WorldWideScience

Sample records for students experience high

  1. Water Intake by Soil, Experiments for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969

    Presented are a variety of surface run-off experiments for high school students. The experiments are analogies to basic concepts about water intake, as related to water delivery, soil properties and management, floods, and conservation measures. The materials needed to perform the experiments are easily obtainable. The experiments are followed by…

  2. The Effectiveness of Geography Student Worksheet to Develop Learning Experiences for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Wiwik Sri; Sumarmi; Ruja, I. Nyoman; Utaya, Sugeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of geography student worksheet in developing high school students' learning experiences. The student worksheet was planned to gain opportunity to develop creative and geography skills. The effectiveness is assessed from the contribution of the worksheets in improving the skills of…

  3. Meaningful Watershed Experiences for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Melinda; Smith, Cynthia; Greene, Joy

    2014-05-01

    Prince William County Public Schools and George Mason University in Virginia, USA, partnered to provide Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs) for over 25,000 middle and high school students (11-18 year olds) across 34 schools. This school district, situated in a rapidly growing region 55 km southwest of Washington DC, has over 82,000 K-12 students. As native forest cover has been replaced with farming and urbanization, water quality has significantly degraded in the 166,534 km2 Chesapeake Bay watershed. This project was designed to increase student awareness of their impact on the land and waters of the largest estuary in the United States. MWEE is a long-term comprehensive project that incorporates a classroom preparation phase, a hands-on outdoor field investigation, and a reflection and data-sharing component. Training and technical assistance enhances the capacity of teachers of 6th grade, high school Earth Science and Environmental Science to deliver MWEEs which includes schoolyard stewardship, inquiry driven field study, use of hand-held technology and computer based mapping and analysis, project sharing and outreach. George Mason University researchers worked closely with K-12 science educators to create a comprehensive watershed-focused curriculum. Graduate and undergraduate students with strong interests in environmental science and education were trained to deliver the field investigation component of the MWEE. Representative teachers from each school were provided 3 days of professional development and were responsible for the training of their school's science education team. A comprehensive curriculum provided teachers with activities and tools designed to enhance students' mastery of state science objectives. Watershed concepts were used as the unifying theme to support student understanding of curriculum and STEM objectives including: scientific investigation, data collection and communication, chemistry, energy, erosion, human

  4. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  5. Understanding Students' Precollege Experiences with Racial Diversity: The High School as Microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie J.; Chang, Stephanie H.

    2015-01-01

    Few qualitative studies consider how high school experiences affect readiness for diversity engagement in college. Using data from an ethnographic case study, three central trends (student experiences within homogeneous high schools, racial divisions within diverse high schools, and students who attended diverse high schools but had little…

  6. The Academic Experience of Male High School Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Kristine M.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Sibley, Margaret H.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Yu, Jihnhee; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Biswas, Aparajita; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the high school academic experience of adolescents with and without childhood ADHD using data from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS). Participants were 326 males with childhood ADHD and 213 demographically similar males without ADHD who were recruited at the start of the follow-up study. Data were collected yearly…

  7. Pornography and sexual experiences among high school students in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattebo, Magdalena; Tydén, Tanja; Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet; Nilsson, Kent W; Larsson, Margareta

    2014-04-01

    The study investigated the differences between high school boys and girls in: (1) the use of pornography, (2) sexual experiences, (3) experience of sexual abuse, and (4) perceptions of sexuality and pornography. It also examined the possible predictors of experiencing sexual activities, such as sex, sociodemographic factors (high school program, household, and ethnic background), pornography consumption, experience of sexual abuse, perception of sexuality, and perception of pornography. A population-based classroom survey of 16-year-old boys (n = 477) and girls (n = 400) from 53 randomly selected high school classes in 2 towns in mid-Sweden. Almost all boys (96%, n = 453) and 54% of the girls (n = 213) had watched pornography. Regardless of sex, pornography consumers had a positive perception of pornography. There were no differences between pornography-consuming boys and girls regarding fantasies, and they had attempted sexual acts inspired by pornography. A higher proportion of girls (15%) than boys (6%) had experienced sexual abuse. Predictors for being sexually experienced (oral sex, intercourse, and anal sex) included: being a girl, attending a vocational high school program, living with separated parents, having experience of sexual abuse, stating that boys and girls are equally interested in sex, and having a positive perception of pornography (Adj. R = 0.166). Boys had more experience of and a more positive perception of pornography, but there were only a few differences between boys and girls in the pornography-consumer group. Girls were more sexually experienced than boys. A positive perception of pornography predicted being sexually experienced.

  8. The Academic Experience of Male High School Students with ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, Kristine M.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Sibley, Margaret H.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Yu, Jihnhee; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Biswas, Aparajita; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the high school academic experience of adolescents with and without childhood ADHD using data from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS). Participants were 326 males with childhood ADHD and 213 demographically similar males without ADHD who were recruited at the start of the follow-up study. Data were collected yearly from parents, teachers and schools. The current study used assessment points at which the participants were currently in or had recently completed gr...

  9. Comparing Computer Game and Traditional Lecture Using Experience Ratings from High and Low Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Michael; Green, Richard; Nilsen, Trond; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Computer games are purported to be effective instructional tools that enhance motivation and improve engagement. The aim of this study was to investigate how tertiary student experiences change when instruction was computer game based compared to lecture based, and whether experiences differed between high and low achieving students. Participants…

  10. Excellence in High-Performing Public Schools in Chile: Students' Perceptions and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Maria Luísa

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I aim to analyze the perceptions regarding excellence shared by students of high-performing public schools in Santiago de Chile and simultaneously to reflect on the way in which they experience it, inside and outside of school. Through the analysis of 24 focus groups conducted in six schools, I conclude that students share…

  11. Learned Helplessness in High School Students Following Experience of Noncontingent Rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Nicholas J.; Winefield, Anthony H.

    1982-01-01

    Compared high-school students differing in achievement motivation in a learned helplessness experiment. A strong helplessness effect was observed in both high- and low-achievement motivation groups. Results show a strong learned helplessness effect unrelated to individual differences in achievement motivation and refute claims that helplessness…

  12. Program to enrich science and mathematics experiences of high school students through interactive museum internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reif, R.J. [State Univ. of New York, New Paltz, NY (United States); Lock, C.R. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This project addressed the problem of female and minority representation in science and mathematics education and in related fields. It was designed to recruit high school students from under-represented groups into a program that provided significant, meaningful experiences to encourage those young people to pursue careers in science and science teaching. It provided role models for those students. It provided experiences outside of the normal school environment, experiences that put the participants in the position to serve as role models themselves for disadvantaged young people. It also provided encouragement to pursue careers in science and mathematics teaching and related careers. In these respects, it complemented other successful programs to encourage participation in science. And, it differed in that it provided incentives at a crucial time, when career decisions are being made during the high school years. Further, it encouraged the pursuit of careers in science teaching. The objectives of this project were to: (1) provide enrichment instruction in basic concepts in the life, earth, space, physical sciences and mathematics to selected high school students participating in the program; (2) provide instruction in teaching methods or processes, including verbal communication skills and the use of questioning; (3) provide opportunities for participants, as paid student interns, to transfer knowledge to other peers and adults; (4) encourage minority and female students with high academic potential to pursue careers in science teaching.

  13. Middle School and High School Students Who Stutter: A Qualitative Investigation of School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Tiffany R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and further understand the ways in which middle school and high school students perceive their school experiences within the school environment. School has an important impact on the social development of children (Milsom, 2006). Learning is not done individually as classrooms are inherently social…

  14. Moving on Up: Urban to Suburban Translocation Experiences of High-Achieving Black American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoqi; Seeberg, Vilma; Malone, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    Minority suburbanization has been a fast growing demographic shift in the United States during the first decade of the 21st century. This article examines the tapestry of the suburbanization experience of a group of high-achieving Black American students and their families as told by them. Departing from the all too common, deficit orientation…

  15. Advocacy for and with LGBT Students: An Examination of High School Counselor Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maru

    2017-01-01

    A paucity of empirical scholarship exists on school counselor advocacy in general and virtually none as it relates to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students specifically. Addressing this gap in the literature, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of high school counselors in the southeastern…

  16. Detecting Students' Experiences of Discontinuities between Middle School and High School Mathematics Programs: Learning during Boundary Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Amanda; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth; Smith, John P., III

    2012-01-01

    Transitions from middle school to high school mathematics programs can be problematic for students due to potential differences between instructional approaches and curriculum materials. Given the minimal research on how students experience such differences, we report on the experiences of two students as they moved out of an integrated,…

  17. A Summer at the University: A twenty five years experience with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    After running a summer school for enthusiastic high school students for 25 years, we reached the point where three of my colleagues at the physics department, are exstudents from two physics courses offered (more than ten years ago) within our program. There are also graduates in some others Faculties in different universities. Here we would like to describe the evolution of this project since its beginning, with 60 students in an introductory physics class to the 3000 now attending (January 2014) the around 60 courses offered in almost all areas of knowledge, from theater to Biotechnology. Lately, as we became aware of the relevance of teaching sciences to young kids in elementary school, we started a winter section addressing this group of students. The courses are mainly a hands on experience. In this talk we will comment about our learning experience working on this kind of projects and our projections for the future. Partial travel support from Escuela de Verano.

  18. High school students' experiences of bullying and victimization and the association with school health center use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D

    2015-05-01

    Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of school-based bullying and victimization and their use of SHCs. Data was analyzed from 2063 high school students in 5 Northern California school districts using the 2009-2010 California Healthy Kids Survey. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used to measure associations. Students who were bullied or victimized at school had significantly higher odds of using the SHCs compared with students who were not, and were also significantly more likely to report confidentiality concerns. The magnitude of associations was largest for Asian/Pacific Islander students, though this was likely due to greater statistical power. African American students reported victimization experiences at approximately the same rate as their peers, but were significantly less likely to indicate they experienced bullying. Findings suggest that SHCs may be an important place to address bullying and victimization at school, but confidentiality concerns are barriers that may be more common among bullied and victimized youth. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  19. First experiences of high-fidelity simulation training in junior nursing students in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Kim, Sang Suk; Park, Young-Mi

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to explore first experiences of high-fidelity simulation training in Korean nursing students, in order to develop and establish more effective guidelines for future simulation training in Korea. Thirty-three junior nursing students participated in high-fidelity simulation training for the first time. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, data were collected from reflective journals and questionnaires of simulation effectiveness after simulation training. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze simulation effectiveness and content analysis was performed with the reflective journal data. Five dimensions and 31 domains, both positive and negative experiences, emerged from qualitative analysis: (i) machine-human interaction in a safe environment; (ii) perceived learning capability; (iii) observational learning; (iv) reconciling practice with theory; and (v) follow-up debriefing effect. More than 70% of students scored high on increased ability to identify changes in the patient's condition, critical thinking, decision-making, effectiveness of peer observation, and debriefing in effectiveness of simulation. This study reported both positive and negative experiences of simulation. The results of this study could be used to set the level of task difficulty in simulation. Future simulation programs can be designed by reinforcing the positive experiences and modifying the negative results. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Gender Differences in the High School and Affective Experiences of Introductory College Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2008-10-01

    The disparity in persistence between males and females studying physics has been a topic of concern to physics educators for decades. Overall, while female students perform as well as or better than male students, they continue to lag considerably in terms of persistence. The most significant drop in females studying physics occurs between high school and college.2 Since most female physicists report that they became attracted to physics and decided to study it further while in high school, according to the International Study of Women in Physics,3 it is problematic that high school is also the stage at which females begin to opt out at much higher rates than males. Although half of the students taking one year of physics in high school are female, females are less likely than males to take a second or Advanced Placement (AP) physics course.4 In addition, the percentage of females taking the first physics course in college usually falls between 30% and 40%. In other words, although you may see gender parity in a first high school physics course, this parity does not usually persist to the next level of physics course. In addition, even if there is parity in a high school physics course, it does not mean that males and females experience the course in the same way. It is this difference in experience that may help to explain the drop in persistence of females.

  1. Considering High School Students' Experience in Asynchronous and Synchronous Distance Learning Environments: QoE Prediction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovski, Toni; Vasileva, Marina; Vasileva-Stojanovska, Tatjana; Trajkovik, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of relevant factors that influence students' experiences is vitally important to the educational process since they play an important role in learning outcomes. The purpose of this study is to determine underlying constructs that predict high school students' subjective experience and quality expectations during asynchronous…

  2. An Examination of the Job Training and Job Experiences of High School Students as They Exit School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Wilbur Drew

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was (a) to determine the level of satisfaction that exiting high school students felt regarding the job preparation and training they received in high school, (b) gather data on work experiences during high school, (c) gather data on job training experiences during high school, and (d) gather data on students…

  3. Robust and Fragile Mathematical Identities: A Framework for Exploring Racialized Experiences and High Achievement among Black College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Ebony O.

    2015-01-01

    I introduce the construct of fragile and robust identities for the purpose of exploring the experiences that influenced the mathematical and racial identities of high-achieving Black college students in mathematics and engineering. These students maintained high levels of academic achievement in these fields while enduring marginalization,…

  4. Experience of a smoking cessation program among high school students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Mills, Mary Etta

    2014-01-01

    In Taiwan, the prevalence of smoking among teenagers has led to a required smoking cessation program in schools. Students caught smoking in school are required to participate in a weekly smoking cessation class. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of high school students in a smoking cessation program. Fifteen adolescents participated in a one-on-one in-depth semistructured interview, and the content was analyzed for patterns based on the methods of Miles and Huberman. In addition, Lewin's change theory of drive forces and restraining forces was used to describe the change in behavior as a result of the program. Five major themes were identified: the onset of smoking-change influenced by families and friends; intention to quit smoking-driving force; the irresistible temptation to smoke-restraining force; limited change effects-more attention and assistance needed; and change in attitude rather than behavior-smoking remained unchanged. Changes were seen in the perceptions and attitudes of these students toward smoking at the end of the program; however, none of them were able to really quit. Most participants revealed that they used improper means to pass the carbon monoxide test requirement that was used as a measure of not smoking. Alternative future intervention strategies for further study include change in health policy to support nicotine replacement methods for heavy adolescent smoker, use of teacher support, and exercise programs to support students going through the smoking cessation period.

  5. Experiences of High School Students about the Predictors of Tobacco Use: a Directed Qualitative Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ghasemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Tobacco use is one of the most important risk factors that increases the burden of diseases worldwide. Based on the increasing speed of tobacco use, the aim of the present study was to explain the experiences of high school students about the determiners of use and non-use of tobacco (cigarettes and hookah based on the theory of protection motivation. Materials and Methods: The present study is a qualitative study based on content analysis that has been carried out for five months from 22, November of 2014 to 20, April of 2015 on male high schools in Noshahr. Data were collected in the form of semi-structured interviews from 21 male high school students of whom 7 smoked cigarettes, 7 used hookah and 7 of them did not use any type of tobacco. Data analysis was carried out through the use of directed qualitative content analysis. Results: Data analysis led to the extraction of 99 primary codes that were categorized into 9 predetermined levels of protection motivation theory including perceived sensitivity, perceived intensity, fear, perceived self-efficacy, response expense, efficiency of the perceived answer, external perceived reward, internal perceived reward, protection motivation. The findings of the study showed that the most important predictors for the use of tobacco were the structures of response expense and high perceived rewards and the most important predictors for non-use of tobacco were perceived sensitivity, perceived intensity and high self-efficacy of students. Conclusions: the findings of the present study showed that the pressure from peers, being present in a group using tobacco and the absence of alternative recreational activities are among the most important factors of using tobacco. So, it is suggested that planners of the health department take the comprehensive interventions to improve effective individual and environmental factors of using tobacco so that they could reduce smoking cigarettes

  6. "I Think I'm Reaching My Potential": Students' Self-Determination Experiences in an Inclusive High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Laura T.; Pell, Megan M.; Poudel, Bishwa B.; Pleet-Odle, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    Through a 5-year qualitative case study of an inclusive high school, we examined students' experiences of self-determination. We conducted analyses of multiple interviews with students, parents, teachers, guidance staff, and administrators using grounded theory methods and guided by self-determination conceptual frameworks. Explicit expectations…

  7. Characterizing Design Cognition of High School Students: Initial Analyses Comparing Those with and without Pre-Engineering Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John; Lammi, Matthew; Gero, John; Grubbs, Michael E.; Paretti, Marie; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Reported in this article are initial results from of a longitudinal study to characterize the design cognition and cognitive design styles of high school students with and without pre-engineering course experience over a 2-year period, and to compare them with undergraduate engineering students. The research followed a verbal protocol analysis…

  8. Undergraduate Student Attitudes and Perceptions toward Low- and High-Level Inquiry Exercise Physiology Teaching Laboratory Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henige, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare student attitudes toward two different science laboratory learning experiences, specifically, traditional, cookbook-style, low-inquiry level (LL) activities and a high-inquiry level (HL) investigative project. In addition, we sought to measure and compare students' science-related attitudes and…

  9. College students' experiences and attitudes regarding middle and high school-based breastfeeding education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the attitudes and experiences of male and female college students relative to breastfeeding education within middle and high school programs of study. Findings revealed that 36.7% of the participants were taught about breastfeeding while enrolled in a specific course in high school; 11.3% received information about breastfeeding in middle school. Overall, participants expressed positive attitudes toward breastfeeding and were supportive of the promotion of breastfeeding within a formal educational setting. However, 54% disagreed with offering information about breastfeeding to middle school students. Furthermore, most (67.8%) participants found public breastfeeding to be unacceptable; 77.7% indicated that breastfeeding is an intimate behavior that should be kept private. School nurses are in a unique position to influence school health and science-related curricula designed to promote the health benefits of breastfeeding. More education is needed to teach young people about the advantages of breastfeeding and to make breastfeeding a socially and culturally acceptable lifestyle behavior.

  10. High School and University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Biotechnology: A Turkish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usak, Muhammet; Erdogan, Mehmet; Prokop, Pavol; Ozel, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Biotechnology has a considerable importance in Turkish biology curriculum. This study was designed to explore or indicate Turkish high school and university students' knowledge and attitudes toward biotechnology. A total number of 352 high school and 276 university students were invited to the study. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire (BKQ)…

  11. An Investigation of the Effects of Authentic Science Experiences Among Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Angela

    Providing equitable learning opportunities for all students has been a persistent issue for some time. This is evident by the science achievement gap that still exists between male and female students as well as between White and many non-White student populations (NCES, 2007, 2009, 2009b) and an underrepresentation of female, African-American, Hispanic, and Native Americans in many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) related careers (NCES, 2009b). In addition to gender and ethnicity, socioeconomic status and linguistic differences are also factors that can marginalize students in the science classroom. One factor attributed to the achievement gap and low participation in STEM career is equitable access to resources including textbooks, laboratory equipment, qualified science teachers, and type of instruction. Extensive literature supports authentic science as one way of improving science learning. However, the majority of students do not have access to this type of resource. Additionally, extensive literature posits that culturally relevant pedagogy is one way of improving education. This study examines students' participation in an authentic science experience and argues that this is one way of providing culturally relevant pedagogy in science classrooms. The purpose of this study was to better understand how marginalized students were affected by their participation in an authentic science experience, within the context of an algae biofuel project. Accordingly, an interpretivist approach was taken. Data were collected from pre/post surveys and tests, semi-structured interviews, student journals, and classroom observations. Data analysis used a mixed methods approach. The data from this study were analyzed to better understand whether students perceived the experience to be one of authentic science, as well as how students science identities, perceptions about who can do science, attitudes toward science, and learning of science practices

  12. High-Fidelity Simulation of Pediatric Emergency Care: An Eye-Opening Experience for Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra P; Colbourne, Peggy A; Murray, Cynthia L

    2018-01-01

    Background Little attention has been given to in-depth examination of what high-fidelity simulation is like for nursing students within the context of a pediatric emergency, such as a cardiopulmonary arrest. It is possible that such high-fidelity simulation could provoke in nursing students intense psychological reactions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to learn about baccalaureate nursing students' lived experience of high-fidelity simulation of pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest. Method Phenomenological methods were used. Twenty-four interviews were conducted with 12 students and were analyzed for themes. Results The essence of the experience is that it was eye-opening. The students found the simulation to be a surprisingly realistic nursing experience as reflected in their perceiving the manikin as a real patient, thinking that they were saving their patient's life, feeling like a real nurse, and feeling relief after mounting stress. It was a surprisingly valuable learning experience in that the students had an increased awareness of the art and science of nursing and increased understanding of the importance of teamwork and were feeling more prepared for clinical practice and wanting more simulation experiences. Conclusion Educators should capitalize on the benefits of high-fidelity simulation as a pedagogy, while endeavoring to provide psychologically safe learning.

  13. The impact of real-time, Internet experiments versus interactive, asynchronous replays of experiments on high school students science concepts and attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubasko, Dennis S., Jr.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether students' learning experiences were similar or different with an interactive, live connection via the Internet in real-time to an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) versus a stored replay of AFM experiments. Did the two treatments influence students' attitudes towards the learning experience? Are there differences in students' understandings of viruses and science investigations? In addition, this study investigated treatment effects on students' understandings of the nature of science. The present study drew upon the research that examined students' attitudes toward science, students' views of the nature of science, instructional technology in education, and prior research on the nanoManipulator. Specific efforts have been made to address reform efforts in science education throughout the literature review. Eighty-five high school biology students participated in the nanoManipulator experience (44 males, 41 females, 64 Euro-American, 16 African-American, and 5 of other ethnicities). Two high school classes were randomly selected and administered the interactive, real-time treatment. Two different high school classes were randomly selected and administered the limited-interaction, experimental replay treatment. The intervention occurred over a one-week period. Qualitative and quantitative measures were used to examine the differences between two treatment conditions. Experiential, affective, cognitive, and the nature of science domains were assessed. Findings show that the questions and statements made in synchronous time by the live treatment group were significantly different than students' questions and statements in asynchronous communication. Students in the replay treatment made more statements about what they learned or knew about the experience than did students in the live experience. Students in both groups showed significant gains in understanding viruses (particularly viral dimensionality and shape

  14. Students' Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character: Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinussa, Anderson L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students' critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME) culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in…

  15. Immigration and Resiliency: Unpacking the Experiences of High School Students from Cape Verde and Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersi, Afra Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the complex factors, both individual and social, that contribute to the resiliency and academic achievement of six adolescent African immigrant students from Cape Verde and Ethiopia who were enrolled in a small high school in the United States. The school was designed specifically for recent adolescent immigrant students.…

  16. "Just Like Me": How Immigrant Students Experience a U.S. High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Using a qualitative bricolage approach (Kincheloe, 2008, 2010), this study explores the school life of immigrant students enrolled in an advanced English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom in a high school. The overarching objective of this study is to examine how these students--five from Mexico, three from Honduras, and one from…

  17. High School Students' Experiences of Bullying and Victimization and the Association with School Health Center Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of…

  18. Students' experiences with interactivity and learning in a high school physics multimedia distance learning course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Stewart, Irene

    The purpose guiding this research has been to learn about and describe the phenomena of interactivity from the learners' perspectives and to learn which of the interactivity affordances and practices were actually used by students and why in the process of learning physics using an interactive multimedia distance learning course system. The bigger purpose behind learning about and describing interactivity has been to gain knowledge and perspective for its instructional design to benefit the learner, the school as curriculum implementer, and instructional media designers to create better products. Qualitative methodology in the interpretivist tradition was used, that is, in-depth interviews and on-site observations, to gain understanding of interactivity from the learners' perspective and to gain understanding of the student learning context impacting and shaping the students' interactivity experiences. NVivo was used to sort, organize and index data. All data were read on three levels: literally, interpretively, and reflexively; and were read comparatively to other perspectives to get descriptions and interpretations that were holistic to the implementation and had potential insight to improve practice for instructional designers, teachers, administrators, specifically to improve the learning experience for students. Site-Specific Findings: Students watched videos, resisted using phone and e-mail, and worked math problems to demonstrate learning, which resulted in very little interactivity, virtually no dialogue about physics, no physical activity, one-way communication, multifaceted dissatisfaction, student need for teacher involvement in the learning enterprise, student appreciation for interactivity, and expressed desire for a real, live teacher. I also found that some students did experience the system as interactive, did experience learner control and self-directed learning, and despite dissatisfaction, liked and appreciated the course. Wider Applications

  19. Learning from High School Students' Lived Experiences of Reading E-Books and Printed Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    E-book sales are down nationwide, and younger readers are proving to be surprisingly persistent in their preference for printed books. Although 66% of schools nationwide offer e-books, adoption is growing at a slower than expected rate. This study takes a closer look at high school students' experiences as they read John Steinbeck's fictional…

  20. Are High School Students Ready for Recombinant DNA?: The UOP Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minch, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a three-week summer college honors course for talented high school juniors with three exams, lab six days a week, a research paper, field trips, and student panel discussions. Presents an overview of the course. Describes the lab which uses "E. coli" for DNA recombination. (MVL)

  1. Disclosure Experiences of Urban, Ethnically Diverse LGBT High School Students: Implications for School Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjas, Kris; Kiperman, Sarah; Meyers, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity is a milestone event for lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) youth and can have both positive and negative mental health consequences. Twenty-nine urban, ethnically diverse LGBT high school students participated in face-to-face, in-depth interviews. Qualitative results revealed two…

  2. The experiences of last-year student midwives with High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Joeri; Beeckman, Katrien; Turcksin, Rivka; Van Winkel, Lies; Gucciardo, Léonardo; Laubach, Monika; Peersman, Wim; Swinnen, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Simulation training is a powerful and evidence-based teaching method in healthcare. It allows students to develop essential competences that are often difficult to achieve during internships. High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation exposes them to real-life scenarios in a safe environment. Although student midwives' experiences need to be considered to make the simulation training work, these have been overlooked so far. To explore the experiences of last-year student midwives with High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training. A qualitative descriptive study, using three focus group conversations with last-year student midwives (n=24). Audio tapes were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was performed. The entire data set was coded according to recurrent or common themes. To achieve investigator triangulation and confirm themes, discussions among the researchers was incorporated in the analysis. Students found High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training to be a positive learning method that increased both their competence and confidence. Their experiences varied over the different phases of the High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training. Although uncertainty, tension, confusion and disappointment were experienced throughout the simulation trajectory, they reported that this did not affect their learning and confidence-building. As High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training constitutes a helpful learning experience in midwifery education, it could have a positive influence on maternal and neonatal outcomes. In the long term, it could therefore enhance the midwifery profession in several ways. The present study is an important first step in opening up the debate about the pedagogical use of High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training within midwifery education. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The IceCube MasterClass: providing high school students an authentic research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Gallart, Silvia; Bechtol, Ellen; Schultz, David; Madsen, Megan; Demerit, Jean; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In May 2014, the first one-day long IceCube Masterclass for high school students was offered. The program was inspired by the masterclasses started in 2005 by the International Particle Physics Outreach Group and supported in the U.S. by QuarkNet. Participation in the IceCube masterclasses has grown each year, with a total of over 500 students in three U.S states and three European countries after three editions. In a masterclass, students join an IceCube research team to learn about astrophysics and replicate the results of a published paper, such as the discovery of astrophysical neutrinos or a measurement of the cosmic ray flux. We will discuss both the scientific and educational goals of the program as well as the organizational challenges. Data from the program evaluation will be used to support the need of educational activities based on actual research as a powerful approach for motivating more students to pursue STEM college programs, making science and scientists more approachable to teenagers, and helping students envision a career in science.

  4. Making ionising radiation a real experience for high school science students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.; Lang, P.; De La Matter, D.; Hinman, P.; White, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian public has little understanding of ionising radiation due in part to its treatment in popular media. In principle, students learn about ionising radiation in their school science classes. Developments in science curricula are providing more education opportunities for this subject. The Canadian Nuclear Society's program for introducing real, personal experience with ionising radiation in the classroom is starting to make a difference. The demand is expected to exceed the resources of the CNS and the program is being developed to facilitate external support. This paper summarizes the need, the history of this program development, and the path forward. (author)

  5. Mo' Money, Mo' Problems? High-Achieving Black High School Students' Experiences with Resources, Racial Climate, and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Walter; Griffin, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    A multi-site case study analyzed the college preparatory processes of nine African American high achievers attending a well-resourced, suburban high school and eight academically successful African Americans attending a low-resourced urban school. Students at both schools experienced barriers, that is, racial climate and a lack of resources, that…

  6. Integrating geoscience and Native American experiences through a multi-state geoscience field trip for high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.; Spencer, M.; Sabatine, S.; Goetz, E. R.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Superior State University (LSSU) developed the GRANITE (Geological Reasoning And Natives Investigating The Earth) to engage high school students in the geosciences. The GRANITE program's target audience is Native American high school students and other populations underrepresented in the geosciences. Through the GRANITE program students undertake a variety of field and laboratory geosciences activities that culminates in a two week summer geoscience field experience during which they travel from Michigan to Wyoming. The sites students visit were selected because of their interesting and diverse geologic features and because in many cases they have special significance to Native American communities. Examples of the processes and localities studied by GRANITE students include igneous processes at Bear Butte, SD (Mato Paha) and Devil's Tower, WY (Mato Tipila); sedimentary processes in the Badlands, SD (Mako Sica) and Black Hills, SD (Paha Sapa); karst processes at Wind Cave, SD (Wasun Niye) and Vore Buffalo Jump; structural processes at Van Hise rock, WI and Dillon normal fault Badlands, SD; hydrologic and laucustrine processes along the Great Lakes and at the Fond du Lac Reservation, MN; fluvial processes along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers; geologic resources at the Homestake Mine, SD and Champion Mine, MI; and metamorphic processes at Pipestone, MN and Baraboo, WI. Through the GRANITE experience students develop an understanding of how geoscience is an important part of their lives, their communities and the world around them. The GRANITE program also promotes each student's growth and confidence to attend college and stresses the importance of taking challenging math and science courses in high school. Geoscience career opportunities are discussed at specific geologic localities and through general discussions. GRANITE students learn geosciences concepts and their application to Native communities and society in general through activities and

  7. Experiences of ocean literacy with different users of operational oceanography services and with high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Paola; Coppini, Giovanni; Martinelli, Sara; Bonarelli, Roberto; Lecci, Rita; Pinardi, Nadia; Cretì, Sergio; Turrisi, Giuseppe; Ciliberti, Stefania Angela; Federico, Ivan; Mannarini, Gianandrea; Verri, Giorgia; Jansen, Eric; Lusito, Letizia; Macchia, Francesca; Montagna, Fabio; Buonocore, Mauro; Marra, Palmalisa; Tedesco, Luca; Cavallo, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    According to a common definition, ocean literacy is an understanding of the ocean's influence on people and people influence on the ocean. An ocean-literate person is able to make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean and its resources. To this aim, this paper presents operational oceanographic tools developed to meet the needs of different users, and activities performed in collaboration with high school students to support new developments of the same tools. Operational oceanography allows to deal with societal challenges such as maritime safety, coastal and marine environment management, climate change assessment and marine resources management. Oceanographic products from the European Copernicus Marine Monitoring Service - CMEMS are transformed and communicated to public and stakeholders through adding-value chains (downstreaming), which consider advanced visualization, usage of multi-channels technological platforms and specific models and algorithms. Sea Situational Awareness is strategically important for management and safety purposes of any marine domain and, in particular, the Mediterranean Sea and its coastal areas. Examples of applications for sea situational awareness and maritime safety are here presented, through user-friendly products available both by web and mobile channels (that already reach more than 100.000 users in the Mediterranean area). Further examples of ocean literacy are web bulletins used to communicate the technical contents and information related to oceanographic forecasts to a wide public. They are the result of a collaboration with high school students, with whom also other activities on improving products visualization and online communication have been performed.

  8. Looking inside the Black Box: The Value Added by Career and Technical Student Organizations to Students' High School Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfeld, Corinne; Stone, James R., III; Aragon, Steven R.; Hansen, David M.; Zirkle, Christopher; Connors, James; Spindler, Matt; Romine, Rebecca Swinburne; Woo, Hui-Jeong

    2007-01-01

    In addition to hands-on learning in classrooms and work-related activities such as co-op, many CTE programs offer a career-focused student organization, known as a Career and Technical Student Organization, or CTSO. CTSOs have been touted as developing such characteristics as leadership and employability skills in students; however, there is…

  9. Masturbation Experiences of Swedish Senior High School Students: Gender Differences and Similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driemeyer, Wiebke; Janssen, Erick; Wiltfang, Jens; Elmerstig, Eva

    Research about masturbation tends to be limited to the assessment of masturbation incidence and frequency. Consequently, little is known about what people experience connected to masturbation. This might be one reason why theoretical approaches that specifically address the persistent gender gap in masturbation frequency are lacking. The aim of the current study was to explore several aspects of masturbation in young men and women, and to examine possible associations with their social backgrounds and sexual histories. Data from 1,566 women and 1,452 men (ages 18 to 22) from 52 Swedish senior high schools were analyzed. Comparisons between men and women were made regarding incidence of and age at first masturbation, the use of objects (e.g., sex toys), fantasies, and sexual functioning during masturbation, as well as about their attitudes toward masturbation and sexual fantasies. Cluster analysis was carried out to identify similarities between and differences within the gender groups. While overall more men than women reported experience with several of the investigated aspects, cluster analyses revealed that a large proportion of men and women reported similar experiences and that fewer experiences are not necessarily associated with negative attitudes toward masturbation. Implications of these findings are discussed in consideration of particular social backgrounds.

  10. The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project: Results of a Summer High-School Student, Teacher, University Scientist Partnership Using a Capstone Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Duane F.; Snow, Gregory R.; Claes, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports results from evaluation of the Cosmic Ray Observatory Project (CROP), a student, teacher, scientist partnership to engage high-school students and teachers in school based cosmic ray research. Specifically, this study examined whether an intensive summer workshop experience could effectively prepare teacher-student teams to…

  11. Young students experience theory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Three sixteen-year-old students from the International School of Geneva, La Chataigneraie have spent a week finding out about the life of a theoretical physicist at CERN. Student Peter Bishop at the blackboard with Robert Fleischer of Theory Division. Peter Bishop, Sam Schoenholz and Alexander Hultin spent the time with the Theory Unit of the Physics department. The visit was at the suggestion of the students themselves, who are required to undertake work experience at an organization, gaining insights into professional life, as part of their studies. After an introduction to CERN at Microcosm, each student had the opportunity to learn about physics at a level well beyond their current academic training. They were mentored by theoretical physicists who introduced them to the basics of particle physics, discussing physics in general as well as topics such as predicting the mass of the Higgs boson and cosmology. A visit to CMS, guided by Ariane Frey, proved very impressive, but the working conditions of physi...

  12. High School Graphics Experience Influencing the Self-Efficacy of First-Year Engineering Students in an Introductory Engineering Graphics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metraglia, Riccardo; Villa, Valerio; Baronio, Gabriele; Adamini, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Today's students enter engineering colleges with different technical backgrounds and prior graphics experience. This may due to their high school of provenience, which can be technical or non-technical. The prior experience affects students' ability in learning and hence their motivation and self-efficacy beliefs. This study intended to evaluate…

  13. An Online High School "Shepherding" Program: Teacher Roles and Experiences Mentoring Online Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Jeffery S.; Graham, Charles R.; Borup, Jered

    2014-01-01

    Several online programs use on-site facilitators to create a stronger sense of community and reduce student dropout. However, very little research addresses how programs that are fully online can provide their students with comparable support. Using K-12 online research, this case study analyzed a "shepherding program" at Mountain…

  14. Gender Differences in the High School and Affective Experiences of Introductory College Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The disparity in persistence between males and females studying physics has been a topic of concern to physics educators for decades. Overall, while female students perform as well as or better than male students, they continue to lag considerably in terms of persistence. The most significant drop in females studying physics occurs between high…

  15. High-school students engaging with researchers within a pre-university programme : Motivations and experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, B.I.; Eijkelhof, H.M.C.

    2018-01-01

    For students, the transition between secondary school and higher education can be problematic. Their prior knowledge may be insufficient, or they may lack the right attitude and skills for university. Especially gifted students often lack challenges to remain motivated. Moreover, it is not easy for

  16. Exploring Factors That Promote Online Learning Experiences and Academic Self-Concept of Minority High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex; Dogbey, James; Yuan, Guangji

    2018-01-01

    The rapid growth of online education at the K-12 level in recent years presents the need to explore issues that influence the academic experiences of students choosing this method of learning. In this study, we examined factors that promote/hinder the learning experiences and academic self-concept of minority students attending an online high…

  17. BIG SCHOOL - SMALL SCHOOL. STUDIES OF THE EFFECTS OF HIGH SCHOOL SIZE UPON THE BEHAVIOR AND EXPERIENCES OF STUDENTS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARKER, ROGER G.; AND OTHERS

    STUDIES WERE MADE IN KANSAS HIGH SCHOOLS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF SCHOOL SIZE UPON THE BEHAVIOR AND EXPERIENCES OF STUDENTS. THE FOLLOWING AREAS WERE CONSIDERED-- THE SCHOOL INVOLVED IN THE STUDY, THE DATA GATHERED FROM RECORDS AND RESEARCH, OUT-OF-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES, AND THE PLACE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE TOTAL LIFE OF FOUR SMALL TOWNS.…

  18. How African-American Elementary Students in High-Poverty Schools Experience Creative Expression: A Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Belinda F.

    2016-01-01

    Literature that addresses how the arts enhance student learning through creative expression is minimal. This is especially true for African-American elementary students from high-poverty backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to employ a case study design to explore how African-American elementary students in high-poverty schools experience…

  19. A Phenomenological Case Study of the Experiences of African American High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Theresa West

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In a progression of scholarly research on the achievement gap, the results remain the same. The data show that there is a statistically significant difference in the achievement of African American and Hispanic students compared with their Caucasian and Asian academic counterparts. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the implications of the gap in achievement for young urban adults. The participants were five African American students who had dropped out of traditional school. These students described their academic decline through interviews and focus group sessions at two alternative educational sites. The data were collected and the results indicated that the students felt disconnected from their teachers and the process of education. As a result of this disconnection, they became adrift in the educational system and were eventually swallowed by the undertow.

  20. Development of instructional manual encouraging student active learning for high school teaching on fluid mechanics through Torricelli's tank experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiwan, Suttinee; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Khemmani, Supitch

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to help students to perform Physics laboratory by themselves and to provide guidelines for high school teacher to develop active learning on fluid mechanics by using Torricelli's tank experiment. The research was conducted as follows: 1) constructed an appropriate Torricelli's tank experiment for high school teaching and investigated the condition for maximum water falling distance. As a consequence, it was found that the distance of the falling water measured from the experiment was shorter than that obtained from the theory of ideal fluid because of the energy loss during a flow, 2) developed instructional manual for high school teaching that encourages active learning by using problem based learning (PBL) approach, which is consistent with the trend of teaching and learning in 21st century. The content validity of our instructional manual using Index of Item-objective Congruence (IOC) as evaluated by three experts was over 0.67. The manual developed was therefore qualified for classroom practice.

