WorldWideScience

Sample records for student interviewers add

  1. Top 5 Ways to Help Students with ADD/ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests five ways to help students with ADD/ADHD. These are: (1) Integrate the primitive reflexes; (2) Diet; (3) Visual attention; (4) Help for auditory attention; and (5) Cognitive training.

  2. A novel text message-based motivational interviewing intervention for college students who smoke cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jorayeva

    2017-11-01

    This study adds to the knowledge on smoking behavior among college students. Preliminary evidence indicates that text message-based motivational interviewing and smoking cessation self-efficacy may help guide successful smoking behavior interventions for college students.

  3. Truth is at hand: how gesture adds information during investigative interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broaders, Sara C; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2010-05-01

    The accuracy of information obtained in forensic interviews is critically important to credibility in the legal system. Research has shown that the way interviewers frame questions influences the accuracy of witnesses' reports. A separate body of research has shown that speakers gesture spontaneously when they talk and that these gestures can convey information not found anywhere in the speakers' words. In our study, which joins these two literatures, we interviewed children about an event that they had witnessed. Our results demonstrate that (a) interviewers' gestures serve as a source of information (and, at times, misinformation) that can lead witnesses to report incorrect details, and (b) the gestures witnesses spontaneously produce during interviews convey substantive information that is often not conveyed anywhere in their speech, and thus would not appear in written transcripts of the proceedings. These findings underscore the need to attend to, and document, gestures produced in investigative interviews, particularly interviews conducted with children.

  4. Using student interviews for becoming a reflective geographer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one......'s own students. This paper addresses three issues: implications of doing insider interviews; ethical issues of interviewing students where power relations are at stake and using visual co-constructions as a means of levelling the analytical power of the insider interviewer. We show how student...... interviews have enhanced our reflection-on-action and give recommendations for prospect student interviewers....

  5. Using student interviews for becoming a reflective geographer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine Olesen; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one......’s own students. This paper addresses three issues: implications of doing insider interviews; ethical issues of interviewing students where power relations are at stake and using visual co-constructions as a means of levelling the analytical power of the insider interviewer. We show how student...... interviews have enhanced our reflection-on-action and give recommendations for prospect student interviewers....

  6. Asymmetrical visual-spatial attention in college students diagnosed with ADD/ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly E; Craver-Lemley, Catherine; Barrett, Anna M

    2008-09-01

    Research indicates that individuals with attention deficit disorder (ADD)/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may exhibit left-right asymmetric spatial attention, with deficient processing of stimuli in the left visual hemispace. However, there is controversy as to when this phenomenon can be observed. People with ADD/ADHD do not have obvious spatial bias when performing everyday tasks. Visual cancellation tasks have demonstrated behavioral asymmetry in ADD/ADHD, but results have not been consistent across studies. Children and older adults with ADD or ADHD have been assessed, but previous studies of college students with ADD/ADHD are not available. We tested 24 students with ADD or ADHD and 24 control students on a verbal and nonverbal cancellation task. The ADD/ADHD group made significantly more left-sided omission errors than controls on a letter cancellation task. This group difference was not observed for a shape cancellation task, however. These results support possible left visual inattention in college students with ADD/ADHD. Studies of functional correlates of these attentional phenomena are needed.

  7. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  8. University Students Add Professional Certifications to Their NPS Degrees [video

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Select students in NPS' Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) take the necessary extra steps to complete professional certifications while earning their NPS degrees, demonstrating a level of competency above and beyond what is required for their graduate degree.

  9. Helping Students to Add Detail and Flair to Their Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pooja; Laud, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    This action research case study measured the effectiveness of a writing strategy designed to enhance imagery in stories that 3 students with severe writing difficulties (2 were identified as learning disabled, 1 was undergoing assessment) produced during their resource room sessions. The authors combined the use of the self-regulated strategy…

  10. Motivational Interviewing for Smoking Cessation among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Kelly; Carter, Kimberly; Curtin, Lisa; Martz, Denise M.; Gagnon, Sandy G.; Michael, Kurt D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing has shown some success as an intervention for college student cigarette smokers. We tested the efficacy and process of a two session motivational-interviewing-based smoking intervention compared to an assessment/information session. College student participants assigned to the motivational interviewing condition did not…

  11. Peer interviewing in medical education research: experiences and perceptions of student interviewers and interviewees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elaine; Brugha, Ruairi; Clarke, Eric; Lavelle, Aisling; McGarvey, Alice

    2015-09-30

    Interviewing is one of the main methods used for data collection in qualitative research. This paper explores the use of semi-structured interviews that were conducted by students with other students in a research study looking at cultural diversity in an international medical school. Specifically this paper documents and gives 'voice' to the opinions and experiences of interviewees and interviewers (the peers and the communities) on the value of peer interviewing in the study and outlines (1) the preparation made to address some of the foreseen challenges, (2) the challenges still faced, and (3) the benefits of using peer interviews with respect to the research study, the individual and the institution. Peer interviewing was used as part of a two-year phased-study, 2012-2013, which explored and then measured the impact of cultural diversity on undergraduate students in a medical higher education institution in Ireland. In phase one 16 peer interviewers were recruited to conduct 29 semi-structured interviews with fellow students. In order to evaluate the peer interviewing process two focus group discussions were he ld and an online survey conducted. Key findings were that substantial preparations in relation to training, informed consent processes and addressing positionality are needed if peer-interviewing is to be used. Challenges still faced included were related to power, familiarity, trust and practical problems. However many benefits accrued to the research, the individual interviewer and to the university. A more nuanced approach to peer interviewing, that recognises commonalities and differences across a range of attributes, is needed. While peer interviewing has many benefits and can help reduce power differentials it does not eliminate all challenges. As part of a larger research project and as a way in which to get 'buy-in' from the student body and improve a collaborative research partnership peer interviewing was extremely useful.

  12. The Effects of Training Medical Students in Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opheim, Arild; Andreasson, Sven; Eklund, Astri Brandell; Prescott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of brief training in Motivational interviewing (MI) for medical students. Design: Video recordings of consultations between 113 final-year medical students and simulated patients were scored blind by two independent raters with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC). Half of the students participated in a…

  13. Financial and Time Burdens for Medical Students Interviewing for Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Paul; Melhado, Trisha; Walling, Anne; Groskurth, Jordan

    2017-02-01

    Interviewing for residency positions is increasingly stressful for students and challenging for programs. Little information is available about the costs and time invested by students in interviewing or about the key factors in decisions to accept interview offers. Our objective was to assess the time and financial costs of residency interviewing for an entire class at a regional campus and explore factors influencing student decisions to accept interviews. We used a 14-item survey administered electronically immediately following National Resident Matching Program results. The response rate was 75% (49 of 65 students). About half interviewed in primary care specialties. Thirty students (63%) applied to 20 or more programs, and 91% were offered multiple interviews out of state. Seventy percent limited interviews by time and cost. Other important factors included personal "fit," program reputation, and the quality of residents. About 50% of the students spent more than 20 days and $1,000-$5,000 interviewing; 29% reported spending over $5,000. Students used multiple funding sources, predominantly loans and savings. Primary care applicants applied to fewer out-of-state programs, reported fewer interview days and lower expenses, but received more financial support from programs. Students invested considerable time and resources in interviewing, and these factors significantly influenced their decisions about accepting interviews. The other major factors in interview decisions concerned personal comfort with the program, especially the residents. The costs and time reported in this study could be greater than other schools due to the regional campus location or lower due to the high proportion of students interviewing in primary care.

  14. Teacher Interviews, Student Interviews, and Classroom Observations in Combinatorics: Four Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddle, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This research consists of teacher interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations, all based around the mathematical content area of combinatorics. Combinatorics is a part of discrete mathematics concerning the ordering and grouping of distinct elements. The data are used in four separate analyses. The first provides evidence that…

  15. Strategies for Successfully Teaching Students with ADD or ADHD in Instrumental Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melago, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers can easily encounter students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the instrumental lesson setting. Applicable to instrumental lesson settings in the public or private schools, private studios, or college studios, this article focuses on specific strategies ranging from the…

  16. Interviewing the Experts: Student Produced Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gary R.; Tucker, Joanne M.; Massad, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    Classroom instruction continues to change dramatically with new technology and pedagogy. Faculty aspire to develop innovative programs and creative education while seeking effective teaching strategies that capitalize on emerging technology and invoke student interest and involvement. Research shows that student involvement, hands-on projects, and…

  17. Helping Students with Disabilities Transition to College: 21 Tips for Students with LD and/or ADD/ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Making the transition from high school to college poses challenges for most students. Moving from a secure, regulated world of secondary education into an unfamiliar environment requiring greater independence can be a destabilizing experience. For students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), managing this…

  18. The effect of videotaping students' interviews with patients for interview skill education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Sung; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Ji Eun; Suh, Sang-Yeon; Park, Ki Heum; Sung, Nak-Jin

    2013-03-01

    The importance of communication between patients and physicians has been proven in many previous studies. The authors analyzed the effect of interview skill education through videotapes which recorded students' interviews with real patients in the outpatient department of family medicine. This study was conducted with all students who chose the elective course of family medicine and one randomly selected student every week from an 'infectious internal medicine' class at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital during the period from December 2008 to March 2011. All students performed a preliminary examination of a new patient at the outpatient department of family medicine. All consultations were videotaped. Feedback to the student was given on the same day by viewing the videotape together. After feedback, all students performed another preliminary examination of one new patient at the department of family medicine the same week. Three family medicine residents scored all videotapes using 10-item interview skill checklists. Many parts of the checklists were modified using the Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scales. Thirty-three students participated. Of 10 items, nine showed increased scores after feedback. There was a significant change in four items after feedback: 'type of question' (before 2.36 ± 0.60, after 2.73 ± 0.72), 'timeline' (before 2.82 ± 0.68, after 3.18 ± 0.73), 'positive verbal reinforcement' (before 2.24 ± 0.56, after 2.61 ± 0.90), and the total score (before 21.70 ± 2.62, after 23.39 ± 3.13) (P skills using videotapes of students' preliminary consultations with real patients in outpatient settings, was effective in improving the interview areas of 'type of question,' 'timeline,' 'positive verbal reinforcement,' and the total interview scores.

  19. Teaching Note-Teaching Student Interviewing Competencies through Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, Cynthia; Vernon, Robert; Lynch, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    A prototype standardized client was created and programmed to respond to students in the 3D virtual world of Second Life. This automaton, called a "chatbot," was repeatedly interviewed by beginning MSW students in a practice course as a learning exercise. Initial results were positive and suggest the use of simulated clients in virtual…

  20. Senior medical student opinions regarding the ideal urology interview day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jesse C; Guralnick, Michael L; Sandlow, Jay I; Langenstroer, Peter; Begun, Frank P; See, William A; O'Connor, Robert Corey

    2014-01-01

    Applicant interviews for urology residency positions are a stressful and costly process for students, faculty, and staff. We conducted a prospective survey to better determine what urology applicants perceive as an ideal interview process to gain sufficient knowledge about a training program. A questionnaire was anonymously completed by all urology residency applicants interviewing at the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2007 to 2013. Questionnaire subject headings included "ideal interview format," "factors contributing to understanding the residency program," and "factors contributing to final rank list order." Questionnaires were distributed to and completed by 221 senior medical students applying for a urology residency position. Most respondents (>80%) reported they would prefer to partake in 5 to 7 faculty interviews in an office setting with the total interview process spanning half to three-fourths of the workday. Spending time with current residents was considered the most valuable tool to acquire knowledge about a residency program. The most important criteria when ranking a program were resident satisfaction, resident operative experience, and perceived strength of faculty. Academic urology programs may wish to consider applicant ideals when organizing residency interviews. Interaction with current residents appears to be the most valuable resource allowing applicants to garner knowledge about a urology training program. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical students' agenda-setting abilities during medical interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, HyeRin; Park, Kyung Hye; Jeon, Young-Jee; Park, Seung Guk; Lee, Jungsun

    2015-06-01

    Identifying patients' agendas is important; however, the extent of Korean medical students' agenda-setting abilities is unknown. The study aim was to investigate the patterns of Korean medical students' agenda solicitation. A total of 94 third-year medical students participated. One scenario involving a female patient with abdominal pain was created. Students were video-recorded as they interviewed the patient. To analyze whether students identify patients' reasons for visiting, a checklist was developed based on a modified version of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to the Medical Interview: Communication Process checklist. The duration of the patient's initial statement of concerns was measured in seconds. The total number of patient concerns expressed before interruption and the types of interruption effected by the medical students were determined. The medical students did not explore the patients' concerns and did not negotiate an agenda. Interruption of the patient's opening statement occurred in 4.62±2.20 seconds. The most common type of initial interruption was a recompleter (79.8%). Closed-ended questions were the most common question type in the second and third interruptions. Agenda setting should be emphasized in the communication skills curriculum of medical students. The Korean Clinical Skills Exam must assess medical students' ability to set an agenda.

  2. Examining How Motivational Interviewing May Foster College Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarussi, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors practicing in higher education settings aspire to meet the developmental needs of college students in addition to addressing their mental health and substance use concerns. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based counseling approach that focuses on enhancing motivation and commitment to change. This article…

  3. Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvale, Steinar; Brinkmann, Svend

    Interviewet spiller en afgørende rolle i en stor del kvalitativ forskning. Men det er samtidig en kompleks disciplin, der rummer mange faldgruber og kræver fintfølende analytiske kompetencer. I denne bog giver Steinar Kvale og Svend Brinkmann en introduktion til de teoretiske og praktiske aspekte...... disciplin gennem en præsentation af dets syv stadier, hvor forfatterne klæder læseren fagligt på til at planlægge og foretage interviews....

  4. Linking students and lecturers - a first year student-staff interview project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjørnegaard Malm, Rie; Lilleøren, Karianne; Mattias Lundmark, Anders

    2017-04-01

    With a wish to familiarize our first year geoscience students with their lecturers, we have introduced a staff-student interview project during their first few weeks as students, a project modified from Dwyer (2001). Our main goals with this project are to tighten the (apparent) gap between the faculty members and the students by introducing the students to academia through a personal meeting. The students are grouped and asked to find an interesting staff member to interview, and are instructed to ask for a CV, a list of publications and an example of a scientific paper authored by the interviewee. During the interview the students should find out how this specific academic career was formed, and how the idea for the example paper came up and finally became a published paper. The students then present their interviewee in class. We also asked the students to answer a questionnaire before and after the exercise. After the exercise students reported a better understanding of the nature of the geosciences and a more nuanced view towards research. They express surprise in how accessible the researchers were, and that they feel more at home at the department after the project. These preliminary results are followed up by interviews of the participating students in December and January 2016/17.

  5. Mental health nursing students' experiences of stress during training: a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, J; Suominen, E; Morgan, C; O'Connell, E-J; Smith, A P

    2015-12-01

    What is known on the subject? Stress can impact students on mental health nurse training. This can have implications at the individual level (e.g. their own mental health) and at the level of the organization (e.g. sickness absence and attrition). What this paper adds to existing knowledge? We interviewed 12 mental health nursing students regarding the stress they experienced during training. Participants described how the academic demands can at times be unbearable during clinical placements. There were also issues with 'being a student' on some placements, with participants describing negative attitudes towards them from staff. The younger participants reported feeling overwhelmed on their initial placements and described some of the main challenges of mental health work for them. Raising concerns about the quality of care on wards was also described as particularly challenging for the students. What are the implications for practice? This paper can be useful to help training providers support mental health nursing students. Recommendations include reducing academic demands during clinical placements and extending and promoting existing support services beyond normal 9 am-5 pm working hours, even if these services are limited. Younger students could be better supported by being allocated to the more well-resourced placements in the early stages of their training. Raising awareness among staff of the tasks students can and cannot perform can help improve staff/student relations. Finally, students should be educated about the issues around raising concerns on placements to help the government's drive for a more open and transparent National Health Service (NHS). Previous studies investigating stress in nursing students focus on general nursing students or adopt quantitative measures. A qualitative study focusing specifically on mental health nursing students is required. One-to-one interviews were carried out with mental health nursing students (n = 12). Data were

  6. Interview Practice U.S. Style: A Workshop for International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a practice interview workshop customized for international graduate students. The session covered cultural and communication dynamics in the interview process, practice exercises, and a question-and-answer period.

  7. Student nurse selection and predictability of academic success: The Multiple Mini Interview project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Julia; Ooms, Ann; Grant, Robert; Paget, Kris; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-05-01

    With recent reports of public enquiries into failure to care, universities are under pressure to ensure that candidates selected for undergraduate nursing programmes demonstrate academic potential as well as characteristics and values such as compassion, empathy and integrity. The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) was used in one university as a way of ensuring that candidates had the appropriate numeracy and literacy skills as well as a range of communication, empathy, decision-making and problem-solving skills as well as ethical insights and integrity, initiative and team-work. To ascertain whether there is evidence of bias in MMIs (gender, age, nationality and location of secondary education) and to determine the extent to which the MMI is predictive of academic success in nursing. A longitudinal retrospective analysis of student demographics, MMI data and the assessment marks for years 1, 2 and 3. One university in southwest London. One cohort of students who commenced their programme in September 2011, including students in all four fields of nursing (adult, child, mental health and learning disability). Inferential statistics and a Bayesian Multilevel Model. MMI in conjunction with MMI numeracy test and MMI literacy test shows little or no bias in terms of ages, gender, nationality or location of secondary school education. Although MMI in conjunction with numeracy and literacy testing is predictive of academic success, it is only weakly predictive. The MMI used in conjunction with literacy and numeracy testing appears to be a successful technique for selecting candidates for nursing. However, other selection methods such as psychological profiling or testing of emotional intelligence may add to the extent to which selection methods are predictive of academic success on nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interviews with Students Enrolled in Academic CPR Workshops, Summer 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Chelley

    This study focuses on students enrolled in academic CPR workshops in the summer of 2002. The goal of the study is to examine changes in the population of students with academic problems. The CPR workshops are a requirement for students that are subject to dismissal. The study was conducted in the summer of 2003 on the telephone with a random…

  9. Course Shopping in Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William E.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the course shopping behaviors among a sample of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across nine campuses of a large urban district. The sample was purposely designed as an analytic, rather than a random, sample that sought to obtain adequate numbers of students in course areas that were of theoretical and of…

  10. Course-Shopping in the Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William B.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    This study examines the course shopping behaviors of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across the nine campuses of the Los Angeles Community College District in spring 2001. The sample students are representative of the district. For the purpose of this analysis, the authors define course shopping as: (1) cyclic shopping, the…

  11. Self-Management of Adherence to Prescribed Stimulants in College Students With ADD/ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Odette N; Doucette, Clara

    2016-03-25

    We examined how college students manage ADHD medication and how beliefs regarding the medication and attitudes of friends and families influence adherence on weekdays and weekends during an academic semester. Undergraduate students (n= 53) responded to an online survey to report their adherence, their beliefs about the effects of the medication, and their perception of important others' views of adherence. Students chose to take more medication on weekdays than weekends. On weekdays, beliefs that the medications enhance academic performance and social skills influenced adherence, and on weekends, beliefs regarding negative side effects were important. The perception that medication leads to a loss of authentic self reduced adherence at both times. Generally, students believed that important others wanted them to take medication. Students were actively weighing the costs and benefits of taking their ADHD medication and consciously adjusting adherence levels from day to day. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Resumes and Interviews: A Guide for Cosmetology. Student's Manual [and] Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selke, Barbara E.

    The student's manual of this set consists of materials dealing with resume writing and job interview skills needed by individuals enrolled in cosmetology instructor training programs. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: resumes and employment applications, employment interviews, and preenrollment interviews.…

  13. Radical Flexibility and Student Success: An Interview with Homero Lopez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2006-01-01

    In this interview with Dr. Homero Lopez, who brings thirty-two years of higher education experience to his position as the founding president of Estrella Mountain Community College, (Maricopa County Community College District of Arizona), topics centered on how learning spaces and campus design are planned and implemented on Estrella Mountain…

  14. Medical Student Acquisition and Retention of Communication and Interviewing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Carol M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Medical students' interpersonal and communication skills were assessed over the course of their first two years of medical training at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. Results of first and second video analyses indicated a significant decline in student process-oriented skills. (Author/MLW)

  15. Interviewing International Students to Understand the Process of Expatriate Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is the most influential trend of the early twenty-first century. However, many students have had limited direct contact with cultures other than their own. The following teaching innovation targets such students to give them an experiential learning opportunity about the process of acculturation for expatriates. This is accomplished…

  16. Contextualism adds realism: nursing students' perceptions of and performance in numeracy skills tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M

    2011-11-01

    This project investigated nursing students' perceptions of and performance in a de-contextualised diagnostic maths paper (i.e. questions only) and a contextualised diagnostic maths paper (i.e. visual pictures along with questions). Sampling was purposive, the criteria being that participants would be from the population of student nurses (n=700) in their second year, of a three-year Bachelor of Nursing course, undertaking a Unit 'Medical-Surgical Nursing 1' (MSN1) at one of four campuses across the University of Western Sydney (UWS), NSW, Australia. The numerical test scores for both papers were analysed with the assistance of SPSS software and a Professional Development Officer. The survey data were analysed manually and thematically by the researcher. There was a substantive improvement in scores from Test 1 (de-contextualised) to Test 2 (contextualised). It is uncertain whether the change occurred because Test 2 is a genuinely better presentation than Test 1 or just a practice effect. Nevertheless, the contextualised paper was preferred by the majority of students (80%). Students preferred the visual images and revealed that it led to a "deeper learning" of numeracy skills, reduced stress and anxiety levels and simulated 'the real life' clinical setting, thus adding "an element of realism" to the situation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Interviews on Heterosexual Students' Expressions of Cultural Competency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carol Isaac; Linda Behar-Horenstein

    2016-01-01

      The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the effects of a cultural competency intervention on dental pre-doctoral students' attitudes toward individuals of a different sexual orientation...

  18. Relationship of medical students' admission interview scores to their dean's letter ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F R; Regan-Smith, M; Tivnan, T

    1992-12-01

    The authors examined the relationship between the admission interview scores for 62 students in the 1986 entering class at Dartmouth Medical School and the students' dean's letter ratings given four years later; they found the relationship to be significant (V = .372, p = .014) and the interview scores to be better independent predictors of the ratings than were total Medical College Admission Test scores or science grade-point averages. Among the 17 students receiving "strong" admission interview scores, 53% received dean's letter ratings in the top one-third and 47% received ratings in the lower two-thirds. Of those 34 who received "medium" interview scores, 68% received ratings in the lower two-thirds; all 11 students who received "weak" interview scores received ratings in the lower two-thirds. The authors suggest (1) that admission interview scores help schools to identify more clearly those applicants most likely to become strong, competitive performers in residency and (2) that the significant relationship between interview scores and dean's letter ratings indicates a need to discover what qualities the interview actually measures and to consider the methods by which interviewers are trained, rather than to forsake the interview.

