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Sample records for student scholarship program

  1. Some Scholarship Students Need Help, Too: Implementation and Assessment of a Scholarship Retention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Amy L.; Hammons, James O.

    2013-01-01

    Students with merit-based scholarships and strong high school GPAs typically have high retention rates. Yet, many high ability students did not need to study in high school, and never developed effective academic skills. Such students may expect to excel in college with the same limited effort. Unfortunately, institutions may unintentionally…

  2. A Scholarship Workshop Program to Improve Underrepresented Student Access to Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a scholarship workshop program to better prepare low socio-economic and minority students to compete for collegiate scholarships. The study involves 1,367 high risk 9th to 12th grade students in Texas. Analysis of the pre- and post tests, using a t-test for dependent variables, indicates a statistically…

  3. Measures of Student Non-Cognitive Skills and Political Tolerance after Two Years of the Louisiana Scholarship Program. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #2. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jonathan N.; Cheng, Albert; Hitt, Collin E.; Wolf, Patrick J.; Greene, Jay P.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the short-term effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) on students' non-cognitive skills and civic values. While a growing number of studies have evaluated K-12 school voucher programs along academic dimensions, few have focused on the development of non-cognitive skills and civic values. This study aims to address…

  4. The Effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program on Student Achievement after Two Years. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #1. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jonathan N.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) is a statewide initiative offering publicly-funded vouchers to enroll in local private schools to students in low-performing schools with family income no greater than 250 percent of the poverty line. Initially established in 2008 as a pilot program in New Orleans, the LSP was expanded statewide in 2012.…

  5. Student Engagement in Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (SERSCA) Program: Sharing a Program Model from Design and Development through Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna; Uy, Ana; Bell, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The Student Engagement in Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (SERSCA) Program at California State University, Stanislaus provides support for student engagement in these areas from idea conception through dissemination. Through assistantships, mini-grants, the Student Research Competition, and travel grants, the Program is designed to…

  6. The Study of the Effectiveness of Scholarship Grant Program on Low-Income Engineering Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ononye, Lawretta C.; Bong, Sabel

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of a National Science Foundation Scholarship in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (NSF S-STEM) program named "Scholarship for Engineering Technology (SET)" at the State University of New York in Canton (SUNY Canton). The authors seek to answer the following question: To what…

  7. INTRODUCTION: GRADUATE STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laverne Jacobs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice is proud to publish issue 32 (1. This issue features a special section highlighting the scholarship of graduate students. While it is always a pleasure to read promising work by newer scholars in the fields of law and social justice, we are certain that this collection of articles represents some of the finest and thought-provoking scholarship stemming from current graduate students in law. The articles stem from a graduate student essay contest that WYAJ held in 2013 and for which we received many submissions. The collection of selected papers offers a view of legal and interdisciplinary research examining issues that are topically diverse but which are all of deep, long-term importance to the world of access to justice. A reader of the special section on Graduate Student Scholarship will find explorations of access to justice from the perspectives of equality rights, discretion, adjudication and methods of legal service delivery, to name a few. A prize was offered to two papers judged to be of exceptional quality. I am very pleased to announce that the winners of those two prizes are Andrew Pilliar, for his article “Exploring a Law Firm Business Model to Improve Access to Justice” and Blair A. Major, for his contribution, “Religion and Law in R v NS: Finding Space to Re-think the Balancing Analysis”. The Editorial Board thanks all those who submitted papers to the contest and to this final special issue of the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice. Another notable feature of this issue is the introduction of a section called Research Notes. The Yearbook will periodically publish peer-reviewed research notes that present the findings of empirical (quantitative, qualitative or mixed method research studies. This section aims to contribute to the growing and important body of empirical scholarship within the realm of access to justice socio-legal research. We hope that you enjoy

  8. NOAA's Undergraduate Scholarship Program Outcomes and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.; Jabanoski, K.; Christenson, T.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports about 115 - 150 undergraduates per year through the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship and the Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship. These programs provide tuition support and paid summer internships at NOAA to exceptional students majoring in the geosciences. Multiple methods were used to evaluate program outcomes and track the career trajectories, including mining LinkedIn data and conducting evaluation surveys of recipients as well as students who applied but did not receive the award. Results show more than 75% of scholars continued on to graduate school, primarily in a NOAA mission fields. This compared to only 56% of nonrecipients. More than 60% of alumni had at least one professional record, with the most alumni working in private industry, followed by nongovernmental organizations and federal, state and local government. The evaluation identified 77 other scholarship programs applied to by NOAA scholarship recipients. The most commonly reported program was the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) for which 20% of scholars applied and 46% of applications were successful. Other common scholarships included the Goldwater Scholarship (received by 5% of NOAA scholars) and the Udall Scholarship (received by 4% of scholars). In the most recent class of 118 undergraduate scholars, 24% reported having another research experience by the time they arrived for orientation at the end of their sophomore year. These results suggest coordination across scholarship opportunities may be useful to engage and retain students in geoscience fields.

  9. Vouchers in the Bayou: The Effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program on Student Achievement after 2 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jonathan N.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) offers publicly funded vouchers to students in low-performing schools with family income no greater than 250% of the poverty line, allowing them to enroll in participating private schools. Initially established in 2008 as a pilot program in New Orleans, the LSP was expanded statewide in 2012. This article…

  10. Merit-Based Scholarships and Student Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Julian, Rey

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-one states offer merit scholarships that require students to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA). Using a comprehensive administrative database from Clemson University, this study estimates the relationship between the incentives created by a South Carolina merit scholarship (LIFE) and students' academic performance. I hypothesize…

  11. Year-Long Peer Mentoring Activity to Enhance the Retention of Freshmen STEM Students in a NSF Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Teresa J.; Evans, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The last year of a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded scholarship program was used to provide pseudo-formal peer mentoring activities to engineering, mathematics, and science undergraduates. A one-credit class was used to afford time for peer mentors and mentees to interact. During the fall semester, seniors augmented each week's topics with…

  12. [The Perspectives and Expectations of New Nursing Graduates Regarding the Hospital-Based Nursing Students Scholarship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Shao, Jung-Hua; Shyu, Yea-Ing

    2016-10-01

    The hospital-based scholarship is a relatively recent incentive used by hospitals to recruit new nursing graduates. Few studies have explored the impact of these scholarship programs on hospital recruitment. To explore the perspectives and expectations of new nursing graduates on the application of a hospital-based scholarship for nursing students. This study used a qualitative research approach. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 20 new nursing graduates from one university in northern Taiwan in 2013. Content analysis was applied to analyze the data. Two themes were identified by participants who had applied for a hospital-based scholarship: "aspire to be a nursing-scholarship recipient and work towards this aspiration" and "look forward to receiving a nursing-scholarship and imagine possible features of the future life." One theme was identified by participants who had not applied for a hospital-based scholarship: "agree with the policy of hospital-based scholarship but resist the restrictions on their life." Although both groups agreed that the scholarship program helped relieve financial stresses, participants who had applied for the scholarship tended to hold positive and aggressive attitudes towards the nursing scholarship. Conversely, participants who had not applied for the scholarship did so due to the perceived conflicts between the scholarship and their career plans. It is recommended to consider providing career-planning assistance to new graduates and to arrange that students who sign a scholarship contract have their clinical practice in their working unit in order to improve adaptation.

  13. 77 FR 16244 - Request for Comments on the Update of the Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... physical therapy); mental and behavioral health (graduate degree programs in clinical psychology, clinical... practitioners, and physician assistants) to also include dental hygiene and behavioral and mental health. (6... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Request for...

  14. Does Competition Improve Public Schools? New Evidence from the Florida Tax-Credit Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figlio, David; Hart, Cassandra M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Programs that enable students to attend private schools, including both vouchers and scholarships funded with tax credits, have become increasingly common in recent years. This study examines the impact of the nation's largest private school scholarship program on the performance of students who remain in the public schools. The Florida Tax Credit…

  15. On Common Constitutional Ground: How Georgia's Scholarship Tax Credits Mirror Other State Programs and Expand Educational Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II.; Erickson, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, Georgia launched a tax-credit scholarship program to expand educational opportunities for the state's pre-K through 12th-grade students by providing them scholarships to attend private schools. Georgia's scholarship tax credit program will help over 13,000 children get the best education for their needs at secular and religious private…

  16. The impact of student-faculty ratio on pharmacy faculty scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Sandra; Garcia, Angela S; Caballero, Joshua; Wolowich, William R

    2010-10-11

    To determine the relationship and impact of student-faculty ratio on scholarship of pharmacy faculty members. The number and rank of faculty members, pharmacy program characteristics, and faculty productivity data were collected to determine the impact of student-faculty ratio on faculty scholarship. Faculty scholarship was not predicted by student-faculty ratio. Factors impacting positively on faculty productivity included National Institutes of Health funding; presence of clinical associate professors, instructors, and lecturers; and programs located in public universities. Faculty productivity is not related to the student-faculty ratio, wherein more faculty members and fewer students equates to increased scholarship. However, public universities may have different infrastructures which are associated with greater academic productivity compared to private institutions. Additionally, utilizing instructors and clinical or nontenure-track faculty members can significantly increase scholarship among faculty members.

  17. Pathways to Excellence Scholarship Program for women in STEM fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rienzi, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Notre Dame of Maryland University (NDMU) has an NSF S-STEM grant, Pathways to Excellence, that gives 10 scholarships annually to academically talented women undergraduates with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing degrees in mathematics, physics, computer information systems, or engineering. NDMU has been cited (Whitten, et al. (2007)) as providing a female friendly environment for the study of physics. In this program we are using a tri-part mentoring system involving a faculty member in the student's discipline, a peer mentor from the program and an external alumnae mentor. The program also has a thematic seminar course for the scholars. Each student in the program is tasked to construct a career development plan in assistance with her faculty mentor and set measured annual goals. In addition, all scholarship students are requested to have an experiential experience. As a result, NDMU aims to strengthen its role in increasing the numbers of well-educated and skilled women employees from diverse backgrounds, including mostly first-generation college students, in technical and scientific areas. Early assessment of the success of the program will be presented as well as modifications that resulted from the formative evaluation. This program is funded by a National Science Foundation S-STEM grant which is not responsible for its content.

  18. WWC Review of the Report "The Short-Term Effects of the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship on Student Outcomes." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Researchers examined the impacts of the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship program on academic and behavioral outcomes of students in grades 9-12 in Kalamazoo Public Schools (KPS). The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship program offers college scholarships to graduating high school students in the KPS district. The percentage of tuition and fees covered is…

  19. The Impact of the Louisiana Scholarship Program on Racial Segregation in Louisiana Schools. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #3. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalite, Anna J.; Mills, Jonathan N.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    The question of how school choice programs affect the racial stratification of schools is highly salient in the field of education policy. We use a student-level panel data set to analyze the impacts of the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) on racial segregation in public and private schools. This targeted school voucher program provides funding…

  20. The Impact of Scholarships for Asian American and Pacific Islander Community College Students: Findings from an Experimental Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, Robert T.; Martin, Margary; Pazich, Loni Bordoloi; Alcantar, Cynthia M.; Nguyen, Bach Mai Dolly; Curammeng, Edward R.; Nguyen, Mike Hoa; Chan, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Extant research on scholarship programs provides foundational knowledge on student enrollment patterns, different types of programs and their students, and outcomes for scholarship recipients in different sectors of higher education. Despite this growing body of research, however, looming questions remain about the measurable impact of scholarship…

  1. Funding School Choice: A Road Map to Tax-Credit Scholarship Programs and Scholarship Granting Organizations. Issues in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Many states are considering a form a school choice known as "tax-credit scholarships," which currently provide school choice to almost 60,000 students in Arizona, Florida and Pennsylvania, which and have just been enacted in Iowa. This guide shows how tax-credit scholarships work and introduces the scholarship granting organizations that…

  2. The Chinese Government Scholarship Program: An Effective Form of Foreign Assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lili; Chapman, David W.

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of Chinese international education assistance through an examination of student experience in the Chinese Government Scholarship Program, an important mechanism of Chinese foreign aid. Grounded in Pascarella's (1985) model of the impact of college on students, the study investigates participants' level of satisfaction with their higher education experience in China and their perception of the role of the scholarship program in promoting positive relationships between China and the scholarship students' home countries. Findings indicate that participants are generally satisfied with their experiences in China and are positive about the impact of the program in building friendships with their home countries. The authors discuss the implications of these findings in terms of China's emerging prominence as a provider of international development assistance.

  3. Testing the Efficacy of a Scholarship Program for Single Parent, Post-Freshmen, Full Time Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Kaka, Sarah J.; Tygret, Jennifer A.; Cathcart, Katy

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy of a scholarship program designed to assist single parent, post-freshmen, full time undergraduate students and predictors of success among a sample of said students, where success is defined as progress toward completion, academic achievement, and degree completion. Results of fixed effects regression and…

  4. The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College. A Partnership among Earth Science, Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmun, Haydee; Buonaiuto, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Catalyst Scholarship Program at Hunter College of The City University of New York (CUNY) was established with a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships to 40 academically talented but financially disadvantaged students majoring in four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics…

  5. Women in science & engineering scholarships and summer camp outreach programs : year 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Since the UTC Scholarship program began in the spring of 2005 and continues today on the S&T campus, numerous female students : have benefitted tremendously from this source of financial aid. The program began in the first few years with 15-30 awards...

  6. Asian Development Bank–Japan Scholarship Program: Annual Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Scholarship Program (JSP) was established in 1988 to provide well-qualified citizens of developing member countries an opportunity to undertake postgraduate studies in economics, management, science and technology, and other development-related fields at 27 educational institutions in 10 countries in Asia and the Pacific. Between 1988 and 2011, Japan contributed more than $126 million to the JSP. A total of 2,818 scholarships have been awarded to recipients from 35 member countries,...

  7. Asian Development Bank–Japan Scholarship Program: Annual Report 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB); Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2011-01-01

    The Japan Scholarship Program (JSP) was established in 1988 to provide well-qualified citizens of developing member countries an opportunity to undertake postgraduate studies in economics, management, science and technology, and other development-related fields at 27 educational institutions in 10 countries in Asia and the Pacific. Between 1988 and 2010, Japan contributed more than $116 million to the JSP. A total of 2,695 scholarships have been awarded to recipients from 35 member countries,...

  8. Impact of the "salary scholarship" impact profile and student achievement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlanga, Vanesa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In Spain, within the framework of the Strategy 2015, the implementation of scholarships, grants and wages especially adapted to the new situation of the European Higher Education, intended to ensure access to university education to those most disadvantaged social groups economically. This research makes an ex post facto, descriptive-comparative aimed at assessing the impact of the grant salary, as an economic factor, on equity, access and academic performance in the first year of college. The study was conducted with a total of 10,394 new students in the 2010-11 cohort at the University of Barcelona, from the database from the institution itself. A total of 642 students agreed to grant salary, with differences depending on the branch of knowledge, gender, and the path to college. In relation to their peers, scholarship students come from families with occupations and / or study less, so scholarships model contributes to equity in access. In relation to performance analysis, scholarship students enrolled and present, on average, a larger number of subjects in order to meet the academic requirements for scholarship renewal, but the results are final academic in several branches knowledge, influenced negatively. One possible explanation is the largest academic pressure of this group in a phase usually complicated: the transition to college.

  9. The Quest for Turkish Scholarships: African Students, Transformation and Hopefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman

    2018-01-01

    on qualitative data collected through interviews, focus groups and discussions with African students in Istanbul, Turkey, this paper finds that the activities as well as the meaning making of African students towards existing Turkish educational and scholarship opportunities, remain essential in understanding...

  10. Contributions of the NOAA Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program to the Geosciences Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2005, the NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program has provided tuition support and paid summer internship opportunities at NOAA to exceptional students majoring in the geosciences. The purpose of the scholarship program is to train students in NOAA mission fields. Multiple methods were used to track the career trajectories of Hollings alumni, including mining LinkedIn data, conducting an impact analysis based on a professionally developed web-based evaluation survey, and a web-based alumni update system. At least one postgraduate record was recorded for 80% of Hollings Scholarship alumni. Of the alumni reached, more than 75% continued on to graduate school in a NOAA mission field, and 86% of those graduate degrees were in a NOAA mission field or other STEM field. More than 60% of alumni had at least one professional record, with the most alumni working in private industry, followed by nongovernmental organizations and federal, state and local government.

  11. Academic Staff's Views About International Scholarships and Support Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ertaç ATİLA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine views of academic staff who have been to the United States in order to do a research study by means of scholarships and support programs provided by the Higher Education Council or Scientific or Technological Research Council of Turkey about the scholarship programs. The qualitative study is carried out as a holistic multiple case study research design. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews from 10 academic staff who participated the scholarship program. Data were analyzed with content analysis technique. The results indicated that application process, time and financial resources were important for the preferences of academic staff in scholarship and support programs. The main reasons for applying the scholar program to undertake an international research study are grouped under three headings as academic, socio-cultural and foreign language improvements. The main influencing factors behind the researchers' preferences to go the United States are its' level of advancements in scientific research and peer influence. Concerning the duration of a research study in abroad the participants thought that 6 months to one year is adequate time and this time depends on the foreign language skills of the researchers, the field of study, subject and project. The main drawbacks of an international research study visit are the long waiting times for having the United States visa with no adequate support, the cost of health insurance and visa, lack of speaking foreign language skills, and adaptation time in the first arrival. As a result, the experienced participants suggested that the future scholarships have to cover health insurance; the researchers have to be supported for developing their foreign language skills and develop a clear research agenda and project prior to going abroad.

  12. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Darby, John B; Hair, Amy B; Rose, Karen M; Ward, Mark A; Turner, Teri L; Balmer, Dorene F

    2016-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT) and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents' intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents' engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents' autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products.

  13. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Darby, John B.; Hair, Amy B.; Rose, Karen M.; Ward, Mark A.; Turner, Teri L.; Balmer, Dorene F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT) and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. Methods The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents’ intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents’ engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Results Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Conclusions Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents’ autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products. PMID:27306995

  14. Is the Juice Worth the Squeeze? A Benefit/Cost Analysis of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Patrick J.; McShane, Michael

    2013-01-01

    School voucher programs have become a prominent aspect of the education policy landscape in the United States. The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program is the only federally funded voucher program in the United States. Since 2004 it has offered publicly funded private school vouchers to nearly four thousand students to attend any of seventy-three…

  15. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Associate Fellows Residents Medical Students Affiliate Members ACS Insurance Programs ACS Discount Programs FACS Resources Career Connection ... and Awards Overview Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards Overview Health Policy Scholarships Scholarships for International Surgeons Research Scholarships ...

  16. An Empirical Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg; D'Andrea, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program, one of the nation's largest school choice programs. It is the first ever completed empirical evaluation of a tax-credit scholarship program, a type of program that creates school choice through the tax code. Earlier reports, including a recent one on the Florida program, have not…

  17. Lottery Funded Scholarships in Tennessee: Increased Access but Weak Retention for Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menifield, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Student retention and low graduation rates are the most significant problems associated with state provided student aid. Evidence suggests that the problems are chronic to certain populations in state colleges and universities. This research examines lottery scholarship data to determine those factors that affect scholarship retention and…

  18. Review of "The Effect of Special Education Vouchers on Public School Achievement: Evidence from Florida's McKay Scholarship Program"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, John T.

    2008-01-01

    A new report published by the Manhattan Institute for Education Policy, "The Effect of Special Education Vouchers on Public School Achievement: Evidence from Florida's McKay Scholarship Program," attempts to examine the complex issue of how competition introduced through school vouchers affects student outcomes in public schools. The…

  19. 42 CFR 62.7 - What will an individual be awarded for participating in the scholarship program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the school to all students pursuing a similar curriculum and “required educational equipment” means... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What will an individual be awarded for participating in the scholarship program? 62.7 Section 62.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. A discrete choice experiment studying students' preferences for scholarships to private medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Rei; Kakihara, Hiroaki

    2016-02-09

    The shortage of physicians in rural areas and in some specialties is a societal problem in Japan. Expensive tuition in private medical schools limits access to them particularly for students from middle- and low-income families. One way to reduce this barrier and lessen maldistribution is to offer conditional scholarships to private medical schools. A discrete choice experiment is carried out on a total of 374 students considering application to medical schools. The willingness to receive a conditional scholarship program to private medical schools is analyzed. The probability of attending private medical schools significantly decreased because of high tuition, a postgraduate obligation to provide a service in specific specialty areas, and the length of time of this obligation. An obligation to provide a service in rural regions had no significant effect on this probability. To motivate non-applicants to private medical schools to enroll in such schools, a decrease in tuition to around 1.2 million yen (US$ 12,000) or less, which is twice that of public schools, was found to be necessary. Further, it was found that non-applicants to private medical schools choose to apply to such schools even with restrictions if they have tuition support at the public school level. Conditional scholarships for private medical schools may widen access to medical education and simultaneously provide incentives to work in insufficiently served areas.

  1. The Role of Student Engagement in the Success of Study of Scholarship Awardee Students of Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Farchaini Budi; Sumarwan, Ujang; Qayim, Ibnul

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the effect of student characteristics, internal factors and external factors on student engagement and the success of scholarship awardee's study in Bogor Agricultural University. The theory used in this study is that the success study of the scholarship awardee is affected by the student characteristics, internal and…

  2. Women in science & engineering scholarships and summer camp outreach programs : year 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Support will make scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and will increase : significantly the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering pr...

  3. Using Student Scholarship To Develop Student Research and Writing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Mark E.; Badura, Amy S.; Davis, Stephen F.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the use of student publications in journals as a teaching tool. Explores the use of this technique in three contexts: (1) enabling students to understand experimental methodology; (2) teaching students about statistics; and (3) helping students learn more about the American Psychological Association (APA) writing style. (CMK)

  4. An Analysis of Arizona Individual Income Tax-Credit Scholarship Recipients' Family Income, 2009-10 School Year. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Paper. PEPG 10-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Vicki E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the "East Valley Tribune and the Arizona Republic" alleged that Arizona's individual income tax-credit scholarship program disproportionately serves privileged students from higher-income families over those from lower-income backgrounds. Yet neither paper collected the student-level, scholarship recipient family income data…

  5. Bizarre Bequests and Strange Scholarships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Cullen M.

    2009-01-01

    There is a scholarship at the University of Texas at Austin endowed by friends of a faculty member whose cat died. The scholarship, which is named for the cat, benefits students in the liberal arts honors program who love cats and who also plan to major in English. People have always been generous to colleges and universities, but they have not…

  6. Optimal Design for Study-Abroad Scholarship: The Effect of Payback Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Donald; Wang, Yaqin

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the optimal design for a study-abroad scholarship. A student is awarded a fixed-amount scholarship to participate in the program but will have to pay back the scholarship if his/her performance fails to meet a target level. When the program is highly productive, the scholarship is low and the target performance is high. The…

  7. Minority engineering scholarships, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Scholarships for Minority Students Studying Engineering and Science: Support will make scholarships available to minority students : interested in engineering and science and will increase significantly the number of minority students that Missouri S...

  8. Marginalization of Published Scholarship on Students with Disabilities in Higher Education Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Edlyn Vallejo

    2014-01-01

    While numbers of students with disabilities continue to rise in postsecondary education, little is known about the extent to which the scholarship on this student population has kept pace. A critical content analysis was conducted to review articles on students with disabilities published in top-tier journals of higher education between 1990 and…

  9. Success of a scholarship scheme for rural students | Ross | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Mosvold Hospital is one of 5 district hospitals providing care for 555 000 indigent people in the Umkhanyakude district, northern KwaZulu-Natal. Recruitment of professional staff is an ongoing challenge for hospital management. An innovative, locally based scholarship scheme, the Friends of Mosveld ...

  10. State Need-Based College Scholarship and Grant Programs: A Study of Their Development, 1969-1980. College Board Report No. 81-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; Boyd, Joseph D.

    Trends in state comprehensive programs of gift (nonrepayable) from 1969-70 through 1979-80 and the relationship of state student aid with funding for institutional operations and with federal programs were studied. The relatively small number of scholarships and grants were included with the need-based grants in the analysis. The first stage of…

  11. The Competitive Effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program on Public School Performance. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #4. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalite, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the significant growth rate and geographic expansion of private school choice programs over the past two decades, it is important to examine how traditional public schools respond to the sudden injection of competition for students and resources. This article uses: (1) a school fixed effects approach; and (2) a regression discontinuity…

  12. Religious Challenges to School Voucher and Tax Benefit/Scholarship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha

    2016-01-01

    A key component of current school reform efforts focuses on increasing parental choice through voucher systems and programs that provide tax benefits for contributions to scholarship programs for private school tuition. Indeed, proposals to adopt such programs have been or currently are being considered in four-fifths of the states, and about half…

  13. The Tax-Credit Scholarship Audit: Do Publicly Funded Private School Choice Programs Save Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    This report follows up on previous work that examined the fiscal effects of private school voucher programs. It estimates the total fiscal effects of tax-credit scholarship programs--another type of private school choice program--on state governments, state and local taxpayers, and school districts combined. Based on a range of assumptions, these…

  14. Innovative Practice in Advancement of Academic Nurse Educator Careers: Developing Scholarship From Program Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Linda L; Hoeksel, Renee; Fitzgerald, Cindy; Doutrich, Dawn

    We describe an innovative practice in advancing careers of academic nurse educators: demonstrating scholarly productivity from program grants. Scholarly productivity is often narrowly defined, especially in research-intensive institutions. The expectation may be a career trajectory based on the traditional scholarship of discovery. However, nurse educators, especially at the associate and full professor ranks, are often involved in leadership activities that include writing and managing program grants. We encourage the academy to value and support the development of program grants that include significant scholarly components, and we offer exemplars of associate and full professor scholarship derived from these projects.

  15. PhD Students' Excellence Scholarships and Their Relationship with Research Productivity, Scientific Impact, and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariviere, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between excellence scholarships and research productivity, scientific impact, and degree completion. Drawing on the entire population of doctoral students in the province of Quebec, this pa- per analyzes three distinct sources of data: students, excellence scholarships, and scientific publications. It shows…

  16. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "The Short-Term Effects of the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship on Student Outcomes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the impact of the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship on high school students' academic and behavioral outcomes. Depending on how long the student had attended Kalamazoo Public Schools (KPS), the scholarship would cover up to 100 percent of tuition and fees for attending any public college or university in the state of Michigan. The…

  17. The Effects of Scholarship Amount on Yield and Success for Master's Students in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Andy; Yang, Rui; Hwang, Jun; McMaken, Jennifer; Rorison, Jamey

    2014-01-01

    The amount of merit-based scholarship support for graduate students in the United States has increased dramatically. Given this increased investment, does increasing the size of scholarships awarded to the most academically able admitted students substantially increase their probability of enrollment? We found no support for a positive answer to…

  18. Can a Public Scholarship Program Successfully Reduce School Drop-Outs in a Time of Economic Crisis? Evidence from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role played by Indonesia's Social Safety Net Scholarships Program in reducing school drop-out rates during the Asian financial crisis. The expectation was that many families would find it difficult to keep their children in school and drop-out rates would be high. The scholarships are found to have been effective in…

  19. Does Digital Scholarship through Online Lectures Affect Student Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinash, Shelley; Knight, Diana; McLean, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    University lectures are increasingly recorded or reproduced and made available to students online. This paper aggregates and critically reviews the associated literature, thematically organised in response to four questions. In response to the first question--does student attendance decrease when online content is made available--research…

  20. A Mentoring Program to Help Junior Faculty Members Achieve Scholarship Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy launched the Bill and Karen Campbell Faculty Mentoring Program (CMP) in 2006 to support scholarship-intensive junior faculty members. This report describes the origin, expectations, principles, and best practices that led to the introduction of the program, reviews the operational methods chosen for its implementation, provides information about its successes, and analyzes its strengths and limitations. PMID:24672062

  1. Minority engineering scholarships renewal, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Scholarships for Minority Students Studying Engineering and Science : Support will make scholarships available to minority students : interested in engineering and science and will increase significantly the number of minority students that Missouri ...

  2. 75 FR 9142 - Information Assurance Scholarship Program (IASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... addition, IASP participants and their faculty advisors (Principal Investigators) are required to complete... faculty advisors (Principal Investigators). Frequency: Annually. Respondent's Obligation: Required to... post-academic assignment criteria for IASP retention students. (i) Nominated personnel shall be high...

  3. Promoting Faculty Scholarship – An evaluation of a program for busy clinician-educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacia Reader

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinician educators face barriers to scholarship including lack of time, insufficient skills, and access to mentoring. An urban department of family medicine implemented a federally funded Scholars Program to increase the participants’ perceived confidence, knowledge and skills to conduct educational research. Method: A part-time faculty development model provided modest protected time for one year to busy clinician educators. Scholars focused on designing, implementing, and writing about a scholarly project. Scholars participated in skill seminars, cohort and individual meetings, an educational poster fair and an annual writing retreat with consultation from a visiting professor. We assessed the increases in the quantity and quality of peer reviewed education scholarship. Data included pre- and post-program self-assessed research skills and confidence and semi-structured interviews. Further, data were collected longitudinally through a survey conducted three years after program participation to assess continued involvement in educational scholarship, academic presentations and publications. Results: Ten scholars completed the program. Scholars reported that protected time, coaching by a coordinator, peer mentoring, engagement of project leaders, and involvement of a visiting professor increased confidence and ability to apply research skills. Participation resulted in academic presentations and publications and new educational leadership positions for several of the participants. Conclusions: A faculty scholars program emphasizing multi-level mentoring and focused protected time can result in increased confidence, skills and scholarly outcomes at modest cost.

  4. Economic analysis of the military health professions scholarship program for neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragel, Brian T; Klimo, Paul; Grant, Gerald A; Taggard, Derek A; Nute, David; McCafferty, Randall R; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2011-09-01

    The 4-year military Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP) provides funds for medical school tuition, books, and a monthly stipend in exchange for a 4-year military commitment (to receive all physician bonuses, an additional 3 months must be served). To analyze the economics of the HPSP for students with an interest in neurosurgery by comparing medical school debt and salaries of military, academic, and private practice neurosurgeons. Salary and medical school debt values from the American Association of Medical Colleges, salary data from the Medical Group Management Association, and 2009 military pay tables were obtained. Annual cash flow diagrams were created to encompass 14.25 years that spanned 4 years (medical school), 6 years (neurosurgical residency), and the first 4.25 years of practice for military, academic, and private practice neurosurgeons. A present value economic model was applied. Mean medical school loan debt was $154,607. Mean military (adjusted for tax-free portions), academic, and private practice salaries were $160,318, $451,068, and $721,458, respectively. After 14.25 years, the cumulative present value cash flow for military, academic, and private practice neurosurgeons was $1 193 323, $2 372 582, and $3 639 276, respectively. After 14.25 years, surgeons with medical student loans still owed $208 761. The difference in cumulative annual present value cash flow between military and academic and between military and private practice neurosurgeons was $1,179,259 and $2,445,953, respectively. The military neurosurgeon will have little to no medical school debt, whereas the calculated medical school debt of a nonmilitary surgeon was approximately $208,000.

  5. Examining Community-Engaged Scholarship in Public Administration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Katrina Herndon

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to broaden the understanding of the role that academic professions play in shaping the values and attitudes of faculty toward CES. This study explored faculty perceptions regarding the factors that encourage or dissuade them in the pursuit of CES within public administration programs. As a framework for research, a conceptual…

  6. Student diversity programs : sponsored items and events for 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Support made scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and increased significantly : the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering programs. R...

  7. 25 CFR 166.903 - How can I get an agriculture scholarship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... scholarships must reapply annually to continue to receive funding beyond the initial award period. Students who... degree-granting program at an accredited college or university. (g) Graduate scholarships are available... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can I get an agriculture scholarship? 166.903 Section...

  8. The American Geological Institute Minority Participation Program (MPP): Thirty Years of Improving Access to Opportunities in the Geosciences Through Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarships for Underrepresented Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, C. N.; Byerly, G. R.; Smith, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Since 1971, the American Geological Institute (AGI) Minority Participation Program (MPP) has supported scholarships for underrepresented minorities in the geosciences at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of our MPP scholars have gone on to hugely successful careers in the geosciences. MPP scholars include corporate leaders, university professors, a NASA scientist-astronaut and a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awardee. Yet as ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in the geosciences, AGI plans to expand its efforts beyond its traditional undergraduate and graduate scholarships to include diversity programs for secondary school geoscience teacher internships, undergraduate research travel support, and doctoral research fellowships. AGI promotes its MPP efforts primarily through its web pages, which are very successful in attracting visitors; through its publications, especially Geotimes; and through its Corporate Associates and Member Societies. Funding for the MPP has come from multiple sources over the past 30 years. Industry, non-profit organizations, and individuals have been the primary source of funding for graduate scholarships. The NSF has regularly funded the undergraduate scholarships. AGI Corporate Associates have contributed to both scholarship programs. The MPP Advisory Committee selects scholarship recipients based upon student academic performance, financial need, and potential for success as a geoscience professional. AGI currently has 29 MPP scholars, including 11 undergraduate and 18 graduate students. Undergraduate scholarships range from \\1000 to \\5000, with an average award of approximately \\2500. Graduate scholarships range from \\500 to \\4000, with an average award of approximately \\1300. In addition to financial assistance, every MPP scholar is assigned a professional geoscientist as a mentor. The mentor is responsible for regular personal contacts with MPP scholars, and with writing evaluation reports that

  9. Handbook of Student Financial Aid: Programs, Procedures, and Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; And Others

    The full range of topics relevant to student financial aid are covered in this book by a variety of experts in financial aid administration and scholarship. The volume details how to organize, implement and assess a financial aid program--including how to determine student need, deal with student bankruptcy and aid termination, and improve…

  10. Schools' Responses to Voucher Policy: Participation Decisions and Early Implementation Experiences in the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Megan J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the supply side of voucher programs, despite schools' central role in program effectiveness. Using survey and interview data on the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program (ICSP), I analyze schools' participation decisions and early implementation experiences to understand better how schools respond to program regulations. I find…

  11. Applying the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Student Perceptions, Behaviours and Success Online and Face-to-Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horspool, Agi; Lange, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face-to-face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach by using a cycle of empirical analysis, reflection and action to improve the learning experience for students. The online course…

  12. The Effectiveness of Zakat Funding through Dompet Dhuafa Beastudi Etos Scholarship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulya Srinovita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Problems of education and poverty are interrelated. The poor people cannot access higher education and they will remain poor with insufficient education. Therefore, the effort to break the cycles of poverty is to provide opportunities for the poor to obtain higher education Dompet Dhuafa through Beastudi Etos empowers education by providing coaching, mentoring and education financing funding. The population of this research is all of the beneficiaries alumni Beastudi Etos scholarship with a total sample of 190 respondents. The result of the research has shown that Beastudi Etos scholarship program is one of the programs that are quite effective in breaking the cycles of poverty through education and economic improvement. The result also indicates that the program is effective in creating excellent and independent generation. It is shown that 81.58% of respondents have successfully completed their studies (Bachelor, Master and Doctoral degrees, the others are in the process of finishing bachelor degree. 88.95% of the respondents have worked and earn income more than 7,000,000 Rupiah/month, 21.5% have dependents from 1 up to 13 persons. In general, the respondents state that coaching and mentoring which has been given is affected on the character (97.4%, skills (94.2%, socials skill (97.9%, and social generosity (97.9%.