  1. Experiences of Latina/o Students in "Large Schools in Drag": A Critical Analysis of an Urban Alternative High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, William; Antrop-González, René

    2007-01-01

    This study uses mixed methods to identify the factors linked to varying levels of academic performance among Latina/o students enrolled in an alternative high school. Results from the quantitative analyses suggest students who had highly educated fathers and who reported high levels of English literacy are very likely to be classified as academic…

  2. Travel Abroad: A Study of the Perceived Influence of High School Students' Experiences of Short-Term Travel or Study Abroad Prior to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angwenyi, David Matara

    2014-01-01

    Students who participate in a short-term travel experience program of 4 weeks or less develop a sense of global citizenship. High school students who spend time traveling abroad might seek to address global issues, not only from a local perspective, but also from a global perspective. The Troika Study guided this study. Using qualitative…

  3. Teachers' Autonomy Support, Autonomy Suppression and Conditional Negative Regard as Predictors of Optimal Learning Experience among High-Achieving Bedouin Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Haya

    2018-01-01

    The study is based on self-determination theory and focuses on the motivation of high-achieving Bedouin students who belong to a hierarchical-collectivist society. The study focuses on the question: What are the relations between teachers' autonomy support and control and an optimal learning experience among students? The study is unique in its…

  4. Developing and Implementing Inquiry-Based, Water Quality Laboratory Experiments for High School Students to Explore Real Environmental Issues Using Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandler, Daphna; Blonder, Ron; Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale and the implementation of five laboratory experiments; four of them, intended for high-school students, are inquiry-based activities that explore the quality of water. The context of water provides students with an opportunity to study the importance of analytical methods and how they influence our everyday…

  5. High school and college introductory science education experiences: A study regarding perceptions of university students persisting in science as a major area of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, L. Denise

    The focus of this study was to investigate college students' perception of high school and college introductory science learning experiences related to persistence in science as a major area of study in college. The study included students' perceptions of the following areas of science education: (1) teacher interpersonal relationship with students, (2) teacher personality styles, (3) teacher knowledge of the content, (4) instructional methods, and (5) science course content. A survey research design was employed in the investigative study to collect and analyze data. One hundred ninety two students participated in the research study. A survey instrument entitled Science Education Perception Survey was used to collect data. The researcher sought to reject or support three null hypotheses as related to participants' perceptions of high school and college introductory science education experiences. Using binomial regression analysis, this study analyzed differences between students persisting in science and students not persisting in science as a major. The quantitative research indicated that significant differences exist between persistence in science as a major and high school science teacher traits and college introductory science instructional methods. Although these variables were found to be significant predictors, the percent variance was low and should be considered closely before concluded these as strong predictors of persistence. Major findings of the qualitative component indicated that students perceived that: (a) interest in high school science course content and high school science teacher personality and interpersonal relationships had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (b) interest in college introductory science course content had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (c) students recalled laboratory activities and overall good teaching as most meaningful to their high school science

  6. Londonfahrten mit Hauptschuelern--ein Erfahrungsbericht (Trips to London with Junior High School Students--Experience Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepp, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Discusses trips to London with junior high school students: planning, choice of goals, costs, pocket money, board and lodging, language preparation, programming. Gives a detailed account of a trip which was particularly geared to the students' circumstances. The possibility of partnership with English schools is discussed. (Text is in German.)…

  7. The Effect of High-Fidelity Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Simulation on Athletic Training Student Knowledge, Confidence, Emotions, and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: High-fidelity simulation is widely used in healthcare for the training and professional education of students though literature of its application to athletic training education remains sparse. Objective: This research attempts to address a wide-range of data. This includes athletic training student knowledge acquisition from…

  8. Do Rural and Regional Students in Queensland Experience an ICT "Turn-Off" in the Early High School Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Lyn; Anderson, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Students learning in regional, rural and remote locations in Queensland are currently experiencing a "turn-off" in relation to school-based ICT in the first three years of high school. At the same time, students are experiencing increasing levels of interest and motivation from their use of ICT at home. Given the importance of ICT as an…

  9. The Experience of a Highly Skilled Student during Handball Lessons in Physical Education: A Relevant Pointer to the Gap between School and Sports Contexts of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crance, Marie-Cecile; Trohel, Jean; Saury, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the experience of a highly skilled student during a handball physical education unit in a French high school. More specifically, the analysis describes the nature of his involvement during two lessons that follow a pedagogical model close to the principles of Sport Education. The present case study of a…

  10. Language Brokering and Self-Concept: An Exploratory Study of Latino Students' Experiences in Middle and High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Kate; Kumpiene, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationships among individual characteristics, language brokering experiences and attitudes, and multiple dimensions of self-concept among a sample of Latino adolescents. The sample was comprised of 66 Latino students in 6th through 11th grades who were proficient in both Spanish and English. Results from…

  11. S.E.A. Lab. Science Experiments and Activities. Marine Science for High School Students in Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kathy, Ed.

    A series of science experiments and activities designed for secondary school students taking biology, chemistry, physics, physical science or marine science courses are outlined. Each of the three major sections--chemistry, biology, and physics--addresses concepts that are generally covered in those courses but incorporates aspects of marine…

  12. Assessing student clinical learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehyba, Katrine; Miller, Susan; Connaughton, Joanne; Singer, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    This article describes the use of an activity worksheet and questionnaire to investigate the learning experience of students on clinical placement. The worksheet measures the amount of time students spend in different learning activities, and the questionnaire explores student satisfaction and preferred learning activities. An activity worksheet and questionnaire … investigate[d] the learning experiences of students on clinical placement METHODS: The activity worksheet and questionnaire were used in a cohort pilot study of physiotherapy students on clinical placement. The activity worksheet provides details of the amount of time students engage in a range of clinical and non-clinical tasks while on placement, such as time spent treating patients, working individually, working with their peers and engaging in reflective practice. In combination with the questionnaire results, it allows clinicians to gain an understanding of the clinical learning environment experienced by their students. The data collected using these tools provide a description of the students' activities while undertaking the clinical placement. This information may guide the refinement of the clinical experience, and offers an opportunity to individualise learning activities to match students' needs and preferences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  13. The Role of Senior High School Experiences in Shaping a Life Project Linked to Higher Education for Students With Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Cruz-Vadillo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the school experiences of 13 students with disabilities. It corresponds to a cross, synchronous and non experimental study, whose scope is mainly descriptive. The data collection was carried out through a semi-structured interview and transcribed from audio recordings to make a category analysis. The main results showed that in the case of students who were born with disabilities, the fact that an institution was inclusive turned out essential for them to have adequate transit through the educational system and thus become apt for higher education. The combination disability-inclusion-right to education-higher education is what this paper aimed to weave, trying to follow as thread or anchor, the previous school experiences of students with disabilities. We recognize that an adequate, inclusive, positive experience besides a subjective construction of the body and disability by family members, become important conditions to access schooling. Education is a right, therefore it can not be seen as an act of charity; it should be required as a quality practice.

  14. Contribution of student involvement in production/service unit and experience of industry practices to entrepreneurial attitude and the impact entrepeneurship readiness of vocational high school students of great Malang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukminna, Halimahtus; Isnandar, Muladi

    2017-09-01

    Purpose of this research was to determine the contribution of student involvement in production/ service unit (X1), experience of industry practices (X2), and entrepreneurial attitude (Y) towards readiness entrepreneurship (Z) of vocational student regional Malang. The design of the study using a quantitative approach. The samples used as many as 130 respondents. Instruments used for collecting data in the form of questionnaires. Data analysis included descriptive and test of hypothesis. The result showed: that the description of data on the level of student involvement in production/ service unit, experience of industry practices, entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurship readiness in the high category. The contribution student involvement in production/ service unit of entrepreneurial attitude of 10.6%. The contribution experience of industry practices of entrepreneurial attitude of 17.4%. The contribution student involvement in production/ service unit and experience of industry practices simultaneously to entrepreneurial attitude of 44.1%. The contribution student involvement in production/ service unit of readiness entrepreneurship of 4%. The contribution experience of industry practices of readiness entrepreneurship of 5%. The contribution entrepreneurial attitude of readiness entrepreneurship of 16%. Finally, the contribution student involvement in production/ service unit, experience of industry practices, and entrepreneurial attitude simultaneously to readiness entrepreneurship of 50.3%.

  15. Teaching Veterinary Anesthesia: A Survey-Based Evaluation of Two High-Fidelity Models and Live-Animal Experience for Undergraduate Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, Gabrielle C; Collins, Teresa; Hosgood, Giselle

    In veterinary medical education, reduction, replacement, and refinement (the three Rs) must be considered. Three clinical skills in anesthesia were identified as challenging to students: endotracheal intubation, intravenous catheterization, and drug dose calculations. The aims of this project were to evaluate students' perception of their level of confidence in performing these three clinical skills in veterinary anesthesia, to document the extent of students' previous experience in performing these three tasks, and to describe students' emotional states during this training. Veterinary students completed a series of four surveys over the period of their pre-clinical training to evaluate the usefulness of high-fidelity models for skill acquisition in endotracheal intubation and intravenous catheterization. In addition, practice and ongoing assessment in drug dose calculations were performed. The curriculum during this period of training progressed from lectures and non-animal training, to anesthesia of pigs undergoing surgery from which they did not recover, and finally to anesthesia of dogs and cats in a neutering clinic. The level of confidence for each of the three clinical skills increased over the study period. For each skill, the number of students with no confidence decreased to zero and the proportion of students with higher levels of confidence increased. The high-fidelity models for endotracheal intubation and intravenous catheterization used to complement the live-animal teaching were considered a useful adjunct to the teaching of clinical skills in veterinary anesthesia. With practice, students became more confident performing drug dose calculations.

  16. High school students' knowledge and experience with a peer who committed or attempted suicide: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilubane, Hilda N; Ruiter, Robert A C; Bos, Arjan E R; Reddy, Priscilla S; van den Borne, Bart

    2014-10-18

    Suicide is a major public health problem for adolescents in South Africa, and also affects those associated with them. Peers become more important during adolescence and can be a significant source of social support. Because peers may be the first to notice psychological problems among each other, the present study's objectives were to assess students' knowledge about suicide, perceived risk factors, signs of poor mental health in adolescents who committed suicide, students' awareness of available mental health care and resources, and beliefs about prevention. This qualitative study used focus group discussions to elicit the thoughts and feelings of high school students who had a peer who committed or attempted suicide. Peers and class mates of suicide attempters and suicide completers were identified with the help of a social worker and school management and were invited to participate. All focus group discussions were audio taped and analyzed. A total of 56 adolescents (13-19 years of age) from Limpopo schools in South Africa participated in six focus group discussions. The data were analyzed by NVivo version 8, using an inductive approach. Participants reported to be affected by the suicide attempt or completed suicide. They felt guilty about their failure to identify and prevent the suicide and displayed little knowledge of warning signs for suicidal behaviour. They identified several risk factors for the suicide of their peers, such as poor relationship issues, teenage pregnancy, punishment, and attention seeking behaviour. Resources for students with mental health problems and survivors of suicide attempts were not perceived to be available at schools and elsewhere. School-based suicide prevention programs based on theory and evidence are necessary. Such interventions should also focus on detection of mental health problems by peers. Counseling services for students with mental health problems and suicide survivors should be available and made known to

  17. Energy Experiments for STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchi, John

    2011-03-01

    Texas Christian University (TCU) is developing an undergraduate program that prepares students to become engineers with an emphasis in energy systems. One of the courses in the program is a technical overview of traditional energy (coal, oil and gas), nuclear energy, and renewable energy that requires as a pre-requisite two semesters of calculus-based physics. Energy experiments are being developed that will facilitate student involvement and provide hands-on learning opportunities. Students participating in the course will improve their understanding of energy systems; be introduced to outstanding scientific and engineering problems; learn about the role of energy in a global and societal context; and evaluate contemporary issues associated with energy. This talk will present the status of experiments being developed for the technical energy survey course.

  18. Student designed experiments to learn fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Catalina

    2013-11-01

    Lasers and high speed cameras are a wonderful tool to visualize the very complex behavior of fluids, and to help students grasp concepts like turbulence, surface tension and vorticity. In this work we present experiments done by physics students in their senior year at the School of Science of the National University of Mexico as a final project in the continuum mechanics course. Every semester, the students make an oral presentation of their work and videos and images are kept in the web page ``Pasión por los Fluidos''. I acknowledge support from the Physics Department of Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

  19. Forced sex, rape and sexual exploitation: attitudes and experiences of high school students in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulumeoderhwa, Maroyi; Harris, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on fieldwork carried out in 2011 with the aim of investigating the attitudes and reported behaviour of Congolese high school students concerning sexual relationships. A total of 56 boys and girls aged 16-20 from two urban and two rural high schools in South Kivu Province took part in focus groups, and 40 of these were subsequently interviewed individually. The majority of boys felt that they were entitled to sex from their girlfriends and that if persuasion was unsuccessful, the use of force was legitimate; this, in their minds, did not constitute rape. Girls, on the other hand, were clear that such forced sex was rape. However it may be understood, rape was perceived as having increased in recent years and was explained by weak legal systems, pornography and provocative dressing by girls. Boys were angry at the competition from older, often married, men who were able to provide monetary and other incentives to the girls.

  20. Teaching chemistry and other sciences to blind and low-vision students through hands-on learning experiences in high school science laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supalo, Cary Alan

    2010-11-01

    Students with blindness and low vision (BLV) have traditionally been underrepresented in the sciences as a result of technological and attitudinal barriers to equal access in science laboratory classrooms. The Independent Laboratory Access for the Blind (ILAB) project developed and evaluated a suite of talking and audible hardware/software tools to empower students with BLV to have multisensory, hands-on laboratory learning experiences. This dissertation focuses on the first year of ILAB tool testing in mainstream science laboratory classrooms, and comprises a detailed multi-case study of four students with BLV who were enrolled in high school science classes during 2007--08 alongside sighted students. Participants attended different schools; curricula included chemistry, AP chemistry, and AP physics. The ILAB tools were designed to provide multisensory means for students with BLV to make observations and collect data during standard laboratory lessons on an equivalent basis with their sighted peers. Various qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments were used to determine whether the hands-on experiences facilitated by the ILAB tools had led to increased involvement in laboratory-goal-directed actions, greater peer acceptance in the students' lab groups, improved attitudes toward science, and increased interest in science. Premier among the ILAB tools was the JAWS/Logger Pro software interface, which made audible all information gathered through standard Vernier laboratory probes and visually displayed through Logger Pro. ILAB tools also included a talking balance, a submersible audible light sensor, a scientific talking stopwatch, and a variety of other high-tech and low-tech devices and techniques. While results were mixed, all four participating BLV students seemed to have experienced at least some benefit, with the effect being stronger for some than for others. Not all of the data collection instruments were found to reveal improvements for all

  1. The Impact of E-Education on At Risk High School Students' Science Achievement and Experiences during Summer School Credit Recovery Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Pamela Prevette

    Nationally, at risk students make up to 30% of U.S. students in public schools. Many at risk students have poor attendance, are disengaged from the learning environment and have low academic achievement. Educational failure occurs when students do not complete the required courses and as a result do not receive a high school diploma or a certificate of attendance. Many at risk students will not graduate; nearly one-third of all United States high school students have left the public school system before graduating, which has been referred to as a national crisis. Many at risk students fail science courses that are required for graduation, such as biology. Clearly, many students are not responding positively to the conditions in many public school classrooms, suggesting the need for different methods of educating at risk students, such as e-education. Three research questions guided the study: 1) Who are the students in an e-education, online summer school credit recovery course? 2) Do students' beliefs about their learning environment or other personal factors influence their academic achievement?, and 3) How do students describe their experiences of an e-education science course? This mixed methods study investigates thirty-two at risk students who were enrolled in one of three e-education science education courses (biology, earth science, and physical science) during a summer session in a rural county in a southeastern US state. These students failed their most recent science course taken in a traditional classroom setting. Artino's (2010) social-cognitive model of academic motivation and emotion was used as a theoretical framework to highlight the salient motivational factors toward learning science (e.g., task characteristics, task value beliefs, positive emotions). Student data included pre and post tests for all e-education lessons, a final exam, survey data (Students Motivation towards Science Learning (SMTSL), time (on task and idle), field notes, and

  2. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  3. Introducing High School Students to Chemical Engineering Kinetics with a Simple Experiment-Based Smartphone Education Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Simone; Ymele-Leki, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A community outreach project was integrated in a District of Columbia public schools summer internship program for students from underrepresented minorities in STEM. The project introduced these students to fundamental engineering principles by leveraging a smartphone application (App) so readily accessible and attractive to them that it boosted…

  4. The experiences of female high school students and interest in STEM: Factors leading to the selection of an engineering or computer science major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoways, Sharon K.

    STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education creates critical thinkers, increases science literacy, and enables the next generation of innovators, which leads to new products and processes that sustain our economy (Hossain & Robinson, 2012). We have been hearing the warnings for several years, that there simply are not enough young scientists entering into the STEM professional pathways to replace all of the retiring professionals (Brown, Brown, Reardon, & Merrill, 2011; Harsh, Maltese, & Tai, 2012; Heilbronner, 2011; Scott, 2012). The problem is not necessarily due to a lack of STEM skills and concept proficiency. There also appears to be a lack of interest in these fields. Recent evidence suggests that many of the most proficient students, especially minority students and women, have been gravitating away from science and engineering toward other professions. (President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, 2010). The purpose of this qualitative research study was an attempt to determine how high schools can best prepare and encourage young women for a career in engineering or computer science. This was accomplished by interviewing a pool of 21 women, 5 recent high school graduates planning to major in STEM, 5 college students who had completed at least one full year of coursework in an engineering or computer science major and 11 professional women who had been employed as an engineer or computer scientist for at least one full year. These women were asked to share the high school courses, activities, and experiences that best prepared them to pursue an engineering or computer science major. Five central themes emerged from this study; coursework in physics and calculus, promotion of STEM camps and clubs, teacher encouragement of STEM capabilities and careers, problem solving, critical thinking and confidence building activities in the classroom, and allowing students the opportunity to fail and ask questions in a safe environment. These

  5. Social Success Skills: Black Male High School Students' Perspectives on Society and Their Media Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degand, Darnel

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation's purpose was to better understand how messages received through different cultural mediums influences the development of social success skills. Black male students were chosen as the focal participants for this year-long study because they are included among the groups whose social success skills development are thought to…

  6. Perceptions of Overweight Students Concerning Their Experiences in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Josh; Graber, Kim C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine overweight students' perceptions of and experiences in physical education. Specifically, the applicability of learned helplessness as a framework to understand their experiences was explored. Participants were seven female and five male high school students whose body mass index was at or higher…

  7. Teachers' Experiences in the General Education Classroom with Students Identified with Emotional Behavioral Disorders at a Title I Southeast Texas High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigee, Alicia D.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the experiences of teachers' in the general education classroom with students with emotional behavior disorders. The five questions that guided the research examined teacher's use of strategies, administration support, and need the training to educate students with emotional behavioral…

  8. International Research Students' Experiences in Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Joanne Sin Wei; Terry, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The flow of international students to study in Australia increases each year. It is a challenge for students to study abroad in a different sociocultural environment, especially for postgraduate research students, as they experience numerous difficulties in an unfamiliar and vastly different study environment. A study aimed to investigate the…

  9. University Experiences and Women Engineering Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, LoAnn Debra Gienger

    Riverside University (a pseudonym), like many universities, has not significantly increased the number of women who graduate with bachelor's degrees in engineering. The purpose of the study is to understand how the university experiences of women students influence the decision to persist in an undergraduate engineering degree and to understand the role of self-perception in how the students perceive experiences as supporting or hindering their persistence in the major. Archival data, documents and artifacts, observations, individual interviews, and a focus group with women engineering students provide insights into students' perceived barriers and supports of student success. Analysis of the data results in two major themes. First, students' self-confidence and self-efficacy influence how women assimilate university experiences as either supportive or diminishing of academic success. Second, university policies and practices shape the campus environment within which student experiences are formed and influence a student's level of institutional, academic, and social integration. The results of the study indicate opportunities for university leadership to enhance strategies that positively shape students' institutional, academic and social integration as precursors toward increasing the number of women students who successfully complete undergraduate engineering degrees at Riverside University. Future research is indicated to better understand how gender and gender identity intersects with other demographic factors, such as socio-economic status, immigration status, and life stage (e.g., traditional versus non-traditional students), to support or deter the persistence of engineering students to degree completion.

  10. When Students Rebel: The American Collegiate Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Joseph M.

    Student unrest has always been a concomitant of student life, going as far back as 1200 and 1229 when students were killed in Paris during town-gown battles. Much of the student unrest in early America was simply a matter of youthful high spirits, though there were some serious cases often involving mass rebellion. The greatest single cause for…

  11. Nursing Student Perceptions Regarding Simulation Experience Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Aimee A; Gruenke, Theresa; Alt-Gehrman, Penny; Hansen, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    The use of simulated learning experiences (SLEs) have increased within nursing curricula with positive learning outcomes for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to explore nursing students' perceptions of their clinical decision making (CDM) related to the block sequencing of different patient care experiences, SLEs versus hospital-based learning experiences (HLEs). A qualitative descriptive design used open-ended survey questions to generate information about the block sequencing of SLEs and its impact on nursing students' perceived CDM. Three themes emerged from the data: Preexperience Anxiety, Real-Time Decision Making, and Increased Patient Care Experiences. Nursing students identified that having SLEs prior to HLEs provided several benefits. Even when students preferred SLEs prior to HLEs, the sequence did not impact their CDM. This suggests that alternating block sequencing can be used without impacting the students' perceptions of their ability to make decisions. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(9):528-532.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Students' Perceptions and Experiences of Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daesang; Rueckert, Daniel; Kim, Dong-Joong; Seo, Daeryong

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on how students perceive the use of mobile devices to create a personalized learning experience outside the classroom. Fifty-three students in three graduate TESOL classes participated in this study. All participants completed five class projects designed to help them explore mobile learning experiences with their own mobile…

  13. Nursing students' experience of patient's death

    OpenAIRE

    Rulíková, Klára

    2016-01-01

    Reflections on student nurse's experience with death of a patient during their studies were collected in form of questionnaires. Theory and practice were compared and research conducted into the needs of students, who experienced patient's death during their studies. Research concluded with recommendation for widening the nursing course programme and adding opportunities for students to share their feelings and experiences after their patients death. Key terms: death, dying patient, study, te...

  14. The experience sampling method: Investigating students' affective experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jayson M.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Improving non-cognitive outcomes such as attitudes, efficacy, and persistence in physics courses is an important goal of physics education. This investigation implemented an in-the-moment surveying technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) [1] to measure students' affective experience in physics. Measurements included: self-efficacy, cognitive efficiency, activation, intrinsic motivation, and affect. Data are presented that show contrasts in students' experiences (e.g., in physics vs. non-physics courses).

  15. Hispanic College Students Library Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Risa; Newman, Eric; Brown, Haakon T.

    2015-01-01

    This study looks at undergraduate Hispanic students' interpretations and current perceptions of the academic library's purpose, usefulness and value. What are the reasons to use the library? What are the barriers to use? This study will examine academic libraries' move toward electronic library materials and what it means for Hispanic students.…

  16. The Role of High School Research Experiences in Shaping Students' Research Self-Efficacy and Preparation for Undergraduate Research Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Amy K.; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi; Jones, Jill N.; Pretlow, Joshua; Keller, Tierney F.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of undergraduate research participation are well documented, but less is known about students' pathways into undergraduate research participation. This mixed-methods study explored the role of an International Baccalaureate research project in students' development of research self-efficacy in high school, and how this development…

  17. A Comparative Study of the Effects of a Concept Mapping Enhanced Laboratory Experience on Turkish High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The research reported here consists of the introduction of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities combined with concept mapping. The purpose of this intervention was to enhance student understanding of acid-base chemistry for tenth grade students' from two classes in a Turkish high school. An additional aim was to enhance…

  18. High Ability Students' Voice on Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Alex C.; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    This study used a self-determination theory lens to investigate high ability learners' motivational experiences. Participants were 15 high ability youth involved in a summer learning camp for gifted students. Two major themes emerged from qualitative data analysis: (a) "The Fun Factor of Learning" and (b) "The Rewards and Pressures…

  19. Students' Understanding of Stern Gerlach Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2009-01-01

    The Stern Gerlach experiment has played a central role in the discovery of spin angular momentum and it has also played a pivotal role in elucidating foundational issues in quantum mechanics. Here, we discuss investigation of students' difficulties related to the Stern Gerlach experiment by giving written tests and interviewing advanced undergraduate and graduate students in quantum mechanics. We also discuss preliminary data that suggest that the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) related to the Stern Gerlach experiment is helpful in improving students' understanding of these concepts.

  20. Improving medical work experience for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Neil; Shah, Alexander; Bollina, Prasad; Bollina, Harsha

    2010-12-01

    This exploratory piece details the development of the programme Medic Insight, which was established in 2007 in Lothian. This is an aptly-named unique organisation that provides an insight into life as a doctor for school students. We believe that the provision of work experience needs to be improved for both students and doctors. Securing work experience in medicine has historically been biased: individuals that have family or friends who work as doctors are able to organise shadowing placements with greater ease. Shadowing experiences are of questionable value, and frequently offer exposure to only one field, and administrators struggle to match doctors' working schedules with those of students. Medic Insight has been developed to address these key problems. It provides a free, application-based shadowing experience for 15-16-year olds, in addition to interactive seminars for younger students. Over the course of the 5-day shadowing experience (Medic Insight Week), students rotate through a variety of specialties, meeting doctors of all grades. Doctors agree to act as mentors prior to the shadowing weeks and post their availability online. Data from our pilot in 2008 has been encouraging. All students who answered our questionnaire found the experience to be either useful or very useful, and ongoing data collection is proving this to be an enjoyable and effective programme. We are confident that Medic Insight will help all suitably enthusiastic and able school students make informed decisions to apply to study medicine. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  1. Childhood sexual abuse experiences and its associated factors among adolescent female high school students in Arbaminch town, Gammo Goffa zone, Southern Ethiopia: a mixed method study

    OpenAIRE

    Mekuria, Aleme; Nigussie, Aderajew; Abera, Muluemebet

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood sexual abuse is a major social problem in Africa including Ethiopia. Moreover, little has been explored about the pattern of childhood sexual abuse in the context of high school students in Ethiopia in general and in Arbaminch town in particular. Thus, the present study aims to assess the prevalence and associated factors of childhood sexual abuse among adolescent female high school students in Arbaminch town. Methods A school- based, cross-sectional study was conducted a...

  2. An international capstone experience for pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Dick R; Vaidya, Varun A; Hufstader, Meghan A; Ray, Max D; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A

    2013-04-12

    This report describes the experiences of the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy over 20 years with an international capstone educational experience for students. Although the university provides reciprocal opportunities to international students, this report focuses on the experiences of the college's pharmacy students who have participated in the program. This capstone course is offered as an elective course in the advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) component of the college's experiential program. Goals of the program and a brief description of its organizational structure are provided. Results of a structured student satisfaction survey and a survey covering the most recent 3 years of the program are presented. This program has greatly broadened participants' cultural horizons and expanded their global view and understanding of the contributions of pharmacy to health care.

  3. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 6 ... Keywords: teaching experience, students' learning outcomes, teacher incentives ... revealed that experienced teachers' perception of their teaching objectives were ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. .... Years. English language. Mathematics Physics. Chemistry. Biology. %.

  4. Evaluating Psychology Students' Library Skills and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steve; Allen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Extensive engagement with current academic sources is expected of all psychology undergraduates. Thirty-eight undergraduate psychology students took part in a series of focus group discussions of their information-searching experiences and skills. The majority of students had not been required to engage with any form of information searching while…

  5. Prescription medicine sharing experience among pharmacy students

    OpenAIRE

    Šliogerytė, Karolina

    2017-01-01

    K.Šliogeryte`s master thesis. Master thesis supervisor associate professor Jonas Grincevičius (2015/2016), lecturer J. Daukšienė(2016/2017); Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical technology and Social pharmacy department. – Kaunas. Master thesis: prescription medicine sharing experience among pharmacy students. The aim: to evaluate LUHS Pharmacy faculty students` experience in prescription drugs` sharing. Methods: empirical qualitative method...

  6. Medical students, early general practice placements and positive supervisor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Margaret; Upham, Susan; King, David; Dick, Marie-Louise; van Driel, Mieke

    2018-03-01

    Introduction Community-based longitudinal clinical placements for medical students are becoming more common globally. The perspective of supervising clinicians about their experiences and processes involved in maximising these training experiences has received less attention than that of students. Aims This paper explores the general practitioner (GP) supervisor perspective of positive training experiences with medical students undertaking urban community-based, longitudinal clinical placements in the early years of medical training. Methods Year 2 medical students spent a half-day per week in general practice for either 13 or 26 weeks. Transcribed semi-structured interviews from a convenience sample of participating GPs were thematically analysed by two researchers, using a general inductive approach. Results Identified themes related to the attributes of participating persons and organisations: GPs, students, patients, practices and their supporting institution; GPs' perceptions of student development; and triggers enhancing the experience. A model was developed to reflect these themes. Conclusions Training experiences were enhanced for GPs supervising medical students in early longitudinal clinical placements by the synergy of motivated students and keen teachers with support from patients, practice staff and academic institutions. We developed an explanatory model to better understand the mechanism of positive experiences. Understanding the interaction of factors enhancing teaching satisfaction is important for clinical disciplines wishing to maintain sustainable, high quality teaching.

  7. High School Band Students' Perspectives of Teacher Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher turnover remains an important issue in education. The least researched perspectives, though, are those of the students who experience teacher turnover. The purpose of this study was to examine how high school band students experience teacher turnover. A total of twelve students were interviewed, representing three schools that experienced…

  8. How High School Students Envision Their STEM Career Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Barnett, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Given that many urban students exclude Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics careers from their career choices, the present study focuses on urban high school students and adopts the social-cultural approach to understand the following questions: how do students envision their careers? What are the experiences that shape students'…

  9. An Intervention to Improve Teachers' Interpersonally Involving Instructional Practices in High School Physical Education: Implications for Student Relatedness Support and In-Class Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Cassandra; Lonsdale, Chris; Dimmock, James; Jackson, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Research grounded in self-determination theory has demonstrated the important role of teachers in shaping students' physical education experiences. Utilizing a cluster-randomized controlled design, this study aimed to examine whether an interpersonally involving training program based on self-determination theory principles could enhance students' in-class experiences. With 18 teachers (males = 8, females = 10, M age  = 32.75, SD = 8.14) and a final sample of 382 students (males = 155, females = 227, M age  = 13.20, SD = 1.66), we implemented linear mixed modeling to investigate the effects on students' (a) perceived relatedness support and (b) enjoyment of physical education, tripartite efficacy beliefs (i.e., self-efficacy, other-efficacy, relation-inferred self-efficacy), self-determined motivation, and amotivation. Relative to those in the control condition, students in the treatment condition reported positive changes in teacher-provided relatedness support, enjoyment, other-efficacy, and peer-focused relation-inferred self-efficacy. These findings demonstrate support for strategies designed to aid physical education teachers' relatedness-supportive instructional behaviors.

  10. Student-Centred Experiments with Stream Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Ian; Larsen, Stefano; Durance, Isabelle; Ormerod, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Field experiments are at the core of ecology, yet rarely find their way into education, probably due to a combination of technical challenges and risks associated with fieldwork. This may compromise student education and perception of the subject, making interesting, readily manageable experiments extremely important. We describe how the daily…

  11. Student perceptions of customer experience in a higher education environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus le Roux

    2014-11-01

    Research purpose: The main aim of the study was to measure students’ level of loyalty, advocacy intentions and perceptions of customer experience during service encounters with administrative staff of the North-West University. Motivation for the study: Positive experiences by students on-campus can increase their satisfaction levels which will lead to an increased propensity for further studies, develop a sense of loyalty and increase advocacy intentions to promote the university to others. Research approach, design and method: This quantitative research followed a descriptive research design. Self-administered questionnaires were handed out to 1295 students on the 3 campuses of the university. Main findings: Students on the Potchefstroom campus show much higher loyalty and advocacy intentions than their counterparts on the Vaal and Mafikeng campuses. Overall the findings indicate that the students have very positive perceptions of the professional appearance of staff members, and also think that their personal information is handled in a secure manner. Male and female students did not differ in their levels of customer experience. European language-speaking students reported a higher level of customer experience compared to their African language-speaking counterparts. The customer experience levels of students in the Potchefstroom Faculty of Health Sciences are higher than students in the Vaal Faculty of Humanities. Practical/managerial implications: It could be beneficial for the management of tertiary institutions to gain insight into the sources or factors that constitute positive experiences for students, for example convenient opening hours and ease of contacting staff by telephone. The training of newly appointed and existing staff could also be enhanced when they are sensitised regarding students’ perceptions of positive customer experiences. Contribution/value-add: The adoption of strategies by HEIs to attract and retain students and render excellent

  12. A Graduate Student's Experience and Perspective on a Student-Teacher-Researcher Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, J.; Stylinski, C.; Doty, C.

    2017-12-01

    Teachers and their K-12 students lack firsthand experience in science research and often harbor misconceptions about science practices and the nature of science. To address this challenge, the NOAA-funded Student-Teacher-Researcher (STAR) partnership that provides rural high school students with authentic research experiences investigating the amount and sources of nitrate in schoolyard runoff. Teachers received training, guiding curricular materials aligned with NGSS and in-classroom support. With a focus on evidence-based reasoning skills, students actively participate in the research process through sample collection, data analysis, and an in-person discussion of conclusions and implications with our scientist team. As a member of this team, I assisted with refining the study design, analyzing nitrate isotope runoff samples, and sharing insights and feedback with students during the in-person discussion session. Assessment results indicate student gained an understanding of nitrate pollution and of science practices. As a graduate student, young scientist, and possessor of a B.S. in Science Education, I already recognized the value of involving K-12 students and teachers in authentic research experiences, as these experiences expose students to the nature of science while also improving content knowledge. During the STAR partnership, I learned firsthand some of the obstacles presented during outreach involving partnerships between a research institution and schools, such as inflexibility of school scheduling and the need for flexibility with research questions requiring complex lab analysis. Additionally, I discovered the challenge of working systemically across a school district, which can have broad impact but limit student experiences. Highlights of my experience included interactions with students and teachers, especially when students have unexpected answers to my questions, providing novel explanations for patterns observed in the data. Despite the

  13. Learning experience in endodontics: Brazilian students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seijo, Marilia O S; Ferreira, Efigênia F; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio P; Paiva, Saul M; Martins, Renata C

    2013-05-01

    Including students' perceptions in the educational process is considered a key component in monitoring the quality of academic programs. This study aimed to evaluate the concept of one's learning experience in endodontic teaching from the perspective of a group of Brazilian students. A total of 126 self-administered, structured questionnaires were distributed to undergraduate dental students enrolled in endodontics courses during the second semester of the 2009 academic year. The questionnaires were administered during final examinations and focused on students' opinions concerning learning during endodontic treatments, time spent during endodontic treatments, difficulties found during endodontic treatments, quality of endodontic treatments performed, characteristics of the technique employed, and suggestions to improve endodontic teaching. Ninety-one percent of the questionnaires were returned for evaluation. The obtained answers were discussed and analyzed, thereby generating quantitative and qualitative data showing students' perceptions of their experiences in endodontics courses. The main points that can affect the teaching of endodontics, according to the undergraduate students, included patients' absences and delays, selection of patients, preclinical and clinical training, difficulties found, type of technique employed, and teachers' orientation during endodontic treatment. The students' perceptions provided valuable information about the development of the course and the teacher-student relationship, together with the added intention of enhancing the teaching of endodontics as well as other courses.

  14. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Fred [Directorate of Radiography, School of Health Care Professions, University of Salford, Allerton Building, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  15. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Fred

    2009-01-01

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  16. The Dutch Experience with Weighted Student Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Edward B.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Weighted student funding (WSF) is used in several U.S. cities as a method for providing more funds to schools with high concentrations of disadvantaged students. The practice has been used successfully in the Netherlands since 1985. Several factors make the success of the Dutch system unlikely to transfer to the United States, including the Dutch…

  17. The Impact of High School Science Teachers' Beliefs, Curricular Enactments and Experience on Student Learning during an Inquiry-Based Urban Ecology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Pimentel, Diane Silva; Strauss, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Inquiry-based curricula are an essential tool for reforming science education yet the role of the teacher is often overlooked in terms of the impact of the curriculum on student achievement. Our research focuses on 22 teachers' use of a year-long high school urban ecology curriculum and how teachers' self-efficacy, instructional practices,…

  18. Supporting the Development of Science Communication Skills in STEM University Students: Understanding Their Learning Experiences as They Work in Middle and High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Brooke L.; Liu, Xiufeng; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the roles that 52 university Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students play in an Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Partnership that connects several middle schools, high schools, institutions of higher learning, businesses, and community institutions. It also examines the support these students…

  19. Using VISIR: Experiments, Subjects and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Lopez-de-Ipina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of applying the VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality system at the course of analog electronics for various degrees of the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Deusto (Spain. The efficiency of the VISIR had been monitored during past three years. Students’ feedback was collected and analyzed. The research shows: 1 VISIR system is functional and useful learning instrument; 2 teacher experience at VISIR plays crucial role in its integration into student experimentation activities; 3 students get best knowledge and skills in the analog electronics from combination of experiments at traditional laboratory and remote lab/ VISIR.

  20. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  1. Bullying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  2. Workplace Stress and the Student Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Anne; Harper, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possible effects of workplace stress in academics on the student learning experience. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were designed and distributed to all academic staff at a Scottish Higher Education Institute. This measured perceived levels of stress amongst academic staff and the possible impact of this…

  3. Nursing Student Teachers' experiences during teaching practice:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mary

    Teaching practice experiences of nursing student provide greater insight to develop effective classroom and clinical teaching ... expectations and benefits are significantly derived from teaching practice although contingent on the mode of entry into the ...... Participation in and Leadership of. Continual Improvement.

  4. Analyzing high school students' reasoning about electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicic, Katarina; Planinic, Maja; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic induction is an important, yet complex, physics topic that is a part of Croatian high school curriculum. Nine Croatian high school students of different abilities in physics were interviewed using six demonstration experiments from electromagnetism (three of them concerned the topic of electromagnetic induction). Students were asked to observe, describe, and explain the experiments. The analysis of students' explanations indicated the existence of many conceptual and reasoning difficulties with the basic concepts of electromagnetism, and especially with recognizing and explaining the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. Three student mental models of electromagnetic induction, formed during the interviews, which reoccurred among students, are described and analyzed within the knowledge-in-pieces framework.

  5. Everyday health communication experiences of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Leslie; Egbert, Nichole; Ho, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined college students' day-to-day health communication experiences. A convenience sample of 109 midwestern university students participated in the study. The participants completed health communication diaries for 2 weeks, generating 2,185 records. Frequent health topics included nutrition and diet, minor health concerns, risky health practices, and body fitness. Approximately 27% of health communication experiences involved the proactive seeking of health-related information or advice. Interpersonal venues (face-to-face, telephone, and e-mail) were evident in about 75% of the records, which were dominated by exchanges with friends and family members. The authors found modest interactions of topic, channel, and purpose. Congruent with the uses and gratifications theory, the authors found that satisfaction with and perceived impact of health communication experiences varied by topic, channel, relationship, and purpose.

