below the surface. The deeper region only shows positron trapping at vacancy-type defects with strong reduced concentration. Complete removal is obtained after 600 deg. C anneal. At this temperature, the positron data for the upper region reveals trapping at Sb and Si sites only. With increasing annealing time (at 600 deg. C) or increasing temperature (up to 1000 deg. C) positron annihilation at Sb-sites associated with neighboring vacancies becomes apparent. Results are correlated with the observed Sb electrical deactivation above 600 deg. C, the shift from small Sb aggregates to precipitates and out-diffusion of Sb from the implantation region at higher temperatures

  11. An experimental study on the mechanical properties of rat brain tissue using different stress-strain definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-07-01

    There are different stress-strain definitions to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be employed to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. It is worth knowing that an optimize stress-strain definition of the brain tissue at different loading directions may have implications for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. This study is aimed to conduct a comparative study on different results are given by the various definitions of stress-strain and to recommend a specific definition when testing brain tissues. Prepared cylindrical samples are excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by applying load on both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) are used to determine the elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The highest non-linear stress-strain relation is observed for the Almansi-Hamel strain definition and it may overestimate the elastic modulus at different stress definitions at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The Green-St. Venant strain definition fails to address the non-linear stress-strain relation using different definitions of stress and triggers an underestimation of the elastic modulus. The results suggest the application of the true stress-true strain definition for characterization of the brain tissues mechanics since it gives more accurate measurements of the tissue's response using the instantaneous values.

  12. The study on clinical conditions and skin dose of upper-gastrointestinal x-ray fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Chul; Ahn, Sung Min; Jang, Sang Sup

    2007-01-01

    This study examined present conditions of upper-gastrointestinal X-ray fluoroscopy and patient skin dose. The authors elected 21 equipment to check the X-ray equipment and exposure factor of fluoroscopy and spot exposure in university hospitals, hospitals, and clinics where perform upper-gastrointestinal X-ray fluoroscopy more than five times every day in Incheon areas. The amount of patient's skin dose during upper-gastrointestinal X-ray fluoroscopy was measured by ionization chamber

  13. Capecitabine based postoperative accelerated chemoradiation of pancreatic carcinoma. A dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Picardi, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Caravatta, Luciana; Tambaro, Rosa; Mignogna, Samantha; Cellini, Numa; Valentini, Vincenzo; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Caprino, Paola; Sofo, Luigi; Ingrosso, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of escalating up to 55 Gy within five weeks, the dose of external beam radiotherapy to the previous tumor site concurrently with a fixed daily dose of capecitabine, in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Material and methods. Patients with resected pancreatic carcinoma were eligible for this study. Capecitabine was administered at a daily dose of 1600 mg/m 2 . Regional lymph nodes received a total radiation dose of 45 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fractions. The starting radiation dose to the tumor bed was 50.0 Gy (2.0 Gy/fraction, 25 fractions). Escalation was achieved up to a total dose of 55.0 Gy by increasing the fraction size by 0.2 Gy (2.2 Gy/fraction), while keeping the duration of radiotherapy to five weeks (25 fractions). A concomitant boost technique was used. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade>3 hematologic toxicity, grade>2 liver, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, or skin toxicity, by RTOG criteria, or any toxicity producing prolonged (> 10 days) radiotherapy interruption. Results and discussion. Twelve patients entered the study (median age: 64 years). In the first cohort (six patients), no patient experienced DLT. Similarly in the second cohort, no DLT occurred. All 12 patients completed the planned regimen of therapy. Nine patients experienced grade 1-2 nausea and/or vomiting. Grade 2 hematological toxicity occurred in four patients. The results of our study indicate that a total radiation dose up to 55.0 Gy/5 weeks can be safely administered to the tumor bed, concurrently with capecitabine (1600 mg/m 2 ) in patients with resected pancreatic carcinoma.

  14. Study of dose profile in TC scanning of cranium; Estudo do perfil de dose em varredura de TC de cranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves Junior, R.L.; Oliveira, A.H., E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Mourao, A.P., E-mail: aprata@des.cefetmg.b [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Engenharia Hospitalar

    2011-10-26

    In this paper it was obtained a dose distribution profile in computerized tomography, when a head simulator object, cylindrical and manufactured in PMMA, were swiped by using the clinical protocol or this device routine. The doses were determined with radiochromic films placed at the four cardinal points and the Center, taking as reference one of object faces. The films were calibrated with pencil ionization chamber in a independent experiment where the obtained doses in the chamber, when a unique central cut or the object were obtained, were confronted with the gray scales on the irradiated films in a similar manner, revealing he factors of conversion mGy.Gray tones{sup -1} which made possible the determination of doses in all the scanning

  15. Comparative study of SOI/Si hybrid substrates fabricated using high-dose and low-dose oxygen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yemin; Chen Meng; Chen Jing; Wang Xiang; Wang Xi

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid substrates comprising both silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and bulk Si regions have been fabricated using the technique of patterned separation by implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) with high-dose (1.5 x 10 18 cm -2 ) and low-dose ((1.5-3.5) x 10 17 cm -2 ) oxygen ions, respectively. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was employed to examine the microstructures of the resulting materials. Experimental results indicate that the SOI/Si hybrid substrate fabricated using high-dose SIMOX is of inferior quality with very large surface height step and heavily damaged transitions between the SOI and bulk regions. However, the quality of the SOI/Si hybrid substrate is enhanced dramatically by reducing the implant dose. The defect density in transitions is reduced considerably. Moreover, the expected surface height difference does not exist and the surface is exceptionally flat. The possible mechanisms responsible for the improvements in quality are discussed

  16. Acute respiratory infection case definitions for young children: a systematic review of community-based epidemiologic studies in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daniel E; Gaffey, Michelle F; Smith-Romero, Evelyn; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Morris, Shaun K

    2015-12-01

    To explore the variability in childhood acute respiratory infection case definitions for research in low-income settings where there is limited access to laboratory or radiologic investigations. We conducted a systematic review of community-based, longitudinal studies in South Asia published from January 1990 to August 2013, in which childhood acute respiratory infection outcomes were reported. Case definitions were classified by their label (e.g. pneumonia, acute lower respiratory infection) and clinical content 'signatures' (array of clinical features that would be always present, conditionally present or always absent among cases). Case definition heterogeneity was primarily assessed by the number of unique case definitions overall and by label. We also compared case definition-specific acute respiratory infection incidence rates for studies reporting incidence rates for multiple case definitions. In 56 eligible studies, we found 124 acute respiratory infection case definitions. Of 90 case definitions for which clinical content was explicitly defined, 66 (73%) were unique. There was a high degree of content heterogeneity among case definitions with the same label, and some content signatures were assigned multiple labels. Within studies for which incidence rates were reported for multiple case definitions, variation in content was always associated with a change in incidence rate, even when the content differed by a single clinical feature. There has been a wide variability in case definition label and content combinations to define acute upper and lower respiratory infections in children in community-based studies in South Asia over the past two decades. These inconsistencies have important implications for the synthesis and translation of knowledge regarding the prevention and treatment of childhood acute respiratory infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pilot study in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma with 3D image-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using modified Heyman packing: Clinical experience and dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, Hajo Dirk; Poetter, Richard; Waldhaeusl, Claudia; Nechvile, Elisabeth; Kirisits, Christian; Knocke, Tomas Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate dose distribution within uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]) and tumor (gross tumor volume [GTV]) and the resulting clinical outcome based on systematic three-dimensional treatment planning with dose-volume adaptation. Dose-volume assessment and adaptation in organs at risk and its impact on side effects were investigated in parallel. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with either locally confined endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) or adenocarcinoma of uterus and ovaries after bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n = 1) were included. Heyman packing was performed with mean 11 Norman-Simon applicators (3-18). Three-dimensional treatment planning based on computed tomography (n = 29) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 18) was done in all patients with contouring of CTV, GTV, and organs at risk. Dose-volume adaptation was achieved by dwell location and time variation (intensity modulation). Twelve patients treated with curative intent received five to seven fractions of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (7 Gy per fraction) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy per fraction and α/β of 10 Gy) to the CTV. Four patients had additional external beam radiotherapy (range, 10-40 Gy). One patient had salvage brachytherapy and 3 patients were treated with palliative intent. A dose-volume histogram analysis was performed in all patients. On average, 68% of the CTV and 92% of the GTV were encompassed by the 60 Gy reference volume. Median minimum dose to 90% of CTV and GTV (D90) was 35.3 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. Results: All patients treated with curative intent had complete remission (12/12). After a median follow-up of 47 months, 5 patients are alive without tumor. Seven patients died without tumor from intercurrent disease after median 22 months. The patient with salvage treatment had a second local recurrence after 27 months and died of endometrial carcinoma after 57 months. In patients treated with palliative intent

  18. A study on the annual equivalent doses received by cardiologists in a UK hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, R.Y.L.; Ryan, E.; Alonso-Arrizabalaga, S.

    2001-01-01

    A dose assessment study was carried out to determine the likely annual equivalent doses received by various parts of a cardiologist's body. High sensitivity GR-200 thermoluminescent dosemeters were attached to cardiologists' foreheads, little fingers, wrists, elbows, knees and ankles. Three common cardiology procedures were investigated, namely, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), permanent pacemaker insertion (PPM) and left heart catheterisation (LHC). Dose monitoring was done on a case-by-case basis. Data on ten cases of each procedure were gathered. The projected annual equivalent doses were computed by averaging the ten doses measured at each site for each examination type and finding out from the cardiologists how many cases of PTCA, PPM and LHC they do in a year. Results in this study show that for the lens of the eye, the projected annual equivalent dose is below 10 mSv and for the other body parts, it is below 100 mSv per year. The study demonstrated that the methodology used can help to optimise radiation protection in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  19. Optimisation of CT procedures by dose reduction in abdominal-pelvic studies of chronic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, D.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Peinado, M.A.; Fernandez, B.; Fernandez, B.M.; Jimenez, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Objectives: CT explorations are responsible of a significant increase of collective dose during last twenty years. However, by adapting the procedures to the specific diagnostic requirements of each kind of exploration, dose values can be decreased. This can be specially interesting for chronic patients who undergo several CT controls. The aim of this research is to contrast CT image diagnostic quality by comparing those techniques commonly used in our hospital with lower dose ones. Materials and methods: In a first phase, a study on phantom has been developed to evaluate image quality variations obtained with standard a several low dose techniques. Dose reduction was quantified as well by means of C.T.D.I. w measurements on an abdominal phantom. Both aspects were taken into account to determine a dose threshold below image quality degradation was considered unacceptable from a diagnostic point of view. Subsequently, a group of 50 chronic patients under follow -up was selected to undergo a control CT but with a low dose-technique. Image diagnostic quality was compared with that of previous controls obtained using the standard technique. Three experimented radiologist carried out this evaluation over a sample of six particular slices located at the abdomen and pelvis using an ordinal scale. Such a scale gradate the confidence level of the image for each radiologist. This evaluation was repeated one and two months later without knowledge of previous results to calculate inter and intra -observer variability. Conclusions: CT studies can be carried out with a significant dose reduction preserving their diagnostic capabilities. A quantitative evaluation will be offered at the end of the study, still running. (authors)

  20. [Effectiveness of various dopamine doses in acute myocardial ischemia complicated by cardiogenic shock (an experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipshidze, N N; Korotkov, A A; Marsagishvili, L A; Prigolashvili, T Sh; Bokhua, M R

    1981-06-01

    The effect of various doses of dopamine on the values of cardiac contractile and hemodynamic function under conditions of acute two-hour ischemia complicated by cardiogenic shock was studied in 27 experiments on dogs. In a dose of 5 microgram/kg/min dopamine caused an optimum increase in cardiac productive capacity, reduction of peripheral resistance, adequate increase in coronary circulation and decrease in ST segment depression on the ECG. Infusion of 10 microgram/kg/min dopamine usually caused myocardial hyperfunction with an increase in total peripheral resistance and cardiac performance. Maximum dopamine doses (10 microgram/kg/min and more) were effective in the areactive form of cardiogenic shock. In longterm dopamine infusion it is necessary to establish continuous control over the hemodynamic parameters and the ECG to prevent aggravation of ischemia and for stage-by-stage reduction of the drug concentration and determination of the minimum maintenance dose.

  1. Image and dose quality in selected studies of conventional radiology in designed hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.; Martinez G, A.; Machado T, A.; Mora M, R. de la; Pedroso, L.; Villa Z, R.; Sotolongo C, J.A.; Rodriguez S, R.M.; Martinez A, U.; Figueroa G, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    The medical exposures have a significant contribution to the received doses by the population. As they generally contribute to the patient's direct benefit during a lot of time has been paid smaller attention that to other exposure forms, in spite of existing potentialities of reducing dose to the patients as consequence of these applications. In such sense in the last years the scientific community and international organizations have defined requirements to contribute to that the doses to the patients are the minimum ones necessary to achieve its diagnostic objective. The work exposes the results obtained in the evaluation of the image quality and dose in studies of radiology of thorax posteroanterior and of lumbosacral column anteroposterior and lateral, carried out in 2 university hospitals of La Havana, as well as the contribution of this investigation to the establishment of guidance levels in our country. (Author)

  2. Dose distribution close to metal implants in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Yu, K.N.; Chan, Josie F.K.; Ho, Robert T.K.; Yu, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Materials with high atomic numbers favor the occurrence of the photoelectric effect when they are irradiated with gamma rays. Therefore, the photoelectric effects of metal implants within the target regions in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery are worth studying. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements. A dose enhancement as high as 10% was observed close to a platinum implant along the x and y axes, while no significant dose enhancements were observed for silver, stainless steel 301, and titanium ones. A dose enhancement as high as 20% was observed close to the platinum implant along the z axis at the superior position of the metal-phantom interface and was 10% higher for other metal implants

  3. A study of gonad doses in X-ray radiographic examinations of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A phantom study has been made in an attempt to redetermine gonad dose associated with routine X-ray diagnostic procedures. Over a range of voltages between 60 kVp and 130 kVp, TLD measurements of skin, ovary, a standardised cassette dose of 1 mrad, and testicle doses were obtained for AP, PA and lateral radiographs. Whilst exact numerical results depended greatly on the characteristics of the film-screen combination used, the contrast required in the final radiograph and the efficiency of the Bucky grid, results of this redetermination did not support the view that a reduction in population genetic dose would follow any general increase in the typical operating potential used for abdominal x-ray examinations. (U.K.)