  13. 42 CFR 62.8 - What does an individual have to do in return for the scholarship program award?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Service or as a Federal civilian in the full-time clinical practice of the participant's profession and (2... completion of the participant's course of study leading to a degree in medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, or an... National Research Service Award Program. (1) A Scholarship Program participant who demonstrates exceptional...

  14. Oceanography and Geoscience Scholars at Texas A&M University Funded through the NSF S-STEM (Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M. J.; Gardner, W. D.

    2016-02-01

    Over the last seven years we have led the creation and implementation of the Oceanography and Geoscience Scholars programs at Texas A&M University. Through these programs we have been able to provide scholarship support for 92 undergraduates in Geosciences and 29 graduate students in Oceanography. Fifty-seven undergraduate scholars have graduated in Geosciences: 30 undergraduate students in Meteorology, 7 in Geology, and 20 in Environmental Geosciences. Two students have graduated in other STEM disciplines. Twenty-four students are in the process of completing their undergraduate degrees in STEM disciplines. Twenty-three students have graduated with MS or PhD degrees in Oceanography and five PhD students are completing their dissertations. As specified in the program solicitation all of the scholars are academically talented students with demonstrated financial need as defined by the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). We have endeavored to recruit students from underrepresented groups. One-third of the undergraduate scholars were from underrepresented groups; 28% of the graduate students. We will present the challenges and successes of these programs.

  15. Using a Merit-Based Scholarship Program to Increase Rates of College Enrollment in an Urban School District: The Case of the Pittsburgh Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozick, Robert; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Engberg, John

    2015-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Promise is a scholarship program that provides $5,000 per year toward college tuition for public high school graduates in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who earned a 2.5 GPA and a 90% attendance record. This study used a difference-in-difference design to assess whether the introduction of the Promise scholarship program directly…

  16. The Fiscal Impact of a Corporate & Individual Tax Credit Scholarship Program on the State of Indiana. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuit, David

    2009-01-01

    Indiana legislators are currently debating the merits of a proposal to adopt a statewide tuition scholarship tax credit program. The proposed program would make available $5 million in tax credits that businesses and individuals could claim by making donations to non-profit Scholarship Granting Organizations (SGOs). SGO donations would be matched…

  17. The Political, Socio-Economic and Sociocultural Impacts of the King Abdullah Scholarship Program (KASP) on Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Kholoud T.; Scott, Safiyyah; Maadad, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Since 2006, Saudi Arabian politicians, economists and sociologists have had to consider the implications of their country's King Abdullah Scholarship Program (KASP). Because Saudi Arabia has certain religious traditions and economic practices that are sensitive, international scholars are examining from different perspectives the outcomes and…

  18. District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program: Additional Policies and Procedures Would Improve Internal Controls and Program Operations. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Cornelia M.; Franzel, Jeanette M.

    2007-01-01

    The D.C. School Choice Incentive Act created the first private kindergarten-through-grade-12 school-choice program supported by federal funds. The program was named the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP). The United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) was asked to assess the (1) accountability mechanisms governing the use of…

  19. Women in science & engineering and minority engineering scholarships : year 3, report for 2008-2009 activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Support made scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and significantly increased : the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering programs. R...

  20. Self-Assessment of the Use of Plagiarism Avoiding Techniques to Create Ethical Scholarship Among Research Students

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Ahmad; Ahsan Ullah

    2015-01-01

    The use of plagiarism avoiding techniques can be helpful to maintain academic integrity, a better learning environment and intellectual honesty. This explored the use of plagiarism avoiding techniques for creating ethical scholarship among research students. It also measured the association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and the satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism. Data were collected from seven universities through an online self-struct...

  1. How we developed the GIM clinician-educator mentoring and scholarship program to assist faculty with promotion and scholarly work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Amanda; Yeh, Hsin Chieh; Bass, Eric B; Brancati, Frederick; Levine, David; Cofrancesco, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Clinician Educators' (CEs) focus on patient care and teaching, yet many academic institutions require dissemination of scholarly work for advancement. This can be difficult for CEs. Our division developed the Clinician-Educator Mentoring and Scholarship Program (CEMSP) in an effort to assist CEs with scholarship, national reputation, recognition, promotion and job satisfaction. The key components are salary-supported director and co-director who coordinate the program and serve as overall mentors and link CEs and senior faculty, and a full-time Senior Research Coordinator to assist with all aspects of scholarship, a close relationship with the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Methods Core provides advanced statistical support. Funding for the program comes from GIM divisional resources. Perceived value was evaluated by assessing the number of manuscripts published, survey of faculty regarding usage and opinion of CEMSP, and a review of faculty promotions. Although impossible to attribute the contributions of an individual component, a program specifically aimed at helping GIM CE faculty publish scholarly projects, increase participation in national organizations and focus on career progression can have a positive impact.

  2. Closing the Education Gender Gap: Estimating the Impact of Girls' Scholarship Program in the Gambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajigo, Ousman

    2016-01-01

    This paper estimates the impact of a school fee elimination program for female secondary students in The Gambia to reduce gender disparity in education. To assess the impact of the program, two nationally representative household surveys were used (1998 and 2002/2003). By 2002/2003, about half of the districts in the country had benefited from the…

  3. Medicare program; offset of Medicare payments to individuals to collect past-due obligations arising from breach of scholarship and loan contracts--HCFA. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-04

    This final rule sets forth the procedures to be followed for collection of past-due amounts owed by individuals who breached contracts under certain scholarship and loan programs. The programs that would be affected are the National Health Service Corps Scholarship, the Physician Shortage Area Scholarship, and the Health Education Assistance Loan. These procedures would apply to those individuals who breached contracts under the scholarship and loan programs and who-- Accept Medicare assignment for services; Are employed by or affiliated with a provider, Health Maintenance Organization, or Competitive Medical Plan that receives Medicare payment for services; or Are members of a group practice that receives Medicare payment for services. This regulation implements section 1892 of the Social Security Act, as added by section 4052 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987.

  4. Why Some Hope Scholarship Recipients Retain the Scholarship and Others Lose It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trant, Eleanore C.; Crabtree, Katelyn E.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hart, Leslie A.; Watson, Tiffany B.; Williams, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The study we report here examined parental, pre-course, and in-course predictors of students' probability of retaining (n = 136) or losing the HOPE scholarship (n = 41). The study was conducted in a multi-section, entry-level course (n = 203) for the Teacher-Education Program at a large state university in the southeastern U.S. Logistic regression…

  5. 42 CFR 62.3 - Who is eligible to apply for a scholarship program award?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... enrollment, or be enrolled, as a full-time student in a school located in a State; (2) Be pursuing a course of study or program offered by the school leading to a degree in medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, or... under this part is ineligible for an award unless a written statement satisfactory to the Secretary is...

  6. Lean Belt Certification: Pathway for Student, Resident, and Faculty Development and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghouche, Alhasan N; Lobo, Brian C; Wannemuehler, Todd J; Johnson, Kimberly E; Matt, Bruce H; Woodward-Hagg, Heather K; Kokoska, Mimi S

    2016-05-01

    Since July 2013, 20 trainee participants have completed the quality improvement curriculum within the Indiana University Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, including 7 otolaryngology residents, 6 otolaryngology-bound medical students, and 7 psychiatry residents. Nine faculty and staff attended. Participants were highly satisfied with the quality and effectiveness of the program. Following program implementation, 2 otolaryngology residents and 2 medical students initiated their own quality improvement projects. Lean training directly resulted in oral and poster presentations at national conferences, journal publications, and institutional research and quality awards. Students completing the program established a local affiliate group of an international health care quality organization. Quality improvement training can be successfully incorporated into residency training with overwhelming program satisfaction and results in greater scholarly and professional development for motivated participants. The skillset acquired by participants leads to projects that improve patient care, increase value, and justify equipment and personnel retention and expansion. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  7. The Indiana Choice Scholarship Program: Legal Challenges, Program Expansion, and Participation. Informing Policy and Improving Practice. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierniak, Katherine; Billick, Rebecca; Ruddy, Anne-Maree

    2015-01-01

    School choice programs can take a variety of forms, from the provision of various public school options, such as charter schools, to programs which provide funds to offset the cost of students' attendance at a private school. The provision of funds is most often accomplished in two ways: through the provision of state educational funds to be used…

  8. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  9. A Quasi-Experimental Investigation of How the Gates Millennium Scholars Program Is Related to College Students' Time Use and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesJardins, Stephen L.; McCall, Brian P.; Ott, Molly; Kim, Jiyun

    2010-01-01

    A national scholarship program provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is designed to improve access to and success in higher education for low-income high-achieving minority students by providing them with full tuition scholarships and non-monetary support. We use a regression discontinuity approach to investigate whether the receipt of…

  10. Engagement Scholarship Consortium Poster Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargerstock, Burton A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Outreach Scholarship Conference has long provided a venue for the presentation of posters representing innovative research, effective practices, and impactful programs. In 2011, conference planners developed a series of measures focused on enriching the poster session as a platform for showcasing community-based scholarship and…

  11. 78 FR 15969 - Request for Nominations to Serve on Board of Trustees for the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Trustees for the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION... a Scholarship Program to provide financial assistance to Native American students to defray the cost... will be reimbursed for reasonable travel expenses related to the performance of their duties as members...

  12. International Scholarship Graduates Influencing Social and Economic Development at Home: The Role of Alumni Networks in Georgia and Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Many students from low- and middle-income countries seek scholarship support to pursue higher education overseas. Often scholarship programs mandate that recipients "give back" to their home countries following their studies so scholars "apply" their experiences to aid their countries of origin. In this comparative qualitative…

  13. An Evaluation of the Children's Scholarship Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Paul E.; Campbell, David E.

    This paper presents first-year results of an evaluation of a Children's Scholarship Fund (CSF) program which provided scholarships enabling low-income families nationwide to send their K-8 children to private schools of their choice. Families won scholarships through a lottery. Telephone surveys of parents/caretakers of children who took advantage…

  14. Library/Information Science Education, Placement, and Salaries. Guide to Employment Sources in the Library and Information Professions; Placements and Salaries 2000: Plenty of Jobs, Salaries Flat; Accredited Master's Programs in Library and Information Studies; Library Scholarship Sources; Library Scholarship and Award Recipients, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darlena; Terrell, Tom; Gregory, Vicki L.

    2002-01-01

    Includes five articles that report on employment sources in the library and information professions; placements and salaries, which indicate plenty of jobs and salaries that are flat; accredited master's programs in library and information studies; library scholarship sources; and library scholarship and award recipients. (LRW)

  15. Geoscience Education Opportunities: Partnerships to Advance TeacHing and Scholarship (GEOPATHS): A Kansas City Minority Student Recruitment Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, J. O.; Niemi, T. M.

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience Education Opportunities: Partnerships to Advance TeacHing and Scholarship (GEOPATHS) is a multi-year project funded by the National Science Foundation to address gaps in teacher preparation, improve teacher content in geosciences and help raise enrollment in the Geosciences, especially among populations that are traditionally underrepresented in the discipline. The project is a partnership between the University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC) and the Kansas City Missouri School District (KCMSD). In this presentation we discuss strategies that we have successfully used to provide credible pathways into the discipline for minorities that have led to a significant increase in the number of underrepresented minority students who are interested in and majoring in geoscience fields at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

  16. Self-Assessment of the Use of Plagiarism Avoiding Techniques to Create Ethical Scholarship Among Research Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of plagiarism avoiding techniques can be helpful to maintain academic integrity, a better learning environment and intellectual honesty. This explored the use of plagiarism avoiding techniques for creating ethical scholarship among research students. It also measured the association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and the satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism. Data were collected from seven universities through an online self-structured questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to explore the variance. The association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism was indicated. Differences were also found on the basis of gender, discipline, level and stage of study.

  17. Teaching and educational scholarship in Tanzania: faculty initiative to improve performance of health professions' students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkony, Charles A; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Owibingire, Sirra S; Fyfe, Molly V; Omer, Selma; Freeman, Phyllis; Makubi, Abel; Mloka, Doreen A; Portillo, Carmen J; Leyna, Germana H; Tarimo, Edith; Kaaya, Ephata E; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Well-educated and competent health professionals influence the health system in which they work to improve health outcomes, through clinical care and community interventions, and by raising standards of practice and supervision. To prepare these individuals, training institutions must ensure that their faculty members, who design and deliver education, are effective teachers. We describe the experience of the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) in encouraging improvements in the teaching capacity of its faculty and postgraduate students triggered by a major institutional transition to competency-based education. We employed a multi-stage process that started by identifying the teaching and learning needs and challenges of MUHAS students and faculty. Collaborating with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), MUHAS responded to these needs by introducing faculty to competency-based curricula and later to strategies for long term continuing improvement. We demonstrate that teaching faculty members are keen for local institutional support to enable them to enhance their skills as educators, and that they have been able to sustain a program of faculty development for their peers.

  18. ISS Robotic Student Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J.; Benavides, J.; Hanson, R.; Cortez, J.; Le Vasseur, D.; Soloway, D.; Oyadomari, K.

    2016-01-01

    The SPHERES facility is a set of three free-flying satellites launched in 2006. In addition to scientists and engineering, middle- and high-school students program the SPHERES during the annual Zero Robotics programming competition. Zero Robotics conducts virtual competitions via simulator and on SPHERES aboard the ISS, with students doing the programming. A web interface allows teams to submit code, receive results, collaborate, and compete in simulator-based initial rounds and semi-final rounds. The final round of each competition is conducted with SPHERES aboard the ISS. At the end of 2017 a new robotic platform called Astrobee will launch, providing new game elements and new ground support for even more student interaction.

  19. Funding Student Scholarships to the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference 2013, February 7-10, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia, Richard

    2013-02-07

    This Basic Award allowed for the funding of student scholarships to the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference which took place in Washington, D.C. from February 7-10, 2013. The conference was the seventh in a series and included a stellar array of invited speakers, compelling panel discussions, a student poster competition, a daylong Doctoral Consortium, a session featuring a choice of attractions unique to Washington, D.C., a gala banquet and dance, and many exciting networking opportunities. The conference created a welcoming environment for STEM students, especially underrepresented minority and female students, who were provided the highest quality of learning, networking, and social experiences to empower their educational experience and enhance their ability to succeed with a rigorous STEM degree. The networking and mentoring opportunities available at the conference were also designed to empower students to succeed in STEM careers and ultimately serve in leadership in industry and the professoriate. A key step in attracting underrepresented students into STEM fields and paving the way for their success in influential positions is to create a nurturing and supportive network and community for them to rely upon. It is also critical to educate leaders in corporations, government and academia about the benefits to be gained from increasing the percentage of STEM professionals from underrepresented groups. To this end, The Tapia Conference serves both functions, as it connects STEM students with STEM professionals, leaders, and academics who share the vision of a STEM workforce and community that is truly representative of the community in which we live.

  20. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Washington State Achievers Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the multi-year, multi-million dollar Washington State Achievers Scholarship program. Concerned about disparities in college participation for low-income students in the state of Washington versus their wealthier peers, the Gates Foundation partnered with the College Success Foundation…

  1. Designing Scholarships to Improve College Success: Final Report on the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy; Ratledge, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Performance-based scholarships have two main goals: (1) to give students more money for college; and (2) to provide incentives for academic progress. MDRC launched the Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration in 2008 to evaluate the effectiveness of these scholarships in a diverse set of states, institutions, and low-income student…

  2. DoD Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program for High School Students, 1995-󈨤 Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    University of Florida Sports Medicine Honor Roll Weightlifting , Swimming NAME: RACE: SEX: HIGH SCHOOL: ANTICIPATED COLLEGE: ANTICIPATED MAJOR...program. Three of the students took a Psychology course, one took a Nutritional Science class, one a Math course and two of them took a Meteorology...Awards and Scholarships: Honor Roll 13. Activities/Hobbies: Weightlifting , Swimming (Suggested Form) INFORMATION FOR EACH APPRENTICE

  3. International Engineering Students--Avoiding Plagiarism through Understanding the Western Academic Context of Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Andrea H.; Rogers, Derek P.; Harris, Michael B.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the best attempts of academic staff to teach students the mechanics of citation, the rules of referencing continue to be broken, particularly by those new to Western university systems (either first-year undergraduate students or international students from different cultural backgrounds). In late 2003, 16 postgraduate international…

  4. Ashinaga Group Asia: International Student Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Eed

    2017-01-01

    Giving orphaned students abroad the chance to study in Japan While Ashinaga originally only supported Japanese students who had lost parents, as time passed it became increasingly clear that we had the experience and means to assist orphaned students outside Japan as well. This first took the shape of fundraising for international humanitarian crises, but eventually grew into various financial aid and scholarship opportunities to benefit orphaned students from around the world. Wh...

  5. College student bereavement, scholarship, and the university: a call for university engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, D E

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of bereavement among traditional-aged college students should impel universities to assist bereaved students on their campuses. Dealing with bereavement can not only challenge a college student's completing the developmental tasks that our society sets for the later adolescent years, but also imperil the student's remaining in school and graduating. It is in the best interests of the university to develop and implement a variety of effective interventions to assist bereaved students. The author argues that universities are communities devoted to scholarly endeavors and should explicitly incorporate the dimension of compassion and caring. An abbreviated case study is used to illustrate the situations in which one grieving student found herself when she returned to school following the death of her father. A call is made for greater university engagement by forming a university-based bereavement center to coordinate and conduct coherent inquiry that fulfills the scholarly functions of discovery, application, and instruction. Four specific actions for a bereavement center are to train nonbereaved students to provide peer support, to provide structured interventions for college students at risk of bereavement complications, to raise consciousness about bereavement on the university campus, and to conduct research into various bereavement populations and bereavement topics.

  6. Can Scholarships Alone Help Students Succeed? Lessons from Two New York City Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The passage of the Higher Education Act of 1965, which extended need-based financial assistance to the general population for the first time, has improved college access for American students, but more work remains to be done to improve college success. According to government statistics, in 2006, about one in six students had earned a degree or…

  7. Application of the theory of indistinct sets for evaluation scholarship quality of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Порфирьевич Добрица

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for evaluating of students quality education, which eliminates the disadvantages of the five point scale is discussed in the article. The theory of indistinct sets is the base of the constructed algorithm.

  8. AWG Scholarships

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Association for Women Geoscientists will give two Chrysalis Scholarships in 1990. The awards are for women who returned to school after an interruption in education of at least a year and who are finishing a thesis for a Masters or Ph.D. degree in geoscience.1989 was the first year for the Chrysalis. The recipient, Diane Bellis, was a doctoral candidate in geochemistry at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro and the mother of four. She received her Ph.D. in May and is currently an AAAS Fellow in the Department of State in Washington, D.C., working on U.S. science policy in Africa and Latin America.

  9. A New Theory-to-Practice Model for Student Affairs: Integrating Scholarship, Context, and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Robert D.; Kimball, Ezekiel W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we synthesize existing theory-to-practice approaches within the student affairs literature to arrive at a new model that incorporates formal and informal theory, institutional context, and reflective practice. The new model arrives at a balance between the rigor necessary for scholarly theory development and the adaptability…

  10. 77 FR 14955 - DoD Information Assurance Scholarship Program (IASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... point of contact at each CAE, responsible for publicizing the DoD IASP to potential recruitment students... college or university to NSA. Centers of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education and... proposal, and all colleges and universities subsequently receiving grants must provide documentation on how...

  11. 42 CFR 62.6 - How will individuals be selected to participate in the scholarship program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) academic performance. (2) Special consideration will be given to (i) medical and osteopathic students who indicate their intention to enter family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, or osteopathic general... this part for a period of 1 school year. (e) Continuation awards. Subject to the availability of funds...

  12. Scholarships for scientific initiation encourage post-graduation degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriela S; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Mendes, Matheus S; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Demarco, Flávio F; Correa, Marcos B

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with the decision to attend an academic post-graduation program by dental students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012, last-year undergraduate students from Dental Schools of Southern Brazil. A closed questionnaire was applied including questions grouped in three different blocks: pre-graduate, undergraduate period and future perspectives. The outcome was the decision to pursuit an academic post-graduation degree. Associations were tested using chi-squared test and chi-squared test for linear trends when appropriate. Multivariate Poisson regression was also performed. The sample was composed by 671 students (response rate of 69.9%, n=467). In relation to future perspectives, 68% of the interviewed students intended to attend a post-graduation program, but only 17.5% would choose a program with academic and research post-graduation program (Master and PhD programs). In the final model, students from public universities (PR 2.08, 95%CI 1.41-3.08) and students that received scientific initiation scholarship (PR 1.93 95%CI 1.14-3.27) presented a twice greater prevalence to seek academic post-graduate programs. Students with higher family incomes showed a lower prevalence to seek these programs (PR 0.50, 95%IC 0.28-0.90). Scholarships seem to encourage undergraduate students to pursue stricto sensu post-graduation.

  13. STEM Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    & Development (LDRD) National Security Education Center (NSEC) Office of Science Programs Richard P Databases National Security Education Center (NSEC) Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Scholarships STEM Education Programs Teachers (K-12) Students (K-12) Higher Education Regional Education

  14. Fighting for Scholarships in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    Fearing a federal court in Oklahoma might end a state-financed merit-scholarship program targeted by a discrimination lawsuit, black legislators passed a bill making the program race and gender neutral. State regents are criticized for failing to develop effective policy to remedy past discrimination. (MSE)

  15. Is Giving Scholarship Worth the Effort? Loyalty among Scholarship Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurlida, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    To stay ahead of competition, a significant factor has now become of significance; student loyalty towards higher learning institutions. Hence, scholarship recipients have the expectation to demonstrate a certain degree of loyalty towards their education sponsor. In addition, they play an important role as opinion leaders and walking advertisement…

  16. Faculty Scholarship Has a Profound Positive Association with Student Evaluations of Teaching--Except When It Doesn't

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that research-productive faculty are also the finest instructors. But, is this commonly held belief correct? In the current study, the notion that faculty scholarship exhibits a positive association with teaching evaluations is investigated. Reflecting the data structure of faculty nested within university, the current…

  17. Delivery, Student Engagement and the Implementation of Good Practice in Entrepreneurship Education: Learning from the UK's New Entrepreneur Scholarship Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wing

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of a research-informed teaching project carried out to identify key factors in the content and delivery of a successful UK government initiative, the New Entrepreneur Scholarship (NES), from 2001 to 2008. The aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing appropriate changes to…

  18. Establishing philanthropic funds for advanced practice scholarships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, T

    1997-01-01

    Because of decreased tuition assistance at some hospitals, experienced nurses interested in advanced roles may quit rather than stay and expand their roles. This author describes how a hospital based philanthropic community group has helped provide scholarships for nurses interested in advanced practice and how to set up a similar scholarship program that will retain these experienced and motivated nurses.

  19. Federal Student Loan Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Student Aid, US Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    For those needing a loan to attend college, think federal aid first. Federal student loans usually offer borrowers lower interest rates and have more flexible repayment terms and options than private student loans. This brief report answers the following questions about federal aid: (1) What is a federal student loan?; (2) What is a private…

  20. Guide to Financial Aid for American Indian Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Hanna J., Ed.; Thomason, Timothy C., Ed.

    This directory compiles information on college financial aid for American Indian and Alaska Native students. Information is provided on approximately 175 programs exclusively for American Indian and Alaska Native students, including private scholarships and fellowships, school-specific programs and scholarships, state financial aid, tribal…

  1. The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Montana. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Many states have enacted or are considering proposals to give tax credits for contributions that provide tuition scholarships for students in K-12 schools to attend the private or public schools of their choice. This study seeks to inform the public and policymakers about the implications for Montana if the state were to enact such a program. The…

  2. State Merit-Based Aid and Enrolling in Graduate Study: Evidence from the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    This study considers the effect of a state merit-based aid program for undergraduate students on subsequent enrollment in graduate school. It uses student unit record data to analyze the impact of the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES). Price theory is used as a framework for understanding the incentives provided by KEES. Using a…

  3. Students' guide to program design

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Lesley Anne

    1992-01-01

    Students' Guide to Program Design is a textbook on program design. This textbook approaches program design by using structures programming techniques and pseudocode to develop a solution algorithm. Divided into 10 chapters, the book begins with a basic explanation of structured programming techniques, top-down development, and modular design. This discussion is followed by detailed concepts of the syntax of pseudocode; methods of defining the problem; the application of basic control structures in the development of the solution algorithm; desk checking techniques; hierarchy charts; and module

  4. The Promise of a College Scholarship Transforms a District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Gary W.; Ash, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Promise programs are place-based scholarships, generally tied to a city or school district, offering near-universal access to all living in the "place." While Promise programs share some characteristics with other scholarship programs, they're unique because they seek to change communities and schools. Underlying such promise programs is…

  5. Developing a scholarship community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbie, Sharon; Weinert, Clarann; Luparell, Susan; Conley, Virginia; Smith, James

    2005-01-01

    To report the results of a multidisciplinary, interinstitutional writing support group established to facilitate faculty scholarly productivity. ORGANIZING CONCEPT: The road to scholarship can be filled with many obstacles, among them time constraints, teaching and meeting demands, student needs, office interruptions, and lack of colleagueship. The problems associated with lack of colleagueship, in particular, can be compounded for faculty who work in isolated contexts with few, if any, senior faculty to serve as mentors. METHODS OF DEVELOPMENT: The Western Writers Coercion Group evolved over a 2-year period from a small group of nursing faculty at a single institution to include, by its second year, 21 faculty from five western university campuses and three academic disciplines. The group met biweekly via teleconference with the objectives of defining and accomplishing realistic individual scholarship goals and providing a forum for the critical exchange of ideas. The ongoing support and mentoring of the group led to significant writing outcomes in the form of manuscripts submitted for publication, abstracts submitted for conference presentation, grant proposals developed, and collegial relationships formed. Although the benefits of group participation varied somewhat for faculty at different points in the career trajectory, they seemed to accrue at all levels of development. Group members underscored the many less quantifiable advantages of group participation: exposure to broader professional perspectives, the formation of key professional relationships, the enrichment of multidisciplinary input, and individualized assistance with time management, goal setting, and actual drafts. The structure and experience of this group, which continues to meet regularly, might be a model to guide other groups of scholars who face geographic isolation and who struggle with balancing time and work and finding motivation for the process of writing.

  6. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Impact of the Gates Millennium Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation began an innovative scholarship program that provides full financial support to low-income minority students across the United States. The Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program has already awarded more than 10,000 scholarships to exceptional students, with the ultimate goal of funding at least…

  7. Association of research self-efficacy with medical student career interests, specialization, and scholarship: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S Beth; Prayson, Richard A; Dannefer, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal Inventory-Short Form (CRAI-SF) items at matriculation (n = 128) or graduation (n = 111) during 2009-2013. Parametric statistics were used to compare CRAI-SF scales to domains proposed in SCCT: trainees' characteristics (gender, training level, advanced degree), career interests, career intentions (medical specialty), and performance (peer-reviewed publications and required thesis topic). A number of lessons emerged in using theory to frame the evaluation of a complex educational program. Graduates rated their research self-efficacy significantly higher on all six CRAI-SF scales with large effect sizes (>.90) on five scales (Conceptualizing a Study, Study Design and Analysis, Responsible Research Conduct, Collaborating with Others, and Reporting a Study). Women and men did not have significantly different scores on CRAI-SF scales (p > .05), suggesting that the research program provides adequate supports for women students. Most thesis projects addressed clinical (36.9 %, n = 41) or translational (34.2 %, n = 38) research topics. The CRAI-SF discriminated between medical school matriculates and graduates, suggesting that research self-efficacy increases with mastery experiences. No significant relationships occurred between CRAI-SF scores and graduates' thesis topics or chosen clinical specialty. Correlations demonstrated significant relationships between graduates' perceptions of research self-efficacy and their interest in clinical research careers.

  8. Increasing Access for Economically Disadvantaged Students: The NSF/CSEM & S-STEM Programs at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Zakiya S.; Iyengar, Sitharama S.; Pang, Su-Seng; Warner, Isiah M.; Luces, Candace A.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing college degree attainment for students from disadvantaged backgrounds is a prominent component of numerous state and federal legislation focused on higher education. In 1999, the National Science Foundation (NSF) instituted the "Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships" (CSEMS) program; this initiative was designed to provide greater access and support to academically talented students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Originally intended to provide financial support to lower income students, this NSF program also advocated that additional professional development and advising would be strategies to increase undergraduate persistence to graduation. This innovative program for economically disadvantaged students was extended in 2004 to include students from other disciplines including the physical and life sciences as well as the technology fields, and the new name of the program was Scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM). The implementation of these two programs in Louisiana State University (LSU) has shown significant and measurable success since 2000, making LSU a Model University in providing support to economically disadvantaged students within the STEM disciplines. The achievement of these programs is evidenced by the graduation rates of its participants. This report provides details on the educational model employed through the CSEMS/S-STEM projects at LSU and provides a path to success for increasing student retention rates in STEM disciplines. While the LSU's experience is presented as a case study, the potential relevance of this innovative mentoring program in conjunction with the financial support system is discussed in detail.

  9. Program Costs and Student Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  10. Student science enrichment training program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-08-01

    This is a report on the Student Science Enrichment Training Program, with special emphasis on chemical and computer science fields. The residential summer session was held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC, for six weeks during 1993 summer, to run concomitantly with the college`s summer school. Fifty participants selected for this program, included high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students came from rural South Carolina and adjoining states which, presently, have limited science and computer science facilities. The program focused on high ability minority students, with high potential for science engineering and mathematical careers. The major objective was to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who would elect to go into science, engineering and mathematical careers. The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and engineering at Claflin College received major benefits from this program as it helped them to expand the Departments of Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science as a result of additional enrollment. It also established an expanded pool of well qualified minority science and mathematics graduates, which were recruited by the federal agencies and private corporations, visiting Claflin College Campus. Department of Energy`s relationship with Claflin College increased the public awareness of energy related job opportunities in the public and private sectors.

  11. Addressing the negative impact of scholarship on dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, R S

    1984-09-01

    Defined broadly, scholarship is the essence of academic and professional life. In several ways, however, scholarship as defined, perceived, and applied within the university has a negative impact on dental education. When scholarship is defined in terms of numbers of publications, faculty efforts are turned away from other important forms of scholarship. The review process for publication quality is unreliable, and the focus on numbers of publications encourages multiple authorship and papers of less practical significance. The proposed solution of nontenure tracks for clinicians creates its own difficulties. Broadening the definition of scholarship will encourage better clinical teaching, clinical judgment, and clinical assessment of student performance, and will result in more satisfied teachers, students, and alumni, and ultimately in better health care through improved judgments and decision processes. The perception that scholarship is a meaningless university hurdle for clinicians must be dispelled.

  12. Transforming practice into clinical scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Jacqueline; Acorn, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this paper were to explicate clinical scholarship as synonymous with the scholarship of application and to explore the evolution of scholarly practice to clinical scholarship. Boyer contributed an expanded view of scholarship that recognized various approaches to knowledge production beyond pure research (discovery) to include the scholarship of integration, application and teaching. There is growing interest in using Boyer's framework to advance knowledge production in nursing but the discussion of clinical scholarship in relation to Boyer's framework is sparse. Discussion paper. Literature from 1983-2015 and Boyer's framework. When clinical scholarship is viewed as a synonym for Boyer's scholarship of application, it can be aligned to this well established framework to support knowledge generated in clinical practice. For instance, applying the three criteria for scholarship (documentation, peer review and dissemination) can ensure that the knowledge produced is rigorous, available for critique and used by others to advance nursing practice and patient care. Understanding the differences between scholarly practice and clinical scholarship can promote the development of clinical scholarship. Supporting clinical leaders to identify issues confronting nursing practice can enable scholarly practice to be transformed into clinical scholarship. Expanding the understanding of clinical scholarship and linking it to Boyer's scholarship of application can assist nurses to generate knowledge that addresses clinical concerns. Further dialogue about how clinical scholarship can address the theory-practice gap and how publication of clinical scholarship could be expanded given the goals of clinical scholarship is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Women in science & engineering and minority engineering scholarships : year 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Support will make scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and will increase : significantly the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering pr...

  14. Women in science & engineering and minority engineering scholarships : year 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Support will make scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and will increase : significantly the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering pr...

  15. Application to Determination of Scholarship Worthiness Using Simple Multi Attribute Rating Technique and Merkle Hellman Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicky Nofriansyah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was focused on explaining how the concept of simple multi attribute rating technique method in a decision support system based on desktop programming to solve multi-criteria selection problem, especially Scholarship. The Merkle Hellman method is used for securing the results of choices made by the Smart process. The determination of PPA and BBP-PPA scholarship recipients on STMIK Triguna Dharma becomes a problem because it takes a long time in determining the decision. By adopting the SMART method, the application can make decisions quickly and precisely. The expected result of this research is the application can facilitate in overcoming the problems that occur concerning the determination of PPA and BBP-PPA scholarship recipients as well as assisting Student Affairs STMIK Triguna Dharma in making decisions quickly and accurately

  16. Attracting students to nuclear careers: INPO educational assistance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkle, M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility industry is responding to a manpower shortage of 2000 at nuclear plants with a concerted analysis of regional training centers and educational assistance programs through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). University support and cooperation are generally strong. The INPO program includes undergraduate- and graduate-level scholarships and fellowships

  17. Scholarship, Textbooks, and Mythology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Laura K.

    2004-01-01

    A new textbook designed for first- or second-year courses in mythology as an introduction to literature shows that a community college faculty member who writes a textbook adds teaching experience to scholarship.

  18. Drawing on Technical Writing Scholarship for the Teaching of Writing to Advanced ESL Students--A Writing Tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Dorota

    2003-01-01

    Outlines the technical writing tutorial (TWT) that precedes an advanced English as a second language (ESL) writing course for students of English Philology at the Jagiellonian University, Poland. Finds a statistically significant increase in the performance of the students who had taken the TWT. Indicates that technical writing books and journals…

  19. Faith, scholarship and postmodernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan VanZanten Gallagher

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Faith, Scholarship, and postmodernismPostmodernism represents perhaps the most important philosophical shift occurring in Western thought since the Enlightenment. It is thus crucial for Christian scholars to address the issues it raises. In the United States, Christian scholars have employed at least two different paradigms in discussing the relationship of faith and scholarship. In the integration model, scholars assume that faith and scholarship are two distinct entities that must be brought together, while the worldview model assumes that the scholar always begins with a narrative worldview that subsequently informs one's scholarship. However, the worldview model holds that one's worldview can be influenced and informed by one's scholarship, life experiences, and cultural settings as well. After distinguishing between various kinds of postmodernism based upon their views of truth, unknowability, and cultural relativism - this article argues that worldview thinking may benefit from the academy’s embrace of postmodernism. Although Christian scholars have expressed a wide variety of opinions on postmodernism, I argue that postmodernism’s anti-foundationalism and recognition of the importance of perspectival thinking provide new opportunities for Christian scholarship.