  6. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Personal librarian enhancing the student experience

    CERN Document Server

    Moniz, Richard; Matthews, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    The incredible shift in the provision of library services resulting from innovations such as online resources, mobile technologies, tablet computers, and MOOCs and hybrid courses makes it more challenging than ever for academic librarians to connect students with the information they need. Enter the Personal Librarian, a flexible concept that focuses on customizing information literacy by establishing a one-on-one relationship between librarian and student from enrollment through graduation. In this book the editors, with decades of library instruction and academic library experience between t

  8. Meteorological Development Laboratory Student Career Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, C., Sr.

    2007-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. The NWS's Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) supports this mission by developing meteorological prediction methods. Given this mission, NOAA, NWS, and MDL all have a need to continually recruit talented scientists. One avenue for recruiting such talented scientist is the Student Career Experience Program (SCEP). Through SCEP, MDL offers undergraduate and graduate students majoring in meteorology, computer science, mathematics, oceanography, physics, and statistics the opportunity to alternate full-time paid employment with periods of full-time study. Using SCEP as a recruiting vehicle, MDL has employed students who possess some of the very latest technical skills and knowledge needed to make meaningful contributions to projects within the lab. MDL has recently expanded its use of SCEP and has increased the number of students (sometimes called co- ops) in its program. As a co-op, a student can expect to develop and implement computer based scientific techniques, participate in the development of statistical algorithms, assist in the analysis of meteorological data, and verify forecasts. This presentation will focus on describing recruitment, projects, and the application process related to MDL's SCEP. In addition, this presentation will also briefly explore the career paths of students who successfully completed the program.

  9. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  10. "Nursing Students Assaulted": Considering Student Safety in Community-Focused Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Kurz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Community nursing experiences for undergraduate students have progressed beyond community-based home visits to a wide array of community-focused experiences in neighborhood-based centers, clinics, shelters, and schools. Our Bachelor of Science in Nursing program chose to use sites situated within neighborhoods close to campus in order to promote student and faculty engagement in the local community. These neighborhood sites provide opportunities for students to deliver nursing services to underserved and vulnerable populations experiencing poverty and health disparities. Some of these neighborhoods are designated as high crime areas that may potentially increase the risk of harm to students and faculty. There is a need to acknowledge the risk to personal safety and to proactively create policies and guidelines to reduce potential harm to students engaged in community-focused experiences. When a group of baccalaureate nursing students was assaulted while walking to a neighborhood clinic, the faculty was challenged as how to respond given the lack of policies and guidelines. Through our experience, we share strategies to promote personal safety for students and recommend transparency by administrators regarding potential safety risks to students engaged in community-focused fieldwork activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Early clinical experience: do students learn what we expect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, E.; Bolhuis, S.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Early clinical experience is thought to contribute to the professional development of medical students, but little is known about the kind of learning processes that actually take place. Learning in practice is highly informal and may be difficult to direct by predefined learning outcomes.

  12. Early clinical experience : do students learn what we expect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Koopmans, Raymond

    CONTEXT Early clinical experience is thought to contribute to the professional development of medical students, but little is known about the kind of learning processes that actually take place. Learning in practice is highly informal and may be difficult to direct by predefined learning outcomes.

  13. Students’ Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character:Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson L. Palinussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students’ critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in Ambon. The instruments of the study are: students’ early math skills test, critical thinking skills mathematical test and perception scale of students’character. Data was analyzed by using t-test and Anova. The study found that: 1 Achievements and enhancement of students’ critical mathematical thinking skills who were treated with by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ skills were treated by conventional mathematics education. The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level; 2 Quality of students’ character who were treated by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ character who were treated by conventional mathematics education The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level  Keywords: Critical Thinking, Students’ Character, Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.4.1.566.75-94

  14. Networking for Successful Diversity Recruiting: Creating a Highly Diverse Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program by Networking with Mentors, Faculty, and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A.; Watts, N. B.

    2017-12-01

    Successfully recruiting for diversity begins as you plan your program and make sure that all elements of the program support diverse participation. The REU on Sustainable Land and Water Resources continues to be one of the most diverse NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduate Programs in the geosciences. Every aspect of the program, from recruiting, the application process, selecting participants, and the methods developed to support participant success have been scrutinized and tailored towards broadening participation. While the focus of the research has been on collaboration with Native American reservations to create community-based participatory research projects and improving access for Native American students, the PIs strive for ethnic and cultural diversity of the participants. Emphasis on networking and building relationships with minority-serving institutions has led to increasing numbers of underrepresented students applying to the REU. In 2017, a full 30% of our applications were from underrepresented groups. The authors will discuss methods for improved diversity recruiting, as well as ways to make every aspect of your program support diversity in the geosciences.

  15. Analyzing High School Students' Reasoning about Electromagnetic Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicic, Katarina; Planinic, Maja; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction is an important, yet complex, physics topic that is a part of Croatian high school curriculum. Nine Croatian high school students of different abilities in physics were interviewed using six demonstration experiments from electromagnetism (three of them concerned the topic of electromagnetic induction). Students were…

  16. Orsay: High-gradient experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Maintaining the tradition of its contribution to the LEP Injector Linac (LIL), Orsay's Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) is carrying out an R&D programme entitled 'New accelerator physics experiments at LAL' (NEPAL). The aim is to contribute to the long-term development of high energy electron-positron linear colliders, where progress can be of short-term benefit both to conventional accelerators and to injectors in rings or free-electron lasers

  17. The Impact of E-Education on At Risk High School Students' Science Achievement and Experiences during Summer School Credit Recovery Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Pamela Prevette

    2015-01-01

    Nationally, "at risk" students make up to 30% of U.S. students in public schools. Many "at risk" students have poor attendance, are disengaged from the learning environment and have low academic achievement. Educational failure occurs when students do not complete the required courses and as a result do not receive a high…

  18. Writing about an experience of illness in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kun Hwang,1 Huan Fan,1 Se Won Hwang2 1Department of Plastic Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea; 2Peninsula Medical School, Exeter, UK Abstract: Pathography is defined as “historical biography from a medical, psychological, and psychiatric viewpoint.” We thought that writing about an experience of illness might help students understand patients’ experience and in turn grow in terms of self-understanding. Participants included 151 medical students. Students wrote about their own experience of illness and were asked to answer questions from the Likert scale. Most students wrote about themselves (79.2%; however, some students (20.8% wrote about the illness of others. Among the 149 pathographies, ecopathography was most frequent (30.9%, followed by testimonial pathography (25.5%; angry pathography (13.4% and alternative pathography (12.1% were relatively less frequent. Eighty-eight pathographies (59.1% showed 120 expressions of family relationship. Among the 120 cases, worrying about family members was most frequent (47.5%, followed by reliance on a family member (32.5%. All students wrote about the enlightenment experienced on returning to daily life. The sense of belonging together was most frequent (38.3%, followed by gratitude for living (20.8%, resolution to be a good doctor (18.1%, and a will to live and be healthy (12.1%. Answers on the Likert scale (total 5 for pathography beneficence were very high in understanding desirable doctor image (4.46, attaining morals and personality as a health care professional (4.49, and understanding basic communication skills (4.46. Writing about an experience of illness allows students to better understand patients’ experience and to grow in self-understanding. Keywords: writing, disease, patients, narration, pathography

  19. iUTAH Summer Research Institutes: Supporting the STEM Pipeline Through Engagement of High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students, Secondary Teachers, and University Faculty in Authentic, Joint Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L. A.; Malone, M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple types of programs are needed to support the STEM workforce pipeline from pre-college through graduate school and beyond. Short-term, intensive programs provide opportunities to participate in authentic scientific research for students who may not be sure of their interest in science and for teachers who may be unable to devote an entire summer to a research experience. The iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-Systainability) Summer Research Institute utilizes an innovative approach for a 5-day program that engages high school and undergraduate students as well as middle and high school teachers in conducting research projects led by graduate students and faculty members. Each Institute involves 3-4 half to full-day research projects. Participants collect (usually in the field) and analyze data for use in on-going research or that is related to a current research project. The participants work in groups with the graduate students to create a poster about each research project. They present their posters on the last day of the Institute at the state-wide meeting of all researchers and involved in this EPSCoR-funded program. In addition to introducing participants to research, one of the Institute's goals is to provide opportunities for meaningful near-peer interactions with students along the STEM pipeline from high school to undergraduate to graduate school. On the end-of-Institute evaluations, almost all students have reported that their discussions with other participants and with graduate students and faculty were a "Highly effective" or "Effective" part of the Institute. In response to a question about how the Institute will impact their course choices or their plans to pursue a career in science, many high school and undergraduate students have noted that they plan to take more science courses. Each year several undergraduates who were previously unsure about a career in science have indicated that they now intend to pursue a

  20. High beta experiments in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nishimura, K.

    1994-09-01

    High beta experiments were performed in the low-aspect-ratio helical device CHS with the volume-averaged equilibrium beta up to 2.1 %. These values (highest for helical systems) are obtained for high density plasmas in low magnetic field heated with two tangential neutral beams. Confinement improvement given by means of turning off gas puffing helped significantly to make high betas. Magnetic fluctuations increased with increasing beta, but finally stopped to increase in the beta range > 1 %. The coherent modes appearing in the magnetic hill region showed strong dependence on the beta values. The dynamic poloidal field control was applied to suppress the outward plasma movement with the plasma pressure. Such an operation gave fixed boundary operations of high beta plasmas in helical systems. (author)

  1. University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Limpopo student nurses' clinical learning experiences in a public hospital at ... was applied to explore and describe the experiences of student nurses' clinical learning ... The ethical principles relevant to the study were observed.

  2. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  3. The Experience of Deep Learning by Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Martin; Baskerville, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how to support accounting students to experience deep learning. A sample of 81 students in a third-year undergraduate accounting course was studied employing a phenomenographic research approach, using ten assessed learning tasks for each student (as well as a focus group and student surveys) to measure their experience of how…

  4. New Postgraduate Student Experience and Engagement in Human Communication Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Godfrey A.

    2015-01-01

    New postgraduate students' feedback on their learning offers insights into engagement. Student feedback to students and teachers can contribute to teacher feedback to students. When this happens, students can feel engaged or connected to their learning experiences. Adopting a more inclusive notion of feedback on learning, this paper explores the…

  5. Predoctoral dental students' perceptions and experiences with prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhima, Matilda; Petropoulos, Vicki C; Salinas, Thomas J; Wright, Robert F

    2013-02-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate the perceptions and experiences of predoctoral dental students and advanced standing students on mentorship, exposure to prosthodontics, and future need for the specialty, and (2) establish a baseline of students' perceptions of the impact of prosthodontics on salary, personal and patient quality of life, and the profession of dentistry. A survey was distributed to 494 predoctoral and advanced standing students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. Questions focused on the perceptions and experiences with the specialty of prosthodontics. A total of 410 surveys were analyzed using Chi Square tests and univariate and multivariate analysis with statistical software. Response rate was 83%. A positive initial introduction to prosthodontics was reported by 57% of students. Most students had positive experiences with prosthodontic faculty and enjoyed laboratory work and challenging/complex dentistry. A greater need for prosthodontists in the future was perceived by 82% of respondents, with 63% reporting that the future of prosthodontics had been emphasized. Students reported (1) a preclinical course directed by prosthodontists and (2) working in the clinic with prosthodontic faculty (p salary (7(th) ), personal quality of life (5(th) ), patient quality of life (4(th) ), and strengthening of the dental field (7(th) ). Reasons few students are interested in prosthodontics as a career, despite a positive first introduction and high perceived future need for prosthodontists may be attributed to a number of factors. These include insufficient prosthodontically, trained faculty, lack of a mentorship program, lack of an advanced graduate program, a perception of feeling unprepared upon graduation, and misconception of potential income in prosthodontics. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Programming: Difficulties and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Özmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Programming courses become prominent as one of the courses in which undergraduate students are unsuccessful especially in departments which offer computer education. Students often state that these courses are quite difficult compared to other courses. Therefore, a qualitative phenomenological approach was used to reveal the reasons of the failures of the undergraduate students in programming courses and to examine the difficulties they confronted with programming. In this scope, the laboratory practices of the Internet Programming course were observed in fall term of the 2013-2014 academic year in a university at central Anatolia. Interviews were made with 12 undergraduate students taking this course. Finally, the difficulties students experienced in the programming were determined as programming knowledge, programming skills, understanding semantics of the program, and debugging. Students emphasized that the biggest causes of failure in programming languages are lack of practice, not using algorithms and lack of knowledge. In addition, it was seen that the students who had high programming experience possess higher programming success and self-efficacy related to programming

  7. ¿POR QUÉ ESCRIBIMOS COMO HABLAMOS? UNA EXPERIENCIA CON ESTUDIANTES DE SECUNDARIA (WHY WE WRITE AS WE SPEAK? EXPERIENCE WITH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ríos González Gabriela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo es resultado de una investigación realizada con una muestra representativa de 512 estudiantes de último año de colegio en Costa Rica; en la que se utilizó la metodología de disponibilidad léxica por medio de encuestas, tiene como objetivo primordial demostrar que la manera de pronunciar influye en la escritura y, por lo tanto, también en la ortografía. Una vez procesados los datos llegamos a la conclusión que existen sonidos que oralmente solemos pronunciarlos de determinada manera, pero su escritura es de otra. No obstante, los jóvenes no saben discernir entre la oralidad y la escritura y, por desconocimiento de la lengua, escriben igual a como pronuncian. Es tarea del docente reforzar estas habilidades lingüísticas para un mejor desempeño académico y profesional de nuestros estudiantes.Abstract: This article is the result of a research made with a representative sample of 512 students of senior year in the high schools in Costa Rica; in which was used the methodology of lexical availability through surveys, as main objective it has to show that the way of pronunciation influence in writing, therefore, also in orthography. Once the data is process we conclude that there are sounds that orally we used to pronunciation in certain way, but it's writing is different. However, youngest do not know how to distinguish between orally and writing, and, by unknowing the language, they write as they pronounce. It's the teacher's homework to reinforce this linguistic skill for better academic and professional performance of our students.

  8. Early clinical experience: do students learn what we expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Koopmans, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    Early clinical experience is thought to contribute to the professional development of medical students, but little is known about the kind of learning processes that actually take place. Learning in practice is highly informal and may be difficult to direct by predefined learning outcomes. Learning in medical practice includes a socialisation process in which some learning outcomes may be valued, but others neglected or discouraged. This study describes students' learning goals (prior to a Year 1 nursing attachment) and learning outcomes (after the attachment) in relation to institutional educational goals, and evaluates associations between learning outcomes, student characteristics and place of attachment. A questionnaire containing open-ended questions about learning goals and learning outcomes was administered to all Year 1 medical students (n = 347) before and directly after a 4-week nursing attachment in either a hospital or a nursing home. Two confirmatory focus group interviews were conducted and data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analyses. Students' learning goals corresponded with educational goals with a main emphasis on communication and empathy. Other learning goals included gaining insight into the organisation of health care and learning to deal with emotions. Self-reported learning outcomes were the same, but students additionally mentioned reflection on professional behaviour and their own future development. Women and younger students mentioned communication and empathy more often than men and older students. Individual learning goals, with the exception of communicating and empathising with patients, did not predict learning outcomes. Students' learning goals closely match educational goals, which are adequately met in early nursing attachments in both hospitals and nursing homes. Learning to deal with emotions was under-represented as a learning goal and learning outcome, which may indicate that emotional aspects

  9. Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

  10. Research Experiences for Science Teachers: The Impact On Their Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2005-12-01

    Deficiencies in science preparedness of United States high school students were recognized more than two decades ago, as were some of their underlying causes. Among the primary causes are the remoteness of the language, tools, and concepts of science from the daily experiences of teachers and students, and the long-standing national shortage of appropriately prepared science teachers. Secondary school science teachers are challenged each school year by constantly changing content, new technologies, and increasing demands for standards-based instruction. A major deficiency in the education of science teachers was their lack of experience with the practice of science, and with practicing scientists. Providing teachers with opportunities to gain hands-on experience with the tools and materials of science under the guidance and mentorship of leading scientists in an environment attuned to professional development, would have many beneficial effects. They would improve teachers' understanding of science and their ability to develop and lead inquiry- and standards-based science classes and laboratories. They would enable them to communicate the vitality and dynamism of science to their students and to other teachers. They would enhance their ability to motivate and guide students. From its inception, Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teacher's goal has been to enhance interest and improve performance in science of students in New York City area schools. The program seeks to achieve this goal by increasing the professional competence of teachers. Our ongoing program evaluation shows that following completion of the program, the teachers implement more inquiry-based classroom and laboratory exercises, increase utilization of Internet resources, motivate students to participate in after school science clubs and Intel-type science projects; and create opportunities for students to investigate an area of science in greater depth and for longer periods

  11. Sexting by High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, Donald S; Cann, Deanna; Velarde, Valerie

    2017-08-01

    In the last 8 years, several studies have documented that many adolescents acknowledge having exchanged sexually explicit cell phone pictures of themselves, a behavior termed sexting. Differences across studies in how sexting was defined, recruitment strategies, and cohort have resulted in sometimes significant differences in as basic a metric as what percentage of adolescents have sent, received, or forwarded such sexts. The psychosocial and even legal risks associated with sexting by minors are significantly serious that accurate estimates of its prevalence, including over time, are important to ascertain. In the present study, students (N = 656) from a single private high school were surveyed regarding their participation in sexting. Students at this same school were similarly surveyed four years earlier. In this second survey, reported rates of sending (males 15.8%; females 13.6%) and receiving (males 40.5%; females 30.6%) sexually explicit cell phone pictures (revealing genitals or buttocks of either sex or female breasts) were generally similar to those reported at the same school 4 years earlier. Rates of forwarding sexts (males 12.2%; females 7.6%) were much lower than those previously acknowledged at this school. Correlates of sexting in this study were similar to those reported previously. Overall, our findings suggest that sexting by adolescents (with the exception of forwarding) remains a fairly common behavior, despite its risks.

  12. It was huge! Nursing students' first experience at AORN Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michelle; Cantrell, Kelly; Fletcher, Daphne; McRaney, David; Morris, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    AN EXPERIENTIAL KNOWLEDGE of mentoring through nursing students' perspectives may enhance AORN's ability to recruit students to perioperative nursing and aid future planning for student involvement in the Association. IN 2003, four first-year nursing students attended the AORN Congress in Chicago with their nursing instructor and mentor. The students' experiences were captured using a thematic analysis to analyze their journals. THE FIVE COMMON THEMES identified were "it was huge," "exhibits," "student program," "exploring the city," and "suggestions for future planning."

  13. "They Think They Know What's Best for Me": An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of the Experience of Inclusion and Support in High School for Vision-Impaired Students with Albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    The challenges of social inclusion and access to the curriculum facing students with visual impairment in schools are well documented. The refreshed UK Vision Strategy (2013) seeks to improve education for students with vision impairment. In order to do this, it is important to understand how students with visual impairment experience education.…

  14. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhabunyakan N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nattapong Buddhabunyakan, Srinaree Kaewrudee, Chompilas Chongsomchai, Sukree Soontrapa, Woraluk Somboonporn, Jen Sothornwit Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a common health problem among adolescents.Objective: To assess the prevalence of PMS in Thai high school students.Materials and methods: This was a prospective study conducted among menstruating high school students in Khon Kaen, Thailand, from September to December, 2015. Participants were asked to prospectively complete an anonymous questionnaire, which included information about demographic data, menstrual patterns, and symptoms to be recorded on a daily calendar of premenstrual experiences according to the diagnostic criteria proposed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All of the data were prospectively recorded for 90 consecutive days.Results: Of the 399 participants, 289 (72.4% completed the self-report questionnaire. Eighty-six participants (29.8%; 95% CI, 24.5%–35.4% reported having PMS. The most common somatic and affective symptoms among participants with PMS were breast tenderness (74.4% and angry outbursts (97.7%. There were significant differences between the PMS and non-PMS groups, and PMS was associated with various problems related to educational activities, including lack of concentration and motivation, poor individual work performance, poor collaborative work performance, and low scores. However, there were no significant differences regarding interpersonal relationships between the PMS and non-PMS groups.Conclusions: PMS is a common menstrual disorder among Thai high school students. The most common symptoms reported in this study were angry outbursts and breast tenderness. Keywords: premenstrual symptoms, prevalence, association, high school students

  15. Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments in Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Maureen; Curtis, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This article presents a study of the higher education experiences of students with visual impairments in Canada. Methods: Students with visual impairments and the staff members of disability programs were surveyed and interviewed regarding the students' experiences in entering higher education and completing their higher education…

  16. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  17. Inside Student Government: The Variable Quality of High School Student Councils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel; Starmanns, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Student governments are the first direct experience that youth have of representative government. However, very little research has been done on student councils in spite of their ubiquity in American high schools and consistent references to their positive effects on the political socialization of youth.…

  18. Work Placement in UK Undergraduate Programmes. Student Expectations and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, David; Richardson, Anne

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 189 pre- and 106 post-sandwich work-experience students in tourism suggested that potential benefits were not being maximized. Students needed better preparation for the work experience, especially in terms of their expectations. The work experience needed better design, and the role of industry tutors needed clarification. (SK)

  19. Investigation of students' experiences of gendered cultures in engineering workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Sally A.; Gardner, Anne; Figueroa, Eugenia; Bennett, Dawn

    2018-05-01

    Women remain severely under-represented in engineering in Australia as in all Western countries. This limits the pool of talent, standpoints and approaches within the profession. Furthermore, this under-representation equates to restriction of the benefits of being an engineer mainly to men. Gendered workplace experiences have been found to contribute to women leaving the profession. In this study we explore students' experiences of gendered cultures in engineering workplaces, using interviews with a purposive sample of 13 students (4 male) recruited following a previous survey. Although the overall experience of workplace learning is positive for many students, male and female engineering students reported experiences consistent with masculine cultures. Educators and employers must proactively lead improvements to the culture in engineering workplaces, prepare students for gendered workplaces and support students to reflect during and after workplace experiences. The experiences presented here could be adapted to enhance inclusivity training.

  20. Further Evidence of an Engagement-Achievement Paradox among U.S. High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, David J.; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    Achievement, engagement, and students' quality of experience were compared by racial and ethnic group in a sample of students (N = 586) drawn from 13 high schools with diverse ethnic and socioeconomic student populations. Using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), 3,529 samples of classroom experiences were analyzed along with self-reported…

  1. A queer day in Canada: examining Canadian high school students' experiences with school-based homophobia in two large-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Tracey; Taylor, Catherine; Chamberland, Line

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study is to examine how location (nationally, compared to Canadian regions) is related to indicators of a hostile school environment for sexual minority youth, particularly when physical abuse is used as the outcome variable. Data representing 5,766 Canadian students were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate techniques. Results from the multivariate analyses showed that non-physical abuse was the most significant predictor of homophobically based physical abuse, for both LGBQ and non-LGBQ students. Findings reiterate the importance of considering the progression of harmful events as an escalation of violence as well as the need to view homophobic bullying as having a significant impact on all students. Finally, while the presence of homophobia is prevalent across all Canadian regions, there are, nevertheless, many regional differences, which could be used to inform region-specific action plans.

  2. How High School Students Select a College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Joseph E., Jr.; And Others

    The college selection process used by high school students was studied and a paradigm that describes the process was developed, based on marketing theory concerning consumer behavior. Primarily college freshmen and high school seniors were interviewed, and a few high school juniors and upper-level college students were surveyed to determine…

  3. A Study on school experiences of physics department students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerit, N.

    2005-01-01

    Bringing up the young people who are seen as the guaranty of the future depends on a better education. One of the best ways of forming a high in quality education is connected to developing the quality in teacher training. Most of the developed countries have been carrying on studies in order to develop teacher training. School experience classes are the ones which are planned for the candidate teachers to observe the school in learning and teaching period and to practice in classrooms. Beginning from candidate teachers first years at school, this class should be thought to be beneficial for identifying their future school atmosphere, and it should be run effectively. For this purpose, it has been identified what difficulties the physics undergraduate and physics (with no thesis) master students, who took part in School Experience classes at the practice schools of Konya at which faculty-school cooperation is applied, had during activities, and their success at overcoming these difficulties, and their ideas about the practice school and its teachers. The research was done by making a survey to the physics undergraduate and physics(with no thesis) master students in 2003 Spring semester. The results of the research were analyzed for both girls and boys separately. After analyzed, the results showed that the most striking activity which both the undergraduate physics and physics(with no thesis) master students had difficulty was group activities. Moreover, it showed that 90 percent of the two groups had the idea that school experience activities would be beneficial for being a good physics teacher. It has been also recognized that the physics undergraduate students had a more positive view than physics(with no thesis) master students on the matter of meeting lack of interest from practice teachers, and taking the same course from the same teacher

  4. Satisfaction and improvement of clinical experiment of student radiotechnologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2006-01-01

    Clinical experiment is a set of experience to help student acquire technic, attitude and knowledge by participating in the clinical work. The radiotechnologists who are employed in departments of radiology serve as clinical instructors. Their responsibilities include teaching students them to become competent radiotechnologist. Clinical instructors often have no formal preparation in teaching student. The purpose of this study is to review some principals that will help clinical instructors support and foster the professional development of student radiotechnologists. The clinical instructor should be able to identify the qualities of instructor, the characteristics of feedback and use facilitation skills when is evaluated student performance. And the survey was performed to evaluate the satisfaction of student participated in clinical experiment, the purpose of this research is to fine the problems and improvements in clinical experiment of student radiotechnologist in Korea

  5. A Long-Term Experiment to Investigate the Relationships between High School Students' Perceptions of Mobile Learning and Peer Interaction and Higher-Order Thinking Tendencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Lai, Chiu-Lin; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Chu, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a one-year program was conducted to investigate the relationships between students' perceptions of mobile learning and their tendencies of peer interaction and higher-order thinking in issue-based mobile learning activities. To achieve the research objective, a survey consisting of eight scales, namely, usability, continuity,…

  6. Retention and Mentorship of Minority Students via Undergraduate Internship Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P.

    2004-12-01

    The School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii is undertaking an Undergraduate Research Internship project to address the lack of full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. The overarching educational objective is to provide education and career development guidance and opportunities for students from underrepresented minorities. In collaboration with industry partners, we hope to prepare undergraduate students for life and careers in today's complex and dynamic technological world by encouraging them to attain high standards in the geosciences, thereby enabling them to compete successfully for positions in graduate programs. To achieve his goal, the project focuses on the following objectives: (1) Creating a high-quality integrated on-campus teaching and off-campus learning environment, and (2) providing an intensive introduction to geoscience careers through the guidance of experienced faculty and workplace mentors. The program will start small, collaborating with one or two companies over the next two years, offering paid summer internships. Opportunities for students include participation in geoscience-related research, obtaining experience in interpreting observations and providing information to end-users, working to improve technology and field methods, and developing the expertise to maintain, operate and deploy equipment. Program participants are assigned individual projects that relate to their academic majors, their career goals, and the ongoing research missions of our industry partners. In addition to their research activities, participants attend a series of seminars and tours dealing with current topics in geoscience to expose them to the wide variety of scientific and technical activities that occur in the workplace. The expected outcomes of this experience will be scientific growth and career development. Given that a very small percentage of all students go on to graduate

  7. The Racialized Experiences of Students of Color in Higher Education and Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica C.; Linder, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Using a critical race theory lens, we examined the racialized experiences of 29 Students of Color in HESA programs across the United States. Students' experiences illuminate 4 themes: educating white peers, invalidation of experiences and identity, racial stereotypes, and isolation. Participants' experiences illustrate a disconnect between HESA…

  8. A Graduate Student's Perspective on Engaging High School Students in Research Outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, A. B.; Horton, R. A., Jr.; Andrews, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The southern San Joaquin basin is one of the United States' most prolific oil producing regions but also one facing numerous problems including low high school graduation rates, low college enrollments, high college dropout rates, low wages, and higher than average unemployment. Investment in STEM education experiences for high school students has been emphasized by California State University Bakersfield as a means to improving these metrics with programs such as the Research Experience Vitalizing Science-University Program (REVS-UP). Now in its seventh year, the REVS-UP (funded by Chevron) forms teams of high school students, a high school teacher, a CSUB graduate student, and a CSUB professor to work for four weeks on a research project. For the past two summers student-teacher teams investigated the diagenesis and mineralogy of the Temblor Formation sandstones in the subsurface of the San Joaquin basin oil fields that are potential CO2 sequestration sites. With a graduate student leading the teams in sample preparation and analysis by scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and cathode luminescence system (SEM-CL) data was gathered on diagenetic processes, detrital framework grains, and authigenic cements. Typically students are introduced to the project in a series of brief seminars by faculty and are then introduced to the techniques and samples. During the second week the students are usually capable of preparing samples and collecting data independently. The final week is focused on developing student-authored research posters which are independently presented by the students on the final day. This gives high school students the opportunity to learn advanced geologic topics and analytical techniques that they would otherwise not be exposed to as well as to gain research and presentation skills. These types of projects are equally important for the graduate students involved as it allows them the

  9. Connecting to Experience: High-Impact Practices for Leadership Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kerry L; Clegorne, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Leadership educators can leverage high-impact experiences to enhance student leadership development. This chapter describes three key practices--sociocultural conversations with peers, mentoring, and membership in off-campus organizations--as levers of leadership learning. Illustrations of the practice in context and reflections from practitioners and students are also included. The chapter concludes with considerations of context, developmental readiness, and best practices of experiential education. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. Undergraduate Mathematics Students' Emotional Experiences in Linear Algebra Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sierra, Gustavo; García-González, María del Socorro

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about students' emotions in the field of Mathematics Education that go beyond students' emotions in problem solving. To start filling this gap this qualitative research has the aim to identify emotional experiences of undergraduate mathematics students in Linear Algebra courses. In order to obtain data, retrospective focus group…

  11. Learning English: Experiences and Needs of Saudi Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Susan; Obeidat, Fayiz

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, Saudi engineering students talk openly of their experiences learning English in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and as university students in the United States (US). These students reported that they learned only the basics of vocabulary and grammar in KSA. Consequently, they came to the US with few English skills. In…

  12. A Gamification Experience to Improve Engineering Students' Performance through Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Carmona, Adrián; Robles, Sergi; Pons, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    The students' lack of motivation is a usual problem. The students value more the obtention of the degree than the developing of competences and skills. In order to fight this, we developed a gamification's experience based on merits and leaderboards. The merits are linked to the attainment of skills and competences that students usually do not…

  13. Differences in clinical experiences of ADN and BSN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, M H

    1998-05-01

    Prior research has suggested that clinical experience for nursing students is stressful. Concern about making an error and harming the patient, limited knowledge and skills for practice, and difficulties in interacting with the teacher and others in the clinical setting are some of the stressors reported by students. Few studies have compared these stresses and the clinical experiences in general between students in associate degree (ADN) and baccalaureate (BSN) nursing programs. The purposes of this research were to compare the clinical experiences of ADN and BSN students at different levels in the programs and describe these experiences from the students' perspectives. As such, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 415 students in ADN and BSN programs in the Midwest. The ADN students reported significantly higher stress in clinical practice than BSN students (t = 2.16, p ADN and BSN students in clinical practice increased as they progressed through the programs. The semester prior to graduation was the most stressful time in terms of clinical practice for both ADN and BSN students. The instructor was the predominant stressor reported by students in ADN programs across all levels of the curriculum. Among BSN students, the most prevalent stresses were coping with demands associated with patient care and the clinical teacher. The findings highlight the important role of the clinical faculty in both types of nursing programs.

  14. International Students' Experiences of Integrating into the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sarah; Arthur, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the integration experiences of 16 international students entering the Canadian workforce using a semistructured interview and constant comparison method. The international students were pursuing immigration to Canada, despite unmet job prospects. Students recommended that employers refrain from discriminating against students…

  15. Voices of Dissent: Unpacking Vietnamese International Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Le; Koo, Fung Kuen; Arambewela, Rodney; Zutshi, Ambika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine Vietnamese international students' experiences with the campus learning environment by analysing differences in staff and student perceptions. Design/Methodology/Approach: Two focus groups (n = 12) and ten in-depth interviews were conducted with Vietnamese students and four in-depth interviews with…

  16. Science Student Teachers and Educational Technology: Experience, Intentions, and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine science student teachers' experience with educational technology, their intentions for their own use, their intentions for their students' use, and their beliefs in the value of educational technology in science instruction. Four hundred-forty-eight science student teachers of different disciplines…

  17. International Students' Experiences of University Libraries and Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    International students constitute a significant proportion of the Australian university population, and thus of the university library-using population. Drawing on qualitative research findings, this paper discusses the library-related experiences and perceptions of international students at two Australian universities. While the students'…

  18. High School Students' Views on Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Ibrahim Umit; Akbayin, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to determine the high school students' views on blended learning. The study was carried out in biology course for the lesson unit of "Classification of Living Things and Biodiversity" with 47 9[superscript th] grade students attending Nevzat Ayaz Anatolian High School in the second term of the academic year of…

  19. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  20. Dual Enrollment for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Linsey; Hughes, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Dual enrollment programs allow high school students to enroll in college courses and potentially earn college credit. The term concurrent enrollment is sometimes used interchangeably with dual enrollment, and sometimes to refer to a particular model of dual enrollment. In some programs, students earn high school and college credit simultaneously;…

  1. High School Students' Perception of University Students as STEM Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    The Danish government has an ambition to recruit more high school students into STEM edu-cations (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics). The students’ choice of further education is based on the people and jobs they have knowledge of. Therefore, to recruit more students into STEM....... Some representatives transmit infor-mation and are thereby definers, whereas other representatives illustrates as personal examples and are thereby models. This study focuses on high school students’ views on STEM representatives and the impact these representatives have on the high school students...... studies, it is important to introduce high school students to good STEM representatives to make possible the development of potential STEM identities. A potential identity within a specific subject area relies on at least a situation bound relation-ship to the subject area or the person representing it...

  2. Understanding Students' Experiences in Their Own Words: Moving beyond a Basic Analysis of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arch Chee Keen

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the lived experiences of students as expressed in their reflections on their experiences of learning at Ambrose University in Calgary. It uses quantitative outcomes-related data from the National Survey of Student Engagement and the Theological School Survey of Student Engagement to illuminate qualitative data obtained through…

  3. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  4. An Enterprise Opportunity for Entrepreneurial Students: Student Enterprise Development and Experience Assessed through the Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin; Bell, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of an experiential learning approach, available to students in all disciplines that combined a hands-on entrepreneurial and enterprise experience with professional consultant mentoring by using a competition to win business start-up funding. Design/methodology/approach:…

  5. Teaching research methodology to student midwives through a socio-constructivist educational model: The experience of the high school for science and health techniques of Tunis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherissi, Atf; Tinsa, Francine; Soussi, Sonia; Benzarti, Anis

    2016-02-01

    Since its independence in 1956, Tunisia's maternal health indicators have steadily improved as the result of the implementation of a national holistic strategy that emancipated women and developed midwifery education and maternal health services provision. The last review of the midwifery education programme, occurred in 2008, and was based on evidence based core competencies. This paper describes the implementation process of the socio-constructivist educational model used by to teach research methodology to student midwives, the changes observed among them, the challenges and the lessons learned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emotional Intelligence in Intensive Clinical Experiences for Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoromski, Lorraine M.

    2017-01-01

    This study looked for associations between measures of emotional intelligence in an intensive clinical experience for nursing students in their final semester of an associate's degree program. The theory of emotional labor was used to make connections between nursing clinical experience and emotional intelligence. Twenty nursing students from a…

  7. Identifying Student Types in a Gamified Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Gabriel; Gama, Sandra; Jorge, Joaquim; Gonçalves, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Gamification of education is a recent trend, and early experiments showed promising results. Students seem not only to perform better, but also to participate more and to feel more engaged with gamified learning. However, little is known regarding how different students are affected by gamification and how their learning experience may vary. In…

  8. Experience of Control and Student Satisfaction with Higher Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungki; Anantharaman, Sekhar

    2013-01-01

    Although the delivery of satisfactory services is an important strategic goal in many colleges, students are known to face challenges and experience a significant amount of stress during their school life. This study proposes and tests students' experience of control over their college life as a promising factor that would enhance their…

  9. Understanding Arts and Humanities Students' Experiences of Assessment and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joelle; McNab, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how undergraduate students on arts and humanities courses experience assessment and feedback. The research uses a detailed audit, a specially devised questionnaire (the Assessment Experience Questionnaire), and student focus group data, and the article examines results from 19 programmes, comparing those from "arts and…

  10. Informing Educational Psychology Training with Students' Community Engagement Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Liesel; Bender, C. J. Gerda; Carvalho-Malekane, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe students' experiences of community engagement in an Educational Psychology practicum in order to inform relevant educational psychology training literature with experiences of students' community engagement. Experiential learning served as our theoretical framework and we employed an instrumental case…

  11. Lessening Sensitivity: Student Experiences of Teaching and Learning Sensitive Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in learning and teaching as emotional activities, there is still very little research on experiences of sensitive issues. Using qualitative data from students from a range of social science disciplines, this study investigates student's experiences. The paper highlights how, although they found it difficult and distressing…

  12. Storying the Student Teaching Experience: Trying on Teaching Personae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Janine S.

    2013-01-01

    This article uses a narrative analysis approach to explore the stories of student teachers' experiences developing a teaching persona during student teaching. In keeping with the narrative format, the researcher presents the participants' stories in a first-person narrative. The participants had similar experiences in the realm of developing their…

  13. Blending Student Technology Experiences in Formal and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, K.-W.; Khaddage, F.; Knezek, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the importance of recognizing students' technology-enhanced informal learning experiences and develop pedagogies to connect students' formal and informal learning experiences, in order to meet the demands of the knowledge society. The Mobile-Blended Collaborative Learning model is proposed as a framework to…

  14. Motivating students to perform an experiment in technological design contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logman, P.S.W.M.; Kaper, W.H.; Ellermeijer, A.L.; Lindell, A.; Kähkönen, A.-L.; Viiri, J.

    2012-01-01

    In a teaching-learning sequence on the subject of energy we have tried technological design contexts to motivate students by using only context-based reasons to perform experiments on the subject of energy. We use these experiments to have the students reinvent practical laws of energy conservation

  15. Targets and Witnesses: Middle School Students' Sexual Harassment Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichty, Lauren F.; Campbell, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    School-based peer-to-peer sexual harassment (SH) emerged as an issue of concern in the early 1990s. As a developing field, this literature has several notable gaps. The current study extends previous research by, (a) exploring the understudied experiences of middle school students, (b) assessing students' experiences witnessing SH, and (c)…

  16. Business Student Attitudes, Experience, and Satisfaction with Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Ann; Kuzma, John; Thiewes, Harold

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to examine business students' perceptions of their online class experience relative to the traditional in-class experience; specifically, whether a descriptive, theoretical or analytical course would be preferred as an online or traditional course. Two hundred and ninety students enrolled in upper-level business courses…

  17. Exploration on the Experiences Obtained by the Student in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Chen

    Through using the method of literature, logical speculation, this paper studied the sports experience. The result shows that the sports itself is a type of experience. The characteristics in the sports experience are innovational, emotional, personal, generating and individual. Through the sports experience, the student could improve their technical performance, cultivate the abundant emotion, form the independent character and produce the moral integrity.