  4. Long-term intercomparison of Spanish environmental dosimetry services. Study of transit dose estimations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duch, Ma Amor; Carlos Saez-Vergara, Jose; Ginjaume, Merce; Gomez, Candelas; Maria Gonzalez-Leiton, Ana; Herrero, Javier; Jose de Lucas, Ma; Rodriguez, Rafael; Marugan, Immaculada; Salas, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the layout and results of a three-year follow-up of a national intercomparison campaign organized on a voluntary basis among the Spanish Laboratories in charge of environmental monitoring at and in the vicinity of Spanish nuclear installations. The dosemeters were exposed in the field at an environmental reference station with a known ambient dose equivalent, and controlled meteorological parameters. The study aimed at verifying the consistency of the different laboratories in estimating the ambient dose equivalent in realistic fields and to evaluate the influence of two different procedures to estimate the transit dose during the transfer of the dosemeters both from and to the dosimetric laboratory and the monitored site. All the results were within 20% of the reference doses for all the dosemeters tested, and in most cases they were within 10%

  5. Study on relations between heavy ions single event upset cross sections and γ accumulated doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chaohui; Geng Bin; Wang Yanping; Peng Honglun; Yang Hailiang; Chen Xiaohua; Li Guozheng

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were done under 252 Cf and 60 Co γ source to study the relation between heavy ion Single Event Upset (SEU) cross sections and γ accumulated doses. There was no obvious rule and little influence of γ accumulated doses on SEU cross sections when Static Random Access Memories were in power off mode and static power on mode. In active measuring mode, the SEU cross section increased as the accumulated doses increasing when same data were written in memory cells. If reverse data, such as '55' and 'AA', were written in memory cells during the experiment, the SEU cross sections decreased to the level when memories were not irradiated under 60 Co γ source, even more small. It implied that the influence of γ accumulated doses on SEU cross sections can be set off by this method

  6. Dose-response study of the hematological toxicity induced by vectorized radionuclides in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau-Poivet, J.; Sas, N.; Nguyen, F.; Abadie, J.; Chouin, N.; Barbet, J.

    2015-01-01

    studied progenitor and blood cells. As compared to 0.8 Gy, one more week was necessary at 1.4 Gy. A mild anemia (21% erythrocyte depletion) was noticed only at this higher absorbed dose between D3 and D10. Conclusion: absorbed doses to the BM between 0.8 and 1.4 Gy induced hematological toxicity expressed by transient BM aplasia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and inconsistent anemia. These depletions and time to recovery were both dose-dependent. Higher absorbed doses will be achieved to better investigate the dose-response relationship and to further develop our compartmental model for platelets. Neutrophils and erythrocytes kinetics are also under investigation to generate satisfying simulations with the model. (authors)

  7. Studies on the dose distribution and treatment technique of high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.H.; Chu, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    Some important properties of high energy electron beams from the linear accelerator, LMR-13, installed in the Yonsei Cancer Center were studied. The results of experimental studies on the problems associated with the 8, 10, and 12 MeV electron beam therapy were as followings; The ionization type dosemeters calibrated by 90 Sr standard source were suitable to the measurements of the outputs and the obsorbed doses in accuracy point of view, and dose measurements using ionization chambers were difficult when measuring doses in small field size and the regions of rapid fall off. The electron energies were measured precisely with an energy spectrometer, and the practical electron energy was calculated within 5% error in the maximum range of the high energy electron beam in water. The correcting factors of perturbated dose distributions owing to radiation field, energy, and materials of the treatment cone were checked and described systematically and thus the variation of dose distributions due to the non-homogeneities of tissues and slopping skin surfaces were completely compensated. The electron beams were adequately diffused using the scatterers, and minimized the bremsstrahlung, irradiation field size, and materials of scatterers. Thus, the therapeutic capacity with the limited electron energy could be extended by improving the dose distributions. (author)

  8. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2007-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population

  9. Feasibility study on standardization of 131I dose in hyperthyrodisom treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yi

    2011-01-01

    To explore feasibility of standardization of 131 I dose in Graves' hyperthyroidism treatment, the data of 681 Graves' disease cases treated with 131 I was retrospective studied. The software was developed to re-calculate the 131 I doses for the patients and compared with original doses given by traditional method. 313 patients with complete information were taken and divided to three groups base on the remedial effect, Cured Group (123 patients), Uncured Group (125 patients) and Hypothyroid Group (65 patients). The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 131 I dose for Graves' hyperthyroidism treatment calculated by two methods (P>0.05). There was obviously statistically significant difference in hypothyroid Group (P 131 I calculated by software method (174.27 MBq) was less than that of traditional method (190.18 MBq). In uncured group, there was still obviously statistically significant difference (P 131 I calculated by software method (187.22 MBq) was more than that of the traditional method (169.46 MBq). In cured group, there was no statistically significant difference (P>0.005), the mean dose of 131 I calculated by software method (185 MBq) was slightly smaller than that of the traditional method(192.03 MBq). The results indicate the calculation of standard 131 I dose for Graves' hyperthyroidism treatment by software developed in this study is feasible. (authors)

  10. Predictors of severity and outcome of global developmental delay without definitive etiologic yield: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Thomaidis, Loretta; Zantopoulos, Georgios Zacharias; Fouzas, Sotirios; Mantagou, Lito; Bakoula, Chryssa; Konstantopoulos, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Although several determinants of global developmental delay (GDD) have been recognized, a significant number of children remain without definitive etiologic diagnosis. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of various prenatal and perinatal factors on the severity and outcome of developmental delay without definitive etiologic yield. Methods From March 2008 to February 2010, 142 children with developmental quotient (DQ)

  11. Use of 99mTc-bicisate in activation studies by split-dose technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, S; Madsen, P L; Sperling, B

    1994-01-01

    The properties of the brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer 99mTc-bicisate (ethyl cysteinate dimer) were examined in regard to its use in test-retest studies with short-interval, split-dose studies. The stimulus applied in these tests was a visual activation by a "flicke......The properties of the brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer 99mTc-bicisate (ethyl cysteinate dimer) were examined in regard to its use in test-retest studies with short-interval, split-dose studies. The stimulus applied in these tests was a visual activation...

  12. Study of External Radiation Expose Dose on Hands of Nuclear Medicine Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Chul; Pyo, Sung Jae

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study are to assess external radiation exposed doses of body and hands of nuclear medicine workers who handle radiation sources, and to measure radiation exposed doses of the hands induced by a whole body bone scan with high frequency and handling a radioactive sources like 99m Tc-HDP and 18 F-FDG in the PET/CT examination. Skillful workers, who directly dispense and inject from radiation sources, were asked to wear a TLD on the chest and ring finger. Then, radiation exposed dose and duration exposed from daily radiation sources for each section were measured by using a pocket dosimeter for the accumulated external doses and the absorbed dose to the hands. In the survey of four medical institutions in Incheon Metropolitan City, only one of four institutions has a radiation dosimeter for local area like hands. Most of institutions uses radiation shielding devices for the purpose of protecting the body trunk, not local area. Even some institutions were revealed not to use such a shielding device. The exposed doses on the hands of nuclear medicine workers who directly handles radioactive sources were approximately twice as much as those on the body. The radiation exposure level for each section of the whole body bone scan with high frequency and that of the PET/CT examination showed that radiation doses were revealed in decreasing order of synthesis of radioactive medicine and installation to a dispensing container, dispensing, administering and transferring. Furthermore, there were statistically significant differences of radiation exposure doses of the hands before and after wearing a syringe shielder in administration of a radioactive sources. In this study, although it did not reach the permissible effective dose for nuclear medicine, the occupational workers were exposed by relatively higher dose level than the non-occupational workers. Therefore, the workers, who closely exposed to radioactive sources should be in compliance with safety

  13. A study on dose attenuation in bone density when TBI using diode detector and TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Hyun Sil; Lee, Jung Jin; Jang, Ahn Ki; KIm, Wan Sun

    2003-01-01

    Uniform dose distribution of the whole body is essential factor for the total body irradiation(TBI). In order to achieved this goal, we used to compensation filter to compensate body contour irregularity and thickness differences. But we can not compensate components of body, namely lung or bone. The purpose of this study is evaluation of dose attenuation in bone tissue when TBI using diode detectors and TLD system. The object of this study were 5 patients who undergo TBI at our hospital. Dosimetry system were diode detectors and TLD system. Treatment method was bilateral and delivered 10 MV X-ray from linear accelerator. Measurement points were head, neck, pelvis, knees and ankles. TLD used two patients and diode detectors used three patients. Results are as followed. All measured dose value were normalized skin dose. TLD dosimetry : Measured skin dose of head, neck, pelvis, knees and ankles were 92.78±3.3, 104.34±2.3, 98.03±1.4, 99.9±2.53, 98.17±0.56 respectably. Measured mid-depth dose of pelvis, knees and ankles were 86±1.82, 93.24±2.53, 91.50±2.84 respectably. There were 6.67%-11.65% dose attenuation at mid-depth in pelvis, knees and ankles. Diode detector : Measured skin dose of head, neck, pelvis, knees and ankles were 95.23±1.18, 98.33±0.6, 93.5±1.5, 87.3±1.5, 86.90±1.16 respectably. There were 4.53%-12.6% dose attenuation at mid-depth in pelvis, knees and ankles. We concluded that dose measurement with TLD or diode detector was inevitable when TBI treatment. Considered dose attenuation in bone tissue, We must have adequately deduction of compensator thickness that body portion involved bone tissue.

  14. A population-based study of dosing and persistence with anti-dementia medications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, Linda

    2013-02-27

    PURPOSE: Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the mainstay of pharmacological intervention for the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD). This study assessed the adequacy of dosing and persistence with AD medications and the predictors of these variables in the \\'real world\\' (outside the clinical trial setting). METHODS: The Health Service Executive-Primary Care Reimbursement Services prescription claims database in the Republic of Ireland contains prescription information for 1.6 million people. Patients aged >70 years who received at least two prescriptions for donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and memantine between January 2006 and December 2010 were included in the study. Rates of dose-maximisation were recorded by examining the initiation dose of each AD drug commenced during the study period and any subsequent dose titrations. Non-persistence was defined by a gap in prescribing of more than 63 consecutive days. Predictors of dose-maximisation and non-persistence were also analysed. RESULTS: Between January 2006 and December 2010, 20,729 patients aged >70 years received a prescription for an AD medication. Despite most patients on donepezil and memantine receiving a prescription for the maximum drug dose, this dose was maintained for 2 consecutive months in only two-thirds of patients. Patients were significantly more likely to have their doses of donepezil and memantine maximised if prescribed in more recent years (2010 vs. 2007). Rates of non-persistence were 30.1 % at 6 months and 43.8 % at 12 months. Older age [75+ vs. <75 years; hazards ratio (HR) 1.16, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.27] and drug type (rivastigmine vs. donepezil; HR 1.15, 95 % CI 1.03-1.27) increased the risk of non-persistence. Non-persistence was lower for those commencing therapy in more recent years (2010 vs. 2007; HR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.73-0.89, p < 0.001) and for those on multiple anti-dementia medications (HR 0.59, 95 % CI 0

  15. Pragmatic criteria of the definition of neonatal near miss: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Pauline Lorena; Jorge, Maria Helena Prado de Mello; Laurenti, Ruy; Fonseca, Sandra Costa; Silva, Kátia Silveira da

    2017-12-04

    The objective of this study was to test the validity of the pragmatic criteria of the definitions of neonatal near miss, extending them throughout the infant period, and to estimate the indicators of perinatal care in public maternity hospitals. A cohort of live births from six maternity hospitals in the municipalities of São Paulo, Niterói, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was carried out in 2011. We carried out interviews and checked prenatal cards and medical records. We compared the pragmatic criteria (birth weight, gestational age, and 5' Apgar score) of the definitions of near miss of Pileggi et al., Pileggi-Castro et al., Souza et al., and Silva et al. We calculated sensitivity, specificity (gold standard: infant mortality), percentage of deaths among newborns with life-threatening conditions, and rates of near miss, mortality, and severe outcomes per 1,000 live births. A total 7,315 newborns were analyzed (completeness of information > 99%). The sensitivity of the definition of Pileggi-Castro et al. was higher, resulting in a higher number of cases of near miss, Souza et al. presented lower value, and Pileggi et al. and de Silva et al. presented intermediate values. There is an increase in sensitivity when the period goes from 0-6 to 0-27 days, and there is a decrease when it goes to 0-364 days. Specificities were high (≥ 97%) and above sensitivities (54% to 77%). One maternity hospital in São Paulo and one in Niterói presented, respectively, the lowest and highest rates of infant mortality, near miss, and frequency of births with life-threatening conditions, regardless of the definition. The definitions of near miss based exclusively on pragmatic criteria are valid and can be used for monitoring purposes. Based on the perinatal literature, the cutoff points adopted by Silva et al. were more appropriate. Periodic studies could apply a more complete definition, incorporating clinical, laboratory, and management criteria, including congenital anomalies

  16. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.silva.rodriguez@sergas.es; Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Pombar, Miguel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Ruibal, Álvaro [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Fundación Tejerina, 28003, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  17. A Randomized Dose-Ranging Study of Neuropeptide Y in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Sehrish; Van Dam, Nicholas T; Horn, Sarah R; Kautz, Marin M; Parides, Michael; Costi, Sara; Collins, Katherine A; Iacoviello, Brian; Iosifescu, Dan V; Mathé, Aleksander A; Southwick, Steven M; Feder, Adriana; Charney, Dennis S; Murrough, James W