  20. The Blind Leading the Blind: Goalball as Engaged Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rheenen, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes an engaged scholarship course at a large public research university on the west coast of the United States. The pilot course introduces students to the scholarship on disability framed within the cultural studies of sport. Participants engage with existing literature while actively participating in goalball, a sport designed…

  1. Developing the Parameters of Scholarship in Postgraduate Coursework Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, Allan F.

    2013-01-01

    Scholarship parameters, in relation to postgraduate coursework studies, are developed against the expectations of the Boyer classifications of scholarship (Boyer, 1990) with particular emphasis on the role of minor thesis development. An example is presented in which postgraduate coursework students are required to undertake a three semester minor…

  2. Scholarship and Dental Education: New Perspectives for Clinical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E.

    1984-01-01

    Career advancement in academic dentistry appears to demand success in teaching, scholarship, and service, but foremost in research or scholarship. As a result, many dental faculty believe they are forced to choose between providing excellent professional preparation for their students or ensuring their academic careers. (MLW)

  3. Four-Year Effects on Degree Receipt and Employment Outcomes from a Performance-Based Scholarship Program in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Gutierrez, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    A college degree is often viewed as a key step toward better employment and higher earnings. Many community college students, however, never graduate and cannot reap the financial benefits associated with a college degree. Although existing research suggests that financial aid interventions can modestly improve students' short-term academic…

  4. Medical Student Financing and the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    exclusive alternatives arises in a wide variety of contexts. The conditional logit technique, recently popularized by McFadden,, has become a widely...financing your medical school educacion this ear (76-77). Assume that you were eligible and that each of these alternatives had een available to you at

  5. Marketing Your College Music Program to Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests the use of time-proven marketing methods to attract high school students to college music programs and keep them interested in the music program. Explores facets of the college and the program that draw students, including reputation, location, costs, and program content. (LS)

  6. Students win national financial planning contest

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphin, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Three Virginia Tech students studying financial planning have won the 2007 Ameriprise Financial Planning Invitational, bringing home $10,000 in scholarship money to support the financial planning program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

  7. Collaboration Between Staff and Students in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: The Potential and the Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Allin

    2014-03-01

    (Mann, 2001. Developing effective collaborations between students and lecturers matters for SoTL practice, as such collaborations have the potential to transform teaching and learning in Higher Education, and develop further our understanding of learning (Werder & Otis, 2009.

  8. Improving student performance in an introductory biology majors course: A social action project in the scholarship of teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Sara Lang Ketchum

    This social action study followed an introductory biology course for a three-year period to determine whether changes in teaching personnel, instructional techniques and reorientation to student-centered learning would impact student performance. The course was redirected from a traditional lecture-laboratory format to one emphasizing active learning inquiry methods. Student retention, achievement, and failure were observed for three years in addition to one year prior, and one year following, the study. The study examined the two semester introductory biology course required of all biology majors and those intending a career in science, medicine or dentistry. During the first semester of the study, the dropout rate decreased from 46% to 21%. Prior to the study, 39% of the students completing the course received a grade of D or F while only 4% received a grade of B or above. During the first semester of the study 14% of the students received a grade of D or F while 46% received a B, B+ or A grade. Similar results were seen in other semesters of the study. A statistical comparison of student retention and performance was carried out using grade data for classes taught by the original faculty, the action study faculty and the post-study faculty. The differences between the original faculty and the action study faculty were statistically significant. Effect size calculations indicated large differences between the action study faculty and the two other faculty groups in terms of student retention, achievement and failure. The results are attributed to both the personnel change and, more significantly, the change in teaching methods and emphasis on student-active learning. Comparison between the pre- and post-study teams showed less dramatic effect sizes than when the action study data were compared with the data from either other team. Nevertheless, the post-study results showed that although the retention rate dropped during the year after the study, the improvement

  9. The Impact of the Promise of Scholarships and Altering School Structure on College Plans, Preparation, and Enrollment

    OpenAIRE

    Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Herting, Jerald R.; Hirschman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The Washington State Achiever (WSA) program was a large-scale educational intervention of scholarships, mentoring, and school redesign designed to encourage students from moderate and low income families to attend college in Washington State. Using a quasi-experimental design based on pre- and post-intervention surveys of high school seniors in program and non-program schools, we find a significant WSA effect on educational outcomes, net of the demographic and socioeconomic composition of stu...

  10. Improving the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning through Classroom Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Patrícia; Teixeira-Dias, José Joaquim; Medina, Jorge

    The scholarship of teaching emerged in the last decades as a fundamental concept to the development of good teaching practices in Higher Education and, consequently, to the enhancement of the quality of student learning. Considering that scholarship comprehends a process as well as an outcome, research on teaching and learning should be viewed as one important aspect of the scholarship of teaching. The goal of this essay is to illustrate how the scholarship of teaching and learning can be enhanced through the development of classroom research rooted on students' questioning, conceived and implemented by both university teachers and educational researchers. Valuing and stimulating students' questions offers an innovative dimension to science education as it puts students at a central role in the learning process. This way, encouraging students' questioning also strengthens teaching-research links by bringing teachers and learners together in a community of inquiry.

  11. Concepções de conhecimento escolar: potencialidades do Programa Institucional de Bolsa de Iniciação à Docência Concepts of school knowledge: potentialities of the Institutional Program of Teaching Initiation Scholarships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Rosana Fetzner

    2012-09-01

    understood that it is still a challenge for many elementary/intermediate schools, to acknowledge and work with knowledge that are significant for the people who attend it. Funded by CAPES, in the context of PIBID, this paper presents the early results of a study on the conceptions of school knowledge that intertwine the teaching practice of teachers from public schools and scholarship holders for teaching initiation involved in the project. The research was developed through the study of intercultural aspects and its contemporary challenges, the follow-up of the work done in the schools and the use of questionnaires to students who had a teaching initiation scholarship granted by the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO, which implemented a project by means of the above mentioned program. We found, until now, that the concept of school knowledge has oscillated between conservative and emancipatory perspectives, and the latter are understood as those which, sharing the notion of well-living, attempt to integrate themselves into the needs of the communities and to share principles involving relationality, the correspondence and the complementarity, as emphasized by Catherine Walsh.

  12. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  13. Making It All Count: A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration Model Incorporating Scholarship, Creative Activity, and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rocky; Hauschild-Mork, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    This study takes a grounded theory approach as a basis for a case study examining a cross-disciplinary artistic and academic collaborative project involving faculty from the areas of English, music, dance, theatre, design, and visual journalism resulting in the creation of research, scholarly, and creative activity that fosters student engagement…

  14. The Rhodes Scholarship in the Current Era of Student Activism: What Do We Consider "Prestigious" and Who Benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary student activism has revealed deep feelings of alienation on college campuses, prompting strong reactions to current and historical racial injustice, including the history of Cecil Rhodes. Can advisors promote restorative justice by encouraging reflection upon privileges afforded to Rhodes scholars and their responsibility to address…

  15. Realizing Student, Faculty, and Institutional Outcomes at Scale: Institutionalizing Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity within Systems and Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malachowski, Mitchell; Osborn, Jeffrey M.; Karukstis, Kerry K.; Ambos, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of undergraduate research as a student, faculty, and institutional success pathway, and provides the context for the Council on Undergraduate Research's support for developing and enhancing undergraduate research in systems and consortia. The chapter also provides brief introductions to each…

  16. Ethical Development through Student Activities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Carol S.

    1991-01-01

    Student activities programing, viewed as essential to the college experience, is defended by outlining some of the values and growth opportunities it provides for students. Several specific programing strategies useful as catalysts in values development are described, including values clarification exercises, multicultural programing, and…

  17. Developing medical students as teachers: an anatomy-based student-as-teacher program with emphasis on core teaching competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Jay, Erie; Starkman, Sidney J; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2013-01-01

    Teaching is an increasingly recognized responsibility of the resident physician. Residents, however, often assume teaching responsibilities without adequate preparation. Consequently, many medical schools have implemented student-as-teacher (SAT) programs that provide near-peer teaching opportunities to senior medical students. Near-peer teaching is widely regarded as an effective teaching modality; however, whether near-peer teaching experiences in medical school prepare students for the teaching demands of residency is less understood. We explored whether the anatomy-based SAT program through the Human Structure didactic block at Mayo Medical School addressed the core teaching competencies of a medical educator and prepared its participants for further teaching roles in their medical careers. A web-based survey was sent to all teaching assistants in the anatomy-based SAT program over the past five years (2007-2011). Survey questions were constructed based on previously published competencies in seven teaching domains--course development, course organization, teaching execution, student coaching, student assessment, teacher evaluation, and scholarship. Results of the survey indicate that participants in the anatomy-based SAT program achieved core competencies of a medical educator and felt prepared for the teaching demands of residency. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. Universal in the Local: Practiscing the Scholarship of Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Rottle

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The 'Scholarship of Engagement' is a burgeoning genre of scholarship exemplified by community-based pedagogic models used in schools of landscape architecture. This form of scholarship employs engagement with the multi-faceted particulars of local places and people, through which it can inform globally relevant principles and strategies. The paper describes attributes of the Scholarship of Engagement, which supports integrated teaching, research and service in landscape architecture and provides an example of the 'universal in the local'. It suggests that a framework for scholarship assessment developed by the Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching is effective in promoting scholarship in the design studio, incorporating the components: clear goals and problem definition; preparation through literature and research; methods including community participation, place analyses, case-study research and analysis, and solution testing through design; assessment of results; effective presentation of the results; and reflective critique by the students, community and faculty. This model frames the structure and description of community design studio work undertaken to help a small Alaskan town confront the impending influx and impacts of large chain stores, a problem communities are increasingly facing. In such an engaged-scholarship approach, the hierarchical values of cosmopolitan versus local are realigned, and faculty and students collaborate with community partners - whether global or local - to solve pressing issues. Can this integrated model of public scholarship be legitimised, supported and extended?

  19. Developing digital scholarship emerging practices in academic libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Mackenzie, Alison

    2016-01-01

    This book provides strategic insights drawn from librarians who are meeting the challenge of digital scholarship, utilizing the latest technologies and creating new knowledge in partnership with researchers, scholars, colleagues and students.

  20. Teaching as Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Neely-Smith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available As research and funding continue to replace teaching as the central mission in more colleges and universities, nursing faculty will be expected to engage in research endeavours as proof of scholarship involvement. However, the multiple roles of the nursing faculty coupled with the pressure to engage in research and funding endeavours have led to increased stress and burnout and increased attrition rate. The purpose of this paper is to delineate the expected roles of the nursing faculty related to the trilogy of teaching, research and service and recommend that colleges/universities recognize not only research as scholarship, but also teaching and service. An integrative review of the literature using books and journals from nursing and other relevant disciplines related to the multiple roles of nursing faculty was conducted. Teaching is a vital role and should remain the central mission of colleges/universities to ensure effective pedagogy. Institutions of higher learning should adapt an umbrella of scholarship under which falls teaching, research, and service; thus, teaching would be considered scholarship.

  1. Valla on Biblical Scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haan, Annet den

    2016-01-01

    Lorenzo Valla’s Annotationes to the New Testament have been the object of study both as part of the history of Biblical scholarship and in the context of Valla’s own intellectual development. The work was, however, embedded in the intellectual context of the Vatican court in the 1450s, where...

  2. Code quality issues in student programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuning, H.W.; Heeren, B.J.; Jeuring, J.T.

    2017-01-01

    Because low quality code can cause serious problems in software systems, students learning to program should pay attention to code quality early. Although many studies have investigated mistakes that students make during programming, we do not know much about the quality of their code. This study

  3. Alternatives for Revitalizing Student Services Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews alternatives for revitalizing the programs and management of community college student services. As program development models, considers Miami-Dade Community College's computer-based instructional management system; entrepreneurial fee-based services; and divestment of situational or special-interest services to student groups. In…

  4. Development of Model for Providing Feasible Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Dhika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development of a model to determine a feasible scholarship recipient on the basis of the naiv¨e Bayes’ method using very simple and limited attributes. Those attributes are the applicants academic year, represented by their semester, academic performance, represented by their GPa, socioeconomic ability, which represented the economic capability to attend a higher education institution, and their level of social involvement. To establish and evaluate the model performance, empirical data are collected, and the data of 100 students are divided into 80 student data for the model training and the remaining of 20 student data are for the model testing. The results suggest that the model is capable to provide recommendations for the potential scholarship recipient at the level of accuracy of 95%.

  5. Exploring Scholarship and the Emergency Medicine Educator: A Workforce Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Coates, Wendy C; Clarke, Samuel; Runde, Daniel P; Fowlkes, Emilie; Kurth, Jacqueline; Yarris, Lalena M

    2017-01-01

    Recent literature calls for initiatives to improve the quality of education studies and support faculty in approaching educational problems in a scholarly manner. Understanding the emergency medicine (EM) educator workforce is a crucial precursor to developing policies to support educators and promote education scholarship in EM. This study aims to illuminate the current workforce model for the academic EM educator. Program leadership at EM training programs completed an online survey consisting of multiple choice, completion, and free-response type items. We calculated and reported descriptive statistics. 112 programs participated. Mean number of core faculty/program: 16.02 ± 7.83 [14.53-17.5]. Mean number of faculty full-time equivalents (FTEs)/program dedicated to education is 6.92 ± 4.92 [5.87-7.98], including (mean FTE): Vice chair for education (0.25); director of medical education (0.13); education fellowship director (0.2); residency program director (0.83); associate residency director (0.94); assistant residency director (1.1); medical student clerkship director (0.8); assistant/associate clerkship director (0.28); simulation fellowship director (0.11); simulation director (0.42); director of faculty development (0.13). Mean number of FTEs/program for education administrative support is 2.34 ± 1.1 [2.13-2.61]. Determination of clinical hours varied; 38.75% of programs had personnel with education research expertise. Education faculty represent about 43% of the core faculty workforce. Many programs do not have the full spectrum of education leadership roles and educational faculty divide their time among multiple important academic roles. Clinical requirements vary. Many departments lack personnel with expertise in education research. This information may inform interventions to promote education scholarship.

  6. Minority students benefit from mentoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, D L; Rodak, B; Fitzgerald, N; Baker, S

    1993-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as one strategy to attract minority students to the radiologic sciences profession. This case study describes a minority mentoring program conducted for pre-radiologic science students at a Midwestern university during the 1991-92 academic year. Ten minority radiologic science students enrolled in the mentoring program. The study showed that mentoring may be a viable option to serve the special needs of minorities for recruitment and retention.

  7. The College Opportunity Grant Program of the California State Scholarship and Loan Commission; A Report on and Evaluation of the 1969 and 1970 COG Selection Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhofer, Edwin L.

    The College Opportunity Grant (COG) program was established by the California legislature in 1968 and was intended to provide monetary grants to financially needy students, primarily from ethnic minorities, to assist them while attending college. This paper contains: (1) a side-by-side description of the characteristics of the 1969 and 1970…

  8. A framework for promoting scholarship productivity in occupational therapy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P J; Justiss, M J; Schmid, A A; Fisher, T F

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a curricular model to support the production of quality research and development of occupational therapy professional students, prepared to become leaders in the production and utilization of evidence for practice. This model is designed for programs with faculty challenged by the dual mandate of program excellence and expectations for scholarly productivity needed for tenure and promotion: typically programs at research universities. The essence of the model is the paralleling of research and competencies for clinical practice where faculty and students participate as a community of scholars. It is based on the literature that addresses the tensions between achieving excellence in research and scholarly productivity, and excellence in teaching. The experience of one university with this model over a five-year period of time is shared with the student-faculty productivity outcomes. These outcomes include dissemination of 55 collaborative peer reviewed products and faculty has generated support for 25 paid graduate assistantships. The combination of student outcomes and faculty support for their research has strengthened the ability of the faculty to excel in meeting the University mandate of scholarship while providing a high quality professional educational program.

  9. The Cal-Bridge Program: Supporting Diverse Graduate Students in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Rudolph, Alexander L.; Abazajian, Kevork; Povich, Matthew S.

    2018-06-01

    The mission of the Cal-Bridge program is to increase the number of underrepresented minority and women students completing a bachelor’s degree and entering a PhD program in astronomy, physics, or closely-related fields. To do so, we have built a network of faculty at diverse higher education institutions, including University of California (UC) campuses, California State Universities (CSUs), and community colleges dedicated to this goal. Students selected for our program are known as Cal-Bridge Scholars, and we give them a wide variety of support: (1) financial scholarships in their junior/senior years at CSU and their first year of graduate school at a UC, (2) intensive mentoring by a pair of CSU and UC faculty members, (3) tutoring, (4) professional development workshops, (5) exposure to research opportunities at various universities, and (6) membership in a growing cohort of like-minded students. In this poster, we report on our work in designing an effective mentoring program and developing tools like our mentoring and graduate application handbooks, and we discuss our tutoring program and the professional development workshops we have designed, and we report on their effectiveness. Funding for this program is provided by NSF-SSTEM Grant #1356133.

  10. Student Assistance Program Outcomes for Students at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Virginia Sue; Kern, John, III; Brent, David A.; Thurkettle, Mary Ann; Puskar, Kathryn R.; Sekula, L. Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Pennsylvania's response to adolescent suicide is its Student Assistance Program (SAP). SAP has been funded for 27 years although no statewide outcome studies using case-level data have been conducted. This study used logistic regression to examine drug-/alcohol-related behaviors and suspensions of suicidal students who participated in SAP. Of the…

  11. Program Characteristics Influencing Allopathic Students' Residency Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Michael D; Miller, Karen Hughes; Ziegler, Craig H; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mitchell, Charlene K

    2016-04-01

    Medical students must consider many overt variables when entering the National Resident Matching Program. However, changes with the single graduate medical education accreditation system have caused a gap in knowledge about more subtle considerations, including what, if any, influence the presence of osteopathic physician (ie, DO) and international medical graduate (IMG) house officers has on allopathic students' residency program preferences. Program directors and selection committee members may assume students' implicit bias without substantiating evidence. To reexamine which program characteristics affect US-trained allopathic medical students' residency selection, and to determine whether the presence of DO and IMG house officers affects the program choices of allopathic medical students. Fourth-year medical students from 4 allopathic medical schools completed an online survey. The Pearson χ(2) statistic was used to compare demographic and program-specific traits that influence ranking decisions and to determine whether school type (private vs public), valuing a residency program's prestige, or interest in a competitive specialty dictated results. Qualitative data were analyzed using the Pandit variation of the Glaser and Strauss constant comparison. Surveys were completed by 323 of 577 students (56%). Students from private vs public institutions were more likely to value a program's prestige (160 [93%] vs 99 [72%]; P<.001) and research opportunities (114 [66%] vs 57 [42%]; P<.001), and they were less likely to consider their prospects of being accepted (98 [57%] vs 111 [81%]; P<.001). A total of 33 (10%) and 52 (16%) students reported that the presence of DO or IMG trainees, respectively, would influence their final residency selection, and these percentages were largely unchanged among students interested in programs' prestige or in entering a competitive specialty. Open-ended comments were generally optimistic about diversification of the physician

  12. Impact of a student leadership development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnut, Renae; Tran-Johnson, Jennifer

    2013-12-16

    To assess the effectiveness of the Student Leadership Development Series (SLDS), an academic-year--long, co-curricular approach to developing leadership skills in pharmacy students. Participants met once per month for activities and a college-wide guest speaker session. Students also completed monthly forms regarding what they had learned, participated in poster presentations, and created a personal leadership platform. One hundred twenty-three students participated in the program between 2008 and 2013. On monthly evaluation forms and a summative evaluation, students indicated that the program helped them feel prepared for leadership opportunities and increased their desire to pursue leadership. They valued interacting with pharmacy leaders from the community and learning how they could distinguish themselves as leaders. The SLDS provided pharmacy students with an opportunity to explore personal leadership styles and develop broader understanding of leadership, and increased their desire to pursue leadership positions in the future.

  13. The University of Stuttgart IKE/University of Arizona student research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The University of Stuttgart's Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE) and the University of Arizona have had a joint program in which graduate students from the IKE spend 1 yr on the University of Arizona campus. This program started in 1982 largely as the result of an initiative begun by K.H. Hoecker, then director of IKE. Since 1985, Alfred Voss has been director and the program has continued without interruption. Under the program, the Deutscher Akademisher Austauschdienst, a government agency of the Federal Republic of Germany has funded scholarships for students from IKE, which provide support for 1 yr during which they attend the University of Arizona as visiting student scholars and engage in a research project under the direction of one of our faculty, which satisfies a part of the requirements for the Ingenieur-Diplom Fachrichtung Maschinenbau. The students get credit for their research from the University of Stuttgart. The topics have a broad range and include software development, artificial intelligence, radiation transport, and energy management studies

  14. A Comprehensive Wellness Program for International Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Millard J.; Ozaki, Roger H.

    This document presents a model wellness program for international college students in the United States and strategies to aid them in staying healthy during their stay. It notes that, without parents or other support groups, international students run the risk of developing serious health problems because of inadequate diet and sleep, substandard…

  15. Performance-Based Scholarships: Replication at Six Sites Using Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Performance-based scholarships were developed to help tackle some of the financial obstacles facing students in the postsecondary education system. In general, these scholarships aim to help reduce the financial burdens of low-income college students, and are structured to help incentivize good academic progress. Performance-based scholarships…

  16. Creating Authentic Geoscience Research Experiences for Underrepresented Students in Two-Year Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.

    2014-12-01

    With community college and two-year program students playing pivotal roles in advancing the nation's STEM agenda now and throughout the remainder of this young millennia, it is incumbent on educators to devise innovative and sustainable STEM initiatives to attract, retain, graduate, and elevate these students to four-year programs and beyond. Involving these students in comprehensive, holistic research experiences is one approach that has paid tremendous dividends. The New York City College of Technology (City Tech) was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) supplemental grant to integrate a community college/two-year program component into its existing REU program. The program created an inviting and supportive community of scholars for these students, nurtured them through strong, dynamic mentoring, provided them with the support structures needed for successful scholarship, and challenged them to attain the same research prominence as their Bachelor degree program companions. Along with their colleagues, the community college/two-year program students were given an opportunity to conduct intensive satellite and ground-based remote sensing research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST) at City College and its CREST Institute Center for Remote Sensing and Earth System Science (ReSESS) at City Tech. This presentation highlights the challenges, the rewards, and the lessons learned from this necessary and timely experiment. Preliminary results indicate that this paradigm for geoscience inclusion and high expectation has been remarkably successful. (The program is supported by NSF REU grant #1062934.)

  17. Teaching Programming to Liberal Arts Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh; Bennedsen, Jens; Brandorff, Steffen

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present a new learning environment to be used in an introductory programming course for studentsthat are non-majors in computer science, more precisely formultimedia students with a liberal arts background. Media-oriented programming adds new requirements to thecraft of programmi...

  18. Research Review: Laboratory Student Magazine Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Explores research on student-produced magazines at journalism schools, including the nature of various programs and curricular structures, ethical considerations, and the role of faculty advisors. Addresses collateral sources that provide practical and philosophical foundations for the establishment and conduct of magazine production programs.…

  19. Student retention in athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r = 0.515, P accounting for 37.2% of the variance between groups. The theoretic model accurately classified 95.7% of the seniors and 53.8% of the major changers. A common theme emerging from the qualitative data was the presence of a strong peer-support group that surrounded many of the senior-level students. Understanding student retention in athletic training is

  20. Measuring Student Transformation in Entrepreneurship Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Gedeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how to measure student transformation primarily within a university entrepreneurship degree program. Student transformation is defined as changes in knowledge (“Head”, skills (“Hand”, and attitudinal (“Heart” learning outcomes. Following the institutional impact model, student transformation is the primary goal of education and all other program goals and aspects of quality desired by stakeholders are either input factors (professors, courses, facilities, support, etc. or output performance (number of startups, average starting salary, % employment, etc.. This goal-setting framework allows competing stakeholder quality expectations to be incorporated into a continuous process improvement (CPI model when establishing program goals. How to measure these goals to implement TQM methods is shown. Measuring student transformation as the central focus of a program promotes harmony among competing stakeholders and also provides a metric on which other program decisions (e.g., class size, assignments, and pedagogical technique may be based. Different stakeholders hold surprisingly different views on defining program quality. The proposed framework provides a useful way to bring these competing views into a CPI cycle to implement TQM requirements of accreditation. The specific entrepreneurial learning outcome goals described in the tables in this article may also be used directly by educators in nonaccredited programs and single courses/workshops or for other audiences.

  1. 34 CFR 611.47 - What are a scholarship recipient's reporting responsibilities upon the close of the LEA's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may require, that confirms that the recipient has taught during this period in a high-need school... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are a scholarship recipient's reporting... EDUCATION TEACHER QUALITY ENHANCEMENT GRANTS PROGRAM Scholarships § 611.47 What are a scholarship recipient...

  2. Women in science & engineering and minority engineering scholarships : year 2 report for 2007-2008 activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Support will make scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and will increase : significantly the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering pr...

  3. Meteorological Development Laboratory Student Career Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, C., Sr.

    2007-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. The NWS's Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) supports this mission by developing meteorological prediction methods. Given this mission, NOAA, NWS, and MDL all have a need to continually recruit talented scientists. One avenue for recruiting such talented scientist is the Student Career Experience Program (SCEP). Through SCEP, MDL offers undergraduate and graduate students majoring in meteorology, computer science, mathematics, oceanography, physics, and statistics the opportunity to alternate full-time paid employment with periods of full-time study. Using SCEP as a recruiting vehicle, MDL has employed students who possess some of the very latest technical skills and knowledge needed to make meaningful contributions to projects within the lab. MDL has recently expanded its use of SCEP and has increased the number of students (sometimes called co- ops) in its program. As a co-op, a student can expect to develop and implement computer based scientific techniques, participate in the development of statistical algorithms, assist in the analysis of meteorological data, and verify forecasts. This presentation will focus on describing recruitment, projects, and the application process related to MDL's SCEP. In addition, this presentation will also briefly explore the career paths of students who successfully completed the program.

  4. 20 CFR 638.520 - Student government and leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student government and leadership programs... Student government and leadership programs. The center operator shall establish an elected student government and student leadership program in accordance with procedures established by the Job Corps Director. ...

  5. Programs for Students and Teachers | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    competition that tests the brainpower of middle and high school teams on science and math topics. Model Car and Education Programs promote science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) using Science educators provide hands-on experiences for students in grades 4-12 to learn about renewable energy

  6. The ISCB Student Council Internship Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anupama, Jigisha; Francescatto, Margherita; Rahman, Farzana

    2018-01-01

    . Consequently, undergraduates and graduates are encouraged to undertake an internship during the course of their degree. The opportunity to explore one's research interests in the early stages of their education is important for students because it improves their skill set and gives their career a boost...... to providing access to computational biology training, especially for students from developing regions, and improving competencies in the field. Here, we present how the Internship Program works and the impact of the internship opportunities so far, along with the challenges associated with this program.......Education and training are two essential ingredients for a successful career. On one hand, universities provide students a curriculum for specializing in one's field of study, and on the other, internships complement coursework and provide invaluable training experience for a fruitful career...

  7. The Identity of Students Choosing Marketing Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto, Idaly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to look deeply into the identity of young students interested in training professional in marketing programs in Bogotá, Colombia. This descriptive study was conducted with the application of multidimensional surveys to 262 young people from five universities that offer training in marketing. The results show that there are differences and similarities in the lifestyles of young people who choose to study Marketing. The first, relating mainly to the identities assumed by students of daytime and nighttime that differ in their activities and more income. The second, by the increasing use and development of academic and social activities through the Internet of interest to young people today. It is hoped that these results provide the administrative and academic management of marketing programs that result in better communication and care of students as consumers.

  8. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools. Special Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. The law permits individual taxpayers in Georgia to reduce annual state taxes up to $2,500 for joint returns when they divert funds to a student scholarship organization (SSO). Georgia's law providing tax credits for private school tuition grants or…

  9. A Value beyond Money? Assessing the Impact of Equity Scholarships: From Access to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Richard J.; Hurd, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on evidence drawn from an evaluation of the impact of a scholarship programme for students from disadvantaged backgrounds at Macquarie University, Sydney. In addition to evidence of improved retention rates, the article suggests that qualitative data derived from a number of interviews with scholarship recipients highlight…

  10. TEACHING CAD PROGRAMMING TO ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela Caffarena CELANI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss the relevance of including the discipline of computer programming in the architectural curriculum. To do so I start by explaining how computer programming has been applied in other educational contexts with pedagogical success, describing Seymour Papert's principles. After that, I summarize the historical development of CAD and provide three historical examples of educational applications of computer programming in architecture, followed by a contemporary case that I find of particular relevance. Next, I propose a methodology for teaching programming for architects that aims at improving the quality of designs by making their concepts more explicit. This methodology is based on my own experience teaching computer programming for architecture students at undergraduate and graduate levels at the State University of Campinas, Brazil. The paper ends with a discussion about the role of programming nowadays, when most CAD software are user-friendly and do not require any knowledge of programming for improving performance. I conclude that the introduction of programming in the CAD curriculum within a proper conceptual framework may transform the concept of architectural education. Key-words: Computer programming; computer-aided design; architectural education.

  11. Building Bridges: Using the Office Consultation Project to Connect Students to Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynski, Korine Steinke; Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2014-01-01

    The Office Consultation Project is an innovative capstone project that partners graduate students in student affairs preparation programs with academic and student affairs practitioners. It provides an opportunity for students to apply research and scholarship to practical settings, while giving practitioners new insight into their units,…

  12. Compendium of student papers : 2013 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2013 Undergraduate Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 23nd year, provides undergraduate students in Civil Engineering the op...

  13. Compendium of student papers : 2011 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2011 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 21st year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Engineering th...

  14. Compendium of student papers : 2012 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2012 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 22nd year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Engineering th...

  15. Compendium of student papers : 2008 Undergraduate Transportation Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2008 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The ten-week summer program, now in its eighteenth year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Enginee...

  16. Compendium of student papers : 2009 undergraduate transportation engineering fellows program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2009 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The ten-week summer program, now in its nineteenth year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Enginee...

  17. Compendium of student papers : 2010 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2010 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 20th year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Engineering th...

  18. Tobacco Control Research Scholarships in Africa | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The funding will provide scholarships to master's students in schools of public health, economics, agriculture, environment, and other disciplines related to tobacco control ... Agent(e) responsable du CRDI ... Prevalence and predictors of cigarette smoking among adolescents of Ethiopia : school based cross sectional survey.

  19. Canada's International Education Strategy: Focus on Scholarships. CBIE Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Based on a survey of approximately 40 professionals involved in various disciplines associated with international education across Canada, this study examines Canada's (federal, provincial, and territorial government) offering of scholarships to international students. Focused at the university level, the study elaborates on relevant international…

  20. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. Georgia's law was enacted in May 2008 in order to assist low income students to transfer out of low performing public schools. Operations under the new act began in late 2008. The law permits taxpayers in Georgia to reduce their annual state taxes…

  1. Assessment of the Impact of Teaching Demands on Research Productivity Among Doctoral Nursing Program Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study that examined the research and scholarship productivity of doctorally prepared nursing faculty teaching and mentoring doctoral students and the conflicting demands on them to maintain programs of research and scholarship. The specific aims were to (a) examine the research productivity and scholarship of faculty members teaching in doctoral programs and mentoring doctoral students to examine the perceived effectiveness of existing institutional mechanisms to support scholarship, (b) explore institutional features and personal practices used by doctoral program faculty to develop and maintain research and scholarship productivity, and (c) analyze predictors of scholarship productivity. Data were collected via an on-line researcher-developed survey that examined doctoral faculty roles/responsibilities and their relationship to their scholarly productivity, overall research productivity, and institutional features and personal practices to support research/scholarship activities. Survey respondents reported spending a large amount of time engaged in research-related activities with 58.9% (n = 326) spending anywhere from 6 to 20 hours per week conducting research, writing research-based papers, giving presentations, grant writing, or conducting evidence-based improvement projects. Scholar productivity among the respondents was robust. Personal practices that most strongly supported faculty members' scholarship productivity were the belief that engaging in scholarship made them better teachers and the personal gratification in experiencing doctoral students' successes. A multiple regression analysis conducted to determine predictors of productivity indicated that the strongest predictor was the average number of hours spent on research/scholarship-related activities, followed by time bought out from teaching and other responsibilities of the faculty role for research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Student Attitudes toward Information Systems Graduate Program Design and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouin, Mark F.; Hefley, William E.; Raghunathan, Srinivasan

    2018-01-01

    This study examines student preferences regarding graduate management information systems (MIS) education. One hundred and eighty four graduate students responded to a survey exploring student attitudes towards degree program content, delivery format, and peer group interaction. Study results indicate that students prefer a program with an even…

  3. A Longitudinal Study of Illinois State Scholarship Commission Monetary Award Recipients, 1967-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph D.; Fenske, Robert H.

    The present effectiveness and future direction of monetary award programs administered by the Illinois State Scholarship Commission is examined in three surveys. A random sample of 1,000 was drawn from the total number of scholarship recipients during the 1967-68 and 1970-71 academic years; 2,000 from the 1973-74 survey. It is shown that: (1)…

  4. Teacher Research Programs = Increased Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2011-12-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers (SRP), founded in 1990, is one of the largest, best known university professional development programs for science teachers in the U.S. For eight weeks in each of two consecutive summers, teachers participate as a member of a research team, led by a member of Columbia University's research faculty. In addition to the laboratory experience, all teachers meet weekly during the summer for a series of pedagogical activities to assist them in transferring the experience to their classrooms. The primary goal of the program is to provide K-12 science teachers with opportunities to work at the cutting edge of science and engineering, and thus to revitalize their teaching and help them to appreciate the use of inquiry-based methods in their classroom instruction. The secondary goals of the program are to give the pre-college teacher the ability to guide their students toward careers in science and engineering, to develop new teaching strategies, and to foster long-term scholarly collaborations. The last is especially important as it leads to a model of the teacher as active in science yet committed to the pre-college classroom. Since its inception, SRP has focused on an objective assessment of the program's impact on attitudes and instructional practices of participating teachers, on the performance of these teachers in their mentors' laboratories, and most importantly, on the impact of their participation in the program has on student interest and performance in science. Our research resulted in a paper published in the journal Science. SRP also facilitates a multi-site survey-based evaluation of other teacher research programs around the country. The author will present the findings of both studies.

  5. Investigating Students' Beliefs about Arabic Language Programs at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaye, Shaye S.