  18. Student Teachers' Perceptions about Their Experiences in a Student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    independent learners with self-regulatory skills in order to be able to foster student ..... helped them socialize and build effective communication. Most of them reported ... of grouping students is believed to lead to higher self-esteem and better ...

  19. Gay-Straight Alliances: Understanding Their Impact on the Academic and Social Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Adam; Schmidt, Kathryn; Clifton, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effectiveness of gay-straight alliances (GSAs) on the social and academic experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youths. The limited research on GSAs suggests that they are associated with positive youth development and increased safety; however, little qualitative information…

  20. The Citizen Science Program "H2O SOS: Help Heal the Ocean—Student Operated Solutions: Operation Climate Change" teaches middle and high school students about ocean threats related to climate change through hands-on activities and learning experiences in the field. This is a continuation of the Program presented last year at the Poster Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N. K.; Wood, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    TThe Citizen Science Program H2O SOS: Help Heal the Ocean—Student Operated Solutions: Operation Climate Change, teaches middle and high school students about ocean threats related to climate change through hands-on activities and learning experiences in the field. During each session (in-class or after-school as a club), students build an understanding about how climate change impacts our oceans using resources provided by ExplorOcean (hands-on activities, presentations, multi-media). Through a student leadership model, students present lessons to each other, interweaving a deep learning of science, 21st century technology, communication skills, and leadership. After participating in learning experiences and activities related to 6 key climate change concepts: 1) Introduction to climate change, 2) Increased sea temperatures, 3) Ocean acidification, 4) Sea level rise, 5) Feedback mechanisms, and 6) Innovative solutions. H2O SOS- Operation Climate change participants select one focus issue and use it to design a multi-pronged campaign to increase awareness about this issue in their local community. The campaign includes social media, an interactive activity, and a visual component. All participating clubs that meet participation and action goals earn a field trip to Ocean Quest where they dive deeper into their selected issue through hands-on activities, real-world investigations, and interviews or presentations with experts. In addition to self-selected opportunities to showcase their focus issue, teams will participate in one of several key events identified by Ocean Quest.

  1. CATE: A Case Study of an Interdisciplinary Student-Led Microgravity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J. E.; Dove, A.; Lane, S. S.; Tiller, C.; Whitaker, A.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.; Benjamin, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Collisional Accretion Experiment (CATE) was designed, built, and flown on NASA's C-9 parabolic flight airplane in less than a year by an interdisciplinary team of 6 undergraduate students under the supervision of two faculty. CATE was selected in the initial NASA Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) solicitation in the Fall of 2013, and the experiment flight campaign was in July 2014. The experiment studied collisions between different particle populations at low velocities (sub-m/s) in a vacuum and microgravity to gain insight into processes in the protoplanetary disk and planetary ring systems. Faculty provided the experiment concept and key experiment design parameters, and the student team developed the detailed hardware design for all components, manufactured and tested hardware, operated the experiment in flight, and analyzed data post-flight. Students also developed and led an active social media campaign and education and public outreach campaign to engage local high school students in the project. The ability to follow an experiment through from conception to flight was a key benefit for undergraduate students whose available time for projects such as this is frequently limited to their junior and senior years. Key factors for success of the program included having an existing laboratory infrastructure and experience in developing flight payloads and an intrinsically simple experiment concept. Students were highly motivated, in part, by their sense of technical and scientific ownership of the project, and this engagement was key to the project's success.

  2. Relationship between student preparedness, learning experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. One of the more discernible needs that challenges universities is addressing the level of preparedness of students entering the higher education environment. Students expect to participate in active learning, while at the same time adopting a certain level of agency to successfully pass through higher ...

  3. Participating Unequally: Student Experiences at UWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowes, Lindsay; Shefer, Tamara; Ngabaza, Sisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses Nancy Fraser's concept of participatory parity to reflect on data gathered by and from third year students in a final year research module in the Women's and Gender Studies Department at the University of the Western Cape in 2015. During the course students developed a research proposal, collected and shared data with other…

  4. Nursing Student Teachers' experiences during teaching practice:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mary

    STUDENTS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN DIRECT ENTRY ... clinical decision making in nursing practice using a mixed research design. ... Quantitative analysis revealed significant (**p<0.001) chi square rejecting the null .... that many students during this exercise report .... face opportunity to give the consent letters. A.

  5. Institutional Ethos: Replicating the Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Cynthia Howman

    2011-01-01

    International branch campuses (IBCs) have been established in significant numbers over the past ten years. A common criticism of IBCs is that they cannot recreate the student culture of the home campus. While this is true, some IBCs have gone to great lengths not only to create a comparable culture for their students, but also to integrate their…

  6. Profiling exiting postgraduate students\\' performance and experiences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transitions in an era of globalisation and universal change impact on postgraduate training of students at higher education institutions. This study aimed to determine completion rates for postgraduate programmes in Education at one higher education institution, to identify the students\\' needs and to investigate their ...

  7. High aspect ratio spheromak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, S.; Schmid, P.

    1987-05-01

    The Reversatron RFP (R/a = 50cm/8cm) has been operated as an ohmically heated spheromak of high aspect ratio. We find that the dynamo can drive the toroidal field upward at rates as high as 10 6 G/sec. Discharges can be initiated and ramped upward from seed fields as low as 50 G. Small toroidal bias fields of either polarity (-0.2 < F < 0.2) do not significantly affect operation. 5 refs., 3 figs

  8. Citizenship Engagement: Responses from High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, the main mission of social studies education is to prepare students for citizenship. With this in mind, the following study examined 191 high school students’ views on how they demonstrated citizenship. Traditionally with this age group, personally responsible citizenship has been a common form of self-reported citizenship engagement. However, in this study, the students seemed to conceptualize citizenship differently. With the Akwesasne Mohawk students, the European Ame...

  9. Governor's School students experience multidisciplinary research in a whole new way

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    High school students from the Virginia Governor's School were recently treated to a unique experience of immersive virtual reality technology and how it is used in understanding and solving real problems facing the commonwealth and the country.

  10. Go Home, Med Student: Comics as Visual Media for Students' Traumatic Medical Education Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    A comic created by a medical student allows the reader to share the student's own unique perception of the medical education experience. Through the process of comic creation, medical students have opportunities to gain insight into how their relationships with patients and supervising physicians have shaped the physician they will become. The comic itself can be a safe space for expression and provides an opportunity for students and educators to share experiences. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Japanese high school students' usage of mobile phones while cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Masao; Nakahara, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the perception and actual use of mobile phones among Japanese high school students while riding their bicycles, and their experience of bicycle crash/near-crash. A questionnaire survey was carried out at high schools that were, at the time of the survey, commissioned by the National Agency for the Advancement of Sports and Health to conduct school safety research. In the survey, we found that mobile phone use while riding a bicycle was quite common among the students during their commute, but those who have a higher perception of danger in this practice, and those who perceived that this practice is prohibited, were less likely to engage in this practice. Male students and students commuting to school by bicycle only were more likely to have used phones while riding. There was a significant relationship between phone usage while riding a bicycle and the experience of bicycle crash/near-crash, although its causality was not established. Bicycle crash/near-crash experienced while using a phone was less prevalent among the students who had a higher perception of danger in phone usage while riding, students who perceived that this practice is prohibited, and students with a shorter travel time by bicycle during the commute. Since mobile phone use while riding a bicycle potentially increases crash risk among cyclists, student bicycle commuters should be made aware of this risk. Moreover, they should be informed that cyclists' phone usage while riding is prohibited according to the road traffic law.

  12. 不同範例展示及實作經驗對國中生科技創造力的影響 Effects of Exemplars and Hands-on Experiences on Technological Creativity of Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    張玉山 Yu-Shan Chang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available 本研究旨在探討不同創意層級的範例展示及實作經驗對國中生科技創造力的影響。研究方法採用二因子實驗設計之準實驗研究,研究對象為231 位臺北縣國中生活科技課程的學生。主要研究工具為產品創意量表,內容包括整體評分、主題設定、色彩變化、造型變化、材料種類、外加機能、組合方法共七項。研究結果顯示,實作經驗對學生作品的造型設計與外加機能設計,有顯著的創意效果;高級與中級創意成品範例對學生作品的整體評分、主題設定、色彩變化、造型變化及外加機能,都有正面的創意效果;但是在材料種類與組合方法方面,不同創意層級的範例展示及實作經驗會有交互影響。 The purpose of this study was to discuss effects of exemplars and hands-on experiences on technological creativity of junior high school students. A quasi-experimental and two-factor research design was adapted to teaching experiment in Living-Technology curriculum. There were 231 junior high school students in Taipei county participating in this study. A product creativity scale, which included items of holistic view, subject matter, color design, styling design, material diversity, function design, and structure combination, was used to collect data. Results of this study indicated that significant creativity effects on styling design and function design caused by factors of hands-on experiences. Moreover, high creative and medium creative exemplars showed positive effects on holistic view, subject matter, color design, styling design, and function design. Nevertheless, there were interactive effects between hands-on experiences and creative exemplars on material diversity and structure combination.

  13. High academic achievement in psychotic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Z; Grothe, L

    1978-02-01

    The authors studied 21 schizophrenic and borderline college students who achieved B+ or higher grade averages and underwent psychotherapy while in college. High academic achievement was found to provide relief from feelings of worthlessness and ineffectuality resulting from poor relationships with parents, siblings, and peers. Psychotherapy and the permissive yet supportive college atmosphere reinforced the students' self-esteem.

  14. Scientific Literacy of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Keith B.; Tulip, David F.

    This investigation was undertaken in order to establish the status of scientific literacy among three groups of secondary school students in four Brisbane, Australia high schools, and to reduce the apparent reticence of science teachers to evaluate students' achievement in the various dimensions of scientific literacy by demonstrating appropriate…

  15. Establishing a Student Research and Publishing Program in High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Jonathan; Laksana, Sangob

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in science is improved by authentic personal experience of research projects and the publication of findings. Graduate students do this, but it is uncommon to find student research and publishing in high school science programs. We describe here the Student Research and Publishing Program (SRPP) established at International School…

  16. Schools or Students? Identifying High School Effects on Student Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Smith, E. Christine

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is clear that discipline in high school is associated with negative outcomes across the life course. Not only are suspensions related to declining academic trajectories during high school in the form of attendance and academic achievement, students suspended once are also more likely to be suspended again and also substantially increase…

  17. Game Performance Decisions of International Baccalaureate Students in Korea and Students in a Traditional American High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Brett; Everhart, Kim; Everhart, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The educational experiences of students engaged in different contexts of learning, particularly curriculum delivered and international travel and residence experiences may be related to problem-solving skills and game decisions and efficiency of high school students engaged in modified game play during physical education class. This study explores…

  18. Impact of hybrid delivery of education on student academic performance and the student experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Heather Brennan; Nutter, Douglas A; Charneski, Lisa; Butko, Peter

    2009-11-12

    To compare student academic performance and the student experience in the first-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program between the main and newly opened satellite campuses of the University of Maryland. Student performance indicators including graded assessments, course averages, cumulative first-year grade point average (GPA), and introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) evaluations were analyzed retrospectively. Student experience indicators were obtained via an online survey instrument and included involvement in student organizations; time-budgeting practices; and stress levels and their perceived effect on performance. Graded assessments, course averages, GPA, and IPPE evaluations were indistinguishable between campuses. Students' time allocation was not different between campuses, except for time spent attending class and watching lecture videos. There was no difference between students' stress levels at each campus. The implementation of a satellite campus to expand pharmacy education yielded academic performance and student engagement comparable to those from traditional delivery methods.

  19. Moving toward heutagogical learning: Illuminating undergraduate nursing students' experiences in a flipped classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca D; Schlairet, Maura C

    2017-02-01

    Nurse educators rely on the tenets of educational theory and evidence-based education to promote the most effective curriculum and facilitate the best outcomes. The flipped classroom model, in which students assume personal responsibility for knowledge acquisition in a highly engaging and interactive environment, supports self-directed learning and the unique needs of clinical education. To understand how students perceived their experiences in the flipped classroom and how students' learning dispositions were affected by the flipped classroom experience. A phenomenological approach was used to gain deeper understanding about students' perspectives, perceptions and subjective experiences of the flipped classroom model. The focus of the study was on characteristics of student learning. Fourteen Bachelors of Science of Nursing (BSN) students at a regional university in the southeastern United States. Using data transcribed from face-to-face, semi-structured interviews, experiential themes were extracted from the qualitative data (student-reported experiences, attributes, thoughts, values, and beliefs regarding teaching and learning in the context of their experience of the flipped classroom) using Graneheim's and Lundman's (2004) guidelines; and were coded and analyzed within theoretical categories based on pedagogical, andragogical or heutagogical learning dispositions. Experiential themes that emerged from students' descriptions of their experiences in the flipped classroom included discernment, challenge, relevance, responsibility, and expertise. The flipped classroom model offers promising possibilities for facilitating students' movement from learning that is characteristic of pedagogy and andragogy toward heutagogical learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding Accounting as a Career: An Immersion Work Experience for Students Making Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Dianne; Murphy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a project which is designed to increase the participation of high school students in accounting work experience placements. The focus of the paper is on an Australian-based project which overcomes the identified barriers to offering high school accounting work experience placements with a resultant increase in the number and…

  1. High School Students' Perception of University Students as STEM Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    ’ potential identities. It shows that the students preferred STEM representatives resembled themselves in some aspects (primarily social and health aspects) and fit their perceptions of a typical person working in STEM in other aspects (knowledge seeking, hard-working etc.). At least two different...... studies, it is important to introduce high school students to good STEM representatives to make possible the development of potential STEM identities. A potential identity within a specific subject area relies on at least a situation bound relation-ship to the subject area or the person representing it....... Some representatives transmit infor-mation and are thereby definers, whereas other representatives illustrates as personal examples and are thereby models. This study focuses on high school students’ views on STEM representatives and the impact these representatives have on the high school students...

  2. Remote Research Mentoring of Virginia High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby, Joanna; Dirienzo, W. J.; Beaton, R.; Pennucci, T.; Zasowski, G.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students at the University of Virginia (UVa) are volunteering as research advisors on astronomy projects for Virginia's science and technology high schools. In previous years, we have worked with more than a dozen students through a research class at Central Virginia Governor's School in Lynchburg to develop an astronomy research curriculum that teaches background concepts and terminology, guides students in data analysis, and prepares them to present material in poster and oral forums. In our fourth year of operation, we are continuing to work with Central Virginia Governor's School and adapting the research curriculum to an independent course at Roanoke Valley Governor's School in Roanoke. Because both schools are far from UVa in Charlottesville, the program operates remotely; graduate advisors and high school students interact through "virtual" means, establishing a successful framework for meaningful remote mentoring. In the current year, six students will complete projects on astrophysical topics including megamasers, astrochemistry, and pulsars using data taken by the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Students at Roanoke Valley were directly trained on the GBT as part of a separate outreach program called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, and all six students will receive hands-on experience in handling GBT data. The current projects are components of larger research efforts by graduate student and professional level researchers, so that the projects contribute to high-level projects only possible with the GBT. This stands as a rare outreach program that uses the principle of “deliberative practice” to train high school students in the development of skills that are crucial to success in science. Furthermore, it provides graduate students with an opportunity to plan and advise research projects, developing a skill set that is required in more advanced academic positions. Our poster discusses the implementation of our online curriculum in two distinct

  3. Bags and blogs: creating an ostomy experience for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Karen S

    2012-01-01

    There are well over three-quarters of a million people living in the United States with an ostomy. These individuals experience many physical and emotional challenges which nurses should address during the in-patient hospitalization experience. The purpose of this educational activity was to provide undergraduate nursing students with a simulated laboratory experience which allowed the student to discuss and experience some of the challenges of living with an ostomy. Small group work, an experiential learning activity, and blogging were used to foster the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective development of the nursing students. All 134 students participated in the small group work and blogging experience and over 100 students participated in the experiential learning activity of wearing an ostomy bag overnight with the bag containing a small amount of simulated fecal material. The impact of the simulated experience is evident in the depth of awareness and emotion expressed in the blogs. The students collectively acknowledged the value of the activity and the impact the gained awareness had on their careers as nurses. The use of social technology and the provision of learning activities, not available on the clinical unit, can have a significant impact on the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective development of nursing students. © 2012 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  4. Student Teachers' Perceptions about Their Experiences in a Student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pre-service teachers according to the demands of the new educational contexts, the move from teacher-centered curricula to learning-centered curricula is a must. The aim of ... The participants of the study were the 37 third year undergraduate students enrolled in the course at one of the tertiary institutions in North Cyprus.

  5. The effect of financial rewards on students' achievement: Evidence from a randomized experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, E.; Oosterbeek, H.; van der Klaauw, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a randomized field experiment in which first-year university students could earn financial rewards for passing all first-year requirements within one year. Financial incentives turn out to have positive effects on achievement of high-ability students, whereas they have a

  6. Coming to America for Spiritual or Academic Growth? Experiences of International Students at One Christian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lishu

    2013-01-01

    The number of international students flocking to North American private Christian schools has continued to grow. The author examined the overall experiences of 67 international high school students studying at a private Christian school in South Carolina. Their frustrations and struggles with academic and spiritual growth in a new cross-cultural…

  7. Protecting Student Press Freedom by State Law: The Experience in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, Wayne

    Following "Tinker vs. Des Moines Community School District," the United States Supreme Court decision that assured First Amendment rights to secondary school students and teachers, California began experimenting with statutory guarantees of free expression for students at the high school and community college levels. Decisions issued by…

  8. High School Student Information Access and Engineering Design Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Developing solutions to engineering design problems requires access to information. Research has shown that appropriately accessing and using information in the design process improves solution quality. This quasi-experimental study provides two groups of high school students with a design problem in a three hour design experience. One group has…

  9. A pharmacogenetics service experience for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Katarzyna; Labinov, Yana; Jiang, Ruixuan; Thomas, Margaret R; Wong, Shan S; Patel, Shitalben; Nutescu, Edith A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2013-10-14

    To utilize a comprehensive, pharmacist-led warfarin pharmacogenetics service to provide pharmacy students, residents, and fellows with clinical and research experiences involving genotype-guided therapy. First-year (P1) through fourth-year (P4) pharmacy students, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy fellows participated in a newly implemented warfarin pharmacogenetics service in a hospital setting. Students, residents, and fellows provided genotype-guided dosing recommendations as part of clinical care, or analyzed samples and data collected from patients on the service for research purposes. Students', residents', and fellows' achievement of learning objectives was assessed using a checklist based on established core competencies in pharmacogenetics. The mean competency score of the students, residents, and fellows who completed a clinical and/or research experience with the service was 97% ±3%. A comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service provided unique experiential and research opportunities for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows and sufficiently addressed a number of core competencies in pharmacogenetics.

  10. Teaching Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan; Willingham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Working with two teachers and thirty-four high school seniors, the authors developed procedures and assessments to teach ethics in an American high school civics class. This approach requires high school students to discover an agreement or convergence between Kantian ethics and virtue ethics. The authors also created an instrument to measure…

  11. Enhancing Students' Entrepreneurial Mindset: A Swedish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Erik; Bohman, Håkan; Hulten, Peter; Wilson, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the test of a pedagogical intervention to enhance students' entrepreneurial mindset on a university course. Design/methodology/approach: The course where the authors tested the new course design is a mandatory one in the business school's undergraduate business program. Pre- and post-evaluations…

  12. Learning experiences of physiotherapy students during primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Primary healthcare (PHC) is necessary to address the health needs of communities. It creates the opportunity for the attainment of curricular outcomes through community-based education. Appropriate learning opportunities are needed to enable students to develop the necessary skills to attain these outcomes ...

  13. Do Students Experience Flow Conditions Online?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Jones, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study asked graduate students enrolled in higher education programs at two institutions to ascertain whether and to what extent they experienced nine flow-related conditions in two settings: (1) online courses or (2) surfing or gaming online. In both settings, flow was experienced "sometimes," although no significant…

  14. Participation in Students' Industrial Work Experience Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIWES has been part of the training requirement of Pharmacy students at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos, for a long time now. At inception, it was done during vacations until about ten years ago when it was incorporated into the semester period. This work was done to find out the feelings and ...

  15. International Student Mobility: The Nordic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyborg, Per

    1996-01-01

    Patterns in college student mobility between Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden are examined, with attention given to challenges posed by having three of these countries within the European Union and two outside it. The role of several formal agreements is discussed, and implications for policy needs concerning interinstitutional and/or…

  16. Traumatic experiences of Kenyan secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A cross-sectional study of 1 110 students (629 males and 481 females), ... of the subjects, followed by witnessing a violent crime and domestic violence; ... Further studies are needed to determine the implications of these findings for ...

  17. Student Teachers' Experiences of Relation Building in Teaching Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Laursen, Per Fibæk

    The study explores how 22 student teachers in a Danish college of education experience and interpret their own becoming a teacher and the implied attitudes to pupils. The student teachers attending mainstream teacher education and a course in mindful awareness and relational competencies have...... – to a larger extend than the mainstream educated student teachers - learned a reflexive attitude to their state of being in teaching practice and to their relational interaction with children in class....

  18. The International Student's Experience: An Exploratory Study of Students from Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearring, Andrew; Le, Huong; Wilson, Rachel; Arambewela, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    International students are an important part of today's global university sector. This paper explores, through 10 in-depth interviews, the perceptions of Vietnamese international students studying with regard to their experience of teaching and learning in Australia. The findings indicate that Vietnamese students struggle with language,…

  19. Student-Run Communications Agencies: Providing Students with Real-World Experiences That Impact Their Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lee; Haygood, Daniel; Vincent, Harold

    2017-01-01

    While several studies have examined the learning outcomes of student-run communications agencies, these studies have mostly been from the perspective of faculty advisors. Through in-depth interviews with student agency graduates, this study examined how current industry professionals perceive the benefits of their student agency experiences and…

  20. The Experiences of Older Students' Use of Web-Based Student Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Katy W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological case study was to understand the experiences of older students' use of web-based student services in a community college setting. For the purpose of this study the term "older student" was defined as people born between the years 1943 and 1960. This group of people, often described as the Baby Boomer…

  1. Staff and Student Experiences of Dialogue Days, a Student Engagement Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a descriptive phenomenological exploration of the lived experience of dialogue days, a student engagement activity, from the perspectives of staff and students. I suggest that dialogue days enhance the relational and emotional aspects of learning with the potential to impact on future student engagement and…

  2. Students Fly High with Creative Alternative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    At one Pennsylvania school, building a model airplane is a learning experience used to assess the abilities of students with reading difficulties. Specific model-building behaviors that can be observed are gathering information, employing prior knowledge, summarizing, visualizing, predicting, self-monitoring, evaluating, measuring, calculating,…

  3. Agricultural experiences as correlates of secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Research Review ... Instruments used were Career Decision Questionnaire, Agricultural Experience Questionnaire and ... in agriculture while poultry (β = -0.333) mostly predicted students career decision in Agricultural Science.

  4. Reflecting on BCMP students' experiences of professionalism during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... in training, and should be trained in the same environment in which they ... Negative experiences of professionalism (46.2%) were context-specific and perceived by students ..... Dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the.

  5. An exploration of students' experiences of Blended Learning in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... experiences of Blended Learning through their interaction with the adaptive ... to university resources such as computers and Wi-Fi had a greater chance of ... were discordant - students scored better on online tests than in written tests.

  6. Sexuality experiences of secondary school students in Nakuru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-06-02

    Jun 2, 2018 ... ... in sexual knowledge. Keywords: Sexuality experiences, secondary school students, Nakuru, Kenya. ... the age of 19 give birth of which 1 million are under 15 years. ..... could be the easy access to birth control and other pre-.

  7. Enhancing the Student Learning Experience in Software Engineering Project Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maira; Ochoa, Sergio F.; Bastarrica, Maria Cecilia; Gutierrez, Francisco J.

    2018-01-01

    Carrying out real-world software projects in their academic studies helps students to understand what they will face in industry, and to experience first-hand the challenges involved when working collaboratively. Most of the instructional strategies used to help students take advantage of these activities focus on supporting agile programming,…

  8. Medical student attachments in private practice – The experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medical student attachments with family/general practitioners (GPs) in non-academic or private practice are a valued resource in the undergraduate teaching of Family Medicine. This study describes the experience and views of GPs in private practice with final-year medical student attachments from the ...

  9. School Psychologists' Experiences with Teacher-to-Student Mistreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Sharon R. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, transcendental, phenomenological study was to describe school psychologists' experiences with teacher-to-student mistreatment in the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 educational setting. There are few United States studies presented in the literature on the topic of teacher-to-student mistreatment and its…

  10. Exploring Student Perceptions of Academic Mentoring and Coaching Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While there is an abundant amount of research relative to coaching and mentoring programs, there is little understanding about the interaction between coaches/mentors and students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of their academic coaching and mentoring experiences at two Southern California community…

  11. Character Formation and Service: A Millennial Student's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, Jacob O.

    2012-01-01

    The author, a millennial college student, describes how his international service experiences positively influenced his social and moral development. He suggests ways educators may inspire students to develop core character values. He also argues that promoting these core values has been a primary purpose of the academy in the United States since…

  12. Influence of Teachers' Teaching Experience on Students' Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examined teachers' teaching experience and students' learning outcomes in the secondary schools in Ondo State Nigeria. As a correlational survey, the study population comprised all the 257 secondary schools that presented students for the year 2003 senior secondary certificate (SSC) examinations in the ...

  13. Analysis of Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined Student's Industrial Work Experience Scheme carried out in NIFFR visa-a-vise the challenge of skilled manpower development for fishery extension. Secondary data collected from NIFFR library and report of 2007 SIWES period was analysed descriptively. Out of 617 students from 36 schools that visited ...

  14. Arab International Students' Experiences in a U.S. University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Rabia, Hazza M.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory study described the experiences of Arab international students in a U.S. postsecondary institution. This research identified those factors that Arab international students reported as facilitating or obstructing their academic success, promoting or limiting their socialization within the context of their postsecondary…

  15. School Experiences of Transgender and Gender Diverse Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tiffany; Smith, Elizabeth; Ward, Roz; Dixon, Jennifer; Hillier, Lynne; Mitchell, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increase in global and local policy protections on the basis of gender identity and expression in education and a recent spate of coverage of transgender students on Australian television and news media. This paper explores the school experiences of Australian transgender and gender diverse students, with…

  16. Assessing Student Teaching Experiences: Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohi; Tice, Kathleen; Collins, Denise; Brown, Amber; Smith, Cleta; Fox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of student teaching experiences by measuring teacher candidates' perceptions of their preparedness. The participants were 130 teacher candidates who had completed their student teaching as part of a program preparing them to teach children in pre-K through grade 4. Teacher candidates…

  17. Students' Evaluation of Their English Language Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizatulliza, M.; Kiely, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of English language teaching and learning, there is a long history of investigating students' performance while they are undergoing specific learning programmes. This research study, however, focused on students' evaluation of their English language learning experience after they have completed their programme. The data were gathered…

  18. A Student Experience of Peer Assisted Study Sessions in Physiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Gisela; Rose, Andrew; Bennet, Tracey; Jaques, Katrina; Rippon, Zoe; van der Meer, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) were introduced as an optional learning experience in a Bachelor of Physiotherapy programme. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of PASS from the student perspective. Eight third year physiotherapy students who had participated in PASS during their second year of training attended a focus group, at…

  19. Lived experiences of nursing students about their pregnancies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nursing students face challenges when they get pregnant as it often leads to either the termination of their studies or unnecessary long study periods. Our aim was to explore and describe the lived experiences of nursing students at a college in South Africa regarding their pregnancies. In a descriptive phenomenological ...

  20. Understanding Student Attitudes toward Bible Reading: A Philippine Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Rito V.

    2008-01-01

    Reflecting from the Philippine experience, this article explores an emerging picture that characterizes contemporary Bible reading attitudes of college students. Six new attitude factor definitions are developed following the development of the Bible Reading (BR) attitude scale for college students constructed by this author in a separate study.…

  1. Apprehensive and Excited: Music Education Students' Experience Vernacular Musicianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine music education students' experiences (N = 64) in courses designed to develop vernacular musicianship and expand understandings of informal music making. Students participated in one of two classes (undergraduate/graduate), formed their own small ensembles, chose their own music and instruments, led their…

  2. Adult Student Expectations and Experiences in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeaux, Renee; Schoenack, Lindsie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated adult student experiences with instructors in online classes. Using expectancy violations theory as a lens, we conducted 22 interviews to understand reasons students enroll in online classes, expectations for instructors, and behaviors instructors employed that may or may not meet expectations. We conducted a thematic…

  3. College Student Characteristics and Experiences as Predictors of Interracial Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Casandra E.; Yeung, Fanny P.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized logistic regression to test whether students' personal characteristics and experiences significantly predict their likelihood of dating interracially in college. The data were drawn from the Campus Life in America Student Survey (CLASS), which was administered to freshmen who were then resurveyed as juniors (n = 513). The most…

  4. Frequency of Examinations and Student Achievement in a Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Maria; Scoppa, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    We carry out a randomized experiment involving undergraduate students enrolled at an Italian University attending two introductory economics classes to evaluate the impact on achievement of examination frequency and interim feedback provision. Students in the treated group were allowed to undertake an intermediate exam and were informed about the…

  5. Transformative Learning Experiences of International Graduate Students from Asian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex; James, Waynne

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the transformative learning experiences of international graduate students from Asian countries. Data collection consisted of quantitative and qualitative methods. Participants included international graduate students from Asia, in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences and Engineering. Overall, 82.3% of the participants…

  6. Experiences of mistreatment among medical students in a University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiences of mistreatment among medical students in a University in south west Nigeria. ... The commonest forms experienced by the students were being shouted at (92.6%), public humiliation or belittlement (87.4%), negative or disparaging remarks about their academic performance (71.4%), being assigned tasks as ...

  7. Exploring the Experiences of International Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaojiong

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, China has grown from an insignificant player to a major destination in the global market for international students. Based on a questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews conducted in 2013, this study uses Shanghai as an example to examine international students' experiences in China. It is found that China has become a niche…

  8. A Post-Intentional Exploration of Agnostic College Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Scholars have adapted college student identity development models to examine and highlight the unique, laborious, and varied experiences of marginalized populations. However, researchers have minimally explored the perspectives of nontheistic and nonreligious college students using poststructural methodologies. I followed a post-intentional…

  9. The Experience and Persistence of College Students in STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong Jade

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an online survey was constructed based on the extant literature on college student success. The survey was used to collect data from a sample of college students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors in order to examine their learning experiences and to identify the factors that may influence their persistence…

  10. A Qualitative Study to Improve the Student Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastania, Raid A.; Balata, Gehan F.; Abd El-Hady, Mohamed I. S.; Gouda, Ahmad; Abd El-Wahab, Mohamad; Mohamad, Abeer S.; Ibrahim, Nashwa M.; Beshr, Eman; Mahdi, Abeer Y.; Mousa, Rabab; Tag, Batool F.; Hisham, Hadeel; El-Sofiani, Ibtehal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: For any educational institution, student satisfaction is an important goal. Thus, the purpose of the study is to use a structured improvement process, define--measure--analyse--improve--control (DMAIC) methodology, to improve students' satisfaction regarding their learning experience at the College of Pharmacy/Umm Al-Qura University.…

  11. Students' Perceptions and Experiences of Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neier, Stacy; Zayer, Linda Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has discussed the opportunities associated with the use of social media tools in the classroom, but has not examined the perceptions students themselves hold about its usefulness in enhancing their educational experience. This research explores students' perceptions of social media as an effective pedagogical tool. Undergraduate…

  12. Camouflage: The Experiences of Low-Income Business College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton de Dutton, Scarlett

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study shares the complex stories of two low-income business students who attend a flagship, public university as out-of-state students with the purpose of understanding, describing, giving voice to, and discovering insight from their experiences. Throughout U.S. Higher Education history, there is a pattern of limited participation…

  13. Simulated learning environment experience in nursing students for paediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Maldonado, Yessy; Barría-Pailaquilén, René Mauricio

    The training of health professionals requires the acquisition of clinical skills in a safe and efficient manner, which is facilitated by a simulated learning environment (SLE). It is also an efficient alternative when there are limitations for clinical practice in certain areas. This paper shows the work undertaken in a Chilean university in implementing paediatric practice using SLE. Over eight days, the care experience of a hospitalized infant was studied applying the nursing process. The participation of a paediatrician, resident physician, nursing technician, and simulated user was included in addition to the use of a simulation mannequin and equipment. Simulation of care was integral and covered interaction with the child and family and was developed in groups of six students by a teacher. The different phases of the simulation methodology were developed from a pedagogical point of view. The possibility of implementing paediatric clinical practice in an efficient and safe way was confirmed. The experience in SLE was highly valued by the students, allowing them to develop different skills and abilities required for paediatric nursing through simulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Experiences of Judeo-Christian Students in Undergraduate Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Truong, Jasmine M.; Brownell, Sara E.

    2017-01-01

    A major research thrust in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is focused on how to retain students as STEM majors. The accumulation of seemingly insignificant negative experiences in STEM classes can, over time, lead STEM students to have a low sense of belonging in their disciplines, and this can lead to lower retention. In this paper, we explore how Judeo-Christian students in biology have experiences related to their religious identities that could impact their retention in biology. In 28 interviews with Judeo-Christian students taking undergraduate biology classes, students reported a religious identity that can conflict with the secular culture and content of biology. Some students felt that, because they are religious, they fall within a minority in their classes and would not be seen as credible within the biology community. Students reported adverse experiences when instructors had negative dispositions toward religion and when instructors were rigid in their instructional practices when teaching evolution. These data suggest that this may be a population susceptible to experiences of cultural conflict between their religious identities and their STEM identities, which could have implications for retention. We argue that more research should explore how Judeo-Christian students’ experiences in biology classes influence their sense of belonging and retention. PMID:28232586

  15. Blogs: Enhancing the Learning Experience for Technology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Birney, Rosanne

    2006-01-01

    Weblogs can be used to enhance the learning experience for technology students, by providing them with several features that are often absent in Learning Management Systems (LMSs). This research aims to demonstrate that weblogs can improve the learning experience by allowing students to reflect on their learning, and by allowing them to easily collaborate with their tutors and with one another. The incorporation of weblogs into the existing learning environment can provide several enhancemen...

  16. E-Learning Experiences of Hong Kong Students

    OpenAIRE

    J. Lam; R. Chan

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of e-learning in Hong Kong has been increasing rapidly in the past decade. To understand the e-learning experiences of the students, the School of Professional and Continuing Education of The University of Hong Kong conducted a survey. The survey aimed to collect students- experiences in using learning management system, their perceived e-learning advantages, barriers in e-learning and preferences in new e-learning development. A questionnaire with 84 questio...

  17. Transition to University Life: Insights from High School and University Female Students in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Edda, Medhanit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to get an insight about how high school female students perceive the transition to university life, and to understand the transition experience of university female students in the first semester. An exploratory study design was used where 166 high school female students and 88 first year university female students…

  18. Using clinical caring journaling: nursing student and instructor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Turton, Michael; Cheng, Su-Fen; Lee-Hsieh, Jane

    2011-06-01

    Journaling has been incorporated into many nursing courses as an active reflective teaching strategy that can facilitate the learning process, personal growth, and professional development of students. There is limited research support of journaling as an appropriate tool to promote reflection for the purpose of learning caring in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of student nurses and instructors who use clinical caring journaling (CCJ) in their clinical practicum. Researchers used a descriptive qualitative research design. The study population was 880 senior student nurses and 90 clinical instructors from a nursing program at a university in Taiwan who used CCJ. After completion of 1 year of clinical practicum, 16 students and 7 instructors participated voluntarily in focus group interviews. Researchers used content analysis to sort interview data into themes. Six themes were categorized that encapsulated student and instructor experiences and perceptions regarding using CCJ in their clinical practicum. These themes were guiding caring behavior toward patients, enabling students' reflective caring abilities, building up students' self-confidence, increasing interaction between students and instructors, enhancing students' self-development, and overcoming writing difficulty. Research findings may serve as a reference for nursing educators to use CCJ strategy in student nurses' clinical practicum.

  19. Impact of an Advanced Cardiac Life Support Simulation Laboratory Experience on Pharmacy Student Confidence and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Whitney D; Mohorn, Phillip L; Haney, Jason S; Phillips, Cynthia M; Lu, Z Kevin; Clark, Kimberly; Corboy, Alex; Ragucci, Kelly R

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To assess the impact of an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) simulation on pharmacy student confidence and knowledge. Design. Third-year pharmacy students participated in a simulation experience that consisted of team roles training, high-fidelity ACLS simulations, and debriefing. Students completed a pre/postsimulation confidence and knowledge assessment. Assessment. Overall, student knowledge assessment scores and student confidence scores improved significantly. Student confidence and knowledge changes from baseline were not significantly correlated. Conversely, a significant, weak positive correlation between presimulation studying and both presimulation confidence and presimulation knowledge was discovered. Conclusions. Overall, student confidence and knowledge assessment scores in ACLS significantly improved from baseline; however, student confidence and knowledge were not significantly correlated.

  20. Dental hygiene student experiences in external placements in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jane A; Hayes, Melanie J; Wallace, Linda

    2012-05-01

    While placements in external locations are being increasingly used in dental education globally, few studies have explored the student learning experience at such placements. The purpose of this study was to investigate student experiences while on external placement in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. A self-reporting questionnaire was distributed to final-year dental hygiene students (n=77) at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2010. The questionnaire included questions regarding the type of placement, experiences offered, supervision, resources available, and lasting impressions. Responding students were generally positive about their external placement experience and indicated that the majority of facilities provided them with the opportunity to provide direct patient care and perform clinical tasks typical of a practicing hygienist. However, there was a statistically significant difference in their opinions about discipline-focused and community placements. Students indicated that their external placement experience provided opportunities to learn more about time and patient management, including hands-on experience with specific clinical tasks. Ongoing evaluations are necessary to ensure that external placements meet both student needs and intended learning outcomes within dental hygiene programs.

  1. CYBERBULLY /CYBERVICTIM EXPERIENCES OF MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZER, Hasibe

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of cyberbullying among teenagers even children has increased in recent years. While bullying defines like repeated and deliberate aggressive behaviours among people have imbalance of power, cyberbullying refers to bullying via electronic communication tools. Some researchers assert that teenagers who are living psychosocial maladjustment incline to be a cyberbully/ cybervictim. In this study, cyberbully/cybervictim behaviours of middle school students were investigated in rela...

  2. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  3. Undergraduate engineering student experiences: Comparing sex, gender and switcher status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergen, Brenda Sue

    This dissertation explores undergraduate engineering experiences, comparing men with women and switchers with non-switchers. Factors related to a chilly academic climate and gender-role socialization are hypothesized to contribute to variations in men's and women's academic experiences and persistence rates. Both quantitative and qualitative data are utilized in an effort to triangulate the findings. Secondary survey data, acquired as result of a 1992 Academic Environment Survey, were utilized to test the hypothesis that sex is the most important predictor (i.e., demographic variable) of perceptions of academic climate. Regression analyses show that sex by itself is not always a significant determinant. However, when sex and college (engineering vs. other) are combined into dummy variables, they are statistically significant in models where sex was not significant alone. This finding indicates that looking at sex differences alone may be too simplistic. Thirty personal interviews were conducted with a random stratified sample of undergraduate students from the 1993 engineering cohort. The interview data indicate that differences in childhood socialization are important. With regard to persistence, differences in socialization are greater for switchers vs. non-switchers than men vs. women. Thus, gender-role socialization does not appear to play as prominent a role in women's persistence as past literature would indicate. This may be due to the self-selection process that occurs among women who choose to pursue engineering. Other aspects of childhood socialization such as parents' level of educational and occupation, students' high school academic preparation and knowledge of what to expect of college classes appear to be more important. In addition, there is evidence that, for women, male siblings play an important role in socialization. There is also evidence that women engineering students at Midwestern University face a chilly academic climate. The factors which

  4. 76 FR 4137 - Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students... Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) is a National Science Foundation program that...