  19. Employer Perceptions of Student Informational Interviewing Skills and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Claudia; Sherony, Bruce; Steinhaus, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Employers continue to report that soft skills are critically important in obtaining employment and achieving long-term career success. Given the challenging job market for college graduates, business school faculty need to provide practical opportunities for students to develop their soft skills in professional settings. A longitudinal study was…

  20. Students' Views on the Effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing for Challenging Disaffection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, Laura; Atkinson, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests motivational interviewing (MI) is an effective intervention for supporting disaffected students. However, previous literature has failed to establish students' views on MI. In the present study, three students took part in an individual MI intervention, delivered by three educational psychologists (EPs). Self-report…

  1. Assisting High School Students with Career Indecision Using a Shortened Form of the Career Construction Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfuss, Mark C.; Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2015-01-01

    A shortened form of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) was used to help high school students struggling with the career decision making process. The shortened instrument is described, as well as, its use with eleventh grade high school students who had low levels of career concern and career curiosity. Students who completed the exercise…

  2. Assessing nursing students' basic communication and interviewing skills: the development and testing of a rating scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, D

    1999-03-01

    This study explores the communication skills of a group of nursing students who were required to interview a simulated client as part of their studies. In order to assess the students and to improve the process of learning discrete skills, an instrument was developed and tested as part of this process. The subjects were 212 nurses enrolled in a bachelor of nursing programme, in New South Wales, Australia, who were studying a problem-based learning package the focus of which was 'alcohol early intervention'. The sub-groups within the sample included registered nurses, a significant percentage of whom had completed their basic nursing education in overseas countries. The Simulated Client Interview Rating Scale (SCIRS) was developed to assess basic humanistic communication skills as well as beginning motivational interviewing skills. The students were required to interview a simulated client and demonstrate competence in interviewing. This was assessed by the SCIRS which was completed by the students and the simulated clients. The instrument proved to be a reliable and valid means of assessing student interview technique as well as a flexible educational tool, while valuable insights into students' interviewing techniques were gained.

  3. Can Japanese students embrace learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills? Focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Takuya; Mukohara, Kei; Otani, Takashi; Ban, Nobutaro

    2011-01-01

    Students' perceptions of learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills have not been fully explored. To explore Japanese students' perceptions of learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills such as role play with student-created scenarios, peer-assisted video reviews, and student-led small group debriefing. We conducted three focus groups with a total of 15 students who participated in the learner-centered seminars on medical interviewing skills at the Nagoya University School of Medicine. The transcripts were analyzed by two authors independently. Keywords and concepts were identified and a thematic framework was developed. Overall, students valued the experience of writing their own scenarios for role play, but some questioned their realism. Many students commented that peer-assisted video reviews provided them with more objective perspectives on their performance. However, some students expressed concerns about competitiveness during the video reviews. While students appreciated teachers' minimum involvement in the group debriefing, some criticized that teachers did not explain the objectives of the seminar clearly. Many students had difficulties in exchanging constructive feedback. We were able to gain new insights into positive and negative perceptions of students about learner-centered methods for teaching medical interviewing skills at one medical school in Japan.

  4. Attributional retraining, self-esteem, and the job interview : Benefits and risks for college student employment

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Nathan C.; Gradt, Shannan E. Jackson; Götz, Thomas; Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of an attributional retraining program for helping upper-level undergraduates perform better in employment interviews as moderated by self-esteem levels. The sample consisted of 50 co-operative education students preparing for actual job interviews who were randomly assigned to an attributional retraining condition (controllable attribution focus) or control condition (communication skills focus). Dependent measures included interview-related attr...

  5. Accuracy of Interviewers and Students in Identifying the Personality Characteristics of Personnel Managers and Computer Programmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunonen, Sampo V.; Jackson, Douglas N.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the employment interview as a method of studying the personality characteristics of job applicants. Describes two studies that indicated a substantial degree of agreement and accuracy in the conceptions held by students and by professional employment interviewers regarding the personality characteristics of personnel managers and…

  6. Attributional Retraining, Self-Esteem, and the Job Interview: Benefits and Risks for College Student Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nathan C.; Jackson Gradt, Shannan E.; Goetz, Thomas; Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of an attributional retraining program for helping upper-level undergraduates perform better in employment interviews as moderated by self-esteem levels. The sample consisted of 50 co-operative education students preparing for actual job interviews who were randomly assigned to an attributional…

  7. Engaging Study Abroad Students in Intercultural Learning through Blogging and Ethnographic Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lina

    2012-01-01

    The study involved 16 American undergraduate students who used weekly blogs and conducted ethnographic interviews with native speakers to develop their intercultural competence over the course of one semester abroad. Selected blog entries, post-surveys, and final interviews were collected and analyzed to report the findings. The results show that…

  8. Improving the Interview Skills of College Students Using Behavioral Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Hart, John M.; Soriano, Heidi L.

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining a job as a college graduate is partly dependent on interview performance. We used a multiple baseline design across skills to evaluate the effects of behavioral skills training with self-evaluation for five college students. Training effects were evaluated using simulated interviews as baseline and posttraining assessments. All…

  9. Removing the interview for medical school selection is associated with gender bias among enrolled students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David; Casey, Mavourneen G; Eley, Diann S

    2014-02-03

    To report, and determine reasons for, a change in the gender ratio observed among enrolled medical students after removal of the interview from the selection process. Cross-sectional study of 4051 students admitted to the medical program at the University of Queensland between 2004 and 2012. Students are enrolled either directly as graduates or via a school-leaver pathway. Change in proportions of male and female students over time, and gender-specific scores in the three sections of the GAMSAT (Graduate Medical School Admissions Test). Between 2004 and 2008 (when an interview was part of the selection process), 891 enrolled students (51.4%) were male, whereas between 2009 and 2012 (no interview), 1134 (57.7%; P enrolled in the medical program at this university increased markedly after removal of the interview from the selection process. This change is limited to domestic direct graduate-entry students, and seems to be due to higher scores by male students in section III of the GAMSAT. The interview may play an important role in ensuring gender equity in selection, and medical schools should carefully monitor the consequences of changes to selection policy.

  10. INTERVIEWING EXPATRIATES AS A SOURCE FOR STUDENTS IN UNDERSTANDING DIFFERENCES IN CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Sri Adnyani,S.Pd.,M.Hum.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interviewing expatriates whom live in Bali was one of the projects that have been done in Cross Cultural Understanding class in the academic year of 2011/2012. The aims of the project was 1 students have direct communication with foreigners living in Bali, 2 students obtain information related to cultural differences experienced by expatriates and 3 students find out how the expatriates overcome cultural differences. The project was done by the students in six weeks. Each student had to contact an expatriate who can easily be found in Bali. They had to prepare an interview guide and put the result of their interview on paper. Each student had to present the result of their project to the class continued with classroom discussion. At the end of the presentation, the students conclude differences in cultural aspects experienced by the expatriates and how they handled those differences to be able to live in Bali. By interviewing expatriates, students had direct information about differences in cultural backgrounds and made Cross Cultural Understanding subject becomes a more realistic issue.

  11. Segregated Groups or Inclusive Education? An Interview Study with Students Experiencing Failure in Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Eva Heimdahl; Roll-Pettersson, Lise

    2007-01-01

    In this study a group of students with reading and writing difficulties relate their experiences of school to their expressed opinions concerning the possibilities of participation and influence in this setting. Twelve students at upper-level compulsory school or upper secondary school were interviewed. Mostly their reading and writing…

  12. Students' perceived experience of university admission based on tests and interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röding, K; Nordenram, G

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the study was to generate an impression, from the perspective of graduating dental students, of the individualised admissions procedures, which they had undergone 5 years before. The subjects comprised 10 randomly selected students, five male and five female, from two different admission rounds. Qualitative research was used and data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews. The results show that even 5 years later, the students remember clearly the different steps in the selection procedure and they found the procedure relevant. In particular, the admission interviews made a lasting impression. The students consider that being interviewed by one admissions committee member at a time reduces the applicant's apprehension and allows a more personal interview. Several believe that the admissions procedure influences academic achievement or improves self-confidence: implicit in their selection by a committee of experienced professionals is affirmation that they have the potential to become good dentists. The students therefore feel encouraged to aspire to higher achievement. All students believe that motivation is an important non-cognitive attribute for success and that students selected through this mode are not only highly motivated but also well informed, with realistic expectations of the undergraduate programme and their future professional career.

  13. Medical student selection: choice of a semi-structured panel interview or an unstructured one-on-one interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann Courneya, Carol; Wright, Kristin; Frinton, Vera; Mak, Edwin; Schulzer, Michael; Pachev, George

    2005-09-01

    Reliability has been shown to be higher in structured medical admissions interviews as compared to unstructured interviews. This study reports the comparison of a proposed semi-structured panel interview with a current individual unstructured medical admissions interview. Inter-rater reliability coefficients were calculated, and correlations were estimated between panel, individual and academic scores. Admission status in 2003 was related to these scores by means of logistic regression. Both individual and panel interviews were significantly correlated with admissions status. The inter rater reliability coefficient (from individual interviews) was 0.12 whereas the interpanel reliability coefficient was 0.52. Panel interview: good across panel and within panel consistency of scoring. No effect of who asked the questions, question order, or interview duration on scoring. No correlation between panel interview scores and academic variables (MCAT, GPA). We found good inter-panel reliability, a high consistency within and between interview panels, and uniformly positive questionnaire responses. The panel interview measures something different from academic variables. These data, in conjunction with a strong sense from the medical and psychological literature supporting the reliability and validity of a semi-structured panel interview, support our decision to replace our individual interview with the panel interview.

  14. Impact of a new curriculum on medical students' interpersonal and interviewing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Karen M; Pfeiffer, Carol A

    2007-02-01

    In 1998 we reported on the rise and fall of medical student communication skills during the 4 years of medical school. Since then, the University of Connecticut School of Medicine has completed a major curriculum renewal project with an emphasis on early clinical work, lifelong learning and more ambulatory training. The goals of this study were to compare students' interviewing and interpersonal skills in standardised patient (SP) assessments in the old and new curricula and to assess the success of the new curriculum in preventing a decline in student skills in this domain. The clinical skills of 202 students were measured longitudinally during encounters with SPs in each of their 4 years of medical school. Students in this study and the earlier study were evaluated using the Arizona Clinical Interviewing Rating (ACIR) Scale. Compared with students from the previous curriculum, students on the new curriculum in this study showed an improvement in ACIR scores. Year 1 mean ACIR scores (1 = poor to 5 = excellent) were, respectively, 3.6 for the old curriculum cohort and 4.0 for the new curriculum group. In Year 4 the mean score for the old curriculum cohort was 3.7 and that for the new curriculum group was 3.8. Students on the new curriculum still showed a decline in ACIR scores from Years 1 to 4, but it was not as severe a decline as it had been previously. Pre-clinical medical students perform better on measures of interpersonal communication than their clinical counterparts. The students who participated in the new curriculum demonstrated an earlier acquisition of and a less steep decline in interviewing and interpersonal skills during the course of medical school.

  15. A US-China Interview Study: Biology Students' Argumentation and Explanation about Energy Consumption Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Hokayem, Hayat; Wang, Sasha; Wei, Xin

    2016-01-01

    As China and the United States become the top two carbon emitters in the world, it is crucial for citizens in both countries to construct a sophisticated understanding of energy consumption issues. This interview study examines how U.S. and Chinese students compare in explaining and arguing about two critical energy consumption issues: burning…

  16. The Evidence for Student-Focused Motivational Interviewing in Educational Settings: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, Laura; Atkinson, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The current systematic literature review sought to determine the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) in educational settings. Student-focused school-based MI (SBMI) studies were assessed using qualitative and quantitative assessment frameworks and data were reported using PRISMA guidelines. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria,…

  17. A Randomized Trial of Motivational Interviewing and Feedback with Heavy Drinking College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Patricia; Walters, Scott T.; Daugherty, Mikyta; Radi, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a brief intervention that has been shown to reduce heavy drinking among college students. Because all college studies of MI to date have included a personalized feedback report, it remains unclear which of the components is necessary to produce behavior change. This study evaluated the separate and collective…

  18. Debriefing Interviews and Coaching Conversations: Strategies to Promote Student Reflexivity and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, J.; Jooste, K.

    2011-01-01

    Without conscious will and engagement in critical reflexivity as a process of growth and learning in research, students remain unaware of their subjective biases and the effect of bias on the inquiry. A qualitative, exploratory, single descriptive case study was used to explore and describe the operationalisation of debriefing interviews and…

  19. Community-Based Research and Student Development: An Interview with Trisha Thorme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of universities have implemented community-based research pedagogy into their undergraduate education. Integrating academic training with community engagement has the potential to engage students in a way volunteering may not. This interview with Trisha Thorme, an anthropologist and assistant director of Princeton University's…

  20. A Focused Ethnography of Baccalaureate Nursing Students Who Are Using Motivational Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Lisa M; Williams, Beverly A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how nursing students learned and used motivational interviewing (MI) in a community-based clinical context at a primary care vascular risk reduction clinic focused on health promotion. A focused ethnography was used to access a sample of 20 undergraduate nursing students, 16 patients, and 2 instructors. Data were generated from participant observations, field notes, student journals, and interviews (one-on-one and focus group). Central to the students' experience was their transformation because of learning and using MI. Three sub themes describe the social processes that shaped the student experience: learning a relational skill, engaging patients, and collaborating as partners. It is feasible for nursing students to learn MI and use this approach to enhance collaborative care in a primary care setting. The experience can be transformative for students. Supporting patients to adopt healthy lifestyles is a significant role for nurses in practice. The findings provide key insights and strategies for nurse educators teaching students a collaborative communication approach, such as MI, to engage patients in health behavior change. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Evaluation of a Motivational Interviewing Training for Third-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecht-Silver, Maureen; Lee, Danbi; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Bristow, Margo

    2016-02-01

    Prevalence of chronic disease is rising at unprecedented rates with associated costs that account for 84% of US health care spending. Physicians have the opportunity to guide patients to make lifestyle changes for preventing and self-managing chronic diseases. However, current medical education offers limited training opportunities in behavioral change counseling approaches. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an increasingly well-recognized intervention in the medical community that addresses both behavior change and self-management support. While evidence to support training in motivational interviewing for medical students is growing, more studies are needed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate changes in third-year medical students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes as a result of a 4-hour MI training. The study utilized a quasi-experimental design with a pretest and posttest to evaluate the impact of a MI workshop. Fifty-three third-year medical students completed the 4-hour workshop. Each student completed an identical pretest and posttest assessing changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Data were analyzed using t test analysis and qualitative thematic analysis. Medical students demonstrated statistically significant improvements in confidence, knowledge, and skills. Students' qualitative comments demonstrated increased understanding of MI and desire and confidence to use new skills. The study provides promising evidence that a short 4-hour training can render positive changes among medical students, which supports integration in medical student education programs. Future studies may include evaluation of curriculum enhancements with a more rigorous research design and development of additional training opportunities.

  2. “Meet the Expert Interviews,” an Integrative Learning Experience for Microbiology and Anatomy & Physiology Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara D. Davis; Mary Flannery; Marty Lowe; Jeannie S. Payne

    2014-01-01

    An important goal of higher education is to encourage students to integrate learning and apply skills to different situations.  In the “Meet the Expert Interviews” students interviewed authors of research papers on Shiga Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC) outbreaks. Students attended seminars, analyzed STEC publications, created questions, and interviewed authors. We hypothesized that the project would enhance student understanding of STEC and encourage students to integrate and apply infor...

  3. The 'values journey' of nursing and midwifery students selected using multiple mini interviews; Year One findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callwood, Alison; Bolger, Sarah; Allan, Helen T

    2017-12-15

    To explore how adult, child and mental health nursing and midwifery students, selected using multiple mini interviews, describe their 'values journey' following exposure to the clinical practice environment. Values based recruitment (VBR) incorporates assessment of healthcare students' personal values using approaches like multiple mini interviews. Students' experience of adjustment to their values during their programme is conceptualized as a 'values journey'. The impact of VBR in alleviating erosion of personal values remains unclear. A cross-professional longitudinal cohort study was commenced at one university in England in 2016 with data collection points at the end of years one, two and three. Non-probability consecutive sampling resulted in 42 healthcare students (8 adult, 8 child and 9 mental health nursing and 17 midwifery students) taking part. Six semi-structured focus groups were conducted at the end of participants' Year One (DC1). Data analysis incorporated inductive and deductive approaches in a hybrid synthesis. Participants described a 'values journey' where their values, particularly communication, courage and wanting to make a difference, were both challenged and retained. Participants personal journeys also acknowledged the: 'courage it takes to use values'; 'reality of values in practice' and 'need for self-reflection on values'. A 'values journey' may begin early in a healthcare student's education programme. This is important to recognize so that appropriate interventions designed to support students in higher education and clinical practice can be implemented. The values incorporated in VBR should be continually evaluated for fitness for purpose. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The willed body donor interview project: medical student and donor expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael; Holman, Alexis; Mueller, Dean A; Gruppen, Larry D; Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The Anatomical Donations Program at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) has begun a multiphase project wherein interviews of donors will be recorded and later shown to medical students who participate in the anatomical dissection course. The first phase of this project included surveys of both current UMMS medical students and donors concerning their perceptions of such a program. A five-question survey administered via Qualtrics software was electronically mailed to all current medical students at UMMS, and a survey was mailed to registered and potential donors requesting information from the UMMS on anatomical donations. A total of 224 medical student responses (response rate 33%) and 54 donor responses (response rate 27%) were received. Seventy-four percent of students and 81% of donors reported they would participate in this program if it existed. Students and donors supported the implementation of this program for varying reasons, though many felt strongly they would not want to participate in a donor interview program. These qualitative results support those of previous studies that show a majority of students desire a closer personal relationship with the donor, and these are the first results to be reported on donor perceptions of a donor interview program. Although many students and donors are in favor of instituting this program, others feel strongly that such an experience could be traumatic. The causes of these differing reactions need to be further explored, and the opinions of those who object to this study will be respected by maintaining voluntary participation in future phases of this study. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. Characteristics and Gender Differences in the Medical Interview Skills of Japanese Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Akiko; Ishikawa, Kazunobu; Motoya, Ryo; Kobayashi, Gen; Moroi, Yoko; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of the communication skills of medical students, we observed their performance during introductory medical interview training with simulated patients (SPs). Methods The subjects of the present study included fifth-year medical students (male, n=180, female, n=99) who were undergoing clinical training in Japan from 2012 to 2014. Each student was assigned to one of four 10-minute clinical scenarios, which was conducted with an SP. Three or four teachers observed and assessed the performance of each of the students. The overall performance was rated on a 10-point scale, and nine basic communication skills that were common to each of the scenarios were rated using a four-point scale. The students also assessed their own performance on these items. The SPs assessed the students' performance from a patient's perspective on four items. Results There were significant correlations between the teacher and student scores. However, the students tended to score themselves significantly lower than the teachers. The female students were rated significantly higher by the teachers on the following four items; 'eye contact and appropriate attitude,' 'nodding and back-channeling,' 'giving empathic verbal responses,' and 'acquisition of patient's psychosocial information.' However, the self-assessments of the female students were only significantly higher than the male students in one item, 'acquisition of patient's psychosocial information.' In contrast, self-assessments of the male students were significantly higher in two items; none of their items was scored higher by the teachers. There was no significant gender difference in the assessments made by the SPs. Conclusion There were significant gender differences in the communication skills of the medical students during introductory training, suggesting the possibility that there were gender-specific traits and gender-based differences in the students' degrees of readiness.

  6. Pre-commencement interviews to support transition and retention of first year undergraduate students

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Wood; Gillian Gray-Ganter; Robyn Bailey

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a pilot study conducted at a regional university in Australia involving a pre-commencement interview strategy that aimed to better support first-year students transitioning into an undergraduate nursing program. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of the approach and inform the development of more effective transition and retention strategies (STARS) at the institutional level. The study was informed by Kalsbeek’s (2013) ‘4 Ps’ framework for s...

  7. Pre-commencement interviews to support transition and retention of first year undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Wood

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of a pilot study conducted at a regional university in Australia involving a pre-commencement interview strategy that aimed to better support first-year students transitioning into an undergraduate nursing program. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of the approach and inform the development of more effective transition and retention strategies (STARS at the institutional level. The study was informed by Kalsbeek’s (2013 ‘4 Ps’ framework for student retention, which identifies student profile, progress through their studies, university processes and alignment between a university’s promises and the student experience of its delivery on those promises as critical components of an all-of-institution approach to improving student retention and success. An additional ‘P’, preparedness, was identified as another important dimension, recognising that student preparedness for study is a vital component of an effective transition and retention strategy. The findings viewed through the lens of the expanded ‘5Ps’ framework highlight the potential of the approach as an institutional strategy for improving student transition, retention and success.  

  8. Physiotherapy students enhance awareness of motivational interviewing skills needed in health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringby, Betina

    questionnaire. 23 students completed the questionnaire (46%). A content analysis of data was made, themes categorized and developed. Findings Students expressed personal development and working with own cases as important motivational factors for coming to class. 83 % had read all or parts of the literature......Background Health professionals who are skilled at communicating are a prerequisite for providing services of high quality. Physiotherapists work within health promotion and support people in change of lifestyle. The aim of this project was to gain insight into physiotherapy students’ motivation...... to train their practical communication skills and what students learned after a training session. The theory of motivational interviewing and the Calgary Cambridge guide served as a basic framework. Methods Training was undergone as an audiovisual training session with an actor. 5th semester physiotherapy...