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety and trauma-related disorders are among the most prevalent and disabling medical conditions in the United States, and posttraumatic stress disorder in particular exacts a tremendous public health toll. We examined the tolerability and anxiolytic efficacy of neuropeptide Y administered via an intranasal route in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. Twenty-six individuals were randomized in a cross-over, single ascending dose study into 1 of 5 cohorts: 1.4 mg (n=3), 2.8 mg (n=6), 4.6 mg (n=5), 6.8 mg (n=6), and 9.6 mg (n=6). Each individual was dosed with neuropeptide Y or placebo on separate treatment days 1 week apart in random order under double-blind conditions. Assessments were conducted at baseline and following a trauma script symptom provocation procedure subsequent to dosing. Occurrence of adverse events represented the primary tolerability outcome. The difference between treatment conditions on anxiety as measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory immediately following the trauma script represented efficacy outcomes. Twenty-four individuals completed both treatment days. Neuropeptide Y was well tolerated up to and including the highest dose. There was a significant interaction between treatment and dose; higher doses of neuropeptide Y were associated with a greater treatment effect, favoring neuropeptide Y over placebo on Beck Anxiety Inventory score (F1,20=4.95, P=.038). There was no significant interaction for State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score. Our study suggests that a single dose of neuropeptide Y is well tolerated up to 9.6 mg and may be associated with anxiolytic effects. Future studies exploring the safety and efficacy of neuropeptide Y in stress-related disorders are warranted. The reported study is registered at: http://clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT01533519). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  18. The relation of metabolic syndrome according to five definitions to cardiovascular risk factors - a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Ming-May

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI, World Health Organization (WHO, and the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS have been commonly used by studies, little is known about agreement among these five definitions. We examined the agreement among these five definitions and explored their relationship with risk factors of cardiovascular disease in a Taiwan population. Methods A total of 1305 subjects aged 40 years and over in Taiwan were analyzed. Biomedical markers and anthropometric indices were measured. Agreement among definitions was determined by the kappa statistic. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the odds of a high cardiovascular risk group for five definitions of MetS. Results The agreement among the NCEP, IDF, and AHA/NHLBI definitions was from substantial to very good, and agreement between the WHO and EGIR definitions was also substantial. All MetS definitions were significantly associated prevalence of microalbuminuria, elevated highly sensitive CRP (hs-CRP, and arterial stiffness only in women. In men, MetS by NCEP and AHA/NHLBI was associated with elevated level of hs-CRP and arterial stiffness. MetS by WHO and EGIR were significantly associated with microalbuminuria. And MetS by WHO was the only MetS definition that significantly associated with prevalence of arterial stiffness (OR: 2.75, 95% CI: 1.22-6.19. Conclusions The associations of these five definitions with cardiovascular risk factors were similar in women, and it was evident that the five definitions performed better in women than in men, with higher ORs observed in relation to arterial stiffness, elevated hs-CRP, and higher Framingham risk scores.

  19. Options for radiation dose optimisation in pelvic digital radiography: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning-Stanley, Anthony S.; Ward, Anthony J.; England, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of phantom orientation and AEC chamber selection on radiation dose and image quality (IQ) for digital radiography (DR) examinations of the pelvis. Methods: A phantom study was conducted using a DR detector, utilising all AEC chamber combinations. Current recommended orientation (Cr-AEC) was with the outer AEC chambers cranially orientated. mAs (given), source-to-skin distance and kV p data facilitated entrance surface dose and effective dose calculations. Six anatomical areas were blindly graded by two observers (3-point scale) for IQ. Statistical differences in radiation dose were determined using the paired Student’s t-test. IQ data was analysed for inter-observer variability (ICC) and statistical differences (Wilcoxon test). Results: Switching phantom orientation (caudally orientated outer AEC chambers: Ca-AEC) reduced mean radiation dose by 36.8%, (p < 0.001). A minor reduction in median IQ (15.5 vs. 15) was seen (p < 0.001). One Ca-AEC orientated image (1.6%) had all anatomical areas graded ‘inadequate’ by at least one observer; all other images were considered ‘adequate’ for all areas. In the Ca-AEC orientation, at least a 44% dose reduction was achievable (p < 0.001) when only the outer AEC chambers were used. In the Cr-AEC orientation, at least 11% dose reduction was achieved (p < 0.001); here the central chamber was used alone, or in combination. IQ scores fell, but remained ‘adequate’. Conclusion: Switching pelvic orientation relative to AEC chamber position can optimise radiation dose during pelvic radiography. AEC chamber position should be clearly marked on equipment to facilitate this. AEC selection should be an active process.

  20. Study of effective dose of various protocols in equipment cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F.; Batista, W. O.; Caldas, L. V. E.; Lara, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    Currently the cone beam computed tomography is widely used in various procedures of dental radiology. Although the doses values associated with the procedures of cone beam CT are low compared to typical values associated with dental radiology procedure in multi slices CT. However can be high compared to typical values of other techniques commonly used in dental radiology. The present scenario is a very wide range of designs of equipment and, consequently, lack of uniformity in all parameters associated with x-ray generation and geometry. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate and calculate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues relevant and estimate effective dose for different protocols with different geometries of exposure in five cone beam CT equipment. For this, a female Alderson anthropomorphic phantom, manufactured by Radiology Support Devices was used. The phantom was irradiated with 26 dosimeters LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), inserted in organs and tissues along the layers forming the head and neck of the phantom. The equipment used, in this present assessment, was: i-CAT Classical, Kodak 9000 3D, Gendex GXCB 500, Sirona Orthophos X G 3D and Planmeca Pro Max 3D. The effective doses were be determined by the ICRP 103 weighting factors. The values were between 7.0 and 111.5 micro Sv, confirming the broad dose range expected due to the diversity of equipment and protocols used in each equipment. The values of effective dose per Fov size were: between 7 and 51.2 micro Sv for located Fov; between 17.6 and 52.0 micro Sv for medium Fov; and between 11.5 and 43.1 micro Sv to large Fov (maxillofacial). In obtaining the effective dose the measurements highlighted a relevance contribution of dose absorbed by the remaining organs (36%), Salivary glands (30%), thyroid (12%) and bone marrow (12%). (Author)

  1. Study of effective dose of various protocols in equipment cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F. [Universidade Federale de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria Prof. Jose Aloisio de Campos, Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, 49-100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Batista, W. O. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho, Salvador, 40301015 Bahia (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E.; Lara, P. A., E-mail: mrs2206@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Currently the cone beam computed tomography is widely used in various procedures of dental radiology. Although the doses values associated with the procedures of cone beam CT are low compared to typical values associated with dental radiology procedure in multi slices CT. However can be high compared to typical values of other techniques commonly used in dental radiology. The present scenario is a very wide range of designs of equipment and, consequently, lack of uniformity in all parameters associated with x-ray generation and geometry. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate and calculate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues relevant and estimate effective dose for different protocols with different geometries of exposure in five cone beam CT equipment. For this, a female Alderson anthropomorphic phantom, manufactured by Radiology Support Devices was used. The phantom was irradiated with 26 dosimeters LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), inserted in organs and tissues along the layers forming the head and neck of the phantom. The equipment used, in this present assessment, was: i-CAT Classical, Kodak 9000 3D, Gendex GXCB 500, Sirona Orthophos X G 3D and Planmeca Pro Max 3D. The effective doses were be determined by the ICRP 103 weighting factors. The values were between 7.0 and 111.5 micro Sv, confirming the broad dose range expected due to the diversity of equipment and protocols used in each equipment. The values of effective dose per Fov size were: between 7 and 51.2 micro Sv for located Fov; between 17.6 and 52.0 micro Sv for medium Fov; and between 11.5 and 43.1 micro Sv to large Fov (maxillofacial). In obtaining the effective dose the measurements highlighted a relevance contribution of dose absorbed by the remaining organs (36%), Salivary glands (30%), thyroid (12%) and bone marrow (12%). (Author)

  2. Foetal Radiation Dose and Risk from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures: A Multinational Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest K.; Darko, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology examinations there is a benefit that the patient derives from the resulting diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed each year, it is inevitable that there will be occasions when an examination(s) may be inadvertently performed on pregnant patients or occasionally it may become clinically necessary to perform an examination(s) on a pregnant patient. In all these circumstances it is necessary to request an estimation of the foetal dose and risk. We initiated a study to investigate fetal doses from different countries. Exposure techniques on 367 foetuses from 414 examinations were collected and investigated. The FetDoseV4 program was used for all dose and risk estimations. The radiation doses received by the 367 foetuses ranges: <0.001–21.9 mGy depending on examination and technique. The associated probability of induced hereditary effect ranges: <1 in 200000000 (5 × 10 −9 ) to 1 in 10000 (1 × 10 −4 ) and the risk of childhood cancer ranges <1 in 12500000 (8 × 10 −8 ) to 1 in 500 (2 × 10 −3 ). The data indicates that foetal doses from properly conducted diagnostic radiology examinations will not result in any deterministic effect and a negligible risk of causing radiation induced hereditary effect in the descendants of the unborn child

  3. A dose-escalation study of combretastatin A4-phosphate in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, E; Smets, P; Daminet, S; Cornelis, I; De Clercq, K; Ni, Y; Vlerick, L; de Rooster, H

    2018-03-01

    Combretastatin A4-Phosphate (CA4P) is a vascular disrupting agent revealing promising results in cancer treatments for humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and adverse events of CA4P in healthy dogs as a prerequisite to application of CA4P in dogs with cancer. Ten healthy dogs were included. The effects of escalating doses of CA4P on physical, haematological and biochemical parameters, systolic arterial blood pressure, electrocardiogram, echocardiographic variables and general wellbeing were characterised. Three different doses were tested: 50, 75 and 100 mg m -2 . At all 3 CA4P doses, nausea, abdominal discomfort as well as diarrhoea were observed for several hours following administration. Likewise, a low-grade neutropenia was observed in all dogs. Doses of 75 and 100 mg m -2 additionally induced vomiting and elevation of serum cardiac troponine I levels. At 100 mg m -2 , low-grade hypertension and high-grade neurotoxicity were also observed. In healthy dogs, doses up to 75 mg m -2 seem to be well tolerated. The severity of the neurotoxicity observed at 100 mg m -2 , although transient, does not invite to use this dose in canine oncology patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Validation of radiosterilization dose of human skin dressings for burnt treatment: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Due to the need for better materials to treat burnt patients, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) and the Rosa Guerzoni Chambergo Tissue Bank are collaborating for developing human skin dressings. Skin was procured from living donors, who surgically were performed a dermolipectomy. Exclusion criteria, stated by the Peruvian Organization for Transplant and Donation were observed. Glycerolized human skin dressings were processed at the tissue bank and sent to IPEN, where the gamma irradiation sterilizing dose was determined. The purpose of this work is to validate the radiation sterilization dose delivered to human skin dressings using the IAEA Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control. A batch of human skin dressings was tested. Average values of bioburden present in ten samples was 30 UFC/item, obtaining a sub-sterilization dose of 4 kGy. Irradiations were performed in the GammacellExcel 220. Sterility tests performed fulfilled the requirements established by the Code, achieving a validated dose value of 19.7 kGy. This preliminary study, that should be repeated in two other batches of processed human skin, allows to diminish 25 kGy the sterilizing dose to the stated above dose value, in a frame of a quality assurance system that also comprises the processes held at tissue banks previous irradiation. It also permit the availability of these materials in Peruvian hospitals. (Author)

  5. ZD0473 pharmacokinetics in Japanese patients: a Phase I dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Tamura, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, N; Ueda, Y; Shimoyama, T; Saijo, N

    2002-12-01

    ZD0473 is new platinum agent that was rationally designed to circumvent platinum resistance and reduce the potential for nephro-and neurotoxicity. This Phase I dose-escalating study investigated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and efficacy of ZD0473 in Japanese patients with solid, refractory tumours. ZD0473 was administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks. Nine patients received a total of 16 cycles of ZD0473 (median 1 cycle/patient), with 3 patients treated at each of 3 doses (60, 90, 120 mg/m2). The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) increased with dose in a linear fashion for both total platinum and ZD0473 in plasma ultrafiltrate, suggesting that the pharmacokinetics of ZD0473 are linear. Haematological and non-haematological toxicities such as nausea and vomiting were mild (grade 1 or 2) and transient. No clinically significant nephro-, oto- or neurotoxicity was observed. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not observed and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. ZD0473 treatment showed evidence of disease stabilisation in 3 patients (33%). In conclusion, ZD0473 appears to have linear pharmacokinetics, and an acceptable tolerability profile at doses up to 120 mg/m2 in Japanese patients with refractory solid malignancies. Following evaluation of the data from all the Western trials, the ZD0473 development programme changed and this Japanese trial was stopped.

  6. Oral sodium phenylbutyrate in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: a dose escalation and pharmacologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphanich, Surasak; Baker, Sharyn D; Grossman, Stuart A; Carson, Kathryn A; Gilbert, Mark R; Fisher, Joy D; Carducci, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, pharmacokinetic parameters, and preliminary efficacy data of oral sodium phenylbutyrate (PB) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Twenty-three patients with supratentorial recurrent malignant gliomas were enrolled on this dose escalation trial. Four dose levels of PB were studied: 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day. Data were collected to assess toxicity, response, survival, and pharmacokinetics. All PB doses of 9, 18, and 27 g/day were well tolerated. At 36 g/day, two of four patients developed dose-limiting grade 3 fatigue and somnolence. At the MTD of 27 g/day, one of seven patients developed reversible grade 3 somnolence. Median survival from time of study entry was 5.4 months. One patient had a complete response for five years, and no partial responses were noted, which yielded an overall response rate of 5%. Plasma concentrations of 706, 818, 1225, and 1605 muM were achieved with doses of 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day, respectively. The mean value for PB clearance in this patient population was 22 liters/h, which is significantly higher than the 16 liters/h reported in patients with other malignancies who were not receiving P450 enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs (P = 0.038). This study defines the MTD and recommended phase 2 dose of PB at 27 g/day for heavily pretreated patients with recurrent gliomas. The pharmacology of PB appears to be affected by concomitant administration of P450-inducing anticonvulsants.