  5. 77 FR 22359 - Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers... opportunities for students and teachers to learn about, experience, and use information technologies within the...

  6. Attitudes of High School Students towards Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Avcı

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, attitudes of high school students towards geometry were investigated in terms of gender, grade, types of the field and school. Population of research includes students who were studying at high school in five distincs of Mersin in 2013-2014 academical year. Sample of research includes 935 students from twelve high schools. Attitude scale which was developed by Su-Özenir (2008 was used for data collection. For data analysis, mean, standart deviation, t test and ANOVA were used. A meaningful difference between students’ attitudes towards geometry and variance of gender and grade level wasn’t observed, on the other hand a meaningful difference according to field and school type is observed.Key Words:    Attitudes towards geometry, high school geometry lesson, attitude scale

  7. Oral Health Education for Medical Students: Malaysian and Australian Students' Perceptions of Educational Experience and Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mas S; Abuzar, Menaka A; Razak, Ishak A; Rahman, Sabariah A; Borromeo, Gelsomina L

    2017-09-01

    Education in oral health is important to prepare future medical professionals for collaborative roles in maintaining patients' oral health, an important component of general health and well-being. The aims of this study were to determine the perceptions of medical students in Malaysia and Australia of the quality of their training in oral health care and their perceptions of their professional role in maintaining the oral health of their patients. A survey was administered in the classroom with final-year Malaysian (n=527; response rate=79.3%) and Australian (n=455; response rate: 60%) medical students at selected institutions in those countries. In the results, most of these medical students reported encountering patients with oral health conditions including ulcers, halitosis, and edentulism. A majority in both countries reported believing they should advise patients to obtain regular dental check-ups and eat a healthy diet, although they reported feeling less than comfortable in managing emergency dental cases. A high percentage reported they received a good education in smoking cessation but not in managing dental trauma, detecting cancerous lesions, or providing dietary advice in oral disease prevention. They expressed support for inclusion of oral health education in medical curricula. These students' experience with and perceptions of oral health care provide valuable information for medical curriculum development in these two countries as well as increasing understanding of this aspect of interprofessional education and practice now in development around the world.

  8. Nursing student voices: reflections on an international service learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, E Eve; Garrett-Wright, Dawn; Kerby, Molly

    2013-01-01

    For the past decade participation in service and experiential learning in higher education has increased. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of BSN and MSN students participating in a multidisciplinary service-learning course in a rural, underserved village in Belize. Researchers analyzed student journals utilizing qualitative data analysis techniques. There were eight consistent themes found in the student journals. The findings indicate that international service learning opportunities increase students' awareness of their place in a global society and the potential contribution they can make in society. For the past decade, service and experiential learning in higher education, including nursing education, has become increasingly important. Simply put, service and experiential learning combine community service activities with a student's academic study for the sole purpose of enriching the academic experience. As faculty, we feel the goal of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education is to produce an educated professional who will become a responsible citizen.

  9. High school students as science researchers: Opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. R.; Grannas, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Today's K-12 students will be the scientists and engineers who bring currently emerging technologies to fruition. Existing research endeavors will be continued and expanded upon in the future only if these students are adequately prepared. High school-university collaborations provide an effective means of recruiting and training the next generation of scientists and engineers. Here, we describe our successful high school-university collaboration in the context of other models. We have developed an authentic inquiry-oriented environmental chemistry research program involving high school students as researchers. The impetus behind the development of this project was twofold. First, participation in authentic research may give some of our students the experience and drive to enter technical studies after high school. One specific goal was to develop a program to recruit underrepresented minorities into university STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs. Second, inquiry-oriented lessons have been shown to be highly effective in developing scientific literacy among the general population of students. This collaboration involves the use of local resources and equipment available to most high schools and could serve as a model for developing high school- university partnerships.

  10. Student Perceptions of High-Achieving Classmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Marion; Vialle, Wilma; Ziegler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The reported study investigated students' perceptions of their high-performing classmates in terms of intelligence, social skills, and conscientiousness in different school subjects. The school subjects for study were examined with regard to cognitive, physical, and gender-specific issues. The results show that high academic achievements in…

  11. Gait analysis by high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; van Dongen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of

  12. Students' perceptions of their learning experiences: A repeat regional survey of healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshire, Claire; Barrett, Neil; Langan, Mark; Harris, Edwin; Wibberley, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Student experience is an international concern and recent research has focused on initiatives to improve students' learning experiences and ultimately reduce attrition levels. To determine similarities and differences between students' perceptions of their learning experiences between 2011 and 2015 in relation to campus-based learning, placement-based learning and personal circumstances. A repeat online survey in 2011 and 2015; using a questionnaire developed from thematic analysis of narrative interviews with a subsample of the target population. Nine universities in the North West of England. A total of 1080 students completed the survey in 2011 and 1983 students in 2015 from a target population of all students studying on commissioned pre-registration healthcare education programmes. An online survey was made available to all undergraduate students studying on Health Education funded programmes within the region and survey respondents were invited to give demographic information and rate their agreement to statements on four-point Likert-type responses. Responses to a repeat survey of healthcare studying in the North West of England in 2015 were strikingly similar overall to those of an original 2011 survey. Although the students were positive overall about their experiences, a number were dissatisfied with some aspects of their experiences - particularly in relation to initial support on campus and whilst studying on placement. Four years on from the original survey, despite a considerable investment in improving students' experiences across the region, there appears to be little change in students' perceptions of their learning experiences CONCLUSION: In the short-term monitoring of student experience needs to be continued; and links to attrition (potential or actual) noted and acted upon. However, given that attrition from these courses has been a long-term problem and the complexity of its resolution a recurrent finding in the literature; new ways of framing

  13. Enhancing the blended learning experience of Calculus I students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Ghassani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Blended Learning showed in the last two decades to be one of the effective ways in education and training. We illustrate our initiative experience with blended learning in the course Calculus I. The main goals we want to achieve are improving students understanding of the course concepts, increasing the level of uniformity in this multi-sections course and enhancing students blended learning experience online and offline. Consequently, this affects positively students' academic performance. We describe and discuss the results that we achieved and the challenges we encountered in view of the initiative aims and goals. The blended learning delivery methods were through Learning Management System (LMS as the online medium and through new offline activities inside and outside the classroom. The LMS we used is Moodle. We designed the resources and activities to cater for the learners different needs. The offline activities were chosen and designed to strengthen the weakness in students study skills based in our experience.

  14. Ethical reasoning through simulation: a phenomenological analysis of student experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gareth; McCullough, Melissa; Maxwell, Alexander P; Gormley, Gerard J

    2016-01-01

    Medical students transitioning into professional practice feel underprepared to deal with the emotional complexities of real-life ethical situations. Simulation-based learning (SBL) may provide a safe environment for students to probe the boundaries of ethical encounters. Published studies of ethics simulation have not generated sufficiently deep accounts of student experience to inform pedagogy. The aim of this study was to understand students' lived experiences as they engaged with the emotional challenges of managing clinical ethical dilemmas within a SBL environment. This qualitative study was underpinned by an interpretivist epistemology. Eight senior medical students participated in an interprofessional ward-based SBL activity incorporating a series of ethically challenging encounters. Each student wore digital video glasses to capture point-of-view (PoV) film footage. Students were interviewed immediately after the simulation and the PoV footage played back to them. Interviews were transcribed verbatim. An interpretative phenomenological approach, using an established template analysis approach, was used to iteratively analyse the data. Four main themes emerged from the analysis: (1) 'Authentic on all levels?', (2)'Letting the emotions flow', (3) 'Ethical alarm bells' and (4) 'Voices of children and ghosts'. Students recognised many explicit ethical dilemmas during the SBL activity but had difficulty navigating more subtle ethical and professional boundaries. In emotionally complex situations, instances of moral compromise were observed (such as telling an untruth). Some participants felt unable to raise concerns or challenge unethical behaviour within the scenarios due to prior negative undergraduate experiences. This study provided deep insights into medical students' immersive and embodied experiences of ethical reasoning during an authentic SBL activity. By layering on the human dimensions of ethical decision-making, students can understand their

  15. Sport students' perception of their learning experience: Amazing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learning environments and activities that focus on learners being active participants can enrich the students' learning experience and in this regard, outdoor adventure education programmes are utilised effectively to enhance the quality and scope of learning. This study investigated the perceived learning experience ...

  16. Initial Educational Experiences of Tertiary Students. LSAY Briefing Number 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Kylie

    2008-01-01

    This "Briefing" presents information about the initial tertiary education experiences, such as satisfaction with aspects of student life and changes to initial enrolments, of two groups of young people, based on two recent Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) research reports. One study focused on the first year experiences of…

  17. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students' Training Experiences in Primary Care Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jared

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on counseling psychology doctoral students' perspectives regarding their practicum training experience in primary care psychology. The four participants included three females and one male. Semi-structured individual and focus group interviews were used to explore participants' experiences. The participants described…

  18. Qallunaaliaqtut: Inuit Students' Experiences of Postsecondary Education in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodon, Thierry; Lévesque, Francis; Dalseg, Sheena Kennedy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn from the experiences of postsecondary Inuit students from Canada. Through surveys, interviews, and focus groups, we realized that despite the challenges associated with pursuing postsecondary education in the South, most respondents perceived their experience to be positive. Lack of access to sufficient and…

  19. University staff experiences of students with mental health problems and their perceptions of staff training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Amelia; Farrer, Louise; Bennett, Kylie; Ali, Kathina; Hellsing, Annika; Katruss, Natasha; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2018-06-01

    University students experience high levels of mental health problems; however, very few seek professional help. Teaching staff within the university are well placed to assist students to seek support. To investigate university teaching staff experiences of, and training needs around, assisting students with mental health problems. A total of 224 teaching staff at the Australian National University completed an anonymous online survey (16.4% response rate from n ∼ 1370). Data on mental health training needs, and experiences of assisting students with mental health problems were described using tabulation. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Most teaching staff (70.1-82.2%) reported at least moderate confidence in their ability to provide emotional support for students. However, many staff (60.0%) felt under-equipped overall to deal with student mental health problems; almost half (49.6%) reported they did not have access to formal training. Specific actions described in assisting students included referrals, offering support, or consulting others for advice. Given the high rates of students who approach staff about mental health problems, there is a critical need to provide and promote both formal mental health response training and explicit guidelines for staff on when, how, and where to refer students for help.

  20. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  1. Wiki Laboratory Notebooks: Supporting Student Learning in Collaborative Inquiry-Based Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Gwendolyn Angela; Grøndahl, Lisbeth; Boman, Simon; Andrews, Trish

    2016-01-01

    Recent examples of high-impact teaching practices in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory that include course-based undergraduate research experiences and inquiry-based experiments require new approaches to assessing individual student learning outcomes. Instructors require tools and strategies that can provide them with insight into individual…

  2. Norwegian High-School Students Internship Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The High-School Students Internship Programme (HSSIP is a programme developed by the ECO group’s Teacher and Student Programmes section to engage students from a young age with scientific research and innovation. Norway was selected as one out of five countries for the pilot programmes run in 2017. Out of some 150 applications, 10 boys and 14 girls, from Longyearbyen (Svalbard) in the North to Flekkefjord in the South, were invited to participate in the Norwegian programme that took place from 15 October - 28 October. The youngsters were offered an intense two-week internship at CERN, during which they took part in many diverse activities. Accompanied by mentors, the students got a deeper insight into how CERN supports particle physics by working on their own projects and through a variety of visits.

  3. Using VISIR: Experiments, Subjects and Students

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Lopez-de-Ipina; Luis Rodriguez; Pablo Orduna; Ignacio Angulo; Unai Hernandez-Jayo; Ingvar Gustavsson; Javier Garcia-Zubia

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of applying the VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality) system at the course of analog electronics for various degrees of the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Deusto (Spain). The efficiency of the VISIR had been monitored during past three years. Students’ feedback was collected and analyzed. The research shows: 1) VISIR system is functional and useful learning instrument; 2) teacher experience at VISIR plays crucial role in its integration into...

  4. Dealing with death: medical students' experiences with patient loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessagno, Regina; Foote, Carrie E; Aponte, Robert

    This article explores medical students' experiences and coping strategies when confronting patient loss in their 3rd and 4th years of their programs. Much of the literature on the impact of patient losses focuses on physicians. This article joins a handful of works aimed at how medical students experience and cope with patient loss. In-depth interviews with 20 medical students provided rich descriptions of their varying experiences coping with death. Consistent with previous work, students experience substantial emotional stress coping with patient deaths, though some were more difficult to bear than others, such as when the dying patient was a child or when treatment errors could have contributed to deaths. Common coping mechanisms included talking through their emotions, thrusting themselves into continuing their rounds, crying, participating in infant death rituals, and turning to religion. When deaths occurred, senior personnel who exhibited empathy toward the deceased and tolerance toward the students' emotional responses were lauded and made the process easier. Also emotionally daunting, in many instances, was dealing with the families of dying patients. Most of the students did not view death as a failure, contrary to much earlier literature, except in instances in which human error or decision making may have played a part in causing the death of a patient.

  5. Reforming High School Science for Low-Performing Students Using Inquiry Methods and Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Marsha Gail

    Some schools fall short of the high demand to increase science scores on state exams because low-performing students enter high school unprepared for high school science. Low-performing students are not successful in high school for many reasons. However, using inquiry methods have improved students' understanding of science concepts. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to investigate the teachers' lived experiences with using inquiry methods to motivate low-performing high school science students in an inquiry-based program called Xtreem Science. Fifteen teachers were selected from the Xtreem Science program, a program designed to assist teachers in motivating struggling science students. The research questions involved understanding (a) teachers' experiences in using inquiry methods, (b) challenges teachers face in using inquiry methods, and (c) how teachers describe student's response to inquiry methods. Strategy of data collection and analysis included capturing and understanding the teachers' feelings, perceptions, and attitudes in their lived experience of teaching using inquiry method and their experience in motivating struggling students. Analysis of interview responses revealed teachers had some good experiences with inquiry and expressed that inquiry impacted their teaching style and approach to topics, and students felt that using inquiry methods impacted student learning for the better. Inquiry gave low-performing students opportunities to catch up and learn information that moved them to the next level of science courses. Implications for positive social change include providing teachers and school district leaders with information to help improve performance of the low performing science students.

  6. Medical student perceptions of an initial collaborative immersion experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Joseph B; Cedarbaum, Jacob; Haque, Fatema; Wheaton, Michael; Vredeveld, Jennifer; Purkiss, Joel; Moore, Laurel; Santen, Sally A; Daniel, Michelle

    2018-03-01

    Recent reviews of interprofessional education (IPE) highlight the need for innovative curricula focused on longitudinal clinical learning. We describe the development and early outcomes of the initial clinical experience (ICE), a longitudinal practice-based course for first-year medical students. While IPE courses focus on student-to-student interaction, ICE focuses on introducing students to interprofessional collaboration. Students attend 14 sessions at one of 18 different clinical sites. They work directly with different health professionals from among 17 possible professions, including nurses, pharmacists, social workers, and respiratory, occupational, and physical therapists. Between 2015 and 2016, 167 students completed the course, and 81 completed the end-of-course evaluation. Students agreed or strongly agreed that ICE meaningfully contributed to their understanding of healthcare teams and different professional roles (86%), improved their understanding of healthcare systems (84%), improved their ability to communicate with healthcare professionals (61%), and improved their ability to work on interprofessional teams (65%). Select themes from narrative comments suggest that clinical immersion improves understanding of professional roles, helps students understand their own future roles in healthcare teams, and increases awareness of and respect for other professionals, with the potential to change future practice. ICE may be a template for other schools wishing to expand their current educational offerings, by engaging learners in more authentic, longitudinal clinical experiences with practicing healthcare professionals.

  7. Educational Opportunities for Students with Disabilities: The Experience of a University Student in Brunei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridah Serajul Haq

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In Brunei, increased numbers of children with disabilities have been given educational opportunities in appropriate programs in schools. Students with disabilities have also succeeded in qualifying for higher studies on completing secondary education. However, there is a need for local university and colleges to cater to the specific needs of students with disabilities. This paper describes the experiences of a student with visual disabilities in Universiti Brunei Darussalam. The student emphasised his use of compensatory learning strategies, the accommodation available on campus, peer relationships and self-advocacy to communicate his needs. The support given to the student facilitated his academic success. The student is fully aware of his capabilities and his positive self-esteem has helped to overcome various setbacks. It is hoped that the information provided in this article will foster improvement in providing facilities for students with disabilities to learn in comfort and for the future enrollment of more students with special needs.

  8. Mars Exploration Student Data Teams: Building Foundations and Influencing Students to Pursue STEM Careers through Experiences with Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, D.; Grigsby, B.; Murchie, S. L.; Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, A.; Morgan, F.; Viviano, C. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Thompson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT) immerses diverse teams of high school and undergraduate students in an authentic research Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based experience and allows students to be direct participants in the scientific process by working with scientists to analyze data sets from NASA's Mars program, specifically from the CRISM instrument. MESDT was created by Arizona State University's Mars Education Program, and is funded through NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars or CRISM, an instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Students work with teacher mentors and CRISM team members to analyze data, develop hypotheses, conduct research, submit proposals, critique and revise work. All students begin the program with basic Mars curriculum lessons developed by the MESDT education team. This foundation enables the program to be inclusive of all students. Teachers have reported that populations of students with diverse academic needs and abilities have been successful in this program. The use of technology in the classroom allows the MESDT program to successfully reach a nationwide audience and funding provided by NASA's CRISM instrument allows students to participate free of charge. Recent changes to the program incorporate a partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a CRISM sponsored competitive scholarship for two teams of students to present their work at the annual USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting. Returning MESDT teachers have attributed an increase in student enrollment and interest to this scholarship opportunity. The 2013 USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting was held in Washington DC which provided an opportunity for the students to meet with their Senators at the US Capitol to explain the science work they had done throughout the year as well as the impact that the program had had on their goals for the future. This opportunity extended to the students by the

  9. The Psychosocial Experience of High School Girls Highly Susceptible to Stereotype Threat: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picho, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The author used phenomenology to explore the subjective experience of ninth-grade girls susceptible to mathematics-related stereotype threat in their authentic learning environments. The sample constituted students categorized as either having low or high susceptibility to stereotype threat (SST) enrolled in Honors mathematics classes at an urban…

  10. Self-Esteem of Junior High and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimberly E.

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the self-esteem of junior high and high school students. The independent variables investigated were quality of family life, birth order, family size, maternal employment, grade level and family structure. The dependent variables were the self-esteem scores from the following sub-scales of the Texas…

  11. Student experiences with an international public health exchange project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Kim A; Richardson, Eileen; Aarts, Clara; Campbell, Barbara; Hemmingway, Ann; Koskinen, Liisa; Mitchell, Maureen P; Nordstrom, Pam

    2009-01-01

    With growing interconnectivity of healthcare systems worldwide and increased immigration, inappropriate cultural and role assumptions are often seen when cultures clash within a country or when there is practice across country boundaries in times of disaster and during international travel. To increase students' multicultural awareness and work experiences abroad, the authors describe a 7-school, 5-country international student exchange project. The authors also share the students' evaluations of their experiences as they are challenged to erase boundaries and embrace nursing across countries. Participating faculty describe the process, challenges, and keys to success found in creating and living this international project. Students involved in the exchange process evaluate the learning opportunities and challenges and the joy of coming together as newfound colleagues and friends.

  12. Graduate students' teaching experiences improve their methodological research skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldon, David F; Peugh, James; Timmerman, Briana E; Maher, Michelle A; Hurst, Melissa; Strickland, Denise; Gilmore, Joanna A; Stiegelmeyer, Cindy

    2011-08-19

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students are often encouraged to maximize their engagement with supervised research and minimize teaching obligations. However, the process of teaching students engaged in inquiry provides practice in the application of important research skills. Using a performance rubric, we compared the quality of methodological skills demonstrated in written research proposals for two groups of early career graduate students (those with both teaching and research responsibilities and those with only research responsibilities) at the beginning and end of an academic year. After statistically controlling for preexisting differences between groups, students who both taught and conducted research demonstrate significantly greater improvement in their abilities to generate testable hypotheses and design valid experiments. These results indicate that teaching experience can contribute substantially to the improvement of essential research skills.

  13. Midwifery students learning experiences in labor wards: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstad, Anne; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2014-12-01

    The labor ward is an important and challenging learning area for midwifery students. It is there the students learn in authentic complex situations, in intimate situations, with potential risk for the life and health of mothers and their babies. The aim of this study was to explore the main concern expressed by midwifery students in labor wards and how they handled this concern. A longitudinal study based on grounded theory methodology was used. The participants were 10 postgraduate midwifery students, from a University College in Norway. Data were gathered and analyzed throughout the 2-year postgraduate program, in the students first, third and fourth semesters. Every student was interviewed three times in a total of 15 single and three focus-group sessions. The grounded theory of "building relationships" explains how students dealt with their main concern: "how to gain access to learning experiences". This theory consisted of three strategies; a) controlling vulnerability, b) cultivating trust and c) obtaining acceptance. Clarifying discussions involving midwives and students may facilitate the process of building relationships and contribute to confident learning. Students appreciate it when the midwives initiate discussions about acute situations and state that a novice may perceive labor and childbirth as more frightening than an experienced midwife would. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinically Prepared Veterinary Students: Enhancing Veterinary Student Hands-on Experiences and Supporting Hospital Caseload Using Shelter Medicine Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M. Shivley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Referral-level medicine is important in the veterinary curriculum, however veterinary students also need a solid base knowledge of clinically relevant, routine surgical and diagnostic skills to be clinically prepared after graduation. Exposure to a referral-only, or primarily referral caseload, does not always provide veterinary students with the routine hands-on experiences and competencies expected by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Australian Veterinary Boards Council, or prospective employers. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess how a shelter medicine program can fill the companion animal caseload gap and create the necessary hands-on experiences considered essential in the veterinary curriculum. Pedagogical frameworks, course curriculum and design, student experiences, and student assessments were described for three core curricular areas (surgery, medical days, population medicine of the Shelter Medicine Program at Mississippi State University. The shelter surgery experience provided a high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter environment where fourth-year students averaged 65 sterilization surgeries in two weeks and demonstrated a quantifiable decrease in surgical time. The shelter surgery experience added on average 9,000 small animal cases per year to the overall hospital caseload. Shelter medical days, where students provide veterinary care during on-site shelter visits, created opportunities for third-year students to directly interact with shelter animals by performing physical examinations and diagnostic testing, and to gain experience in developing treatment protocols and recommendations for commonly encountered problems. The shelter medical days experience averaged over 700 small animal cases per year and over 1,500 diagnostic procedures. Finally, students participated in 15 onsite shelter consultations where they obtained a working knowledge

  15. Clinically Prepared Veterinary Students: Enhancing Veterinary Student Hands-on Experiences and Supporting Hospital Caseload Using Shelter Medicine Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivley, Jacob M; Brookshire, Wilson C; Bushby, Philip A; Woodruff, Kimberly A

    2018-01-01

    Referral-level medicine is important in the veterinary curriculum, however veterinary students also need a solid base knowledge of clinically relevant, routine surgical and diagnostic skills to be clinically prepared after graduation. Exposure to a referral-only, or primarily referral caseload, does not always provide veterinary students with the routine hands-on experiences and competencies expected by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Australian Veterinary Boards Council, or prospective employers. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess how a shelter medicine program can fill the companion animal caseload gap and create the necessary hands-on experiences considered essential in the veterinary curriculum. Pedagogical frameworks, course curriculum and design, student experiences, and student assessments were described for three core curricular areas (surgery, medical days, population medicine) of the Shelter Medicine Program at Mississippi State University. The shelter surgery experience provided a high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter environment where fourth-year students averaged 65 sterilization surgeries in two weeks and demonstrated a quantifiable decrease in surgical time. The shelter surgery experience added on average 9,000 small animal cases per year to the overall hospital caseload. Shelter medical days, where students provide veterinary care during on-site shelter visits, created opportunities for third-year students to directly interact with shelter animals by performing physical examinations and diagnostic testing, and to gain experience in developing treatment protocols and recommendations for commonly encountered problems. The shelter medical days experience averaged over 700 small animal cases per year and over 1,500 diagnostic procedures. Finally, students participated in 15 onsite shelter consultations where they obtained a working knowledge of biosecurity at a

  16. Autonomy and the Student Experience in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nicholas Ron

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a Self-Determination Theory perspective with two studies. Study I, a correlational study, investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (vs. controlling) students perceived their instructors to be. An autonomy supportive instructor acknowledges students' perspectives, feelings, and perceptions and provides students with information and opportunities for choice, while minimizing external pressures. It was found that the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was positively correlated with student interest and enjoyment in learning physics (beta=0.31***) and negatively correlated with student anxiety about taking physics (beta=-0.23**). It was also positively correlated with how autonomous (vs. controlled) students' reasons for studying physics became over the duration of the course (i.e., studying physics more because they wanted to vs. had to; beta=0.24***). This change in autonomous reasons for studying physics was in turn positively correlated with student performance in the course (beta=0.17*). Additionally, the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was directly correlated with performance for those students entering the course with relatively autonomous reasons for studying physics (beta=0.25**). In summary, students who perceived their instructors as more autonomy supportive tended to have a more favorable experience in the course. If greater autonomy support was in fact the cause of a more favorable student experience, as suggested by Self-determination Theory and experimental studies in other contexts, these results would have implications for instruction and instructor professional development in similar contexts. I discuss these implications. Study II, an experimental study, investigated the effect

  17. Evaluating Spiritual Experiences and Some Psychological Components in Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Taheri Kharameh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spiritual experiences seem to be an important component in Religious and spiritual life of some one. Aim of the present study was to determinate relation between daily spiritual experiences, and psychological variables in students of Qom University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, 138 students of the Qom University of Medical Sciences were selected via random sampling methods. These students completed the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale, Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS-21 and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12. Data were analyzed in SPSS16 software environment utilizing descriptive statistics and the Independent t-test, ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Mean and standard deviations of daily spiritual experiences scores was 28.27(4.90.  The daily spiritual experiences was associated with mental health (r = -0.22, P-value = 0.01 depression(r = -0.25, P-value = 0.005, and stress (r = -0.23, P-value = 0.01. Conclusion: The findings indicated that spiritual experiences were respectively the most important religious - spiritual components which may affect psychological health in students.

  18. The Gravity Model for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Paul; Mitchell, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The authors suggest ways in which the gravity model can be used in high school geography classes. Based on Newton's Law of Molecular Gravitation, the law states that gravitation is in direct ratio to mass and inverse ratio to distance. One activity for students involves determination of zones of influence of cities of various sizes. (Author/AV)

  19. Vaccination learning experiences of nursing students: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali; Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students being trained to perform vaccinations. The grounded theory method was applied to gather information through semi-structured interviews. The participants included 14 undergraduate nursing students in their fifth and eighth semesters of study in a nursing school in Iran. The information was analyzed according to Strauss and Corbin's method of grounded theory. A core category of experiential learning was identified, and the following eight subcategories were extracted: students' enthusiasm, vaccination sensitivity, stress, proper educational environment, absence of prerequisites, students' responsibility for learning, providing services, and learning outcomes. The vaccination training of nursing students was found to be in an acceptable state. However, some barriers to effective learning were identified. As such, the results of this study may provide empirical support for attempts to reform vaccination education by removing these barriers.

  20. Your Voice Counts: Listening to the Voice of High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggers, Beth; Hwang, Yoon-Suk; Mercer, K. Louise

    2011-01-01

    Supporting students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in inclusive settings presents both opportunities and significant challenges to school communities. This study, which explored the lived experience of nine students with ASD in an inclusive high school in Australia, is based on the belief that by listening to the voices of students, school…

  1. An Observational Study of Peer Learning for High School Students at a Cybersecurity Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Jason M.; Pike, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and implementation of a cybersecurity camp offered as a cybersecurity learning experience to a group of female and male high school students. Students ranged in grade level from freshmen to senior. Student demographics, including any existing pre-requisite knowledge, were unknown to camp designers prior to the…

  2. Numerical Modelling with Spreadsheets as a Means to Promote STEM to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The article gives an account of an experiment in which sixty-eight high school students of age 16 - 19 developed spreadsheet applications that simulated fall and projectile motion in the air. The students applied the Euler method to solve the governing differential equations. The aim was to promote STEM to the students and motivate them to study…

  3. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas…

  4. Communicating Wave Energy: An Active Learning Experience for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trongnghia; Hou, Gene; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an education project to communicate the wave energy concept to high school students. A virtual reality system that combines both hardware and software is developed in this project to simulate the buoy-wave interaction. This first-of-its-kind wave energy unit is portable and physics-based, allowing students to conduct a number of…

  5. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  6. Student perception of travel service learning experience in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Aditi; Kaddoura, Mahmoud; Dominick, Christine

    2013-08-01

    This study explores the perceptions of health profession students participating in academic service learning in Morocco with respect to adapting health care practices to cultural diversity. Authors utilized semi-structured, open-ended interviews to explore the perceptions of health profession students. Nine dental hygiene and nursing students who traveled to Morocco to provide oral and general health services were interviewed. After interviews were recorded, they were transcribed verbatim to ascertain descriptive validity and to generate inductive and deductive codes that constitute the major themes of the data analysis. Thereafter, NVIVO 8 was used to rapidly determine the frequency of applied codes. The authors compared the codes and themes to establish interpretive validity. Codes and themes were initially determined independently by co-authors and applied to the data subsequently. The authors compared the applied codes to establish intra-rater reliability. International service learning experiences led to perceptions of growth as a health care provider among students. The application of knowledge and skills learned in academic programs and service learning settings were found to help in bridging the theory-practice gap. The specific experience enabled students to gain an understanding of diverse health care and cultural practices in Morocco. Students perceived that the experience gained in international service learning can heighten awareness of diverse cultural and health care practices to foster professional growth of health professionals.

  7. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  8. Caution, Student Experience May Vary: Social Identities Impact a Student’s Experience in Peer Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Brownell, Sara E.; Thummaphan, Phonraphee; Lan, Ming-Chih; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for implementing active learning in college-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses, classrooms across the country are being transformed from instructor centered to student centered. In these active-learning classrooms, the dynamics among students becomes increasingly important for understanding student experiences. In this study, we focus on the role a student prefers to assume during peer discussions, and how this preferred role may vary given a student’s social identities. In addition we explore whether three hypothesized barriers to participation may help explain participation difference in the classroom. These barriers are 1) students are excluded from the discussion by actions of their groupmates; 2) students are anxious about participating in peer discussion; and 3) students do not see value in peer discussions. Our results indicate that self-reported preferred roles in peer discussions can be predicted by student gender, race/ethnicity, and nationality. In addition, we found evidence for all three barriers, although some barriers were more salient for certain students than others. We encourage instructors to consider structuring their in-class activities in ways that promote equity, which may require more purposeful attention to alleviating the current differential student experiences with peer discussions. PMID:26628561

  9. Direction discovery: A science enrichment program for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Suzanne S; Schwartz-Bloom, Rochelle D

    2009-03-01

    Launch into education about pharmacology (LEAP) is an inquiry-based science enrichment program designed to enhance competence in biology and chemistry and foster interest in science careers especially among under-represented minorities. The study of how drugs work, how they enter cells, alter body chemistry, and exit the body engages students to conceptualize fundamental precepts in biology, chemistry, and math. Students complete an intensive three-week course in the fundamentals of pharmacology during the summer followed by a mentored research component during the school year. Following a 5E learning paradigm, the summer course captures student interest by introducing controversial topics in pharmacology and provides a framework that guides them to explore topics in greater detail. The 5E learning cycle is recapitulated as students extend their knowledge to design and to test an original research question in pharmacology. LEAP students demonstrated significant gains in biology and chemistry knowledge and interests in pursuing science. Several students earned honors for the presentation of their research in regional and state science fairs. Success of the LEAP model in its initial 2 years argues that coupling college-level coursework of interest to teens with an authentic research experience enhances high school student success in and enthusiasm for science. Copyright © 2009 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. American high school students shine a spotlight on CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Between 2 and 7 April eighteen American high school students were let loose at CERN armed with video cameras. Their mission? To take on the role of broadcast journalists and inspire their peers across the US with short documentaries and blogs illuminating the work happening at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Members of the teams of budding physicists and broadcast journalists pose in front of the ATLAS detector.Following in the footsteps of professional journalists around the world, six teams of American high school students recently travelled to CERN to experience the increasing excitement in the run-up to the switch-on of the LHC. The six teams are from five states across the US and were the winners of a competition sponsored and funded by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation. Each team consists of three students plus a teacher, who combine their knowledge of ph...

  11. Space experiments with high stability clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessot, R.F.C.

    1993-01-01

    Modern metrology depends increasingly on the accuracy and frequency stability of atomic clocks. Applications of such high-stability oscillators (or clocks) to experiments performed in space are described and estimates of the precision of these experiments are made in terms of clock performance. Methods using time-correlation to cancel localized disturbances in very long signal paths and a proposed space borne four station VLBI system are described. (TEC). 30 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  12. Interprofessional student experiences on the HAVEN free clinic leadership board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elizabeth Anne; Swartz, Martha K

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the experiences of students serving on the leadership board of HAVEN - the student-run free clinic of the Yale University health professional schools. Open-ended responses were collected from 18 of the 28 members of the 2011-2012 leadership board through an online survey. Students reported an overall positive experience participating on the board and valued the opportunity to be part of a committed community creating change. The majority of students reported that their time as a board member had improved their attitude towards interprofessional collaboration (78%) and had also fostered their leadership skills (67%). Around two thirds (67%) reported that their experience had positively impacted their future career plans, either reinforcing their desire to work with underserved populations or encouraging them to pursue leadership roles. Based on these data, it is suggested that the HAVEN Free Clinic offers a useful opportunity for students to experience the demands of clinical care leadership while working together in an interprofessional context.

  13. Asian Students' Voices: An Empirical Study of Asian Students' Learning Experiences at a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacqui; Li, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    More than 85% of the international students in New Zealand are Asian in origin. The level of satisfaction of Asian international students with their learning experiences in New Zealand has been of enormous concern for the New Zealand export education industry. The results of this current research, based on a qualitative research study conducted at…

  14. The Value of International Experiences for Business Students: Measuring Business Student Attitudes toward Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Sean; Maresco, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The value of an international experience--especially for students of business--continues to be an area of focus at colleges and universities. Students across all disciplines within the business curriculum: accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, or sport management are expected by employers to possess knowledge of, and appreciation…

  15. Reflective Processes: A Qualitative Study Exploring Early Learning Student Teacher Mentoring Experiences in Student Teaching Practicums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral thesis explored mentoring in early learning teacher preparation programs. This study explored the reflective processes embedded in the work between student teachers and their mentors during early learning student teacher experiences at Washington State community and technical colleges. Schon's (1987a) concepts of…

  16. Empowering High School Students in Scientific Careers: Developing Statewide Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Swartz, D.

    2008-05-01

    Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) is a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center focused on improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. The Center is divided into three sections including Knowledge Transfer, Research, and Education and Diversity. The Science Education and Diversity mission is to educate and train people with diverse backgrounds in Climate and Earth System Science by enhancing teaching and learning and disseminating science results through multiple media. CMMAP is partnering with two local school districts to host an annual global climate conferences for high school students. The 2008 Colorado Global Climate Conference seeks "To educate students on global and local climate issues and empower them to se their knowledge." The conference is sponsored by CMMAP, The Governor's Energy Office, Poudre School District, Thompson School District, Clif Bar, and Ben and Jerry's Scoop Shop of Fort Collins. The conference seeks to inspire students to pursue future education and careers in science fields. Following an opening welcome from the Governor's Energy Office, Keynote Piers Sellers will discuss his experiences as an atmospheric scientist and NASA astronaut. Students will then attend 3 out of 16 breakout sessions including such sessions as "Hot poems, Cool Paintings, and the treasures of Antiquity of Climate Change", "Mitigation vs Adaptation", "Bigfoot Walks(What Size is our carbon footprint?)" "The Wedges: Reduc ing Carbon Emissions", and "We the People: Climate and Culture of Climate Change" to name a few. Using The Governor's High School Conference on the Environment sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education as a model we are developing statewide partnerships to bring high school students together to look at global climate issues that will impact their future and of which they can be part of the solution through their education and career paths. In addition to

  17. Young Engineers and Sciences (YES) - Mentoring High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Asbell, E.; Reiff, P. H.

    2008-09-01

    Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA) during the past 16 years. The YES program provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. During these years, YES has developed a website for topics in space science from the perspective of high school students, including NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) (http://yesserver.space.swri.edu). High school science teachers participate in the workshop and develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation in the academic year. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. Over the past 16 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, one business has started, and three scientific publications have resulted. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, Northside Independent School District, SwRI, and several local charitable foundations.

  18. Harmfulness of smoking among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Rotter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess the level of awareness of smoking and non smoking students on harmful impact of nicotine and cigarette smoke on human body. Material and methods: The study was carried out in March 2011 in high schools in Szczecin. Own elaborated questionnaire was used. 288 students from high school, technical college and vocational school were tested. Results: The majority of responders (95,1% claimed that cigarette smoke is harmful both for passive and active smokers. They most often pinpoint the direct cause connected with smoking to pulmonary diseases (264 persons and cancers (240 persons. Almost 90% of students found negative impact of tobacco products on development of fetus of pregnant women. Overwhelming majority of respondents (83,2% feels anxious if it comes to stay in a room filled with smoke. Conclusions: The awareness of high school students on negative influence of smoking on human body is quite satisfactory, but there is still a need for more education in the range of diseases and symptoms connected with smoking.