  9. Supervisor descriptions of veterinary student performance in the clinical workplace: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E J

    2017-06-10

    This qualitative study investigated the qualities of veterinary student performance that inform a supervisor's impression of their competency. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 supervisors from different veterinary subdisciplines, to elicit descriptions of excellent, weak and marginal students. Thematic analysis of transcriptions revealed 12 themes, of which engagement was frequently discussed and of stated importance, and trustworthiness was a differentiator of weak and marginal students from excellent students. Other themes were knowledge, application of knowledge, technical and animal handling skills, communication, social interaction, personal functioning, caring for animals, impact, prospects and the difficulty in judging competency. Patterns of association of themes were found, however themes were also used independently in unique combinations for most students described. The findings show the range of abilities, behaviours, attitudes and personal characteristics of students that are considered by supervisors and how these are weighted and balanced. The key contribution of engagement and trustworthiness to the overall impression aligns with research indicating their importance for success in clinical practice, as both contributors to competency and indicators of it. The findings may inform future design and investigation of workplace-based learning and in-training evaluation, as well as conceptions of veterinary competency. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Does integrating research into the prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate curriculum enhance students' clinical practice? An interview study on students' perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qaroot, Bashar S; Sobuh, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Problem-based learning (where rather than feeding students the knowledge, they look for it themselves) has long been thought of as an ideal approach in teaching because it would encourage students to acquire knowledge from an undetermined medium of wrong and right answers. However, the effect of such approach in the learning experience of prosthetics and orthotics students has never been investigated. This study explores the implications of integrating problem-based learning into teaching on the students' learning experience via implementing a research-informed clinical practice module into the curriculum of last year prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate students at the University of Jordan (Amman, Jordan). Qualitative research pilot study. Grounded theory approach was used based on the data collected from interviewing a focus group of four students. Students have identified a number of arguments from their experience in the research-informed clinical practice where, generally speaking, students described research-informed clinical practice as a very good method of education. Integrating problem-based learning into teaching has many positive implications. In particular, students pointed out that their learning experience and clinical practice have much improved after the research-informed clinical practice. Findings from this investigation demonstrate that embedding problem-based learning into prosthetics and orthotics students' curriculum has the potential to enhance students' learning experience, particularly students' evidence-based practice. This may lead to graduates who are more knowledgeable and thus who can offer the optimal patient care (i.e. clinical practice). © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  11. What makes an interprofessional education programme meaningful to students? Findings from focus group interviews with students based in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Ben; Donovan, Sarah; Coleman, Karen; McKinlay, Eileen; Beckingsale, Louise; Gallagher, Peter; Gray, Ben; Neser, Hazel; Perry, Meredith; Pullon, Sue

    2016-05-01

    It is important to understand what an interprofessional education (IPE) experience means to students and what makes it meaningful so that optimal use can be made of IPE opportunities and resources. This article reports qualitative data from a larger study evaluating an 11-hour IPE programme which focused on long-term condition management. Qualitative analysis aimed to explore students' perspectives of the programme. Forty-one students from dietetics, medicine, physiotherapy, and radiation therapy were invited to participate in interprofessional focus groups. Data gathered from 34 students who participated in two focus groups were analysed inductively using thematic analysis. Three key themes emerged related to (i) learning, (ii) perceived long-term professional benefits, and (iii) the structure and content of the programme. Participants considered the programme to be a valuable learning opportunity with direct relevance to their future clinical careers. Findings indicated that providing students with an opportunity to learn about each other should be prioritised within IPE programmes and that this process should be student-led. This may help students to effectively learn with and from each other. Students perceived active learning activities, including interviewing a patient in their home and presenting findings to their peers, to be particularly valuable.

  12. Physiotherapy students enhance awareness of motivational interviewing skills needed in health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringby, Betina

    Background Health professionals who are skilled at communicating are a prerequisite for providing services of high quality. Physiotherapists work within health promotion and support people in change of lifestyle. The aim of this project was to gain insight into physiotherapy students’ motivation...... to train their practical communication skills and what students learned after a training session. The theory of motivational interviewing and the Calgary Cambridge guide served as a basic framework. Methods Training was undergone as an audiovisual training session with an actor. 5th semester physiotherapy....... In the light of the present focus on communication as an important skill for health professionals, we hope the project can contribute to further didactic discussions around how to train communication skills in health professional education. Keywords: Communication. Motivational interviewing. Physiotherapy...

  13. Helping University Students Succeed at Employment Interviews: The Role of Self-Reflection in e-Portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lackner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a Transition to Work course for fourth-year psychology majors, we had students use an e-portfolio to self-reflect on the learning experiences they deemed most significant during their degree. Such significant learning experiences can be drawn upon when answering behavioral job interview questions. We examined whether students would show improvement in mock behavioral interview performance over time, and whether any potential improvement was related to performance on self-reflective course assignments. Students indicated that the majority of their significant learning experiences had taken place outside of the classroom (e.g., paid and unpaid work, extracurricular activities. Across the duration of the course, students improved on all metrics of interview performance, and final interview performance was predicted by student grades on a self reflective e-portfolio, but not other course assignments.

  14. Teaching dental students motivational interviewing techniques: analysis of a third-year class assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Jessica G

    2010-12-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) has been promoted in recent years as an effective method for engaging patients in positive health behaviors and increasing adherence to treatment regimens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a brief training of MI techniques provided within the dental school curriculum. Third-year dental students received three hours of instruction on MI theory and techniques and then were assigned to use the method with a patient and report on their attempt in a paper. To determine if the brief training and paper assignment were effective methods for training students and assessing their understanding of MI methods, the papers were analyzed to assess aspects of the students' self-reported use of MI-related methods. Effective use of MI techniques was demonstrated by students who appropriately matched their intervention to the patient's stage of readiness to change, accurately recognized patient resistance, and responded to resistance. The paper assignment appeared to be an effective method to assess the students' use and understanding of MI-related techniques.

  15. Questions and Reflections: The Use of Motivational Interviewing Microskills in a Peer-Led Brief Alcohol Intervention for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollison, Sean J.; Lee, Christine M.; Neighbors, Clayton; Neil, Teryl A.; Olson, Nichole D.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. First year students (N=67) took part in a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) led by peer facilitators trained in MI and BASICS.…

  16. The effect of personality traits on undergraduate dental students' performance in multiple mini interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; Yamany, Ibrahim; Hassan, Mona Hassan Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Multiple mini interviews (MMI) is a structured student selection method where applicants rotate around a series of stations that do not require previously learned knowledge. The Big Five Inventory (BFI) is a tool often used to measure personality traits commonly used in applicant selection. The aim of the current study was to assess the effect of personality traits using the BFI on undergraduate dental students' performance in MMI. This research was conducted at The Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. All undergraduates applying to the dental program at King Abdulaziz University, Faculty of Dentistry (KAUFD) in two academic years [(2014-2015) and (2015-2016)] undertook the MMI held at KAUFD and completed the BFI inventory with a total number of 350 students. The MMI consisted of five stations while the BFI contained forty-four items. Data were analysed by SPSS version 20, using independent-samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman's rho correlation coefficient and Chi-square test. female students scored higher than their male counterparts but scores were only significant in the empathy station (p<0.001) in the first year, and in both empathetic skills and team work abilities (p<0.05) in the second. BFI results indicate that male students scored higher on agreeableness (p<0.003) and lower on neuroticism (p<0.001) in the first year while female students scored higher on agreeableness and conscientiousness (p<0.001) in the second year. Students of private schools had higher total MMI scores compared to those of public schools (p<0.05). MMI combined with the Big Five Inventory can be a useful tool in the admission process.

  17. A comparison of personalized feedback for college student drinkers delivered with and without a motivational interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James G; Benson, Trisha A; Vuchinich, Rudy E; Deskins, Mary M; Eakin, David; Flood, Amanda M; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Torrealday, Ohiana

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated the relative efficacy of personalized drinking feedback (PDF) delivered with and without a motivational interview (MI) for college student drinkers. Heavy-drinking college students (N = 54; 691% female) were identified from a large screening sample and randomly assigned either to receive PDF during a single MI session or to receive PDF without an MI. Of these participants, 51 (94%) completed a 6-month follow-up assessment that included measures of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. At 6-months postintervention, participants in both groups showed significant, small to moderate reductions in alcohol consumption, but the groups did not differ. Women showed larger reductions than men. Rates of alcohol-related problems remained relatively unchanged. The hypothesis that an MI would enhance the efficacy of PDF was not supported.

  18. Peer tutoring in patient-centred interviewing skills: experience of a project for first-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Kidd, Jane

    2003-07-01

    Peer tutoring is a potentially valuable resource in higher education. There are few published accounts of the impact of peer tutoring in medical education. College-wide experience of peer tutoring together with difficulties recruiting medical teachers for a communication programme led to the development of a peer-tutoring project. This paper reports the impact on first-year medical students of peer tutoring in patient-centred interviewing. After attending a preparatory workshop, third-year medical students co-facilitated their first-year colleagues in a session:Interviewing a Simulated Patient. First-year students completed written evaluations immediately after the session and two months later randomly selected students were assessed in patient-centred interviews. The impact of the peer-tutoring experience was evaluated by comparing these outcomes for students in groups co-facilitated by peer tutors with those who worked in groups facilitated by medical teachers. The eight learning objectives were completely met by more than 56% of students. However, there were statistically significant differences for four objectives with more students in groups facilitated by medical teachers completely meeting these objectives. Although the seven educational techniques used in the session were rated favourably by all students, two were rated as more effective in achieving the learning objectives by students in groups facilitated by medical teachers. Free-text comments revealed no differences between groups. Two months after the session, there were no differences between students in terms of interviewing skills as rated by trained observers and simulated patients, whilst simulated patients were more satisfied with interviews from students facilitated by peer tutors (p Peer tutors can support the acquisition of basic patient-centred interviewing skills in first-year medical students when contributing to one session of a structured programme. First-year students were receptive and

  19. Peer-Assisted History-Taking Groups: A Subjective Assessment of their Impact Upon Medical Students' Interview Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifenheim, Katharina Eva; Petzold, Ernst Richard; Junne, Florian; Erschens, Rebecca Sarah; Speiser, Natalie; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Among the clinical skills needed by all physicians, history taking is one of the most important. The teaching model for peer-assisted history-taking groups investigated in the present study consists of small-group courses in which students practice conducting medical interviews with real patients. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the expectations, experiences, and subjective learning progress of participants in peer-assisted history-taking groups. Methods: The 42 medical student participants completed a 4-month, peer-assisted, elective history-taking course, which both began and ended with a subjective assessment of their interview skills by way of a pseudonymized questionnaire. Measures comprised the students' self-assessment of their interview skills, their expectations of, and their experiences with the course and especially with the peer tutors. Results: Medical students' most important motivations in attending peer-assisted history-taking groups were becoming able to complete a structured medical interview, to mitigate difficult interviewing situations, and to address patients' emotional demands appropriately. By the end of the course, students' self-assessment of both their interview skills and management of emotional issues improved significantly. Students especially benefitted from individual feedback regarding interview style and relationship formation, as well as generally accepted and had their expectations met by peer tutors. Conclusions: To meet the important learning objectives of history-taking and management of emotional issues, as well as self-reflection and reflection of student-patient interactions, students in the field greatly appreciate practicing medical interviewing in small, peer-assisted groups with real patients. At the same time, peer tutors are experienced to be helpful and supportive and can help students to overcome inhibitions in making contact with patients.

  20. How Can Medical Students Add Value? Identifying Roles, Barriers, and Strategies to Advance the Value of Undergraduate Medical Education to Patient Care and the Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Dekhtyar, Michael; Hawkins, Richard E; Wolpaw, Daniel R

    2017-09-01

    As health systems evolve, the education community is seeking to reimagine student roles that combine learning with meaningful contributions to patient care. The authors sought to identify potential stakeholders regarding the value of student work, and roles and tasks students could perform to add value to the health system, including key barriers and associated strategies to promote value-added roles in undergraduate medical education. In 2016, 32 U.S. medical schools in the American Medical Association's (AMA's) Accelerating Change in Education Consortium met for a two-day national meeting to explore value-added medical education; 121 educators, systems leaders, clinical mentors, AMA staff leadership and advisory board members, and medical students were included. A thematic qualitative analysis of workshop discussions and written responses was performed, which extracted key themes. In current clinical roles, students can enhance value by performing detailed patient histories to identify social determinants of health and care barriers, providing evidence-based medicine contributions at the point-of-care, and undertaking health system research projects. Novel value-added roles include students serving as patient navigators/health coaches, care transition facilitators, population health managers, and quality improvement team extenders. Six priority areas for advancing value-added roles are student engagement, skills, and assessments; balance of service versus learning; resources, logistics, and supervision; productivity/billing pressures; current health systems design and culture; and faculty factors. These findings provide a starting point for collaborative work to positively impact clinical care and medical education through the enhanced integration of value-added medical student roles into care delivery systems.

  1. "Recombinant Protein of the Day": Using Daily Student Presentations to Add Real-World Aspects to a Biotechnology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F.

    2013-01-01

    To provide a realistic view of the biotechnology industry for students, a novel course focusing on recombinant proteins and their importance in medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry, scientific research, and agriculture was developed. ''Designer Proteins and Society,'' an upper-division elective, was taught in the Fall 2012 semester to 16 junior,…

  2. Can Multiple Mini-Interviews Predict Academic Performance of Dental Students? A Two-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaki, Sumer M; Yamany, Ibrahim A; Shinawi, Lana A; Hassan, Mona H A; Tekian, Ara

    2016-11-01

    Prior research has shown that students' previous grade point average (GPA) is the best predictor for future academic success. However, it can only partly predict the variability in dental school performance. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of multiple mini-interviews (MMI) as an admission criterion by comparing them with the academic performance of dental students over a two-year period. All incoming undergraduate dental students at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry (KAUFD) during academic year 2013-14 were invited to participate in MMI. Students rotated through six objective structured clinical exam (OSCE)-like stations for 30 minutes total and were interviewed by two trained faculty interviewers at each station. The stations were focused on noncognitive skills thought to be essential to academic performance at KAUFD. The academic performance of these students was then followed for two years and linked to their MMI scores. A total of 146 students (71 males and 75 females) participated in an interview (response rate=92.9%). Most students scored in the acceptable range at each MMI station. Students' total MMI score, ambitions, and motives were significant predictors of GPA during the two years of follow-up (pacademic performance of undergraduate dental students.

  3. Practical Adjustment to Life in the United States: Interviews with Incoming Japanese Students at an American University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Kenji

    To expand on previous studies of the difficulties encountered by Japanese students in the United States, 20 newly-arrived Japanese university students were interviewed about ten areas of daily life: nonverbal communication, money, time, systems of measurement, clothes, education, transportation, communication, manners, and getting acquainted with…

  4. Attitudes to Teaching Ethics to Bioscience Students: An Interview-Based Study Comparing British and American University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, John A.; Morgan, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    An interview-based survey was carried out with British and American university teachers. In both countries there was widespread (but in the UK, not unanimous) support for the proposition that ethics should be taught to Bioscience students. Reasons included a need to help students engage with the ethical issues associated with their subject and the…

  5. What Factors Affect Nursing Students' Decisions of Whether to Take Rural Jobs: An Exploratory Interview Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuexian; Haycock-Stuart, Elaine; Rodgers, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore factors that effect nursing students' decisions of whether to take rural jobs in China. Methods: An exploratory interview study was conducted in China during May and June 2011. Eleven final year nursing students were purposively recruited from four nursing schools in one eastern area in China. The…

  6. Linking Rhetorical Sensitivity with the Ability of an Athletic Training Student to Successfully Perform a Patient Medical Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncino, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the self-reported rhetorical sensitivity of a sample of athletic training students is positively related to successfully performing a patient medical interview. Particularly, the study focused on if athletic training students' reported communication behaviors is related to their…

  7. Qualitative Investigation of the "Cooking with Kids" Program: Focus Group Interviews with Fourth-Grade Students, Teachers, and Food Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Catherine V.; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Focus group (FG) interviews with students and adults were used to obtain a rich understanding of the "Cooking with Kids" classroom experience from the child and adult participant perspectives. Methods: FG topics included students' cooking experiences at school and home and perceptions of "Cooking with Kids". Verified transcripts of…

  8. “Meet the Expert Interviews,” an Integrative Learning Experience for Microbiology and Anatomy & Physiology Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara D. Davis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An important goal of higher education is to encourage students to integrate learning and apply skills to different situations.  In the “Meet the Expert Interviews” students interviewed authors of research papers on Shiga Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC outbreaks. Students attended seminars, analyzed STEC publications, created questions, and interviewed authors. We hypothesized that the project would enhance student understanding of STEC and encourage students to integrate and apply information to real world problems. The project was assessed by student surveys. The majority of 129 students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the seminar enhanced their understanding of E.coli transmission, diagnosis, and treatment; that the interview enhanced their understanding of epidemiology; and made them more aware of the steps involved in determining the cause of the outbreak.  The project was engaging for students and faculty and provided a unique way for professional outreach to biology students.  The project is an innovative example of an integrative method to enhance student learning and interaction with microbiology and epidemiology professionals.

  9. Postgraduate career intentions of medical students and recent graduates in Malawi: a qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, the Malawian Ministry of Health declared a human resource crisis and launched a six year Emergency Human Resources Programme. This included salary supplements for key health workers and a tripling of doctors in training. By 2010, the number of medical graduates had doubled and significantly more doctors were working in rural district hospitals. Yet there has been little research into the views of this next generation of doctors in Malawi, who are crucial to the continuing success of the programme. The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing the career plans of medical students and recent graduates with regard to four policy-relevant aspects: emigration outside Malawi; working at district level; private sector employment and postgraduate specialisation. Methods Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourth year medical students and first year graduates, recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Key informant interviews were also carried out with medical school faculty. Recordings were transcribed and analysed using a framework approach. Results Opportunities for postgraduate training emerged as the most important factor in participants’ career choices, with specialisation seen as vital to career progression. All participants intended to work in Malawi in the long term, after a period of time outside the country. For nearly all participants, this was in the pursuit of postgraduate study rather than higher salaries. In general, medical students and young doctors were enthusiastic about working at district level, although this is curtailed by their desire for specialist training and frustration with resource shortages. There is currently little intention to move into the private sector. Conclusions Future resourcing of postgraduate training opportunities is crucial to preventing emigration as graduate numbers increase. The lesser importance put on salary by younger doctors may

  10. Motivational interviewing interventions and alcohol abuse among college students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah-Brempong, Emmanuel; Okyere, Paul; Owusu-Addo, Ebenezer; Cross, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The study sought to assess the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) interventions in reducing alcohol consumption among college students, as compared to no intervention or alternative interventions. It also sought to identify the potential moderators to MI intervention effects. Database sources consulted included Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLE, PsycLIT, CINAHL, and MEDLINE. Included studies were (1) underpinned by experimental, quasi-experimental, and nonexperimental designs; (2) studies in which participants were either college males only or females only or both; and (3) studies in which adaptations of MI were based on key MI principles. Excluded studies were (1) non-English language studies; (2) studies not published from 2000-2012; (3) studies in which participants were not college students; (4) studies in which intervention was not delivered by face-to-face approach; and (5) studies that failed to embark on postintervention follow-ups. A total of 115 abstracts were screened. These were narrowed down to 13 studies from which data for the study were extracted. Selected studies were underpinned by experimental, quasi-experimental, and nonexperimental designs. Owing to the heterogeneity in selected studies, a narrative synthesis was used. MI interventions were found to be effective in reducing alcohol consumption among college students, when compared to alternative interventions or no intervention. Potential moderators of MI intervention effects were identified to include practitioner's adherence to MI techniques and individual's drinking motives. MI presents itself as a promising tool that can augment the many existing social-environmental strategies of health promotion.

  11. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer Glazer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30, motivation (22, readiness for the profession (17, service (12, and problem-solving (12. Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  12. Photo elicitation interviews as a way of accessing primary school students' attitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Stine Karen; Schmidt, Maria Christina Secher; Tonnesen, Pia Beck

    explores the potential of photo-elicitation interviews as a qualitative path to affect. This particular type of interview is shaped as conversations about self-produced images of mathematics. When conducting the photo elicitation interviews, researchers also introduce their own photographs...

  13. Nursing and Dental Hygiene Selection Procedures. Part I: The Structured Interview as a Tool for Selecting Students into an Associate of Arts Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Elaine L.; And Others

    A structured interview procedure was used during the spring of 1975 as a tool in selecting nursing and dental hygiene students at Johnson County Community College. Potential students had two 20-minute interviews: one by a staff member of the program to which application was made, and one by another staff member. Interviewers rated the applicants…

  14. Knowledge about Students in the USA: 30 Years of Educational Research. An Interview with Alexander W. Astin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliézer de los Santos Valadez

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, Doctor Alexander Astin retraces the work he has done in the last 30 years. He explains about the relevance of getting to know higher education students, since being acquainted with their school trajectory inside and outside campus, is fundamental to institutional decision-making. Doctor Astin also states the importance of evaluating an institution's quality by investigating the students' learning.

  15. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runeson Bo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI, Burnout (OLBI, Depression (MDI at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. Results 98 (77% responded on both occasions, 80 (63% of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27% had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students

  16. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Marie E; Runeson, Bo

    2007-04-12

    Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i) and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale) were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI), Burnout (OLBI), Depression (MDI) at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI) were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. 98 (77%) responded on both occasions, 80 (63%) of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27%) had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities

  17. Development of Case Stories by Interviewing Students about their Critical Moments in Science, Math, and Engineering Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Esselstein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dartmouth’s Critical Moments project is designed to promote discussions among faculty and graduate students about the retention of students, particularly women and minorities, in science, math, and engineering (SME disciplines. The first phase of the ongoing project has been the development of four case stories, which are fictionalized composites drawn from surveys and interviews of real Dartmouth students. The surveyed population was 125 students in general chemistry. Of the 77 who agreed to be interviewed, 61 reported having experienced a critical moment – i.e., a positive or negative event or time that had a significant impact on the student’s academic life. Leading critical moments were a poor grade on an exam; challenge from group work; excitement from an internship; and falling in love with a non-SME discipline from other coursework. Interviews of 13 students who had negative critical moments led to the development of case stories for: Antoinetta ’09, who had a disappointing group experience; Dalila ’08, who was poorly prepared; Greg ’09, who got in over his head in his first year; and Michelle ’08, who was shocked by her result in the first exam. The case stories are being discussed by graduate students, TA and faculty in various workshops at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning.