  7. Oral sodium phenylbutyrate in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: A dose escalation and pharmacologic study1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphanich, Surasak; Baker, Sharyn D.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Fisher, Joy D.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, pharmacokinetic parameters, and preliminary efficacy data of oral sodium phenylbutyrate (PB) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Twenty-three patients with supratentorial recurrent malignant gliomas were enrolled on this dose escalation trial. Four dose levels of PB were studied: 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day. Data were collected to assess toxicity, response, survival, and pharmacokinetics. All PB doses of 9, 18, and 27 g/day were well tolerated. At 36 g/day, two of four patients developed dose-limiting grade 3 fatigue and somnolence. At the MTD of 27 g/day, one of seven patients developed reversible grade 3 somnolence. Median survival from time of study entry was 5.4 months. One patient had a complete response for five years, and no partial responses were noted, which yielded an overall response rate of 5%. Plasma concentrations of 706, 818, 1225, and 1605 μM were achieved with doses of 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day, respectively. The mean value for PB clearance in this patient population was 22 liters/h, which is significantly higher than the 16 liters/h reported in patients with other malignancies who were not receiving P450 enzyme–inducing anticonvulsant drugs (P = 0.038). This study defines the MTD and recommended phase 2 dose of PB at 27 g/day for heavily pretreated patients with recurrent gliomas. The pharmacology of PB appears to be affected by concomitant administration of P450-inducing anticonvulsants. PMID:15831235

  8. Cervicitis aetiology and case definition: a study in Australian women attending sexually transmitted infection clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, M Josephine; Garden, Frances L; Rawlinson, William D; Naing, Zin W; Cumming, Robert G; Konecny, Pam

    2016-05-01

    Studies examining cervicitis aetiology and prevalence lack comparability due to varying criteria for cervicitis. We aimed to outline cervicitis associations and suggest a best case definition. A cross-sectional study of 558 women at three sexually transmitted infection clinics in Sydney, Australia, 2006-2010, examined pathogen and behavioural associations of cervicitis using three cervicitis definitions: 'microscopy' (>30 pmnl/hpf (polymorphonuclear leucocytes per high-powered field on cervical Gram stain)), 'cervical discharge' (yellow and/or mucopurulent cervical discharge) or 'micro+cervical discharge' (combined 'microscopy' and 'cervical discharge'). Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) had the strongest associations with cervicitis definitions 'micro+cervical discharge': CT adjusted prevalence ratio (APR)=2.13 (95% CI 1.38 to 3.30) p=0.0006, MG APR=2.21 (1.33 to 3.69) p=0.002, TV APR=2.37 (1.44 to 3.90) p=0.0007 NG PR=4.42 (3.79 to 5.15) pdefinitions with best clinical utility and pathogen prediction were 'cervical discharge' and 'micro+cervical discharge'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Space Station data system analysis/architecture study. Task 1: Functional requirements definition, DR-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The initial task in the Space Station Data System (SSDS) Analysis/Architecture Study is the definition of the functional and key performance requirements for the SSDS. The SSDS is the set of hardware and software, both on the ground and in space, that provides the basic data management services for Space Station customers and systems. The primary purpose of the requirements development activity was to provide a coordinated, documented requirements set as a basis for the system definition of the SSDS and for other subsequent study activities. These requirements should also prove useful to other Space Station activities in that they provide an indication of the scope of the information services and systems that will be needed in the Space Station program. The major results of the requirements development task are as follows: (1) identification of a conceptual topology and architecture for the end-to-end Space Station Information Systems (SSIS); (2) development of a complete set of functional requirements and design drivers for the SSIS; (3) development of functional requirements and key performance requirements for the Space Station Data System (SSDS); and (4) definition of an operating concept for the SSIS. The operating concept was developed both from a Space Station payload customer and operator perspective in order to allow a requirements practicality assessment.

  10. Studies on the gonad dose in x-ray examination for the two day human dock at Nissei Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shozo; Muraoka, Tsutomu; Ishigaki, Naoya; Ono, Toshio; Nakai, Toshio

    1979-01-01

    The gonad dose in x-ray examination should be reduced to the minimum extent. The purpose of this study is to estimate the gonad dose in x-ray examination for the two day-human dock at Nissei Hospital. The gonad dose to 40 males and 60 females was measured on cholecystography and gastrointestinal radiography. Dose measurement was performed using a thermoluminescence dosimeter. The results were as follows: Mean gonad dose is 6.9 mR to male and 44.2 mR to female, so that gonad dose to female is 6.4 times greater than that to male. (author)

  11. Follow up on a workloaded interventional radiologist's occupational radiation doses - a study case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketner, D.; Ofer, A.; Engel, A.

    2004-01-01

    During many interventional procedures, patients' radiation doses are high, affecting radiologist's radiation doses. We checked occupational doses of a workloaded interventional radiologist during seven years

  12. Simulative study on dose distribution of 103Pd stent in blood-vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu; Xu Zhiyong; Sun Fuyin; Xu Shuhe; Ma Fengwu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dose distribution of 103 Pd stent in the blood-vessel. Methods: Simulative study on dose distribution of endovascular 103 Pd stent was conducted with thermoluminescence dosimeter. The vessel wall was substituted by muscle equivalent material in this simulative study. Results: When radioactivity of the study 103 Pd stent was 9.8 MBq the absorbed dose from the stent surface by muscle equivalent material was 9.8 Gy at 17 d (the half-life period of 103 Pd). The radioactivity of 103 Pd stent surface rapidly attenuated over the radial distance. 80% of the radioactivity at the area that was radially 0.4 mm apart from the stent surface was absorbed by the simulative blood-vessel wall. Conclusion: Endovascular 103 Pd stent does not exert significant injury on the surrounding organs or tissues

  13. Exploring Stakeholder Definitions within the Aerospace Industry: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jonathan R.

    A best practice in the discipline of project management is to identify all key project stakeholders prior to the execution of a project. When stakeholders are properly identified, they can be consulted to provide expert advice on project activities so that the project manager can ensure the project stays within the budget and schedule constraints. The problem addressed by this study is that managers fail to properly identify key project stakeholders when using stakeholder theory because there are multiple conflicting definitions for the term stakeholder. Poor stakeholder identification has been linked to multiple negative project outcomes such as budget and schedules overruns, and this problem is heightened in certain industries such as aerospace. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore project managers' and project stakeholders' perceptions of how they define and use the term stakeholder within the aerospace industry. This qualitative exploratory single-case study had two embedded units of analysis: project managers and project stakeholders. Six aerospace project managers and five aerospace project stakeholders were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with both project managers and project stakeholders. All data were analyzed using Yin's (2011) five-phased cycle approach for qualitative research. The results indicated that the aerospace project managers and project stakeholder define the term stakeholder as "those who do the work of a company." The participants build upon this well-known concept by adding that, "a company should list specific job titles" that correspond to their company specific-stakeholder definition. Results also indicated that the definition of the term stakeholder is used when management is assigning human resources to a project to mitigate or control project risk. Results showed that project managers tended to include the customer in their stakeholder definitions

  14. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken with each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 ± 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 ± 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 ± 0.010 and 0.781 ± 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.

  15. Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Breast CT Using Spectral Shaping Filters: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Iodinated contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging of the breast has been studied with various modalities, including full-field digital mammography (FFDM), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and dedicated breast CT. Contrast imaging with breast CT has a number of advantages over FFDM and DBT, including the lack of breast compression, and generation of fully isotropic 3-D reconstructions. Nonetheless, for breast CT to be considered as a viable tool for routine clinical use, it would be desirable to reduce radiation dose. One approach for dose reduction in breast CT is spectral shaping using X-ray filters. In this paper, two high atomic number filter materials are studied, namely, gadolinium (Gd) and erbium (Er), and compared with Al and Cu filters currently used in breast CT systems. Task-based performance is assessed by imaging a cylindrical poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom with iodine inserts on a benchtop breast CT system that emulates clinical breast CT. To evaluate detectability, a channelized hoteling observer (CHO) is used with sums of Laguerre-Gauss channels. It was observed that spectral shaping using Er and Gd filters substantially increased the dose efficiency (defined as signal-to-noise ratio of the CHO divided by mean glandular dose) as compared with kilovolt peak and filter settings used in commercial and prototype breast CT systems. These experimental phantom study results are encouraging for reducing dose of breast CT, however, further evaluation involving patients is needed.

  16. Study of distribution dose for chest radiography using the computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, B.C.; Menezes, C.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (MCE) to perform dose studies in situations of radiation exposure without the need for individuals to be exposed. MCEs are essentially composed of a simulator of the radioactive source, a Monte Carlo code, and a phantom of voxels representing the human anatomy. The objective of this work was to perform a study of the dose distribution in the thoracic region in radiographic exams using the MCE ALDERSON / EGSnrc. For that, virtual simulations were performed using Monte Carlo Method techniques to calculate the dose in the simulator of voxels representative of the thoracic region. The results show that most beam energy was deposited in the skeleton for all simulated radiological techniques, while smaller fractions were deposited in the lungs and soft tissue. For example, at 90 kV voltage, 14% of the energy was deposited in the bone medium, while lungs and soft tissue receive only 5 and 3%, respectively. It is concluded that the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE can be used for studies of the dose distribution on chest radiographs used in radiodiagnosis practice, thus optimizing dose absorbed in the patient in clinical exams

  17. High-dose-rate-intracavitary brachytherapy applications and the difference in the bladder and rectum doses: A study from rural centre of Maharashatra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To report the difference in the bladder and rectum doses with different applications by the radiotherapists in the same patient of the carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by multiple fractions of high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. Materials and Methods : Between January 2003 to December 2004, a total of 60 cases of the carcinoma uterine cervix were selected randomly for the retrospective analyses. All 60 cases were grouped in six groups according to the treating radiotherapist who did the HDR-ICBT application. Three radiotherapists were considered for this study, named A, B and C. Ten cases for each radiotherapist in whom all three applications were done by the same radiotherapist. And 10 cases for each radiotherapist with shared applications in the same patient (A+B, A+C and B+C. The bladder and rectal doses were calculated in reference to point "A" dose and were limited to 80% of prescribed point "A" dose, as per ICRU-38 recommendations. Received dose grouped in three groups- less then 80% (< 80%, 80-100% and above 100% (>100%. A total of 180 applications for 60 patients were calculated for the above analyses. Results : There is a lot of difference in the bladder and rectal doses with the application by the different radiotherapists, even in the same patient with multiple fractions of HDR-ICBT. Applications by ′A′ radiotherapist were within the limits in the self as well as in the shared groups more number of times, by ′B′ radiotherapist was more times exceeding the limit and by ′C′ radiotherapist doses were in between the A and B. Discussion and Conclusion : For the rectal and bladder doses most important factors are patient′s age, disease stage, duration between EBRT and HDR-ICRT and patient anatomy, but these differences can be minimized to some extent by careful application, proper packing and proper fixation.

  18. Validation of self-reported cannabis dose and potency: an ecological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, P.; Liebregts, N.; de Graaf, R.; Korf, D.J.; van den Brink, W.; van Laar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To assess the reliability and validity of self-reported cannabis dose and potency measures. Design Cross-sectional study comparing self-reports with objective measures of amount of cannabis and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration. Setting Ecological study with assessments at

  19. Validation of self-reported cannabis dose and potency: an ecological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, Peggy; Liebregts, Nienke; de Graaf, Ron; Korf, Dirk J.; van den Brink, Wim; van Laar, Margriet

    2013-01-01

    To assess the reliability and validity of self-reported cannabis dose and potency measures. Cross-sectional study comparing self-reports with objective measures of amount of cannabis and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration. Ecological study with assessments at participants' homes or in

  20. Assessment of individual dose utilization vs. physician prescribing recommendations for recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in paediatric and adult patients with congenital haemophilia and alloantibody inhibitors (CHwI): the Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia (DOSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppo, R A; Kessler, C M; Neufeld, E J; Cooper, D L

    2013-07-01

    Recent data from the Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia diary study has described home treatment with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in congenital haemophilia with inhibitors (CHwI). The current analysis compares prescribed and patient/caregiver-reported rFVIIa administration in paediatric and adult CHwI patients in this study. Patients with ≥ 4 bleeding episodes within a 3-month period prescribed rFVIIa as first-line therapy for bleeding episodes were eligible. Patients/caregivers completed a diary for ≥ 90 days or until the patient experienced four bleeds. Initial, total and mean rFVIIa doses reported for each bleeding episode were calculated and compared with the physician-prescribed doses. Of 52 enrolled patients (25 children; 27 adults), 39 (75%) completed the study. Children and adults had similar mean durations of bleeding episodes. Both patient groups were administered higher initial rFVIIa doses for joint bleeds than prescribed: median (range) 215.2 (74.1-400.0) mcg kg(-1) vs. 200.0 (61.0-270.0) mcg kg(-1) for children, and 231.3 (59.3-379.7) mcg kg(-1) vs. 123.0 (81.0-289.0) mcg kg(-1) for adults. The median infused dose for joint bleeds was higher in adults than children (175.2 vs. 148.0 mcg kg(-1) ), but children received significantly more doses per joint bleed than adults (median 6.5 vs. 3.0). The median total dose per joint bleed was higher in children than adults (1248.7 vs. 441.6). For children and adults, both initial and additional doses administered for bleeds were higher than prescribed. Children received higher total doses per bleed due to an increased number of infusions per bleed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan; Efe, Esma; Yavuz, Melek; Sonmez, Serhat; Yavuz, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  2. Pilot study: relative dose of the TLD, OSL and Radiochromic film applied in CT exams dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuti, C.F.; Maia, R.S.I.; Romano, R.F.T.; Daros, K. A.C.