    2009-01-01

    The current study attempted to identify students' of Arabic programs beliefs about their chosen programs. To achieve this purpose, a survey was developed to collect the data from randomly selected students in liberal-arts and education-based programs at Kuwait University. The results showed that students were statistically differentiated as a…

  6. Career Maturity of Students in Accelerated versus Traditional Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J.; Richard, George V.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors assessed the career maturity of students in accelerated versus traditional academic programs. Students in traditional programs were hypothesized to be more advanced regarding their career decision making and development when compared with students in accelerated programs. The Medical Career Development Inventory (see M. L. Savickas,…

  7. The Evaluative Impact of Graduate Scholarships: The Case of the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloo-Bhagwandeen, Sarah; Mustapha, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    The UWI Postgraduate Scholarship has been the most longstanding award offered by the University of the West Indies. However, completion rates of students have been decreasing and the number of students registered has not been increasing significantly. This paper investigates the UWI Postgraduate Scholarships awarded from 2001 to 2007. This…

  8. Partisan Scholarship in Technoscientific Controversies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Hansson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    of who controls, manipulates, and establishes decisions, facts, and knowledge. With this in mind, it is possible to identify different forms of partisan research including capture by participants, de facto and overt partisanship, and mercenary scholarship. These different forms of partisan scholarship...... are characterised by differences in the motives underlying epistemological choices of research topic and method, personal commitments to the fields studied, use of research findings in controversies, and positioning of results in wider debates. Two examples help to illustrate partisan scholarship: first, a study...... of new technologies for managing climate change (carbon dioxide capture and storage); and second, the construction of the new underground metro system in Athens and its accommodation of accessibility standards. Both cases entail partisan positions and raise similar concerns about the orthodox...

  9. The Cal-Bridge Program: Increasing the Gender and Ethnic Diversity of Astrophysics Students in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2016-06-01

    The mission of the Cal-Bridge program is to increase the number of underrepresented minority and women students completing a bachelor’s degree and entering a PhD program in astronomy, physics, or closely-related fields. The program has created a network of faculty at diverse higher education institutions, including 5 University of California (UC) campuses, 9 California State Universities (CSUs), and 10 community colleges in southern California, dedicated to this goal. Students selected for the program are know as “Cal-Bridge Scholars” and they are given a wide variety of support: (1) scholarships in their junior/senior years at CSU and their first year of graduate school at a UC, (2) intensive mentoring by a pair of CSU and UC faculty members, (3) tutoring, when needed, (4) professional development workshops, (5) exposure to research opportunities at various universities, and (6) membership in a growing cohort of like-minded students. We report on the structure of our program, lessons learned with our current 12 Cal-Bridge scholars, and the results of our first two years of operation. Funding for this program is provided by NSF-SSTEM Grant #1356133.

  10. The Effect of Coaching and Mentoring Programs to Improve Students Competencies: Case Study of Beastudi Etos Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udiutoma, Purwa; Srinovita, Yulya

    2015-01-01

    Progress of a country largely determined by quality of its human resources and quality of human life is much influenced by educational factors. Chains of poverty absolutely cannot be separated from economic, health and educational factors. Therefore, one effort to break chains of poverty is to provide proper education. Dompet Dhuafa through…

  11. Teaching Introductory Programming to IS Students: Java Problems and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Mark O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the impact the use of the Java programming language has had on the way our students learn to program and the success they achieve. The importance of a properly constructed first course in programming cannot be overstated. A course well experienced will leave students with good programming habits, the ability to learn on their…

  12. The impact of the promise of scholarships and altering school structure on college plans, preparation, and enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Herting, Jerald R; Hirschman, Charles

    2012-07-01

    The Washington State Achiever (WSA) program was a large-scale educational intervention of scholarships, mentoring, and school redesign designed to encourage students from moderate and low income families to attend college in Washington State. Using a quasi-experimental design based on pre- and post-intervention surveys of high school seniors in program and non-program schools, we find a significant WSA effect on educational outcomes, net of the demographic and socioeconomic composition of students across schools. Across the three intervention high schools, the program is strongly significant in one school, significant after a lag in another school, and not significant in a third. We speculate about the potential reasons for the differential program effect across high schools. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Support and Surveillance: 1956 Hungarian Refugee Students in Transit to the Joyce Kilmer Reception Centre and to Higher Education Scholarships in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Following the end of the 1956 Revolution, a significant number of university students fled Hungary and the human capital flooding into Austria drew the attention of universities worldwide. The cold war and its influence on international student organisations and on the domestic conceptualisation of refugees in the USA contextualise this case study…

  14. On the Way to Scholarship: From Master's to Doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleis, Afaf Ibrahim

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the discipline of nursing is predicated on the development of a community of scholars who have a passion for substance. Nurse educators are challenged to develop programs and environments that stimulate and nurture scholarship. Includes a discussion of strategies for development of scholarly doctoral education. (Author)

  15. Tax-Credit Scholarships in Maryland: Forecasting the Fiscal Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to inform the debate over a proposal in Maryland to give tax credits to businesses for contributions to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools or which contribute to innovative educational programs in the public schools. The study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of a tax-credit…

  16. Four-Year Degree and Employment Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial of a One-Year Performance-Based Scholarship Program in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Gutierrez, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    A college degree is often viewed as a key step toward better employment and higher earnings. Many community college students, however, never graduate and cannot reap the financial benefits associated with a college degree. Although existing research suggests that financial aid interventions can modestly improve students' short-term academic…

  17. Planning Student Flow with Linear Programming: A Tunisian Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezeau, Lawrence

    A student flow model in linear programming format, designed to plan the movement of students into secondary and university programs in Tunisia, is described. The purpose of the plan is to determine a sufficient number of graduating students that would flow back into the system as teachers or move into the labor market to meet fixed manpower…

  18. Toward a New Era: Alternatives for Revitalizing Student Services Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    Alternatives for revitalizing the programs and management of student services in community colleges are reviewed in this paper. First, alternatives related to student services programs are considered, including: (1) the increased use of computer-assisted counseling to integrate student services more fully with mainstream academic activities; (2)…

  19. Between Vulnerability and Risk: Promoting Access and Equity in a School-University Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Alan; Jayman, Alison Jenkins

    2011-01-01

    This article utilizes interview data to explore how notions of risk operate in a school-university partnership program. Our analysis traces the divergence between conceptualizations of "at-risk" in scholarship, its use in policy, and students' responses to this terminology. Although students targeted in such programs are often…

  20. Higher Education Preparation and Decision-Making Trends among International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna; Dagley, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how international students obtain information about college in the United States when they are in their home countries. The findings reveal that the majority of students visit university websites to obtain information regarding various programs. Students also receive scholarships and/or assistantships from the university,…

  1. Small-Island Perceptions of Scholarships: Perspectives from Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Caribbean has the lowest tertiary enrolment in the Western Hemisphere. This figure currently stands at 10% of the population, instead of a desired 30%. [1] Jamaica specifically, has seen a decline in tertiary education enrolment at major institutions such as the University of Technology, Northern Caribbean University, with the only exception being the University of the West Indies showing a marginal increase of 3.6% in 2016. The inability to cover the cost of tertiary education by citizens is a deterrent - despite government subsidies of up to 80%. Scholarship resources exist in Jamaica, but the challenge is the small number of scholarships granted, in proportion to a large applicant pool. Consequently, only the highest performing students are selected at the expense of other higher performing students. Interestingly though, scholarship resources exist internationally for tertiary studies. In the United States for example, US$100 million funds go unclaimed each year due to a lack of awareness. The European Union (EU) will also invest 80 million Euros in research and innovation from 2014 to 2020, with these funds air marked for partnerships between the EU and the rest of the world. The overall aim of this research is to assess the awareness of Jamaicans ages 17 to 45 years, in terms of their knowledge of these international funds, their perceptions of scholarships as a source of tertiary education financing, and preferences for physical locations of study. [1] UWI Professor Archibald McDonald

  2. How to improve the program for Japanese Studies Students

    OpenAIRE

    澤田, 田津子

    2010-01-01

    Japanese Studies Students (=international students who specialize in Japanese language and culture in Japan; Hereafter referred to as J.students) show a variety of language skill and interests depending on the features of education in Japanese in their respective countries. All the J.students, however, receive an education at our university for one year based on one education program for the J.students. This paper shows first the variety of J.students through analysis of their final theses of...

  3. Connecting Scientists, College Students, Middle School Students & Elementary Students through Intergenerational Afterschool STEM Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Paglierani, R.; Raftery, C. L.; Romero, V.; Harper, M. R.; Chilcott, C.; Peticolas, L. M.; Hauck, K.; Yan, D.; Ruderman, I.; Frappier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiverse education group at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Lab created the NASA-funded "Five Stars Pathway" model in which five "generations" of girls and women engage in science together in an afterschool setting, with each generation representing one stage in the pathway of pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM). The five stages are: elementary-age students, middle-school-age students, undergraduate-level college students, graduate-level college students and professional scientists. This model was field-tested at two Girls Inc. afterschool locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and distributed to Girls Inc. affiliates and other afterschool program coordinators nationwide. This presentation will explore some of the challenges and success of implementing a multigenerational STEM model as well as distributing the free curriculum for interested scientists and college students to use with afterschool programs.

  4. GeoX: A New Pre-college Program to Attract Underrepresented Minorities and First Generation Students to the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. C.; Garcia, S. J.; Houser, C.; GeoX Team

    2011-12-01

    An emerging challenge in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education is the recruitment of underrepresented groups in those areas of the workforce. This paper describes the structure and first-year results of the Geosciences Exploration Summer Program (GeoX) at Texas A&M University. Recent evidence suggest that pipeline programs should target junior and senior high school students who are beginning to seriously consider future career choices and appropriate college programs. GeoX is an overnight program that takes place during the summer at Texas A&M University. Over the course of a week, GeoX participants interact with faculty from the College of Geosciences, administrators, current students, and community leaders through participation in inquiry-based learning activities, field trips, and evening social events. The aim of this project is to foster a further interest in pursuing geosciences as an undergraduate major in college and thereby increase participation in the geosciences by underrepresented ethnic minority students. With funding from industry and private donors, high achieving rising junior and rising senior students, with strong interest in science and math, were invited to participate in the program. Students and their parents were interviewed before and after the program to determine if it was successful in introducing and enhancing awareness of the: 1) various sub-disciplines in the geosciences, 2) benefits of academia and research, 3) career opportunities in each of those fields and 4) college admission process including financial aid and scholarship opportunities. Results of the survey suggest that the students had a very narrow and stereotypical view of the geosciences that was almost identical to the views of their parents. Following the program, the students had a more expanded and positive view of the geosciences compared to the pre-program survey and compared to their parents. While it remains to be seen how many of those

  5. Science teaching scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Physics research projects undertaken by secondary or high school students are once again being sought for consideration in the annual international competition entitled `First step to the Nobel Prize in physics'. This, the eighth in the series, is being organized by the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences for the academic year 1999/2000, and as in previous years the competition is open to all secondary (high) school students regardless of country, type of school, sex, nationality etc. The only conditions are that the school must not be a university college and the participant's age should not exceed 20 years on 31 March 2000 (the deadline for competition entries). There are no restrictions on the subject matter of papers, their level, methods applied etc but they must have a research character and deal with physics topics or topics directly related to physics. Participation in the competition does not need any agreement from the candidate's school or educational authorities: the students must conduct their research in the most appropriate way for them. More than one paper can be submitted by a participant but each paper must have only one author; papers must not exceed 25 typed pages in length. The winners do not receive financial prizes or gifts but instead are invited to undertake a month's research work at the Polish Institute of Physics, with their expenses (except travel) paid for by the competition organizers. Entries should be sent by the competition deadline to Mrs M E Gorzkowska, Secretary of the First Step, Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL 02-668 Warszawa, Poland. All those who receive an award will have their papers published in the competition proceedings. Information on the competition can be found in the pub/competitions subdirectory of the anonymous section of the server ftp.ifpan.edu.pl (see also nobelprizes.com/firstep/).

  6. Orientation Programming for Graduate Students: An Institutional Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickio, Craig J.; Tack, Martha W.

    1989-01-01

    Orientation at the graduate level can serve many functions such as reducing anxiety, familiarizing students with new academic challenges, and orienting students' spouses. It can also improve student retention, satisfaction, and success. Guidelines for developing programs responsive to graduate students' diverse needs are offered. (Author/MSE)

  7. Combining program visualization with programming workspace to assist students for completing programming laboratory task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvina Elvina

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Program Visualization tools (PVs have been developed for assisting novice students to understand their source code further. However, none of them are practical to be used in the context of completing programming laboratory task; students are required to keep switching between PV and programming workspace when they need to know how their code works. This paper combines PV with programming workspace to handle such issue. Resulted tool (which is named PITON has 13 features extracted from PythonTutor, PyCharm, and student’s feedbacks about PythonTutor. According to think-aloud and user study, PITON is more practical to be used than a combination of PythonTutor and PyCharm. Further, its features are considerably helpful; students rated these features as useful and frequently used.

  8. Social Network Analysis of the Farabi Exchange Program: Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurlu, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Exchange programs offer communication channels created through student and instructor exchanges; a flow of information takes place through these channels. The Farabi Exchange Program (FEP) is a student and instructor exchange program between institutions of higher education. Through the use of social network analysis and…

  9. Student Assistance Program Sandia High School 1985-86 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce-Prather, Margaret; Shainline, Michael

    This document presents data from the second year of the Student Assistance Program, a counseling program to help students who may be abusing drugs or alcohol, implemented at Sandia High School in the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public School system. Data are included from the program's monthly records sheets, from parent involvement questionnaires,…

  10. Gotta Have It! Pepsi Challenges Students to Stay in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsalan, Carla M.

    1993-01-01

    A program sponsored by Pepsi-Cola Company is designed to provide students in inner-city school districts with reasons for staying in school. Incentives for students include scholarship credit of $250 for each semester in which they maintain a C average; mentor-teachers receive $1,000 for continuing education, classroom enhancement, or the…

  11. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Success for Underrepresented Students in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, Anura U.; Offutt, Christine A.; Whitling, Jacqueline; Woodhouse, Donald

    2016-01-01

    To recruit underrepresented students with demonstrated financial need into STEM disciplines, Lock Haven University established the interdisciplinary Nano Scholars Program, offering National Science Foundation-funded scholarships, academic support, and social support. Small cohort sizes, a student-led science learning community (the Nano Club), and…

  12. Peer tutoring program for academic success of returning nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    High attrition rates among students in associate degree nursing programs are a concern for faculty, administrators, and students. Programs offering academic and emotional support for students at risk for failing a clinical course may decrease attrition rates and improve academic performance. A peer tutoring program was developed for returning nursing students who were unsuccessful in a previous clinical course. Peer tutors met with returning students weekly to review course work, complete case studies and practice NCLEX questions. Trusting, supportive relationships developed among students and a significant increase in grades was noted at the end of the course for 79% of students. Implementation of peer tutoring was beneficial for returning students, tutors, and the nursing program and may be valuable in other courses where academic achievement is a concern.

  13. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a Student Mentoring Program

    OpenAIRE

    Sandner, Malte

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from a natural-experiment which evaluates the effectiveness of a student mentoring program. The mentoring includes several compulsory, scheduled, faceto- face appointments between a mentor and a student in the first study year. All mentors are graduated and employed by the institution. For the evaluation, I use the fact that the mentoring is only offered to students in an economics and management program, whereas it is not offered to students in an industrial engi...

  14. Which Introductory Programming Approach Is Most Suitable for Students: Procedural or Visual Programming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Chaker; Millham, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the visual programming approach to teaching introductory programming courses and then compare this approach with that of procedural programming. The involved cognitive levels of students, as beginning students are introduced to different types of programming concepts, are correlated to the learning processes of…

  15. Assessment of Student Outcomes in Undergraduate Health Information Administration Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jody

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to a) determine what assessment methods are being used in undergraduate health information administration programs to assess student learning and the usefulness of those methods, b) determine to what extent programs have incorporated good student learning assessment practices. Programs use a variety of assessment tools to measure student learning; the most useful include assessments by the professional practice supervisor, course tests, assignments, presentati...

  16. A Question of Merit: Merit-Based Scholarship Programs Have Gained Huge Popularity in a Number of States, but Many Wonder at What (or Whose) Expense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finken, Dee Anne

    2004-01-01

    Ten years ago, the state best known for its peaches launched a revolution that still reverberates in the halls of colleges and universities across the country. Faced with a plethora of poorly performing high-school students and a growing number of graduates fleeing the state for postsecondary study, Georgia unveiled its Helping Outstanding Pupils…

  17. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenards, Nishele

    2011-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

  18. Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Programming: Difficulties and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Özmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Programming courses become prominent as one of the courses in which undergraduate students are unsuccessful especially in departments which offer computer education. Students often state that these courses are quite difficult compared to other courses. Therefore, a qualitative phenomenological approach was used to reveal the reasons of the failures of the undergraduate students in programming courses and to examine the difficulties they confronted with programming. In this scope, the laboratory practices of the Internet Programming course were observed in fall term of the 2013-2014 academic year in a university at central Anatolia. Interviews were made with 12 undergraduate students taking this course. Finally, the difficulties students experienced in the programming were determined as programming knowledge, programming skills, understanding semantics of the program, and debugging. Students emphasized that the biggest causes of failure in programming languages are lack of practice, not using algorithms and lack of knowledge. In addition, it was seen that the students who had high programming experience possess higher programming success and self-efficacy related to programming

  19. Measuring discursive influence across scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerow, Aaron; Hu, Yuening; Boyd-Graber, Jordan; Blei, David M; Evans, James A

    2018-03-27

    Assessing scholarly influence is critical for understanding the collective system of scholarship and the history of academic inquiry. Influence is multifaceted, and citations reveal only part of it. Citation counts exhibit preferential attachment and follow a rigid "news cycle" that can miss sustained and indirect forms of influence. Building on dynamic topic models that track distributional shifts in discourse over time, we introduce a variant that incorporates features, such as authorship, affiliation, and publication venue, to assess how these contexts interact with content to shape future scholarship. We perform in-depth analyses on collections of physics research (500,000 abstracts; 102 years) and scholarship generally (JSTOR repository: 2 million full-text articles; 130 years). Our measure of document influence helps predict citations and shows how outcomes, such as winning a Nobel Prize or affiliation with a highly ranked institution, boost influence. Analysis of citations alongside discursive influence reveals that citations tend to credit authors who persist in their fields over time and discount credit for works that are influential over many topics or are "ahead of their time." In this way, our measures provide a way to acknowledge diverse contributions that take longer and travel farther to achieve scholarly appreciation, enabling us to correct citation biases and enhance sensitivity to the full spectrum of scholarly impact. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  20. The future of electronic scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Holtorf

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper about the future of electronic scholarship takes the form of a commentary about my experiences with publishing an electronic monograph. An earlier version of that work was originally submitted to the University of Wales as a hypermedia Doctoral dissertation in archaeology. I will discuss to what extent (if any the electronic and multilinear format of my work proved valuable in challenging and advancing some foundations of current academic discourse. A key question is how academic credibility can be maintained, while at the same time pioneering some radical possibilities of electronic scholarship. It emerges that the criteria for this credibility are themselves at stake. The paper is divided into three main parts. After a short introduction , I will first review three ways in which I originally thought that the hypermedia format would allow clear benefits for academic writing and discourse, and how I see them now. They refer to intertextuality, the open-ended 'living' text, and multilinearity in writing and argument. Then I will review the main problems which I originally thought might be difficult to reconcile with contemporary academic discourse, and discuss to what extent they indeed turned out to be obstacles. These include screen reading, orientation and navigation issues, and the problem of long-term preservation. Finally, I will turn to the issue of academic publishing and how electronic scholarship may be able to help it become more satisfactory by dissolving existing ties to commercial interests.

  1. The Fiscal Impact of the Kentucky Education Tax Credit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the fiscal impact of a proposal to create a personal tax credit for educational expenses and a tax-credit scholarship program in Kentucky. It finds that the actual fiscal impact of the program would be much less than its nominal dollar size, due to the reduced public school costs resulting from migration of students from public…

  2. Use of a student support group to reduce student stress in a nurse anesthesia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kless, J R

    1989-02-01

    Stress in nurse anesthesia programs may be excessive at times, especially in new students. While some degree of stress is necessary to motivate learning, excessive or prolonged stress can interfere with the normal learning process, thereby prolonging a student's clinical and academic progress. In the extreme, excessive stress may even preclude a student's successful completion of the educational program. Active faculty intervention through a student support group is advocated as a method for controlling stress levels and facilitating student learning. The positive effects of such intervention also increase the overall productivity of a program and better prepare nurse anesthesia students for their future careers.

  3. Taking Stock of Private-School Choice: Scholars Review the Research on Statewide Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Patrick J.; Harris, Douglas N.; Berends, Mark; Waddington, R. Joseph; Austin, Megan

    2018-01-01

    In the past few years, four states have established programs that provide public financial support to students who choose to attend a private school. These programs--a tax-credit-funded scholarship initiative in Florida and voucher programs in Indiana, Louisiana, and Ohio--offer a glimpse of what expansive statewide choice might look like. What…

  4. Nursing scholarship within the British university system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramcharan, P; Ashmore, R; Nicklin, L; Drew, J

    This article is a review of how a school of nursing and midwifery might promote scholarship within the university system. It is argued that the emphasis on research in universities has undermined the importance of scholarship within education and practice. The difficulties of recognizing scholarly processes as opposed to products such as publications is outlined in relation to three areas of potential scholarship within nurse education, i.e. research, teaching and practice. Issues are raised about how scholarship might be promoted in these three areas in practical terms. It is argued that systems of recognition and reward should be equitably distributed between these wide areas of potential scholarship. This will mean universities accommodating different models of scholarship and nurses recognizing their responsibility to contribute to scholarly activity.

  5. Integrating Reiki and community-engaged scholarship: an interdisciplinary educational innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, Marie N; Bennett, David N; Chambers, Donna

    2014-09-01

    To provide students with a meaningful holistic care experience while integrating community-engaged scholarship, students partnered with a Reiki-prepared faculty member within a nurse-managed community clinic to offer Reiki to the clients and participate in the evaluation of the effectiveness of the modality. This article describes how students and faculty integrated holistic care, scholarship, and community engagement. This experience provided the students with an opportunity to embrace the art and science of holistic nursing while obtaining experience in measuring outcomes.

  6. The Implementation of Analytical Hierarchy Process Method for Outstanding Achievement Scholarship Reception Selection at Universal University of Batam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfuah; Widiantoro, Suryo

    2017-12-01

    Universal University of Batam offers outstanding achievement scholarship to the current students to be each year of new academic year, seeing the large number of new Students who are interested to get it then the selection team should be able to filter and choose the eligible ones. The selection process starting with evaluation and judgement made by the experts. There were five criteria as the basic of selection and each had three alternatives that must be considered. Based on the policy of University the maximum number of recipients are five for each of six study programs. Those programs are art of music, dance, industrial engineering, environmental engineering, telecommunication engineering, and software engineering. The expert choice was subjective that AHP method was used to help in making decision consistently by doing pairwise comparison matrix process between criteria based on selected alternatives, by determining the priority order of criteria and alternatives used. The results of these calculations were used as supporting decision-making to determine the eligible students receiving scholarships based on alternatives of selected criteria determined by the final results of AHP method calculation with the priority criterion A (0.37%), C (0.23%), E (0.21%), D (0.14%) and B (0.06%), value of consistency ratio 0.05. Then the alternative priorities 1 (0.63), 2 (0.26) and 3 (0.11) the consistency ratio values 0.03, where each CR ≤ 0.1 or consistent weighting preference.

  7. Scholarships | College of Engineering & Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical Engineering Instructional Laboratories Student Resources Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Academic Programs Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Major Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Minor Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering

  8. Needs and Acculturative Stress of International Students in CACREP Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Malvika; Laux, John M.; Roseman, Christopher P.; Tiamiyu, Mojisola; Spann, Sammy

    2017-01-01

    International students enrolled in programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs provided acculturative stress and needs data. Acculturative stress was correlated with academic, social, language, and cultural needs. Furthermore, relationships were found between students' types of needs.…

  9. "Hour of Code": Can It Change Students' Attitudes toward Programming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jie; Wimmer, Hayden; Rada, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction to computer science organized by Code.org, a non-profit dedicated to expanding participation in computer science. This study investigated the impact of the Hour of Code on students' attitudes towards computer programming and their knowledge of programming. A sample of undergraduate students from two…

  10. Campus Support Services, Programs, and Policies for International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna, Ed.; Foster, Charlotte, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Study abroad programs have proven beneficial for both the international student as well as the domestic community and school population interacting with the student. In an effort to promote cultural awareness, intercultural communications as well as opportunities for future study abroad program success, universities must take care to provide…

  11. Initiating a Developmental Motor Skills Program for Identified Primary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harville, Valerie Terrill

    A physical education specialist at an elementary school in one of the fastest growing sections of the country developed and implemented a developmental motor skills program for primary school students. The program focused on: (1) developing a method of referring students for testing; (2) providing a specialized motor diagnostic test; (3) improving…

  12. Implementing the "Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers Program"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W.; Johnson, Roger T.

    2004-01-01

    The Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers Program trains every student in a school in the competencies they need to (a) resolve conflicts constructively and (b) make their schools safe places in which to learn. The program is directly based on the theory and research on constructive conflict resolution. More than 16 studies in 2 different countries…

  13. Using POGIL to Help Students Learn to Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Helen H.; Shepherd, Tricia D.

    2013-01-01

    POGIL has been successfully implemented in a scientific computing course to teach science students how to program in Python. Following POGIL guidelines, the authors have developed guided inquiry activities that lead student teams to discover and understand programming concepts. With each iteration of the scientific computing course, the authors…

  14. Exxon and Higher Education: Reflections on One Student-to-Student Advising Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschauer, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Describes the implementation of Exxon's Student-to-Student advising program at Wautauga College. Advanced students are hired to teach beginning students basic college survival skills including time management, taking lecture notes, reading textbooks, taking exams, writing reports, making oral presentation, and improving interpersonal relations.…

  15. High School Students' Perceptions of Alcohol Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogenchuk, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Grade 11 students' perceptions of programs related to the prevention of alcohol use in high school settings through an analysis of quantitative and qualitative data elicited from student questionnaires (n=452) and focus groups. It was found that students felt a need for increased information on alcohol…

  16. Student Deep Learning in Bachelor English Programs within Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Khazima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast undergraduate students' descriptions about transformational teaching practices, and student deep learning in bachelor English programs in selected universities within Pakistan. This study utilized a survey to gather responses from five hundred and twenty three students. A paired sample t test was utilized…

  17. My IEP: A Student-Directed Individualized Education Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Students with disabilities need to be more involved in planning and presenting individualized education program (IEP) meetings, and teachers need an effective, efficient curriculum to teach students how. "My IEP" curriculum uses folding graphic organizers to teach students to self-direct IEP meetings, targeting self-advocacy and…

  18. The American Nuclear Society's international student exchange program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, I.

    1988-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society's (ANS's) International Student Exchange Program sponsors bilateral exchanges of students form graduate schools in American universities with students from graduate schools in France, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), and Japan. The program, now in its 12th year, was initiated in response to an inquiry to Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) from the director of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay proposing to send French nuclear engineering students to the United States for summer jobs. The laboratory was asked to accept two students to work on some nuclear technology activity and ANS was invited to send American students to France on an exchange basis. To date, 200 students have taken part in the program. It has been a maturing and enriching experience for them, and many strong and enduring friendships have been fostered among the participants, many of whom will become future leaders in their countries

  19. Helping Students Test Programs That Have Graphical User Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Thornton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Within computer science education, many educators are incorporating software testing activities into regular programming assignments. Tools like JUnit and its relatives make software testing tasks much easier, bringing them into the realm of even introductory students. At the same time, many introductory programming courses are now including graphical interfaces as part of student assignments to improve student interest and engagement. Unfortunately, writing software tests for programs that have significant graphical user interfaces is beyond the skills of typical students (and many educators. This paper presents initial work at combining educationally oriented and open-source tools to create an infrastructure for writing tests for Java programs that have graphical user interfaces. Critically, these tools are intended to be appropriate for introductory (CS1/CS2 student use, and to dovetail with current teaching approaches that incorporate software testing in programming assignments. We also include in our findings our proposed approach to evaluating our techniques.

  20. 34 CFR 611.46 - What are a scholarship recipient's reporting responsibilities upon graduation from the teacher...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and other identifying information about the recipient; (ii) That he or she is teaching in a high-need... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are a scholarship recipient's reporting... scholarship recipient's reporting responsibilities upon graduation from the teacher preparation program? (a...

  1. An Analysis on Distance Education Computer Programming Students' Attitudes Regarding Programming and Their Self-Efficacy for Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the attitudes of students studying computer programming through the distance education regarding programming, and their self-efficacy for programming and the relation between these two factors. The study is conducted with 104 students being thought with distance education in a university in the north region of Turkey in…

  2. Impact of a visual programming experience on the attitude toward programming of introductory undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Saurabh

    Traditionally, textual tools have been utilized to teach basic programming languages and paradigms. Research has shown that students tend to be visual learners. Using flowcharts, students can quickly understand the logic of their programs and visualize the flow of commands in the algorithm. Moreover, applying programming to physical systems through the use of a microcontroller to facilitate this type of learning can spark an interest in students to advance their programming knowledge to create novel applications. This study examined if freshmen college students' attitudes towards programming changed after completing a graphical programming lesson. Various attributes about students' attitudes were examined including confidence, interest, stereotypes, and their belief in the usefulness of acquiring programming skills. The study found that there were no statistically significant differences in attitudes either immediately following the session or after a period of four weeks.

  3. Utilizing Team Debate to Increase Student Abilities for Mentoring and Critical Appraisal of Global Health Care in Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Naomi; Farnum, Karen; Beauchesne, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Although graduates of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs are expected to demonstrate competence in advanced clinical scholarship, mentoring, and leadership, little is published about how team debate on a global health care topic supports DNP student learning and skill development. This article reports on an illuminative evaluation of DNP student learning experiences of team debate in the context of a 2-week international school program in Ireland. A focused illuminative evaluation approach involving a cohort of seven DNP students, who had participated in an international school team debate, was used. Data were collected using a Web-based qualitative questionnaire designed to elicit in-depth reflective accounts of DNP students' learning experiences. Content analysis revealed that team debate on a global health care topic enhanced learning in relation to fostering critical thinking and critical appraisal skills; encouraging teamwork; providing opportunities for mentoring, relationship building, and socialization into profession; and, from the DNP student perspective, increasing knowledge and global understanding of health care. This evaluation provides insights for nurse educators into the benefits of introducing team debate as a group activity to enhancing scholarly inquiry and mentoring skills of DNP students. Further research to evaluate team debate in other nurse education programs is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Successful Physical Activity Programming for Students with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheis, Susan F.; Boswell, Boni B.; Decker, Jim

    2000-01-01

    This article describes Success in Physical Activity, a program for students with autism. The program, based on adaptations of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communications-Handicapped Children (TEACCH) recreational structure program, focuses on two areas: physical fitness and motor ability. (Contains seven references.)…

  5. Saudi Arabian International Graduate Students' Lived Experiences at a U.S. University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Barbara N.; Snead, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Enrollment of Saudi Arabian International students' in United States institutions of higher learning has increased substantially over the years since King Abdullah initially launched the Saudi scholarship program in 2005 that was renewed in 2010 and funded an outward flow of Saudi student, including females, to universities worldwide. A commitment…

  6. Unmet Student Financial Need in the State of Washington: A Study of the "Need Gap."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert; And Others

    A study of unmet student financial need in Washington State was conducted by the Washington Council for Postsecondary Education. "Unmet need" is the difference between need and the total amount of aid received by the student through federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs, privately funded scholarships, and nonsubsidized…

  7. Educational Scholarship and Technology: Resources for a Changing Undergraduate Medical Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Brandon N; Corral, Irma; John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G

    2017-06-01

    Returning to the original emphasis of higher education, universities have increasingly recognized the value and scholarship of teaching, and medical schools have been part of this educational scholarship movement. At the same time, the preferred learning styles of a new generation of medical students and advancements in technology have driven a need to incorporate technology into psychiatry undergraduate medical education (UGME). Educators need to understand how to find, access, and utilize such educational technology. This article provides a brief historical context for the return to education as scholarship, along with a discussion of some of the advantages to this approach, as well as several recent examples. Next, the educational needs of the current generation of medical students, particularly their preference to have technology incorporated into their education, will be discussed. Following this, we briefly review the educational scholarship of two newer approaches to psychiatry UGME that incorporate technology. We also offer the reader some resources for accessing up-to-date educational scholarship for psychiatry UGME, many of which take advantage of technology themselves. We conclude by discussing the need for promotion of educational scholarship.

  8. Report of an innovative research program for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheil, E P; Crain, H

    1992-10-01

    In summary, an innovative low-cost way to teach undergraduate students about research and to socialize students into attending research conferences has been developed. It is not perfect yet, but with time, critical students, and responsive research-productive faculty, each program should improve. It is not surprising that sophomore students do not achieve the objectives at the same level as older students. As students move closer to the "real" world of nursing practice and develop increasing sophistication about nursing in general and research in particular, they are, hopefully, more knowledgeable consumers of nursing research. What is particularly satisfying to the planners of those Research Days is that through the experience of attending Undergraduate Research Day at various points in their educational progress, students are socialized into discussing research. Additionally, they seemed to develop some degree of comfort with this aspect of their future nursing role. The RN and former student panel participants normalized research involvement for the student attendees. Panel member stories about their mistakes and successes made students realize that nursing investigations need not be the sole property of those with doctoral degrees. A serendipitous outcome of these programs was an increased awareness by students of the specific research project in which their teachers were engaged. Students informally reported a feeling of pride and reflected accomplishment. The importance of timing in offering such programs should not have been a surprise at this urban commuter university. Unwittingly, in scheduling the Friday afternoon program the planners ignored the initial consideration that the program not impose financial hardship on students.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Conceptualizing 20 years of engaged scholarship: A scoping review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Beaulieu

    Full Text Available Engaged scholarship, a movement that has been growing steadily since 1995, offers a new way of bridging gaps between the university and civil society. Numerous papers and reports have been published since Boyer's foundational discourse in 1996. Yet, beyond a growing interest in orienting universities' missions, we observed a lack a formal definition and conceptualization of this movement. Based on a scoping review of the literature over the past 20 years, the objective of this article is to propose a conceptualization of engaged scholarship. More specifically, we define its values, principles, and processes. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this new posture for faculty and students, as well as for the university as an institution.