  19. Mapping classroom experiences through the eyes of enlace students: The development of science literate identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oemig, Paulo Andreas

    The culture of a science classroom favors a particular speech community, thus membership requires students becoming bilingual and bicultural at the same time. The complexity of learning science rests in that it not only possesses a unique lexicon and discourse, but it ultimately entails a way of knowing. My dissertation examined the academic engagement and perceptions of a group (N=30) of high school students regarding their science literate practices. These students were participating in an Engaging Latino Communities for Education (ENLACE) program whose purpose is to increase Latino high school graduation rates and assist them with college entrance requirements. At the time of the study, 19 students were enrolled in different science classes to fulfill the science requirements for graduation. The primary research question: What kind of science classroom learning environment supports science literate identities for Latino/a students? was addressed through a convergent parallel mixed research design (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2011). Over the course of an academic semester I interviewed all 30 students arranged in focus groups and observed in their science classes. ENLACE students expressed interest in science when it was taught through hands-on activities or experiments. Students also stressed the importance of having teachers who made an effort to get to know them as persons and not just as students. Students felt more engaged in science when they perceived their teachers respected them for their experiences and knowledge. Findings strongly suggest students will be more interested in science when they have opportunities to learn through contextualized practices. Science literate identities can be promoted when inquiry serves as a vehicle for students to engage in the language of the discipline in all its modalities. Inquiry-based activities, when carefully planned and implemented, can provide meaningful spaces for students to construct knowledge, evaluate claims

  20. Experiences of Visually Impaired Students in Community College Math Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, S. Tomeka

    Blind and visually impaired students who attend community colleges face challenges in learning mathematics (Forrest, 2010). Scoy, McLaughlin, Walls, and Zuppuhaur (2006) claim these students are at a disadvantage in studying mathematics due to the visual and interactive nature of the subject, and by the way mathematics is taught. In this qualitative study six blind and visually impaired students attended three community colleges in one Mid-Atlantic state. They shared their experiences inside the mathematics classroom. Five of the students were enrolled in developmental level math, and one student was enrolled in college level math. The conceptual framework used to explore how blind and visually impaired students persist and succeed in math courses was Piaget's theory on constructivism. The data from this qualitative study was obtained through personal interviews. Based on the findings of this study, blind and visually impaired students need the following accommodations in order to succeed in community college math courses: Accommodating instructors who help to keep blind and visually impaired students motivated and facilitate their academic progress towards math completion, tutorial support, assistive technology, and a positive and inclusive learning environment.

  1. Clinical Education Environment Experiences of Operating Room Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh khazaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The objective of medical education is to train competent and qualified workforce in order to provide services in various health environments. One of the important objectives of Operating Room students is to train workforce who can involve in patient’s health and recovery. Training these students should cause clinical ability and independent decision making during surgery. Since students during internship face with many problems, this study has been conducted to explore and describe the challenges and experiences.Methods: This qualitative study is a phenomenology that was conducted based on 20 students in the last semester of Operating Room associate’s degree with purposive sampling. Deep and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data and data were analyzed by content analysis method.Results: The findings in 5 main themes: (1 Physical space and equipment in the operating room, (2 The student’s position in operating room, (3 Integrating knowledge and action, (4 Managing education environment and 5- Student’s viewpoint about operating room and working in it.Conclusions: Interviews with students revealed the educational environment challenges with which they are faced during their study. Teachers can provide solutions to overcome the challenges and create a positive atmosphere for students' learning using results of this study and students may continue their interest in education and improve the quality of their education.Keywords: CLINICAL EDUCATION, OPERATING ROOM STUDENTS, CHALLENGE

  2. Educators' experiences of managing students with ADHD: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D A; Russell, A E; Arnell, S; Ford, T J

    2017-07-01

    The symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are associated with difficulty coping with the social, behavioural and academic components of school. Compared with medication and other non-pharmacological treatment, there is less evidence relating to school-based interventions to support children with ADHD. There is additionally an absence of any research focused on the experiences and practices of educators in the UK around how they work with children who are inattentive, impulsive and hyperactive. Forty-two educational practitioners from primary, secondary and alternate provision schools in the UK participated in focus groups or individual interviews that explored (1) their experiences of managing students with ADHD in the classroom and (2) factors that helped and hindered them in this endeavour. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Analysis identified six themes: broad strategies, student-centred, inclusive strategies, labelling, medication and relationships. Participants' experiences of managing students with ADHD drew upon a wide range of strategies that typically involved responding to individual needs in an inclusive manner, so individuals with ADHD could access the classroom with their peers. Participants spoke about three factors that helped and hindered managing students with ADHD. Labelling of students with ADHD was reported, with the negative aspects of labelling, such as stigmatization, affecting the classroom. Educators reported mixed experiences regarding the helpfulness of medication; where helpful, it allowed the use of strategies in the classroom. Although students with ADHD were described as having rollercoaster relationships, positive relationships were considered key to the support of children with these difficulties. This study suggests that factors such as attitudes towards ADHD, relationships experienced by students with ADHD and other treatments being delivered need to be carefully considered before strategies are put

  3. Indiana secondary students' evolution learning experiences and demarcations of science from non-science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lisa A.

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has documented students' conceptual difficulties learning evolution and how student learning may be related to students' views of evolution and science. This mixed methods study addressed how 74 high school biology students from six Indiana high schools viewed their evolution learning experiences, the demarcations of science from non-science, and evolution understanding and acceptance. Data collection entailed qualitative and quantitative methods including interviews, classroom observations, surveys, and assessments to address students' views of science and non-science, evolution learning experiences, and understanding and acceptance of evolution. Qualitative coding generated several demarcation and evolution learning experience codes that were subsequently used in quantitative comparisons of evolution understanding and acceptance. The majority of students viewed science as empirical, tentative but ultimately leading to certain truth, compatible with religion, the product of experimental work, and the product of human creativity. None of the students offered the consensus NOS view that scientific theories are substantiated explanations of phenomena while scientific laws state relationships or patterns between phenomena. About half the students indicated that scientific knowledge was subjectively and socio-culturally influenced. The majority of students also indicated that they had positive evolution learning experiences and thought evolution should be taught in secondary school. The quantitative comparisons revealed how students who viewed scientific knowledge as subjectively and socio-culturally influenced had higher understanding than their peers. Furthermore, students who maintained that science and religion were compatible did not differ with respect to understanding but had higher acceptance than their peers who viewed science and religion as conflicting. Furthermore, students who maintained that science must be consistent with their

  4. Flow experiences in everyday classes of Spanish college students: the fit between challenge and skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Escartin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the flow state as a high intrinsic motivation experience. Following Csikszenmihalyi´s theoretical model (1990, we analyze in which contents within the social psychology subject, students experience more flow. Participants were Spanish college students from a general course on Social Psychology. They completed a diary study during 12 master classes through the academic semester. The results showed that students experienced different states of consciousness in different sessions: relaxation, apathy, flow and anxiety, respectively. These findings provide new insight into the relationship between an academic subject and students, facilitating the creation of new and innovative strategies for learning. The ultimate goal is to modify and improve the dynamics and learning activities for the teaching course, increasing the experience of flow in class (and reducing the levels of anxiety, apathy or relaxation.

  5. Students' educational experiences and interaction with residents on night shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jocelyn; Sokoloff, Max; Tendhar, Chosang; Schmidt, John; Christner, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to investigate whether increased night shifts for students on paediatric rotations had any negative impact on their overall quality of educational experiences in light of the implementation of duty-hour restrictions. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 30 students on paediatric rotations during the academic year 2011/12. Students completed two questionnaires, one in response to their experiences during the day shifts and another in response to their experiences during the night shifts. Only 25 cases were retained for the final analyses. The non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyse the quantitative data, and constant comparative thematic analyses, as described by Creswell, were used to analyse the qualitative data. [Do] increased nights shifts for students … [have] any negative impact on their overall quality of educational experiences[?] RESULTS: The results indicated that students' perceived quality of experiences during the night shifts was greater, compared with their day shifts. Students reported having more time to socialise during the night shifts. They further reported that informal ways of learning, such as impromptu teaching and spontaneous discussions on clinical problems, were more beneficial, and these often occurred in abundance during the night shifts as opposed to the scheduled didactic teaching sessions that occur during the day shifts. This study documented many unanticipated benefits of night shifts. The feeling of cohesiveness of the night team deserves further exploration, as this can be linked to better performance outcomes. More consideration should be given to implementing night shifts as a regular feature of clerkships. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  6. Academic attainment and the high school science experiences among high-achieving African American males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trice, Rodney Nathaniel

    This study examines the educational experiences of high achieving African American males. More specifically, it analyzes the influences on their successful navigation through high school science. Through a series of interviews, observations, questionnaires, science portfolios, and review of existing data the researcher attempted to obtain a deeper understanding of high achieving African American males and their limitations to academic attainment and high school science experiences. The investigation is limited to ten high achieving African American male science students at Woodcrest High School. Woodcrest is situated at the cross section of a suburban and rural community located in the southeastern section of the United States. Although this investigation involves African American males, all of whom are successful in school, its findings should not be generalized to this nor any other group of students. The research question that guided this study is: What are the limitations to academic attainment and the high school science experiences of high achieving African American males? The student participants expose how suspension and expulsion, special education placement, academic tracking, science instruction, and teacher expectation influence academic achievement. The role parents play, student self-concept, peer relationships, and student learning styles are also analyzed. The anthology of data rendered three overarching themes: (1) unequal access to education, (2) maintenance of unfair educational structures, and (3) authentic characterizations of African American males. Often the policies and practices set in place by school officials aid in creating hurdles to academic achievement. These policies and practices are often formed without meaningful consideration of the unintended consequences that may affect different student populations, particularly the most vulnerable. The findings from this study expose that high achieving African American males face major

  7. Some studies on Fourier analysis in students experiment

    OpenAIRE

    大崎, 正雄

    2016-01-01

    Here we give some troubles in teaching and their solutions occured during the Software Science Experiment course, which is opened for the 4th semester in the Department of Software Science. One of the subjects of this experiment course is Fourier analysis using MyPC. Some students are not familiar with calculating the integration of sinusoidal function, and also some need support for drawing graphs with MS Excel. Typical mistakes and their settlements are given.

  8. Creating meaningful learning experiences: Understanding students' perspectives of engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, Richard James Chung Mun

    , relevance, and transfer. With this framework of student learning, engineering educators can enhance learning experiences by engaging all three levels of students' understanding. The curriculum studies orientation applied the three holistic elements of curriculum---subject matter, society, and the individual---to conceptualize design considerations for engineering curriculum and teaching practice. This research supports the characterization of students' learning experiences to help educators and students optimize their teaching and learning of design education.

  9. Experiences that influence a student's choice on majoring in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Donya Rae

    Currently the production of college graduates with science and engineering degrees is insufficient to fill the increasing number of jobs requiring these skills. This study focuses on physics majors with an in-depth examination of student transitions from high school to college. Many different areas of influence could affect a student's decision to major in physics. The first phase of this study addresses all of the potential areas of influence identified from the literature. The goal was to identify common influences that might be used to increase students' interest in majoring in physics. Subjects (N=35) from the first phase were recruited from physics majors at diverse Michigan colleges and universities. The second phase of this study explored, in more depth, important areas of influence identified in the first phase of the study. Subjects (N=94) from the second phase were recruited from diverse colleges and universities in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. The interviews were also conducted via email. Approximately half of the students in the study decided to major in physics while still in high school. Their reasons relate to many of the areas of influence. For example, high school physics teachers were cited as a strong influence in many students' decisions to major in physics. Influential physics teachers were described as being helpful, encouraging and interesting. The teachers also need to be their students' number one cheerleader and not their number one critic. Some areas of influence were found to be different for males vs. females. A high percentage of all physics majors had influential adults with careers in physical or biological science fields. This percentage was even larger for female physics majors. Female students also showed a greater initial interest in astronomy than the male students. Thus, high school and college physics teachers should seek to expose students to science-related careers and adults with these careers. Astronomy is also an

  10. Social anxiety experiences and responses of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behiye Akacan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the responses of university students in social anxiety situations in order to create a psychological counselling program with a structured group based on Cognitive Behavioural and Existential Approaches. These responses involve the behaviour and thoughts of the university students in situations where they experience or anticipate social anxiety. The semi-structured interview form developed by the researchers was used in the study during the face-to-face interviews with fifty-one 4th year students from the Guidance and Psychological Counselling (GPC and Pre-School Teaching (PST departments. The scope of the interview form includes the situations where 1 students experience social anxiety in the school setting and their thoughts and behaviours regarding these situations, 2 the situations where they anticipate social anxiety in their future profession, and 3 the situations where they experience social anxiety in their daily lives. Our aim was to collect data from these areas. The data collected were analysed through content analysis. The findings of the study revealed that the thoughts regarding the social anxiety situations of the final year students studying in Guidance and Psychological Counselling and Pre-School Teaching departments are generally negative and their behaviour usually presents as desertion or avoidance.

  11. A high-power target experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, H G; Ludewig, H; Palmer, Robert; Samulyak, V; Simos, N; Tsang, Thomas; Bradshaw, T W; Drumm, Paul V; Edgecock, T R; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Bennett, Roger; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Haseroth, H; Haug, F; Lettry, Jacques; Hayato, Y; Yoshimura, Koji; Gabriel, Tony A; Graves, Van; Spampinato, P; Haines, John; McDonald, Kirk T

    2005-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed as a proof-of-principle test for a target system capable of converting a 4 MW proton beam into a high-intensity muon beam suitable for incorporation into either a neutrino factory complex or a muon collider. The target system is based on exposing a free mercury jet to an intense proton beam in the presence of a high strength solenoidal field.

  12. Simulation experience enhances physical therapist student confidence in managing a patient in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Patricia J; Lazarus, Marcilene; Schillo, Rebecca; Rosen, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Rehabilitation of patients in critical care environments improves functional outcomes. This finding has led to increased implementation of intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programs, including early mobility, and an associated increased demand for physical therapists practicing in ICUs. Unfortunately, many physical therapists report being inadequately prepared to work in this high-risk environment. Simulation provides focused, deliberate practice in safe, controlled learning environments and may be a method to initiate academic preparation of physical therapists for ICU practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of participation in simulation-based management of a patient with critical illness in an ICU setting on levels of confidence and satisfaction in physical therapist students. A one-group, pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental design was used. Physical therapist students (N=43) participated in a critical care simulation experience requiring technical (assessing bed mobility and pulmonary status), behavioral (patient and interprofessional communication), and cognitive (recognizing a patient status change and initiating appropriate responses) skill performance. Student confidence and satisfaction were surveyed before and after the simulation experience. Students' confidence in their technical, behavioral, and cognitive skill performance increased from "somewhat confident" to "confident" following the critical care simulation experience. Student satisfaction was highly positive, with strong agreement the simulation experience was valuable, reinforced course content, and was a useful educational tool. Limitations of the study were the small sample from one university and a control group was not included. Incorporating a simulated, interprofessional critical care experience into a required clinical course improved physical therapist student confidence in technical, behavioral, and cognitive performance measures and was associated with high

  13. The experiences of student nurses on placements with practice nurses: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Julia; Ooms, Ann; Sharples, Kath; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-01-01

    To prepare the registered nurse of tomorrow in the United Kingdom (UK) to care for patients in general practice (GP)-led services, today's student nurses need to have the opportunity to experience placements with practice nurses to enable them to make positive career choices to become practice nurses in the future. The role of the practice nurse is described in the article. As a pilot project, seventeen students undertook placements with practice nurses in one of seven GP practices selected by the London GP Deanery and the university as having fulfilled the criteria to support student nurses in placements. A mentorship preparation programme was provided to prepare practice nurses for mentoring these students. An evaluation study was undertaken of this pilot project. Findings showed that students were highly positive about the experience; the majority rated this placement as being as good as or better than previous placement experiences. The evaluation also explored the impact on student learning and the value that the placement had. There was a positive impact on students' knowledge and skills in certain clinical areas especially related to health promotion. Students also indicated that they would like to have additional placements with practice nurses and would consider a career as a practice nurse in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High density implosion experiments at Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, M.D.; Hatchett, S.P.; Nelson, M.B.; Lerche, R.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Ress, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    Deuterium filled glass microballoons are used as indirectly driven targets for implosion experiments at the Nova Laser Fusion Facility. High levels of laser precision were required to achieve fuel densities and convergences to an ignition scale hot spot. (AIP) copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  15. Research experience in Maine leads to teacher and student success in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade-Redden, D.; Incze, L.; Census Of Marine Life-Maine

    2010-12-01

    As a High School science teacher it is my responsibility to present curriculum, to create enthusiasm for science, and to instill a passion and love for science in my students. Through a research experience as an ARMADA master teacher my passion and enthusiasm for the ocean was rekindled in the Gulf of Maine. Topics I had taught for years came alive in front of my eyes, and I was able to experience science to its fullest. I brought home many photographs, valuable information, and new enthusiasm to my students. I began a program called S.A.N.D. (Students As Nature Directors). In this program my students teach 3rd graders about the oceans and its many wonders. Also, I have incorporated hands-on research based projects. The research experience has enabled my students to become more scientifically literate and capable of sharing scientific knowledge with others. This presentation will show how research/teacher partnerships benefit students as well as teachers and how my students and district have benefited from my experience as an ARMADA master teacher. Author: Debra Slade-Redden Author #2: Lew Incze

  16. Experiences And Thoughts of University Students About Psychological Violance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulhan YIÐITALP

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequency of violence is increasing in our country, as in all over the world. It seems to be an unpreventable issue violence can be prevented by three main steps; description of problem, defination of risk groups and interventions through risk groups. We conducted this study to evaluate the frequency and perception of violence in last year students of Dicle University who will be member of different professions immidately. Ten different faculties of 977 last year students was the subject of this study. Four focus group discussions on violence were conducted with 7-8 students in each to develop the inquiry form. Inquiry form was applied by confidentiality rules. Violence was asked to students during last 15 days. Perceptions were collected by using scaled Likert scoring system. All data were stored in computer and frequncy tabulations were prepared. During last 15 days 6,2% of 398 girl students suffered with physical violence. This was 7,9% in men students (n:579. Girl students were violent by her fathers and brothers and men students were violent by their peers and others. Psycological violence was 23.7% in girl students and 20.5% in boy students. Sexual violence was not present in boy students but transgression to girl students was 1.2% and importunity was 4.5%. Violence through youth is an important public health issue bcause its high frequency and effects. Frequently perpetrate of violence was from relatives. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(2: 131-136

  17. Experiences of a student-run clinic in primary care: a mixed-method study with students, patients and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Maria; Leanderson, Charlotte; Fläckman, Birgitta; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Björklund, Karin; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Stenfors, Terese

    2018-03-01

    To explore how a student-run clinic (SRC) in primary health care (PHC) was perceived by students, patients and supervisors. A mixed methods study. Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher evaluation scale (CLES + T) assessed student satisfaction. Client satisfaction questionnaire-8 (CSQ-8) assessed patient satisfaction. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with supervisors. Gustavsberg PHC Center, Stockholm County, Sweden. Students in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and psychology and their patients filled in questionnaires. Supervisors in medicine, nursing and physiotherapy were interviewed. Mean values and medians of CLES + T and CSQ-8 were calculated. Interviews were analyzed using content analysis. A majority of 199 out of 227 student respondents reported satisfaction with the pedagogical atmosphere and the supervisory relationship. Most of the 938 patient respondents reported satisfaction with the care given. Interviews with 35 supervisors showed that the organization of the SRC provided time and support to focus on the tutorial assignment. Also, the pedagogical role became more visible and targeted toward the student's individual needs. However, balancing the student's level of autonomy and the own control over care was described as a challenge. Many expressed the need for further pedagogical education. High student and patient satisfaction reported from five disciplines indicate that a SRC in PHC can be adapted for heterogeneous student groups. Supervisors experienced that the SRC facilitated and clarified their pedagogical role. Simultaneously their need for continuous pedagogical education was highlighted. The SRC model has the potential to enhance student-centered tuition in PHC. Key Points Knowledge of student-run clinics (SRCs) as learning environments within standard primary health care (PHC) is limited. We report experiences from the perspectives of students, their patients and supervisors

  18. Baccalaureate Accounting Student Mentors' Social Representations of Their Mentorship Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Vicky; Brown, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Mentorship has been shown to enhance engagement, participation, and understanding of the workplace through the development of soft-skills and leadership capacity. This research identifies and describes the social representations of second and third year Baccalaureate accounting students relating to their experiences in mentoring first year…

  19. School Nurses' Experiences in Dealing with Bullying Situations among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozi, Pamela Lamarca; Jones Bartoli, Alice

    2016-01-01

    School nurses have an important role in helping students to deal with bullying. However, most of the previously undertaken studies do not have nurses as the subjects, considering their experiences around this theme. This study used a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses (SNs). The thematic analysis was employed…

  20. The Influence of Student Experiences on Post-Graduation Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Joe; Lye, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to establish the extent to which in-class teaching quality instruments can be used to predict post-graduation survey results. It examines the responses for the Good Teaching Scale of the Course Experience Questionnaire administered to 10,433 students who completed their studies at a major Australian tertiary institution from…

  1. Experiences of Chinese international students learning English at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to provide insight into the experiences of Chinese international students in some South African tertiary institutions. The study investigates their successes and failures in endeavouring to learn English and the culture shock and 'learning shock' they endure when registering to study in an African country with ...

  2. Student Conceptions of International Experience in the Study Abroad Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitwieser, Bernhard T.; Light, Gregory J.

    2018-01-01

    While much of recent study abroad research has focused on identifying and measuring different learning outcomes in terms of specific skills, competencies, perspectives and attributes acquired during study abroad opportunities, less research has considered how students' deeper conceptions and understandings of international experience may change…

  3. Acculturative Stress and Adjustment Experiences of Greek International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulakis, Mixalis; Dike, Craig A.; Massa, Amber C.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated eight Greek international college students' experiences of acculturation and acculturative stress at a mid-western university in the United States. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and Consensual Qualitative Research methodology was utilized for data analysis to identify contextual themes and…

  4. Students' Experiences with Community in an Open Access Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Stephanie J.; Cullen, Theresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Online open access courses have become regular offerings of many universities. Building community and connectedness is an important part of branding and success of such offerings. Our goal was to investigate students' experiences with community in an open access course. Therefore, in this study, we explored the sense of community of 342…

  5. Caring for Students with Type 1 Diabetes: School Nurses' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueh-Ling; Volker, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study used a Husserlian phenomenological approach to obtain an understanding of the essences of five experienced Taiwanese school nurses' lived experience of caring for students with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Audio-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis entailed a modified method from…

  6. The Psychosocial Experiences of a Student with Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anne L.; Duquette, Cheryll

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an in-depth case study of the psychosocial experiences of Eric, a student with low vision, who is enjoying social success in his neighborhood school. It explores the factors that contribute to Eric's social successes at school and in the community and presents a model for inclusion.

  7. Women Engineering Transfer Students: The Community College Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    An interpretative philosophical framework was applied to a case study to document the particular experiences and perspectives of ten women engineering transfer students who once attended a community college and are currently enrolled in one of two university professional engineering programs. This study is important because women still do not earn…

  8. Influence of Teachers' Teaching Experience on Students' Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 6 ... should encourage experienced teachers to stay on the job through the provision of incentives .... sampling technique. The instrument used to collect data was an inventory titled 'secondary schools teachers' teaching experience and students' learning .... Source: Statistics Division, Ministry of Education, Akure.

  9. Comparing the Impact of Two Internship Experiences on Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Janet

    1993-01-01

    Of 71 students in business or social service internships, 54 participated in systematic activities to integrate core curriculum with field experience. Opportunities for guided analysis and reflection enabled them to recognize curriculum relevance and develop empathy, interpersonal skills, awareness of politics, understanding of organizations, and…

  10. Experiences with "Acute" Food Insecurity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Luke; Harris, Frank, III

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to understand which racial/ethnic student groups experience food insecurity and the extent to which other external insecurities and challenges are predictive of acute food insecurity. Data were derived from the Community College Success Measure (CCSM), an institutional needs assessment tool used by colleges to examine challenges…

  11. Student teachers' experiences of a learning programme based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to explore student teachers' experiences of the content dimension of the essential features of technology and Technology Education in an OBE related learning programme. To achieve this, a learning programme was developed using criteria derived from these essential features. In gauging ...

  12. Differentiating Biochemistry Course Laboratories Based on Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2011-01-01

    Content and emphases in undergraduate biochemistry courses can be readily tailored to accommodate the standards of the department in which they are housed, as well as the backgrounds of the students in the courses. A more challenging issue is how to construct laboratory experiences for a class with both chemistry majors, who usually have little or…

  13. Japanese International Female Students' Experience of Discrimination, Prejudice, and Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzo, Claude; Wong, Y. Joel

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study examined four Japanese international female college students' experience of discrimination, prejudice, and stereotypes in a predominately white university. Four themes emerged from the analysis of data: (1) overt forms of prejudice and discrimination; (2) stereotypes common to Asians; (3) stereotypes unique to the Japanese;…

  14. Using Computer Games for Instruction: The Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Michael; Green, Richard; Nilsen, Trond; Thompson, David; Tomes, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Computer games are fun, exciting and motivational when used as leisure pursuits. But do they have similar attributes when utilized for educational purposes? This article investigates whether learning by computer game can improve student experiences compared with a more formal lecture approach and whether computer games have potential for improving…

  15. Students' Positive and Negative Experiences in Hybrid and Online Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mansour, Bassou; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2007-01-01

    As higher education institutions struggle to meet the growing demand for education from non-traditional students, many are turning to hybrid and online courses. These courses, free up classroom space, allow faculty to reach a wider audience using technology; and are therefore cost effective. But, what learning experiences do these courses provide…

  16. Students' Experience of University Space: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen a wave of new building across British universities, so that it would appear that despite the virtualization discourses around higher education, space still matters in learning. Yet studies of student experience of the physical space of the university are rather lacking. This paper explores the response of one group of…

  17. The Experiences and Needs of Transgender Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemyn, Genny

    2012-01-01

    The experiences and needs of college students who identify on the transgender spectrum (androgynous, gender nonconforming, genderqueer, transfeminine, transmaculine, transgender, etc.) have begun to be explored in recent years, but this work has largely been limited to four-year colleges and universities. Virtually no research has considered the…

  18. Memory and digit span experiment among psychology students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was an experiment that investigated short-term memory and digit span among the psychology students in a federal and state university in Lagos State, Nigeria. Memory is the process involved in retaining; retrieving and using information about stimuli, images, events, ideas and skills after original information was ...

  19. Agreed Discoveries: Students' Negotiations in a Virtual Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Goran; Ivarsson, Jonas; Lindstrom, Berner

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the scientific reasoning of a dyad of secondary school students about the phenomenon of dissolution of gases in water as they work on this in a simulated laboratory experiment. A web-based virtual laboratory was developed to provide learners with the opportunity to examine the influence of physical factors on gas…

  20. Teaching Experience in University Students Using Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántar, María del Rocío Carranza; Ballesteros, Nuria Salán; Torres, Claudia Islas; Padilla, Alma Azucena Jiménez; Barajas, Rosa Elena Legaspi

    2016-01-01

    Social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, are currently one of the most mainstream forms of media in the world. Yet, its educational use for the dissemination of knowledge is not significantly evident. Under this premise, this report is presented, considering an experience in which teachers and university-level students used these…

  1. Changes to the Student Loan Experience: Psychological Predictors and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study builds on the work of scholars who have explored psychological perceptions of the student loan experience. Survey analysis ("N" = 175) revealed a multidimensional model was developed through factor analysis and testing, which revealed four latent variables: "Duress," "Mandatory," "Financial," and…

  2. College Student Experiences Questionnaire: Norms for the Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Robert M.; Kish, Kelly A.; Kuh, George D.; Muthiah, Richard N.; Thomas, Auden D.

    2003-01-01

    The College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ) was developed by UCLA Professor Emeritus Dr. C. Robert Pace in the 1970s. First administered by Dr. Pace in 1979, the CSEQ Research Program formally moved its operations to Indiana University's Center for Postsecondary Research and Planning in 1994, under the direction of Chancellor's Professor…

  3. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism appears to be a common problem among college students, yet there is little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to minimize plagiarism. This study presents the results of a field experiment that evaluated the effects of a web-based educational tutorial in reducing plagiarism. We found that assignment to the treatment…

  4. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  5. Unpacking Gender Differences in Students' Perceived Experiences in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-11-01

    Prior research has shown, at our institution: 1) males outperform females on conceptual assessments (a gender gap), 2) the gender gap persists despite the use of research-based reforms, and 3) the gender gap is correlated with students' physics and mathematics background and prior attitudes and beliefs [Kost, et al. PRST-PER, 5, 010101]. Our follow-up work begins to explore how males and females experience the introductory course differently and how these differences relate to the gender gap. We gave a survey to students in the introductory course in which we investigated students' physics identity and self-efficacy. We find there are significant gender differences in each of these three areas, and further find that these measures are weakly correlated with student conceptual performance, and moderately correlated with course grade.

  6. Healthcare students' experiences of an interprofessional, student-led neuro-rehabilitation community-based clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Louise; Hutchinson, Laura; Theodoros, Deborah; Williams, Katrina; Copley, Anna; Fagan, Amy; Desha, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Student-led clinics are becoming more prominent as educators seek alternate models of clinical education for health professionals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate healthcare students' experiences of an interprofessional student-led clinic for clients with neurological conditions. Thirteen students representing occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and speech pathology were recruited for the study. A sequential mixed-methods evaluation was employed and the results from the Interprofessional Education Scale and focus group revealed that the students experienced positive perceptions of working collaboratively with other professions, forming good relationships with others, as well as an increased respect for the roles of other professions. The findings suggest that providing a capstone opportunity, where students can work as part of an interprofessional team with a real client, in a format they may come across in future clinical practice, may be beneficial in providing them with essential interprofessional skills as new graduate health professionals.

  7. University-Level Research Projects for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to provide an opportunity for high school students to participate in university-level research projects. In this case, students from Pinkerton Academy (Derry, New Hampshire) were invited to participate in efforts to catalog data from the COMPTEL experiment on NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These activities were part of a senior level honors course at Pinkerton. Although the success of this particular program was rather limited, we feel that the general concept is a sound one. In principle, the concept of partnerships between local schools and university researchers is one that could be especially attractive to soft money researchers. Programs can be carefully designed to benefit both the students and the research program.

  8. Astronomy: social background of students of the integrated high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, M. R.; Barbosa, J. I. L.

    2017-07-01

    Astronomy-related contents exist in almost all levels of basic education in Brazil and are also frequently disseminated through mass media. Thus, students form their own explanations about the phenomena studied by this science. Therefore, this work has the objective of identifying the possible social background of the Integrated High School students on the term Astronomy. It is a research of a basic nature, descriptive, and for that reason a quali-quantitative approach was adopted; the procedures to obtain the data were effected in the form of a survey. The results show that the tested students have a social background about the object Astronomy, which is on the one hand fortified by elements they have made or which is part of the experience lived by the respondents within the formal space of education, and on the other hand based on elements possibly disseminated through the mass media.

  9. Students' perceptions of a blended learning experience in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varthis, S; Anderson, O R

    2018-02-01

    "Flipped" instructional sequencing is a new instructional method where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking during the in-person class session; a novel approach studied in this research. The purpose of this study was to document dental students' perceptions of flipped-based blended learning and to apply a new method of displaying their perceptions based on Likert-scale data analysis using a network diagramming method known as an item correlation network diagram (ICND). In addition, this article aimed to encourage institutions or course directors to consider self-regulated learning and social constructivism as a theoretical framework when blended learning is incorporated in dental curricula. Twenty (second year) dental students at a Northeastern Regional Dental School in the United States participated in this study. A Likert scale was administered before and after the learning experience to obtain evidence of their perceptions of its quality and educational merits. Item correlation network diagrams, based on the intercorrelations amongst the responses to the Likert-scale items, were constructed to display students' changes in perceptions before and after the learning experience. Students reported positive perceptions of the blended learning, and the ICND analysis of their responses before and after the learning experience provided insights into their social (group-based) cognition about the learning experience. The ICNDs are considered evidence of social or group-based cognition, because they are constructed from evidence obtained using intercorrelations of the total group responses to the Likert-scale items. The students positively received blended learning in dental education, and the ICND analyses demonstrated marked changes in their social cognition of the learning experience based on the pre- and post-Likert survey data. Self-regulated learning and social constructivism

  10. Students' Perceptions of an Applied Research Experience in an Undergraduate Exercise Science Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Regis C; Crandall, K Jason; Dispennette, Kathryn; Maples, Jill M

    2017-01-01

    Applied research experiences can provide numerous benefits to undergraduate students, however few studies have assessed the perceptions of Exercise Science (EXS) students to an applied research experience. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to describe the rationale and implementation of an applied research experience into an EXS curriculum and 2) to evaluate EXS undergraduate students' perceptions of an applied research experience. An EXS measurement course was chosen for implementation of an applied research experience. The applied research experience required groups of students to design, implement, and evaluate a student-led research project. Fourteen questions were constructed, tailored to EXS undergraduate students, to assess students' perceptions of the experience. Qualitative analysis was used for all applicable data, with repeated trends noted; quantitative data were collapsed to determine frequencies. There was an overall positive student perception of the experience and 85.7% of students agreed an applied research experience should be continued. 84.7% of students perceived the experience as educationally enriching, while 92.8% reported the experience was academically challenging. This experience allowed students to develop comprehensive solutions to problems that arose throughout the semester; while facilitating communication, collaboration, and problem solving. Students believed research experiences were beneficial, but could be time consuming when paired with other responsibilities. Results suggest an applied research experience has the potential to help further the development of EXS undergraduate students. Understanding student perceptions of an applied research experience may prove useful to faculty interested in engaging students in the research process.

  11. The Climate Experiences of Students in Introductory Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón S. Barthelemy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding course climate is important for improving students’ experiences and increasing the likelihood of their persistence in STEM fields. This study presents climate survey results from 523 students taking introductory biology at the University of Michigan. Principal component analysis revealed that a student’s climate experience is comprised of five main elements: comfort, school avoidance, relationship to course, academic stress, and discomfort. Of these climate factors, comfort, school avoidance, and relationship to course were significant predictors of course satisfaction, and academic stress was a significant predictor of persistence. The results indicated the importance of a positive climate that is facilitated by the instructor in order to promote a positive student experience. Climate may be an important metric for institutions to track across time and course.

  12. Short-term, informal, and low-stakes scientific laboratory and field experiences improve STEM student retention and academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, C.; Pride, C. J.; Cox, T.

    2017-12-01

    Formal internship experiences strongly improve student success in the STEM fields. Classical programs like NSF's Research Experiences for Undergraduates are highly successful for traditional and non-traditional students. Moreover when early undergraduate and at-risk (e.g., low income, academically-challenged) students engage in these experiences, their career paths are re-enforced or changed, academic progress and retention improves, and they are encouraged to continue into graduate school. Students build connections to their course-based learning and experience the life of a working scientist. However, NSF formal experiences are relatively expensive to provide (>5000 per student per experience) and are available to fewer than 5% of geoscience majors each year. Although other funded formal internship opportunities exist, they are likely available to no more than 10% of total enrolled geoscience students. These high-quality programs cannot impact enough early undergraduate students to encourage their remaining in science and improve the current overall retention and graduation rates in the US. Savannah State University faculty successfully completed multiple grants funding low-stakes undergraduate field-science experiences. These short-term (semester to year), part-time (5-10h/week) experiences provide similar classroom-to-real-world science connections, offer students direct laboratory and field experiences, build skill sets, and provide a small source of revenue assisting financially-challenged students to stay on campus rather than seeking off-campus employment. For a much lower investment in time and grant resources (500-1500 per student per experience), participant graduation rates exceeded 80%, well above the university 27-34% graduation rate during the same time period. Relatively small infusions of research dollars targeting undergraduate experiences in the field and laboratory could significantly impact long-term student outcomes in STEM disciplines. These

  13. What students really learn: contrasting medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-08-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a framework of 'before', 'during' and 'after' clinical placements. Three major themes emerged from the analysis, contrasting the medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment: (1) expectations of the placement; (2) relationship with the supervisor; and (3) focus of learning. The findings offer an increased understanding of how medical and nursing students learn in the clinical setting; they also show that the clinical learning environment contributes to the socialisation process of students not only into their future profession, but also into their role as learners. Differences between the two professions should be taken into consideration when designing interprofessional learning activities. Also, the findings can be used as a tool for clinical supervisors in the reflection on how student learning in the clinical learning environment can be improved.

  14. Modeling a High Explosive Cylinder Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Marvin A.

    2017-06-01

    Cylindrical assemblies constructed from high explosives encased in an inert confining material are often used in experiments aimed at calibrating and validating continuum level models for the so-called equation of state (constitutive model for the spherical part of the Cauchy tensor). Such is the case in the work to be discussed here. In particular, work will be described involving the modeling of a series of experiments involving PBX-9501 encased in a copper cylinder. The objective of the work is to test and perhaps refine a set of phenomenological parameters for the Wescott-Stewart-Davis reactive burn model. The focus of this talk will be on modeling the experiments, which turned out to be non-trivial. The modeling is conducted using ALE methodology.