    2015-01-01

    At DDI/UNIFESP, the abdomen and chest CT exams correspond to 38% of the exams, becoming the focus of studies. The aim of this study is to assess the relative dose using TLDs, OSLs and RF for the evaluation of the dose distribution in the skin in abdomen CT exams. The simulation of the CT exam was performed in an anthropomorphic phantom, using a CT scanner Philips, Brilliance/64 and TLDs, OSLs and RF fixed along the sagittal axis of the phantom. The OSLs showed similar performance to the TLDs and RF shows low accuracy, resulting in an average value (0.927±0.022). (author)

  3. Pilot study: relative dose of the TLD, OSL and Radiochromic film applied in CT exams dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuti, C.F. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Maria Aparecida Pedrossian; Maia, R.S.I.; Romano, R.F.T.; Daros, K. A.C., E-mail: daros.kellen@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2015-07-01

    At DDI/UNIFESP, the abdomen and chest CT exams correspond to 38% of the exams, becoming the focus of studies. The aim of this study is to assess the relative dose using TLDs, OSLs and RF for the evaluation of the dose distribution in the skin in abdomen CT exams. The simulation of the CT exam was performed in an anthropomorphic phantom, using a CT scanner Philips, Brilliance/64 and TLDs, OSLs and RF fixed along the sagittal axis of the phantom. The OSLs showed similar performance to the TLDs and RF shows low accuracy, resulting in an average value (0.927±0.022). (author)

  4. Infusion dose requirement of rocuronium in patients on phenytoin therapy - A prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, Veena; Radhakrishnan, Arathi; Halemani, Kusuma; Keshavan, Venkatesh H

    2017-10-01

    Patients with intracranial tumour are usually on anticonvulsants. Patients on phenytoin therapy demonstrate rapid metabolism of nondepolarising muscle relaxants secondary to enzyme induction. Infusion dose requirement of rocuronium in such patients has been sparingly studied. We studied the continuous infusion dose requirement of rocuronium bromide in patients on phenytoin therapy and its correlation with serum levels of phenytoin. Seventy-five patients scheduled for supratentorial tumour surgery were included in the study. Patients not on phenytoin were taken as control. The primary outcome variable studied was the infusion dose requirement of rocuronium in patients on phenytoin. Based on pre-operative serum phenytoin levels, study group patients were divided into two groups: sub-therapeutic level group (phenytoin level 10 μg/mL). Following anaesthesia induction, rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg/kg was administered to achieve tracheal intubation. Rocuronium infusion was titrated to maintain zero response on the train-of-four response. Demographic data were comparable. Patients receiving phenytoin required higher infusion dose compared to the control group (0.429 ± 0.2 mg/kg/h vs. 0.265 ± 0.15 mg/kg/h, P rocuronium (0.429 ± 0.205 mg/kg/h vs. 0.429 ± 0.265 mg/kg/h ( P = 0.815). The recovery was faster in the phenytoin group compared to the control group. Haowever, it was not clinically significant. The infusion dose requirement of rocuronium bromide in patients on phenytoin is higher and the serum levels of phenytoin does not influence the dose required.

  5. United States-assisted studies on dose reconstruction in the former Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Bouville, A.

    1995-12-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the US and the USSR entered into an agreement to work on the safety of civilian nuclear reactors; one aspect of that work was to study the environmental transport and health effects of radionuclides released by the accident. After the break-up of the USSR separate agreements were established between the US and Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia to continue work on dose reconstruction and epidemiologic studies of health effects from exposure to external radiation and the incorporation of radionuclides. Studies in Belarus and Ukraine related to the Chernobyl accident now emphasize epidemiologic: studies of childhood-thyroid cancer and leukemia, and eye-lens-cataract formation in liquidators. Supporting studies on dose reconstruction emphasize a variety of ecological, physical, and biological techniques. Studies being conducted in Russia currently emphasize health effects in the workers and the population around the Mayak Industrial Association. As this production complex is an analogue of the US Hanford Works, advantage is being taken of the US experience in conducting a similar, recently completed dose-reconstruction study. In all cases the primary work on dose reconstruction is being performed by scientists from the former Soviet Union. US assistance is in the form of expert consultation and participation, exchange visits, provision of supplies and equipment, and other forms of local assistance

  6. Radiation data definitions and compilation for equipment qualification data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouquet, F.L.; Winslow, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Dose definitions, physical properties, mechanical properties, electrical properties, and particle definitions are listed for insulators and dielectrics, elastomeric seals and gaskets, lubricants, adhesives, and coatings

  7. Image quality and doses on selected studies of conventional radiology in designed hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina; Machado Tejeda, Adalberto; Mora Machado, Roxana de la; Pedroso, Luis; Martinez Acosta, Ubaldo; Fiqueroa Garcia, Luisa M.

    2008-01-01

    The medical exposures have a significant contribution to the doses received by the population, although it has been given minor attention than to other exposure forms, despite of existing potentialities of reducing doses to the patients as consequence of these applications. In the last years the scientific community and international organizations have defined requirements to contribute to that the doses to the patients are the minimum ones necessary to achieve their diagnostic objective. The present work gives the results obtained in the evaluation of the image quality and doses for exams of thorax PA, lumbar spine AP and lumbar spine lateral, carried out in 2 university hospitals of Havana, as well as the contribution on this investigation to the establishment of the guidance levels in the country. During the investigation it took as reference for the reference for the evaluation of the image quality of the radiological studies the emitted criteria by European Union. The behavior of these approaches for the case of the thorax studies presented its biggest difficulties with the achievement of the approaches related with the visualization of breathing structures, being the execution percentages lower than the remaining countries of the region. In general the behaviour of the approaches of quality image in the ARCAL project. The behaviour of the image quality approaches are associated to different technical factors. The obtained results of doses for thorax PA are bigger than the recommended International Standards Basics in both hospitals. (author)

  8. Evaluation of dose components for healthy tissue tolerance studies on dogs at the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, P.; Moss, R.L.; Siefert, A.; Huiskamp, R.; Gavin, P.; Konijnenberg, M.

    1993-01-01

    Before the start of clinical trails of BNCT on glioma patients at the Petten reactor, certain preconditions must be determined. In particular the tolerance of healthy brain tissue exposed to the epithermal neutron beam requires investigation. In these studies, beagle dogs have been subjected to different levels of irradiation and 10 B, the latter in the form of BSH. To support this work a treatment planning tool is being developed to predict the various dose components within the treatment volume. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP, has been used to simulate the particle transport and to predict the different dose rate distributions. The doses rates generated by MCNP are manipulated with a processing code, TREAT, to give irradiation times, peak dose positions and to display the required data in a graphical format. This paper explains the basic methodology used in the system and a practical case is presented for one of the healthy tissue tolerance dogs. Doses, both physical and RBE weighted, have been produced for pre-treatment planning studies

  9. Measurement of dose to skin using TLD of several radiodiagnostic studies in San Jose, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, P.

    1998-01-01

    It is quantified the radiation doses on skin for several radiodiagnostic studies in patients of the Calderon Guardia Hospital in San Jose, Costa Rica at the period October 1997-September 1998 using thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD 100. The crystals receive the decoction standard procedures and they are arranged at the middle of the irradiation field. For a total of 973 radiodiagnostic studies it was found that the dose on skin in mGy are: 2.09 for thorax AP/AP, 5.33 for thorax LAT, 5.35 for skull AP/PA, 2.98 for skull LAT, 10.74 for abdomen, hips and pelvis, 6.20 for spines AP, 9.35 for spines LAT, 11.48 for lumbar columns AP, 29.99 for lumbar columns LAT and 6.87 for intravenous skin diagrams (first plate ap). It is produced thus the first reference bank for the national hospitals, which is compared with the orientation levels of doses for IAEA. Recommendations to diminish the collective doses through quality control programs are discussed, taking as goal to have got radiographs of excellent diagnostic quality, but with the less possible doses. (Author)

  10. The impact of digital imaging on patient doses during barium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, D.A.; Chapple, C.-L.; Faulkner, K.

    1995-01-01

    Barium studies performed on 10 digital and four non-digital fluoroscopic systems were monitored with dose-area product meters as part of a Regional Patient Dosimetry Audit programme. The data have been collected using a computer to read and reset the dose-area product meter and also to collect patient and examination details. A comparison of dose-area product measurements from digital and non-digital fluoroscopy units on over 10 000 barium studies is presented. The data have been corrected according to patient size. The mean size corrected dose-area product for a barium meal examination was found to be 7.62 Gy cm -2 for a digital set compared with 15.45 Gy cm -2 for a non-digital set with 2462 and 1308 patients included in each measurement series, respectively. Dose-area products were also a factor of approximately two lower for barium enema, barium swallow and barium follow-through examinations performed on digital systems. (author)

  11. [Deliberate interruptions and changes of dose of inhaled corticosteroids by asthma patients: "a community pharmacy study"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, L; Van Ganse, É; Devouassoux, G; Chatté, G; Tamberou, C; Belhassen, M; Chamba, G

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) remains a major issue for asthma management, even among patients receiving a regular prescription from their doctor. The frequency of deliberate interruption of ICS, and of spontaneous changes of dose, were studied in a population of asthma patients recruited in community pharmacies. Asthma patients (aged 18-50) recruited in community pharmacies reported in self-administered questionnaires their spontaneous interruptions and changes of doses of ICS during the past 3 months. The characteristics of patients who interrupted their therapy or who modified the dose were compared with other patients. The studied population included 252 patients (mean age 35 year-old, females: 59%), of whom 62% had inadequately controlled asthma. Among these patients, 25% had interrupted ICS therapy during the past 3 months, while 21% spontaneously changed the dose. The most reported reason for interrupting ICS was the cessation of symptoms (50%). In multivariate analysis, interrupting ICS was mainly associated with inadequate asthma control (OR=3.1, 95% CI 1.5-6.4), while the strongest association with changing ICS doses was the patients' perception of asthma as a concern in their lives (OR=3.2, 95% CI 1.2-8.4). These results underline a poor understanding of the purpose of ICS therapy by patients. They also highlight the need of therapeutic education to improve the management of the disease. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of the contribution of X-ray and gamma photons to the measured exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriampanarivo, H.L.H.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the contribution of X-rays and gamma radiation to the measured dose in the city of Antananarivo. The annual indoor absorbed dose was studied as well. Measurements were carried out in twelve sites, namely public schools and churches. The mean dose rate lies between (0.34±0.03)μSv/h and (0.38±0.04)μSv/h for most of the sites. Two of them showed values between (0.40±0.04)μSv/h and (0.30±0.03)μSv/h. Mean indoor dose rate is of (0.36±0.04)μSv/h and the annual absorbed dose is (3.16±0.32)mSv/person. Indoor measurements showed mean integral values ranging from (277.22±0,22)cps to (733.66±0,37)cps. The lowest mean count rate is (277.22±0,22)cps, measured in the AMARO site, whereas the highest are (733,66±0,37)cps, (697,81±0,36)cps and (689,32±0,36)cps measured in ALO0 , AKELY, and MASINA respectively. [fr

  13. Comparative study on skin dose measurement using MOSFET and TLD for pediatric patients with acute lymphatic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohammed, Huda I; Mahyoub, Fareed H; Moftah, Belal A

    2010-07-01

    The object of this study was to compare the difference of skin dose measured in patients with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (mobile MOSFET dose verification system (TN-RD-70-W) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 chips, Harshaw/ Bicron, OH, USA). Because TLD has been the most-commonly used technique in the skin dose measurement of TBI, the aim of the present study is to prove the benefit of using the mobile MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) dosimeter, for entrance dose measurements during the total body irradiation (TBI) over thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measurements involved 10 pediatric patients ages between 3 and 14 years. Thermoluminescent dosimeters and MOSFET dosimetry were performed at 9 different anatomic sites on each patient. The present results show there is a variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD in all patients, and for every anatomic site selected, there is no significant difference in the dose delivered using MOSFET as compared to the prescribed dose. However, there is a significant difference for every anatomic site using TLD compared with either the prescribed dose or MOSFET. The results indicate that the dosimeter measurements using the MOSFET gave precise measurements of prescribed dose. However, TLD measurement showed significant increased skin dose of cGy as compared to either prescribed dose or MOSFET group. MOSFET dosimeters provide superior dose accuracy for skin dose measurement in TBI as compared with TLD.

  14. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  15. Point Organ Radiation Dose in Abdominal CT: Effect of Patient Off-Centering in an Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Khawaja, Ranish Deedar; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Lira, Diego; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Primak, Andrew; Xu, George; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2017-08-01

    To determine the effect of patient off-centering on point organ radiation dose measurements in a human cadaver scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol. A human cadaver (88 years, body-mass-index 20 kg/m2) was scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol on 128-slice dual source MDCT (Definition Flash, Siemens). A total of 18 scans were performed using two scan protocols (a) 120 kV-200 mAs fixed-mA (CTDIvol 14 mGy) (b) 120 kV-125 ref mAs (7 mGy) with automatic exposure control (AEC, CareDose 4D) at three different positions (a) gantry isocenter, (b) upward off-centering and (c) downward off-centering. Scanning was repeated three times at each position. Six thimble (in liver, stomach, kidney, pancreas, colon and urinary bladder) and four MOSFET dosimeters (on cornea, thyroid, testicle and breast) were placed for calculation of measured point organ doses. Organ dose estimations were retrieved from dose-tracking software (eXposure, Radimetrics). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. There was a significant difference between the trends of point organ doses with AEC and fixed-mA at all three positions (p 92% for both protocols; p < 0.0001). For both protocols, the highest mean difference in point doses was found for stomach and lowest for colon. Measured absorbed point doses in abdominal CT vary with patient-centering in the gantry isocenter. Due to lack of consideration of patient positioning in the dose estimation on automatic software-over estimation of the doses up to 92% was reported. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Moinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); D’Souza, Derek [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  17. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for "dose of the day" calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Catarina; McClelland, Jamie; Moinuddin, Syed; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; D'Souza, Derek; Royle, Gary

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the "dose of the day" received by a head and neck patient. NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for "dose of the day" calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on a replan CT. The DD is smaller

  18. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Catarina; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary; McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; Moinuddin, Syed; D’Souza, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  19. Duration of post-vaccination immunity to yellow fever in volunteers eight years after a dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S; de Lima, Sheila Maria Barbosa; de Noronha, Tatiana Guimarães; Xavier, Janaina Reis; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; de Albuquerque, Elizabeth Maciel; Farias, Roberto Henrique Guedes; da Matta de Castro, Thalita; Homma, Akira