  10. Conceptualizing 20 years of engaged scholarship: A scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marianne; Breton, Mylaine

    2018-01-01

    Engaged scholarship, a movement that has been growing steadily since 1995, offers a new way of bridging gaps between the university and civil society. Numerous papers and reports have been published since Boyer’s foundational discourse in 1996. Yet, beyond a growing interest in orienting universities’ missions, we observed a lack a formal definition and conceptualization of this movement. Based on a scoping review of the literature over the past 20 years, the objective of this article is to propose a conceptualization of engaged scholarship. More specifically, we define its values, principles, and processes. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this new posture for faculty and students, as well as for the university as an institution. PMID:29489870

  11. Conceptualizing 20 years of engaged scholarship: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marianne; Breton, Mylaine; Brousselle, Astrid

    2018-01-01

    Engaged scholarship, a movement that has been growing steadily since 1995, offers a new way of bridging gaps between the university and civil society. Numerous papers and reports have been published since Boyer's foundational discourse in 1996. Yet, beyond a growing interest in orienting universities' missions, we observed a lack a formal definition and conceptualization of this movement. Based on a scoping review of the literature over the past 20 years, the objective of this article is to propose a conceptualization of engaged scholarship. More specifically, we define its values, principles, and processes. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this new posture for faculty and students, as well as for the university as an institution.

  12. Unpacking University-Community Partnerships to Advance Scholarship of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Mirza, Mansha Parven; Hansen, Anne Marie Witchger

    2015-01-01

    Today, more than ever, occupational therapists are engaged in close partnerships with community organizations and community settings such as service agencies, refugee and immigrant enclaves, and faith-based organizations, to name a few, for the purpose of engaging in scholarship of practice. However, we know little about the views of community partners regarding the development and sustainability of university-community partnerships. The purpose of this article is twofold: First, we will describe a pilot study in which we gathered qualitative data from community partners engaged in scholarship of practice with faculty and students, regarding their views about benefits of partnerships, challenges, and characteristics of sustainable partnerships. Second, based on this pilot study and extensive experience of the authors, we propose a revised version of a partnerships model available in the literature. We illustrate the model through examples of the authors' collective experiences developing and sustaining successful university-community partnerships.

  13. Is traditional financial aid too little, too late to help youth succeed in college? An introduction to The Degree Project promise scholarship experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N

    2013-01-01

    One of the key barriers in accessing postsecondary opportunities for many students is financial aid. This chapter begins by providing a review of prior evidence on the relationship between financial aid and postsecondary outcomes. One type of financial aid intervention that challenges traditional aid and scholarship options are "promise programs." These programs make commitments to low-income students when they are much younger than when students typically apply for aid and have the potential to encourage students to better prepare during high school, develop the social capital they need to navigate the path to college, and pay for growing college costs. In this chapter, the author describes the design and rationale for The Degree Project (TDP), which is the first randomized trial of a promise scholarship in the United States. In addition to the important new evidence the demonstration program will generate, TDP also shows how educators and researchers can work together to provide the insight and answers policy makers need to address very real education gaps. © WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Curated Collections for Educators: Five Key Papers on Evaluating Digital Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Antonia; Chan, Teresa M; Sampson, Christopher; Grossman, Catherine; Butts, Christine; Casey, John; Caretta-Weyer, Holly; Gottlieb, Michael

    2018-01-03

    Traditionally, scholarship that was recognized for promotion and tenure consisted of clinical research, bench research, and grant funding. Recent trends have allowed for differing approaches to scholarship, including digital publication. As increasing numbers of trainees and faculty turn to online educational resources, it is imperative to critically evaluate these resources. This article summarizes five key papers that address the appraisal of digital scholarship and describes their relevance to junior clinician educators and faculty developers. In May 2017, the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Faculty Incubator program focused on the topic of digital scholarship, providing and discussing papers relevant to the topic. We augmented this list of papers with further suggestions by guest experts and by an open call via Twitter for other important papers. Through this process, we created a list of 38 papers in total on the topic of evaluating digital scholarship. In order to determine which of these papers best describe how to evaluate digital scholarship, the authorship group assessed the papers using a modified Delphi approach to build consensus. In this paper we present the five most highly rated papers from our process about evaluating digital scholarship. We summarize each paper and discuss its specific relevance to junior faculty members and to faculty developers. These papers provide a framework for assessing the quality of digital scholarship, so that junior faculty can recommend high-quality educational resources to their trainees. These papers help guide educators on how to produce high quality digital scholarship and maximize recognition and credit in respect to receiving promotion and tenure.

  15. Decision Support System for Determining Scholarship Selection using an Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, T. D.; Sari, E. O.; Destarianto, P.; Riskiawan, H. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Decision Support System is a computer program application that analyzes data and presents it so that users can make decision more easily. Determining Scholarship Selection study case in Senior High School in east Java wasn’t easy. It needed application to solve the problem, to improve the accuracy of targets for prospective beneficiaries of poor students and to speed up the screening process. This research will build system uses the method of Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is a method that solves a complex and unstructured problem into its group, organizes the groups into a hierarchical order, inputs numerical values instead of human perception in comparing relative and ultimately with a synthesis determined elements that have the highest priority. The accuracy system for this research is 90%.

  16. Teacher training program for medical students: improvements needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Diggele C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christie van Diggele,1 Annette Burgess,2 Craig Mellis21The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Sydney Medical School – Central, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaIntroduction: Skills in peer teaching, assessment, and feedback are increasingly documented internationally as required graduate attributes in medicine. Yet these skills are rarely taught in medical schools. We sought to design and deliver a short but effective teacher training (TT program for medical students that could be easily integrated into the professional development curriculum. This study sought to evaluate such a pilot program, based on student perception.Methods: The study took place at a major metropolitan teaching hospital, where 38 medical students were invited to attend a voluntary, newly designed four-module TT program. In total, 23/38 (61% of invited students attended. Mixed methods were used for evaluation. Questionnaires were completed by 21/23 (91% of students, and 6/23 (26% of students participated in a focus group.Results: Students reported that as a result of the program they felt more confident to facilitate small group teaching activities and to provide feedback to peers using the suggested frameworks. Students would like the program to contain more in-depth educational theory and to allow a more time for small group learning activities. They would also like to see opportunities for participation across all clinical schools.Conclusion: The TT program was successful in increasing student awareness of educational theory and practice, thereby improving their confidence in teaching and assessing their peers and making them feel better prepared for their careers as medical practitioners. Key improvements to the program are needed in terms of more in-depth theory and more time spent on small group learning. This might be achieved by complementing the course with e-learning.Keywords: teacher training, medical students, peer teaching, peer

  17. Managing Student Affairs Programs: Methods, Models, Muddles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    Management processes and problems are examined in a variety of student affairs contexts. This book (1) proposes a theoretical framework for the analysis of management functions in colleges and universities, (2) studies the practice of management in several different student affairs contexts to uncover current practices, issues, problems, and…

  18. Applying Sleep Research to University Students: Recommendations for Developing a Student Sleep Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C.; Buboltz, Walter C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Many students are unaware that academic difficulties may be related to their sleep habits. This article introduces key elements of a student sleep education program that can be easily incorporated into many universities first-year orientation classes or as part of residential housing programs. (Author)

  19. A Study of Pacific Islander Scholarship Football Players and Their Institutional Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Monica K.

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the theories of social and cultural capital and introduces athletic capital in order to gain an understanding of Polynesian scholarship football players and their experiences at an institution of higher education. Additionally, theories of student identity development and student-athlete development are also utilized to gain a…

  20. The Hathaway Scholarship and Academic Preparation: A Study of Perceptions of Academic Preparation and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagard, Tammy Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    With the implementation of the Hathaway scholarship in the state of Wyoming, questions arose regarding the effectiveness of a prescribed set of high school courses (the Success Curriculum) in preparing students for success in college. This research sought to determine the perceptions of academic preparation of students who earned the Hathaway…

  1. Rural Student Vocational Program (RSVP) [and] Housing Guide for Parents and Students [and] Work Supervisor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rural Student Vocational Program, Wasilla, AK.

    The purpose of the Rural Student Vocational Program (RSVP) is to provide rural high school vocational students with work and other experiences related to their career objective. Students from outlying schools travel to Anchorage, Fairbanks, or Juneau (Alaska) to participate in two weeks of work experience with cooperating agencies and businesses.…

  2. College Student for a Day: A Transition Program for High School Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Alexandra; Ross, Denise E.

    2015-01-01

    High school students with disabilities can benefit from early exposure to campus-based accommodations and supports as they transition to college. College Student for a Day (CSFAD) is an on-campus activity-based program that introduces high school students with disabilities to supports and accommodations on a college campus. This Practice Brief…

  3. Using Career Pathways to Guide Students through Programs of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Debra D.; Krismer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes career pathways that evolved through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training consortium grant designed to help students complete programs of study and enter health care careers.

  4. Strategies to Recruit and Retain Students in Physical Science and Mathematics on a Diverse College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jen-Mei; Kwon, Chuhee; Stevens, Lora; Buonora, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This article presents implementation details and findings of a National Science Foundation Scholarship in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM) consisting of many high-impact practices to recruit and retain students in the physical sciences and mathematics programs, particularly first-generation and underrepresented…

  5. Integrating Professional Development into STEM Graduate Programs: Student-Centered Programs for Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, L.; McCay, D.; Driscoll, C. T.; Glas, R. L.; Gutchess, K. M.; Johnson, A.; Millard, G.

    2017-12-01

    Recognizing that over half of STEM Ph.D. graduates are finding work outside of academia, a new, NSF-funded program at Syracuse University, EMPOWER (or Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research) is encouraging its graduate students to take ownership of their graduate program and design it to meet their anticipated needs. Launched in 2016, EMPOWER's goal is to prepare graduate students for careers in the water-energy field by offering targeted workshops, professional training coursework, a career capstone experience, a professional development mini-grant program, and an interdisciplinary "foundations" seminar. Through regular student feedback and program evaluation, EMPOWER has learned some important lessons this first year: career options and graduate students' interests are diverse, requiring individualized programs designed to meet the needs of prospective employers and employees; students need exposure to the range of careers in their field to provide a roadmap for designing their own graduate school experience; effective programs nurture a culture that values professional development thereby giving students permission to pursue career paths and professional development opportunities that meet their own needs and interests; and existing university resources support the effective and efficient integration of professional development activities into graduate programs. Many of the positive outcomes experienced by EMPOWER students may be achieved in departmental graduate programs with small changes to their graduate curricula.

  6. Encouraging engagement in enabling programs: The students’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Hellmundt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student retention is a key concern in tertiary education enabling programs with research showing that early engagement leads to higher completion rates (Hodges et al., 2013. But how do students new to university education learn how to engage effectively? This article outlines an engagement framework that foregrounds Guidance, Encouragement, Modelling and Structure (GEMS as a holistic approach to facilitating effective student engagement. This framework was developed from qualitative data gleaned from students enrolled in the Preparing for Success Program at Southern Cross University, New South Wales, Australia. The findings from the students indicate that the GEMS framework activates student potential and enables them to use existing knowledge and experience to not only deepen and broaden their learning but also successfully prepare for further study.

  7. SoTL as a Subfield for Political Science Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Lee

    2017-01-01

    This article offers a theoretical proposal of how political science graduate programs can emphasize teaching in the discipline by creating the subfield of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). Currently, these programs neither prepare their students for academic positions where teaching is valued nor participate in a disciplinary trend…

  8. Education Scholarship and its Impact on Emergency Medicine Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbino, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) education is becoming increasingly challenging as a result of changes to North American medical education and the growing complexity of EM practice. Education scholarship (ES) provides a process to develop solutions to these challenges. ES includes both research and innovation. ES is informed by theory, principles and best practices, is peer reviewed, and is disseminated and archived for others to use. Digital technologies have improved the discovery of work that informs ES, broadened the scope and timing of peer review, and provided new platforms for the dissemination and archiving of innovations. This editorial reviews key steps in raising an education innovation to the level of scholarship. It also discusses important areas for EM education scholars to address, which include the following: the delivery of competency-based medical education programs, the impact of social media on learning, and the redesign of continuing professional development. PMID:26594270

  9. Education Scholarship and its Impact on Emergency Medicine Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbino, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) education is becoming increasingly challenging as a result of changes to North American medical education and the growing complexity of EM practice. Education scholarship (ES) provides a process to develop solutions to these challenges. ES includes both research and innovation. ES is informed by theory, principles and best practices, is peer reviewed, and is disseminated and archived for others to use. Digital technologies have improved the discovery of work that informs ES, broadened the scope and timing of peer review, and provided new platforms for the dissemination and archiving of innovations. This editorial reviews key steps in raising an education innovation to the level of scholarship. It also discusses important areas for EM education scholars to address, which include the following: the delivery of competency-based medical education programs, the impact of social media on learning, and the redesign of continuing professional development.

  10. Tax Credit Scholarship Programs and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lenford C.; Spearman, Patrick Thomas

    2014-01-01

    After "Zelman v. Simmons-Harris" (2002), civil conflict over use of vouchers and taxes to purchase private education, especially in religious schools, largely remained an issue for state courts' jurisprudence. However, in 2010, it returned to the U.S. Supreme Court when Arizona taxpayers challenged the constitutionality of the state's…

  11. Impact of School Flu Vaccine Program on Student Absences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaspohl, Sara S.; Dixon, Betty T.; Streater, James A.; Hausauer, Elizabeth T.; Newman, Christopher P.; Vogel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Literature provides evidence that school attendance correlates with academic performance and student success. Influenza is a contributing factor to school absences. Primary prevention for influenza includes immunization. School-located influenza vaccine (SLIV) programs provide greater access for students to be immunized. A retrospective review of…

  12. Critical Elements of Student Assistance Programs: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rodriguez, Leslie; Beyard, Karen; Goldstein, Marc B.

    2010-01-01

    Student assistance programs (SAPs) are one approach for using teams to respond to student needs, but there is little research on SAP implementation and whether SAPs function as intended. The authors present findings from a study of two SAPs that use a model developed by Connecticut's Governor's Prevention Partnership. The study focused on…

  13. Focus on Student Success: Components for Effective Summer Bridge Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Quiroz, Alicia; Garza, Nora R.

    2018-01-01

    Using research focused on best practices, focus group information, and data analytics, the Title V: Focus on Student Success (FOSS) Grant created a model for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a summer bridge program. Results included increased academic performance indicators in first-year Hispanic college students. Validation for…

  14. Assertiveness Training: A Program for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Grant, Deborah S.

    1980-01-01

    Proposes an assertiveness training program suitable for adolescents in a high school group setting. After role-playing examples, students should begin formulating their own responses. Early work in this area indicates that students eagerly participate in assertiveness training groups, and are quick to pick up the skills required for assertive…

  15. Enhancing Student Engagement through Simulation in Programming Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiaq, Sakirulai Olufemi; Jamil, Md Golam

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of a simulator for teaching programming to foster student engagement and meaningful learning. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory mixed-method research approach was adopted in a classroom-based environment at a UK university. A rich account of student engagement dimensions…

  16. Improvements Needed in Administration of the Guaranteed Student Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report identifies improvements needed in administration of the guaranteed student loan program. Improvements needed are based on the fact that that lenders are not informed when student borrowers drop out of school. Alternatives for providing lenders with timely information on enrollment terminations are indicated. Additional administrative…

  17. African American Students' Experiences in Special Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Eleanor; Howley, Aimee

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Disproportionate placement of African American students into special education programs is likely to be a form of institutional racism, especially when such placement stigmatizes students. If placement also fails to lead to educational benefits, the practice becomes even more suspect. Some studies have explored disproportionate…

  18. Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP) Administrative Manual. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    WICHE (the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) is a regional, nonprofit organization. WICHE and its 15 member states work to improve access to higher education and ensure student success. Its student exchange programs, regional initiatives, and its research and policy work allow it to assist constituents throughout the West and…

  19. Barriers to International Student Mobility: Evidence from the Erasmus Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Otero, Manuel; Huisman, Jeroen; Beerkens, Maarja; de Wit, Hans; Vujic, Suncica

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we look at the barriers to international student mobility, with particular reference to the European Erasmus program. Much is known about factors that support or limit student mobility, but very few studies have made comparisons between participants and nonparticipants. Making use of a large data set on Erasmus and non-Erasmus…

  20. Analysis of Students' Errors on Linear Programming at Secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to identify secondary school students' errors on linear programming at 'O' level. It is based on the fact that students' errors inform teaching hence an essential tool for any serious mathematics teacher who intends to improve mathematics teaching. The study was guided by a descriptive survey ...

  1. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  2. Scholarship, publication, and career advancement in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C

    2009-07-01

    Scholarship and publication are key contributors to career advancement in health professions education worldwide. Scholarship is expressed in many ways including original research; integration and synthesis of ideas and data, often across disciplines; application of skill and knowledge to problems that have consequences for health professionals, students, and patients; and teaching in many forms. Professional publication also has diverse outlets ranging from empirical articles in peer reviewed journals, textbook chapters, videos, simulation technologies, and many other means of expression. Scholarship and publication are evaluated and judged using criteria that are consensual, public, and transparent. This three-part AMEE Guide presents advice about how to prepare and publish health professions education research reports and other forms of scholarship in professional journals and other outlets. Part One addresses scholarship-its varieties, assessment, and attributes of productive scholars and scholarly teams. Part Two maps the road to publication, beginning with what's important and reportable and moving to manuscript planning and writing, gauging manuscript quality, manuscript submission and review, and writing in English. Part Three offers 21 practical suggestions about how to advance a successful and satisfying career in the academic health professions. Concluding remarks encourage health professions educators to pursue scholarship with vision and reflection.

  3. Students Learn Programming Faster through Robotic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Allison; Newsom, Jeff; Schunn, Chris; Shoop, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Schools everywhere are using robotics education to engage kids in applied science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities, but teaching programming can be challenging due to lack of resources. This article reports on using Robot Virtual Worlds (RVW) and curriculum available on the Internet to teach robot programming. It also…

  4. Analysing Student Programs in the PHP Intelligent Tutoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weragama, Dinesha; Reye, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Programming is a subject that many beginning students find difficult. The PHP Intelligent Tutoring System (PHP ITS) has been designed with the aim of making it easier for novices to learn the PHP language in order to develop dynamic web pages. Programming requires practice. This makes it necessary to include practical exercises in any ITS that…

  5. Evaluating a Psychology Graduate Student Peer Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Christina; Mullins, Morell E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on mentoring outcomes and characteristics of various types of mentoring programs in different settings is limited. The present study sampled 39 graduate students at a small Midwestern university to evaluate peer mentoring in a graduate school setting. Mentoring function and outcome relationships as well as program characteristics were…

  6. Evaluation of a Program to Teach Medical Students about Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Harvey A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Week-end Intervention Program (WIP) used by Wright State University School of Medicine, which assesses the alcohol problems of those convicted of offenses such as drunk driving and then assists in finding treatment, is described. The impact of the program in educating medical students about alcoholism is discussed. (MLW)

  7. Male College Student Perceptions of Intercultural and Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, Kathryn Q.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to understand why men participate in study abroad at much lower rates than women, this study examines how male college students at a large research university perceive a university-run global education program, especially in terms of the expected costs and benefits of participating in such programs, and the extent to which gender…

  8. An Enrichment Program for Migrant Students: MENTE/UOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Michael B.

    The report describes the objectives and accomplishments of a summer enrichment program, Migrantes Envueltos en Nuevos Temas de Educacion/Migrants Engaged in New Themes in Education (MENTE), for promising and talented migrant high schoolers. The program is a cooperative one with a university. Students selected by a review committee are tested for…

  9. Student Perceptions of the Value of a University Laptop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Claudia; Sherony, Bruce; Steinhaus, Carol

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2000, when a mandatory laptop program was initiated at a Midwest regional university, a faculty research team began a longitudinal study to determine student perceptions of the value of the program. Value was defined as usefulness of the computer, reasonable price for the computer and the quality of the computer. A survey of 1,000…

  10. Project SAIL: A Summer Program Brings History Alive for Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    This project describes Project SAIL (Schools for Active Interdisciplinary Learning), a federally funded project providing in-depth staff development during a 3-week summer program for teachers, parents, and their gifted/talented economically disadvantaged students. The program theme, "Searching for Patterns in History," has been used with students…

  11. A Program Based on Maslow's Hierarchy Helps Students in Trouble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Mary Ruth; Saunders, Ron; Watkins, J. Foster

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses the development of an "alternative school" in an urban school system for students having trouble in the regular secondary setting. The program was based upon "Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs" and is described in detail. The initial assessment of the program produced very positive results.

  12. Learning to Program with Personal Robots: Influences on Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Monica M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of using robots in introductory programming courses is to increase motivation among learners. There have been several types of robots that have been used extensively in the classroom to teach a variety of computer science concepts. A more recently introduced robot designed to teach programming to novice students is the Institute…

  13. Measuring learning, student engagement, and program effectiveness: a strategic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzi, Julie; Austin, Connie

    2005-01-01

    What if there was an effective way to address the age-old question from students, "Why do we have to do this assignment?" And from faculty, "How do we know our students are really learning?" And from administrators, "How will we demonstrate to our peers, our accrediting agencies, and other program stakeholders that our programs are educationally effective?" As it undertook a curriculum redesign, faculty in a baccalaureate school of nursing developed a 9-step process for curriculum implementation. The authors discuss how they applied the 9 steps strategically, positioning the program for 2 successful accreditation self-studies and concurrently addressing, with greater confidence, some of these age-old questions.

  14. Assumptions and Challenges of Open Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Veletsianos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Researchers, educators, policymakers, and other education stakeholders hope and anticipate that openness and open scholarship will generate positive outcomes for education and scholarship. Given the emerging nature of open practices, educators and scholars are finding themselves in a position in which they can shape and/or be shaped by openness. The intention of this paper is (a to identify the assumptions of the open scholarship movement and (b to highlight challenges associated with the movement’s aspirations of broadening access to education and knowledge. Through a critique of technology use in education, an understanding of educational technology narratives and their unfulfilled potential, and an appreciation of the negotiated implementation of technology use, we hope that this paper helps spark a conversation for a more critical, equitable, and effective future for education and open scholarship.

  15. Feminist approaches to sexuality and law scholarship

    OpenAIRE

    Auchmuty, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality and Law scholarship is a new and developing field but, like most legal scholarship, it is dominated by masculine concerns and methodologies. This article explains why research that ignores feminist concerns and methodologies will be incomplete and inaccurate, and suggests questions that should be asked of resources to ensure a complete and accurate coverage of the topic. Rosemary Auchmuty is Professor of Law at the University of Reading. She writes on gender and sexuality issues, pr...

  16. A multifaceted program to encourage medical students' research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, K; Stagnaro-Green, A

    2001-07-01

    Clinician-scientists are important members of a research community that has more opportunities than ever before to solve problems important to patients. Nevertheless, the number of physicians applying for and receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has dropped. Introducing medical students to research and relevant support mechanisms early in their education may help to reverse this trend. In 1995, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine created its Office of Student Research Opportunities (OSRO) to stimulate students to engage in research. It also appointed a new dean to direct the OSRO; the person who filled this new position was a senior faculty member involved in patient-oriented research. The OSRO advises students, identifies faculty who want to mentor students, sponsors the Distinction in Research program, organizes an annual research day, helps fund summer and full-time research, and has created an endowment to support student travel to national meetings. Between 1997 and 2000 the number of students who participated in the research day increased from 18 to 74, and the number of publications by the graduating classes increased from 34 to 58 between 1997 and 1999. Participants have presented both basic and clinical projects. The authors' experience has shown that medical students can be motivated to carry out research with appropriate encouragement from the administration and the faculty, something that may help to reverse a troubling national trend. Based upon these early successes, Mount Sinai is developing a novel five-year program to provide medical students with research training.

  17. What do dental students think about mandatory laptop programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricson, William; Eisenberg, Elise; Guest, Gary; Jones, Pamela; Johnson, Lynn; Panagakos, Fotinos; McDonald, James; Cintron, Laura

    2006-05-01

    In spite of efforts by many dental schools to provide information technology resources for students, only a handful of studies have been conducted to determine what dental students think about these initiatives. There are no reports in the literature describing students' perceptions of mandatory laptop programs, which are now being implemented by at least 25 percent of North American dental schools. In schools that have implemented laptop programs, students are required either to enroll with their own laptops that meet specifications or to purchase a laptop from the school at matriculation. In some schools, students are also required to purchase curriculum support software that is bundled with the laptop. This study was conducted to determine students' opinions at U.S. dental schools with mandatory laptop programs about these aspects of this information technology initiative: frequency of use, perceived necessity of use, note-typing during lectures, effectiveness of training, influence on study habits, benefits, implementation problems, added value in relation to added tuition costs, impact on quality of dental education, overall rating of the laptop experience, and impact of the laptop on use of other electronic curriculum resources. Responses of students at schools that purchased packaged curriculum support software from a commercial vendor were compared with students' responses at schools where faculty provided their own educational software. Responses were also compared among freshmen, sophomores, and upperclassmen in a cross-sectional sample. In 2004, approximately 800 dental students at fourteen dental schools responded to eleven questions that requested their impressions and evaluation of mandatory laptop programs and associated educational software. These questions comprised one section of the IREC Students' Questionnaire (IREC=Institutional Readiness for Electronic Curriculum) that assessed students' perceptions of various aspects of information technology

  18. Getting Foster Youth to and through College: Successes and Challenges of the New Jersey Foster Care Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maia; Losey, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of the New Jersey Foster Care Scholars program is a testament to its importance. Typical college students rely on parents for financial assistance and emotional support. Youth aging out of foster care often are on their own. The scholarship program offers an opportunity for higher education that many foster youth thought they would…

  19. Student supports: developmental education and other academic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Eric P; Boatman, Angela; Long, Bridget Terry

    2013-01-01

    Low rates of college completion are a major problem in the United States. Less than 60 percent of students at four-year colleges graduate within six years, and at some colleges, the graduation rate is less than 10 percent. Additionally, many students enter higher education ill-prepared to comprehend college-level course material. Some estimates suggest that only one-third of high school graduates finish ready for college work; the proportion is even lower among older students. Colleges have responded to the poor preparation of incoming students by placing approximately 35 to 40 percent of entering freshmen into remedial or developmental courses, along with providing academic supports such as summer bridge programs, learning communities, academic counseling, and tutoring, as well as student supports such as financial aid and child care. Eric Bettinger, Angela Boatman, and Bridget Terry Long describe the role, costs, and impact of these college remediation and academic support programs. According to a growing body of research, the effects of remedial courses are considerably nuanced. The courses appear to help or hinder students differently by state, institution, background, and academic preparedness. The mixed findings from earlier research have raised questions ranging from whether remedial programs, on average, improve student academic outcomes to which types of programs are most effective. Administrators, practitioners, and policy makers are responding by redesigning developmental courses and searching for ways to implement effective remediation programs more broadly. In addition, recent research suggests that colleges may be placing too many students into remedial courses unnecessarily, suggesting the need for further examining the placement processes used to assign students to remedial courses. The authors expand the scope of remediation research by discussing other promising areas of academic support commonly offered by colleges, including advising, tutoring

  20. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) 2009-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for rising senior undergraduates majoring in any of the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of a NASA airborne campaign, including flying onboard NASA research aircraft while studying Earth system processes. Approximately thirty-two students are competitively selected each summer from colleges and universities across the United States. Students work in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assist in the operation of instruments onboard NASA aircraft where they sample and measure atmospheric gases and image land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participate in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors help to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student develops an individual research project from the data collected and delivers a conference-style final presentation on their results. Each year, several students present the results of their SARP research projects in scientific sessions at this meeting. We discuss the results and effectiveness of the program over the past nine summers and plans for the future.

  1. Student Feedback of Career Development Workshops for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, J. E.; Pressley, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A number of techniques are employed each year to evaluate the effectiveness of and to identify opportunities for improvement in the Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (LAR) REU program at Washington State University. For example, information gathered from pre-/post-surveys and pre-/post-interviews provides information regarding students' perceptions and levels of experience with the scientific process, career and academic goals, and motivation for joining the REU program. Poster session rubrics assess students' abilities to summarize their experiences in a professional setting. Alumni surveys gauge former participants' perceptions of the REU experience. One seemingly simple and highly useful, but often less documented, component of the evaluation process for program improvement is the use of workshop feedback forms. Weekly workshops are designed to provide students with enhanced knowledge and skills in the area of atmospheric chemistry as well as research design skills, academic and career guidance, and presentation skills. According to previous years' evaluation reports, workshops are largely beneficial to students for learning new skills. Yet, students suggest a number of recommendations that may benefit any REU program, such as: providing slides beforehand to provide a framework for the upcoming workshop, having instructors speak in more student-friendly language, covering higher-level topics, and including more hands-on, instructor-guided practice during the workshops. Thus, workshop feedback forms provide meaningful feedback to increase learning outcomes and enhance the REU student experience. This presentation will offer ideas gathered from over five years of workshop feedback forms that, while somewhat specific to workshops offered for the LAR REU, can offer faculty and PIs insight into the student experience, enhancing their ability to improve programming and achieve greater learning outcomes.

  2. Use of an international faculty/student exchange program as a process to establish and improve graduate education and research within an allied health discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, V S; Kirk, P; Birch, N J

    1998-01-01

    It has been recognized in the allied health professions that allied health disciplines must enhance and increase their research and scholarly activity. If faculty/staff are to be judged in the academic environment in which they work, their efforts to conduct research must be supported. Recognition for academic scholarship measured by the performance of research and scholarly activity is often difficult for faculty/staff to attain because of increased demands for scheduled time devoted to classroom instruction and student advising. This inability for faculty/staff to engage in research and scholarly activity often is enhanced by the lack of proper and adequate facilities and equipment. Also important is the role of graduate education, which itself, provides a stimulus for the performance of research and scholarly activity. This article reports outcomes achieved by an international faculty/staff-student program that provides an opportunity for faculty/staff and students within an allied health discipline to conduct research and scholarly activity. This program could serve as a model to identify the strengths and benefits that can be achieved by such programs. This program is capable of improving the research and scholarly activity of all academic units within an allied health discipline.

  3. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  4. Rutgers Young Horse Teaching and Research Program: undergraduate student outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Sarah L

    2012-12-01

    Equine teaching and research programs are popular but expensive components of most land grant universities. External funding for equine research, however, is limited and restricts undergraduate research opportunities that enhance student learning. In 1999, a novel undergraduate teaching and research program was initiated at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. A unique aspect of this program was the use of young horses generally considered "at risk" and in need of rescue but of relatively low value. The media interest in such horses was utilized to advantage to obtain funding for the program. The use of horses from pregnant mare urine (PMU) ranches and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mustangs held the risks of attracting negative publicity, potential of injury while training previously unhandled young horses, and uncertainty regarding re-sale value; however, none of these concerns were realized. For 12 years the Young Horse Teaching and Research Program received extensive positive press and provided invaluable learning opportunities for students. Over 500 students, at least 80 of which were minorities, participated in not only horse management and training but also research, event planning, public outreach, fund-raising, and website development. Public and industry support provided program sustainability with only basic University infrastructural support despite severe economic downturns. Student research projects generated 25 research abstracts presented at national and international meetings and 14 honors theses. Over 100 students went on to veterinary school or other higher education programs, and more than 100 others pursued equine- or science-related careers. Laudatory popular press articles were published in a wide variety of breed/discipline journals and in local and regional newspapers each year. Taking the risk of using "at risk" horses yielded positive outcomes for all, especially the undergraduate students.

  5. Can Universal, Place-Based Scholarships Reduce Inequality? Lessons from Kalamazoo, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Adams, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The Kalamazoo Promise, announced in 2005, is an innovative college-scholarship program available to every graduate of the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Public Schools. Programs such as the Kalamazoo Promise, which is being emulated in cities across the United States, open new avenues for the acquisition of human capital regardless of income level or…

  6. Science and students: Yucca Mountain project's education outreach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, A.V.; Larkin, E.L.; Reilly, B.; Austin, P.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is very concerned about the lack of understanding of basic science. Increasingly, critical decisions regarding the use of energy, technology, and the environment are being made. A well-educated and science-literate public is vital to the success of these decisions. Science education and school instruction are integral parts of the DOE's public outreach program on the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). Project staff and scientists speak to elementary, junior high, high school, and university students, accepting all speaking invitations. The objectives of this outreach program include the following: (1) educating Nevada students about the concept of a high-level nuclear waste repository; (2) increasing awareness of energy and environmental issues; (3) helping students understand basic concepts of earth science and geology in relation to siting a potential repository; and (4) giving students information about careers in science and engineering

  7. Motivating programming students by Problem Based Learning and LEGO robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto Chotto, Mayela; Mora, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    . For this reason the school is focusing on different teaching methods to help their students master these skills. This paper introduces an experimental, controlled comparison study of three learning designs, involving a problem based learning (PBL) approach in connection with the use of LEGO Mindstorms to improve...... students programming skills and motivation for learning in an introductory programming course. The paper reports the results related with one of the components of the study - the experiential qualities of the three learning designs. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey with 229 students...... from three groups exposed to different learning designs and through six qualitative walk-alongs collecting data from these groups by informal interviews and observations. Findings from the three studies were discussed in three focus group interviews with 10 students from the three experimental groups....

  8. The Racialized Experiences of Students of Color in Higher Education and Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica C.; Linder, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Using a critical race theory lens, we examined the racialized experiences of 29 Students of Color in HESA programs across the United States. Students' experiences illuminate 4 themes: educating white peers, invalidation of experiences and identity, racial stereotypes, and isolation. Participants' experiences illustrate a disconnect between HESA…

  9. The Speech Anxiety Program at UTK: A Training Program for Students with High Public Speaking Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Bob

    The University of Tennessee (Knoxville) offers as a special section of the public speaking curriculum, a "speech anxiety" program, taught by faculty and graduate students from the speech and theatre and educational psychology departments and staff from the counseling services center. The students spend the first few weeks of the special…

  10. Teacher Research Experience Programs = Increase in Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2010-12-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers (SRP), founded in 1990, is one of the largest, best known university-based professional development programs for science teachers in the U.S. The program’s basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have not experienced it firsthand. For eight weeks in each of two consecutive summers, teachers participate as a member of a research team, led by a member of Columbia University’s research faculty. In addition to the laboratory experience, all teachers meet as a group one day each week during the summer for a series of pedagogical activities. A unique quality of the Summer Research Program is its focus on objective assessment of its impact on attitudes and instructional practices of participating teachers, on the performance of these teachers in their mentors’ laboratories, and most importantly, on the impact of their participation in the program on student interest and performance in science. SRP uses pass rate on the New York State Regents standardized science examinations as an objective measure of student achievement. SRP's data is the first scientific evidence of a connection between a research experience for teachers program and gains in student achievement. As a result of the research, findings were published in Science Magazine. The author will present an overview of Columbia's teacher research program and the results of the published program evaluation.

  11. Integrating student-focused career planning into undergraduate gerontology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoogian, Margaret M; Cannon, Melissa L

    2018-04-02

    As our global older adult populations are increasing, university programs are well-positioned to produce an effective, gerontology-trained workforce (Morgan, 2012; Silverstein & Fitzgerald, 2017). A gerontology curriculum comprehensively can offer students an aligned career development track that encourages them to: (a) learn more about themselves as a foundation for negotiating career paths; (b) develop and refine career skills; (c) participate in experiential learning experiences; and (d) complete competency-focused opportunities. In this article, we discuss a programmatic effort to help undergraduate gerontology students integrate development-based career planning and decision-making into their academic programs and achieve postgraduation goals.