  15. Education of Social Skills among Senior High School Age Students in Physical Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelaitis, Arturas V.; Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2016-01-01

    Research aim was to reveal peculiarities of the education of social skills among senior high school age students in physical education classes. We hypothesized that after the end of the educational experiment the senior high school age students will have more developed social skills in physical education classes. Participants in the study were 51…

  16. A Positive Model for Reducing and Preventing School Burnout in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aypay, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to develop and test the validity of a model limited to attitude towards the future and subjective well-being for reducing and preventing the school burnout that high school students can experience. The study is designed as a relational screening model conducted over 389 high school students. The data in this study are analyzed…

  17. Improving Mathematical Communication Ability and Self Regulation Learning of Junior High Students by Using Reciprocal Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qohar, Abdul; Sumarmo, Utari

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a posttest experiment control group design by using reciprocal teaching, conducted in Indonesia University of Education to investigate students' ability in mathematical communication and self regulated learning. Subject of the study were 254 of 9th grade students from three junior high schools of high, medium,…

  18. Impact of audio-visual storytelling in simulation learning experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sandra; Parker, Christina N; Fox, Amanda

    2017-09-01

    Use of high fidelity simulation has become increasingly popular in nursing education to the extent that it is now an integral component of most nursing programs. Anecdotal evidence suggests that students have difficulty engaging with simulation manikins due to their unrealistic appearance. Introduction of the manikin as a 'real patient' with the use of an audio-visual narrative may engage students in the simulated learning experience and impact on their learning. A paucity of literature currently exists on the use of audio-visual narratives to enhance simulated learning experiences. This study aimed to determine if viewing an audio-visual narrative during a simulation pre-brief altered undergraduate nursing student perceptions of the learning experience. A quasi-experimental post-test design was utilised. A convenience sample of final year baccalaureate nursing students at a large metropolitan university. Participants completed a modified version of the Student Satisfaction with Simulation Experiences survey. This 12-item questionnaire contained questions relating to the ability to transfer skills learned in simulation to the real clinical world, the realism of the simulation and the overall value of the learning experience. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise demographic information. Two tailed, independent group t-tests were used to determine statistical differences within the categories. Findings indicated that students reported high levels of value, realism and transferability in relation to the viewing of an audio-visual narrative. Statistically significant results (t=2.38, psimulation to clinical practice. The subgroups of age and gender although not significant indicated some interesting results. High satisfaction with simulation was indicated by all students in relation to value and realism. There was a significant finding in relation to transferability on knowledge and this is vital to quality educational outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  19. Gamification of the Laboratory Experience to Encourage Student Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drace

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Microbiology (ASM Task Force on Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Microbiology Students published recommendations for introductory microbiology courses that suggest teaching specific skill sets in the laboratory beyond just fundamental knowledge and concepts of microbiology (6; however, students can sometimes view a skills-based laboratory experience as a task list of unrelated assignments to complete for a grade. Therefore, providing explicit connections throughout the lecture and laboratory exercises is critical for a truly integrated learning experience. Several pedagogical techniques can provide a coherent framework throughout a course. For example, case-based studies can connect lecture with laboratory skills and increase student engagement by applying newly developed knowledge and skills to tackle real-world simulations (2, 3. One reason that case-based studies succeed is that they can provide intrinsic motivations and an alternate purpose for students to engage with the material. A more recent trend in pedagogy involves using game design elements to increase student engagement and motivation. Gamification is the application of game design (accruing points or badges, reaching significant levels of accomplishment, or other reward elements in a non-game context to motivate or influence participation (1, 5. A natural extension of both of these methods is to gamify a case-based approach where a fictional scenario is presented for students to role-play as scientists using their developed skills to solve a complex problem. The typical microbiology laboratory, as described by the ASM Task Force, can easily incorporate game design elements without extensive modification of the exercises themselves. Instead, gamification involves structuring the lab in a way that gives the course a coherent and unified purpose. This ultimately allows the student to see how the principles and concepts of lecture and laboratory connect

  20. Physiotherapy students' perceptions and experiences of clinical prediction rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Grahame M; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Stanton, Tasha R; Kelly, David H; Vicenzino, Bill; Wand, Benedict M; Rivett, Darren A

    2017-09-01

    Clinical reasoning can be difficult to teach to pre-professional physiotherapy students due to their lack of clinical experience. It may be that tools such as clinical prediction rules (CPRs) could aid the process, but there has been little investigation into their use in physiotherapy clinical education. This study aimed to determine the perceptions and experiences of physiotherapy students regarding CPRs, and whether they are learning about CPRs on clinical placement. Cross-sectional survey using a paper-based questionnaire. Final year pre-professional physiotherapy students (n=371, response rate 77%) from five universities across five states of Australia. Sixty percent of respondents had not heard of CPRs, and a further 19% had not clinically used CPRs. Only 21% reported using CPRs, and of these nearly three-quarters were rarely, if ever, learning about CPRs in the clinical setting. However most of those who used CPRs (78%) believed CPRs assisted in the development of clinical reasoning skills and none (0%) was opposed to the teaching of CPRs to students. The CPRs most commonly recognised and used by students were those for determining the need for an X-ray following injuries to the ankle and foot (67%), and for identifying deep venous thrombosis (63%). The large majority of students in this sample knew little, if anything, about CPRs and few had learned about, experienced or practiced them on clinical placement. However, students who were aware of CPRs found them helpful for their clinical reasoning and were in favour of learning more about them. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancing the learning experience of student radiographers with dyslexia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Widening participation policies and increased awareness of dyslexia has resulted in a marked increase in the numbers of students with dyslexia being identified in higher education in recent years. This study was conducted to not only gain a greater understanding of teaching and learning strategies, but also provide opportunities for improved learning experiences and achievement of students who do not respond well to written forms of assessment. Although a small scale study, the outcomes demonstrate a useful pilot for future scrutiny and basis for further study

  2. Enhancing the learning experience of student radiographers with dyslexia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Irene [Cranfield University, Centre for Radiographic and Medical Studies, RMCS, Shrivenham, Swindon, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: irene.foster@uwe.ac.uk

    2008-02-15

    Widening participation policies and increased awareness of dyslexia has resulted in a marked increase in the numbers of students with dyslexia being identified in higher education in recent years. This study was conducted to not only gain a greater understanding of teaching and learning strategies, but also provide opportunities for improved learning experiences and achievement of students who do not respond well to written forms of assessment. Although a small scale study, the outcomes demonstrate a useful pilot for future scrutiny and basis for further study.

  3. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche

  4. Changes in Taiwanese nursing student values during the educational experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hua; Liching Sung Wang; Yarbrough, Susan; Alfred, Danita; Martin, Pam

    2010-09-01

    Professional values are standards for action and provide a framework for evaluating behavior. This study examined changes in the professional values of nursing students between their entrance to and graduation from an undergraduate nursing program. A pre- and post-test design was employed. A convenience sample of 94 students from a university in Taiwan was surveyed. Data were collected from students during the sophomore and senior years. Total scores obtained for the revised Nurses Professional Values Scale during the senior year of the nursing program were significantly higher than upon program entry. The 'caring' subscale was scored highest at both program entry and graduation, but the pre- and post-test scores were not significantly different from each other. The students scored significantly higher on the 'professionalism' and 'activism' subscales at post-test than they did at pre-test. Professional values changed in a positive direction between the beginning of the student nurses' educational experience and their graduation. The results supported the premise that education had a positive effect on these students' professional values but causality could not be assumed.

  5. Workplace violence against nursing students and nurses: an Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, Nicola; Heponiemi, Tarja

    2011-06-01

    Nurses and nursing students are exposed to workplace violence. To compare the characteristics and effects of violence in nursing students and nurses in order to assess the phenomenon and take preventive action. A retrospective survey was conducted in three Italian university schools of nursing. At the end of a lecture, 346 of 349 students agreed to fill out a questionnaire that included domains on violence, mental health, job stress, and organizational justice. This group was compared with 275 nurses from a general hospital (94.2% participation rate). The prevalence of subjects reporting at least one upsetting episode of physical or verbal violence during their lifetime activity in clinical settings was 43% in nurses and 34% in nursing students. Nurses reported more physical assaults (odds ratio [OR] 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-6.18), threats (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.39-5.79), and sexual harassment (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.15-5.54) during the previous 12 months than students. Nurses were mostly assaulted or harassed by patients or their relatives and friends ("external" violence), whereas students often reported verbal and also physical violence on the part of colleagues, staff, and others, including teachers, doctors, and supervisors ("internal" violence). Verbal violence was associated with high levels of psychological problems, as measured by the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire, in both students and nurses. Verbal violence was also associated with high job strain, low social support, and low organizational justice, but only among nursing students. Preventive action is urgently needed to control patient-to-worker and worker-to-worker violence in clinical settings. Not only nurses, but also nursing students, would benefit from multilevel programs of violence prevention. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. High energy collisions of nuclei: experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, H.H.

    1977-09-01

    Heavy-ion nuclear reactions with projectile energies up to 2.1 GeV/A are reviewed. The concept of ''rapidity'' is elucidated, and the reactions discussed are divided into sections dealing with target fragmentation, projectile fragmentation, and the intermediate region, with emphasis on the production of light nuclei in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Target fragmentation experiments using nuclear emulsion and AgCl visual track detectors are also summarized. 18 figures

  7. Triggers for a high sensitivity charm experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, D.C.

    1994-07-01

    Any future charm experiment clearly should implement an E T trigger and a μ trigger. In order to reach the 10 8 reconstructed charm level for hadronic final states, a high quality vertex trigger will almost certainly also be necessary. The best hope for the development of an offline quality vertex trigger lies in further development of the ideas of data-driven processing pioneered by the Nevis/U. Mass. group

  8. The student fieldwork experience: influencing factors and implications for learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Alan; Stokes, Alison

    2010-05-01

    Fieldwork has always been a crucial component of undergraduate geoscience degrees, yet our understanding of the learning processes that operate in a field environment is limited. Learning is a complex process, and there is increasing interest in the role played in this process by the affective domain, in particular the link between affect (emotion and attitude) and cognition (understanding). This presentation covers two UK-based studies that investigated the impact of residential geoscience fieldwork on students' affective responses (e.g. feelings, attitudes, motivations), and their subsequent learning outcomes; student affective responses are thought to be linked to the adoption of effective approaches to learning. The first study involved ~300 students from 7 UK universities undertaking residential field classes in, geography, earth and environmental sciences (GEES disciplines). Mixed-format surveys applied before and after fieldwork demonstrated significant effects in the affective domain. In general, student responses were very positive prior to fieldwork and became more positive as a result of the field experience. The data were analysed for any subgroup differences (gender, age, previous experience) but the only significant difference concerned levels of anxiety amongst some groups of students prior to fieldwork. However, post fieldwork surveys showed that the field experience mitigated these anxieties; for most it was not as bad as they thought it would be. This study demonstrated that fieldwork generated positive attitudes amongst students to their subject of study as well as development of ‘soft' interpersonal skills. The second study collected qualitative and quantitative data from 62 students at a single UK university before, during and after a nine day geologic mapping-training field course, a style of fieldwork not surveyed in the first study. As with the first study, pre-field class positive affects became strengthened, while negative feelings and

  9. A Phenomenographic Investigation of the Ways Engineering Students Experience Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fila, Nicholas David

    Innovation has become an important phenomenon in engineering and engineering education. By developing novel, feasible, viable, and valued solutions to complex technical and human problems, engineers support the economic competitiveness of organizations, make a difference in the lives of users and other stakeholders, drive societal and scientific progress, and obtain key personal benefits. Innovation is also a complex phenomenon. It occurs across a variety of contexts and domains, encompasses numerous phases and activities, and requires unique competency profiles. Despite this complexity, many studies in engineering education focus on specific aspects (e.g., engineering students' abilities to generate original concepts during idea generation), and we still know little about the variety of ways engineering students approach and understand innovation. This study addresses that gap by asking: 1. What are the qualitatively different ways engineering students experience innovation during their engineering projects? 2. What are the structural relationships between the ways engineering students experience innovation? This study utilized phenomenography, a qualitative research method, to explore the above research questions. Thirty-three engineering students were recruited to ensure thorough coverage along four factors suggested by the literature to support differences related to innovation: engineering project experience, academic major, year in school, and gender. Each participant completed a 1-2 hour, semi-structured interview that focused on experiences with and conceptions of innovation. Whole transcripts were analyzed using an eight-stage, iterative, and comparative approach meant to identify a limited number of categories of description (composite ways of experiencing innovation comprised of the experiences of several participants), and the structural relationships between these categories. Phenomenographic analysis revealed eight categories of description that were

  10. Introduction to nanotechnology: a short course for high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    This report devoted to presenting results of development and implementation of a short course (4 hours) entitled "Introduction to Nanotechnology" that was specially designed for familiarizing high school students with nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The course contains introduction to nanotechnology, essential definitions, short overview of history, descriptions for various examples of nanomaterials and their classifications, performing demonstration experiments. All these parts of the course are briefly analyzed from pedagogical effectiveness point of view. Finally, results of course testing, problems and perspectives of nano-oriented education at high school are also discussed shortly.

  11. Experiences of a student-run clinic in primary care: a mixed-method study with students, patients and supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Maria; Leanderson, Charlotte; Fläckman, Birgitta; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Björklund, Karin; Nilsson, Gunnar H.; Stenfors, Terese

    2018-01-01

    experiences from the perspectives of students, their patients and supervisors, representing five healthcare disciplines. Students particularly valued the pedagogical atmosphere and the supervisory relationship. Patients expressed high satisfaction with the care provided. Supervisors expressed that the structure of the SRC supported the pedagogical assignment and facilitated student-centered tuition – simultaneously the altered learning environment highlighted the need for further pedagogical education. Student-run clinics in primary health care have great potential for student-regulated learning. PMID:29368978

  12. Instant messaging and nursing students' clinical learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Brühlmann, Florian; Odetola, Titilayo Dorothy; Dipeolu, Oluwafemi; Gröhbiel, Urs; Ajuwon, Ademola J

    2018-05-01

    Although learning in clinical settings is a key element of nursing education, for many learners these are challenging developmental contexts often marked by isolation and a lack of belongingness. Despite the massive appropriation of mobile instant messaging (MIM) platforms and the connective properties attendant to them, very little is known about their role in and impact on nursing students' clinical learning experiences. To address this gap, the study, which was part of a multinational research project on the use of mobile social media in health professions education in developing countries, examined the use of the instant messaging platform WhatsApp by nursing students during placements and potential associations with socio-professional indicators. The survey involved a total number of 196 nursing students from 5 schools in Oyo State, Nigeria. The findings suggest that students used WhatsApp relatively frequently and they perceived that this platform strongly enhanced their communication with other students and nurses. WhatsApp use during placements was positively associated with students' maintained social capital with peer students, the development of a professional identity, placement satisfaction and with reduced feelings of isolation from professional communities. The determinants that influenced WhatsApp use during placements were perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. No associations were found between WhatsApp use during placement and age, attitude, subjective norms and placement duration. This study is one of the first of its kind that points to the relevance of mobile instant messaging as part of nursing students' (inter)personal learning environments in clinical settings and, particularly, in the development setting under investigation. Further research is needed to corroborate these findings, to enhance the understanding of the impact mechanisms, and to evaluate a more systematic use of MIM in clinical learning contexts. Copyright © 2018

  13. Assertiveness levels of nursing students who experience verbal violence during practical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sati; Hisar, Filiz; Görgülü, Ulkü

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate students' verbal violence experiences, the effect of assertiveness on being subjected to violence, the behaviour of students after the violence and the experience of psychological distress during practical training. The study sample consisted of 274 students attending a school of nursing. A questionnaire form and the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS) were used for data collection. Percentages, means and the independent samples t-test were used for the evaluation of data. During practical training, the students suffered verbal violence from teachers, department nurses and doctors. The students had higher mean scores of RAS for most types of violence committed by the teachers and being reprimanded by the nurses and 69.3% had not responded to the violence. Students with a high level of assertiveness are subjected to violence more frequently. Being subjected to verbal violence and feeling psychological distress during practical training are a major problem among nursing students. Students should be supported in terms of assertiveness and dealing with violence effectively.

  14. Teaching Experiences for Graduate Student Researchers: A Study of the Design and Implementation of Science Courses for Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anne Wrigley

    Modern science education reform recommends that teachers provide K-12 science students a more complete picture of the scientific enterprise, one that lies beyond content knowledge and centers more on the processes and culture of scientists. In the case of Research Experience for Teachers (RET) programs, the "teacher" becomes "researcher" and it is expected that he/she will draw from the short-term science research experience in his/her classroom, offering students more opportunities to practice science as scientists do. In contrast, this study takes place in a program that allows graduate students, engaged in research full-time, to design and implement a short-duration course for high school students on Saturdays; the "researcher" becomes "teacher" in an informal science program. In this study, I investigated eleven graduate students who taught in the Saturday Science (SS) program. Analyses revealed participants' sophisticated views of the nature of science. Furthermore, participants' ideas about science clearly resonated with the tenets of NOS recommended for K-12 education (McComas et al., 1998). This study also highlighted key factors graduate students considered when designing lessons. Instructors took great care to move away from models of traditional, "lecture"-based, university science teaching. Nonetheless, instruction lacked opportunities for students to engage in scientific inquiry. In instances when instructors included discussions of NOS in SS courses, opportunities for high school students to learn NOS were not explicit enough to align with current science reform recommendations (e.g., AAAS, 2009). Graduate students did, however, offer high school students access to their own science or engineering research communities. These findings have significant implications for K-12 classroom reform. Universities continue to be a valuable resource for K-12 given access to scientists, materials or equipment, and funding. Nonetheless, and as was the case with

  15. Students teaching students: evaluation of a "near-peer" teaching experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, David M; Conrad, Miles; Nguyen, Janet; Kohi, Maureen P; Webb, Emily M

    2013-09-01

    Teaching is an important skill. Academic physicians teach on a daily basis, and nearly all physicians occasionally teach colleagues and patients. There are generally few opportunities for medical students to learn teaching skills. We developed a novel "near-peer" teaching program in which fourth-year students cotaught first-year students. Eighteen fourth-year students enrolled in our institution's primary senior radiology elective learned the basics of ultrasound through a series of lectures and hands-on scanning sessions. Each fourth-year student, paired with a radiology resident or attending, then cotaught a first-year anatomy small group session. After instruction, voluntary surveys were administered to assess the perceived value of the "near-peer" teaching experience. Seventeen of 18 (94%) and 104 of 120 (87%) administered surveys were returned by fourth- and first-year students, respectively. Sixteen (94%) and 99 (95%) of the fourth- and first-year students reported they "enjoyed" or "really enjoyed" the near-peer teaching experience. Fourteen (82%) of the fourth years perceived improvement in their teaching skills and an increase in their knowledge. Only 8 (47%) of the fourth years thought they were "helpful" or "very helpful," though 92 (88%) of the first years identified their fourth-year co-instructors as "helpful" or "very helpful." We piloted a novel "near-peer" program. Both senior and freshman students enjoyed the experience, and fourth years thought the session was educational for them as well. Although most fourth years did not judge themselves as helpful, first-year students overwhelmingly considered them a useful addition to the session. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. UNH Project SMART 2017: Space Science for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Broad, L.; Goelzer, S.; Levergood, R.; Lugaz, N.; Moebius, E.

    2017-12-01

    Every summer for the past 26 years the University of New Hampshire (UNH) has run a month-long, residential outreach program for high school students considering careers in mathematics, science, or engineering. Space science is one of the modules. Students work directly with UNH faculty performing original work with real spacecraft data and hardware and present the results of that effort at the end of the program. This year the student research projects used data from the Messenger, STEREO, and Triana missions. In addition, the students build and fly a high-altitude balloon payload with instruments of their own construction. Students learn circuit design and construction, microcontroller programming, and core atmospheric and space science along with fundamental concepts in space physics and engineering. Our payload design has evolved significantly since the first flight of a simple rectangular box and now involves a stable descent vehicle that does not require a parachute. Our flight hardware includes an on-board flight control computer, in-flight autonomous control and data acquisition of multiple student-built instruments, and real-time camera images sent to ground. This year we developed, built and flew a successful line cutter based on GPS location information that prevents our payload from falling into the ocean while also separating the payload from the balloon remains for a cleaner descent. We will describe that new line cutter design and implementation along with the shielded Geiger counters that we flew as part of our cosmic ray air shower experiment. This is a program that can be used as a model for other schools to follow and that high schools can initiate. More information can be found at .

  17. U.S.-Based Short-Term Public Health Cultural Immersion Experience for Chinese Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Dorothy Lewis; Biederman, Donna J.

    2017-01-01

    A U.S. and Chinese university developed a short-term student exchange program in public/community health. The program--which consisted of lectures, seminars, field trips, cross-cultural experiences, and a synthesis excursion--resulted in high levels of program satisfaction, increased intrapersonal awareness, and skill acquisition. Program content…

  18. The Experiences of Incoming Transgender College Students: New Data on Gender Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Ellen Bara; Hughes, Bryce

    2017-01-01

    According to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, transgender students in K-12 settings experience high rates of harassment (78 percent), physical assault (35 percent), and even sexual violence (12 percent). In response to the mounting evidence of discrimination, the Obama administration in May 2016 issued a "Dear Colleague"…

  19. Elementary Teacher Assessments of Principal Servant Leadership, Their Experience with Team Learning and Student Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This study compared teacher assessments of principal servant leadership and their experience with team learning in high, moderate, and low student academic achieving elementary schools. The participants were from fifteen moderate need elementary schools located in southern New York State counties. One hundred sixty two teachers responded to a 36…

  20. Enhancing the Student Experience through Service Design: The University of Derby Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Polina; Morrison, Sue; Mutton, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The student experience in higher education is firmly placed at the top of the strategic agenda for the majority of higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK at present. In the current climate of public cuts, universities increasingly have to strike a delicate balance between cost efficiencies and delivery of the high-quality university…

  1. The Relationship of Motivation and Flow Experience to Academic Procrastination in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunju

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author examined the relationships of motivation and flow experience to academic procrastination in 262 Korean undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire on procrastination, flow, and motivation. The results indicated that high procrastination was associated with lack of self-determined motivation and low incidence of…

  2. Sexual harassment victimization and perpetration among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clear, Emily R; Coker, Ann L; Cook-Craig, Patricia G; Bush, Heather M; Garcia, Lisandra S; Williams, Corrine M; Lewis, Alysha M; Fisher, Bonnie S

    2014-10-01

    This large, population-based study is one of the few to examine prevalence rates of sexual harassment occurring during the past 12 months by victimization and perpetration among adolescents. In this large, cross-sectional survey of students attending 26 high schools, sexual harassment was defined using three questions from the Sexual Experiences Questionnaire. Among 18,090 students completing the survey, 30% disclosed sexual harassment victimization (37% of females, 21% of males) and 8.5% reported perpetration (5% of females, 12% of males). Sexual harassment perpetration was highly correlated with male sex, minority race/ethnicity, same-sex attraction, bullying, alcohol binge drinking, and intraparental partner violence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Crossing the threshold: students' experiences of the transition from student to staff nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Draper, Janet; Sparrow, Shelagh; Gallagher, Donna

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning-funded project exploring the experience of student nurses making the transition from student to qualified nurse. \\ud \\ud The transition from student to staff nurse ‘is a common rite of passage that marks the end of initial educational preparation in the discipline and the beginning of the professional journey as a nurse’ (Nash et al, 2009: 49). However, the extent to which newly qualified staff nurses are abl...

  4. The experiences of African American graduate students: A cultural transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joretta

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) have long been an intellectual resource for the African American community. HBCUs have provided and continue to provide an educational pathway for many Black students, particularly women who seek graduate and advanced degrees. However, despite the overwhelmingly positive presence of HBCU in the African American community, the academic training of students who graduate from HBCUs may be perceived as insufficient by predominantly White graduate institutions (PWIs). As a result, African American students who are not well integrated into their respective departmental communities and cultures at PW/is are likely to leave graduate school. Thus the continuing loss of talented people, potential research, role models for society, and the next generation of African American students in the fields of math, engineering, and the sciences (STEM) create a segregated and limited university environment. Studies in the field that attempt to provide insight in to experiences of underrepresented students are ultimately beneficial. However, often such studies do not address the process of adapting to the culture of a predominantly white institution (PWI), particularly within white and male dominated fields such as mathematics and the sciences. Research has also indicated that the first two years at a predominantly white graduate institution is the crucial transitional period for students of color, and it is this transitional moment in time that is the focus of this study. I consider how students make the transition from HBCU to majority institutions, and what impact this transition has on their persistence and commitment to their discipline. The limited amount of research that does address the experiences of minority doctoral students in math and science is usually coupled with the experiences of women. However, race and gender are not linear or additive. It cannot be assumed that the same factors that effect the under representation

  5. Examining students' views about validity of experiments: From introductory to Ph.D. students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dehui; Zwickl, Benjamin M.

    2018-06-01

    We investigated physics students' epistemological views on measurements and validity of experimental results. The roles of experiments in physics have been underemphasized in previous research on students' personal epistemology, and there is a need for a broader view of personal epistemology that incorporates experiments. An epistemological framework incorporating the structure, methodology, and validity of scientific knowledge guided the development of an open-ended survey. The survey was administered to students in algebra-based and calculus-based introductory physics courses, upper-division physics labs, and physics Ph.D. students. Within our sample, we identified several differences in students' ideas about validity and uncertainty in measurement. The majority of introductory students justified the validity of results through agreement with theory or with results from others. Alternatively, Ph.D. students frequently justified the validity of results based on the quality of the experimental process and repeatability of results. When asked about the role of uncertainty analysis, introductory students tended to focus on the representational roles (e.g., describing imperfections, data variability, and human mistakes). However, advanced students focused on the inferential roles of uncertainty analysis (e.g., quantifying reliability, making comparisons, and guiding refinements). The findings suggest that lab courses could emphasize a variety of approaches to establish validity, such as by valuing documentation of the experimental process when evaluating the quality of student work. In order to emphasize the role of uncertainty in an authentic way, labs could provide opportunities to iterate, make repeated comparisons, and make decisions based on those comparisons.

  6. Students' experiences of embedded academic literacy support in a graduate entry nursing program: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Maneze, Della; Everett, Bronwyn; Glew, Paul; Trajkovski, Suza; Lynch, Joan; Salamonson, Yenna

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry nursing (GEN) programs were designed to address the predicted nursing shortfall. In Australia, although these programs attract students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, the workload is compounded by cultural differences and a new academic learning environment which presents additional challenges. This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of GEN students enrolled in the introductory unit of their nursing program with embedded academic literacy support in Sydney, Australia. Twenty-four commencing GEN students were interviewed in January 2016. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Three main themes emerged which illustrated that GEN students were 'diamonds in the rough'. They possessed a raw natural beauty that required some shaping and polishing to ensure academic needs were met. To ensure retention is high, institutions need to evaluate how best to support and harness the potential of these unique students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  8. High Foot Implosion Experiments in Rugby Hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Joseph; Leidinger, J.-P.; Callahan, D.; Kaiser, P.; Morice, O.; Marion, D.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Strozzi, D.; Hinkel, D.; Michel, P.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Khan, S.; Rygg, R.; Hurricane, O.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Team; CEA/DAM Team

    2015-11-01

    The rugby hohlraum design is aimed at providing uniform x-ray drive on the capsule while minimizing the need for crossed beam energy transfer (CBET). As part of a series of experiments at the NIF using rugby hohlraums, design improvements in dual axis shock tuning experiments produced some of the most symmetric shocks measured on implosion experiments at the NIF. Additionally, tuning of the in-flight shell and hot spot shape have demonstrated that capsules can be tuned between oblate and prolate with measured velocities of nearly 340 km/s. However, these experimental measurements were accompanied by high levels of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) that may result from the long inner beam path length, reamplification of the inner SRS by the outers, significant (CBET) or a combination of these. All rugby shots results were achieved with lower levels of hot electrons that can preheat the DT fuel layer for increased adiabat and reduced areal density. Detailed results from these experiments and those planned throughout the summer will be presented and compared with results obtained from cylindrical hohlraums. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Lab under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Dental Student Hand Hygiene Decreased With Increased Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaembut, Nanmanas; Ampornaramveth, Ruchanee S; Pisarnturakit, Pagaporn P; Subbalekha, Keskanya

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness, related knowledge, attitudes, and practices of hand hygiene (HH) among dental students with different levels of clinical experience. This was a cross-sectional analytical study. Bacterial samples on the participants' hands were obtained using a swab technique before and after handwashing, for oral surgical procedures. After culturing, the colony-forming units were counted. Self-reported questionnaires reflecting the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to HH were completed by the participants. This study was performed in a primary oral health care institution, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok, Thailand). Bacterial samples and self-reported questionnaires were collected in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Bacterial culture was performed in the Department of Microbiology. The 120 participants comprised first, second, third-year clinical training students (CTs), and postgraduate dental students (PGs) (32, 34, 30, and 24 participants, respectively). More than 99% of the bacteria were eliminated from the participants' hands after handwashing. Significantly higher numbers of bacteria were recovered from the hands of the PGs compared with those of the CTs, and the hands of the third-year CTs compared with those of the first-year CTs (p < 0.001), after HH. The first-year CTs had the highest attitude scores, whereas the PGs had the lowest practice scores. The knowledge scores were similar in all groups. HH effectiveness, attitudes, and practices of dental students decreased as students gained more clinical experience, whereas knowledge did not. Our results suggest that HH instruction should be given throughout the duration of dental students' education. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The SWOOPE experience: Precollege students mapping the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhardt, R.C.; Hyer, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    SWOOPE (Students Watching Over Our Planet Earth) is an innovative environmental science education program for teachers and students sponsored by the Department of Energy and developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The students, kindergarten through high school, gather data on an item of concern in the environment and send some of those data to a database at Los Alamos. Discussions and graphs of their results are sent back to them in newsletters. One of the key ideas of the program i s to involve the students in the process of science. They learn how to gather the data through a variety of hands-on science activities in the classroom and then take the measuring devices home to gather data in their own environment. Frequently, this involves their parents in the process as well. Although the measuring devices are usually simple and inexpensive, they are true scientific instruments, capable of gathering meaningful data. The collected data are available to scientists, agencies, and the community at large. Thus, the students participate in a truly collaborative scientific effort. Two SWOOPE Discovery Units, Water Quality and Radiation and Radon, were developed by teachers at summer institutes and have been piloted in the classroom over a two-year period. Currently, 112 teachers and almost 5000 students are using the materials. Data collected by students in the Radiation and Radon Unit include radon measurements and background measurements of ionizing radiation. The. student data on radon are being used b a study of home radon levels in New Mexico by the New Mexico Environment Department. Students in the Water Quality Unit are gathering data on city, ground and surface water that should also prove useful to environmental scientists. The water measurements include pH, temperature, turbidity, hardness, and the concentrations of nitrates, chlorine, and coliform bacteria

  11. EARTHTIME: Teaching geochronology to high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, Britta; Buchwaldt, Robert; McLean, Noah; Rioux, Matthew; Bowring, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    The authors taught an educational module developed as part of the EARTHTIME (www.earth-time.org) outreach initiative to 215 high school students from a Massachusetts (USA) High School as part of an "out-of-school" field trip. The workshop focuses on uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating of zircons and its application to solving a geological problem. The theme of our 2.5-hour module is the timing of the K-T boundary and a discussion of how geochronology can be used to evaluate the two main hypotheses for the cause of the concurrent extinction—the Chicxlub impact and the massive eruption of the Deccan Traps. Activities are divided into three parts: In the first part, the instructors lead hands-on activities demonstrating how rock samples are processed to isolate minerals by their physical properties. Students use different techniques, such as magnetic separation, density separation using non-toxic heavy liquids, and mineral identification with a microscope. We cover all the steps from sampling an outcrop to determining a final age. Students also discuss geologic features relevant to the K-T boundary problem and get the chance to examine basalts, impact melts and meteorites. In the second part, we use a curriculum developed for and available on the EARTHTIME website (http://www.earth-time.org/Lesson_Plan.pdf). The curriculum teaches the science behind uranium-lead dating using tables, graphs, and a geochronology kit. In this module, the students start by exploring the concepts of half-life and exponential decay and graphically solving the isotopic decay equation. Manipulating groups of double-sided chips labeled with U and Pb isotopes reinforces the concept that an age determination depends on the Pb/U ratio, not the absolute number of atoms present. Next, the technique's accuracy despite loss of parent and daughter atoms during analysis, as well as the use of isotopic ratios rather than absolute abundances, is explained with an activity on isotope dilution. Here the students

  12. Connecting High School Physics Experiences, Outcome Expectations, Physics Identity, and Physics Career Choice: A Gender Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how students' physics identities are shaped by their experiences in high school physics classes and by their career outcome expectations. The theoretical framework focuses on physics identity and includes the dimensions of student performance, competence, recognition by others, and interest. Drawing data from the Persistence…

  13. Teaching experience in university students using social networks

    OpenAIRE

    María del Rocío Carranza Alcántar; Nuria Salán Ballesteros; Claudia Islas Torres; Alma Azucena Jiménez Padilla; Rosa Elena Legaspi Barajas

    2016-01-01

    Social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, are currently one of the mainstream media in the world, yet its educational use for the dissemination of knowledge is not significantly evident, under this premise this report is presented, considering an experience in which teachers and university-level students used these networks as mediators of educational practices; such mediation was implemented in order to promote mobile learning as an option to facilitate the process of construction ...

  14. Language proficiency and the international postgraduate student experience

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, M

    2016-01-01

    In an increasingly competitive environment, with reduced government funding, full fee-paying international students are an important source of revenue for higher education institutions (HEIs). Although many previous studies have focused on the role of English language proficiency on academic success, there is little known about the extent to which levels of English language proficiency affect these non-native English speaking students’ overall course experience. There have been a wealth of st...

  15. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources.

  16. Exploring the experiences and coping strategies of international medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malau-Aduli Bunmi S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have addressed the challenges that international medical students face and there is a dearth of information on the behavioural strategies these students adopt to successfully progress through their academic program in the face of substantial difficulties of language barrier, curriculum overload, financial constraints and assessment tasks that require high proficiency in communication skills. Methods This study was designed primarily with the aim of enhancing understanding of the coping strategies, skill perceptions and knowledge of assessment expectations of international students as they progress through the third and fourth years of their medical degree at the School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Australia. Results Survey, focus group discussion and individual interviews revealed that language barriers, communication skills, cultural differences, financial burdens, heavy workloads and discriminatory bottlenecks were key factors that hindered their adaptation to the Australian culture. Quantitative analyses of their examination results showed that there were highly significant (p Conclusions Despite the challenges, these students have adopted commendable coping strategies and progressed through the course largely due to their high sense of responsibility towards their family, their focus on the goal of graduating as medical doctors and their support networks. It was concluded that faculty needs to provide both academic and moral support to their international medical students at three major intervention points, namely point of entry, mid way through the course and at the end of the course to enhance their coping skills and academic progression. Finally, appropriate recommendations were made.

  17. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmair, Felix, E-mail: bachmair@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-09-21

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  18. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.

  19. Virtual neutron scattering experiments - Training and preparing students for large-scale facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hougaard Overgaard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dansk Vi beskriver, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter kan udnyttes i et læringsdesign ved at forberede de studerende til hands-on-eksperimenter ved storskalafaciliteter. Vi illustrerer designet ved at vise, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter bruges på Niels Bohr Institutets kandidatkursus om neutronspredning. I den sidste uge af kurset, rejser studerende til et storskala neutronspredningsfacilitet for at udføre neutronspredningseksperimenter. Vi bruger studerendes udsagn om deres oplevelser til at argumentere for, at arbejdet med virtuelle experimenter forbereder de studerende til at engagere sig mere frugtbart med eksperimenter ved at lade dem fokusere på fysikken og relevante data i stedet for instrumenternes funktion. Vi hævder, at det er, fordi de kan overføre deres erfaringer med virtuelle eksperimenter til rigtige eksperimenter. Vi finder dog, at læring stadig er situeret i den forstand, at kun kendskab til bestemte eksperimenter overføres. Vi afslutter med at diskutere de muligheder, som virtuelle eksperimenter giver. English We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering. In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred. We proceed to

  20. Effect of Physical Therapy Students' Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivko, Susan E; Abbruzzese, Laurel D; Duttaroy, Pragati; Hansen, Ruth L; Ryans, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Physical therapy clinical education experiences (CEEs) are difficult to secure, particularly first-level CEEs. Our purpose was to determine 1) what impact student full-time CEEs have on PT clinician productivity and 2) whether there is a productivity difference between first vs final CEEs. Productivity logs, including possible factors impacting productivity, were distributed to clinician-student pairings on first and final CEEs. Two-week baseline data (without a student) were compared to weeks 1 and 6 (with a student) for 31 logs using a 2x4 repeated-measures ANOVA. In a subset of 17 logs for CEEs 8 weeks or longer, a 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. There was a significant increase in the number of patients seen and CPT units billed by both levels of CEEs comparing weeks 1 and 6. In the subset of CEEs, 8 weeks or longer, there was a significant increase in the number of patients treated per hour at week 6 and a trend toward a change at week 8 when compared to baseline week A. The factors selected as impacting productivity were census (59%) and staffing (32%). Physical therapy clinician-student pairings showed an overall increase in productivity during both full-time first and final level CEEs.

  1. Undergraduate Neuropharmacology: A Model for Delivering College-Level Neuroscience to High School Students in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Morris, Linda E; Buckland, Helen T; Popa, Simina M; Cunningham, Susanna L

    2015-01-01

    Our university course for non-majors (Biology 100) on the neurobiology of drug addiction was recently retooled for delivery at high schools around the state of Washington in order to engage younger students in the study of psychoactive drugs. Many of these students are earning both high school and university credits (dual-enrollment). This paper outlines the course design principles we used to ensure that high school students are earning valid college credits. We present an analysis of learning gains experienced by both university and high school students as measured by before and after course knowledge surveys. We also describe how assessment strategies used for on-campus students have been transferred to our high school partner teachers and how generous interchange and observation ensure that the high school students are engaging deeply in their study of neuroscience. Indeed, many have had a transformative experience that inspires them to contemplate the field of neuroscience as they transition into university study.

  2. Psychotic-like Experiences and Substance Use in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Paino, Mercedes; Muñiz, José

    2016-03-02

    Psychotic disorders, as well as psychotic-like experiences and substance use, have been found to be associated. The main goal of the present study was to analyse the relationship between psychoticlike experiences and substance use in college students. The simple comprised a total of 660 participants (M = 20.3 years, SD = 2.6). The results showed that 96% of the sample reported some delusional experience, while 20.3% reported at least one positive psychotic-like experience. Some substance use was reported by 41.1% of the sample, differing in terms of gender. Substance users reported more psychoticlike experiences than non-users, especially in the positive dimension. Also, alcohol consumption predicted in most cases extreme scores on measures of delusional ideation and psychotic experiences. The association between these two variables showed a differentiated pattern, with a stronger relationship between substance use and cognitive-perceptual psychotic-like experiences. To some extent, these findings support the dimensional models of the psychosis phenotype and contribute a better understanding of the links between psychoticlike experiences and substance use in young adults. Future studies should further explore the role of different risk factors for psychotic disorders and include models of the gene-environment interaction.

  3. Reactor G1: high power experiments; Experiences a forte puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laage, F de; Teste du Baillet, A; Veyssiere, A; Wanner, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Retel, H [Societe Rateau, D.E.A. (France)

    1957-07-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  4. Dietetics students' perceptions and experiences of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earland, J; Gilchrist, M; McFarland, L; Harrison, K

    2011-04-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is a process through which students are provided with learning opportunities with other professions aiming to improve client care. The need to include effective IPE in preregistration programmes for health professionals is increasingly being recognised. The overall aim of the present study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of final-year dietetics students of IPE delivered through interactive online learning groups. A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the students' satisfaction with the IPE modules, including importance to their clinical placements, and their understanding of the roles of other professions. Six dietetics students took part in a focus group that addressed the impact of participating in the IPE modules. The focus group discussion was recorded, transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Twenty students completed the questionnaire (77% of the cohort). Satisfaction with the IPE modules increased as the programme progressed, with 65%, 90% and 95% of the respondents, respectively, being satisfied with the content, assessment and access of the final module. Participating in the programme enhanced the students' opinions on the value of the roles of other professionals (80%) and enhanced their awareness of interprofessional issues (75%). Four key areas of interest emerged from the focus group analysis: key impressions; understanding the role of the dietitian and other professionals; the advantages and disadvantages of online delivery; and interprofessional working in the work environment. The most important outcome of participating in IPE was that students' knowledge of other professions was enhanced, which had a positive impact on placements. An effective information technology infrastructure and appropriate scenarios are key requirements for the online delivery of IPE. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Students helping students: vertical peer mentoring to enhance the medical school experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Christine; Deerin, Jessica; Leykum, Luci

    2017-05-02

    Effective mentoring is an important component of medical student professional development. We provide a description of the mentoring program at our institution. Our institution UTHSCSA implemented a student-advising program (Veritas) with clinical faculty mentors and senior students (MiMs). The MiMs provided vertical peer mentoring to more junior students as an adjunct to faculty advising. The MiMs lead small group discussions that foster camaraderie, share academic and career information and promote professional identity. An optional MiM elective more intensively develops mentorship and leadership skills through a formal curriculum. The authors used annual survey data of all students as well as student mentors to evaluate program effectiveness. Overall, student perception of the program improved each year across multiple domains, including feeling more prepared, supported and satisfied with their overall experience in medical school. Student mentors also found the process rewarding and helpful to their future careers as physicians. The authors suggest implementing a vertical peer-mentoring program can be an effective adjunct to faculty mentoring.