    2018-06-27

    In 2009, Bio-Manguinhos conducted a dose-response study with the yellow fever vaccine, administering the vaccine in the usual mean dose of 27,476 IU (full dose, reference) and in tapered doses (10,447 IU, 3013 IU, 587 IU, 158 IU, and 31 IU) by the usual subcutaneous route and usual volume (0.5 mL). Tapered doses were obtained by dilution in the manufacturer's laboratory, and the test batches presented industrial quality. Doses down to 587 IU showed similar immunogenicity to the full dose (27,476, reference), while the 158 IU and 31 IU doses displayed lower immunogenicity. Seropositivity was maintained at 10 months, except in the group that received the 31 IU dose. The current study aims to determine whether yellow fever seropositivity was maintained eight years after YF vaccination in non-revaccinated individuals. According to the current study's results, seropositivity was maintained in 85% of 318 participants and was similar across groups. The findings support the use of the yellow fever vaccine in fractional doses during outbreaks, but each fractional dose should have at least 587 IU. This study also supports the minimum dose required by WHO, 1000 IU. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT 03338231. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-E-T-49: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, H; Tachibana, H; Kamima, T; Takahashi, R; Kawai, D; Sugawara, Y; Yamamoto, T; Sato, A; Yamashita, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: AAPM TG114 does not cover the independent verification for IMRT. We conducted a study of independent dose verification for IMRT in seven institutes to show the feasibility. Methods: 384 IMRT plans in the sites of prostate and head and neck (HN) were collected from the institutes, where the planning was performed using Eclipse and Pinnacle3 with the two techniques of step and shoot (S&S) and sliding window (SW). All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. An ion-chamber measurement in a water-equivalent slab phantom was performed to compare the doses computed using the TPS and an independent dose verification program. Additionally, the agreement in dose computed in patient CT images between using the TPS and using the SMU was assessed. The dose of the composite beams in the plan was evaluated. Results: The agreement between the measurement and the SMU were −2.3±1.9 % and −5.6±3.6 % for prostate and HN sites, respectively. The agreement between the TPSs and the SMU were −2.1±1.9 % and −3.0±3.7 for prostate and HN sites, respectively. There was a negative systematic difference with similar standard deviation and the difference was larger in the HN site. The S&S technique showed a statistically significant difference between the SW. Because the Clarkson-based method in the independent program underestimated (cannot consider) the dose under the MLC. Conclusion: The accuracy would be improved when the Clarkson-based algorithm should be modified for IMRT and the tolerance level would be within 5%

  1. A study on the evaluation of radiation doses in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Koju

    1980-01-01

    Radiation doses and possible biological risks due to dental full mouth examination (adult: 10-film technique, child: 6-film technique) were evaluated based on preliminary experiments and statistical surveillance of patients' records. Dosimetrical studies were performed by using head and neck phantoms and a dental x-ray tube. Radiation doses were measured by x-ray films and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For the obtained doses of skin, eyes, thyroid gland and bone marrow, the biological risk of leukemia and thyroid cancer was discussed on the statistical basis of patients at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital. The major findings were as follows: The total number of patients who recieved full mouth x-ray examination at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital in 1978 was 1,099. The number of male patients was 382 (3,804 films) and that of female patients was 717 (7,138 films). In both sexes, the number of patients was the greatest in the group of 8 - 14 years of age. The collective doses of bone marrow due to full mouth 10-film examination performed at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital in 1978 were approximately 6.0 rad, which could induce leukemia with a probability of 1/8,000. The collective doses of thyroid gland were approximately 13 rad, which could induce lethal thyroid cancer with a probability of 1/15,000. The radiation dose due to the dental radiography for examination at Kanagawa Dental College Hospital was proved to be apparently below the level that could actually induce radiation injuries. But the collective radiation doses due to dental examination in Japan as a whole were approximately 8,000 times greater than that in Kanagawa Dental College Hospital. (J.P.N.)

  2. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered low-dose rapamycin in healthy dogs: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeanne C.; Allstadt, Sara D.; Fan, Timothy M.; Khanna, Chand; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina D.; LeBlanc, Amy K.; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs. Animals 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds. Procedures The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and non-compartmental analyses. Results Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in ng/mL. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, needs to be determined. PMID:26709938

  3. Effect of almond consumption on the serum fatty acid profile: a dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Stephanie; Kendall, Cyril W C; Gascoyne, Ana-Maria; Bazinet, Richard P; Bashyam, Balachandran; Lapsley, Karen G; Augustin, Livia S A; Sievenpiper, John L; Jenkins, David J A

    2014-10-14

    Consumption of almonds has been shown to be associated with a decreased risk of CHD, which may be related to their fatty acid (FA) composition. However, the effect of almond consumption on the serum FA composition is not known. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether almond consumption would alter the serum FA profile and risk of CHD, as calculated using Framingham's 10-year risk score, in a dose-dependent manner in hyperlipidaemic individuals when compared with a higher-carbohydrate control group using dietary interventions incorporating almonds. A total of twenty-seven hyperlipidaemic individuals consumed three isoenergetic (mean 1770 kJ/d) supplements during three 1-month dietary phases: (1) full-dose almonds (50-100 g/d); (2) half-dose almonds with half-dose muffins; (3) full-dose muffins. Fasting blood samples were obtained at weeks 0 and 4 for the determination of FA concentrations. Almond intake (g/d) was found to be inversely associated with the estimated Framingham 10-year CHD risk score (P= 0·026). In both the half-dose and full-dose almond groups, the proportions of oleic acid (OA) and MUFA in the TAG fraction (half-almond: OA P= 0·003; MUFA P= 0·004; full-almond: OA Pconsumption increases OA and MUFA content in serum TAG and NEFA fractions, which are inversely associated with CHD lipid risk factors and overall estimated 10-year CHD risk.

  4. Mortality and career radiation doses for workers at a commercial nuclear power plant: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Hrubec, Z.; Hurwitz, P.E.; Goff, T.E.; Wilson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Career radiation doses for 8,961 male workers at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) were determined for both utility (n = 4,960) and contractor (n = 4,001) employees. Workers were followed from the time of first employment at CCNPP (including plant construction) to the end of 1984 (mean follow-up = 5.4 y). Plant operation began in 1975. The mean duration of employment was 1.9 y at CCNPP and 3.1 y in the nuclear industry. Career radiation doses were determined from dosimetry records kept by the utility company and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). For all exposed workers, the average career dose was 21 mSv and was higher for contractor (30 mSv) than utility (13 mSv) workers. Career doses were also higher among those employed in the nuclear industry for greater than or equal to 15 y (111 mSv) and among workers classified as health physicists (56 mSv). Cumulative doses of greater than or equal to 50 mSv were received by 12% of the workers; the maximum career dose reported was 470 mSv. The availability of social security numbers for practically all employees facilitated record-linkage methods to determine mortality; 161 deaths were identified. On average the workers experienced mortality from all causes that was 15% less than that of the general population of the U.S., probably due to healthier members of the population being selected for employment. Our investigation demonstrates that historical information is available from which career doses could be constructed and that, in principle, it is feasible to conduct epidemiologic studies of nuclear power plant workers in the U.S. Although difficult, the approach taken could prove useful until such time as a comprehensive registry of U.S. radiation workers is established

  5. Three-dimensional dose distribution in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yi-Shuan; Lin, Yu-Ying; Cheung, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to establish three-dimensional dose distributions for contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) using self-developed Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. Dose calibration and distribution evaluations were performed on a full-field digital mammography unit with dual energy (DE) contrast-enhanced option. Strategy for dose calibration of films in the DE mode was based on the data obtained from common target/filter/kVp combinations used clinically and the dose response model modified from Rampado's model. Dose derived from films were also verified by measured data from an ionization chamber. The average difference of dose was 8.9% in the dose range for clinical uses. Three-dimensional dose distributions were estimated using triangular acrylic phantom equipped with the mammography system. Five pieces of film sheets were separately placed between the acrylic slabs to evaluate the dose distribution at different depths. After normalizing the dose in each pixel to the maximum dose at the top-center position of the acrylic, normalized dose distribution for transverse, coronal and sagittal planes, could thus be obtained. The depth dose distribution evaluated in this study may further serve as a reference for evaluating the patient glandular dose at different depths based on the entrance exposure information. - Highlights: • CEDM techniques can enhance contrast uptake areas and suppress background tissue. • Dose for the dual-energy acquisition is about 20% higher than standard mode. • A new method is proposed to estimate the 3D dose distribution in dual-energy CEDM. • Depth of normalized dose ratio of 0.5 is less than but near 1 cm in the DE mode

  6. SU-F-T-268: A Feasibility Study of Independent Dose Verification for Vero4DRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M; Kokubo, M; Takahashi, R; Takayama, K; Tanabe, H; Sueoka, M; Okuuchi, N; Ishii, M; Iwamoto, Y; Tachibana, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Vero4DRT (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd.) has been released for a few years. The treatment planning system (TPS) of Vero4DRT is dedicated, so the measurement is the only method of dose verification. There have been no reports of independent dose verification using Clarksonbased algorithm for Vero4DRT. An independent dose verification software program of the general-purpose linac using a modified Clarkson-based algorithm was modified for Vero4DRT. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of independent dose verification program and the feasibility of the secondary check for Vero4DRT. Methods: iPlan (Brainlab AG) was used as the TPS. PencilBeam Convolution was used for dose calculation algorithm of IMRT and X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo was used for the others. Simple MU Analysis (SMU, Triangle Products, Japan) was used as the independent dose verification software program in which CT-based dose calculation was performed using a modified Clarkson-based algorithm. In this study, 120 patients’ treatment plans were collected in our institute. The treatments were performed using the conventional irradiation for lung and prostate, SBRT for lung and Step and shoot IMRT for prostate. Comparison in dose between the TPS and the SMU was done and confidence limits (CLs, Mean ± 2SD %) were compared to those from the general-purpose linac. Results: As the results of the CLs, the conventional irradiation (lung, prostate), SBRT (lung) and IMRT (prostate) show 2.2 ± 3.5% (CL of the general-purpose linac: 2.4 ± 5.3%), 1.1 ± 1.7% (−0.3 ± 2.0%), 4.8 ± 3.7% (5.4 ± 5.3%) and −0.5 ± 2.5% (−0.1 ± 3.6%), respectively. The CLs for Vero4DRT show similar results to that for the general-purpose linac. Conclusion: The independent dose verification for the new linac is clinically available as a secondary check and we performed the check with the similar tolerance level of the general-purpose linac. This research is partially supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and

  7. SU-F-T-268: A Feasibility Study of Independent Dose Verification for Vero4DRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, M; Kokubo, M [Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takahashi, R [Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto, Tokyo (Japan); Takayama, K [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Tanabe, H; Sueoka, M; Okuuchi, N [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Ishii, M; Iwamoto, Y [Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Vero4DRT (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd.) has been released for a few years. The treatment planning system (TPS) of Vero4DRT is dedicated, so the measurement is the only method of dose verification. There have been no reports of independent dose verification using Clarksonbased algorithm for Vero4DRT. An independent dose verification software program of the general-purpose linac using a modified Clarkson-based algorithm was modified for Vero4DRT. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of independent dose verification program and the feasibility of the secondary check for Vero4DRT. Methods: iPlan (Brainlab AG) was used as the TPS. PencilBeam Convolution was used for dose calculation algorithm of IMRT and X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo was used for the others. Simple MU Analysis (SMU, Triangle Products, Japan) was used as the independent dose verification software program in which CT-based dose calculation was performed using a modified Clarkson-based algorithm. In this study, 120 patients’ treatment plans were collected in our institute. The treatments were performed using the conventional irradiation for lung and prostate, SBRT for lung and Step and shoot IMRT for prostate. Comparison in dose between the TPS and the SMU was done and confidence limits (CLs, Mean ± 2SD %) were compared to those from the general-purpose linac. Results: As the results of the CLs, the conventional irradiation (lung, prostate), SBRT (lung) and IMRT (prostate) show 2.2 ± 3.5% (CL of the general-purpose linac: 2.4 ± 5.3%), 1.1 ± 1.7% (−0.3 ± 2.0%), 4.8 ± 3.7% (5.4 ± 5.3%) and −0.5 ± 2.5% (−0.1 ± 3.6%), respectively. The CLs for Vero4DRT show similar results to that for the general-purpose linac. Conclusion: The independent dose verification for the new linac is clinically available as a secondary check and we performed the check with the similar tolerance level of the general-purpose linac. This research is partially supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and

  8. Fundamental studies on miniature dose meter using variable capacitance Si-diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoshio

    1976-01-01

    The results of fundamental studies on development of a miniature dose meter using a semiconductor applicable for dosimetry in both intracavitary and external radiotherapy are described. Many different instruments have been applied in clinical dosimetry for regional lesions, mostly in phantom studies, e. g. the small sized ionization chamber, the fluoroluminescence glass dose meter and the thermoluminescence dose meter. However, there are considerable problems regarding safety, reproducibility, and simplicity for regional dosimetry of intracavitary lesions, such as genitourinary, gastrointestinal and respiratory malignancies. To overcome these problems, an attempt was made to develop a miniature catheter type detector using a variable capacitance Si-diode for gamma ray dosimetry. The newly developed miniature dose meter using a semiconductor has the following characteristics. As the tip of detector (23mm long and 3mm in diameter) is very small, the apparatus unit is easy to manipulate in the dosimetry of intracavitary lesions. As no voltage is supplied to the detector, there is no danger of electric shock from in vivo studies. A strict linearity existed between the radiation dose rate and the generated voltage even when the range of experimental irradiation dose rate was extremely wide. The sensitivity of the detector was affected by the environmental temperature, but it was easy to correct the sensitivity by applying a special calibration chart to the value derived from a thermister enclosed in the detector. Even with the experimental irradiation of more than 50,000R, no changes in the sensitivity of the detector were observed. Thus, the durability of the apparatus was shown to be excellent. (auth.)