  12. Mentoring program for students newly enrolled in an Engineering Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Peña-Martín

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a mentoring program for first year engineering students in the Telecommunications Engineering College (ETSIT at the University of Malaga (UMA. Actors involved in the program are professors from staff, veterans mentoring students and, of course, freshmen. All of them has been organized trough the Moodle based Virtual Learning Environment Platform of the UMA. The program has gone through several phases over three years. This paper shows the main objectives of this mentoring program, the initial design to get them where professors played mentor role, and successive changes made to try to improve the results, including the assumption of the mentor role by senior students (peer mentoring. The tools used for program evaluation are shown too. Despite the low participation, it has been a framework for the development of various educational and socializing activities (for mentors and mentees focused on developing generic competences. Furthermore, it has been a research tool to get a better understanding of problems affecting students newly enrolled.

  13. Hmong Students in Higher Education and Academic Support Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soua Xiong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Student awareness, usage, and perception of academic support programs were examined among 55 Hmong college students at a large, public western university. Twenty-eight students had participated in one or more ASPs while 27 students had not participated in any ASPs. Those who had participated found the programs to be supportive with an average rating of 7.39 out of 10 (10 being most supportive. The majority of students who did not participate in ASPs reported that they were not aware of ASPs and their services. Results also show that the majority of Hmong college students perceived a lack of time to study, poor study habits, lack of money, lack of motivation, lack of direction on career goals, and poor time management to be obstacles for them in higher education. Based on the findings, it seems ASPs were not able to reach some Hmong students with their outreach efforts. However, those that they were able to reach found academic support services helpful, especially with financial concerns and direction on career goals.

  14. Passionate scholarship or academic safety: an ethical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merryfeather, Lyn

    2015-03-01

    Are we passionate scholars or is academic safety something to which we aspire? Do we teach our students one thing and practice another? Are some forms of scholarship more acclaimed than others, some methodologies more acceptable? What are the ethical implications in these various questions? In this article, I outline my experiences, both as a student researcher and as an educator, that have brought me to ask these things. Holism is an ideal that many nursing students are taught and encouraged to bring to their practice, and yet holism does not seem, in many instances, to be supported in academia or in bedside practice. I suggest the possible causes for these difficulties and propose solutions. I suggest that the bedrock of ethical practice, both in the academy and with patients, is to bring all of who we are, the alchemic mystery of holism, to everything we do. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. A Study of the Development of Students' Visualizations of Program State during an Elementary Object-Oriented Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajaniemi, Jorma; Kuittinen, Marja; Tikansalo, Taina

    2008-01-01

    Students' understanding of object-oriented (OO) program execution was studied by asking students to draw a picture of a program state at a specific moment. Students were given minimal instructions on what to include in their drawings in order to see what they considered to be central concepts and relationships in program execution. Three drawing…

  16. AISES 1995 annual conference ($10,000), AISES scholarship fund ($5,000). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-30

    The conference took place in Detroit, MI, November 9--12, 1995, at the COBO Convention Center. This educational event and career fair serve as part of the reward for students pursuing or about to complete their education. The community of peers, professionals, elders, family and mentors embrace the students` ambitions and celebrate the students` accomplishments. For students who might otherwise feel disconnected while in school, the annual gathering at the conference is a vital part of maintaining their motivation and inspiring perseverance. The 1995 Conference attendance was 1,900 students and professionals. Some 230 companies, government agencies, universities and organizations were represented at the Career Fair where students gathered information regarding employment and educational opportunities. In an effort to provide as many opportunities as possible for students and recruiters, a networking room was available throughout the conference for interviewing, networking and socializing. Student poster research presentations were displayed in this area as well. A Job Information Center was also open to provide announcements for specific job opening as well as cross-referenced lists of majors/disciplines and the organizations that recruit in those areas of interest. Total scholarship disbursements for 1995 exceeded $600,000. Scholarships were granted to some 375 students in awards of $1,000 to $4,000. AISES scholarships are awarded to American Indian/Alaska Native undergraduate and graduate students who are members of AISES majoring in the sciences, engineering, health-related fields, business, natural resources, math and science secondary education, and energy resource management. Scholarship are awarded in recognition of students` leadership and academic achievements.

  17. From Rupture to Resonance: Uncertainty and Scholarship in Fine Art Research Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Beverley; Holbrook, Allyson

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the phenomenon of "rupture" identified in student narratives of uncertainty and scholarship experienced during the course of Fine Art research degrees in two Australian universities. Rupture captures the phenomenon of severe disruption or discontinuity in existing knowledge and typically signifies epistemological…

  18. Many Rhodes: Travelling Scholarships and Imperial Citizenship in the British Academic World, 1880-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Tamson

    2011-01-01

    Since its Foundation in 1901, the Rhodes Scholarships scheme has been held up as the archetype of a programme designed to foster imperial citizens. However, though impressive in scale, Cecil Rhodes's foundation was not the first to bring colonial students to Britain. Over the course of the previous half-century, governments, universities and…

  19. Feminist Scholarship: Cross-Disciplinary Connections for Cultivating a Critical Perspective in Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifsteck, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Kinesiology has not been a particularly inviting space for feminist critical analysis. In this article, as a graduate student in the field, I argue that feminist scholarship from women and gender studies can be applied to kinesiology issues to promote a critical perspective that is often missing in kinesiology. I draw connections between feminist…

  20. The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Oklahoma. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This analysis examines the demographics of the special needs population in public and private schools in Oklahoma and estimates the impact on school enrollments providing tax credit funded scholarship grants for special needs students. The author and his colleagues develop a model that shows how the expenditures of Oklahoma's school districts vary…

  1. Racializing Experiences of Foreign-Born and Ethnically Diverse Black Male Engineering Graduate Students: Implications for Student Affairs Practice, Policy, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Brian A.; Knight, Alexander; Robeson, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Despite a growing body of work on the experiences of Black collegians, the higher education knowledge base lacks scholarship focused on Black men in graduate programs who are foreign-born and/or identify ethnically as other than African American. In this article, we provide a domain-specific investigation (i.e., based on students' field of study),…

  2. Students' explanations in complex learning of disciplinary programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Camilo

    Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) has been denominated as the third pillar of science and as a set of important skills to solve the problems of a global society. Along with the theoretical and the experimental approaches, computation offers a third alternative to solve complex problems that require processing large amounts of data, or representing complex phenomena that are not easy to experiment with. Despite the relevance of CSE, current professionals and scientists are not well prepared to take advantage of this set of tools and methods. Computation is usually taught in an isolated way from engineering disciplines, and therefore, engineers do not know how to exploit CSE affordances. This dissertation intends to introduce computational tools and methods contextualized within the Materials Science and Engineering curriculum. Considering that learning how to program is a complex task, the dissertation explores effective pedagogical practices that can support student disciplinary and computational learning. Two case studies will be evaluated to identify the characteristics of effective worked examples in the context of CSE. Specifically, this dissertation explores students explanations of these worked examples in two engineering courses with different levels of transparency: a programming course in materials science and engineering glass box and a thermodynamics course involving computational representations black box. Results from this study suggest that students benefit in different ways from writing in-code comments. These benefits include but are not limited to: connecting xv individual lines of code to the overall problem, getting familiar with the syntax, learning effective algorithm design strategies, and connecting computation with their discipline. Students in the glass box context generate higher quality explanations than students in the black box context. These explanations are related to students prior experiences. Specifically, students with

  3. A comprehensive medical student career development program improves medical student satisfaction with career planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Brian J; Hammoud, Maya M; Middleton, Eric; Moroney, Donney; Schigelone, Amy

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) initiated a new career development program (CDP). The CDP incorporates the 4-phase career development model described by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Careers in Medicine (CiM). The CDP offers self-assessment exercises with guidance from trained counselors for 1st- and 2nd-year medical students. Career exploration experiences include Career Seminar Series luncheons, shadow experiences with faculty, and a shadow program with second-year (M2) and fourth-year (M4) medical students. During the decision-making phase, students work with trained faculty career advisors (FCA). Mandatory sessions are held on career selection, preparing the residency application, interviewing, and program evaluation. During the implementation phase, students meet with deans or counselors to discuss residency application and matching. An "at-risk plan" assists students who may have difficulty matching. The CiM Web site is extensively used during the 4 stages. Data from the AAMC and UMMS Graduation Questionnaires (GQ) show significant improvements for UMMS students in overall satisfaction with career planning services and with faculty mentoring, career assessment activities, career information, and personnel availability. By 2003, UMMS students had significantly higher satisfaction in all measured areas of career planning services when compared with all other U.S. medical students.

  4. Tomorrow's engineers through teacher/student programs at Penn State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, C.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in math and science increases when the problems and topics are current and socially relevant. A course that integrates various sciences requires a solid foundation in mathematics and an understanding that real life consists of an interaction of the basic sciences. One topical area that requires the understanding of math and science and affects our society is radiation. Although nuclear issues are prevalent in the news, very few secondary science educators receive much formal training in radiation and nuclear science. A strong push for educational programs on this topic by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and state departments of education began in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Through this effort, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) developed the Nuclear Concepts Institute for secondary science teachers and has continued its involvement with educational programs in nuclear science for teachers and students. From discussions with teachers and students along with formal and informal surveys, the programs have had a positive impact on teachers' interest in learning more about nuclear science and on students' choices to enter nuclear engineering or a related field. The paper discusses the Nuclear Concepts Program; formation of the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association (ANSTA); ANSTA projects; other Penn State educational programs; and impact of education programs

  5. Examining the Impact of a Highly Targeted State Administered Merit Aid Program on Brain Drain: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Analysis of Missouri's Bright Flight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, James R.; Muñoz, José; Curs, Bradley R.; Ehlert, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of state-funded merit-based aid programs has become increasingly popular among policy-makers, particularly in the southeastern part of the United States. One of the primary rationales of state-funded merit-based aid is to provide scholarships to the best and brightest students as a means to retain high quality human capital in the…

  6. An Analysis of the Role of Social Safety Net Scholarships in Reducing School Drop-Out during the Indonesian Economic Crisis. Innocenti Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Lisa A.

    This paper uses regression and matching techniques to evaluate Indonesia's Social Safety Net Scholarships Programme. The scholarships program was developed to try to prevent large numbers of children from dropping out of school as a result of the Asian financial crisis. The expectation was that many families would find it difficult to keep their…

  7. An Occupational Therapy and Teaching Partnership: Applying a Scholarship of Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Brian; MacCobb, Siobhán

    2017-07-01

    Occupational therapists must generate knowledge and evidence that relates specifically to their practice context especially when there is a paucity of literature for emerging areas of practice. This paper describes the process of adopting a scholarship of practice approach with other professionals to generate evidence for practice in mainstream post primary school settings with students with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties (SEBD). Scholarship of practice and clinical reasoning are closely intertwined as therapists generate evidence on their practice to make informed decisions and judgments. In this paper, there are a number of important concepts needing to be highlighted for their meaning in this specific context.

  8. Practice for beginners programming lesson using App Lab: Introduction of programming learning for undergraduate students

    OpenAIRE

    榊原, 直樹

    2017-01-01

    App Lab is an online programming education environment. It was designed classes of programming for beginners using the App Lab. Through 15 lessons of the class, it was to understand the basic structure of the programming of the sequential-repetition-branch. Students were allowed to complete the game as a final project. The effectiveness of App the Lab has been confirmed from these results.

  9. Trends and Features of Student Research Integration in Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, Svetlana; Makarova, Elena; Andreassen, John-Erik

    2016-01-01

    This study examines trends and features of student research integration in educational program during international cooperation between Østfold University College in Norway and Southern Federal University in Russia. According to research and education approach the international project is aimed to use four education models, which linked student…

  10. A Summer Leadership Development Program for Chemical Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Annie E.; Evans, Greg J.; Reeve, Doug

    2012-01-01

    The Engineering Leaders of Tomorrow Program (LOT) is a comprehensive curricular, co-curricular, extra-curricular leadership development initiative for engineering students. LOT envisions: "an engineering education that is a life-long foundation for transformational leaders and outstanding citizens." Academic courses, co-curricular certificate…

  11. Mentoring and Student Support in Online Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Coe, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The increase in online graduate programs and the online mentoring of student research have led to the need to identify challenges faced by online mentees and successful strategies used by online mentors during the dissertation process. Based on semistructured interviews with ten graduates, strategies for online mentoring and areas of support…

  12. Students' Perception on the Prospect of Economics Education Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiriza, Mica Siar

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the extent to which perceptions of students on the prospect of the Economics Education Program. The method used in this research is descriptive method in which the required data is obtained through questionnaire and technique of analyzing data used is percentages. Questionnaires were distributed through the Student…

  13. A Program Based on Maslow's Hierarchy Helps Students in Trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Mary Ruth; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes the program at Alabama's Huntsville Alternative School, where severe behavioral problems are dealt with by promoting positive self-concepts in students through acceptance, trust, warmth, concern, firmness, consistency, humor, and the meeting of human needs as identified by Abraham Maslow. (Author/PGD)

  14. Effective Ninth-Grade Transition Programs Can Promote Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, Victoria; Thornton, Bill; Usinger, Janet

    2014-01-01

    The transition from middle into high school can be perilous for some students. High school freshmen fail at an alarming rate. In a general sense, the environment, expectations, structure, and culture of high schools are different from middle schools. However, school leaders can implement transition programs that may promote success of 9th graders.…

  15. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  16. A suicide awareness and intervention program for health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Eve; Bowerman, Lisa; Zimitat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Many emergency service professionals and health professionals play important roles in the assessment and management of suicide risk but often receive inadequate mental health training in this area. A 'Suicide Awareness and Intervention Program' (SAIP) was developed for first year medical, paramedical and pharmacy students at the University of Tasmania, Australia. The program aimed to increase students' knowledge and awareness about suicide-related issues, develop interpersonal skills around suicide screening and increase awareness of available support services. A 5-hour experiential SAIP was embedded within the curriculum. A pre and post evaluation of knowledge, skills and attitudes was conducted, with an open-ended follow-up survey regarding use of what was learned in the program. Pre and post SAIP surveys showed significant improvement inknowledge and practical skills. Feedback from students and the counselling service indicated enduring impact of the program. Participation in the SAIP increased knowledge, skills and attitudes related to the assessment and management of individuals at risk for suicide, and the application of this ability to students' personal and professional lives.

  17. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Enhancing Teacher-Student Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, John H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Defines Neurolinguistic Programming (NCP) and discusses specific dimensions of the model that have applications for classroom teaching. Describes five representational systems individuals use to process information and gives examples of effective and ineffective teacher-student communication for each system. (MCF)

  18. E-learning program for medical students in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiana Silveira; Souza, Murilo Barreto; Filho, Roberto Silveira Silva; de Medeiros, Luciana Molina; Criado, Paulo Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop an e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning). Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning) had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0±0.8) than those who only participated in classes (7.75±1.8, p dermatology. PMID:21655756

  19. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  20. Mentoring For Success: REU Program That Help Every Student Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    NSF REU site programs provide remarkable opportunities for students to experience first-hand the challenges and rewards of science research. Because REU positions are relatively scarce, applicant pools are large, and it is easy to fill available positions with students who already have well-developed research skills and proven abilities to excel academically. Advisors bringing REU participants into their labs may see this as the ideal situation. However, using experience and academic record as the primary selection criteria ignores an enormous pool of talented students who have simply never been in a position to show, or discover themselves, what they can do. Reaching this audience requires a shift in strategy: recruiting in ways that reach students who are unaware of REU opportunities; adjusting our selection criteria to look beyond academics and experience, putting as much emphasis on future potential as we do on past performance; finding, or developing, mentors who share this broader vision of working with students; and providing an institutional culture that ensure every student has the kind of multi-node support network that maximizes his or her success. REU programs should be primary tools to developing a deeper and broader science workforce. Achieving that goal will require innovative approaches to finding, recruiting, and mentoring participants.

  1. Accounting Students' Reflections on a Regional Internship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Cord

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to gain professional industry experience for accounting students while undertaking theirundergraduate degree provides them with both a competitive edge in the marketplace and an opportunity toexperience the activities undertaken in their chosen profession. Structured experiential learning programsprovide students with the practical opportunity to apply their knowledge in an industry context and also toreflect on their personal learning journey. This paper explores the learning contribution of students’reflection-based assessments in an innovative and flexible internship program based on an e-learningframework. Through a preliminary investigation, it has been identified that after undertaking this internshipprogram, accounting students from an Australian regional university have advanced their learning pertainingto workplace preparedness, understanding and application of accounting principles, generic skillenhancement, and consolidation of accounting as their chosen professional career. The paper suggests that aninternship program such as the one examined contributes to the professional accountancy bodies’ andcommunity’s expectations of accounting graduates possessing key cognitive and behavioural skills.

  2. Designing a Peer-Mentoring Program for Education Doctorate (EdD) Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kendra Lowery; Rachel Geesa; Kat McConnell

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: In preparation for creating a peer-mentoring program for education doctorate (EdD) students, we conducted a literature review to learn about the characteristics of peer-mentoring programs for graduate students and EdD students specifically. Method: Our search criteria included articles about peer mentoring for graduate students only; published in peer-reviewed journals since the year 2000; and about programs that involved more experienced students, students farther along in t...

  3. NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program Ronald E. McNair PhD Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sunnie

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ronald E. McNair PHD Program was funded in September 1995. Implementation began during the spring of 1996. The deferment of the actual program initial semester enabled the program to continue support through the fall semester of 1998. This was accomplished by a no-cost extension from August 15, 1998 through December 31, 1998. There were 12 fellows supported by the program in 1996, 15 fellows in 1997, and 15 fellows 1998. Current program capacity is 15 fellows per funding support. Support for the academic outreach component began in spring 1998. The program was named the "Good Enough" Crew Activity (GECA) in honor of Dr. McNair's philosophy of everyone being good enough to achieve anything they want bad enough. The program currently enrolls 65 students from the third through the eight grades. The program is held 12 Saturdays per semester. The time is 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM each Saturday Morning. Program direction and facilitation is jointly administered with the PHD fellows and the Saturday Academy staff. Dr. John Kelly, REM-PHD Principal Investigator serves in a program oversight and leadership capacity. Ms. Sunnie Howard, The NASA REM-PHD Administrative Coordinator serves in an administrative and logistical capacity. Mr. Aaron Hatch, the NASA-AMES Liaison Officer, serve@'in a consultative and curriculum review capacity. The first recognition activity will be held on December 12, 1998, with the students, parents, faculty, PHD fellows, and other local student support services persons. Program outreach efforts are jointly supported by the NASA REM-PHD Program and the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Ph.D. program reached its first milestone in May 1998. North Carolina A&T State University graduated the first Ph.D. fellows. The first three Ph.D. Alumni were Ronald E. McNair PHD Program Fellows. It is hoped that this is just the beginning of a highly acclaimed doctoral program. The ultimate program success will be recognized when the

  4. Application of the fuzzy topsis multi-attribute decision making method to determine scholarship recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvanizam, I.

    2018-03-01

    Some scholarships have been routinely offered by Ministry of Research, Technology and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia for students at Syiah Kuala University. In reality, the scholarship selection process is becoming subjective and highly complex problem. Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM) techniques can be a solution in order to solve scholarship selection problem. In this study, we demonstrated the application of a fuzzy TOPSIS as an MADM technique by using a numerical example in order to calculate a triangular fuzzy number for the fuzzy data onto a normalized weight. We then use this normalized value to construct the normalized fuzzy decision matrix. We finally use the fuzzy TOPSIS to rank alternatives in descending order based on the relative closeness to the ideal solution. The result in terms of final ranking shows slightly different from the previous work.

  5. Development of a systematic career coaching program for medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to develop a systematic career-coaching program (SCCP) that can be used by medical teaching schools to address a growing need for career-coaching. The program objectives were to help students (1) develop a comprehensive self-understanding of their aptitudes, interests, and personality traits; (2) explore possible career choices and decide on a career path; and (3) develop the competencies needed to prepare for their future careers. Methods The SCCP was based on the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model and decision-making questioning model. Medical professionals, medical education and career counseling experts, and students participated in designing the program. Results The SCCP describes coaching content, tools, operational methods, and appropriate timing, and identifies the professionals and specialists who can offer their expertise in the different coaching phases. It is designed to allow medical schools to offer the program in segments or in its entirety, depending on the curriculum and environment. Conclusion The SCCP represents a viable career-coaching program for medical students that can be applied in part or in its entirety, depending on a medical school’s curriculum and educational environment. PMID:29510607

  6. Development of a systematic career coaching program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yera Hur

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study aimed to develop a systematic career-coaching program (SCCP that can be used by medical teaching schools to address a growing need for career-coaching. The program objectives were to help students (1 develop a comprehensive self-understanding of their aptitudes, interests, and personality traits; (2 explore possible career choices and decide on a career path; and (3 develop the competencies needed to prepare for their future careers. Methods The SCCP was based on the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation model and decision-making questioning model. Medical professionals, medical education and career counseling experts, and students participated in designing the program. Results The SCCP describes coaching content, tools, operational methods, and appropriate timing, and identifies the professionals and specialists who can offer their expertise in the different coaching phases. It is designed to allow medical schools to offer the program in segments or in its entirety, depending on the curriculum and environment. Conclusion The SCCP represents a viable career-coaching program for medical students that can be applied in part or in its entirety, depending on a medical school’s curriculum and educational environment.

  7. Development of a systematic career coaching program for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yera; Cho, A Ra; Kwon, Mihye

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a systematic career-coaching program (SCCP) that can be used by medical teaching schools to address a growing need for career-coaching. The program objectives were to help students (1) develop a comprehensive self-understanding of their aptitudes, interests, and personality traits; (2) explore possible career choices and decide on a career path; and (3) develop the competencies needed to prepare for their future careers. The SCCP was based on the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model and decision-making questioning model. Medical professionals, medical education and career counseling experts, and students participated in designing the program. The SCCP describes coaching content, tools, operational methods, and appropriate timing, and identifies the professionals and specialists who can offer their expertise in the different coaching phases. It is designed to allow medical schools to offer the program in segments or in its entirety, depending on the curriculum and environment. The SCCP represents a viable career-coaching program for medical students that can be applied in part or in its entirety, depending on a medical school's curriculum and educational environment.

  8. Study on the Internship Programs for International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Izumi; Iwatsu, Fumio

    Recently, the number of international students who have an experience of internship as employment experience has been increasing. In general, internship is a system through which students gain a work experience relating to his/her major field and future career, while at university. Many Japanese leading industries are situated in this Chubu area. Therefore, we have tried to facilitate an internship as a part of the curriculum from 2005. Here we report the progress of our internship programs and try to study the possibility of its future. Through this study, we can say that an internship would be a good opportunity for both international students and Japanese companies to understand each other. On the other hand, it is hard to bring the system to match students and companies, form both side of financial base and human resource. Therefore, to bring up good talent becomes to good connection with the industrial world.

  9. Graduate Student Research in the Classroom--Understanding the Role of Research Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Amber; Stockley, Denise; Kinderman, Laura; Egan, Rylan

    2016-01-01

    As universities continue to grow their undergraduate programs, graduate students are increasingly called upon to teach first and second year classes, often without feeling adequately prepared for the task. These teaching opportunities, however, can provide novice instructors with a chance to engage in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning…

  10. The Rise of Student-to-Student Learning: Youth-led Programs Impacting Engineering Education Globally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian O'Shea

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Around the globe, students and young engineers are playing an increasing role in the coordination and delivery of engineering education programs. Many youth-led initiatives are now conducted with students involved in all aspects of their creation, organisation and delivery. This trend presents an exciting opportunity for the education of engineering students, both those involved in delivery of the courses and for participants. This paper profiles four leading youth-led engineering education programs and analyses their structure and growth in recent years. Profiled are initiatives coordinated by Engineers Without Borders – Australia (EWB-A; the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST; the Electrical Engineering Students’ European Association (EESTEC; and the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED. Each case study includes a brief history of the organisation, program overview, growth analysis and future projections. The common features amongst these programs were analysed, as were the aspects which made them distinct from traditional university offerings. Key findings about the initiatives include: an international focus; the mixture of formal learning and social aspects; an integral role of volunteers within the organisation; the use of residential programs; and the role of internal professional development of committee members and volunteers. Additionally, this paper outlines the benefits for universities and provides a guide for how engineering faculties can support and nurture these initiatives and effectively create partnerships.

  11. Health behaviors of mandated and voluntary students in a motivational intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Intervention programs to reduce drinking by college students need to address developmental dynamics of freshmen students, including gender, psychosocial factors, personality, and lifestyle health-promoting behaviors.

  12. 78 FR 48417 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Educational Partnership Program (EPP), Ernest F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... alumni student data collection are the Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program and the Recruiting, Training.... Method of Collection Electronic applications and electronic forms are required from participants, and the primary methods of submittal are email and Internet transmission of electronic forms. Approximately 1% of...

  13. Evaluation of a Secure Laptop-Based Testing Program in an Undergraduate Nursing Program: Students' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jinyuan; Gunter, Glenda; Tsai, Ming-Hsiu; Lim, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the many robust learning management systems, and the availability of affordable laptops, have made secure laptop-based testing a reality on many campuses. The undergraduate nursing program at the authors' university began to implement a secure laptop-based testing program in 2009, which allowed students to use their newly purchased laptops to take quizzes and tests securely in classrooms. After nearly 5 years' secure laptop-based testing program implementation, a formative evaluation, using a mixed method that has both descriptive and correlational data elements, was conducted to seek constructive feedback from students to improve the program. Evaluation data show that, overall, students (n = 166) believed the secure laptop-based testing program helps them get hands-on experience of taking examinations on the computer and gets them prepared for their computerized NCLEX-RN. Students, however, had a lot of concerns about laptop glitches and campus wireless network glitches they experienced during testing. At the same time, NCLEX-RN first-time passing rate data were analyzed using the χ2 test, and revealed no significant association between the two testing methods (paper-and-pencil testing and the secure laptop-based testing) and students' first-time NCLEX-RN passing rate. Based on the odds ratio, however, the odds of students passing NCLEX-RN the first time was 1.37 times higher if they were taught with the secure laptop-based testing method than if taught with the traditional paper-and-pencil testing method in nursing school. It was recommended to the institution that better quality of laptops needs to be provided to future students, measures needed to be taken to further stabilize the campus wireless Internet network, and there was a need to reevaluate the Laptop Initiative Program.

  14. Direction discovery: A science enrichment program for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Suzanne S; Schwartz-Bloom, Rochelle D

    2009-03-01

    Launch into education about pharmacology (LEAP) is an inquiry-based science enrichment program designed to enhance competence in biology and chemistry and foster interest in science careers especially among under-represented minorities. The study of how drugs work, how they enter cells, alter body chemistry, and exit the body engages students to conceptualize fundamental precepts in biology, chemistry, and math. Students complete an intensive three-week course in the fundamentals of pharmacology during the summer followed by a mentored research component during the school year. Following a 5E learning paradigm, the summer course captures student interest by introducing controversial topics in pharmacology and provides a framework that guides them to explore topics in greater detail. The 5E learning cycle is recapitulated as students extend their knowledge to design and to test an original research question in pharmacology. LEAP students demonstrated significant gains in biology and chemistry knowledge and interests in pursuing science. Several students earned honors for the presentation of their research in regional and state science fairs. Success of the LEAP model in its initial 2 years argues that coupling college-level coursework of interest to teens with an authentic research experience enhances high school student success in and enthusiasm for science. Copyright © 2009 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign: Empowering Students to Measure, Investigate, and Understand Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaro, J.; Andersen, T.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Wegner, K.; Tessendorf, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) is a two-year campaign focused on empowering students to measure, investigate, and understand the climate system in their local community and around the world. Schools can participate in the campaign via three mechanisms: climate foundations, intensive observing periods (IOPs), and research investigations. Participation in the first year of the SCRC focused on increasing student understanding and awareness of climate. Students in 49 countries participated by joining a quarterly webinar, completing the online climate learning activity, collecting and entering data during IOPs, or completing an online join survey. The year also included a video competition with the theme of Earth Day 2012, as well as a virtual student conference in conjunction with The GLOBE Program's From Learning to Research Project. As the SCRC continues into its second year, the goal is for students to increase their understanding of and ability to conduct scientific research focused on climate. Furthermore, year two of the SCRC seeks to improve students' global awareness by encouraging collaborations among students, teachers and scientists focused on understanding the Earth as a system. In addition to the continuation of activities from year one, year two will have even more webinars offered, two competitions, the introduction of two new IOPs, and a culminating virtual student conference. It is anticipated that this virtual conference will showcase research by students who are enthusiastic and dedicated to understanding climate and mitigating impacts of climate change in their communities. This presentation will highlight examples of how the SCRC is engaging students all over the world in hands-on and locally relevant climate research.

  16. 78 FR 45617 - Student Assistance General Provisions, Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Family Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ..., et al. Student Assistance General Provisions, Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Family Education... General Provisions, Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Family Education Loan Program, and William D... General Provisions, Federal Perkins Loan (Perkins Loan) Program, Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL...

  17. Toward a model of institutional scholarship in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Leila; Mucciolo, Thomas W

    2011-12-01

    Using an expanded definition of scholarship that goes beyond the scholarship of discovery (research) to include the scholarship of integration, the scholarship of application, and the scholarship of teaching, this article explains interrelationships among these scholarship types in health professions and specifically dental education. Such interrelationships can lead to meaningful expansion of scholarship especially in the form of translational research, which relies on the development of all four of these types of scholarship. In recent years, health care-related organizations have been seeking ways to expand translational research. At the same time, an increasing number of academic institutions have been considering how to redefine what qualifies as advancing one's discipline in ways that go beyond mere number of publications and grants to better reflect the faculty member's overall scholarly effort. These redefinitions and a new attention to scholarly collaboration have led to the concept of a "complete scholar": one who makes contributions in all four areas of scholarship by collaborating with other scholars, practitioners, and members of the community. Expanding the concept of a complete scholar to that of a "complete institution" is the basis for what we propose as a Model of Institutional Scholarship. This model is exemplified by the Cochrane Collaboration, a gold standard for a complete vision of research on evidence-based health care. In the Model of Institutional Scholarship, an institution can visualize, plan, develop, and orchestrate all scholarship being conducted within its realm, creating collaborations among individual efforts that will enhance effectiveness and the creation of new knowledge.

  18. DPS Planetary Science Graduate Programs Database for Students and Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, David R.; Roman, Anthony; Meinke, Bonnie K.

    2017-10-01

    Planetary science is a topic that covers an extremely diverse set of disciplines; planetary scientists are typically housed in a departments spanning a wide range of disciplines. As such it is difficult for undergraduate students to find programs that will give them a degree and research experience in our field as Department of Planetary Science is a rare sighting, indeed. Not only can this overwhelm even the most determined student, it can even be difficult for many undergraduate advisers.Because of this, the DPS Education committee decided several years ago that it should have an online resource that could help undergraduate students find graduate programs that could lead to a PhD with a focus in planetary science. It began in 2013 as a static page of information and evolved from there to a database-driven web site. Visitors can browse the entire list of programs or create a subset listing based on several filters. The site should be of use not only to undergraduates looking for programs, but also for advisers looking to help their students decide on their future plans. We present here a walk-through of the basic features as well as some usage statistics from the collected web site analytics. We ask for community feedback on additional features to make the system more usable for them. We also call upon those mentoring and advising undergraduates to use this resource, and for program admission chairs to continue to review their entry and provide us with the most up-to-date information.The URL for our site is http://dps.aas.org/education/graduate-schools.

  19. Adapting research instruction to support the scholarship of practice: practice-scholar partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Evidence-based practice (EBP) is crucial to the success of delivering quality occupational therapy services. The skill to engage in the scholarship of practice is central to being able to create evidence specific to one's everyday practice and leads to an emerging role within occupational therapy called the practice-scholar. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the effectiveness of an instructional approach that engaged the scholarship of practice and the functions of a practice-scholar. Occupational therapy graduate students and practitioners collaborated to develop a practice-based study proposal during a traditional experimental research class. The objective was to apply research concepts contextualized within the natural practice context while developing the role of the practice-scholar in designing outcomes studies. As part of an entry-level research course, students (n == 39) and practitioners (n == 14) were grouped into learning teams and discussed two self-assessments to reflect on their self-efficacy perceptions of practice-scholarship research at the beginning and the end of a series of guided sessions to design a research proposal. Postcourse results show that students' perceptions of self-efficacy improved regarding their abilities to participate in practice-scholarship as a result of the learning partnerships. Anecdotal similarities were found for practitioners. As an instructional method, the learning partnership facilitated the development of foundational knowledge and skills related to becoming practice-scholars through increased self-efficacy in using proposal design. This educational approach proactively used the scholarship of practice research to bridge practice and education using a meaningful, partnership-based model for entry-level graduate students and occupational therapy practitioners.

  20. How Albanian Private Universities can use Game Theory for Optimization of Scholarship Offers

    OpenAIRE

    Llambrini Sota; Fejzi Kolaneci

    2013-01-01

    There are 46 private universities in Albania. We believe that the tuition fee andscholarship for high GPA students are two important components of the competitionbetween private universities. This study is a first attempt in applying Game Theory foroptimization of scholarship offers by Albanian private universities during academic years.There is a conflict between the utility functions of shareholders to maximize their profitsand the utility functions of the students enrolled in private unive...

  1. M. Hildred Blewett and the Blewett Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Barbara

    2011-03-01

    M. Hildred Blewett became a physicist at a time when few women were physicists. After beginning her career at General Electric, she became a respected accelerator physicist, working at Brookhaven, Argonne, and eventually CERN. Blewett was married for a time to John Blewett, another accelerator physicist, but the couple divorced without children and she never remarried. She felt that her career in physics was hampered by her gender, and when she died in 2004 at the age of 93, she left the bulk of her estate to the American Physical Society, to found a Scholarship for women in physics. Since 2005 the Blewett Scholarship has been awarded to women in physics who are returning to physics after a career break, usually for family reasons. Family/career conflicts are one of the most important reasons why young women in early careers leave physics---a loss for them as well as the physics community, which has invested time and money in their training. The Blewett Scholarship is one way for the physics community, under the leadership of CSWP, to help these young women resume their careers. I will discuss the life and work of Hildred Blewett, the Blewett Scholarship, and its benefits to the physics community.