  6. Associations among bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Sheri; Toomey, Russell B; Walker, Jenny L

    2013-04-01

    This study examined associations among depression, suicidal behaviors, and bullying and victimization experiences in 1491 high school students using data from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Results demonstrated that depression mediated the association between bullying/victimization and suicide attempts, but differently for males and females. Specifically, depression mediated the link between traditional victimization and suicide attempts similarly across gender, whereas depression mediated the link between cyber victimization and suicide attempts only for females. Similarly, depression mediated the link between traditional bullying and suicide attempts for females only. Depression did not mediate the link between cyberbullying and suicide attempts for either gender. Implications of the findings are discussed, including the importance of greater detection of depression among students involved in bullying, and the need for a suicide prevention and intervention component in anti-bullying programs. Findings suggest that bullying prevention efforts be extended from middle school students to include high school students. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High current beam transport experiments at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klabunde, J.; Schonlein, A.; Spadtke, P.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the high current ion beam transport experiment is reported. 190 keV Ar 1+ ions were injected into six periods of a magnetic quadrupole channel. Since the pulse length is > 0.5 ms partial space charge neutralization occurs. In our experiments, the behavior of unneutralized and partially space charge compensated beams is compared. With an unneutralized beam, emittance growth has been measured for high intensities even in case of the zero-current phase advance sigma 0 0 . This initial emittance growth at high tune depression we attribute to the homogenization effect of the space charge density. An analytical formula based on this assumption describes the emittance growth very well. Furthermore the predicted envelope instabilities for sigma 0 > 90 0 were observed even after 6 periods. In agreement with the theory, unstable beam transport was also experimentally found if a beam with different emittances in the two transverse phase planes was injected into the transport channel. Although the space charge force is reduced for a partially neutralized beam a deterioration of the beam quality was measured in a certain range of beam parameters. Only in the range where an unneutralized beam shows the initial emittance growth, the partial neutralization reduces this effect, otherwise the partially neutralized beam is more unstable

  8. A longitudinal online interprofessional education experience involving family nurse practitioner students and pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrea; Broeseker, Amy; Cunningham, Jill; Cortes, Cyndi; Beall, Jennifer; Bigham, Amy; Chang, Jongwha

    2017-03-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) continues to gain traction worldwide. Challenges integrating IPE into health profession programmes include finding convenient times, meeting spaces, and level-appropriate assignments for each profession. This article describes the implementation of a 21-month prospective cohort study pilot programme for the Master of Science in nursing family nurse practitioner (FNP) and doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at a private university in the United States. This IPE experience utilised a blended approach for the learning activities; these students had initial and final sessions where they met face-to-face, with asynchronous online activities between these two sessions. The online assignments, discussions, and quizzes during the pilot programme involved topics such as antimicrobial stewardship, hormone replacement therapy, human papilloma virus vaccination, prenatal counselling, emergency contraception, and effects of the Affordable Care Act on practice. The results suggested that the FNP students held more favourable attitudes about online IPE and that the PharmD students reported having a clearer understanding of their own roles and those of the other participating healthcare students. However, the students also reported wanting more face-to-face interaction during their online IPE experience. Implications from this study suggest that effective online IPE can be supported by ensuring educational parity between students regarding the various topics discussed and a consistent approach of the required involvement for all student groups is needed. In addition, given the students desire for more face-to-face interaction, it may be beneficial to offer online IPE activities for a shorter time period. It is anticipated that this study may inform other programmes that are exploring innovative approaches to provide IPE to promote effective collaboration in patient care.

  9. Recent experiments involving highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    Very large and fragile atoms may be produced by exciting normal atoms with light or by collisions with other atomic particles. Atoms as large as 10 -6 m are now routinely produced in the laboratory and their properties studied. In this review some of the simpler experimental methods available for the production and detection of such atoms are described including tunable dye laser-excitation and field ionization. A few recent experiments which illustrate the collision properties and the effects of electric and and magnetic fields are also described. The relevance of highly excited atoms in other areas of research including radioastronomy and isotope separation are discussed. (author)

  10. Transfer adjustment experiences of underrepresented students of color in the sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, June C.

    Two-year colleges have long served as the starting point for many students in higher education and particularly those of underrepresented backgrounds. In recent years, these institutions have been called upon to help address the high attrition rates facing the science and mathematics disciplines by promoting interest development and transfer of underrepresented students in these fields. This study examined the adjustment experiences of underrepresented students of color after transferring from community colleges to a four-year university in the sciences. By employing qualitative interviews with students of African, Latino, Pacific Island, and Southeast Asian descent, students' perceptions of the sciences at the two- and four-year campus, adjustment process, and benefits and detriments of taking the transfer route were the focus of this research. The findings show that transfer students experience a very different science culture at each institutional type in terms of pedagogy and curriculum and interactions with classmates and faculty. While students witnessed a collaborative science culture at the community college, they faced a highly competitive and individualistic environment at the university. The greater the difference encountered, the more difficult were students' adjustment. Adjustment was aided in two primary ways: socialization experiences before transferring and the development of common identity groups with other students who shared similar backgrounds, goals, and struggles. These groups formed organically at the two-year college but were more difficult to forge at the university. When present, however, they served as niches, sites of validation, and counter spaces within the larger university setting. It appears that starting at the community college benefited most participants by providing a nurturing environment that fostered their commitment to science. Some students felt that they would have been dissuaded from pursuing their majors had they only

  11. Gaming Preferences, Motivations, and Experiences of Pharmacy Students in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan Ying; Wong, Li Lian; Yap, Kai Zhen; Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern

    2016-02-01

    Serious games are becoming popular in various healthcare domains. However, they should be designed to cater toward learners' perspectives, needs, and specifications in order to be used to their full potential in education. This study investigated the gaming experiences, motivations, and preferences of pharmacy students. An anonymous self-administered survey obtained participant demographics, gaming experiences (enjoyment level of different game genres, years of experience, gaming frequency and duration, and motivations), and gaming preferences (on in-game rewards, settings, storylines, perspectives, and styles). Descriptive statistics, t tests, analysis of variance, chi-squared tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for analysis. The response rate was 69.1 percent (465/673 undergraduates). Role-playing games (RPGs) (4.12 ± 1.07) and massively multiplayer online RPGs (MMORPGs) (3.81 ± 1.26) had the highest enjoyment ratings. Males enjoyed imagination games (e.g., RPGs, MMORPGs) more than females, whereas females enjoyed simulation games more. Top motivating factors for respondents were progressing to the next level (3.63 ± 1.19), excitement (3.33 ± 1.33), and a feeling of efficacy when playing (3.02 ± 1.16). Unlocking mechanisms (25.2 percent) and experience points (17.6 percent) were the most popular in-game reward systems. Most respondents preferred a fantasy/medieval/mythic setting (59.8 percent) and an adventurer storyline (41.3 percent), with similar proportions preferring competitive (35.3 percent), cooperative (33.3 percent), and collaborative (30.8 percent) game styles. Different groups of pharmacy students differ in their gaming experiences, motivating factors, and preferences. There is no "one size fits all" game that is suitable for all pharmacy education. Such differences should be considered when developing a pharmacy game in order to cater to the diverse student population.

  12. Shopping Problems among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E.; Potenza, Marc N.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Cavallo, Dana A.; Desai, Rani A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although shopping behavior among adolescents is normal, for some the shopping becomes problematic. An assessment of adolescent shopping behavior along a continuum of severity and its relationship to other behaviors and health issues is incompletely understood. Methods A large sample of high school students (n=3999) was examined using a self-report survey with 153 questions concerning demographic characteristics, shopping behaviors, other health behaviors including substance use, and functioning variables such as grades and violent behavior. Results The overall prevalence of problem shopping was 3.5% (95%CI: 2.93–4.07). Regular smoking, marijuana and other drug use, sadness and hopelessness, and antisocial behaviors (e.g., fighting, carrying weapons) were associated with problem shopping behavior in both boys and girls. Heavy alcohol use was significantly associated with problem shopping only in girls. Conclusion Problem shopping appears fairly common among high school students and is associated with symptoms of depression and a range of potentially addictive and antisocial behaviors. Significant distress and diminished behavioral control suggest that excessive shopping may often have significant associated morbidity. Additional research is needed to develop specific prevention and treatment strategies for adolescents who report problems with shopping. PMID:21497217

  13. Shopping problems among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Potenza, Marc N; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Cavallo, Dana A; Desai, Rani A

    2011-01-01

    Although shopping behavior among adolescents is normal, for some, the shopping becomes problematic. An assessment of adolescent shopping behavior along a continuum of severity and its relationship to other behaviors and health issues is incompletely understood. A large sample of high school students (n = 3999) was examined using a self-report survey with 153 questions concerning demographic characteristics, shopping behaviors, other health behaviors including substance use, and functioning variables such as grades and violent behavior. The overall prevalence of problem shopping was 3.5% (95% CI, 2.93-4.07). Regular smoking, marijuana and other drug use, sadness and hopelessness, and antisocial behaviors (e.g., fighting, carrying weapons) were associated with problem shopping behavior in both boys and girls. Heavy alcohol use was significantly associated with problem shopping only in girls. Problem shopping appears fairly common among high school students and is associated with symptoms of depression and a range of potentially addictive and antisocial behaviors. Significant distress and diminished behavioral control suggest that excessive shopping may often have significant associated morbidity. Additional research is needed to develop specific prevention and treatment strategies for adolescents who report problems with shopping. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Abdullah Faruk; Güzeller, Cem Oktay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The…

  15. Designing experiments on thermal interactions by secondary-school students in a simulated laboratory environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkos, Ioannis; Psillos, Dimitris; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides

    2011-07-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of investigative activities with manipulations in a virtual laboratory on students' ability to design experiments. Sample Fourteen students in a lower secondary school in Greece attended a teaching sequence on thermal phenomena based on the use of information and communication technology, and specifically of the simulated virtual laboratory 'ThermoLab'. Design and methods A pre-post comparison was applied. Students' design of experiments was rated in eight dimensions; namely, hypothesis forming and verification, selection of variables, initial conditions, device settings, materials and devices used, process and phenomena description. A three-level ranking scheme was employed for the evaluation of students' answers in each dimension. Results A Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed a statistically significant difference between the students' pre- and post-test scores. Additional analysis by comparing the pre- and post-test scores using the Hake gain showed high gains in all but one dimension, which suggests that this improvement was almost inclusive. Conclusions We consider that our findings support the statement that there was an improvement in students' ability to design experiments.

  16. Guitars and Makerspace: Examining the Experience of First Nations Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jay; Gobeil, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This research project examined the impact on student engagement of a makerspace approach in an all-First Nations high school. First Nations learners have many factors limiting their success in the K-12 system such as lack of connection to the curriculum, limited cultural relevance of course content, and poor attendance. A common concern for those…

  17. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment: A successful student-run scientific spacecraft mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Q.; Li, X.; Palo, S. E.; Blum, L. W.; Gerhardt, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment is a spacecraft mission developed and operated by students at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The 3U CubeSat was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in September 2012. The massively successful mission far outlived its 4 month estimated lifetime and stopped transmitting data after over two years in orbit in December 2014. CSSWE has contributed to 15 scientific or engineering peer-reviewed journal publications. During the course of the project, over 65 undergraduate and graduate students from CU's Computer Science, Aerospace, and Mechanical Engineering Departments, as well as the Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences Department participated. The students were responsible for the design, development, build, integration, testing, and operations from component- to system-level. The variety of backgrounds on this unique project gave the students valuable experience in their own focus area, but also cross-discipline and system-level involvement. However, though the perseverance of the students brought the mission to fruition, it was only possible through the mentoring and support of professionals in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department and CU's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

  18. The interrelationship between the work experience of distance education students, job satisfaction, andacademic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Welman

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available In terms of the cooperative education strategy of technikons, students are expected to do subject-relevant work in the industry/commerce to gain practical experience. The degree of subject-relevant work performed by 166 distance education students, and how this is related to their academic performance, was investigated. It was found that in contrast to older Afrikaans- and English-speaking male students, it was mainly students who speak a black language who do not gain subject-relevant work experience, have minimal job satisfaction and do not earn high marks in the third-year subject (Organizational Behaviour. It is suggested that the State integrate the issues of work provision, education and training for the success of cooperative education in South Africa. Opsomming  Volgens die kooperatiewe onderwysstrategie van technikons word daar van studente verwag om vakrelevante werk in die bedryf/handel te doen om praktykervaring op te doen. Die graad van vakrelevante werk wat 166 afstandsonderrigstudente doen en die verband daarvan met hul akademiese prestasie is ondersoek. Daar is gevind dat in teenstelling met ouer, manlike, Afrikaans- en Engelssprekende studente/ dit veral swarttaalsprekende studente is wat nie vakrelevante werkservaring opdoen nie, 'n lae graad van werkstevredenheid beleef/ en nie hoe punte in die derdejaarvak (Organisasiegedrag verdien nie. Daar word voorgestel dat die Staat die kwessies van werkverskaffing, onderwys en opieiding integreer ten einde kooperatiewe onderwys in Suid-Afrika te laat slaag.

  19. Dental Students' Perceived Value of Peer-Mentoring Clinical Leadership Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Rachel A; Hammaker, Daniel J; de Peralta, Tracy L; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2016-03-01

    This pilot study compared second- and fourth-year dental students' perceived values of newly implemented clinical leadership experiences (CLEs) at one U.S. dental school during the 2012-13 academic year. In the CLEs, fourth-year (D4) students mentored second-year (D2) dental students during faculty-supervised patient treatment. The two cohorts' perceived value of the experiences was measured with questionnaires consisting of five-point Likert scale questions and open text responses. Out of a total of 114 D2 and 109 D4 students, 46 D2 students and 35 D4 students participated (response rates of 40.4% and 32.1%, respectively). While responses from both cohorts showed they highly valued the CLEs, the D2s perceived greater value: 4.07 (0.53) v. 3.51 (0.95), pmentor D2s, that the CLEs had educational benefits, and that the CLEs increased their comfort with peer communication. Theme analysis of open text questions revealed that the respondents perceived the D4s were more accessible than faculty and provided guidance and individual attention; the CLEs increased student comfort; the CLEs reinforced D4 skills, knowledge, and confidence; and the CLEs provided management, leadership, and collaborative work experience. Theme analysis also highlighted student concerns about a lack of program structure. Overall, the majority of both groups valued CLEs in their dental education. Particular advantages they perceived were increased comfort, guidance, and attention. Further program development should address student concerns. These results suggest that similar programs should be considered and/or expanded in other dental schools' curricula.

  20. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Faruk Kılıç; Cem Oktay Güzeller

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The sample was chosen through the stratified and cluster sampling procedure. The students were chosen randomly depending on the regions of their school at...

  1. Reproductive Science for High School Students: A Shared Curriculum Model to Enhance Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Megan; Cleveland, Charlotte; Gordon, Diana; Jones, Lynda; Zelinski, Mary; Winter, Patricia; Chang, Jeffrey; Senegar-Mitchell, Ericka; Coutifaris, Christos; Shuda, Jamie; Mainigi, Monica; Bartolomei, Marisa; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    The lack of a national reproductive biology curriculum leads to critical knowledge gaps in today's high school students' comprehensive understanding of human biology. The Oncofertility Consortium developed curricula that address the basic and clinical aspects of reproductive biology. Launching this academy and creating easy-to-disseminate learning modules allowed other universities to implement similar programs across the country. The expansion of this informal, extracurricular academy on reproductive health from Northwestern University to the University of California, San Diego, Oregon Health & Science University, and the University of Pennsylvania magnifies the scope of scientific learning to students who might not otherwise be exposed to this important information. To assess the experience gained from this curriculum, we polled alumni from the four centers. Data were collected anonymously from de-identified users who elected to self-report on their experiences in their respective reproductive science academy. The alumni survey asked participants to report on their current academic standing, past experiences in the academy, and future academic and career goals. The results of this national survey suggest the national oncofertility academies had a lasting impact on participants and may have contributed to student persistence in scientific learning. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  2. Living in an older adult community: a pharmacy student's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasia, Emily; Estus, Erica

    2013-12-01

    Interacting with older adults is a daily practice for pharmacists. It is important to understand how medications affect their wellbeing, but there are many other factors that affect quality of life. To truly understand some of the challenges facing older adults, Emily Anastasia, a sixth-year pharmacy student at the University of Rhode Island, moved into South Bay Retirement Living, a senior living community, for an eight-day immersion experience as a special project within one of her advanced pharmacy practice experience rotations. During her stay, she did not attend classes nor leave the facility unless on the South Bay bus with the other assisted living residents. She lived with a 92-year-old roommate, developed close friendships with many of the residents, and kept a detailed journal of her experience. The purpose of this reflection is to share her experience and recognize lifestyle as well as social and physical environment as factors in understanding the aging process. Immersing a pharmacy student within an assisted living community provides a unique opportunity to observe and appreciate characteristics of older adults that cannot be learned within a classroom setting.

  3. Medical student debt at the Christchurch School of Medicine. The New Zealand Wellbeing, Intentions, Debt and Experiences (WIDE) survey of medical students pilot study. Results part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, D; Palmer, C; Mulder, R; Wilkinson, T

    2001-10-26

    To determine the level and sources of medical student debt at the Christchurch School of Medicine. A questionnaire, The New Zealand Wellbeing, Intentions, Debt, and Experiences (WIDE) Survey of Medical Students, was developed and administered to all 204 medical students at the Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Included were questions on student demographics, sources and levels of debt, parental financial support, and student perceptions of their debt. The response rate was 88%. International students, whose debt was with an overseas government, and students with mortgages were excluded from the data analysis. The combined total debt for the remaining 165 students was $7775000 with $6290000 (81%) owed to the Government Students Loans scheme. One quarter of 6th year medical students had a debt over $83250, 50% had a debt over $70000, and 75% had a debt over $50000. Student allowances were inaccessible to 64% of 4th and 5th year students and part-time employment during term-time was common. Lack of funds was reported to impair full participation in the medical course. The majority of medical students at the Christchurch School of Medicine accumulate high levels of debt, mainly dtrough the Government Student Loans scheme, during their medical training.

  4. Simulation experiences of paramedic students: a cross-cultural examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Chloe Abel,1 Eihab Khasawneh,2 Linda Ross,1 Tracy Levett-Jones31Department of Community Emergency Health & Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, AustraliaBackground: Simulation-based education is an important part of paramedic education and ­training. While accessing clinical placements that are adequate in quality and quantity continues to be challenging, simulation is being recognized by paramedic academics as a potential alternative. Examining students’ satisfaction of simulation, particularly cross-culturally is therefore important in providing feedback to academic teaching staff and the international paramedic community.Objective: This study aimed to compare simulation satisfaction among paramedic students from universities in Australia and Jordan.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based English version of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale was administered to paramedic students from all year levels.Results: A total of 511 students participated in this study; 306 students (60% from Australia (Monash University and 205 students (40% from Jordan (Jordan University of Science and Technology. There were statistically significant differences with large effect size noted in all three original factors between Australian and Jordanian students: debrief and feedback (mean =38.66 vs mean =34.15; P<0.001; d=0.86, clinical reasoning (mean =21.32 vs mean =18.28; P<0.001; d=0.90, and clinical learning (mean =17.59 vs mean =15.47; P<0.001; d=1.12.Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that simulation education is generally well received by students in Australia and Jordan although Australian students reported having higher satisfaction levels then their Jordanian counterparts. These results

  5. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-01-01

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5·10 21 molecules/cm 3 , 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm 3 ) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm 3 ) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved

  6. The Educational, Social and Emotional Experiences of Students with Dyslexia: The Perspective of Postsecondary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doikou-Avlidou, Maro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at exploring the educational, social and emotional experiences of individuals with dyslexia both during school and tertiary education. For this purpose, semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten Greek students with dyslexia who were enrolled in higher education institutions. The data analysis was carried out with…

  7. Student Satisfaction or Happiness?: A Preliminary Rethink of What Is Important in the Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Aftab; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the purpose of the complex open system of higher education and to explore this transformative experience as personal flourishing, where students come to terms with a way of being, matching their potentiality with their agency and leading to profound happiness. There is influential, but not uncontested…

  8. Ergonomics in dentistry: experiences of the practice by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, P P N S; Gottardello, A C A; Wajngarten, D; Presoto, C D; Campos, J A D B

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the experiences of students enrolled in the last year of dentistry school with ergonomic practice. This is a qualitative, observational and cross-sectional study, with a non-probabilistic sample design. The sample comprised students enrolled in the last year of dentistry in Araraquara-UNESP (n = 29). The data were collected by means of open semi-structured and individual interviews, captured by a digital voice recorder. The students were interviewed in their own university at a time that was previously scheduled, and care was taken to provide a private and welcoming environment to carry out the interviews. A script containing questions related to practices in ergonomics was prepared at the university. Data analysis was carried out using the qualitative-quantitative Collective Subject Discourse technique with the aid of Qualiquantisoft ® software program. It was found that more than half of the students (58.6%) believe that adopting an ergonomic posture is important to prevent future problems, pain and occupational diseases, and 62.1% of the students confirm having difficulties in adopting ergonomic postures due to the types of treatment required and the regions of the mouth being treated. The main reasons stated for the fact that their colleagues do not adopt ergonomic postures are lack of attention, practice and forgetfulness (44.8%) and difficulty in visualising the operatory field or the procedure performed (27.6%). It is possible to conclude that the students interviewed know ergonomic principles and their importance in occupational health. However, they found it difficult to put these principles into practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Look into International Graduate Students' Experience in the United States: A Grounded Theory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Shuko

    2013-01-01

    The number of international students in the United States has been increasing each year, but little is known about their experience. There are recent studies on international students, however, only a few research has focused on international students studying at graduate level. To best study international graduate students' experience, a…

  10. The House System: Evaluating Its Role in the Experience of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of students' experiences of the House system, an innovative scheme introduced for business students, aiming to enhance student experience. The findings are based on a survey of 350 students and 4 group interviews. Analysis of the findings, both statistical and qualitative, indicated perceived clear benefits for the…

  11. Finance Students' Experiences of Lecture-Based Active Learning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Kerry; Munro, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Consistent with current higher education concerns with student engagement and the student experience, this study explored third-year undergraduate Finance students' experiences of lecture-based active learning tasks. Finance students from the 2012 and 2014 cohorts from a South African university were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire…

  12. Teaching experience in university students using social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Carranza Alcántar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, are currently one of the mainstream media in the world, yet its educational use for the dissemination of knowledge is not significantly evident, under this premise this report is presented, considering an experience in which teachers and university-level students used these networks as mediators of educational practices; such mediation was implemented in order to promote mobile learning as an option to facilitate the process of construction and socialization of knowledge; In this sense, the research presented aimed to identify the experience and opinion of students regarding the influence of this strategy in achieving their learning. The quantitative methodology was applied through the application type of a survey of students who participated and realized the importance of socialization of knowledge. The results showed favorable opinions regarding the use of these networks, highlighting the benefits of mobile learning as a way to streamline the training process. The proposal is to continue this type of strategies to promote flexible teaching-learning options.

  13. Teacher Research Experience Programs = Increase in Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2010-12-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers (SRP), founded in 1990, is one of the largest, best known university-based professional development programs for science teachers in the U.S. The program’s basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have not experienced it firsthand. For eight weeks in each of two consecutive summers, teachers participate as a member of a research team, led by a member of Columbia University’s research faculty. In addition to the laboratory experience, all teachers meet as a group one day each week during the summer for a series of pedagogical activities. A unique quality of the Summer Research Program is its focus on objective assessment of its impact on attitudes and instructional practices of participating teachers, on the performance of these teachers in their mentors’ laboratories, and most importantly, on the impact of their participation in the program on student interest and performance in science. SRP uses pass rate on the New York State Regents standardized science examinations as an objective measure of student achievement. SRP's data is the first scientific evidence of a connection between a research experience for teachers program and gains in student achievement. As a result of the research, findings were published in Science Magazine. The author will present an overview of Columbia's teacher research program and the results of the published program evaluation.

  14. Reactor G1: high power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laage, F. de; Teste du Baillet, A.; Veyssiere, A.; Wanner, G.

    1957-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  15. Evaluating High School Students' Anxiety and Self-Efficacy towards Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çimen, Osman; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and self-efficacy are among the factors that impact students' performance in biology. The current study aims to investigate high school students' perception of biology anxiety and self-efficacy, in relation to gender, grade level, interest in biology, negative experience associated with biology classes, and teachers' approaches in the…

  16. Mathematically Gifted High School Students' Approaches to Developing Visual Proofs (VP) and Preliminary Ideas about VP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurel, Isikhan; Morali, H. Sevgi; Karahan, Ozge; Boz, Burcak

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the procedure and examples of visual proofs (VP-or proof without words) developed by gifted mathematics secondary school students after their experiences. The participants of this study are three male 9th grade students enrolled in a private science high school. In the first stage of the research a briefing…

  17. Improving the Interest of High-School Students toward Chemistry by Crime Scene Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, A.; Chiorri, C.; Bracco, F.; Carnasciali, M. M.; Alloisio, M.; Grotti, M.

    2018-01-01

    Improving the interest of high-school students towards chemistry (and science in general) is one of the goals of the Italian Ministry of Education. To this aim, we designed a context-based activity that actively involved students in six different laboratory experiences interconnected by a case study of the murder of Miss Scarlet, from the famous…

  18. ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR ACADEMICALLY TALENTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM LOW INCOME FAMILIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRESSMAN, HARVEY

    A PROPOSAL FOR AN ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR ACADEMICALLY TALENTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM LOW-INCOME FAMILIES IN CERTAIN AREAS OF BOSTON IS PRESENTED. BASIC ASSUMPTIONS ARE THAT THERE IS AND OBVIOUS AND PRESSING NEED TO GIVE EXTRA HELP TO THE ABLE STUDENT FROM A DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUND, AND THAT A RELATIVELY BRIEF ENRICHMENT EXPERIENCE FOR…

  19. Experiences gained by establishing the IAMG Student Chapter Freiberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Sebastian M.; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Shahzad, Faisal

    2013-04-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG) Student Chapter Freiberg was founded in 2007 at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) in Germany by national and international graduate and undergraduate students of various geoscientific as well as natural science disciplines. The major aim of the IAMG is to promote international cooperation in the application and use of Mathematics in Geosciences research and technology. The IAMG encourages all types of students and young scientists to found and maintain student chapters, which can even receive limited financial support by the IAMG. Following this encouragement, generations of students at TUBAF have build up and established a prosperous range of activities. These might be an example and an invitation for other young scientists and institutions worldwide to run similar activities. We, some of the current and former students behind the student chapter, have organised talks, membership drives, student seminars, guest lectures, several short courses and even international workshops. Some notable short courses were held by invited IAMG distinguished lecturers. The topics included "Statistical analysis in the Earth Sciences using R - a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics", "Geomathematical Natural Resource Modeling" and "Introduction to Geostatistics for Environmental Applications and Natural Resources Evaluation: Basic Concepts and Examples". Furthermore, we conducted short courses by ourselves. Here, the topics included basic introductions into MATLAB, object oriented programming concepts for geoscientists using MATLAB and an introduction to the Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Most of those short courses lasted several days and provided an excellent and unprecedented teaching experience for us. We were given credit by attending students for filling gaps in our university's curriculum by providing in-depth and hands-on tutorials on topics, which were merely

  20. European pharmacy students' experience with virtual patient technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Afonso Miguel; Madeira, Filipe

    2012-08-10

    To describe how virtual patients are being used to simulate real-life clinical scenarios in undergraduate pharmacy education in Europe. One hundred ninety-four participants at the 2011 Congress of the European Pharmaceutical Students Association (EPSA) completed an exploratory cross-sectional survey instrument. Of the 46 universities and 23 countries represented at the EPSA Congress, only 12 students from 6 universities in 6 different countries reported having experience with virtual patient technology. The students were satisfied with the virtual patient technology and considered it more useful as a teaching and learning tool than an assessment tool. Respondents who had not used virtual patient technology expressed support regarding its potential benefits in pharmacy education. French and Dutch students were significantly less interested in virtual patient technology than were their counterparts from other European countries. The limited use of virtual patients in pharmacy education in Europe suggests the need for initiatives to increase the use of virtual patient technology and the benefits of computer-assisted learning in pharmacy education.

  1. Gender differences and similarities in medical students' experiences of mistreatment by various groups of perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Heidi; Tauber, Gloria; Komlenac, Nikola; Hochleitner, Margarethe

    2017-08-14

    Mistreatment of medical students during medical education is a widespread concern. Studies have shown that medical students report the most mistreatment compared to students of other study programs and that the prevalence of mistreatment peaks during clinical training. For this reason, a study was conducted to assess prevalence of mistreatment among medical students committed by various groups of people. The focus was to identify whether gender was associated with the experience of mistreatment. Additionally, students' perception of university climate for reporting sexual harassment was assessed. In the study 88 medical students (45 women, 43 men) participated. A modified version of the Questionnaire on Student Abuse was used to assess students' experience of various types of mistreatment and associated distress during medical education. To explore factors that could be associated with this experience the organizational climate for reporting sexual harassment was assessed with the Psychological Climate for Sexual Harassment. The most often cited perpetrators of mistreatment were strangers (79.5%), friends (75.0%) and university staff (68.2%). Strangers mostly committed psychological mistreatment and sexual harassment, whereas friends additionally engaged in physical mistreatment of medical students. The most common form of mistreatment conducted by university staff was humiliation of students. These kinds of psychological mistreatment were reported to be distressing (43%). Gender differences were found in the prevalence of mistreatment. Women experienced more sexual harassment and humiliation than did men. On the other hand, men experienced more physical mistreatment than did women. Women reported experiencing more distress from mistreatment experiences than did men and also more often reported being mistreated by university staff than did men. Women perceived a greater risk in reporting sexual harassment to the organization than did men. Mistreatment of female and

  2. TRANSFORMING RURAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN ZIMBABWE THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: LIVED EXPERIENCES OF STUDENT COMPUTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomba Clifford

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A technological divide exists in Zimbabwe between urban and rural schools that puts rural based students at a disadvantage. In Zimbabwe, the government, through the president donated computers to most rural schools in a bid to bridge the digital divide between rural and urban schools. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of Advanced Level students using computers at two rural boarding Catholic High Schools in Zimbabwe. The study was guided by two research questions: (1 How do Advanced level students in the rural areas use computers at their school? and (2 What is the experience of using computers for Advanced Level students in the rural areas of Zimbabwe? By performing this study, it was possible to understand from the students’ experiences whether computer usage was for educational learning or not. The results of the phenomenological study showed that students’ experiences can be broadly classified into five themes, namely worthwhile (interesting experience, accessibility issues, teachers’ monopoly, research and social use, and Internet availability. The participants proposed teachers use computers, but not monopolize computer usage. The solution to the computer shortage may be solved by having donors and government help in the acquisitioning of more computers.

  3. The Effect of Capstone Cooperative Education Experiences, and Related Factors, on Career and Technical Education Secondary Student Summative Assessment Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth D.; Walter, Richard A.; Yoder, Edgar P.

    2013-01-01

    Research has discussed the benefits of cooperative education experiences for secondary career and technical education students. Yet, in this era of high stakes testing and program accountability, the amount of time that students are permitted to participate in cooperative education has diminished, fearing that time spent out of the classroom would…

  4. Work Experience in Relation to Study Pace and Thesis Grade: Investigating the Mediating Role of Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, Tarja; Parpala, Anna; Mattsson, Markus; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari

    2016-01-01

    University students often work during their studies, and working is considered to be one reason for high dropout rates or slow progress in studies. Moreover, the nature of students' work experience varies greatly. The study aimed to explore how working while studying is related to study success, and took approaches to learning and the nature of…

  5. 'There's so much to it': the ways physiotherapy students and recent graduates experience practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradell, S; Peseta, T; Barrie, S

    2018-05-01

    Health science courses aim to prepare students for the demands of their chosen profession by learning ways appropriate to that profession and the contexts they will work and live in. Expectations of what students should learn become re-contextualised and translated into entry-level curriculum, with students operating as a connection between what is intended and enacted in curriculum, and required in the real world. Drawing on phenomenology, this paper explores how students understand practice-the collective, purposeful knowing, doing and being of a community-in entry-level physiotherapy programs. Ways of thinking and practising (WTP)-a framework attentive to the distinctive nature of a discipline, its values, philosophies and world-view (McCune and Hounsell in High Educ 49(3):255-289, 2005)-provides the conceptual lens. Six themes describing how students see the WTP of physiotherapy practice emerged from the analysis: discovery of new knowledge; problem solving client related contexts; adopting a systems based approach to the body; contributing to a positive therapeutic alliance; developing a sense of self and the profession; and the organisation of the workforce. The study produces knowledge about practice by focusing on physiotherapy students' experiences of disciplinary learning. Including students in educational research in this way is an approach that can help students realise their potential as part of a community of practice.

  6. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  7. Students' beliefs, attitudes, and conceptual change in a traditional and a constructivistic high school physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, April Dean

    In this study, the relationships between student beliefs about the nature of science, student attitudes, and conceptual change about the nature of forces were investigated within a traditional and within a constructivistic high school physics classroom. Students in both classrooms were honors students taking a first year high school physics course and were primarily white and middle to upper SES. Students in the traditional classroom were all high ability juniors, and physics instruction was integrated with pre-calculus. Students in the constructivistic classroom were a mixture of juniors and seniors. Due to the interrelated nature of these factors and the complexity of their interactions, a naturalistic inquiry design was chosen. The data sources included videotape of 7-9 weeks of instruction; analysis of the videotapes using the Secondary Teacher Analysis Matrix (Gallagher & Parker, 1995); field notes; pretest/posttest assessment with the Force Concept Inventory (Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhammer, 1992); student responses from the Views on Science-Technology-Society questionnaire (Aikenhead & Ryan, 1992), the Questionnaire for the Assessment of a Science Course (Chiappetta, 1995), and the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (Taylor, Fraser, & White, 1994); student interviews; and teacher interviews. In the traditional classroom, (a) students did not think that physics was relevant to everyday experiences; (b) high conceptual change students were more likely to have an angular world view (Cobern, 1993) and have views more similar to the teacher's about the nature of science; and (c) high conceptual change students were able to develop an internally consistent understanding of the content; however, that content appeared to be isolated knowledge in some students. In the constructivistic classroom, (a) students saw physics as relevant and useful; (b) there was no difference in world view or agreement with the teacher's views on the nature of science between high

  8. Attitudes of Turkish High School Students toward Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenilmez, Kursat

    2007-01-01

    This study examines high school students' attitudes toward mathematics and analyzes whether there were differences in attitude and its source that could be attributed to gender, class level, type of school, mathematics success, whether the students received preschool education, families' income level, and high school student's place of living.…

  9. High School Students' Representations and Understandings of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Brizuela, Bárbara M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the representations and understandings of electric fields expressed by Chinese high school students 15 to 16 years old who have not received high school level physics instruction. The physics education research literature has reported students' conceptions of electric fields post-instruction as indicated by students'…

  10. Exploring High-Achieving Students' Images of Mathematicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Mario Sánchez; Rosas, Alejandro; Zavaleta, Juan Gabriel Molina; Romo-Vázquez, Avenilde

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the images that a group of high-achieving Mexican students hold of mathematicians. For this investigation, we used a research method based on the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) with a sample of 63 Mexican high school students. The group of students' pictorial and written descriptions of mathematicians assisted us…

  11. High School Students' Implicit Theories of What Facilitates Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Eileen Carlton; Miles, Rhea; Petersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research has primarily concentrated on adults' implicit theories about high quality science education for all students. Little work has considered the students' perspective. This study investigated high school students' implicit theories about what helped them learn science. Purpose: This study addressed (1) What characterizes high…

  12. Academic Self-Efficacy of High Achieving Students in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo-Lavadores, Ana Karen; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Pinto-Sosa, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore for differences in the academic self-efficacy of Mexican high school students. A gird questionnaire was administered to 1,460 students form private and public schools. As expected, high achieving students showed significantly higher academic self-efficacy that their peers. However, interesting gender…

  13. Students' attitude to homework: how is homework perceived by high-achieving students and those with learning disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Trobec, Nika

    2013-01-01

    Homework assignments have many positive educational effects, which are achieved only when they are regularly performed and completed. While doing homework, students are under the influence of various external and internal factors that affect its utility. Many of them experience homework-related problems in one or more areas which are described in theoretical part. Aim of the empirical survey was to do a research on homework practices of students with learning disabilities and high achieving s...

  14. Translating University Biosensor Research to a High School Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Bank, Alex; Turpeinen, Dylan; King, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates is great. To interest more students into STEM degrees, we made our graphene biosensor research portable, inexpensive, and safe to demonstrate technology development to high school students. The students increased their knowledge of biosensors and proteins, and…

  15. Teacher Professional Development to Foster Authentic Student Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, K.; Iyengar, E.

    2004-12-01

    This presentation reports on a new teacher workshop design that encourages teachers to initiate and support long-term student-directed research projects in the classroom setting. Teachers were recruited and engaged in an intensive marine ecology learning experience at Shoals Marine Laboratory, Appledore Island, Maine. Part of the weeklong summer workshop was spent in field work, part in laboratory work, and part in learning experimental design and basic statistical analysis of experimental results. Teachers were presented with strategies to adapt their workshop learnings to formulate plans for initiating and managing authentic student research projects in their classrooms. The authors will report on the different considerations and constraints facing the teachers in their home school settings and teachers' progress in implementing their plans. Suggestions for replicating the workshop will be offered.

  16. Lifelong Learning at the Technion: Graduate Students' Perceptions of and Experiences in Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein-Farraj, Rania; Barak, Miri; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the development of two Distance Learning (DL) courses and their effect on students' perceptions and learning experiences. Our study included about 260 science and engineering graduate students. Among them, 105 students were divided into two research groups: on-campus students (N=70) and DL students (N=35). These two groups…

  17. Students as partners: Our experience of setting up and working in a student engagement friendly framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravković, Marko; Serdinšek, Tamara; Sobočan, Monika; Bevc, Sebastjan; Hojs, Radovan; Krajnc, Ivan

    2018-03-11

    Student engagement (SE) in the curriculum is a positive indicator in the development of students deeply involved in their learning. It also has several benefits for the schools' level of educational innovation and quality assurance. In order to identify the most important pearls from the last decade of educational developments within the field of SE at the Faculty of Medicine University of Maribor, we searched through our school's archives, publications and research in the field of medical education. Three areas were identified as the most important SE complements: (i) peer teaching, (ii) school governance, and (iii) extracurricular activities. The paper highlights how many student-driven initiatives move from informal frameworks toward a formal structure, elective courses, and, in the end, compulsory components of the curriculum. As demonstrated by the three educational achievements at our school, fostering a high level of SE can lead to innovative curricular changes, benefit the whole school and enable students to deliver highly impactful extracurricular projects.

  18. The Impact of an International Cultural Experience on Previously Held Stereotypes by American Student Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Loretta; Bengiamin, Marlene; Downey, Vicki Wessman

    2001-01-01

    Examined stereotypes held by U.S. student nurses before and after participating in an educational experience in Russia. The experience was intended to prepare them to be effective nurses in multicultural health care settings. Data from student interviews indicated that the experience changed students' stereotyped attitudes about Russian culture…

  19. Interactive Effects of Environmental Experience and Innovative Cognitive Style on Student Creativity in Product Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chia-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Environmental experience can enhance the ideas of design students. Thus, this type of experience may interfere with the influence of design students' cognitive style on creativity. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of environmental experience on the relationship between innovative cognitive style and industrial design students'…

  20. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...