  9. Treatment dose-response in amblyopia therapy: the Monitored Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (MOTAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Stephens, David A; Fielder, Alistair R

    2004-09-01

    Amblyopia is the commonest visual disorder of childhood. Yet the contributions of the two principal treatments (spectacle wear and occlusion) to outcome are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the dose-response relationship of amblyopia therapy. The study comprised three distinct phases: baseline, in which repeat measures of visual function were undertaken to confirm the initial visual deficit; refractive adaptation: an 18-week period of spectacle wear with six weekly measurements of logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity; occlusion: in which participants were prescribed 6 hours of "patching" per day. In the latter phase, occlusion was objectively monitored and logMAR visual acuity recorded at 2-week intervals until any observed gains had ceased. Data were obtained from 94 participants (mean age, 5.1 +/- 1.4 years) with amblyopia associated with strabismus (n = 34), anisometropia (n = 23), and both anisometropia and strabismus (n = 37). Eighty-six underwent refractive adaptation. Average concordance with patching was 48%. The relationship between logMAR visual acuity gain and total occlusion dose was monotonic and linear. Increasing dose rate beyond 2 h/d hastened the response but did not improve outcome. More than 80% of the improvement during occlusion occurred within 6 weeks. Treatment outcome was significantly better for children younger than 4 years (n = 17) than in those older than 6 years (n = 24; P = 0.0014). Continuous objective monitoring of the amount of patching therapy received has provided insight into the dose-response relationship of occlusion therapy for amblyopia. Patching is most effective within the first few weeks of treatment, even for those in receipt of a relatively small dose. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural basis for the dose-response functions. Copyright Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

  10. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-01-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  11. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-06-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  12. Study of the Radiochromic Film for High Dose Measurement in Radiation Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yi-zhen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To establish the radiochromic film dosimeter for high dose level measurement during radiation processing, By corresponding formula and its preparation process research, batches of radiochromic film dosimeters were prepared using nylon as substrate and pararosaniline cyanide as dye. In Co-60 gamma reference radiation field, dosimetry response performance of radiochromic film was studied and results showed that the repeatability was good to 1.0%. The response curves demonstrated good linearity in the dose range of 5-210 kGy, and the signal of radiochromic film dosimeters after irradiation under the condition of low temperature storage within 2 weeks was stable. In addition, the radiochromic film dosimeters were not found to have noticeable dose rate dependence in the range of this experiment. In the linear dose range, radiochromic film dosimeter measures the absorbed dose, with extended uncertainty 4.2% (k=2 for Co-60 gamma rays. The film was suitable as dosimeters for the parameters measurement of the electron beam on the accelerator.

  13. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  14. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  15. A study on the effect of low doses gamma radiation on mushroom spawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajlouni, Said

    1993-03-01

    Mushroom spawn (Hybrid-521) was irradiated at room temperature using low doses of gamma radiation (50-600 rad). The spawn was then planted at two stages; first, after 24 hours of irradiation, and second after storage for three weeks at refrigeration temperature. Results of this study showed that the applied doses of gamma radiation did not have any stimulatory effect on mushroom growth or productivity. It was also noticed that mushroom production rate decreased when irradiated spawn was stored for three weeks prior to planting, as compared with spawn planted 24 hours after irradiation. (author). 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Study on mechanism of decreased lipid peroxide by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Okazoe, Yoko; Akimaru, Kunihiro; Sato, E.F.; Utsumi, Kozo.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the effect of SOD on lipid peroxidation in biomembrane from V.E-deficient rats, in order to study the mechanism of increased SOD activities and decreased lipid peroxide by low dose irradiation. The following results were obtained. i. Active oxygen (O 2 - ) strongly enhances lipid peroxidations in biomembrane with the Fe 3+ as catalyst. ii. SOD evidently inhibits lipid peroxidations under above conditions. iii. We suggested that the effect of SOD enhanced by low dose irradiation results in inhibition of lipid peroxidation. (author)

  17. An experimental study on total dose effects in SRAM-based FPGAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhibin; He Baoping; Zhang Fengqi; Guo Hongxia; Luo Yinhong; Wang Yuanming; Zhang Keying

    2009-01-01

    In order to study testing methods and find sensitive parameters in total dose effects on SRAM-based FPGA, XC2S100 chips were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays and tested with two test circuit designs. By analyzing the experimental results, the test flow of configuration RAM and bock RAM was given, and the most sensitive parameter was obtained. The results will be a solid foundation for establishing test specification and evaluation methods of total dose effects on SRAM-based FPGAs. (authors)

  18. Dose per unit area - a study of elicitation of nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise Arup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental sensitization depends upon the amount of allergen per unit skin area and is largely independent of the area size. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at testing if this also applies for elicitation of nickel allergy. PATIENTS/METHODS: 20 nickel allergic individuals were tested...... with a patch test and a repeated open application test (ROAT). Nickel was applied on small and large areas. The varying parameters were area, total dose and dose per unit area. RESULTS: In the patch test, at a low concentration [15 microg nickel (microg Ni)/cm(2)], there were significantly higher scores...... on the large area with the same dose per area as the small area. At higher concentrations of nickel, no significant differences were found. In the ROAT at low concentration (6.64 microg Ni/cm(2)), it was found that the latency period until a reaction appeared was significantly shorter on the large area...

  19. The effects of glucocorticoids on the inhibition of emotional information: A dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Véronique A; Ellenbogen, Mark A; Washburn, Dustin; Joober, Ridha

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that cortisol influences cognitive and affective processes such as selective attention and memory for emotional events, yet the effects of glucocorticoids on attentional inhibition in humans remain unknown. Consequently, this double-blind study examined dose-dependent effects of exogenous glucocorticoids on the inhibition of emotional information. Sixty-three university students (14 male, 49 female) ingested either a placebo pill or hydrocortisone (10mg or 40mg), and completed a negative priming task assessing the inhibition of pictures depicting angry, sad, and happy faces. The 10mg, but not the 40mg hydrocortisone dose elicited increased inhibition for angry faces relative to placebo. Thus, moderate glucocorticoid elevations may have adaptive effects on emotional information processing, whereas high glucocorticoid elevations appear to attenuate this effect, consistent with the view that there are dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoids on cognition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A study on the relationship dose-effect in case of gamma irradiation on leptospira

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevska, M.; Yankov, N.; Grigorov, L.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of gamma rays in doses 400, 2000, 10000 and 100000 rads upon two serotypes of leptospira has been examined. The development of the leptospira after the irradiation was traced upon a dark field of vision and by counting in Petroff-chamber. The morphological and functional changes (size, agility, reproduction and degree of lysis) have been determined and proved to be dependent on the dose. Differences in the indices have been observed in the pathogenic (L.Pomona (local strain Tsalapitsa)) and sapropyte (L.Thraciae (local strain Bulgaria 4)) serotypes, the saprophytic one being more resistant. The age of the culture was significant for the degree of the observed changes. Regarding the eventual practical use of the present study for obtaining killed leptospira antigens doses of 10000 and 100000 rad which are dependent of the age and the pathogenicity of the culture might be taken into consideration. (author)

  1. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation

  2. Clinical application of Chamomilla recutita in phlebitis: dose response curve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2011-01-01

    This experimental and dose-response curve study aimed to carry out the quality control of the Chamomilla recutita sample, as well as to estimate the ideal dose, for anti-inflammatory effect, of the extract of its capitula, in patients with phlebitis due to peripheral intravenous infusion of antineoplastic chemotherapy and to evaluate the toxicity of this extract in human beings. The therapeutic efficacy, concerning the anti-inflammatory potential, of different doses of Chamomilla recutita extract were analyzed and compared in 25 patients. The time of regression of phlebitis was shorter for groups with 2.5% concentration (mean=29.2h, standard deviation = 8.98) and 5% concentration (mean = 38.8h, standard deviation = 17.47). Local toxicity was almost not observed. This research contributes to the innovation of the nursing clinical practice, since it suggests an alternative for the treatment of phlebitis through the clinical use of phytotherapeutic drugs.

  3. Study of radon progeny distribution and radiation dose rate in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The absorbed dose rate in air of airborne gamma-ray and the concentration of radon progeny in surface air have been observed continuously in Maizuru, Japan. When data observed on fine days were plotted, with dose rate as ordinate and contraction as abscissa, these points traced with a lapse of time illustrated an anticlockwise looping for each day. This result suggests that the variation of absorbed dose rate lags behind that of concentration of radon progeny; this is due to the delay time incurred as the concentration level gradually varies from ground surface to upper air. Radon progeny concentrations in precipitation and in surface air have been observed there in order to study the relationship between the two concentrations and the influence of precipitation patterns on the concentration in precipitation. Results obtained from analysis of the observed data suggest that radon progeny in precipitation originate mainly from scavenging within the cloud (rainout) and not from that below the cloud (washout). (author)

  4. A comparative study of single-dose treatment of chancroid using thiamphenicol versus Azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Walter; Di Chiacchio, Nilton G; Di Chiacchio, Nilton; Romiti, Ricardo; Criado, Paulo R; Velho, Paulo Eduardo N Ferreira

    2009-06-01

    A study was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil, to compare azithromycin with thiamphenicol for the single-dose treatment of chancroid. In all, 54 men with chancroid were tested. The etiology was determined by clinical characterization and direct bacterioscopy with Gram staining. None of the patients had positive serology or dark-field examination indicating active infection with Treponema pallidum. Genital infections due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae and herpes simplex virus were excluded by polymerase chain reaction testing. For 54 patients with chancroid, cure rates with single-dose treatment were 73% with azithromycin and 89% with thiamphenicol. HIV seropositivity was found to be associated with treatment failure (p=0.001). The treatment failed in all HIV positive patients treated with azithromycin (p=0.002) and this drug should be avoided in these co-infected patients. In the view of the authors, thiamphenicol is the most indicated single-dose regimen for chancroid treatment.

  5. Dose-image quality study in digital chest radiography using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2008-01-01

    One of the main preoccupations of diagnostic radiology is to guarantee a good image-sparing dose to the patient. In the present study, Monte Carlo simulations, with MCNPX code, coupled with an adult voxel female model (FAX) were performed to investigate how image quality and dose in digital chest radiography vary with tube voltage (80-150 kV) using air-gap technique and a computed radiography system. Calculated quantities were normalized to a fixed value of entrance skin exposure (ESE) of 0.0136 R. The results of the present analysis show that the image quality for chest radiography with imaging plate is improved and the dose reduced at lower tube voltage

  6. A comparative study of single-dose treatment of chancroid using thiamphenicol versus Azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter B. Junior

    Full Text Available A study was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil, to compare azithromycin with thiamphenicol for the single-dose treatment of chancroid. In all, 54 men with chancroid were tested. The etiology was determined by clinical characterization and direct bacterioscopy with Gram staining. None of the patients had positive serology or dark-field examination indicating active infection with Treponema pallidum. Genital infections due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae and herpes simplex virus were excluded by polymerase chain reaction testing. For 54 patients with chancroid, cure rates with single-dose treatment were 73% with azithromycin and 89% with thiamphenicol. HIV seropositivity was found to be associated with treatment failure (p=0.001. The treatment failed in all HIV positive patients treated with azithromycin (p=0.002 and this drug should be avoided in these co-infected patients. In the view of the authors, thiamphenicol is the most indicated single-dose regimen for chancroid treatment.

  7. Effect of propranolol in head tremor: quantitative study following single-dose and sustained drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzetti, S; Sasso, E; Negrotti, A; Baratti, M; Fava, R

    1992-12-01

    The effect of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol has been investigated in nine patients suffering from isolated (six patients) or prominent (three patients) essential tremor of the head. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the tremorolytic efficacy of propranolol has been assessed by a quantitative accelerometric method after a single oral dose (120 mg) and following 2 weeks of sustained treatment with two different dosage regimens of the drug (120 and 240 mg daily). As compared with placebo, a significant reduction in tremor magnitude was found following a single oral dose but not on sustained administration of the beta-blocker at either dosage. The results suggest that the efficacy of sustained propranolol on isolated or prominent essential head tremor is less predictable and satisfactory than expected on the basis of the single-dose response, as compared with hand tremor.

  8. Biofuel Drying - Literature Study and Definitions, Concepts and Terms; Torkning av biobraensle - litteraturstudie samt definitioner, begrepp och termer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanati, Mehri; Faghihi, Mostafa

    2001-09-01

    The report contains one section with definitions and explications of terms in the field of drying of biofuels. The second section presents, in english, the result of a literature study in the same subject, based on 90 literature references.

  9. The quest for a universal definition of polytrauma: a trauma registry-based validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Nerida E; D'Este, Catherine; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2014-10-01

    A pilot validation recommended defining polytrauma as patients with an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score greater than 2 in at least two Injury Severity Score (ISS) body regions (2 × AIS score > 2). This study aimed to validate this definition on larger data set. We hypothesized that patients defined by the 2 × AIS score > 2 cutoff have worse outcomes and use more resources than those without 2 × AIS score > 2 and that this would therefore be a better definition of polytrauma. Patients injured between 2009 and 2011, with complete documentation of AIS by New South Wales Trauma Registry and 16 years and older were selected. Age and sex were obtained in addition to outcomes of ISS, hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) admission, ICU LOS, and mortality. We compared demographic characteristics and outcomes between patients with ISS greater than 15 who did and did not meet the 2 × AIS score > 2 definition. We then undertook regression analyses (logistic regression for binary outcomes [ICU admission and death] and linear regression for hospital and ICU LOS) to compare outcomes for patients with and without 2 × AIS score > 2, adjusting for sex and age categories. In the adjusted analyses, patients with 2 × AIS score > 2 had twice the odds of being admitted to the ICU compared with those without 2 × AIS score > 2 (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-2.8) and 1.7 times the odds of dying (95% CI, 1.4-2.0; p 2 also had a mean difference of 1.5 days longer stay in the hospital compared with those without 2 × AIS score > 2 (95% CI, 1.4-1.7) and 1.6 days longer ICU stay (95% CI, 1.4-1.8; p 2 had higher mortality, more frequent ICU admissions, and longer hospital and ICU stay than those without 2 × AIS score > 2 and represents a superior definition to the definitions for polytrauma currently in use. Diagnostic test/ criteria, level III.