  18. The benefits of discussing suicide with Alaska native college students: qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCou, Christopher R; Skewes, Monica C; López, Ellen D S; Skanis, Marie L

    2013-01-01

    Suicide represents a significant health disparity for communities in rural Alaska, and has implications for mental health among people who have lost loved ones from suicide. A qualitative interview study was conducted to examine the ways in which suicide has affected the lives of college students who have migrated from rural villages to an urban university (N = 25). The present research represents a secondary aim of the study-specifically, we examined the affective responses of Alaska Native college students from rural villages after completing in-depth semistructured interviews about their experiences related to suicide. Debriefing questions posed at the conclusion of the interviews revealed that the majority of participants (n 16) stated they felt "better" after completing the interview, and no participants reported feeling "worse." No participant required the use of the safety plan developed in case of severe emotional distress. All participants indicated they would be interested in participating in future research. Analysis of questions pertaining to the interview experience revealed the salience of foundation (the participant's prior experience discussing issues like suicide), process (the interview questions and questioning style), and outcomes (the challenges and benefits of participation described by the respondent). Findings provided important insights concerning the experience of discussing past trauma, perceived importance of research addressing coping with suicide, and the influence of past experiences in the process of talking about suicide.

  19. College students with diabetes: using focus groups and interviews to determine psychosocial issues and barriers to control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowik, M J; Kendall, P A; Harris, M A

    1997-01-01

    College students with diabetes are at risk for improvised diabetes care due to their age, newly acquired independence, and erratic schedules. The purpose of this study was to employ focus groups and interviews to identity factors that affect the ability of these students to engage in appropriate self-care behaviors. Focus group and interview questions were developed to address variables of the Expanded Health Belief Model. Two focus groups and fifteen interviews were conducted. Barriers to successful diabetes management were time management, stress hypoglycemic reactions, diet management constraints, and inadequate finances. Several psychosocial issues that affected successful management also were identified. These issues were grouped into three categories: (1) inconveniences of diabetes management, (2) motivators to managing diabetes, and (3) social support issues. The findings show the value of formative evaluation that can then be used to design diabetes education programs to meet clients' perceived needs.

  20. Keeping Up Appearances: How Practitioners Can Help Students Make Positive Impressions (and Avoid Fashion Faux Pas) During the Interview Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Karol A. D.; Steele, Markell

    1999-01-01

    Presents results of the UCLA career center's 1999 Business Attire Survey. The survey polled recruiters about appropriate apparel and accessories for students interviewing for entry-level jobs. Also discusses recruiters' responses beyond the survey questions that reflect corporate policy and personal opinions and help illuminate the quantitative…

  1. The Role of Motivational Interviewing in Depression and Psychological Well-Being in Mothers of Students Having Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Imanparvar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of motivational interviewing on the minimising of depression symptoms and improvement of psychological well-being among mothers of students having learning disabilities were studied. The methodology was based on the comparison of pretest-posttest Vs control-groups. The statistical data included all mothers of primary-school students having learning disabilities (50 subjects and normal students (50 subjects residing in the city of Ardabil, Iran. Subject selections were made through simple random sampling method and group counselling sessions focused on motivational interviewing were held for the experimental group for total eight "60-minute sessions". The structure of the motivational interviewing sessions was extracted from a prescribed prescript of group therapy. To tabulate the data; Ryff’s Scales of Psychological Well-Being, Beck Depression Inventory, and Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire were used. As per the statistical analysis the motivational interviewing can reduce depression symptoms and improve psychological well-being in mothers of students having learning disabilities.

  2. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bradner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. Methods: At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. Results: The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. Conclusion: This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine.

  3. Medical students' perceptions of the factors influencing their academic performance: an exploratory interview study with high-achieving and re-sitting medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todres, Mathew; Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Sidhu, Kalwant; Stephenson, Anne; Jones, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about medical students' perceptions of the factors that influence their academic performance. To detect factors medical students, in the final years of their undergraduate medical studies, believe affect their academic performance. We conducted semi-structured interviews with high-achieving and re-sitting students in the final two years of their studies in a London medical school. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was conducted. Similarities and differences in factors perceived to affect the academic performance of high-achieving and re-sitting students were identified. Eight re-sitting and ten high-achieving students were interviewed. Three core themes were identified: engagement with learning; reflections on learning methods and experiences and the application of learning to future practice. High-achieving students showed a greater awareness of what worked in terms of their approaches to learning and coping with difficulty than re-sitting students. There were also differences in the degree of positive engagement with peers, suggesting the positive contribution of socialising with other medical students. This exploratory qualitative study identified attitudes, behaviours and motivations that appeared to contribute to success or failure at medical school. Our findings suggest ways to improve appraisal, remediation and support mechanisms for students.

  4. Creating the Environment for Minority Student Success: An Interview with Jacqueline Fleming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerry; Fleming, Jacqueline

    1992-01-01

    Jacqueline Fleming, author of "Blacks in College," discusses the meaning of cultural diversity, African-American student achievement at historically black and predominantly white colleges, assisting underprepared minority students, educational climates for success, African-American and white students' experiences of college, fear of success among…

  5. Exploratory Research on Social Media and Digital Writing : Qualitative Interview of Japanese College Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KIM, Sang-Mi

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examined how indigenous social media relates to college students' peer interaction and cultural involvement toward digital writing on social networking services (SNSs) in Japan...

  6. Developing Student Critical Thinking Skills through Teaching Psychology: An Interview with Claudio S. Hutz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Claudio S. Hutz, who is dean of Instituto de Psicologia at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where he has been teaching psychology since 1977. Discusses topics such as teaching psychology in Brazil and developing critical thinking skills. (CMK)

  7. Performance Evaluation Interviews: A Method to Bring Forensic Coaches' and Students' Expectations Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, C. B.; Nuss, Mark D.

    This paper focuses on the performance evaluation, a tool extensively treated in the scholarly literature that allows managers and employees to gain shared understanding about workplace behavior. The paper maintains that in the forensic community, the performance evaluation interview can also be an effective forum in which coaches can give…

  8. Sales Role-Plays and Mock Interviews: An Investigation of Student Performance in Sales Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sudha; Kothandaraman, Prabakar; Kashyap, Rajiv; Ashnai, Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Sales competitions provide students with opportunities to apply their understanding of sales. Despite a long tradition of scholarship on sales role-plays, the answer to what drives student performance in sales competitions remains elusive. In this research, we examine how motivation (work engagement) and ability (cognitive aptitude and…

  9. Developing Students' Cultural Intelligence through an Experiential Learning Activity: A Cross-Cultural Consumer Behavior Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpis, Lada Helen; Hunter, James

    2017-01-01

    Business schools can increase their competitiveness by offering students intercultural skills development opportunities integrated into the traditional curricula. This article makes a contribution by proposing an approach to developing students' cultural intelligence that is based on the cultural intelligence (CQ) model, experiential learning…

  10. Challenges Confronted by Korean Students in a Chinese University: An Interview Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Meihua

    2015-01-01

    During recent decades, both institutions of higher education and university students of the world are trying to become international by offering or gaining some form of international education, which has caught the attention of increasingly more researchers (Jackson, 2004; Trenchs-Parera, 2009). As East Asian students have increasingly become the…

  11. Perceived stress at transition to workplace: a qualitative interview study exploring final-year medical students' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Tobias R; Bugaj, Till J; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore final-year medical students' stressors and coping strategies at the transition to the clinical workplace. In this qualitative study, semi-standardized interviews with eight final-year medical students (five male, three female; aged 25.9±1.4 years) were conducted during their internal medicine rotation. After verbatim transcription, a qualitative content analysis of students' impressions of stress provoking and easing factors during final-year education was performed. Students' statements regarding burdens and dealing with stress were classified into four main categories: A) perceived stressors and provoking factors, B) stress-induced consequences, C) personal and external resources for preventing and dealing with stress, and D) final-year students' suggestions for workplace improvement. Final-year medical students perceived different types of stress during their transition to medical wards, and reported both negative consequences and coping resources concerning perceived stress. As supervision, feedback, and coping strategies played an important role in the students' perception of stress, final-year medical education curricula development should focus on these specifically.

  12. Effect of a Direct Instruction Flashcard System for Increasing the Performance of Basic Division Facts for a Middle School Student with ADD/OHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjordahl, Michaelyn; Talboy, Rebeccah; Neyman, Jennifer; McLaughlin, T. F.; Hoenike, Richelle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a Direct Instruction (DI) flashcard system on the mastery, accuracy and fluency of basic division math facts (numbers 0-12) for a seventh grade boy, diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). The effects of the DI flashcard system were examined in a multiple baseline design across…

  13. Exploration of the impacts of distributed-site Research Experiences for Undergraduates using pre-/post- student interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, H.; Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The benefits for student participants of undergraduate research opportunities have been well documented. However, advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT) and cultural shifts around online education and virtual peer-to-peer interaction have lead to new models in which to structure such experiences. Currently, these ICT-enabled Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs connect geographically distributed interns in supportive e-learning communities while maintaining a traditional local mentoring arrangement. To document and explore the effects of distributed REU Sites in more depth, six interns from such a program, the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS) REU, were selected at random and asked to be interviewed about the REU experience. The primary targets of the interviews are to understand the mentor/mentee relationships, feeling of support and development and value of near-peer and far-peer relationships throughout their internship in a distributed REU program, and whether they receive the training necessary to gain confidence as a researcher. We also examine the various communication technologies as well as best practices and strategies that can increase intern connectedness. Pre-internship interviews were conducted in-person at the start of the centralized internship orientation week, while post-internship interviews were virtual (e.g. video chat with Skype or Google Hangout). These semi-structured interviews have full audio recordings and subsequent transcriptions. An additional, virtual follow-up interview will be conducted next spring after the interns have an opportunity to attend and present their research at a national conference (e.g., AGU). Interview material will be analyzed through a process of coding, sorting, local integration, and inclusive integration. Results will also be triangulated with pre- and post- survey data both from participants and other survey data from previous years of the IRIS

  14. A generalizability study of the medical judgment vignettes interview to assess students' noncognitive attributes for medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolucci Elizabeth

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the reliability of admission interviews has been improved through the use of objective and structured approaches, there still remains the issue of identifying and measuring relevant attributes or noncognitive domains of interest. In this present study, we use generalizability theory to determine the estimated variance associated with participants, judges and stations from a semi-structured, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview used as part of an initiative to improve the reliability and content validity of the interview process used in the selection of students for medical school. Methods A three station, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview was conducted with 29 participants and scored independently by two judges on a well-defined 5-point rubric. Generalizability Theory provides a method for estimating the variability of a number of facets. In the present study each judge (j rated each participant (p on all three Medical Judgment Vignette stations (s. A two-facet crossed designed generalizability study was used to determine the optimal number of stations and judges to achieve a 0.80 reliability coefficient. Results The results of the generalizability analysis showed that a three station, two judge Medical Judgment Vignettes interview results in a G coefficient of 0.70. As shown by the adjusted Eρ2 scores, since interviewer variability is negligible, increasing the number of judges from two to three does not improve the generalizability coefficient. Increasing the number of stations, however, does have a substantial influence on the overall dependability of this measurement. In a decision study analysis, increasing the number of stations to six with a single judge at each station results in a G coefficient of 0.81. Conclusion The Medical Judgment Vignettes interview provides a reliable approach to the assessment of candidates' noncognitive attributes for medical school. The high inter-rater reliability is attributed

  15. A generalizability study of the medical judgment vignettes interview to assess students' noncognitive attributes for medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnon, Tyrone; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2008-12-10

    Although the reliability of admission interviews has been improved through the use of objective and structured approaches, there still remains the issue of identifying and measuring relevant attributes or noncognitive domains of interest. In this present study, we use generalizability theory to determine the estimated variance associated with participants, judges and stations from a semi-structured, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview used as part of an initiative to improve the reliability and content validity of the interview process used in the selection of students for medical school. A three station, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview was conducted with 29 participants and scored independently by two judges on a well-defined 5-point rubric. Generalizability Theory provides a method for estimating the variability of a number of facets. In the present study each judge (j) rated each participant (p) on all three Medical Judgment Vignette stations (s). A two-facet crossed designed generalizability study was used to determine the optimal number of stations and judges to achieve a 0.80 reliability coefficient. The results of the generalizability analysis showed that a three station, two judge Medical Judgment Vignettes interview results in a G coefficient of 0.70. As shown by the adjusted E rho 2 scores, since interviewer variability is negligible, increasing the number of judges from two to three does not improve the generalizability coefficient. Increasing the number of stations, however, does have a substantial influence on the overall dependability of this measurement. In a decision study analysis, increasing the number of stations to six with a single judge at each station results in a G coefficient of 0.81. The Medical Judgment Vignettes interview provides a reliable approach to the assessment of candidates' noncognitive attributes for medical school. The high inter-rater reliability is attributed to the greater objectivity achieved through the used of the

  16. A meta-ethnography of interview-based qualitative research studies on medical students' views and experiences of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, David

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative research suggests that medical students' empathy declines during their training. This meta-ethnography asks: What new understanding may be gained by a synthesis of interview-based qualitative research on medical students' views and experiences of empathy? How can such a synthesis be undertaken? A meta-ethnography synthesizes individual qualitative studies to generate knowledge increasing understanding and informing debate. A literature search yielded eight qualitative studies which met the inclusion criteria. These were analyzed from a phenomenological and interpretative perspective. The meta-ethnography revealed a conceptual confusion around empathy and a tension in medical education between distancing and connecting with patients. Barriers to empathy included a lack of patient contact and a strong emphasis on the biomedical over the psycho-social aspects of the curriculum. A number of influences discussed in the paper lead students to adopt less overt ways of showing their empathy. These insights deepen our understanding of the apparent decline in empathy in medical students. The lessons from these studies suggest that future curriculum development should include earlier patient contact, more emphasis on psycho-social aspects of care and address the barriers to empathy to ensure that tomorrow's doctors are empathetic as well as competent.

  17. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  18. Technology and science in classroom and interview talk with Swiss lower secondary school students: a Marxist sociological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2013-06-01

    In much of science education research, the content of talk tends to be attributed to the persons who produce the sound-words in a speech situation. A radically different, sociological perspective on language-in-use grounded in Marxism derives from the work of L. S. Vygotsky and the members of the circle around M. M. Bakhtin. Accordingly, each word belongs to speaker and recipient simultaneously. It represents collective consciousness and, therefore, shared ideology, which can no longer be attributed to the individual. The purpose of this study is to develop a sociological perspective on language in science education, a perspective in which language continuously changes. I articulate this position in the context of classroom and interview talk with 14-year-old Swiss non-academically streamed lower secondary students about technology and science. In this context, science classrooms and interviews are shown to be microcosms of Swiss (German) culture and society reproduced in and through the situated talk about science and technology.

  19. The "What Is a System" Reflection Interview as a Knowledge Integration Activity for High School Students' Understanding of Complex Systems in Human Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripto, Jaklin; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Snapir, Zohar; Amit, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the reflection interview as a tool for assessing and facilitating the use of "systems language" amongst 11th grade students who have recently completed their first year of high school biology. Eighty-three students composed two concept maps in the 10th grade--one at the beginning of the school year and one at its end.…

  20. Timeline interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain and discuss timeline interviews as a method for doing life history research. It is a ‘how to’ article explaining the strengths and weaknesses of using a timeline when conducting qualitative interviews. The method allows the interviewee to participate...... in the reporting of the interview which may give raise to ownership and sharing of the analytical power in the interview situation. Exactly for this reason, it may not be the most appropriate method for interviewing elites or for conducting insider interviews where positionality can be at play. The use...... of the timeline should not lead the nterviewer or the interviewee to assume linearity and coherence; it is an rganising principle for the events. It provides an opportunity for linking the story with the wider social, political and environmental context during the interview. hile the method is very suitable...

  1. Life Satisfaction among Highly Achieving Students in Hong Kong: Do Gratitude and the "Good-Enough Mindset" Add to the Contribution of Perfectionism in Prediction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether gratitude and the "good-enough mindset" added to the contribution of perfectionism in predicting life satisfaction in 245 Chinese highly achieving students in Hong Kong. Participants completed self-report questionnaires that included scales on life satisfaction, positive and negative perfectionism…

  2. The Effects of a Copy, Cover, Compare Procedure and a Token Economy on the Retention of Basic Multiplication Facts by Two Middle School Students with ADD and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolich, Barbara; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A Copy, Cover, and Compare procedure was found to produce large improvements in the accuracy of the multiplication facts of two middle school students with attention deficit disorder or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. The addition of a token economy program produced only small improvements in performance. (Author/PB)

  3. Steps in Designing Queue and Interview Process using Information System: A Case of Re-registration of New Students in Universitas Negeri Makassar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Saleh Ahmar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Universitas Negeri Makassar (UNM have a number of prospective students is quite a lot. Based on data released by the BAPSI UNM (2015 that the data student candidates of UNM who passed the selection with SNMPTN SBMPTN selection as 3,791 people. If the prospective graduate students interviewed are normally it will take a long time and will certainly make students uncomfortable. Therefore it is necessary design an information systems to solving this problem. This research aim to develop an information system to facilitate the process queue. The method used in this research is to use the three stages in the Software Development Life Cycle method namely Initiation Phase, Development/Acquisition Phase, and Implementation Phase. This information system development using PHP and CodeIgniter as a its framework. This design results will be obtained an queues and interviews information system that can be used to manage the queue and interview data. By implementing this system, it potentially reduce time to wait and the process of managing results of interviews can be obtained directly without a process of inputting interview repeat if done manually.

  4. Narrative interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  5. Doing Dirty Interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    in the position of a psychologist with past experiences within supervision and consultation/coaching. The framing of the interview was build around the theme “My role in keeping students out from dropping out of the Vocational Educational Training College.” We will discuss how both the interviewer...

  6. Clinical communication skills learning outcomes among first year medical students are consistent irrespective of participation in an interview for admission to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Mavourneen; Wilkinson, David; Fitzgerald, Jennifer; Eley, Diann; Connor, Jason

    2014-07-01

    Although contentious most medical schools interview potential students to assess personal abilities such as communication. To investigate any differences in clinical communication skills (CCS) between first year students admitted to UQ medical school with or without an admissions interview. A retrospective analysis of 1495 student assessment scores obtained after structured communication skills training (CCS) between 2007 and 2010. The average assessment score was 3.76 ([95% CI, 3.73-3.78]) and adjusting for student characteristics, showed no main effect for interview (p = 0.89). The strongest predictor of scores was gender with females achieving significantly higher scores (3.91 [95% CI, 3.54-4.28] vs. 3.76 [95% CI, 3.39-4.13]; p ≤ 0.001). Data show no differences in post-training assessment measures between students who were interviewed during selection or not. Further research about the quality and retention of communications skills after training is warranted.

  7. 'Thinking on my feet': an improvisation course to enhance students' confidence and responsiveness in the medical interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shochet, Robert; King, Julie; Levine, Rachel; Clever, Sarah; Wright, Scott

    2013-02-01

    by patients such that they must be adept at improvising. Because of the gap that currently exists in interview skills training programmes, we hypothesised that the field of improvisational theatre would effectively supplement the traditional curriculum. Improvisation relies on listening, confidence and responding instinctively and spontaneously. 13,14 In this paper, we describe our efforts to develop a brief curriculum for medical students providing training in the art of theatre improvisation, with the goal of enhancing students' confidence and performance in clinical encounters. We hoped that this innovative curricular experience would establish a venue where secondyear medical students could learn and practise improvisational skills that might prove helpful in their communications with patients during medical encounters.

  8. Add Fiber without Extra Calories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166315.html Add Fiber Without Extra Calories How to fill up, not ... 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Are you getting enough fiber in your diet? According to the National Fiber ...

  9. 'I wish someone watched me interview:' medical student insight into observation and feedback as a method for teaching communication skills during the clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Heather; Rosenbaum, Marcy; Axelson, Rick

    2016-11-09

    Experts suggest observation and feedback is a useful tool for teaching and evaluating medical student communication skills during the clinical years. Failing to do this effectively risks contributing to deterioration of students' communication skills during the very educational period in which they are most important. While educators have been queried about their thoughts on this issue, little is known about what this process is like for learners and if they feel they get educational value from being observed. This study explored student perspectives regarding their experiences with clinical observation and feedback on communication skills. A total of 125 senior medical students at a U.S. medical school were interviewed about their experiences with observation and feedback. Thematic analysis of interview data identified common themes among student responses. The majority of students reported rarely being observed interviewing, and they reported receiving feedback even less frequently. Students valued having communication skills observed and became more comfortable with observation the more it occurred. Student-identified challenges included supervisor time constraints and grading based on observation. Most feedback focused on information gathering and was commonly delayed until well after the observed encounter. Eliciting students' perspectives on the effect of observation and feedback on the development of their communication skills is a unique way to look at this topic, and brings to light many student-identified obstacles and opportunities to maximize the educational value of observation and feedback for teaching communication, including increasing the number of observations, disassociating observation from numerically scored evaluation, training faculty to give meaningful feedback, and timing the observation/feedback earlier in clerkships.

  10. The Relationship between Baseline Drinking Status, Peer Motivational Interviewing Microskills, and Drinking Outcomes in a Brief Alcohol Intervention for Matriculating College Students: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollison, Sean J.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Witkiewitz, Katie; Lee, Christine M.; Ray, Anne E.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend previous findings (Tollison et al., 2008) on the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. This study used a larger sample size, multiple follow-up time-points, and latent variable analyses allowing for…

  11. Methodological Reflections on Researching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender University Students in Hong Kong: To What Extent Are They Vulnerable Interview Subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Yiu Tung

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, the importance of reflexivity has been acknowledged in higher education research. In this paper, I reflect on my experience of researching lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) university students in Hong Kong. The focus is not on the findings that emerge from the in-depth interviews conducted per se, but on the…

  12. Life-history interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    My first encounter with life history research was during my Ph.D. research. This concerned a multi-method study of nomadic mobility in Senegal. One method stood out as yielding the most interesting and in-depth data: life story interviews using a time line. I made interviews with the head...... of the nomadic households and during these I came to understand the use of mobility in a complex context of continuity and change, identity and belonging in the Fulani community. Time line interviews became one of my favourite tool in the years to follow, a tool used both for my research in various settings...... of a time line for making life story interviews. I decided that the lack of authoritative literature should not omit me from teaching my students how to make a time line interview. After an introduction, they had to use the tool for making an interview each other concerning their learning journey to DPU...