  2. Receive, Reorganize, Return: Theatre as Creative Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Sara; Braunschneider, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of theatre as a mode of creative scholarship, from the research involved in sketch creation to the presentation of that research to academic audiences. We particularly focus on a specific sketch developed by the CRLT Players--one that explores the consequences of subtle discrimination faced by women scientists in…

  3. A Decade of Scholarship in Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Avery M.; Padgett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The teaching environment in business schools has changed dramatically over the last decade. But the last comprehensive review of the scholarship of teaching was conducted more than a decade ago. Where and from whom do the best practices for teaching originate today? To answer this question, the authors examine marketing education scholarship…

  4. What Determines Faculty-Engaged Scholarship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelgesang, Lori J.; Denson, Nida; Jayakumar, Uma M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how faculty and institutional characteristics shape engaged scholarship. Controlling for faculty dispositions, disciplinary differences, and institutional characteristics, the authors examined the impact of perceived institutional support for community partnerships, community-based research, and teaching on faculty engagement.…

  5. The Unbearable Blind Spots of Comics Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenna Clarke Gray

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Comics scholarship has a problem with representation that could be addressed if it paid greater attention to whose voices are amplified and when. This commentary is a call to attend to diversity in our discipline and for an end to the all-white, all-male comics conference, without resorting to “tokenism” as the solution.

  6. Scholarship as a Way of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Kasper Risbjerg

    2016-01-01

    human beings. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the rise of Big Humanities questioned this moral purpose. However, Big Humanities also reemphasized the importance of epistemic virtues for scholarship. The language of epistemic virtues helped scholars create new communities...

  7. My Student Body: Effects of an Internet-Based Prevention Program to Decrease Obesity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChausse, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of My Student Body (MSB)-Nutrition, an Internet-based obesity prevention program for college students. Participants: Three hundred and twenty ethnically diverse undergraduate students were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: MSB-Nutrition program, an on-campus weight management course, and a comparison group.…

  8. Critical Assessment of Video Production in Teacher Education: Can Video Production Foster Community-Engaged Scholarship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    In the theoretical framework of production pedagogy, I reflect on a video production project conducted in a teacher education program and discuss the potential of video production to foster community-engaged scholarship among pre-service teachers. While the importance of engaging learners in creating media has been emphasized, studies show little…

  9. Working Together or Apart: Promoting the Next Generation of Digital Scholarship. CLIR Publication No.145

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathlin, Ed.; Leney, Brian Ed.

    2009-01-01

    As part of its ongoing programs in digital scholarship and the cyberinfrastructure to support teaching, learning and research, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) held a symposium on September 15, 2008 in which a group of some 30 leading scholars was invited to…

  10. Competency-Based Faculty Development in Community-Engaged Scholarship: A Diffusion of Innovation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Catherine; Doherty, William J.; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Cook, Nancy; Dubrow, Gail; Mendenhall, Tai J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors utilized interviews, competency surveys, and document review to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year, cohort-based faculty development pilot program, grounded in diffusion of innovations theory, and aimed at increasing competencies in community engagement and community-engaged scholarship. Five innovator participants designed the…

  11. Medical student education program in Alzheimer’s disease: The PAIRS Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Angela L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As life expectancy increases, dementia incidence will also increase, creating a greater need for physicians well-trained to provide integrated geriatric care. However, research suggests medical students have limited knowledge or interest in pursuing geriatric or dementia care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the PAIRS Program and its effectiveness in enhancing medical education as a service-learning activity and replication model for the Buddy ProgramTM. Methods Between 2007 and 2011, four consecutive classes of first year Boston University School of Medicine students (n = 45; 24 ± 3 years, 58% female, 53% White participated in a year-long program in which they were paired with a patient with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Assessments included pre- and post-program dementia knowledge tests and a post-program reflective essay. Results Program completion was 100% (n = 45. A paired-sample t-test revealed a modest improvement in dementia knowledge post-program (p  Conclusions Quantitative and qualitative findings suggest that the PAIRS Program can enhance the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes regarding geriatric healthcare in future generations of physicians, a skill set that is becoming increasingly relevant in light of the rapidly aging population. Furthermore, results suggest that The Buddy ProgramTM model can be successfully replicated.

  12. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Clark

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited. We have developed two low-cost programs--"Present Your PhD Thesis to a 12-Year-Old" and "Shadow a Scientist"--that combine training in science communication with outreach to area middle schools. We assessed the outcomes of these programs and found a 2-fold benefit: scientists improve their communication skills by explaining basic science research to a general audience, and students' enthusiasm for science and their scientific knowledge are increased. Here we present details about both programs, along with our assessment of them, and discuss the feasibility of exporting these programs to other universities.

  13. A meaningful MESS (Medical Education Scholarship Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari A. Whicker

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Graduate medical education faculty bear the responsibility of demonstrating active research and scholarship; however, faculty who choose education-focused careers may face unique obstacles related to the lack of promotion tracks, funding, career options, and research opportunities. Our objective was to address education research and scholarship barriers by providing a collaborative peer-mentoring environment and improve the production of research and scholarly outputs. Methods: We describe a Medical Education Scholarship Support (MESS group created in 2013. MESS is an interprofessional, multidisciplinary peer-mentoring education research community that now spans multiple institutions. This group meets monthly to address education research and scholarship challenges. Through this process, we develop new knowledge, research, and scholarly products, in addition to meaningful collaborations. Results: MESS originated with eight founding members, all of whom still actively participate. MESS has proven to be a sustainable unfunded local community of practice, encouraging faculty to pursue health professions education (HPE careers and fostering scholarship. We have met our original objectives that involved maintaining 100% participant retention; developing increased knowledge in at least seven content areas; and contributing to the development of 13 peer-reviewed publications, eight professional presentations, one Masters of Education project, and one educational curriculum. Discussion: The number of individuals engaged in HPE research continues to rise. The MESS model could be adapted for use at other institutions, thereby reducing barriers HPE researchers face, providing an effective framework for trainees interested in education-focused careers, and having a broader impact on the education research landscape.

  14. Effectiveness of a Dental Students Stress Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Alzahem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dental education stress effects and sources were explored thoroughly in the literature, but the effectiveness of stress management programs received less attention. This study introduced a new stress management program, named Dental Education Stress Management (DESM program. It showed its effectiveness in a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest-follow-up-control group design. The new program was based on the principle of psychoeducation and consisted of three 90-min sessions, to teach dental students how to better deal with their stress symptoms and to reduce their general stress level. Two instruments were used to assess the level of stress of the dental students, namely the Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES, and the Psychological Stress Measure (PSM-9. Results show that the DESM program has the desired effect of decreasing the stress levels of its participants, and these effects lasted for at least two weeks. Because of several methodological limitations of the study more research is needed to draw more generalizable conclusions.

  15. 76 FR 4137 - Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students... Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) is a National Science Foundation program that...

  16. The Effects of Part-Time MBA Programs on Students: The Relationships between Students and Their Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Melvin; Burns, David J.; Manolis, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The authors explore how the relationship between part-time master of business administration (MBA) students and their employers changes as students proceed through their MBA program by examining the degree to which students are integrated into their employer organizations. Significant positive relationships observed between students' progress…

  17. Scholar in Residence: an innovative application of the scholarship of engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacelon, Cynthia S; Donoghue, Linda Carey; Breslin, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Universities are expected to engage with communities for the benefit of both. Based on the definition of scholarship advanced by Boyer in the 1990s, inclusive of the scholarship of discovery, integration, teaching, and application, the School of Nursing and Jewish Geriatric Services, Inc., have instituted a unique collaboration entitled the Scholar in Residence. Unlike traditional agreements between schools of nursing and agencies to provide clinical experience and educate students, this agreement is designed to build scholarship for both university and agency. Outcomes include building opportunities for faculty and staff scholarship at the agency, enhancing the integration of knowledge into practice, intensifying opportunities for the sharing of knowledge by providing opportunities for students to work with faculty and staff on individual projects, and enriching the application of knowledge by providing opportunities for faculty clinical practice and consultation. The Scholar in Residence is a model of collaboration between the university and the community that reflects the mission of the university and provides value to the community agency through strategic engagement of both entities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishing a Student Research and Publishing Program in High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Jonathan; Laksana, Sangob

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in science is improved by authentic personal experience of research projects and the publication of findings. Graduate students do this, but it is uncommon to find student research and publishing in high school science programs. We describe here the Student Research and Publishing Program (SRPP) established at International School…

  19. Who Does Not Benefit from Federal and State Financial Aid Programs? Information Brief. Volume 7, Issue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Board of Governors, State University System, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brief presents statistics showing that many students from middle-income and lower-income Florida families do not qualify for federal or state grants and scholarships, and that nearly half of state university system middle- and lower-income families do not receive benefits from federal or state financial aid programs. (Contains technical…

  20. A Bystander Bullying Psychoeducation Program with Middle School Students: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana; Sears, Dara; Lundquist, Amanda; Hausheer, Robin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a brief, stand-alone bystander bullying psychoeducation program for middle school students. The purpose of the program was to train students to take action as peer advocates. Pre- and post-tests indicated that after completing the 90-minute psychoeducation program, students reported an increase in their…

  1. Using a Geriatric Mentoring Narrative Program to Improve Medical Student Attitudes towards the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Pamela; Cohen, Diane; Novack, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    This study examined first-year medical student attitudes concerning the elderly before and after instituting a geriatric mentoring program. The program began and ended with a survey designed to assess students' attitudes toward the elderly. During the mentoring program, students visited the same senior for four visits throughout the academic year.…

  2. Accreditation and Educational Quality: Are Students in Accredited Programs More Academically Engaged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James S.; Cole, Shu T.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a great deal of debate regarding the value of program accreditation. Two research questions guided this study: 1) are students enrolled in accredited parks, recreation, and leisure programs more academically engaged than students enrolled in non-accredited programs, and 2) do students enrolled in accredited parks, recreation, and…

  3. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  4. Scholarships for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hach, Bryce

    2007-12-01

    The Hach Scientific Foundation 's mission is very focused and very simple: supporting chemistry education, primarily at the K 12 level. Through the recruitment of new teachers, addressing the issues of existing teacher retention, and supporting the best instruction and assessment strategies in chemistry education, the Foundation has a firm commitment to making the life of the chemistry student and teacher the most positive and educational experience possible. Although the Foundation's charter has its roots firmly planted in chemistry, the outgrowth of Hach Co. cofounder Clifford Hach's love of the "central science", it took more than 20 years before the Foundation announced it would narrow its aim singly on chemistry education.

  5. Medical student service learning program teaches secondary students about career opportunities in health and medical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary students to foster their interest in healthcare and medicine. High school student participants are engaged in a semester-long course that relies on interactive lectures, problem-based learning sessions, mentoring relationships with medical students, and opportunities for shadowing healthcare providers. To date, the curriculum has been offered for 7 consecutive years. To determine the impact that participation in the curriculum has had on college/career choices and to identify areas for improvement, an electronic questionnaire was sent to former participants. Based on a 32% response rate, 81% of former participants indicated that participation in the course influenced their decision to pursue a medical/science-related career. More than half (67%) of respondents indicated intent to pursue a MD/PhD or other postgraduate degree. Based on responses obtained, additional opportunities to incorporate laboratory-based research and simulation sessions should be explored. In addition, a more formalized mentoring component has been added to the course to enhance communication between medical students and mentees. Health/medicine-related educational outreach programs targeting high school students may serve as a pipeline to introduce or reinforce career opportunities in healthcare and related sciences. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  6. The Scholarship of Teaching: Inter-Cultural and Inter-Disciplinary Communication for Academic Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the intersection of teaching for passion, learning as the goal, and culture as the final barrier, this paper explores the scholarship of teaching in the milieu of disciplinary and cultural diversity, i.e. the globe. We are students of the world, yet scholars in our own area of expertise. This distinction underscores the difference between good teaching and scholarly teaching. Good teaching promotes student learning as reflected in student satisfaction surveys and learning outcomes [3], [8] and [22], while scholarship of teaching integrates the teaching and learning literature reflecting on the theory and practice of teaching, resulting in new paradigms shared through publications [6], [23] and [7]. Just as teaching and research complement one another so do good teaching and scholarly teaching.

  7. Scotland's GP paediatric scholarship: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVicar, Ronald; Borland, Lyndsey; McHale, Sharon; Goh, Dayeel; Potter, Alex

    2018-05-01

    In a previous publication we described the implementation and early evaluation of general practice paediatric scholarships in Scotland. We suggested that it was too early to be able to determine whether this significant investment will produce a return for Scotland in terms of enhanced roles in providing, leading or developing children's services in primary care or at the primary care/secondary care interface. This paper presents the results of a survey of the impact of the scholarship for the first six cohorts of the scholarship (119 General Practitioners). The response rate was 76%. Of the 90 respondents, almost half (44) have developed roles or areas of special paediatric interest either within or out with the practice, or in three cases both within and out with the practice. A total of 37 (43%) of those that continue to work within general practice reported that they have developed areas of special interest of benefit to the practice. Qualitative analysis of free text questions suggested that scholars had benefited from their experience in terms of increased confidence in dealing with child health problems, developing links with secondary care colleagues, and personal gain with respect to role development. What is already known in this area: Changes in GP Training have been suggested in order to provide a workforce that can meet the needs of infants, children and young people. Studies have shown a positive impact of paediatric trainees and GP trainees learning together. Little attention has however been given to the potential to support trained GPs to develop their expertise in child health. What this work adds: Early evaluation of the Scottish Paediatric Scholarship suggested a high degree of satisfaction. This more robust evaluation suggests that almost half (44/90 respondents) have developed roles or areas of special paediatric interest either within or out with the practice, or in three cases both within and out with the practice. Suggestions for future

  8. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyeart, Peter; Gracia, Brant; Wessel, Aimee; Jarmoskaite, Inga; Polioudakis, Damon; Stuart, Yoel; Gonzalez, Tony; MacKrell, Al; Rodenbusch, Stacia; Stovall, Gwendolyn M.; Beckham, Josh T.; Montgomery, Michael; Tasneem, Tania; Jones, Jack; Simmons, Sarah; Roux, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited. We have developed two low-cost programs—"Present Your PhD Thesis to a 12-Year-Old" and "Shadow a Scientist”—that combine training in science communication with outreach to area middle schools. We assessed the outcomes of these programs and found a 2-fold benefit: scientists improve their communication skills by explaining basic science research to a general audience, and students' enthusiasm for science and their scientific knowledge are increased. Here we present details about both programs, along with our assessment of them, and discuss the feasibility of exporting these programs to other universities. PMID:26844991

  9. Towards a Serious Game to Help Students Learn Computer Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Muratet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Video games are part of our culture like TV, movies, and books. We believe that this kind of software can be used to increase students' interest in computer science. Video games with other goals than entertainment, serious games, are present, today, in several fields such as education, government, health, defence, industry, civil security, and science. This paper presents a study around a serious game dedicated to strengthening programming skills. Real-Time Strategy, which is a popular game genre, seems to be the most suitable kind of game to support such a serious game. From programming teaching features to video game characteristics, we define a teaching organisation to experiment if a serious game can be adapted to learn programming.

  10. Does Research Training During Residency Promote Scholarship and Influence Career Choice? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a 10-Year Cohort of the UCSF-PRIME Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwes, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Bridget; Stanley, Marion; Grant, Ross; Shunk, Rebecca; Connor, Denise; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, and the Carnegie Foundation report on medical education recommend creating individualized learning pathways during medical training so that learners can experience broader professional roles beyond patient care. Little data exist to support the success of these specialized pathways in graduate medical education. We present the 10-year experience of the Primary Care Medicine Education (PRIME) track, a clinical-outcomes research pathway for internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). We hypothesized that participation in an individualized learning track, PRIME, would lead to a greater likelihood of publishing research from residency and accessing adequate career mentorship and would be influential on subsequent alumni careers. We performed a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residency alumni from UCSF who graduated in 2001 through 2010. We compared responses of PRIME and non-PRIME categorical alumni. We used Pearson's chi-square and Student's t test to compare PRIME and non-PRIME alumni on categorical and continuous variables. Sixty-six percent (211/319) of alumni responded to the survey. A higher percentage of PRIME alumni published residency research projects compared to non-PRIME alumni (64% vs. 40%; p = .002). The number of PRIME alumni identifying research as their primary career role was not significantly different from non-PRIME internal medicine residency graduates (35% of PRIME vs. 29% non-PRIME). Process measures that could explain these findings include adequate access to mentors (M 4.4 for PRIME vs. 3.6 for non-PRIME alumni, p medicine residency programs.

  11. Art, Scholarship, Community: Experiences of Viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Eden

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This critical reflection originated in a visit to the ‘Artists and Academics’ exhibition held at Fargo Creative Village, Coventry, 26 November 2016. My thoughts about the exhibition have served as a springboard to consider ideas of scholarship, art and community more broadly. I use my research on British artists from the early twentieth century, their ideas about the processes of viewing art and the spiritual in art, to discuss examples in the exhibition. I conclude by considering how this collaborative event can bring academic ideas into conversation with artworks. I suggest that the resulting exchanges may enable viewers to think differently about art and scholarship as well as enrich academic practice.

  12. Symposium on the Foundations of Newtonian Scholarship

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael; The foundations of Newtonian scholarship

    2000-01-01

    Newtonian scholarship has taken great steps forward in the last half-century.The recent completion of critical editions of Newton's mathematical papers and of his scientific correspondence, as well as the publication of the first volume of his optical papers and of variant readings of the Principia in the original Latin, have made most of Newton's scientific work generally available for study and analysis for the first time. This has provided a better understanding of Newton's Principia and Optics especially regarding their origin and interpretation, much of which has remained obscure for several centuries. Some of the new developments and insights are presented in this book by several of the scholars who have made these primary sources accessible, and by others who are using them to elucidate Newton's work. Most of the papers included were presented at the Symposium on the Foundations of Newtonian Scholarship, held at the Royal Society in London in March 1997.

  13. Polycentrism in Global Health Governance Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Jale

    2018-01-01

    Drawing on an in-depth analysis of eight global health networks, a recent essay in this journal argued that global health networks face four challenges to their effectiveness: problem definition, positioning, coalition-building, and governance. While sharing the argument of the essay concerned, in this commentary, we argue that these analytical concepts can be used to explicate a concept that has implicitly been used in global health governance scholarship for quite a few years. While already prominent in the discussion of climate change governance, for instance, global health governance scholarship could make progress by looking at global health governance as being polycentric. Concisely, polycentric forms of governance mix scales, mechanisms, and actors. Drawing on the essay, we propose a polycentric approach to the study of global health governance that incorporates coalitionbuilding tactics, internal governance and global political priority as explanatory factors. PMID:29325406

  14. The Enhancement Seminar Model as a Strategy to Promote Diversity and Student Success in MSW Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Larry D.; Rycraft, Joan R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an enhancement program by examining a cohort of 57 students admitted on probationary status to an MSW program in 2002 and required to participate in the enhancement program. The demographics for students admitted on probation demonstrate that the program is effective in increasing the diversity of the…

  15. 25 CFR 36.99 - Are immunizations required for residential program students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are immunizations required for residential program... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Program Requirements § 36.99 Are immunizations required for residential program students? Each student must have all immunizations required by State, local, or tribal governments...

  16. [Return scholarship of the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Humberto

    2010-09-01

    Developing countries suffer from brain drain for many decades. Industrialized countries have raised their barriers against immigrants, but have created mechanisms to attract foreign professionals, with aggressive policies to capture talents, in an effort to increase their competitiveness. To mitigate the effects of the migration of scientists, the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia has created its own "return scholarship" about 12 years ago, and has repatriated 12 scientists through it. The funds invested in attracting the scholars total U.S. $333,540.00 and they have secured U.S. $9,249,828.42 in research funds during the same period, a figure over 27 times higher. They have published 8 articles in national journals, 68 internationally, and trained 29 undergraduate and 20 graduate students as Thesis Tutors. Other universities and institutions of our countries can emulate this successful experience, which is still evolving.

  17. Enclosure and open access in communication scholarship

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The current state of scholarly communication is one of contest between an increasingly commercial system that is dysfunctional and incompatible with the basic aims of scholarship, and emerging alternatives, particularly open access publishing and open access archiving. Two approaches to facilitating global participation in scholarly communication are contrasted in this paper; equity is seen as a superior goal to the donor model, which requires poverty or inequity to succeed. The current stat...

  18. Predictors of doctoral student success in professional psychology: characteristics of students, programs, and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James M; Kim, Yang-Hyang

    2011-04-01

    In the face of the rising number of doctoral recipients in professional psychology, many have voiced concerns about the quality of nontraditional training programs. Past research suggests that, on a variety of outcomes, graduates from clinical PhD programs outperform graduates from clinical PsyD and, to a lesser extent, counseling PhD programs. We examine an aggregate archival dataset to determine whether student or university characteristics account for the differences in outcomes among programs. The data show meaningful differences in the outcomes of clinical PhD, PsyD, and counseling PhD programs. Furthermore, graduates from research-intensive universities perform better on the psychology licensure exam and are more likely to become American Board of Professional Psychology diplomates. The available data support the notion that the ability to conduct research is an essential component of graduate education. In this light, PsyD programs represent a unique opportunity to train students in the types of evaluation and outcomes assessments used by practicing psychologists. We discuss implications for graduate-level training in professional psychology. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Facilitating student retention in online graduate nursing education programs: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Hunker, Diane F

    2014-07-01

    Online education, a form of distance education, provides students with opportunities to engage in lifelong learning without the restrictions of time and space. However, while this approach meets the needs of employed nursing professionals, it poses some challenges for educators. Student retention is one such challenge. Student retention rates serve as measures of program quality and are reported to accrediting bodies. Therefore, it is imperative that administrators and program faculty implement comprehensive programs to ensure student retention. This review of the literature was designed to identify strategies to improve student retention in online graduate nursing education programs. The review includes 23 articles that address models, research, and best practices supported in nursing and higher education. The findings indicate that student retention in online programs is a multidimensional problem requiring a multifaceted approach. Recommendations for facilitating retention in online nursing programs include ensuring social presence and program and course quality, and attentiveness to individual student characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation program for high school students (PROCES). Results from the pilot program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Oscar; Jiménez-Fábrega, Xavier; Díaz, Núria; Coll-Vinent, Blanca; Bragulat, Ernest; Jiménez, Sònia; Espinosa, Gerard; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; García-Alfranca, Fernando; Alvarez, M Teresa; Salvador, Jordi; Millá, José; Sánchez, Miquel

    2005-01-15

    The PROCES (Programa de Reanimació Cardiopulmonar Orientat a Centres d'Ensenyament Secundari) program is aimed at teaching basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) to teenagers within high school. Our aim was to analyze the results obtained from the pilot program. PROCES was splitted in 7 sessions: 5 of them (5 hours) were taught by teachers at high school and 2 of them (4 hours, including how to perform b-CPR) were taught by emergency physicians. To assess the degree of students' learning, they were administered a 20-question test before and after the program. Epidemiological characteristics and students' opinions (all them were requested to rate the program from 0 to 10) were also collected. Students were 14 years-old in 38%, 15 in 38% and 16 or more in 24%. Before PROCES, the mean mark (over 20 points) was 8.5 (2.4). After PROCES, marks improved up to 13.5 (3.2) (p knowledge and skills in b-CPR, with no exceptions associated with teenagers' characteristics.

  1. CONTRIBUTION OF A LINEAR PROGRAMMING VBA MODULE TO STUDENTS PEFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUČÍRKOVÁ Lenka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of freeware modules as a teaching support of Operations Research methods at the Department of Systems Engineering, Czech university of Life Sciences (CULS Prague. In particular, we concentrated on a linear programming module and measured the impact on student performance. The motivation for this evaluation is based on a current development of a new module that focuses on Traveling Salesman Problem. First, we explain the current situation both worldwide and in the Czech Republic and the CULS Prague. Subsequently, we describe the content of students’ exams and statistical methods applied to the evaluation. Finally, we analyze and generalize the obtained results. The students exams have show a positive impact of the modules. Further, our analysis has proven that this impact is statistically significant. The findings motivate us to made new modules for other methods.

  2. An innovative portfolio of research training programs for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, Karen; Wyatt, Christina; Muller, David

    2012-12-01

    Medical student education continues to evolve, with an increasing emphasis on evidence-based decision making in clinical settings. Many schools are introducing scholarly programs to their curriculum in order to foster the development of critical thinking and analytic skills, encourage self-directed learning, and develop more individualized learning experiences. In addition, participation in rigorous scholarly projects teaches students that clinical care and research should inform each other, with the goal of providing more benefit to patients and society. Physician-scientists, and physicians who have a better appreciation of science, have the potential to be leaders in the field who will deliver outstanding clinical care, contribute new knowledge, and educate their patients.

  3. ENGAGING ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS IN ROBOTICS THROUGH HUMMINGBIRD KIT WITH SNAP! VISUAL PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Newley; Hasan Deniz; Erdogan Kaya; Ezgi Yesilyurt

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how Hummingbird robotics kit with Snap! programing language was used to introduce basics of robotics to elementary and middle school students. Each student in the robotics program built a robot. The robot building process was open ended. Any specific robotics challenge was not provided to the students. Students’ knowledge about robots and programming language were measured through pre, post, and delayed posttests. Results indicated that students improv...

  4. French Speaking Skills of Grade 8 English Program Students. Research Report 82-08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Margaret

    The speaking skills of grade 8 students in a core French program in Ottawa were compared with the skills of grade 6 students enrolled in the core program. A total of 337 grade 8 students were given a French speaking test. Two-hundred and nine students had taken the test in grade 6. In general, the grade 8 students seemed prepared to express basic…

  5. Vocational interest types of medical students and its usage in student career counseling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yera; Lee, Keumho

    2012-12-01

    It is very important to consider student's personality, aptitudes, and interest to choose an appropriate major or career. This study explored three overarching topics: Are there difference in vocational interest types by gender? Do students' vocational interest type concur with type related to medicine? Are the results of Strong Interest Inventory useful in student career counseling? The subjects were 124 freshmen in Konyang University College of Medicine. The Strong Interest Inventory (Korean version) was used. This were divided into three scales: general occupational themes (GOT), basic interest scales (BIS), and personal style scales (PSS). The data were analyzed by the frequency analysis, chi-square test and t-test. From GOT six interest types, male and female showed significant differences in realistic (t=2.71, p=0.008), artist (t=-3.33, p=0.001), and social (t=-2.08, p=0.039) types. From PSS, the score of work style was below 50 points, it is mean they prefer to work alone, with the ideas, materials rather than work with people. Investigative type was the most frequent type (63.7%) and social type was the least (8.1%). The interest test results were very useful in student career counseling with professors (n=53). The satisfaction survey results showed 58.5% of professors were very satisfied as the data was "helpful in understanding the students," "useful in leading natural conversation (41.5%)," and "helpful in creating rapport (39.6%)." Strong vocational interest types explains an individual's career interests, and reflect the characteristics of medical students are. The finding of the study can be used to provide student counseling and developing a tailored student career guidance program.

  6. Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope. Programming for Students with Special Needs. Book 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarren, Sandra G. Bernstein

    2004-01-01

    "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope" is Book 10 in the Programming for Students with Special Needs series; a revision and expansion of the 1997 Alberta Learning teacher resource, "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Possible Prenatal Alcohol-Related Effects."…

  7. Clinically speaking: A communication skills program for students from non-English speaking backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Caroline San; Rogan, Fran; Kilstoff, Kathleen; Brown, Di

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an innovative oral communication skills program for first year students in a Bachelor of Nursing degree at an Australian university. This program was introduced in 2004 to meet the needs of first year undergraduate students from non-English speaking backgrounds who had experienced difficulties with spoken English while on clinical placement. The program consisted of early identification of students in need of communication development, a series of classes incorporated into the degree program to address students' needs, followed by a clinical placement block. This paper describes the structure of the program, discusses some of the major problems encountered by students in the clinical setting and presents some of the teaching strategies used to address these problems. Evaluations of the program suggest that students' communication skills and confidence improved, resulting in a more positive clinical experience for the majority of students.

  8. Factors that influence medical student selection of an emergency medicine residency program: implications for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey N; Howell, John M; Hegarty, Cullen B; McLaughlin, Steven A; Coates, Wendy C; Hopson, Laura R; Hern, Gene H; Rosen, Carlo L; Fisher, Jonathan; Santen, Sally A

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of student decision-making when selecting an emergency medicine (EM) training program is essential for program directors as they enter interview season. To build upon preexisting knowledge, a survey was created to identify and prioritize the factors influencing candidate decision-making of U.S. medical graduates. This was a cross-sectional, multi-institutional study that anonymously surveyed U.S. allopathic applicants to EM training programs. It took place in the 3-week period between the 2011 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) rank list submission deadline and the announcement of match results. Of 1,525 invitations to participate, 870 candidates (57%) completed the survey. Overall, 96% of respondents stated that both geographic location and individual program characteristics were important to decision-making, with approximately equal numbers favoring location when compared to those who favored program characteristics. The most important factors in this regard were preference for a particular geographic location (74.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 72% to 78%) and to be close to spouse, significant other, or family (59.7%, 95% CI = 56% to 63%). Factors pertaining to geographic location tend to be out of the control of the program leadership. The most important program factors include the interview experience (48.9%, 95% CI = 46% to 52%), personal experience with the residents (48.5%, 95% CI = 45% to 52%), and academic reputation (44.9%, 95% CI = 42% to 48%). Unlike location, individual program factors are often either directly or somewhat under the control of the program leadership. Several other factors were ranked as the most important factor a disproportionate number of times, including a rotation in that emergency department (ED), orientation (academic vs. community), and duration of training (3-year vs. 4-year programs). For a subset of applicants, these factors had particular importance in overall decision-making. The vast majority

  9. Developing an Embedded Peer Tutor Program in Design Studio to Support First Year Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamberlan, Lisa; Wilson, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    An improved first year student experience is a strategic focus for higher education in an increasingly competitive marketplace. A successful peer tutoring program creates a visible community of practice, supports the student learning experience, elevates senior students as ambassadors of the program, and reinforces an emphasis on learning through…

  10. Developing Student Programming and Problem-Solving Skills with Visual Basic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2009-01-01

    Although most computer users will never need to write a computer program, many students enjoy the challenge of creating one. Computer programming enhances students' problem solving by forcing students to break a problem into its component pieces and reassemble it in a generic format that can be understood by a nonsentient entity. It promotes…

  11. The Purpose of a Student Affairs Preparation Program within Jesuit Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Jeremy; Swezey, Erin

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the congruence of a student affairs professional preparation program within Jesuit higher education. It connects the mission of Jesuit education and Jesuit religious and educational principles to the philosophy of student affairs work in colleges and universities. A program in student development administration at Seattle…

  12. Students' Desired and Experienced Levels of Connectivity to an Asynchronous, Online, Distance Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Shawnda; Baker, Mary; Terras, Katherine; Mahar, Patti; Chiasson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This study examined graduate students' desired and experienced levels of connectivity in an online, asynchronous distance degree program. Connectivity was conceptualized as the students' feelings of community and involvement, not their level of access to the Internet. Graduate students enrolled in a distance degree program were surveyed on both…

  13. Leveraging Sociocultural Theory to Create a Mentorship Program for Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosslin, Matt; Wakefield, Jenny S.; Bennette, Phyllis; Black, James William, III

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a proposed doctoral student connections program that is based on sociocultural theory. It is designed to assist new students with starting their educational journey. This program is designed to leverage social interactions, peer mentorship, personal reflection, purposeful planning, and existing resources to assist students in…

  14. Third Space Strategists: International Students Negotiating the Transition from Pathway Program to Postgraduate Coursework Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Pathway programs exist to prepare students for progression into university degrees but the transition experience for many students may not be as smooth as is suggested by the notion of the pathway. While attending a pathway program and at the beginning of their university degree, students may be in a third space, a liminal space where they engage…

  15. Mars Exploration Student Data Teams: Building Foundations and Influencing Students to Pursue STEM Careers through Experiences with Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, D.; Grigsby, B.; Murchie, S. L.; Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, A.; Morgan, F.; Viviano, C. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Thompson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT) immerses diverse teams of high school and undergraduate students in an authentic research Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based experience and allows students to be direct participants in the scientific process by working with scientists to analyze data sets from NASA's Mars program, specifically from the CRISM instrument. MESDT was created by Arizona State University's Mars Education Program, and is funded through NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars or CRISM, an instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Students work with teacher mentors and CRISM team members to analyze data, develop hypotheses, conduct research, submit proposals, critique and revise work. All students begin the program with basic Mars curriculum lessons developed by the MESDT education team. This foundation enables the program to be inclusive of all students. Teachers have reported that populations of students with diverse academic needs and abilities have been successful in this program. The use of technology in the classroom allows the MESDT program to successfully reach a nationwide audience and funding provided by NASA's CRISM instrument allows students to participate free of charge. Recent changes to the program incorporate a partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a CRISM sponsored competitive scholarship for two teams of students to present their work at the annual USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting. Returning MESDT teachers have attributed an increase in student enrollment and interest to this scholarship opportunity. The 2013 USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting was held in Washington DC which provided an opportunity for the students to meet with their Senators at the US Capitol to explain the science work they had done throughout the year as well as the impact that the program had had on their goals for the future. This opportunity extended to the students by the

  16. Development and evaluation of a leadership program for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D A; Klingborg, D J

    2001-01-01

    Leadership skills are important for many facets of professional life, but no known leadership training programs exist in North American veterinary schools. It was the purpose of this project to develop, deliver, and evaluate a leadership program for first-year veterinary students. Leadership attributes emphasized in the course included effective communication, openness to learning from others, self-awareness, commitment beyond self-interest, motivation, decision making, understanding issue complexity, and team building. The five-day course was delivered to 21 new veterinary students randomly selected just prior to their first-year orientation in the fall of 2000. Participants ranked themselves higher than non-participants in a post-course evaluation on their ability to be effective leaders. Participants reported an increase in self-confidence and a clearer understanding of their leadership roles. Participants also noted new support systems among co-participants and expressed a new ability to consider complex issues more broadly. Most reported that they frequently used enhanced skills in giving and receiving feedback and team building. Other leadership tools identified as valuable included negotiation, group dynamics, a structured approach to problem solving, time management, and an awareness of personal learning style preferences as a means to improve communication.

  17. A Summer Math and Physics Program for High School Students: Student Performance and Lessons Learned in the Second Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Nicholas; Baird, Michael; Bennett, Jake; Fry, Jason; Garrison, Lance; Maltese, Adam

    2013-05-01

    For the past two years, the Foundations in Physics and Mathematics (FPM) summer program has been held at Indiana University in order to fulfill two goals: provide additional physics and mathematics instruction at the high school level, and provide physics graduate students with experience and autonomy in designing curricula and teaching courses. In this paper we will detail changes made to the program for its second year and the motivation for these changes, as well as implications for future iterations of the program. We gauge the impact of the changes on student performance using pre-/post-test scores, student evaluations, and anecdotal evidence. These data show that the program has a positive impact on student knowledge and this impact was greater in magnitude in the second year of the program. We attribute this improvement primarily to the inclusion of more inquiry-driven activities. All activities, worksheets, and lesson plans used in the program are available online.

  18. Empirical scholarship in contract law: possibilities and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Korobkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Professor Korobkin examines and analyzes empirical contract law scholarship over the last fifteen years in an attempt to guide scholars concerning how empiricism can be used in and enhance the study of contract law. After defining the parameters of the study, Professor Korobkin categorizes empirical contract law scholarship by both the source of data and main purpose of the investigation. He then describes and analyzes three types of criticisms that can be made of empirical scholarship, explains how these criticisms pertain to contract law scholarship, and considers what steps researchers can take to minimize the force of such criticisms.