  10. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  11. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews

  12. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  13. Therapeutic drug monitoring to individualize the dosing of pazopanib: a pharmacokinetic feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, D. de; Erp, N. van; Hartigh, J. den; Wolterbeek, R..; Hollander-van Deursen, M. den; Labots, M.; Guchelaar (LUMC), H.J.; Verheul, H.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients treated with the standard dose of pazopanib show a large interpatient variability in drug exposure defined as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24h). The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of pharmacokinetics (PK)-guided

  14. Pharmacokinetically guided sunitinib dosing: a feasibility study in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankheet, N.; Kloth, J.S.; Gadellaa-van Hooijdonk, C.G.M.; Cirkel, G.A.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Lolkema, M.P.; Schellens, J.H.; Voest, E.E.; Sleijfer, S.; Jonge, M.J. de; Haanen, J.B.; Beijnen, J.H.; Huitema, A.D.; Steeghs, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background:Plasma exposure of sunitinib shows large inter-individual variation. Therefore, a pharmacokinetic (PK) study was performed to determine safety and feasibility of sunitinib dosing based on PK levels.Methods:Patients were treated with sunitinib 37.5 mg once daily. At days 15 and 29 of

  15. A decade of comparative dose planning studies for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Specht, Lena

    2014-01-01

    , especially in young patients with a long life expectancy. In this study, we review the current evidence for modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma with a focus on a reduced delivered dose, a reduced irradiated volume, and a more conformal...

  16. Experimental study of radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the BAEC TRIGA Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajijul Hoq, M; Malek Soner, M A; Salam, M A; Haque, M M; Khanom, Salma; Fahad, S M

    2017-12-01

    The 3MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been under operation for about thirty years since its commissioning at 1986. In accordance with the demand of fundamental nuclear research works, the reactor has to operate at different power levels by utilizing a number of experimental facilities. Regarding the enquiry for safety of reactor operating personnel and radiation workers, it is necessary to know the radiation level at different strategic points of the reactor where they are often worked. In the present study, neutron, beta and gamma radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the reactor facility with reactor power level of 2.4MW was measured to estimate the rising level of radiation due to its operational activities. From the obtained results high radiation dose is observed at the measurement position of the piercing beam port which is caused by neutron leakage and accordingly, dose rate at the stated position with different reactor power levels was measured. This study also deals with the gamma dose rate measurements at a fixed position of the reactor pool top surface for different reactor power levels under both Natural Convection Cooling Mode (NCCM) and Forced Convection Cooling Mode (FCCM). Results show that, radiation dose rate is higher for NCCM in compared with FCCM and increasing with the increase of reactor power. Thus, concerning the radiological safety issues for working personnel and the general public, the radiation dose level monitoring and the experimental analysis performed within this paper is so much effective and the result of this work can be utilized for base line data and code verification of the nuclear reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aten, Jan Jaap; Oudega, Mardien; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-06-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment characteristics, clinical outcome, and cognitive functioning after ECT. Thirty-nine unipolar depressed patients dosed using repeated DTM and 40 matched patients treated with ABM were compared. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the index course, as well as the total number of ECT sessions. Both groups were similar regarding age, sex, psychotic features, mean baseline MADRS, and median baseline MMSE. At the end of the index course, the two methods showed equal outcome (mean end MADRS, 11.6 ± 8.3 in DTM and 9.5 ± 7.6 in ABM (P = 0.26); median end MMSE, 28 (25-29) and 28 (25-29.8), respectively (P = 0.81). However, the median number of all ECT sessions differed 16 (11-22) in DTM versus 12 (10-14.8) in ABM; P = 0.02]. Using regression analysis, dosing method and age were independently associated with the total number of ECT sessions, with less sessions needed in ABM (P = 0.02) and in older patients (P = 0.001). In this comparative cohort study, ABM and DTM showed equal outcome for depression and cognition. However, the median ECT course duration in repeated DTM appeared longer. Additionally, higher age was associated with shorter ECT courses regardless of the dosing method. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. A theoretical and experimental dose rate study at a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackey, Tracey A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose rate monitoring out at the Radiation Technology Centre (RTC) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) to establish the safety or otherwise of staff at the occupied areas is presented. The facility operates a rectangular source of Co-60 gamma with an having activity of 27.4kCi as at March 2015 and has 14 workers. The aim of the research was determine by means of practical and theoretical evaluations shielding effectiveness of the irradiation chamber. This was to ensure that occupationally exposed workers are not over exposed or their exposures do not exceed the regulatory limits of 7.5μSv/h or 50mSv per annum. The study included dose rate measurements at controlled areas, evaluation of personnel dose history, comparison of experimental and theoretical values and determination of whether the shielding can support a. 18.5PBq (500kCi) Co-60 source. Practical dose rate measurements when the source was in the irradiation position was carried out using a Thermo Scientific Rad-Eye Gamma Survey Meter in the controlled areas of the facility which included the control room, electric room, deionizer room, on top of the roof of irradiation chamber (specifically above the roof plugs) and the two entrances to the irradiation chamber; the personnel door and the goods door. Background reading was found to be 0.08±0.01μSv/h whilst the average dose rates at the two entrances to the irradiation chamber (i e.,- the personnel door and the goods door) were measured to be 0.090μSv/h and 0.109μSv/h respectively. Practical measurements at the roof plugs produced average values of 0.135μSv/h. A particular point on the roof marked as plug-3 produced a relatively higher dose rate of 8.151μSv/h due probably to leakage along the cable to the drive motor. Measurements in the control room, electrical room and deionizer room had average readings of 0.116μSv/h, 0.089μSv/h and 0.614μSv/h respectively. All these average values were below the regulatory limits of 7.5

  19. What is desirable and feasible in dose reconstruction for application in epidemiological studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Beebe, G.W.; Anspaugh, L.

    1996-02-01

    Epidemiological studies of populations are of two general forms, monitoring or formal, and serve several possible purposes. Monitoring studies inform members of potentially affected population groups of the nature and magnitude of the risks that might have been imposed on them. Formal epidemiological studies can increase scientific knowledge about the quantitative risk that attends exposure. Risks of human health due to radiation exposure are most appropriately estimated by means of formal epidemiological studies. Dosimetric data are essential for any epidemiological study, but the detail and accuracy needed depend on the purposes to be served. If the need is for a monitoring study, then general information about doses will suffice. However, a formal study that is expected to contribute to scientific information about quantitative radiation risk requires careful individual dose estimation. This paper is devoted to the discussion of dosimetric data needed for formal epidemiological studies of populations exposed as a result of nuclear power operations. The recommendations made by the National Research Council have largely been followed. The examples used in this paper are relevant to the Chernobyl accident, which caused a large number of people to be exposed at relatively high doses and provided an opportunity for formal epidemiological studies to be initiated. The studies that are singled out are those of thyroid cancer among children who resided in Belarus and in Ukraine at the time of the accident, and those of leukemia among workers involved in the mitigation of the accident and in clean-up operations

  20. Pharmacokinetics of surotomycin from phase 1 single and multiple ascending dose studies in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandorkar, Gurudatt; Zhan, Qiao; Donovan, Julie; Rege, Shruta; Patino, Hernando

    2017-03-28

    Surotomycin, a novel, orally administered, cyclic, lipopeptide antibacterial in development for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, has demonstrated minimal intestinal absorption in animal models. Safety, tolerability, and plasma pharmacokinetics of single and multiple ascending oral doses (SAD/MAD) of surotomycin in healthy volunteers were characterized in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 studies. Participants were sequentially enrolled into one of four SAD (500, 1000, 2000, 4000 mg surotomycin) or three MAD (250, 500, 1000 mg surotomycin twice/day for 14 days) cohorts. Ten subjects were randomized 4:1 into each cohort to receive surotomycin or placebo. Surotomycin plasma concentrations rose as dose increased (maximum plasma concentration [C max ]: 10.5, 21.5, 66.6, and 86.7 ng/mL). Systemic levels were generally low, with peak median surotomycin plasma concentrations observed 6-12 h after the first dose. In the MAD study, surotomycin plasma concentrations were higher on day 14 (C max : 25.5, 37.6, and 93.5 ng/mL) than on day 1 (C max : 6.8, 11.0, and 21.1 ng/mL for increasing doses), indicating accumulation. In the SAD study, <0.01% of the administered dose was recovered in urine. Mean surotomycin stool concentration from the 1000 mg MAD cohort was 6394 μg/g on day 5. Both cohorts were well tolerated with all adverse events reported as mild to moderate. Both SAD and MAD studies of surotomycin demonstrated minimal systemic exposure, with feces the primary route of elimination following oral administration; consistent with observations with similar compounds, such as fidaxomicin. Results of these phase 1 studies support the continued clinical development of surotomycin for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. NCT02835118 and NCT02835105 . Retrospectively registered, July 13 2016.

  1. Optimising intraperitoneal gentamicin dosing in peritoneal dialysis patients with peritonitis (GIPD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipman Jeffrey

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics are preferentially delivered via the peritoneal route to treat peritonitis, a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD, so that maximal concentrations are delivered at the site of infection. However, drugs administered intraperitoneally can be absorbed into the systemic circulation. Drugs excreted by the kidneys accumulate in PD patients, increasing the risk of toxicity. The aim of this study is to examine a model of gentamicin pharmacokinetics and to develop an intraperitoneal drug dosing regime that maximises bacterial killing and minimises toxicity. Methods/Design This is an observational pharmacokinetic study of consecutive PD patients presenting to the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital with PD peritonitis and who meet the inclusion criteria. Participants will be allocated to either group 1, if anuric as defined by urine output less than 100 ml/day, or group 2: if non-anuric, as defined by urine output more than 100 ml/day. Recruitment will be limited to 15 participants in each group. Gentamicin dosing will be based on the present Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital guidelines, which reflect the current International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis Peritonitis Treatment Recommendations. The primary endpoint is to describe the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin administered intraperitoneally in PD patients with peritonitis based on serial blood and dialysate drug levels. Discussion The study will develop improved dosing recommendations for intraperitoneally administered gentamicin in PD patients with peritonitis. This will guide clinicians and pharmacists in selecting the most appropriate dosing regime of intraperitoneal gentamicin to treat peritonitis. Trial Registration ACTRN12609000446268

  2. Feasibility study for the development of a Dose Calibrator with a well ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista Romeu, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Dose calibrators are intended for the metrological assurance of medical diagnostic studies in which radiopharmaceuticals are used. It is the final link in the national system of standards to ensure quality control and the radiation safety of the dose administered to patients while using these nuclear techniques. The wide utilization of radiopharmaceuticals in our country in several modules of nuclear medicine and other laboratories where radio-isotopic preparations are used, as well as the existence of the National Center of Isotopes to produce them determine the necessity of national production of dose calibration equipment. In this paper, it is presented the result of a feasibility study to develop a dose calibrator with a well-type ionization chamber for nuclear medicine services of the National Health System with gamma camera. It is specifically intended to contribute to monitor and control the activity of the prepared samples to be administered to patients under studies with gamma cameras to ensure compliance with the current requirements of quality and radiation safety. (Author)

  3. Correlation-study about the ambient dose rate and the weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Masato; Hatano, Yuko; Aoyama, Tomoo; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Ishizuka, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    The long-term radiation risks are believed to be heavily affected by the resuspension process. We therefore focus on the surface-atmosphere exchange process of released radioactive materials in this study. Radioactive materials were deposited on the soil and float in the air, and such complicated process are influenced by the weather conditions deeply. We need to reveal the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate. In this study, we study the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate with the correction of the decrease due to the radioactive decay. We found that there is a negative correlation between the ambient dose rate and the soil water content by the correlation coefficient. Using this result, we reconstruct the ambient dose rate from the weather conditions by the multiple regression analysis and found that the reconstructed data agree with the observation very well. Using Kalman filter, which can be sequentially updates the state estimate, we obtained such a good agreement.

  4. Study on method of dose estimation for the Dual-moderated neutron survey meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bo; Li, Taosheng; Xu, Yuhai; Gong, Cunkui; Yan, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In order to study neutron dose measurement in high energy radiation field, a Dual-moderated survey meter in the range from 1 keV to 300 MeV mean energies spectra has been developed. Measurement results of some survey meters depend on the neutron spectra characteristics in different neutron radiation fields, so the characteristics of the responses to various neutron spectra should be studied in order to get more reasonable dose. In this paper the responses of the survey meter were calculated under different neutron spectra data from IAEA of Technical Reports Series No. 318 and other references. Finally one dose estimation method was determined. The range of the reading per H*(10) for the method estimated is about 0.7–1.6 for the neutron mean energy range from 50 keV to 300 MeV. -- Highlights: • We studied a novel high energy neutron survey meter. • Response characteristics of the survey meter were calculated by using a series of neutron spectra. • One significant advantage of the survey meter is that it can provide mean energy of radiation field. • Dose estimate deviation can be corrected. • The range of corrected reading per H*(10) is about 0.7–1.6 for the neutron fluence mean energy range from 0.05 MeV to 300 MeV

  5. The Effects of Metal on Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) in CT: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Maram M.

    Over the past number of years there has been a significant increase in the awareness of radiation dose from use of computed tomography (CT). Efforts have been made to reduce radiation dose from CT and to better quantify dose being delivered. However, unfortunately, these dose metrics such as CTDI vol are not a specific patient dose. In 2011, the size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) was introduced by AAPM TG-204 which accounts for the physical size of the patient. However, the approach presented in TG-204 ignores the importance of the attenuation differences in the body. In 2014, a newer methodology that accounted for tissue attenuation was introduced by the AAPM TG-220 based on the concept of water equivalent diameter, Dw. One of the limitation of TG-220 is that there is no estimation of the dose while highly attenuating objects such as metal is present in the body. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the accuracy of size-specific dose estimates in CT in the presence of simulated metal prostheses using a conventional PMMA CTDI phantom at different phantom diameter (body and head) and beam energy. Titanium, Cobalt- chromium and stainless steel alloys rods were used in the study. Two approaches were used as introduced by AAPM TG-204 and 220 utilizing the effective diameter and the Dw calculations. From these calculations, conversion factors have been derived that could be applied to the measured CTDIvol to convert it to specific patient dose, or size specific dose estimate, (SSDE). Radiation dose in tissue (f-factor = 0.94) was measured at various chamber positions with the presence of metal. Following, an average weighted tissue dose (AWTD) was calculated in a manner similar to the weighted CTDI (CTDIw). In general, for the 32 cm body phantom SSDE220 provided more accurate estimates of AWTD than did SSDE204. For smaller patient size, represented by the 16 cm head phantom, the SSDE204 was a more accurate estimate of AWTD that that of SSDE220. However, as the

  6. Consensus on the Definition of Advanced Parkinson’s Disease: A Neurologists-Based Delphi Study (CEPA