  13. ‘I wish someone watched me interview:’ medical student insight into observation and feedback as a method for teaching communication skills during the clinical years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Schopper

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts suggest observation and feedback is a useful tool for teaching and evaluating medical student communication skills during the clinical years. Failing to do this effectively risks contributing to deterioration of students’ communication skills during the very educational period in which they are most important. While educators have been queried about their thoughts on this issue, little is known about what this process is like for learners and if they feel they get educational value from being observed. This study explored student perspectives regarding their experiences with clinical observation and feedback on communication skills. Methods A total of 125 senior medical students at a U.S. medical school were interviewed about their experiences with observation and feedback. Thematic analysis of interview data identified common themes among student responses. Results The majority of students reported rarely being observed interviewing, and they reported receiving feedback even less frequently. Students valued having communication skills observed and became more comfortable with observation the more it occurred. Student-identified challenges included supervisor time constraints and grading based on observation. Most feedback focused on information gathering and was commonly delayed until well after the observed encounter. Conclusions Eliciting students’ perspectives on the effect of observation and feedback on the development of their communication skills is a unique way to look at this topic, and brings to light many student-identified obstacles and opportunities to maximize the educational value of observation and feedback for teaching communication, including increasing the number of observations, disassociating observation from numerically scored evaluation, training faculty to give meaningful feedback, and timing the observation/feedback earlier in clerkships.

  14. The Interview, a Tool to Create and Develop Civic, Moral and Ethical Skills for Pupils and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Alexandrache

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we intend to present the importance of the interview for developing ethical and moral-civic behaviours and consciousness. These aspects are often neglected in school activities, because the interview is used for developing the communicate competences or for make a social researches. Our paper analyze the value of interview from the civic, moral, ethic educational perspective. In this sense, we are used more observations and case studies. The theoretical aspects and examples of good practice hope the teacher to develop ethical awareness.

  15. The `What is a system' reflection interview as a knowledge integration activity for high school students' understanding of complex systems in human biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripto, Jaklin; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Snapir, Zohar; Amit, Miriam

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the reflection interview as a tool for assessing and facilitating the use of 'systems language' amongst 11th grade students who have recently completed their first year of high school biology. Eighty-three students composed two concept maps in the 10th grade-one at the beginning of the school year and one at its end. The first part of the interview is dedicated to guiding the students through comparing their two concept maps and by means of both explicit and non-explicit teaching. Our study showed that the explicit guidance in comparing the two concept maps was more effective than the non-explicit, eliciting a variety of different, more specific, types of interactions and patterns (e.g. 'hierarchy', 'dynamism', 'homeostasis') in the students' descriptions of the human body system. The reflection interview as a knowledge integration activity was found to be an effective tool for assessing the subjects' conceptual models of 'system complexity', and for identifying those aspects of a system that are most commonly misunderstood.

  16. Qualitative Assessment of Learning Strategies among Medical Students Using Focus Group Discussions and In-depth Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Anuradha Sujai; Ganjiwale, Jaishree Deepak; Varma, Jagdish; Singh, Praveen; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Singh, Tejinder

    2017-01-01

    Background: Globally, students with top academic performance and high intellectual capacity usually opt to study medicine. However, once students get enrolled, their academic performance varies widely. Such variations appear to be determined by various factors, one of them being types of learning strategies adopted by students. The learning strategies utilized by the students with better academic performance are likely to be more effective learning strategies. Aims and Objectives: The objecti...

  17. Motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kamilla; Humaidan, Peter; Sørensen, Lise H

    2013-01-01

    of motivational interviewing (intervention group, n = 110), 64 received motivational support by phone or e-mail only and 13 women did not wish any motivational support (control group, n = 77). The mean weight loss and decrease in BMI was greater in the intervention group compared with the control group (9.3 kg...

  18. Zero Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Barbara A.; Frank, Austin C.

    1976-01-01

    Students who made an initial appointment for counseling but did not keep it are compared with students who kept appointments at a counseling center or psychiatric service. Impulsiveness appears to be the main characteristic distinguishing the "no shows" from the "shows". A few other differences were observed, especially for women. (Author)

  19. Assessing metacognition of grade 2 and grade 4 students using an adaptation of multi-method interview approach during mathematics problem-solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzle, A.

    2017-11-01

    The important role that metacognition plays as a predictor for student mathematical learning and for mathematical problem-solving, has been extensively documented. But only recently has attention turned to primary grades, and more research is needed at this level. The goals of this paper are threefold: (1) to present metacognitive framework during mathematics problem-solving, (2) to describe their multi-method interview approach developed to study student mathematical metacognition, and (3) to empirically evaluate the utility of their model and the adaptation of their approach in the context of grade 2 and grade 4 mathematics problem-solving. The results are discussed not only with regard to further development of the adapted multi-method interview approach, but also with regard to their theoretical and practical implications.

  20. The relationship between baseline drinking status, peer motivational interviewing microskills, and drinking outcomes in a brief alcohol intervention for matriculating college students: a replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollison, Sean J; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Mallett, Kimberly A; Witkiewitz, Katie; Lee, Christine M; Ray, Anne E; Larimer, Mary E

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend previous findings (Tollison et al., 2008) on the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. This study used a larger sample size, multiple follow-up time-points, and latent variable analyses allowing for more complex models to be tested in a sample with different characteristics than Tollison et al. Matriculating students who participated in high school sports (N=327) took part in a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students led by peer facilitators trained in motivational interviewing (MI). Participants were assessed pre- and immediately postintervention on contemplation to change, as well as pre-, 5months, and 10months postintervention on drinking quantity. Independent coders used the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity scale (Moyers, Martin, Manuel, & Miller, 2003) to evaluate therapist MI adherence. Contrary to our previous study, results indicated that a higher number of open questions was positively related to increases in drinking, especially for heavier drinkers. Congruent with the previous study, more simple reflections was positively related to increases in drinking. Finally, this study revealed that heavier baseline drinking was associated with more simple reflections. There were no significant results found for changes in contemplation. Results corroborate previous findings that the excessive use of simple reflections may be indicative of countertherapeutic outcomes while raising questions about the relationship between the frequency of open questions and therapeutic outcomes. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Annual Interviews

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Annex II, page 1, Section 3 of the Administrative Circular no. 26 (Rev. 5) states that "The annual interview shall usually take place between 15 November of the reference year and 15 February of the following year." Following the meeting of the Executive Board on 7 December 2004 and the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 19 January 2005, it has been decided, for the advancement exercise of 2005, to extend this period until 15 March 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  2. Entrevista/Interview: Q: How to Raise Money for Your Hispanic Students? A: Involve Your Alumni and Their Corporate Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Karla

    1983-01-01

    An interview with Raul Vargas, the director of the University of Southern California's Office for Mexican American Programs is presented. The office provides scholarships for some of USC's Hispanic undergraduates, raises scholarship money through alumni and corporate contacts, and acts as a liaison between the university and the Hispanic…

  3. Enriching Social Studies with Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Describes how an interview project used in conjunction with a primary sources based curriculum enhanced history learning. Students were involved in gaining information from community citizens. Outlines the procedures involved in the interviewing process and discusses the benefits to students including increased content acquisition, skills, and…

  4. Creating a Collaborative "Hot Clock": Using Smart Phones to Motivate Students' Learning in News Interviewing and Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang-Yi Flora

    2016-01-01

    This unit activity is integrated into the chapters on radio of the appropriate course--Survey of Mass Media, Broadcast Journalism, News Writing, Media Programing, or Communication Technology. Employing the concept of a "hot-clock radio format," the purpose of this unit activity is to motivate students' collaborative learning in news…

  5. Performance Feedback to Support Instruction with Speech-Language Pathology Students on a Family-Centered Interview Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer A.; Woods, Juliann J.

    2011-01-01

    Gaining knowledge and skills in the practice of family-centered assessment procedures is an important component of the preservice education for early intervention providers. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of systematic instruction on speech-language pathology (SLP) practicum students' implementation of family-centered…

  6. Exploring Newly Introduced Methods for Testing MDIs with Add-On Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark Copley

    2014-01-01

      In an interview, Mark Copley, sales director of Copley Scientific, provides expert insight on why add-on devices are used, how these devices impact drug delivery with a pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI...

  7. Religion, assessment and the problem of 'normative uncertainty' for mental health student nurses: a critical incident-informed qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, A M; Baker, C; Cross, S

    2015-10-01

    There is limited research around how mental health (MH) student nurses interpret and differentiate between people's religious and cultural beliefs and the existence of psychopathological symptomatology and experiences. Here we focus on one cultural issue that arose from research exploring how MH student nurses approach and interpret religion and culture in their practice - that is, the difficulties in determining the clinical significance of the religious beliefs and experiences expressed by the people they care for. While problems with establishing the cultural boundaries of normality in clinical assessments are an important area of debate in cultural psychiatry, it remains a peripheral issue in MH nurse education. An anthropologically informed qualitative research design underpinned 'critical incident' (CI)-focused ethnographic interviews with 36 second and third-year MH nursing field students and seven undergraduate MH branch lecturers. Follow up focus groups were also carried out. Interview transcripts were subject to thematic analysis. Four subthemes were identified under the broad theme of the clinical significance of religious-type expression and experience: (1) identifying the difference between delusions and religious belief; (2) identifying whether an experience was hallucination or religious experience; (3) the clinical implications of such challenges; and (4) applying religion-specific knowledge. There are clinical implications that may result from the difficulties with assessing the clinical significance of religious beliefs and experiences, identified in both our research and within international cultural psychiatry literature and research. Misinterpretation and therefore wrongly assessing someone's experience as pathological is a significant concern. It is suggested that CI analysis could be adapted to help nurses, nursing students and nurse educators recognize the religious dimensions of mental distress, particularly those that then potentially

  8. 76 FR 47240 - ``Add Us In'' Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... historically excluded communities, to employ youth and adults with disabilities. Add Us In aims to achieve... of Disability Employment Policy ``Add Us In'' Initiative AGENCY: Office of Disability Employment... ranging from $500,000 to $550,000. The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop...

  9. Peer Effects and Human Capital Accumulation: the Externalities of ADD

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Aizer

    2008-01-01

    Recent work shows that peers affect student achievement, but the mechanisms are not well understood. I show that peer behavior is an important mechanism, perhaps more so than ability, by exploiting exogenous timing in diagnosis/treatment of ADD among peers that improves peer behavior while holding peer achievement constant. Improvements in peer behavior increase student achievement. Moreover, resources mitigate the negative effects of peer behavior. These findings imply that the optimal respo...

  10. Current Events. Interview: Nuyorican Dreamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainburn, Samantha

    2000-01-01

    Interviews Robert Torres, a Nuyorican who excelled at school and escaped the ghetto while his family remained, then made a documentary about the situation. This interview examines how poverty affects children; how teachers can help impoverished Hispanic students; how teachers helped him; how educators should be compensated; what making the…

  11. The fairness, predictive validity and acceptability of multiple mini interview in an internationally diverse student population--a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maureen E; Dowell, Jon; Husbands, Adrian; Newell, John; O'Flynn, Siun; Kropmans, Thomas; Dunne, Fidelma P; Murphy, Andrew W

    2014-12-21

    International medical students, those attending medical school outside of their country of citizenship, account for a growing proportion of medical undergraduates worldwide. This study aimed to establish the fairness, predictive validity and acceptability of Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) in an internationally diverse student population. This was an explanatory sequential, mixed methods study. All students in First Year Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway 2012 were eligible to sit a previously validated 10 station MMI. Quantitative data comprised: demographics, selection tool scores and First Year Assessment scores. Qualitative data comprised separate focus groups with MMI Assessors, EU and Non-EU students. 109 students participated (45% of class). Of this 41.3% (n = 45) were Non-EU and 35.8% (n = 39) did not have English as first language. Age, gender and socioeconomic class did not impact on MMI scores. Non-EU students and those for whom English was not a first language achieved significantly lower scores on MMI than their EU and English speaking counterparts (difference in mean 11.9% and 12.2% respectively, PIELTS) (r = 0.5, PIELTS (r = 0.44; p = 0.006; n = 38) and EU school exit exam (r = 0.52; p<0.001; n = 56). MMI predicted EU student OSCE performance (r = 0.27; p = 0.03; n = 64). In the analysis of focus group data two overarching themes emerged: Authenticity and Cultural Awareness. MMI was considered a highly authentic assessment that offered a deeper understanding of the applicant than traditional tools, with an immediate relevance to clinical practice. Cultural specificity of some stations and English language proficiency were seen to disadvantage international students. Recommendations included cultural awareness training for MMI assessors, designing and piloting culturally neutral stations, lengthening station duration and providing high quality advance information to candidates. MMI is a welcome addition to assessment armamentarium for

  12. The effect of video interviews with STEM professionals on STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest of middle school students in conservative Protestant Christian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsup, Philip R.

    Inspiring learners toward career options available in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is important not only for economic development but also for maintaining creative thinking and innovation. Limited amounts of research in STEM education have focused on the population of students enrolled in religious and parochial schools, and given the historic conflict between religion and science, this sector of American education is worthy of examination. The purpose of this quantitative study is to extend Gottfredson's (1981) Theory of Circumscription and Compromise as it relates to occupational aspirations. Bem's (1981) Gender Schema Theory is examined as it relates to the role of gender in career expectations, and Crenshaw's (1989) Intersectionality Theory is included as it pertains to religion as a group identifier. Six professionals in STEM career fields were video recorded while being interviewed about their skills and education as well as positive and negative aspects of their jobs. The interviews were compiled into a 25-minute video for the purpose of increasing understanding of STEM careers among middle school viewers. The research questions asked whether middle school students from conservative, Protestant Christian schools in a Midwest region increased in STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest as a result of viewing the video and whether gender interacted with exposure to the video. A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control groups, pretest/posttest factorial design was employed to evaluate data collected from the STEM Semantic Survey. A Two-Way ANCOVA revealed no significant differences in dependent variables from pretest to posttest. Implications of the findings are examined and recommendations for future research are made. Descriptors: STEM career interest, STEM attitude, STEM gender disparity, Occupational aspirations, Conservative Protestant education.

  13. Impact of Repeated Questioning on Interviewers: Learning From a Forensic Interview Training Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Jacquelynn F; Cheung, Monit

    2016-01-01

    Forensic interviewers have a difficult job with high risk for career burnout and secondary trauma. Few studies have addressed how new forensic interviewers or trainees experience repeated questioning and multiple interviews. This study simulated the process of training new forensic interviewers through the creation of two interview videos in which social work graduate students participated as actors portraying the roles of interviewer and child. These films served as instructional aids preparing graduate social work students for professional child welfare roles while promoting research-based approaches to interviewing children about sexual abuse allegations. Qualitative data from two cohorts of student actors were collected to analyze interviewers' perspectives on repeated questioning and interviews in child sexual abuse cases. Two themes were extracted from the subjects' experiences: "It is emotionally taxing" and "Navigating the interviewer role is unexpectedly complex." Exposure to repeated questions and multiple interviews affected the performance and confidence of the interviewers.

  14. Firefox add-ons for medical reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2010-07-01

    Firefox is a Web browser created by the Mozilla project, an open-source software group. Features of the browser include automated updates, advanced security and standards compliance, and the ability to add functionality through add-ons and extensions. First introduced in 2004, Firefox now accounts for roughly 30% of the browser market. This article will focus primarily on add-ons and extensions available for the browser that are useful to medical researchers.

  15. Medicating for ADD/ADHD: Personal and Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer L.; Pestello, Frances G.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty college students from a private Midwestern university were interviewed about their past and present experiences with taking medication for Attention Deficit Disorder. Analysis of respondent interviews suggested the following themes that were discussed and analyzed: recruitment of the young, little personal stigma, societal issues, side…

  16. Staff and students' perceptions and experiences of teaching and assessment in Clinical Skills Laboratories: interview findings from a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Catherine E; Casey, Dympna; Shaw, David; Murphy, Kathy

    2012-08-01

    The Clinical Skills Laboratory has become an essential structure in nurse education and several benefits of its use have been identified. However, the literature identifies the need to examine the transferability of skills learned there into the reality of practice. This research explored the role of the Clinical Skills Laboratory in preparing nursing students for the real world of practice. This paper focuses specifically on the perceptions of the teaching and assessment strategies employed there. Qualitative multiple case study design. Five case study sites. Interviewees (n=58) included academic staff, clinical staff and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews. The Clinical Skills Laboratory can provide a pathway to practice and its authenticity is significant. Teaching strategies need to incorporate communication as well as psychomotor skills. Including audio-visual recording into assessment strategies is beneficial. Effective relationships between education institutions and clinical settings are needed to enhance the transferability of the skills learned. The Clinical Skills Laboratory should provide an authentic learning environment, with the appropriate use of teaching strategies. It is crucial that effective links between educators and clinical staff are established and maintained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of Aggression and Defiance in Children with ADD/ADHD Tendencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janella

    2011-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) appear to have become more prevalent in the past few years. Many children who display ADD/ADHD tendencies also display behaviors which cause problems in a classroom setting. Considering the fact that these behaviors could be displayed by the student population as…

  18. 75 FR 45164 - ``Add Us In'' Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... of the Assistant Secretary for Office of Disability Employment Policy ``Add Us In'' Program AGENCY... from $500,000 to $625,000. The objectives of this new initiative, Add Us In, are: (1) To increase the ability of targeted businesses to employ adults and youth with disabilities; (2) to develop and evaluate...

  19. Inviting Calm Within: ADD, Neurology, and Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, Phillip S.; Tanase, Madalina

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM IV") describes ADD as behaviorally observed impairments in attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Officially known as AD/HD, we use ADD here because we are dealing primarily with attention, organizational, and impulsivity issues. A more…

  20. Conceptual Dynamics in Clinical Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Bruce; Lee, Victor R.; Krakowski, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    One of the main tools that we have for the study of student science conceptions is the clinical interview. Research on student understanding of natural phenomena has tended to understand interviews as tools for reading out a student's knowledge. In this paper, we argue for a shift in how we think about and analyze interview data. In particular, we argue that we must be aware that the interview itself is a dynamic process during which a sort of conceptual change occurs. We refer to these short time-scale changes that occur over a few minutes in an interview as conceptual dynamics. Our goal is to devise new frameworks and techniques for capturing the conceptual dynamics. To this end, we have devised a simple and neutral cognitive framework. In this paper, we describe this framework, and we show how it can be applied to understand interview data. We hope to show that the conceptual dynamics of interviews are complex, but that it nonetheless feasible to make them a focus of study.

  1. Modified personal interviews: resurrecting reliable personal interviews for admissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan Mahan; Woods, Nicole N; Fechtig, Lindsey; Anderson, Geoff

    2012-10-01

    Traditional admissions personal interviews provide flexible faculty-student interactions but are plagued by low inter-interview reliability. Axelson and Kreiter (2009) retrospectively showed that multiple independent sampling (MIS) may improve reliability of personal interviews; thus, the authors incorporated MIS into the admissions process for medical students applying to the University of Toronto's Leadership Education and Development Program (LEAD). They examined the reliability and resource demands of this modified personal interview (MPI) format. In 2010-2011, LEAD candidates submitted written applications, which were used to screen for participation in the MPI process. Selected candidates completed four brief (10-12 minutes) independent MPIs each with a different interviewer. The authors blueprinted MPI questions to (i.e., aligned them with) leadership attributes, and interviewers assessed candidates' eligibility on a five-point Likert-type scale. The authors analyzed inter-interview reliability using the generalizability theory. Sixteen candidates submitted applications; 10 proceeded to the MPI stage. Reliability of the written application components was 0.75. The MPI process had overall inter-interview reliability of 0.79. Correlation between the written application and MPI scores was 0.49. A decision study showed acceptable reliability of 0.74 with only three MPIs scored using one global rating. Furthermore, a traditional admissions interview format would take 66% more time than the MPI format. The MPI format, used during the LEAD admissions process, achieved high reliability with minimal faculty resources. The MPI format's reliability and effective resource use were possible through MIS and employment of expert interviewers. MPIs may be useful for other admissions tasks.

  2. International Students' Perceptions of Race and Socio-Economic Status in an American Higher Education Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Zachary S.

    2016-01-01

    International students add a great deal of cultural and intellectual diversity to college campuses, but they also bring racial stereotypes and socio-economic status hierarchies that can affect campus climate. Forty-seven interviews with Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean international students were conducted. Results indicated that a majority of…

  3. The Reference Interview: Some Intercultural Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R. Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the significance of the reference interview and the need for better communication between Black students and White librarians. Sensitivity and understanding of Black behaviors are recommended as ways of building trust between librarians and students. (52 references) (MES)

  4. Southeast Economic Add-on 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To collect data on an angler's last trip for revealed preference models and economic valuation purposes. Typically done as an add-on to the MRIP intercept survey and...

  5. Southeast Economic Add-on 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To collect data on an angler's last trip for revealed preference models and economic valuation purposes. Typically done as an add-on to the MRIP intercept survey and...

  6. Southeast Economic Add-on 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To collect data on an angler's last trip for revealed preference models and economic valuation purposes. Typically done as an add-on to the MRIP intercept survey and...

  7. Southeast Economic Add-on 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To collect data on an angler's last trip for revealed preference models and economic valuation purposes. Typically done as an add-on to the MRIP intercept survey and...

  8. Weighing Portions Adds Up to Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_167159.html Weighing Portions Adds Up to Weight Loss Put an end to guesstimating calories with simple ... control is a must when you want to lose weight. "Guesstimating" the size of a chicken breast at ...

  9. Add Audio and Video to Your Site

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Nothing spices up websites like cool sound effects (think ker-thunk as visitors press a button) or embedded videos. Think you need a programmer to add sizzle to your site? Think again. This hands-on guide gives you the techniques you need to add video, music, animated GIFs, and sound effects to your site. This Mini Missing Manual is excerpted from Creating a Web Site: The Missing Manual.

  10. Child and Interviewer Race in Forensic Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Amy K; Mackey, Tomiko D; Langendoen, Carol; Barnard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of child race and interviewer race on forensic interviewing outcomes. The results of the regression analysis indicated that child race and interviewer race had a significant effect on interview outcome category (no findings, inconclusive, or findings consistent with sexual abuse). Furthermore, the results indicate that the interaction of child and interviewer race had predictive value for rates of findings consistent with sexual abuse but not in the direction predicted. Cross-race dyads had significantly higher rates of interview outcomes consistent with sexual abuse. These findings suggest that more research into the effect of race on disclosure of child sexual abuse is needed.

  11. The physics interviewing project: a tour of interviews in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, E; Scadron, M

    1978-06-02

    The Physics Interviewing Project assists graduate physics departments in evaluating foreign applicants. Supported by some 20 universities, two interviewers, both working scientists, travel abroad and interview students individually for about 1 hour each. Prospective teaching assistants are rated on physics knowledge, problem-solving ability, and English language proficiency. Ratings on all interviewees are sent to all supporting schools and other schools as requested. The Project aids able students from countries that have no physics Ph.D. programs (Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand) to obtain assistantships and Ph.D.'s abroad, assists in the technological development of those countries, and helps U.S. schools in selecting the most promising foreign candidates. A similar program should be beneficial in other sciences.