  19. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Awards Overview Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards Overview Health Policy Scholarships Scholarships for International Surgeons Research Scholarships and Fellowships Resident Scholarships Special ...

  20. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... and Awards Overview Health Policy Scholarships Scholarships for International Surgeons Research Scholarships and Fellowships Resident Scholarships Special Opportunity Scholarships ...

  1. Green Infrastructure Research Promotes Students' Deeper Interest in Core Courses of a Water Resources Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerk, W.; Montalto, F. A.; Foti, R.

    2015-12-01

    As one of most innovative among low impact development technologies, Green Infrastructure (GI) is a new technology that presents a range of potential research opportunities. Inherently linked to sustainability, urban quality of life, resilience, and other such topics, GI also represents a unique opportunity to highlight the social relevance of practical STEM research to undergraduate students. The nature of research on urban GI, in fact, as well as the accessibility of the GI sites, allows students to combine hands-on experience with theoretical work. Furthermore, the range of scales of the projects is such that they can be managed within a single term, but does not preclude longer engagement. The Sustainable Water Resource Engineering lab at Drexel University is engaged in two types of GI research outside the classroom. One type is a research co-op research internship. The second is a selective university-wide faculty-mentored summer scholarship STAR (Students Tackling Advanced Research) specifically designed for freshmen. The research projects we developed for those curricula can be accomplished by undergraduate students, but also address a larger research need in this emerging field. The research tasks have included identifying and calibrating affordable instruments, designing and building experimental setups, and monitoring and evaluating performance of GI sites. The work also promoted deeper understanding of the hydrological processes and initiated learning beyond the students' current curricula. The practice of the Lab's research being embedded into the educational process receives positive feedback from the students and achieves meaningful and long-lasting learning objectives. The experience helps students to students acquire hands-on experience, improves their metacognition and evidence-based inquiring into real-world problems, and further advances decision-making and communication skills.

  2. Teachers' participation in research programs improves their students' achievement in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Samuel C; Dubner, Jay; Miller, Jon; Glied, Sherry; Loike, John D

    2009-10-16

    Research experience programs engage teachers in the hands-on practice of science. Program advocates assert that program participation enhances teachers' skills in communicating science to students. We measured the impact of New York City public high-school science teachers' participation in Columbia University's Summer Research Program on their students' academic performance in science. In the year before program entry, students of participating and nonparticipating teachers passed a New York State Regents science examination at the same rate. In years three and four after program entry, participating teachers' students passed Regents science exams at a rate that was 10.1% higher (P = 0.049) than that of nonparticipating teachers' students. Other program benefits include decreased teacher attrition from classroom teaching and school cost savings of U.S. $1.14 per $1 invested in the program.

  3. Students' Perceptions of Bilingualism in Spanish and Mandarin Dual Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm-Leary, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Considerable research documents students' outcomes in dual language (DL) programs, but there is little examination of students' perceptions of bilingualism and its impact on students' cognitive functioning and social relationships, especially with comparative studies across different target languages and student backgrounds. This study, which…

  4. The analysis of students' characteristics related to the achievement in the introduction course to programming

    OpenAIRE

    Habjan, Klaudija

    2016-01-01

    In this Master thesis we look into students' characteristics which impact their success at introductory programming course. We want to define characteristics which are connected to and positively correlate with success at introductory programming course. The majority of novice students studying Computing on the Two-subject teacher program at the Faculty of Education, University of Ljubljana experience programming for the first time in this introductory programming course. Every year, stude...

  5. Personalized Computer-Assisted Mathematics Problem-Solving Program and Its Impact on Taiwanese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Jung; Liu, Pei-Lin

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a personalized computer-assisted mathematics problem-solving program on the performance and attitude of Taiwanese fourth grade students. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the personalized computer-assisted program improved student performance and attitude over the nonpersonalized program.…

  6. Impacts of a Summer Bridge Program in Engineering on Student Retention and Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Luciana; Reisel, John R.; Walker, Cindy M.

    2018-01-01

    A summer bridge program was developed in an engineering program to advance the preparation of incoming freshmen students, particularly with respect to their math course placement. The program was intended to raise the initial math course placement of students who otherwise would begin their engineering studies in courses below Calculus I. One…

  7. Breaking down Barriers: A Bridge Program Helps First-Year Biology Students Connect with Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katelyn M.; Ashley, Michael; Brownell, Sara E.

    2018-01-01

    Summer bridge programs often aim to build social connections for first-year students to ease their transition into college, yet few studies have reported on bridge programs successfully leading to these outcomes. We backward designed a summer bridge program for incoming biology majors to increase the comfort and connections among students and…

  8. Student Enrollment and Dropout: An Evaluation Study of DCSA Program at Bangladesh Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mohammad Mamunur; Jahan, Monira; Islam, Md. Anwarul; Ratna, Meherin Munjarin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the present status of DCSA program focusing on student enrollment, dropout, and completion trends. The study tries to explore the factors that attract or pull students to enroll in the program and push them to dropout from the program. Secondary data analysis and interview are used to generate data of the…

  9. An Online High School "Shepherding" Program: Teacher Roles and Experiences Mentoring Online Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Jeffery S.; Graham, Charles R.; Borup, Jered

    2014-01-01

    Several online programs use on-site facilitators to create a stronger sense of community and reduce student dropout. However, very little research addresses how programs that are fully online can provide their students with comparable support. Using K-12 online research, this case study analyzed a "shepherding program" at Mountain…

  10. Student science enrichment training program: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1989-04-21

    This is a status report on a Student Science Enrichment Training Program held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC. The topics of the report include the objectives of the project, participation experienced, financial incentives and support for the program, curriculum description, and estimated success of the program in stimulating an occupational interest in science and research fields by the students.

  11. What's Working: Program Factors Influencing California Community College Basic Skills Mathematics Students' Advancement to Transfer Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiero, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which basic skills program factors were exhibited by successful basic skills programs that helped students advance to transfer-level mathematics. This study specifically examined California community college basic skills programs that assist students who place in mathematics courses 2 levels…

  12. Toward Social Justice: The Characteristics of an Effective Mathematics Intervention Program for Urban Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowens, Bryan D.; Warren, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    This two-part investigation (a) assessed the impact of the Jaime Escalante Math Program (JEMP), a structured summer mathematics intervention program, on the math achievement of urban middle school students, (b) identified the characteristics of the program that the administrators and teachers perceived to contribute to student achievement, and (c)…

  13. Career/Vocational Preparation for Students with Disabilities: A Program Improvement Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.

    This program improvement guide is designed to assist district and school level interdisciplinary planning teams to improve career/vocational programs for students with disabilities. Its focus is on the integration of best practices within the educational program continuum to achieve positive student outcomes. The guide includes three sections.…

  14. Universal Prevention Program Outcomes: Safe Schools Healthy Students in a Rural, Multicultural Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elizabeth; McFarland, Joyce; Siebold, Wendi; Aguilar, Rafael; Sarmiento, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The Idaho Consortium for Safe Schools Healthy Students consists of three school districts in rural North Central Idaho and the Nez Perce Tribe's Students for Success Program. Universal prevention programs implemented in the elementary schools include Second Step and the middle schools implemented the Life Skills program. Each of the three…

  15. Enhancing the College Student Experience: Outcomes of a Leisure Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katherine A.; Gagnon, Ryan J.; Anderson, Denise M.; Pilcher, June J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Experiential education in higher education provides opportunities for college student development that contribute to student success. As such, a leisure education program is posited as a complement to experiential education programming. Purpose: This study explored the impact of a leisure education program (leisure skills) on…

  16. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  17. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  18. Assessing the efficacy of advancing underrepresented minority groups through AGU's Student Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, L.; Hurtado, C.; Gottschall, H.; Meisenhelder, K.; Hankin, E. R.; Harwell, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to cultivate a diverse and inclusive organization that uses its position to build the global talent pool in Earth and space science. To cultivate a diverse talent pool, AGU must also foster a diverse student member population. The two largest AGU programs serving students are the Outstanding Student Paper Award (OSPA) and the Student Grants programs. OSPA allows students to practice their presentation skills and receive valuable feedback from experienced scientists. Over 3,000 students participated in OSPA at Fall Meeting 2016. The Student Grants program includes a suite of 14 travel and research grant opportunities. Over 2,000 students applied for grant opportunities in 2016 and 246 grants and fellowships were awarded. The OSPA and Student Grants programs also engage non-student members through volunteering opportunities for program roles, such as OSPA judge or grant reviewer. This presentation will look at the temporal participation trends of underrepresented minority groups in AGU's OSPA and Student Grants programs. The participation of underrepresented minority groups will also be compared before and after the implementation of policy changes to the Student Grants program in 2012.

  19. Differential Programming Needs of College Students Preferring Web-Based Versus In-Person Physical Activity Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Stephanie P; Forman, Evan M; Butryn, Meghan L; Herbert, James D

    2017-09-21

    College students report several barriers to exercise, highlighting a need for university-based programs that address these challenges. In contrast to in-person interventions, several web-based programs have been developed to enhance program engagement by increasing ease of access and lowering the necessary level of commitment to participate. Unfortunately, web-based programs continue to struggle with engagement and less-than-ideal outcomes. One explanation for this discrepancy is that different intervention modalities may attract students with distinctive activity patterns, motivators, barriers, and program needs. However, no studies have formally evaluated intervention modality preference (e.g., web-based or in-person) among college students. The current study sought to examine the relationship between intervention modality preference and physical activity programming needs. Undergraduate students (n = 157) enrolled in psychology courses at an urban university were asked to complete an online survey regarding current activity patterns and physical activity program preferences. Participants preferring web-based physical activity programs exercised less (p = .05), were less confident in their abilities to exercise (p = .01), were less likely to endorse the maintenance stage of change (p web-based programming may require programs that enhance self-efficacy by fostering goal-setting and problem-solving skills. A user-centered design approach may enhance the engagement (and therefore effectiveness) of physical activity promotion programs for college students.

  20. A Review of Trends in Distance Education Scholarship at Research Universities in North America, 1998-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall S. Davies

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores and summarizes trends in research and scholarship over the last decade (i.e., 1998-2007 for students completing dissertations and theses in the area of distance education. The topics addressed, research designs utilized, and data collection and analysis methods used were compiled and analyzed. Results from this study indicate that most of the distance education research conducted by graduate students in this period of time has been descriptive, often addressing the perceptions, concerns, and satisfaction levels of various stakeholders with a particular distance education experience. Studies of this type typically used self-report surveys and analyzed the data using descriptive statistics. Validating the concern of many distance education scholars, there was a lack of graduate student research aimed at developing a theory base in distance education. On a positive note, projects directly comparing distance education with traditional face-to-face classrooms to determine the merit of specific programs declined significantly in 2007 as compared to 1998. This result might indicate that distance learning is becoming accepted as a viable and important educational experience in its own right. Another encouraging finding was the decreased emphasis on studies focused on technology issues, such as those analyzing the quality of distance education technology and questioning educators’ ability to provide an acceptable technology-enabled distance learning experience.

  1. Promotion and Tenure: Application of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and Scholarship of Engagement Criteria to Health Professions Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa J. Register

    2018-03-01

    Discussion: More research on the application of the scholarship of discovery, the scholarship of integration, and the scholarship of application is needed in health professions education to further guide faculty and administrators. Investigation into the discrepancy in rank within tenured faculty in educations is an area that would bring insight into current challenges and barriers, allowing educational researchers the ability to research and develop effective strategies.

  2. Public Pedagogy and Representations of Higher Education in Popular Film: New Ground for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Katelyn; Marquis, Elizabeth; Puri, Varun

    2018-01-01

    Constructions of teaching, learning, and the university within popular culture can exert an important influence on public understandings of higher education, including those held by faculty and students. As such, they constitute a rich site of inquiry for the scholarship of teaching and learning. Drawing on the notion of film as 'public pedagogy,'…

  3. Attracting Students Into Science: Insights From a Summer Research Internship Program for Community College Students in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. P.; Smith, L. K.; Gold, A. U.; Batchelor, R. L.; Monday, B.

    2014-12-01

    Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) programs commonly serve students already committed to careers in science. To spark student interest in the sciences early in their college career, the CIRES diversity initiative teamed with the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory to build an REU for Colorado community college students. A group of 7 students was selected from consideration of diversity, prior training, and personal statements. Each student was paired with a research science mentor. Field excursions and team-building exercises filled the first week of the 8-week program. Students received weekly training in science communication, responsible conduct of research, use of spreadsheet and graphing software, and statistical analysis. Each student presented their research in a poster session, an oral presentation, and a written report. Several aspects of this pilot program worked well. The students formed a very supportive cohort, despite the fact that they were not in residence. Cohesion grew out of the immersion in field trips, and was reinforced with weekly check-ins. The trainings were essential for seeing projects through to written and oral presentations. Teaming students for fieldwork was an effective strategy to build support, and reduce mentor fatigue. Each student produced useful data. In the future, we would include a workshop on personal finances to address a clear need. Transportation support will be provided. A residential program might attract some but could preclude participation of students with families or other life-issues. Personal tutoring tailored to research projects would address low math skills. All 7 students completed the program; several elected to submit to the undergraduate virtual poster session at Fall AGU. Students all reported enormous personal and academic growth. Some are discussing transfer and graduate school opportunities with their mentors. The enthusiasm and appreciation of the students was unparalleled.

  4. From Polarity to Plurality in Translation Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolla Karimzadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of the literature in translation studies shows that translation scholarship can be discussed in 3 Macro-levels including 1 Corpus-based studies, 2 Protocol-based studies, and 3 Systems- based studies. Researchers in the corpus-based studies test the hypothesis about the universals of translation. They also try to identify translation norms and regular linguistic patterns. This scholarship aims at showing that the language of translation is different from that of non-translation. The other purpose is to identify the techniques and strategies adopted by the translators. In protocol –based studies, the researchers study the mental activities and the individual behaviors of the translators while translating. They aim to describe the behavior of professional translators (versus translator trainees during the process of translation in a bid to identify how they chunk the source text (unit of translation and to describe how the translation trainees develop their translation competence. These studies are longitudinal for the reason that they aim to investigate the change of intended behaviors in the subjects of the study. Like corpus-based studies, they are experimental and data for analysis are collected by various methods including the translators’ verbal report, keystroke logging, eye tracking, and so on. Recently, in a method called “triangulation”, they combine the above-mentioned methods of data collection to test their hypotheses on a stronger experimental basis. To collect the data, they also employ the methods used in neurology (for example the technology of Electroencephalogram in order to obtain information on the physiological processes in the brains of the translators while translating. And finally in the systems-based studies, the researchers analyze more extended systems of production, distribution, and consumption of translations and their impacts on the target culture in a specific socio-cultural context. Differentiating

  5. Mentoring medical students in your general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John

    2016-05-01

    Mentoring medical students in general practices is becoming more common in Australia due to formalised scholarship programs and informal approaches by students. This paper defines mentoring in Australian general practice. Practical suggestions are made on how to structure a mentorship program in your practice. Mentoring differs from leadership and teaching. It is a long-term relationship between a student and an experienced general practitioner. Avoiding summative assessment in mentorship is important to its success. Mentoring is about forming a safe place to confidentially discuss personal and professional issues between a mentor and student. This is based on defining roles and mutual trust. At the same time, students crave formative feedback. Unfortunately, present feedback models are based on teaching principles that can blur the differences between assessor, teacher and mentor. Mentorship can provide students with orientation and learning experiences so that they are prepared for practice as an intern.

  6. Training program for students and young engineers in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The JMTR is expected to be a key infrastructure to contribute the nuclear Human Resource Development (HRD) by a research and On-Job-Training (OJT) in order to support global expansion of nuclear power industry. The training program for Asian young researchers and engineers were started from JFY 2011 in JAEA, and ten trainees from Kazakhstan and Thailand had attended in this program in JFY 2011. In addition, in the nuclear HRD initiative program sponsored by the MEXT, the training course was newly established for domestic students and young engineers from JFY 2010 to JFY 2012. In this course, basic understanding on irradiation test and post irradiation examination is aimed to achieve by overall and practical training such as the neutronic/thermal designs of irradiation capsule, post irradiation examination, measurement and evaluation of neutron fluence, etc. using the JMTR and the related facilities. The 1st training course was held with 10 trainees in JFY 2010. The 2nd and 3rd training courses were also held with 19 trainees and 16 trainees in JFY 2011. From JFY 2012, two courses will be held in every year, and 20 trainees will be accepted in each course. (author)

  7. Training program for students and young engineers in JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Suzuki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The JMTR is expected to be a key infrastructure to contribute the nuclear Human Resource Development (HRD) by a research and On-Job-Training (OJT) in order to support global expansion of nuclear power industry. The training program for Asian young researchers and engineers were started from JFY 2011 in JAEA, and ten trainees from Kazakhstan and Thailand had attended in this program in JFY 2011. In addition, in the nuclear HRD initiative program sponsored by the MEXT, the training course was newly established for domestic students and young engineers from JFY 2010 to JFY 2012. In this course, basic understanding on irradiation test and post irradiation examination is aimed to achieve by overall and practical training such as the neutronic/thermal designs of irradiation capsule, post irradiation examination, measurement and evaluation of neutron fluence, etc. using the JMTR and the related facilities. The 1st training course was held with 10 trainees in JFY 2010. The 2nd and 3rd training courses were also held with 19 trainees and 16 trainees in JFY 2011. From JFY 2012, two courses will be held in every year, and 20 trainees will be accepted in each course. (author)

  8. Application to graduate psychology programs by undergraduate students of color: the impact of a research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Gordon C Nagayama; Allard, Carolyn B

    2009-07-01

    The top 86 students were selected from a pool of approximately 400 applicants to a summer clinical psychology research training program for undergraduate students of color. Forty-three of the students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 clinical psychology research training programs, and 43 were randomly assigned to a control condition without training. The multicultural version of the training program emphasized the cultural context of psychology in all areas of training, whereas cultural context was de-emphasized in the monocultural version of the program. Although the cultural content of the 2 training programs was effectively manipulated as indicated by a fidelity check by an outside expert, there were no significant differences between the effects of the 2 programs on the outcomes measured in this study. The primary differences in this study were between students who did versus those who did not participate in a training program. Sixty-five percent of the students who completed the multicultural training program applied to graduate schools in psychology, compared with 47% of those who completed the monocultural training program, and 31% of those in the control group. Participation in summer research training programs also increased self-perceptions of multicultural competence.

  9. Ronald E. McNair Graduate Student Researchers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    According to the latest report by the National Science Foundation, only eighty-three (83) African-Americans received doctoral degrees in all engineering disciplines in 2000. North Carolina A&T State University (NC A&T) awarded Ph.D.s to 15 African-Americans, in only two engineering disciplines over the past 4 years. It clearly indicates that the partnership between NASA and NC A&T plays a significant role in producing minority engineering Ph.D.s, which this country needs to establish an ethnically diverse workforce to compete in a global economy. Many of these students would not have been able to study for their doctoral degrees without the Ronald E. McNair Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

  10. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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  11. Altmetrics, Legacy Scholarship, and Scholarly Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B. Collister

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available When using alternative metrics (altmetrics to investigate the impact of a scholar’s work, researchers and librarians are typically cautioned that altmetrics will be less useful for older works of scholarship. This is because it is difficult to collect social media and other attention retroactively, and the numbers will be lower if the work was published before social media marketing and promotion were widely accepted in a field. In this article, we argue that altmetrics can provide useful information about older works in the form of documenting renewed attention to past scholarship as part of a scholar’s legacy. Using the altmetrics profile of the late Dr. Thomas E. Starzl, often referred to as “the father of modern transplantation”, we describe two cases where altmetrics provided information about renewed interest in his works: a controversy about race and genetics that shows the ongoing impact of a particular work, and posthumous remembrances by colleagues which reveal his scholarly legacy.

  12. OpenVIVO: Transparency in Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Ilik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available OpenVIVO is a free and open-hosted semantic web platform that anyone can join and that gathers and shares open data about scholarship in the world. OpenVIVO, based on the VIVO open-source platform, provides transparent access to data about the scholarly work of its participants. OpenVIVO demonstrates the use of persistent identifiers, the automatic real-time ingest of scholarly ecosystem metadata, the use of VIVO-ISF and related ontologies, the attribution of work, and the publication and reuse of data—all critical components of presenting, preserving, and tracking scholarship. The system was created by a cross-institutional team over the course of 3 months. The team created and used RDF models for research organizations in the world based on Digital Science GRID data, for academic journals based on data from CrossRef and the US National Library of Medicine, and created a new model for attribution of scholarly work. All models, data, and software are available in open repositories.

  13. Integrated neuroscience program: an alternative approach to teaching neurosciences to chiropractic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaohua; La Rose, James; Zhang, Niu

    2009-01-01

    Most chiropractic colleges do not offer independent neuroscience courses because of an already crowded curriculum. The Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida has developed and implemented an integrated neuroscience program that incorporates neurosciences into different courses. The goals of the program have been to bring neurosciences to students, excite students about the interrelationship of neuroscience and chiropractic, improve students' understanding of neuroscience, and help the students understand the mechanisms underpinning the chiropractic practice. This study provides a descriptive analysis on how the integrated neuroscience program is taught via students' attitudes toward neuroscience and the comparison of students' perceptions of neuroscience content knowledge at different points in the program. A questionnaire consisting of 58 questions regarding the neuroscience courses was conducted among 339 students. The questionnaire was developed by faculty members who were involved in teaching neuroscience and administered in the classroom by faculty members who were not involved in the study. Student perceptions of their neuroscience knowledge, self-confidence, learning strategies, and knowledge application increased considerably through the quarters, especially among the 2nd-year students. The integrated neuroscience program achieved several of its goals, including an increase in students' confidence, positive attitude, ability to learn, and perception of neuroscience content knowledge. The authors believe that such gains can expand student ability to interpret clinical cases and inspire students to become excited about chiropractic research. The survey provides valuable information for teaching faculty to make the course content more relevant to chiropractic students.

  14. 26 CFR 1.25A-3 - Hope Scholarship Credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-time basis to obtain a certificate as a travel agent. Student G completes the program in December 2002... paid during the taxable year for education furnished to an eligible student (as defined in paragraph (d...)(2)); plus (ii) 50 percent of the next $1,000 of such expenses paid with respect to that student. (2...

  15. The Debates in Marx's Scholarship on Dimensions of Human nature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Debates in Marx scholarship revolve around whether Karl Marx recognizes the individual and social dimensions of human nature and which of the two he prefers. This paper considers the debates in two ways. The first relates to Marx scholarship in favour of the individual dimension of human nature. The second concerns ...

  16. Developing scholarship of teaching and learning through a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A growing interest in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) in higher education requires the seeking of opportunities for its development within and across disciplines and institutions. However, rewards for individual competitiveness in research publications, including the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning ...

  17. Conceptualising Transformation and Interrogating Elitism: The Bale Scholarship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsis, Hannah; Dominguez-Whitehead, Yasmine; Liccardo, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we consider the extent to which a scholarship programme at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) engages with the challenges of transformation. This scholarship programme highlights the transformative potential of a programme that focuses on excellence for a previously under-represented group, but also demonstrates how this…

  18. Ranking Regime and the Future of Vernacular Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    World university rankings and their global popularity present a number of far-reaching impacts for vernacular scholarship. This article employs a multidimensional approach to analyze the ranking regime's threat to local scholarship and knowledge construction through a study of Japanese research universities. First, local conditions that have led…

  19. A Journal-Neutral Ratio for Marketing Faculty Scholarship Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeck, Matt; Baruca, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a journal-neutral Publication to Citation Ratio (PCR) to complement qualitative methods to evaluate a marketing educator's scholarship for reappointment, promotion, tenure, and post-tenure review (RPTP) decisions. We empirically establish a minimum time period to evaluate scholarship data, then benchmark publication and…

  20. Community-Engaged Scholarship: Toward a Shared Understanding of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Cynthia Gordon

    2018-01-01

    Community-engaged scholarship (CES) is frequently recommended as a postsecondary practice for producing knowledge to address real-world issues and support the public good. But CES has multiple meanings, and understandings overlap with similar terms, such as publicly engaged scholarship. I draw upon recommendations in the field to propose an…

  1. Conceptualizing Practitioner-Scholarship for Educational Leadership Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmiller, Chad R.; Lester, Jessica Nina

    2017-01-01

    In this conceptual article, we draw upon recent literature to describe the theoretical, epistemological, and methodological anchors that can inform a working conception of practitioner-scholarship. We position practitioner-scholarship at the intersection of an individual's work as a practitioner and researcher, wherein a practitioner focuses on…

  2. Engaged Scholarship in the Academy: Reflections from the Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drame, Elizabeth R.; Martell, Sandra Toro; Mueller, Jennifer; Oxford, Raquel; Wisneski, Debora B.; Xu, Yaoying

    2011-01-01

    This paper represents a series of reflections on collective and individual efforts of diverse women scholars to reconcile alternative views of scholarship within the academy. We document our collective experience with embedding the concept of the "scholarship of engagement" in our practice of research, teaching, and service through a process of…

  3. African tourism scholarship: Trends in academic journal publishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Against the background of the growth of tourism as a sector of importance for African economies this paper reflects on an issue of growing controversy in tourism scholarship, namely the patterns of production of tourism research and of publishing in academic journals. Earlier work documented that African scholarship on ...

  4. Tax-Credit Scholarships in Nebraska: Forecasting the Fiscal Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to inform the debate over a proposal in Nebraska to give tax credits for contributions to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools. The study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of tax-credit scholarships on the state and on local school districts. The author estimates the impact that…

  5. What is the role of the centre for educational scholarship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    The role of the Centre for Educational Scholarship is to promote scholarship, in terms of teacher education, teacher accreditation, and teacher collaboration. The strategy adopted by the University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK, is outlined, and a way of estimating effectiveness is suggested.

  6. A Transformative Perspective on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranton, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I explore the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning through the lens of transformative learning theory and critical theory. In doing so, I expand the notion of a Scholarship of Teaching so as to go beyond the solving of practical problems in teaching and the improvement of teaching effectiveness. I focus on an emancipatory…

  7. Embedding the Scholarship of Engagement at a Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Patrick A.; Else, Fabienne C.; Smith, Kylie M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite receiving growing international recognition and regard, the scholarship of engagement remains undervalued internally at academic institutions, especially in relation to career development and academic promotion. This form of scholarship presents difficulties relating to evaluation, assessment, and evidencing that are not generally present…

  8. Toward an Understanding of Unusually Successful Programs for Economically Disadvantaged Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.; Pellicer, Leonard O.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual framework derived from previous research was used to evaluate successful compensatory programs for high-risk students. Program effectiveness standards, school culture, curriculum, and teaching were examined through site visits to three elementary and one middle school. (MMU)

  9. An evaluation of the Florence Nightingale Foundation scholarships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Matthew; Tod, Angela; McCabe, Candy; Giordano, Richard

    2017-01-18

    The Florence Nightingale Foundation (FNF) is a charity that awards scholarships in leadership, travel and research to nurses, midwives and other healthcare professionals to promote excellence in practice. The FNF offers mentoring support to scholars, and provides support with career development and writing articles for publication, in addition to the financial award. The leadership scholarships are bespoke: leadership scholars can access a range of development opportunities that are specially commissioned for them, and select their programme of study and experiences, based on their individual needs. All scholarships provide opportunities to represent the FNF and to meet other scholars at the FNF annual conference. This article provides an overview of the FNF scholarships, based on the findings of two evaluations that demonstrated the value of these scholarships in improving services for patients and carers, as well as enhancing the careers of individual scholars.

  10. Bringing new archival sources to Wundt scholarship: the case of Wundt's assistantship with Helmholtz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas

    2014-02-01

    Wilhelm Wundt's biography is one of the main domains in Wundt scholarship that deserves more detailed attention. The few existing biographical works present many problems, ranging from vagueness to chronological inaccuracies, among others. One of the important gaps concerns the so-called Heidelberg period (1852-1874), during which he went from being a medical student to holding a professorship at the University of Heidelberg. The aim of this article is to dispel a very common confusion in the secondary literature, which refers to Wundt's assistantship with Helmholtz at the Physiological Institute, by establishing the precise dates of his assistantship. Contrary to what is generally repeated in the secondary literature, the primary sources allow us to determine precisely this period from October 1858 to March 1865. I conclude by pointing out the indispensability of the primary sources not only to Wundt scholarship but also to the historiography of psychology in general.

  11. Effectiveness of a formal post-baccalaureate pre-medicine program for underrepresented minority students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, B; Edwards, A S; Segal, S S; Gillum, L H; Lindsay, A; Johnson, N

    2001-08-01

    To address the effectiveness of a formal postbaccalaureate (PB) experience for underrepresented minority (URM) students before medical school. The program provided an intense year-long experience of course work, research, and personal development. There were 516 participants from one medical school: 15 URM medical students had completed the formal PB program, 58 students had done independent PB work before matriculation, and 443 students were traditional matriculants. Cognitive and academic indicators [college science and non-science grade-point averages (GPAs); biology, physics, and verbal MCAT scores; and percentage scores from first-year medical school courses] were compared for the three groups. Both groups of students with PB experience demonstrated competency in the first year of medical school consistent with traditional students even though the students who had completed the formal PB program had lower MCAT scores and lower college GPAs than did the traditional students. Traditional predictors of academic performance during the first year of medical school did not significantly contribute to actual academic performances of students from the formal PB program. The results support the use of a formal PB program to provide academic readiness and support for URM students prior to medical school. Such a program may also improve retention. Noncognitive variables, however, may be important to understanding the success of such students in medical school.

  12. Student perspectives of a Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in a brain injury rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Freyr; Fleming, Jennifer; Marshall, Kathryn; Ninness, Nadine

    2017-10-01

    Professional practice education is a core and essential component of occupational therapy training. With increasing numbers of education programmes and more students requiring professional practice placements, development of innovative models of professional practice education has emerged, but these require investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student experiences and perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in an inpatient brain injury rehabilitation unit. A qualitative approach, guided by phenomenological theory was used. Participants were 15 students who had completed a professional practice placement in the Student-Led Groups Program. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews and analysed thematically. Three over-arching themes emerged from the data; balance of support and freedom, development of clinical skills and missed opportunities. Students described how the structure of the placement facilitated independent learning and autonomy that was balanced with support from clinicians and student peers. Students perceived that they had developed a breadth of clinical skills and also had missed some learning opportunities in this professional practice placement structure. Overall student perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program were positive, supporting the continued use of this model of professional practice education in this setting. The results highlight the value of structured and consistent approaches for supervision, including the use of formal approaches to peer supervision in the initial stages of learning. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  13. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Meinel, Felix G; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; St?rmann, Sylv?re; Niedermaier, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite increasing recognition that mentoring is essential early in medical careers, little is known about the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students. We conducted this study to survey all medical schools in Germany regarding the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students as well as the characteristics, goals and effectiveness of these programs. Methods A definition of mentoring was established and program inclusion criteria were determined based ...

  14. Student satisfaction and academic performance in a dual PharmD/MBA degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumney, Elinor C G; Ragucci, Kelly R

    2006-04-15

    Evaluate the academic experience and satisfaction of students enrolled in the dual PharmD/MBA degree program between the South Carolina College of Pharmacy and The Citadel's School of Business Administration. Compare grade point averages of students enrolled in the dual degree program with those of traditional student colleagues. A standardized satisfaction survey instrument was administered to 32 students currently enrolled in the dual PharmD/MBA degree program. Grade point averages (GPAs) in both pharmacy and business coursework were also collected for analysis. There were slightly higher percentages of both female and minority students in the dual degree program compared to the pharmacy class as a whole. Eighteen (56%) of students completed the survey, and responses were generally positive. The mean GPA of students in the dual degree program was higher than that of both pharmacy (3.37 vs 3.08, p vs 3.64, not statistically significant) students not enrolled in the dual degree program. Students enrolled in the dual degree program did better academically than their counterparts and indicated an overall high level of satisfaction with the program.

  15. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinilla, Severin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU. We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  16. Effectiveness of an integrated handwriting program for first-grade students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case-Smith, Jane; Holland, Terri; Bishop, Beth

    2011-01-01

    We developed and piloted a program for first-grade students to promote development of legible handwriting and writing fluency. The Write Start program uses a coteaching model in which occupational therapists and teachers collaborate to develop and implement a handwriting-writing program. The small-group format with embedded individualized supports allows the therapist to guide and monitor student performance and provide immediate feedback. The 12-wk program was implemented with 1 class of 19 students. We administered the Evaluation of Children's Handwriting Test, Minnesota Handwriting Assessment, and Woodcock-Johnson Fluency and Writing Samples test at baseline, immediately after the Write Start program, and at the end of the school year. Students made large, significant gains in handwriting legibility and speed and in writing fluency that were maintained at 6-mo follow-up. The Write Start program appears to promote handwriting and writing skills in first-grade students and is ready for further study in controlled trials.

  17. Research on scholarships holders who studied abroad and returned to Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena A. Vasojevic

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge has become the most valuable resource of the new era and the resource of the future. The intention of this study is to improve knowledge about the problem of migration of educated people from Serbia from the perspective of scholarship holders who, after being abroad, returned to their country. The aim of this research is to show the profile of the scholarship holders of post-academic and post-graduate students, who studied abroad and then returned to Serbia. Their motives for departure and return, as well as their perception of integration into the work environment in Serbia and utilization of their knowledge is presented. Methods: For the purpose of this research a questionnaire was constructed which was distributed online. Collected data were analysed using statistical tools. Results: This research has shown that the primary motive for education abroad is the desire for personal development. It has also been shown that an important factor for the return of students from abroad is their expectation of comparative advantage in the labour market and their belief of getting a desired job. Apart from this, it is shown that the scholarship holders only partially used the acquired knowledge and thus, do not have enough influence in the development of their organizations.Conclusion: The main research contribution is reflected in the improvement of the knowledge about the motivation of scholars to return from developed countries and highlighted problems which scholarship holders have after returning.Implications and research limitation: the results obtained can be generalised to countries that are passing or have recently moved a transition, and are similar in cultural characteristics. The present contains certain limitations that must be taken into account while interpreting final results. The most significant constraint is the sample size, but the obtained results, especially the motives of the scientific experts for a return to the country

  18. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  19. NASA's Student Launch Projects: A Government Education Program for Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2009-01-01

    Among the many NASA education activities, the Student Launch projects are examples of how one agency has been working with students to inspire math, science and engineering interest. There are two Student Launch projects: Student Launch Initiative (SLI) for middle and high school students and the University Student Launch Initiative (USLI) for college students. The programs are described and website links are provided for further information. This document presents an example of how an agency can work with its unique resources in partnership with schools and communities to bring excitement to the classroom.

  20. Students' Attitudes toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Alana D.; Zientek, Linda R.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Moreno, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students' science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Because of the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students' content…