  12. Applying Attribution Theory to Teaching of Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunig, Larissa A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how to teach interviewing to journalism students. Advocates a course informed by attribution theory, based on a creative, dialogical definition of the interview. Suggests using tape recorders or videotapes to help students objectively evaluate their own and others' performances. (SR)

  13. Psychotherapy as Stochastic Process: Fitting a Markov Chain Model to Interviews of Ellis and Rogers. University of Minnesota Office of Student Affairs Research Bulletin, Vol. 15, No. 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Hummel, Thomas J.

    This investigation tested the hypothesis that the probabilistic structure underlying psychotherapy interviews is Markovian. The "goodness of fit" of a first-order Markov chain model to actual therapy interviews was assessed using a x squared test of homogeneity, and by generating by Monte Carlo methods empirical sampling distributions of…

  14. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Keyu [THz Technical Research Center of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518067 (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Photonic Information Technology, Shenzhen 518067 (China); College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518067 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Xiao, Jun-Jun [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Yin, Xiaobo, E-mail: Xiaobo.Yin@Colorado.Edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  15. Interview with Peter Jenni

    CERN Document Server

    PH Newsletter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Jenni, former spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration, discusses the challenges and satisfactions from his long-standing career in high-energy physics in this month’s PH Newsletter.   Peter Jenni. Following a long career at CERN that dates back to 1970 (ranging from Summer Student to Fellow and to Staff), Peter Jenni recently retired after about 40 years marked by exciting discoveries (from the first two-photon production of eta-prime at SPEAR to the Higgs boson at the LHC). Peter was involved in the LHC from its very beginnings and was spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration until February 2009. Peter Jenni will continue working with ATLAS as a guest scientist with the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, and when he's not travelling he still spends most of his time in his office in Building 40, where he met with interviewer Panos Charitos. Panos Charitos: When did you first arrive to CERN? Peter Jenni: I first came to CERN as a Summer Student in ...

  16. Aspartame, Behavior, and Cognition in ADD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1994-01-01

    The effects of aspartame (34 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks) on the cognition, behavior, and monoamine metabolism of 15 children with a history of ADD were evaluated at the Yale University School of Medicine, using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study design.

  17. 76 FR 49508 - ``Add Us In'' Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Disability Employment Program ``Add Us In'' Initiative AGENCY: Office of Disability Employment Policy, Department of Labor. ACTION: Correction to the Funding Opportunity Number and Closing Date...

  18. Sense made common: how to add value to early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Sarah

    2014-02-01

      Authentic early experiences (AEEs) have become commonplace in medical curricula. There is a wealth of evidence that students enjoy these experiences, despite significant diversity in context, content and intended purpose between different medical schools. Positive evaluations have rarely explained how or why particular outcomes are achieved, or if unpredicted consequences occurred. AEE is a form of experiential learning, but experience alone is not sufficient for useful learning. Students need support to maximise the potential learning from AEE and minimise undesirable consequences.   This article makes practical suggestions for clinical teachers to add value to AEE. It is based on research that used multiple qualitative methods to further understand AEE. The research sought to address two questions: (1) how and why do students construct useful knowledge and meaning-making from AEE; and (2) how and why do students make AEE work for them? The author draws on her perspective and experience as a practising clinician and clinical teacher to interpret and practically apply research findings.   Clinical teachers can add value to AEE through both actions in the workplace and interactions with their local medical school(s). Suggestions are made to: actively manage expectations; deliberately create legitimacy; proactively manage risk; constructively discuss differences; model connectedness; and develop a consensus understanding of what is 'allowed'.   All of these suggestions are about 'making sense common'. Clinical teachers are encouraged to use questions accompanying the main text to make a self-assessment of their current practice and consider potential changes to provide additional value for students during AEE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The interview in the admission process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Johnson, E K; Molidor, J B

    1990-03-01

    Significant demographic, legal, and educational developments during the last ten years have led medical schools to review critically their selection procedures. A critical component of this review is the selection interview, since it is an integral part of most admission processes; however, some question its value. Interviews serve four purposes: information gathering, decision making, verification of application data, and recruitment. The first and last of these merit special attention. The interview enables an admission committee to gather information about a candidate that would be difficult or impossible to obtain by any other means yet is readily evaluated in an interview. Given the recent decline in numbers of applicants to and interest in medical school, many schools are paying closer attention to the interview as a powerful recruiting tool. Interviews can be unstructured, semistructured, or structured. Structuring involves analyzing what makes a medical student successful, standardizing the questions for all applicants, providing sample answers for evaluating responses, and using panel interviews (several interviewers simultaneously with one applicant). Reliability and validity of results increase with the degree of structuring. Studies of interviewers show that they are often biased in terms of the rating tendencies (for instance, leniency or severity) and in terms of an applicant's sex, race, appearance, similarity to the interviewer, and contrast to other applicants). Training interviewers may reduce such bias. Admission committees should weigh the purposes of interviewing differently for various types of candidates, develop structured or semistructured interviews focusing on nonacademic criteria, and train the interviewers.

  20. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  1. Equity in interviews: do personal characteristics impact on admission interview scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Andrew B; Homer, Matthew; Miller, Amy

    2010-11-01

    Research indicates that some social groups are disadvantaged by medical school selection systems. The stage(s) of a selection process at which this occurs is unknown, but at interview, when applicant and interviewer are face-to-face, there is potential for social bias to occur. We performed a detailed audit of the interview process for a single-entry year to a large UK medical school. Our audit included investigating the personal characteristics of both interviewees and interviewers to find out whether any of these factors, including the degree of social matching between individual pairs of interviewees and interviewers, influenced the interview scores awarded. A total of 320 interviewers interviewed 734 applicants, providing complete data for 2007 interviewer-interviewee interactions. The reliability of the interview process was estimated using generalisability theory at 0.82-0.87. For both interviewers and interviewees, gender, ethnic background, socio-economic group and type of school attended had no influence on the interview scores awarded or achieved. Staff and student interviewer marks did not differ significantly. Although numbers in each group of staff interviewers were too small for formal statistical analysis, there were no obvious differences in marks awarded between different medical specialties or between interviewers with varying amounts of interviewing experience. Our data provide reassurance that the interview does not seem to be the stage of selection at which some social groups are disadvantaged. These results support the continued involvement of senior medical students in the interview process. Despite the lack of evidence that an interview is useful for predicting future academic or clinical success, most medical schools continue to use interviews as a fundamental component of their selection process. Our study has shown that at least this arguably misplaced reliance upon interviewing is not introducing further social bias into the selection

  2. Effects of Low- Versus High-Fidelity Simulations on the Cognitive Burden and Performance of Entry-Level Paramedicine Students: A Mixed-Methods Comparison Trial Using Eye-Tracking, Continuous Heart Rate, Difficulty Rating Scales, Video Observation and Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brennen W; Carter, Owen B-J; Rudd, Cobie J; Claxton, Louise A; Ross, Nathan P; Strobel, Natalie A

    2016-02-01

    High-fidelity simulation-based training is often avoided for early-stage students because of the assumption that while practicing newly learned skills, they are ill suited to processing multiple demands, which can lead to "cognitive overload" and poorer learning outcomes. We tested this assumption using a mixed-methods experimental design manipulating psychological immersion. Thirty-nine randomly assigned first-year paramedicine students completed low- or high-environmental fidelity simulations [low-environmental fidelity simulations (LF(en)S) vs. high-environmental fidelity simulation (HF(en)S)] involving a manikin with obstructed airway (SimMan3G). Psychological immersion and cognitive burden were determined via continuous heart rate, eye tracking, self-report questionnaire (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index), independent observation, and postsimulation interviews. Performance was assessed by successful location of obstruction and time-to-termination. Eye tracking confirmed that students attended to multiple, concurrent stimuli in HF(en)S and interviews consistently suggested that they experienced greater psychological immersion and cognitive burden than their LF(en)S counterparts. This was confirmed by significantly higher mean heart rate (P students who ultimately revived the patient (58% vs. 30%, P students did so significantly more quickly (P students had low immersion resulting in greater assessment anxiety. High-environmental fidelity simulation engendered immersion and a sense of urgency in students, whereas LF(en)S created assessment anxiety and slower performance. We conclude that once early-stage students have learned the basics of a clinical skill, throwing them in the "deep end" of high-fidelity simulation creates significant additional cognitive burden but this has considerable educational merit.

  3. Interview with Lenny Kaye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Garrigós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lenny Kaye has been Patti Smith’s long term guitarist, friend and collaborator, ever since they first began together in the early 1970s. He grew up between New York and New Jersey, graduating in American History from Rutgers University, where he later taught a course in the Department of American Studies on the History of American Rock, which became famous because of the large number of students who wanted to enroll in it. A very prolific writer and musician, he has produced an important number of records, as well as collaborated with numerous music magazines. He is the author of two books, Waylon Jennings: An Autobiography (1996 and You Call it Madness, The Sensuous Song of the Croon (2004. Nuggets (1972, his anthology of 60s garage music, is famous for defining the genre. This interview took place when he was visiting Spain in November 2012 with the Patti Smith Group. In it, we discussed the New York scene of the 70s, music, literature, drugs, politics, and many other things.

  4. Interview as intraviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kit Stender

    2014-01-01

    do not merely refer to passive entities but must be understood as matter that matters. To illustrate my points I will analyse how bringing a puppet with me to interviews with 4-6 year old children seemed to interfere with the interview situation creating unforeseen diversions in ways that influenced......In this article I will illustrate how our understanding of the interview situation changes when we rethink it with some of the concepts from Karen Barad’s notion of agential realism. With concepts such as ‘apparatuses’, ‘phenomena‘, ‘intra-action’ and ‘material-discursive’ (Barad, 2007) it becomes...... possible to focus more extensively on how matter matters in the interview situation. Re-thinking the interview as an intraview1, I argue that Barad’s concepts will enhance our awareness not only of how the researcher affects the interview but also of how certain kinds of materiality in interview situations...

  5. Coding interview questions concepts, problems, interview questions

    CERN Document Server

    Karumanchi, Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Peeling Data Structures and Algorithms: * Programming puzzles for interviews * Campus Preparation * Degree/Masters Course Preparation * Instructor’s * GATE Preparation * Big job hunters: Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Flip Kart, Adobe, IBM Labs, Citrix, Mentor Graphics, NetApp, Oracle, Webaroo, De-Shaw, Success Factors, Face book, McAfee and many more * Reference Manual for working people

  6. Entrevistas com profissionais como atividade de ensino-aprendizagem desejável na formação do psicólogo Interviewing professionals as a desirable teaching-learning activity for psychology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldir Bettoi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi o de refletir sobre possíveis interações de atividades de ensino-aprendizagem, especialmente entrevistas feitas com psicólogos sobre sua profissão, com concepções de alunos sobre sua futura profissão de psicólogo(a. Foram analisados questionários, respondidos pelos alunos no início e no final de seu contato com a disciplina, transcrições de entrevistas com psicólogos realizadas pelos alunos e comentários escritos que eles fizeram sobre as entrevistas. Procurou-se, a partir daí, delinear possíveis contribuições das entrevistas na construção de imagens dos alunos sobre a profissão. A análise do conjunto de informações indica que as entrevistas e a reflexão orientada sobre elas podem contribuir para a construção de uma imagem do psicólogo mais próxima de alguém que realiza ações profissionais significativas, ao mesmo tempo que propiciam aos alunos acesso a informações sobre possibilidades de atuação antes desconhecidas, constituindo-se em atividade relevante em sua formação.This investigation led to reflections about the possible interactions of some teaching - learning activities (in particular, the student's activity of interviewing professionals working in different areas of application with students' conceptions about their future profession as Psychologists. The analysis was based on questionnaires answered by the students at the beginning and at the end of the course, transcriptions of the interviews they made and their written comments on these interviews. An outline of the possible contributions of the interviews to the students' constructing of images about profession is presented. The interviews possibly contributed to the constructing of a conception about a professional, revealed at the end of the course, in which he/she is seen as someone who leads significant professional actions; they may also bring to the students a varied set of information regarding new

  7. The Diagnostic/Therapeutic Preabortion Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekelheide, Priscilla Day

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic aspect of the preabortion interview are discussed with attention to specifics that will identify students with the greatest likelihood for psychological problems and/or repeat abortions. (JD)

  8. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Sibling Pairs Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Haberstick, Brett C.; Smolen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the design and phenotype and genotype data available for sibling pairs with varying genetic relatedness in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Add Health is a nationally-representative longitudinal study of over 20,000 adolescents in the U.S. in 1994-95 who have been followed for fifteen years into adulthood. The Add Health design included oversamples of more than 3,000 pairs of individuals with varying genetic resemblance, ranging from monozygotic twins, dizygotic twins, full siblings, half siblings, and unrelated siblings who were raised in the same household. Add Health sibling pairs are therefore nationally representative and followed longitudinally from early adolescence into adulthood with 4 in-home interviews during the period 1994-2009. Add Health has collected rich longitudinal social, behavioral, environmental, and biological data, as well as buccal cell DNA from all sample members, including siblings pairs. Add Health has an enlightened dissemination policy and to date has released phenotype and genotype data to more than 10,000 researchers in the scientific community. PMID:23231780

  9. Making and Breaking Stereotypes: East Asian International Students' Experiences with Cross-Cultural/Racial Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Zachary

    2013-01-01

    In response to recent budget cuts and declining revenue streams, American colleges and universities are admitting larger numbers of international students. These students add a great deal of cultural and intellectual diversity to college campuses, but they also bring racial stereotypes that can affect cross-racial interaction as well as campus climate. Forty-seven interviews with Chinese, Japanese, and Korean graduate and undergraduate international students were conducted at the University o...

  10. An Interview Method for Teaching Adolescent Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching adolescent psychology which requires that students interview adolescents on course topics. The reports of these interviews become the basis of classroom discussions which are designed to demonstrate that concepts of adolescence vary as a function of time. (Author/DH)

  11. Learning motivational interviewing: scripting a virtual patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaume, William A; Berger, Bruce A; Barker, Bradford N

    2006-04-15

    This article describes a written assignment for a first-year professional communication course to facilitate the understanding and mastery of motivational interviewing in dealing with patient ambivalence and resistance. The goal was to immerse students in how motivational interviewing differs from traditional biomedical counseling with regard to phrasing individual responses to the patient and managing the flow of interaction. Students were required to write a script for a working prototype of the Auburn University Virtual Patient. The script had to specify the text for the virtual patient's comments, 2-5 possible responses for the student pharmacist to choose from, and multiple interactional paths representing motivational interviewing, biomedical counseling, and a mix of the 2. Student feedback and test results are reported. Qualitative analysis of written student feedback indicated that (1) the project took too much time because of the complexities of the computer procedures resulting from the Virtual Patient being a prototype, and (2) the computer procedures deflected attention from the critical thinking involved in writing the script. Quantitative item analysis of final examination results indicated that students scored an average one full-letter grade better on the questions about motivational interviewing than on the questions covering other topics. The scriptwriting assignment is a challenging exercise in assimilating the verbal skills necessary for using motivational interviewing in patient counseling. Many students exhibited greater interest in motivational interviewing, greater knowledge of why motivational interviewing is successful, greater facility with wording responses, and greater confidence in their ability to use motivational interviewing in the future. Because almost all students had negative reactions to the difficulty and time involved in making their scripts actually work with the virtual patient prototype, future assignments should delete

  12. Interview of Terry Doyle

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions

    2012-01-01

    An Interview with Terry Doyle, Director of Corporate Development, Nokia. This is part of a series of interviews organized by the SMS Interest Group of Strategy Practice, as part of the preparation for the 2013 SMS Special conference at Lake Geneva which is co-sponsored by ATLAS/CERN. For more information: http://geneva.strategicmanagement.net The purpose of the interviews is to provide input for academics, business practitioners and consultants about fundamental questions of strategy in enterprises.

  13. Det kvalitative interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    Bogen begynder med en teoretisk funderet introduktion til det kvalitative interview gennem en skildring af de mange forskellige måder, hvorpå samtaler er blevet brugt til produktion af viden. Opmærksomheden henledes specielt på de komplementære positioner, der kendetegner det oplevelsesfokuserede...... interview (fænomenologiske positioner) og det sprogfokuserede interview (diskursorienterede positioner), som henholdsvis fokuserer på interviewsamtalen som rapporter (om interviewpersonens oplevelser) og redegørelser (foranlediget af interviewsituationen). De følgende kapitler omhandler forskellige måder...... forskningsresultater baseret på kvalitative interview....

  14. Creativity in ethnographic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    2014-01-01

    to describe their everyday work life. By employing a methodological framework focusing on reflexive processes, interviews became consensual interactions, and the content of the interviews turned out to be analyses, interpretations and meaning making, that is, knowledge production. Interpretation and meaning...

  15. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  16. Interview, observation og dokumentanalyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer.......Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer....

  17. Interview with Danny Kaplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Kaplan, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Danny Kaplan is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Macalester College. He received Macalester's Excellence in teaching Award in 2006 and the CAUSE/USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. This interview took place via email on March 4-June 17, 2017. Topics covered in the interview include: (1) the current state of…

  18. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  19. How do Innovation Intermediaries add Value?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Yen; Hsuan, Juliana; Mahnke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Innovation intermediaries are increasingly being used in practice, but there is little concrete theoretical guidance on when and how they add value to client's new product development (NPD) processes. This paper develops propositions on innovation intermediaries value-added based on a detailed case...... study of an innovation intermediary's relations to three major clients in the European apparel fashion industry. We identify key contingencies to an innovation intermediary's value added (e.g. NDP speed and complexity of involvement). We also suggest a framework that specifies when a combination of four...... types of specific intermediary capabilities (best-cost capabilities, timing-capabilities, market-response capabilities, and product solution capabilities) increases value added in clients' NDP processes....

  20. Philosophical Hermeneutic Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne K. Vandermause PhD, RN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes, exemplifies and discusses the use of the philosophical hermeneutic interview and its distinguishing characteristics. Excerpts of interviews from a philosophical hermeneutic study are used to show how this particular phenomenological tradition is applied to research inquiry. The purpose of the article is to lay out the foundational background for philosophical hermeneutics in a way that clarifies its unique approach to interviewing and its usefulness for advancing health care knowledge. Implications for health care research and practice are addressed.

  1. Computational Complexities of University Interview Timetabling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Naoyuki; Kiyonari, Yuuki; Miyano, Eiji; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Yamanaka, Katsuhisa

    This paper introduces a new timetabling problem on universities, called interview timetabling. In this problem, some constant number, say three, of referees are assigned to each of 2n graduate students. Our task is to construct a presentation timetable of these 2n students using n timeslots and two rooms, so that two students evaluated by the same referee must be assigned to different timeslots. The optimization goal is to minimize the total number of movements of all referees between two rooms. This problem comes from the real world in the interview timetabling in Kyoto University. We propose two restricted models of this problem, and investigate their time complexities.

  2. Accommodative response/stimulus by dynamic retinoscopy: near add guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, David A; Rana, Sania; Ramolia, Julie

    2012-10-01

    Monocular estimation method (MEM) dynamic retinoscopy and low neutral (LN) dynamic retinoscopy are common procedures for evaluating the need for near-point plus adds for improved near-point performance in non-presbyopes. A combination of MEM and LN has been suggested to be a method of plotting accommodative response/accommodative stimulus functions and evaluating guidelines for prescribing from MEM. Using a combined MEM-LN procedure, MEM was performed on 80 young adults at 40 cm, with distance correction and with plus adds in 0.25 D steps up to and including +2.00 D. Modified Thorington dissociated phorias were also performed with each of the plus adds. Subjects picked a preferred add, which subjectively made print easiest and most comfortable to read. The mean preferred add was +0.58 D over the distance prescription. The add derived from subtracting 0.25 D from the lag of accommodation with distance correction averaged 0.10 D more plus than the preferred add. The add at which dynamic retinoscopy showed a "with" motion of 0.25 D averaged 0.54 more plus than the preferred add. The add at which dynamic retinoscopy showed a "with" motion of 0.50 D averaged 0.16 more plus than the preferred add. Adds derived from subtracting 0.25 D from the lag with distance correction and from finding the add that yields 0.50 D of "with" motion compared favorably with the preferred adds on average, but the standard deviations of the differences were high. Those guidelines could be reasonable starting points for the prescription of near-point plus adds for non-presbyopes, but follow-up testing to confirm or adjust add power would be advisable in the clinical setting.

  3. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  4. Interview mit Hagen Keller

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmotti, Paola; Isabella, Giovanni; Tiziana LAZZARI; Varanini, Gian Maria

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this interview addresses the cultural, social and political milieu that shaped Hagen Keller’s education in Germany, the relations with both his mentor Gerd Tellenbach and the other scholars; the approach to prosopography to understand the power structures. Then the interview examines the Roman experience in the Sixties (a scientific and also human one); the book Adelsherrschaft und ständische Gesellschaft and the debate that has attracted; the relationship between local hist...

  5. Interview with Yakov Sinai

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Yakov Sinai is the recipient of the 2014 Abel Prize of the Norvegian Academy of Science and Letters. The interview was originally published in the September 2014 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society.......Yakov Sinai is the recipient of the 2014 Abel Prize of the Norvegian Academy of Science and Letters. The interview was originally published in the September 2014 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society....

  6. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  7. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  8. The relationship between interview-based schizotypal personality dimension scores and the continuous performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Jeffrey S; Kamath, Vidyulata; Compton, Michael T

    2009-03-01

    The existing research that has examined cognitive performance in samples with subclinical schizotypal personality features has been largely limited to psychometric self-report questionnaires, which may be biased by distorted self-awareness of symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between performance on a degraded-AX continuous performance test (CPT) and continuous dimension scores created from a structured clinical interview for schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), which reflected both the breadth and severity of schizotypal personality symptoms, in 52 undergraduate students. Only one participant met full diagnostic criteria for SPD. The overall dimension score from the SPD clinical interview showed a positive correlation with both omission (r(s)=.47) and false alarm (r(s)=.41) errors on the CPT. Interpersonal symptoms were positively correlated with omission errors (r(s)=.47), while Disorganized symptoms were positively correlated with false alarm errors (r(s)=.40). Results suggest that higher SPD interview-based dimension scores are associated with lower levels of performance on the CPT, even when examining a relatively subclinical sample of young adults. In contrast, scores from the psychometric Abbreviated Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire in the same sample did not correlate with accuracy measures on the CPT, suggesting that the interview-based measure of schizotypal personality may have a stronger relationship with CPT accuracy. Findings also add to a growing literature suggesting that Interpersonal SPD symptoms are primarily related to omission errors, while Disorganized SPD symptoms are primarily related to false alarm errors.

  9. Interview with Gavin Butt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina; Alexandra Sofie, Jönsson

    2008-01-01

    We have interviewed Gavin Butt about his research interest in the cross-field between performance and performativity in the visual arts: queer theory, queer cultures and their histories, post-second world war U.S. art, contemporary art and critical theory.......We have interviewed Gavin Butt about his research interest in the cross-field between performance and performativity in the visual arts: queer theory, queer cultures and their histories, post-second world war U.S. art, contemporary art and critical theory....

  10. More than add Women and Stir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Meldgaard; Leer, Jonatan

    2015-01-01

    Food studies and the study of food and gender have been particularly strong scholarly currents in the US. Here, anthropologist Carole Counihan was one of the first scholars to work with the food-gender intersection. Over the past four decades, she has continued to work with the area in an array o...... of different contexts. In this interview, Counihan describes how she has worked with the gendering of food culture. Along the way, she also offers her perspectives on working in changing academic environments and shares her suggestions for future areas of research....

  11. Twentyfourth Podcast - Interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Every wednesday the Doctoral School of Human Centred Informatics hosts a small research seminar, where PhD students and senior researchers can share and discuss their ongoing work. Today, we bring an interview from spring 2008. On February 27, Lars Holmgaard Christensen presented his paper "Homo ...... Performans - The Performative Turn". After the seminar, Thomas Ryberg and Anders Albrechtslund made an interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen which is avaliable as podcast....

  12. Optical quality differences between three multifocal intraocular lenses: bifocal low add, bifocal moderate add, and trifocal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid-Costa, David; Ruiz-Alcocer, Javier; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa; García-Lázaro, Santiago; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2013-11-01

    To compare the in vitro optical quality at different focal points of two new bifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) and one new trifocal IOL. The AcrySof ReSTOR SV25T0 (+2.5 diopter [D] add) and the AcrySof ReSTOR SN6AD1 (+3.0 D add) with two main foci (Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX) and the AT LISA tri 839MP with three main foci (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) were evaluated. The optical quality of the IOLs was measured with the PMTF optical bench (LAMBDA-X, Nivelles, Belgium). The optical quality of the IOLs was quantified by the modulation transfer function (MTF) at five different focal points (0.0, -1.5, -2.0, -2.5, and -3.0 D) and for 3.0- and 4.5-mm apertures. The through-focus MTF of the IOLs was also recorded. For the 0.0 D focal point, the AcrySof ReSTOR (+2.5 D add) obtained the highest MTF values for all apertures. For the -2.5 D focal point, the AcrySof ReSTOR (+3.0 D add) showed the highest MTF values for 3.0 mm. For the -3.0 D focal point at 3.0- and 4.5-mm aperture, the best values were obtained with the AcrySof ReSTOR (+3.0 D add) and the AT LISA, respectively. For the -1.5 D focal point, the trifocal IOL provided better values. For the -2.0 D focal point, all IOLs provided comparable results. The through-focus MTF curves showed three and two peaks for the trifocal and bifocal IOLs, respectively. The trifocal IOL provides a better optical quality at the -1.5 D focal point. However, the optical quality of the trifocal IOL significantly decreases compared to the bifocal IOLs at far distance and -2.5 D focal points. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Ethics of justice and ethics of care. Values and attitudes among midwifery students on adolescent sexuality and abortion in Vietnam and their implications for midwifery education: a survey by questionnaire and interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie; Van Tam, Vu; Nga, Nguyen Thu; Ransjo-Arvidson, Anna-Berit; Johansson, Annika

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent's sexuality and related reproductive health and rights problems are sensitive issues in Vietnam. Globalisation has had an impact on the lifestyles of young people, and rising numbers of abortion and STI/HIV risks among youth are posing major health concerns in the country. These problems need to be addressed. Midwives belong to a key category of health personnel in Vietnam, whose task it is to promote adolescents' sexual and reproductive health and prevent reproductive ill health. It is important to understand future midwives' perceptions and attitudes in order to improve their education and training programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate Vietnamese midwifery students' values and attitudes towards adolescent sexuality, abortion and contraception and their views on professional preparation. A quantitative survey including 235 midwifery students from four different secondary medical colleges in northern Vietnam was carried out in 2003. A qualitative study addressing similar questions was performed and 18 midwifery students were individually interviewed. Findings revealed a general disapproval of adolescent pre-marital sexual relations and abortion-'an ethics of justice'-but also an empathic attitude and willingness to support young women, who bear the consequences of unwanted pregnancies and social condemnation-'an ethics of care'. Gender-based imbalance in sexual relationships, limited knowledge about reproductive health issues among youth, and negative societal attitudes were concerns expressed by the students. The students saw their future tasks mainly related to childbearing and less to other reproductive health issues, such as abortion and prevention of STI/HIV. Midwifery education in Vietnam should encourage value-reflective thinking around gender inequality and ethical dilemmas, in order to prepare midwives to address adolescents' reproductive health needs.

  14. Interviewing media workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the use of Niklas Luhmann’s systems theoretical approach in order to analyse interviews conducted with media workers concerning their experiences of ethnic diversity in newsrooms. Applying systems theory means constructing the interview as a social system and seeing the “data” as observations produced by the observer and not as representations of a reality. The first part of the article describes the interview methodology and the second part provides examples, from the current study, of how systems theory can be applied in order to analyse interviews. Using a difference-theoretical approach means looking at the distinctions the informants make when talking about their experiences. These main guiding distinctions can be summarised as immigrant background/competence as well as advantage/competence. Using the guiding distinction of inclusion/exclusion when interpreting the interviewees’ statements, the interdependencies of mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in newsrooms related to ethnic background can be examined.

  15. Interviewing the moderator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2004-01-01

    There has been an upsurge of academic interest in using focus groups (FGs) as a main or stand-alone qualitative method. In this article, the authors introduce a recently developed ancillary method to FGs called interviewing the moderator. The method is employed immediately after an FG and consists...

  16. Interview without a subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2010-01-01

    for the accomplishment of interviews. The paper focuses on a discussion of theoretical and methodological considerations of design, approach and research strategy. These discussions are specified in relation to a project on gender and ethnicity in cultural encounters at Universities. In the paper, I introduce a research...

  17. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 9. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan. S Varadhan R Sujatha. Face to Face Volume 17 Issue 9 September 2012 pp 903-912. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/09/0903-0912 ...

  18. The Reference Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Geraldine B.

    1972-01-01

    Good reference librarians need to be good interviewers. Unfortunately most librarians have not learned to use the technique of open questions to obtain information about the user and what he is looking for. Examples of open and closed questions with typical responses are given. (4 references) (DH)

  19. Interview with Pierre Deligne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pierre Deligne is the recipient of the 2013 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. This interview was conducted in May 2013 in conjunction with the Abel Prize celebration. The article originally appeared in the September 2013 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical...

  20. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  1. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  2. Interview with Dennis Pearl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Pearl, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Dennis Pearl is Professor of Statistics at Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education (CAUSE). He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. This interview took place via email on November 18-29, 2016, and provides Dennis Pearl's background story, which describes…

  3. Het cultureel interview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martine Lammertink; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    In Nurse Academy verscheen het volgende artikel met Martine Lammertink van PsyQ / Parnassia Groep als eerste auteur:Lammertink, M. & van Meijel, B. (2014). Het cultureel interview. Nurse Academy GGZ, 3, 32 - 35. Ook Robert Meijburg, opleider Parnassia Groep, en Diana Polhuis, Hoofdopleider GGZ-VS,

  4. The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adult with Developmental Disability (PAS-ADD) Checklist: Reliability and Validity of French Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, F.; Carminati, G. Galli

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lack of psychometric measures of psychopathology especially in intellectual disabilities (ID) population was addressed by creation of the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adult with Developmental Disability (PAS-ADD-10) in Moss et?al. This schedule is a structured interview designed for professionals in psychopathology. The…

  5. Adding Value to the Health Care System: Identifying Value-Added Systems Roles for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Graaf, Deanna; Johannes, Bobbie; Blatt, Barbara; Wolpaw, Daniel R

    To catalyze learning in Health Systems Science and add value to health systems, education programs are seeking to incorporate students into systems roles, which are not well described. The authors sought to identify authentic roles for students within a range of clinical sites and explore site leaders' perceptions of the value of students performing these roles. From 2013 to 2015, site visits and interviews with leadership from an array of clinical sites (n = 30) were conducted. Thematic analysis was used to identify tasks and benefits of integrating students into interprofessional care teams. Types of systems roles included direct patient benefit activities, including monitoring patient progress with care plans and facilitating access to resources, and clinic benefit activities, including facilitating coordination and improving clinical processes. Perceived benefits included improved value of the clinical mission and enhanced student education. These results elucidate a framework for student roles that enhance learning and add value to health systems.

  6. I Know How to Add Them, I Didn't Know I Had to Add Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhagroo, Jyoti R.

    2015-01-01

    Ten non-English speaking immigrant students shared their lived experiences in their secondary school mathematics classrooms in New Zealand. Through the voices of these students some understandings of the challenges they experienced as second language learners are brought to the fore. The students' perspectives of the language-related challenges…

  7. Amalia Ballarino s interview

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Interview to Amalia Ballarino (CERN, TE) on the development of new electric power cables based on the superconducting material magnesium diboride (MgB2) for the Hi-Lumi LHC and for the transport of electricity from clean power plants . The development was carried out in collaboration with a team led by prof. Carlo Rubbia at the IASS (Institute for Advanced Sustainable Studies), Potsdam, Germany.

  8. Interview with Steve Mellema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Conducted by Ken; Membrey, Jill

    2000-11-01

    Dr Steven H Mellema is Associate Professor and Chair of Physics at Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, Minnesota, USA. He has been on the International Advisory Panel for Physics Education since 1997 and earlier this year he joined the journal's Editorial Board for its Spring meeting in London. He subsequently agreed to undergo a `People in physics' interview and the result of this is set out below.

  9. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  10. Use of Admissions Interview Comments to Predict Clinical Clerkship Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Helen Hicks; Dunlap, Margaret Reed

    The use of admission interview comments to predict clinical clerkship success of medical students was evaluated. Narrative comments made by admissions interviewers regarding an applicant's skills and attitudes were coded, as were narrative evaluations of these students during year III of required clerkships in pediatrics and internal medicine in…

  11. The Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scale: Its Applicability and Adaptability for the Evaluation of Pre-Search Reference Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    This paper discusses the applicability and adaptability for evaluating reference interviews in library science of the Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scale (ACIRS), a process-oriented scale originally developed in 1976 at the Arizona College of Medicine to evaluate the interview performance of medical students. The analysis surveys the content…

  12. New Perspectives From Unstructured Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1980s, Ray Pahl, a sociologist at the University of Kent, and PhD student Claire Wallace conducted interviews examining young people’s experiences of growing up, work, and unemployment on the Isle of Sheppey; these interviews are now deposited at the University of Essex, and this article examines how historians and others might reuse them to interrogate other subjects. The article examines one working-class young woman’s ideas about gender and sexuality in the early 1980s, using the Listening Guide method developed by psychologist Carol Gilligan to probe the individual subjectivity and emotion, as well as the cultural discourses at play in this interview. The interviewee was a young woman who was involved in a culture of casual sex with men “on the ships,” and the article focuses on how she saw the exchanges of money, drink, and gifts between them and herself, and how she avoided seeing her actions as “prostitution.” The analysis shows how in a particular locality in the early 1980s, a particular subculture could allow some young women to sidestep the dominant codes governing young, working-class women’s sexuality and go “on the ships” without seeing this as marking them as “prostitutes”’ or any related category. Thus, the article troubles the ontology of “prostitution” as a category. It also suggests how we can use a single individual’s narrative to offer a broader account of cultures or subcultures, by starting with the individual and examining how one subjectivity navigated and interacted with broader cultural discourses. Finally, this article also offers suggestions about some of the methodological and ethical issues with reusing archived sociological data but argues that it holds rich possibilities.

  13. Interview: Joseph Agassi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Agassi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Agassi is an Israeli scholar born in Jerusalem on May 7, 1927. He has many books and articles published contributing to the fields of logic, scientific method, foundations of sciences, epistemology and, most importantly for this Journal, in the historiography of science. He studied with Karl Popper, who was definitely his biggest influence. He taught around the world in different universities. He currently lives in Herzliya, Israel. For his important contribution to the historiography of science, we chose to open the first issue of this journal with this interview recognizing his importance for the field, as well as paying our homage to him.

  14. Vocation Project Interview Questions--Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Leahy, Mary; Fredman, Nick; Moodie, Gavin; Arkoudis, Sophie; Bexley, Emmaline

    2012-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Missing Links: The Fragmented Relation between Tertiary Education and Jobs. It is an added resource for further information. It contains interview questions for: (1) graduates; (2) learning advisors; (3) managers; (4) pathways officers; (5) students; and (6)…

  15. Interviews: Linking Leadership Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah N.; Roebuck, Deborah B.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership educators use various tools to enable their students to learn about leadership. This article describes the assignment "Interview with a Leader" which the authors have incorporated into several different leadership courses. Grounded in constructivist and social learning theories, the authors have found this assignment to be…

  16. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  17. A Content Analysis of Medical School Admissions Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Altmaier

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prospective medical school applicants use Internet websites to gain information about medical school interviews as well as to offer their experience in such interviews. This study examined applicants’ reported experiences of interviews and compared them to the purposes of the interview as purported by medical schools. Method. Content analysis of student feedback regarding medical school interviews at 161 medical schools was conducted for entries of over 4600 students applying to medical school who anonymously and voluntarily completed an online questionnaire. Results. Across all medical schools, nearly one half of all cited interview questions addressed non-cognitive characteristics of the applicants. Top ranked medical schools were reported to ask significantly more interpersonal and illegal questions and fewer academic/general knowledge questions than other medical schools. Lower ranked schools did not differ significantly in the types of questions reportedly asked applicants compared to other medical schools. Discussion. Medical school interviews are generally gathering types of information about applicants that admissions personnel identify as important in the admission decision. In addition to measuring interpersonal characteristics, medical school admissions interviews are assessing cognitive abilities and ethical decision-making. Sources on the Internet provide actual medical school interview questions to prospective students. This practice can help them gain an undue advantage in interviewing. Admissions committees and faculty who interview students may want to consider how best to obtain accurate and valid responses from applicants.

  18. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the performance appraisal of reference year 2003, the interview calendar has been fixed between 1 January and 31 March 2004. This new calendar gives a better time schedule to the supervisors to conduct the interviews. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of the new CERN structure as from 2004. With this later time limit, the new departments are invited to strictly respect the target date of 31 March. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage: http://cern.ch/hr-div will lead directly to the page with the form. The personal data for the first page of the form can be generated by each divisional hierarchy, by the Divisional Administrative Officer (DAO) or by the staff member himself via HRT. Following discussions about the first two years of MAPS, and in order to improve the performance appraisal process, some modifications have been brought to section 2 (Assessme...

  19. Interview: Drew Feustel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Sliker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Andrew J. (Drew Feustel, Purdue alum, geophysicist and NASA astronaut. Dr. Feustel's first spaceflight in May 2009 (STS-125 repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. His second spaceflight in May 2011 (STS-134 was the penultimate journey of the Space Shuttle program. At Purdue University, Feustel served as a Residence Hall Counselor for two years at Cary Quadrangle and he was a Research Assistant and Teaching Assistant in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. His MS thesis investigated physical property measurements of rock specimens under elevated hydrostatic pressures simulating Earth’s deep crustal environments. While at Purdue, Feustel served for three years as Grand Prix Chairman and team Kart driver for Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity.

  20. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric...... person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform...... faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully...

  1. "Blind" interviewing: Is ignorance bliss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Jillian R; Pena, Michelle M; Schreiber Compo, Nadja

    2016-10-01

    Current investigative interviewing guidelines [e.g., Technical Working Group: Eyewitness evidence. (1999). Eyewitness evidence: A guide for law enforcement. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice. Retrieved from https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/178240.pdf ] suggest that interviewers review available case information prior to conducting a witness interview. The present study investigated the effect of interviewers' pre-interview awareness of crime details on eyewitnesses' memory and interviewer behaviour shortly after a mock crime or a week later. Results indicate that blind interviewers with no knowledge about the crime elicited more correct information than those who were correctly informed about the crime. Differences in interviewer behaviour emerged only in the very first question of the interview: Blind interviewers were more likely to begin the interview with a non-suggestive question than the informed interviewers. Blind interviewers also recalled more details than the informed interviewers when asked to generate a report after the witness interview documenting the witness' account.

  2. Enhancing motivational interviewing training in a family medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltman, Stacey; WinklerPrins, Vincent; Serrano, Adriana; Talisman, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of unhealthy behaviors among patients in the healthcare system, traditional medical training involves little or no exposure to effective behavior change techniques such as Motivational Interviewing. An online learning community for enhanced training in Motivational Interviewing was developed for 3rd-year medical students. The website included educational materials about Motivational Interviewing as well as problematic health behaviors, a repository of exemplar videos and student videos with feedback, and a discussion board. Student participants were given the opportunity to record an encounter with a patient and to receive feedback on their use of Motivational Interviewing from a faculty member. Student volunteers in the Family Medicine Clerkship at Georgetown University School of Medicine were randomized to enhanced training, which included the online learning community, or training as usual. All student volunteers completed a questionnaire assessing self-efficacy initially and at the end of the clerkship. Students also participated in an Observed Structured Clinical Exam, which was subsequently coded by a blinded rater for behavioral counts of Motivational Interviewing techniques, key steps in Motivational Interviewing, and overall Motivational Interviewing style. Students in the enhanced training arm were rated as having significantly higher scores in Motivational Interviewing style in the Observed Structured Clinical Exam than training as usual students. A significant increase in self-efficacy from pre- to posttest in the overall sample was observed but between-group differences were not significant. Student feedback was particularly positive regarding video recorded practice sessions with patients and individualized feedback. The results of this study as well as student feedback suggest that future work should include patient practice sessions and individualized feedback in developing Motivational Interviewing curricula.

  3. Bracketing as a skill in conducting unstructured qualitative interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorsa, Minna Anneli; Kiikkala, Irma; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2015-03-01

    To provide an overview of bracketing as a skill in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Researchers affect the qualitative research process. Bracketing in descriptive phenomenology entails researchers setting aside their pre-understanding and acting non-judgementally. In interpretative phenomenology, previous knowledge is used intentionally to create new understanding. A literature search of bracketing in phenomenology and qualitative research. This is a methodology paper examining the researchers' impact in creating data in creating data in qualitative research. Self-knowledge, sensitivity and reflexivity of the researcher enable bracketing. Skilled and experienced researchers are needed to use bracketing in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Bracketing adds scientific rigour and validity to any qualitative study.

  4. Influence of gender on outcomes of medication-history interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, D A; Ranelli, P L; Ried, L D

    1996-03-01

    This study investigated the influence of patient and provider gender on the outcomes of medication-history interviewing. In a previous study, 112 pharmacy students conducted medication-history interviews with 2 simulated patients. A secondary analysis was accomplished using complete data from 85 of the original 112 pharmacy students. The other 27 students were eliminated because of missing data. Factor analysis and canonical correlation were used to assess associations between the prior study's set of predictor variables and measures of interview completeness and patient satisfaction with the interview. Female and male pharmacy students appear to use different expressive, interactive, and interrogative skills. Allergy-asking was more complete when female pharmacy students interviewed a male patient. Emotive patient satisfaction was found to be associated more positively with a female student and female patient while teleological patient satisfaction between a male student and male patient was nearly double the result of the female-female dyad. Medication-history interview outcomes appear to differ as a consequence of the use of different sets of skills during same-sex or opposite-sex interviews.

  5. Using the Dialectic Method in the Competitive Scholarship Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, W. Michael

    2003-01-01

    College admission professionals use the interview process as a tool for evaluating prospective students. Academic credentials and standardized test scores may attest to a student's academic ability, but they do not provide reliable insight into a student's motivation, character, intellect or basic values. To assist in this evaluation process,…

  6. Research Organizations Interview the Poor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carol H.

    1974-01-01

    Researchers who conducted 194 interviews surveys of low income populations returned mail questionnaires about their experiences; the results are interpreted as bearing upon both the ease or difficulty of interviewing poor people and how advisable it may be to employ interviewers matched to respondents by class and race/ethnicity in surveys of the…

  7. An Interview with Ralph Tyler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Jeri Ridings

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Ralph Tyler. This interview will be of interest to those entering the field of education as well as for those who have made their home within the field for some time now. In the interview, Dr. Tyler discusses work in education and educational evaluation that spans over a half a century. He describes issues…

  8. Screening for Mental Health Problems in Adults with Learning Disabilities Using the Mini PAS-ADD Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Maurice; Taggart, Laurence; McLornian, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Prevalence rates vary considerably regarding the mental health of people with learning disabilities. This variation is a consequence of the assessment methods used to identify such clinical conditions and also different populations studied. The aim of this study was to screen for mental health problems in adults with mild-to-moderate learning…

  9. “Before dividing we have to add”: inter-viewing the foregrounds of indigenous students “Antes de dividir temos que somar”: ‘entre-vistando’ foregrounds de estudantes indígenas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Skovsmose

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Students’ cultural diversity is an important factor to consider in a mathematics education concerned with equity. We argue that the significance of mathematics education is not only given by the understanding of mathematical concepts but also by students’ foreground, that is, the students’ perception of their future possibilities in life as made apparent to the individual by his/her social-political context. For students in a cultural borderline position, different reasons and intentions for engaging in mathematics learning may be related to the construction of meaning in mathematics. Through inter-viewing Brazilian Indian students’ foreground, we illuminate the different types of significance given to mathematics education in their particular situation. Keywords: Inter-viewing. Foreground. Cultural Borderline Position.A diversidade cultural dos estudantes é um fator importante a ser considerado na educação matemática que se preocupa com a igualdade. Sustenta-se que o significado da educação matemática não está vinculado apenas à compreensão de conceitos matemáticos mas, também, ao foreground dos estudantes, isto é, à percepção de suas possibilidades futuras na vida tal como aparecem ao indivíduo em seu contexto sociopolítico. Para os estudantes que estão em uma posição cultural de fronteira, as diferentes razões e intenções que os levam a envolver-se com a aprendizagem matemática podem estar relacionadas à construção de significado em Matemática. Entre-vistas com alguns estudantes indígenas do Brasil trazem à cena diferentes tipos de significados por eles atribuídos à Educação Matemática em suas situações particulares. Palavras chave: Entre-vista. Foreground. Posição Cultural de Fronteira.

  10. Belief in the unstructured interview: The persistence of an illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Dana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unstructured interviews are a ubiquitous tool for making screening decisions despite a vast literature suggesting that they have little validity. We sought to establish reasons why people might persist in the illusion that unstructured interviews are valid and what features about them actually lead to poor predictive accuracy. In three studies, we investigated the propensity for ``sensemaking'' - the ability for interviewers to make sense of virtually anything the interviewee says---and ``dilution''---the tendency for available but non-diagnostic information to weaken the predictive value of quality information. In Study 1, participants predicted two fellow students' semester GPAs from valid background information like prior GPA and, for one of them, an unstructured interview. In one condition, the interview was essentially nonsense in that the interviewee was actually answering questions using a random response system. Consistent with sensemaking, participants formed interview impressions just as confidently after getting random responses as they did after real responses. Consistent with dilution, interviews actually led participants to make worse predictions. Study 2 showed that watching a random interview, rather than personally conducting it, did little to mitigate sensemaking. Study 3 showed that participants believe unstructured interviews will help accuracy, so much so that they would rather have random interviews than no interview. People form confident impressions even interviews are defined to be invalid, like our random interview, and these impressions can interfere with the use of valid information. Our simple recommendation for those making screening decisions is not to use them.

  11. Thinking Globally, Interviewing Locally: Using an Intensive Interview Project to Teach Globalization and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Norma J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I connect globalization and qualitative methodological practice, describing a semester-long intensive interview project about the anti-apartheid movement. I provide a detailed overview of the project as well as considerations for those who might want to adapt it for their own courses. Using students' reflections on the projects…

  12. Sez6l2 regulates phosphorylation of ADD and neuritogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Yabe, Ichiro; Takahashi, Hidehisa; Watanabe, Masashi; Nomura, Taichi; Kano, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2017-10-12

    Increasing evidence shows that immune-mediated mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system disorders including cerebellar ataxias, as indicated by the aberrant production of neuronal surface antibodies. We previously reported a patient with cerebellar ataxia associated with production of a new anti-neuronal antibody, anti-seizure-related 6 homolog like 2 (Sez6l2). Sez6l2 is a type 1 membrane protein that is highly expressed in the hippocampus and cerebellar cortex and mice lacking Sez6l2 protein family members develop ataxia. Here we used a proteomics-based approach to show that serum derived from this patient recognizes the extracellular domain of Sez6l2 and that Sez6l2 protein binds to both adducin (ADD) and glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1). Our results indicate that Sez6l2 is one of the auxiliary subunits of the AMPA receptor and acts as a scaffolding protein to link GluR1 to ADD. Furthermore, Sez6l2 overexpression upregulates ADD phosphorylation, whereas siRNA-mediated downregulation of Sez612 prevents ADD phosphorylation, suggesting that Sez6l2 modulates AMPA-ADD signal transduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Eight Issues to Think About Before Interviewing Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Kuehne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on my personal experience and understanding of conducting research interviews with farmers. It incorporates ethnographic fiction—an approach to writing that is based on first-hand accounts—to examine some of the issues that researchers might think about before interviewing farmers. Research interviews with farmers are unique events because farmers are a sub-cultural group located in a particular landscape, which means that they have quite different experiences, behaviors, and motivations to academic researchers. It is hard to build an understanding of conducting research interviews with farmers other than by doing them. The article focuses on what, for me, were the eight most important issues around interviewing farmers that I had to grapple with. Discussing these issues may add to potential interviewers' understanding of some of the issues with farmer interviews and result in improved interaction and co-operation with them. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1602205

  14. Delivering Higher Education to Adults: An Interview with Robert Mendenhall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Joni E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Robert Mendenhall, president of Western Governors University, who is the 2012 recipient of the Virginia B. Smith (VBS) Innovative Leadership Award. The annual award recognizes his leadership in redesigning higher education delivery for adult students. In the interview, Robert Mendenhall talks about his work…

  15. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    and children of different ages. When used for child obesity prevention, motivational interviewing was connected with dilemmas which should not be left to the individual nurse but be handled in practice by the school health service management. It is suggested to distinguish carefully between obesity prevention...... a prevention strategy targeting children with a high risk of obesity with an intervention conducted by school nurses using motivational interviewing.Motivational interviewing is a counselling method to bring about behavioural change (Miller and Rollnick 1995). Effect has been documented for a range of problem...... for what data told about motivational interviewing. Next, specifically according to the keywords of the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques. Key results : The study showed that the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques are integrated, inseparable, and adapted by the school nurses...

  16. Structured Interviewing: Raising the Psychometric Properties of the Employment Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Michael A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a highly structured six-step employment interviewing technique which includes asking the same questions, consistently administering the process to all candidates, and having an interview panel. Results of a field study of 243 job applicants using this technique demonstrated interrater reliability, predictive validity, test fairness for…

  17. Interviewers' challenging questions in British broadcast debate interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, Sofie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years some British broadcast panel interviews take a particularly confrontational form. In these debate interviews, news seems to be generated as arguments provided by the interviewees who participate as protagonists of opposite positions. This paper will briefly attempt to show...

  18. Motivational interviewing for medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Marissa C; Cannon-Breland, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    To familiarize pharmacists with motivational interviewing as a way to engage patients in discussions about medication adherence. Motivational interviewing is a collaborative, patient-centered communications skill set that can increase behavior change by stimulating a patient's own internal motivation for change. Pharmacists using motivational interviewing can explore factors associated with medication nonadherence, assess patient ambivalence and/or resistance, and educate a patient to promote medication-adherent behaviors. Pharmacists can use motivational interviewing to effectively engage patients in a conversation that addresses medication adherence.

  19. Adding Value: Online Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Donna R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to add to the emerging literature related to online student engagement with additional suggestions for instructional strategies. Student engagement is one of the tenets of effective online instruction; as such, particular attention to how it adds value to student learning is crucial and worth the time and effort to enhance…

  20. Convergent Validation of an Interview-Based Personality Assessment: A Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Myron D.; Ellis, Bruce J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a 2-session laboratory project in which students develop, conduct, and attempt to validate an interview-based personality assessment. In Session 1, students learn about effective interview procedures and then design and pilot-test an interview to assess 4 personality traits (emotionality, activity level, sociability, and…

  1. Analysis of air-conditioning and drying processes using spreadsheet add-in for psychrometric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Diemuodeke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A spreadsheet add-in for the psychrometric data at any barometric pressure and in the air-conditioning and drying temperatureranges was developed using appropriate correlations. It was then used to simulate and analyse air-conditioning and dryingprocesses in the Microsoft Excel environment by exploiting its spreadsheet and graphic potentials. The package allowsone to determine the properties of humid air at any desired state, and to simulate and analyse air-conditioning as well asdrying processes. This, as a teaching tool, evokes the intellectual curiosity of students and enhances their interest and abilityin the thermodynamics of humid-air processes.

  2. Aikido Politics in Interview Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Phyllis Ghim Lian

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes how less powerful subjects in an unequal encounter, an admission interview in an educational institution, were able to counter the power directed at them by the more powerful subject through "aikido" strategies. In the context of the interview, harmonizing with the ideological discursive formation of the institution in question…

  3. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  4. Systematic Interviewing Skills. Typescript Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Roy C.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    Part of a five-part package (see note) of training materials to teach interviewing skills to human services personnel, this typescript manual is intended for use as a visual reference to aid in understanding the taped dialogues of the packages tape/slide demonstrations of interview interaction, and for referral in class discussions. The typescript…

  5. BUSINESS ETIQUETTE IN JOB INTERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGEEVA JULIA VICTOROVNA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of job interview transcripts from the perspective of dominant communicant’s (HR manager communicative behavior. The interviewer uses various etiquette forms that facilitate a more productive dialogue and stipulate cooperative strategies and tactics in order to achieve the main goal - to determine whether the job applicant meets the requirements of the employer.

  6. Telmisartan as Monotherapy or add-on Therapy in African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antihypertensive effect, tolerability and safety profile of telmisartan, an angiotensin II-receptor antagonist, when given alone or as add- on therapy to adult African subjects with mild to moderate essential hypertension for a period of 12- 48 weeks. Methods: This study was part of a ...

  7. Alles over aardappelen en energie op ADD Energieplein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoutsen, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Op 20 augustus 2014 is het weer Aardappeldemodag (ADD) in Westmaas. Een geheel nieuw onderdeel dat straks op deze sectorbeurs zal verrijzen is het Energieplein. Hier zal alles in het teken staan van energiebesparende en -leverende maatregelen in en rondom de aardappelteelt. Coördinatrice Maureen

  8. Does gesture add to the comprehensibility of people with aphasia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nispen, Karin; Sekine, Kazuki; Rose, Miranda; Ferré, Gaëlle; Tutton, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Gesture can convey information co-occurring with and in the absence of speech. As such, it seems a useful strategy for people with aphasia (PWA) to compensate for their impaired speech. To find out whether gestures used by PWA add to the comprehensibility of their communication we looked at the

  9. Medicalised Pupils: The Case of ADD/ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2009-01-01

    Recent decades have seen an increasing number of life's problems conceptualised and interpreted through the prism of disease; among them are those affecting pupils at school. Witness the cases of hyperactivity and deficient attention, so often diagnosed as ADD/ADHD. Research indicates that there is at least some tendency towards overdiagnosis of…

  10. Can mock interviewers' personalities influence their personality ratings of applicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Thomas; Macan, Therese

    2009-03-01

    The authors examined individual difference and self-regulatory variables to understand how an interviewer rates a candidate's personality. Participants were undergraduate students at a large midwestern university in the United States who completed measures of individual differences, read an employment interview transcript involving a candidate applying for a customer service job, and rated the candidate's personality. Participants' agreeableness, social skills, and communion striving were positively associated with their ratings of the candidate's helpfulness and obedience. The authors provide a foundation for further research on interviewer effectiveness and the processes underlying the employment interview.

  11. Talking about Happiness: Interview Research and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In addition to teaching research and writing skills, First-Year Composition classes are well situated to help students develop strategies for managing stress and increasing well-being. I describe an assignment sequence in which students interview others from three generations about topics related to happiness and wellbeing, analyze shared…

  12. Establishing an Interview Anxiety Baseline: Assessing Applicants' Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Lori; Carden, Lila; Johnson, Lars; Boyd, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    This research includes survey data about the types of anxiety levels that college students experience while preparing for job interviews. Survey findings included female students reporting higher levels of anxiety than their male counterparts on four of the five scales. Results suggest that additional training for female applicants could reduce…

  13. A method of phenomenological interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    In this article I propose a method of interviewing for descriptive phenomenological research that offers an explicit, theoretically based approach for researchers. My approach enables application of descriptive phenomenology as a total method for research, and not one just focused on data analysis. This structured phenomenological approach to interviewing applies questions based on themes of experience contextualization, apprehending the phenomenon and its clarification. The method of questioning employs descriptive and structural questioning as well as novel use of imaginative variation to explore experience. The approach will help researchers understand how to undertake descriptive phenomenological research interviews.

  14. Interview with Martha C. Nussbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Abbate

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here's the interview granted by Martha Nussbaum to Fabrizia Abbate about the role of preference in social dynamics. How important are aesthetic preferences in the development of moral attitudes and choices ?

  15. Interview Questions with Bentham Scientific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    John Mather answers questions for an interview for the Bentham Science Newsletter. He covers topics ranging from his childhood, his professional career and his thoughts on research, technology and today's scientists and engineers.

  16. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  17. Interview of Haroon Ahmed - 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Haroon

    2009-01-01

    Filmed on 8th December 2009 by Alan Macfarlane and edited by Sarah Harrison Interview of the scientist and sometime Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, Haroon Ahmed. A discussion of his life and work.

  18. BBB Interviews Wallace D. Muhammad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Books Bulletin, 1979

    1979-01-01

    In this interview, subjects covered include: changes in Islam, the spiritual greatness of America, Muslim businesses, interracial marriage, the World Community of Islam, and opening the doors of Islam to Caucasians. (WI)

  19. The case for interactive interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Christopher; Kenny, Christine

    1994-04-01

    It is reported in the Penguin Book of Interviews ( 1 ) that Marlon Brando recalled an interview with Truman Capote as follows: 'The little bastard spent half the night telling me all his problems, I figured the least I could do was tell him a few of mine.' In sharing experiences with his interviewee, Capote had managed to extract information he would otherwise not have gained.

  20. An Excel Add-In for Statistical Process Control Charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Buttrey

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available t shifts in processes in, for example, manufacturing. Among these are control charts".Control charts and other SPC techniques have been in use since at least the 1950s, and,because they are comparatively unsophisticated, are often used by management or op-erations personnel without formal statistical training. These personnel will often haveexperience with the popular spreadsheet program Excel, but may have less training on amainstream statistical package. Base Excel does not provide the ability to draw controlcharts directly, although add-ins for that purpose are available for purchase.We present a free add-in for Excel that draws the most common sorts of control charts.It follows the development of the textbook of Montgomery (2005, so it may be well-suited for instructional purposes.

  1. Add Control: plant virtualization for control solutions in WWTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiza, M; Bengoechea, A; Grau, P; De Keyser, W; Nopens, I; Brockmann, D; Steyer, J P; Claeys, F; Urchegui, G; Fernández, O; Ayesa, E

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes part of the research work carried out in the Add Control project, which proposes an extension of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) models and modelling architectures used in traditional WWTP simulation tools, addressing, in addition to the classical mass transformations (transport, physico-chemical phenomena, biological reactions), all the instrumentation, actuation and automation & control components (sensors, actuators, controllers), considering their real behaviour (signal delays, noise, failures and power consumption of actuators). Its ultimate objective is to allow a rapid transition from the simulation of the control strategy to its implementation at full-scale plants. Thus, this paper presents the application of the Add Control simulation platform for the design and implementation of new control strategies at the WWTP of Mekolalde.

  2. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak

    OpenAIRE

    Min Kyung Lee; Yoon Young Kim

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We ...

  3. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-05-19

    Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors' efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups--plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen the course of psychosis. Better designed

  4. Humor adds the creative touch to CQI teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, J W

    1994-07-01

    The health care industry is looking to continuous quality improvement as a process to both improve patient care and promote cost effectiveness. Interdisciplinary teams are learning to work together and to use data-driven problem solving. Humor adds a creative and welcome touch to the process that makes it easier and more fun to work in teams. The team leader or facilitator who uses humor along the journey sanctions the risk-taking behavior that accompanies creative solutions to tough problems.

  5. Feasibility and Usability of Tele-interview for Medical Residency Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Lee, Hayoung; Fair, Malika; Maloney, Kaylah; Caggiula, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Every year in the United States, medical students and residency programs dedicate millions of dollars to the residency matching process. On-site interviews for training positions involve tremendous financial investment, and time spent detracts from educational pursuits and clinical responsibilities. Students are usually required to fund their own travel and accommodations, adding additional financial burdens to an already costly medical education. Similarly, residency programs allocate considerable funds to interview-day meals, tours, staffing, and social events. With the rapid onslaught of innovations and advancements in the field of telecommunication, technology has become ubiquitous in the practice of medicine. Internet applications have aided our ability to deliver appropriate, evidence-based care at speeds previously unimagined. Wearable medical tech allows physicians to monitor patients from afar, and telemedicine has emerged as an economical means by which to provide care to all corners of the world. It is against this backdrop that we consider the integration of technology into the residency application process. This article aims to assess the implementation of technology in the form of web-based interviewing as a viable means by which to reduce the costs and productivity losses associated with traditional in-person interview days.

  6. Using skype as an alternative for residency selection interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edje, Louito; Miller, Christine; Kiefer, Jacklyn; Oram, David

    2013-09-01

    Residency interviews can place significant time and financial burdens on applicants. To determine whether the use of Skype as a screening tool during interview season in a family medicine residency is cost-effective and time-efficient for the applicant and the residency program. We surveyed 2 groups of medical students during interviews for our family medicine program. Thirty-two students were interviewed via our face-to-face, traditional interview (TI) process, and 10 students, the second group, who did not meet the program's standard interview selection criteria for TI, underwent our Skype interview (SI) process. Using an unpaired t test, we found that the applicants' costs of an SI were significantly less than a TI, $566 (95% confidence interval [CI] $784-$349, P Skype may be a cost-effective and time-efficient screening tool for both the applicant and the program. Alternate uses of SI may include the time-sensitive, postmatch Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program.

  7. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-02-10

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called "stress bandage", the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated.

  8. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-02-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called “stress bandage”, the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated.

  9. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called “stress bandage”, the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated. PMID:26860896

  10. GnRH-Analoga und Add-back-Verfahren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinstein J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available GnRH-Analoga haben eine große Bedeutung in der medikamentösen Therapie der Endometriose erlangt. Sie sind in der Lage, Endometrioseassoziierte Schmerzen zu beseitigen und sind Bestandteil der Therapie der endometriosebedingten Infertilität. Aufgrund der Chronizität der Endometriose bedarf es in vielen Fällen der Prolongation der GnRH-A-Therapie über den Zeitraum von 6 Monaten hinaus. Für diese Fälle eignet sich eine Add-back- Therapie nach dem Format von Hormonersatztherapien, um vasomotorischen Nebeneffekten und dem Knochensubstanzverlust entgegenwirken zu können. Dabei wird der Estrogenanteil niedrig dosiert eingesetzt, um innerhalb eines "therapeutischen Fensters" den Hypoestrogenismus auszugleichen, ohne das Endometriosewachstum zu fördern. Prinzipiell kann dazu das Estrogen oral, aber auch transdermal appliziert werden. Die Effektivität der Kombination aus GnRH-A plus Add-back bezüglich der Knochenprotektion konnte bereits für einen Zeitraum von bis zu 10 Jahren bestätigt werden, sodass damit eine Langzeitkonzeption für Frauen mit rezidivierender Endometriose und wiederholten operativen Eingriffen existiert. Alternativen zur klassischen Add-back mit Sexualsteroiden existieren vielfältig, aber ihr Einsatz ist durch Partialwirkungen und eigene Nebenwirkungen limitiert.

  11. The reliability of in-home measures of height and weight in large cohort studies: Evidence from Add Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Hussey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the emergence of obesity as a global health issue, an increasing number of major demographic surveys are collecting measured anthropometric data. Yet little is known about the characteristics and reliability of these data. Objective: We evaluate the accuracy and reliability of anthropometric data collected in the home during Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health, compare our estimates to national standard, clinic-based estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES and, using both sources, provide a detailed anthropometric description of young adults in the United States. Methods: The reliability of Add Health in-home anthropometric measures was estimated from repeat examinations of a random subsample of study participants. A digit preference analysis evaluated the quality of anthropometric data recorded by field interviewers. The adjusted odds of obesity and central obesity in Add Health vs. NHANES were estimated with logistic regression. Results: Short-term reliabilities of in-home measures of height, weight, waist and arm circumference - as well as derived body mass index (BMI, kg/m2 - were excellent. Prevalence of obesity (37Š vs. 29Š and central obesity (47Š vs. 38Š was higher in Add Health than in NHANES, while socio-demographic patterns of obesity and central obesity were comparable in the two studies. Conclusions: Properly trained non-medical field interviewers can collect reliable anthropometric data in a nationwide, home visit study. This national cohort of young adults in the United States faces a high risk of early-onset chronic disease and premature mortality.

  12. The reliability of in-home measures of height and weight in large cohort studies: Evidence from Add Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Jon M.; Nguyen, Quynh C.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Richardson, Liana J.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Tabor, Joyce W.; Entzel, Pamela P.; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2015-01-01

    Background With the emergence of obesity as a global health issue an increasing number of major demographic surveys are collecting measured anthropometric data. Yet little is known about the characteristics and reliability of these data. Objectives We evaluate the accuracy and reliability of anthropometric data collected in the home during Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), compare our estimates to national standard, clinic-based estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and, using both sources, provide a detailed anthropometric description of young adults in the United States. Methods The reliability of Add Health in-home anthropometric measures was estimated from repeat examinations of a random subsample of study participants. A digit preference analysis evaluated the quality of anthropometric data recorded by field interviewers. The adjusted odds of obesity and central obesity in Add Health vs. NHANES were estimated with logistic regression. Results Short-term reliabilities of in-home measures of height, weight, waist and arm circumference—as well as derived body mass index (BMI, kg/m2)—were excellent. Prevalence of obesity (37% vs. 29%) and central obesity (47% vs. 38%) was higher in Add Health than in NHANES while socio-demographic patterns of obesity and central obesity were comparable in the two studies. Conclusions Properly trained non-medical field interviewers can collect reliable anthropometric data in a nationwide, home visit study. This national cohort of young adults in the United States faces a high risk of early-onset chronic disease and premature mortality. PMID:26146486

  13. An Oral History Interview with MICHAEL M. CERNEA (interviewer: Judith Freidenberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAEL M. CERNEA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The editors and editorial board of Human Organization are pleased to introduce readers to the following oral history interview with Michael M. Cernea, a development social scientist who has militated throughout his academic career and applied work for "putting people first", in the forefront of development projects and policies. Working for a long time for the promotion of anthropological and sociological knowledge, either in the activities of the World Bank or in the policies and programs of governments of both developed and developing countries, Dr. Cernea cleared pathways for applied social science that are sure to benefit people in development settings for many years to come. Undoubtedly many readers already know Dr. Cernea's work well, especially those of us who teach the anthropology of development or work in applied settings and organizations, but this interview embeds his broad body of work into a personal, human, and at times tragic context that opens with brushes with death, Nazi brutality, and exile. It also provides valuable insights for carrying out the work of development anthropologists within large-scale organizations and governments.This interview with Dr. Cernea was conducted by Dr. Judith Freidenberg, of the University of Maryland, on June 30, 2003, for the Society for Applied Anthropology Oral History Project, headquartered at the University of Kentucky Libraries. This Project aims to create, through the vehicle of oral histories, a record of the life, activities and experiences of number of selected scholars-anthropologists who devoted a great part of their scientific work to research, to applied work in different settings, to inducing development, including to hands-on work on crafting public social policies and actual development programs. The present transcript of the interview was reviewed by both participants for editorial purposes. Michael M. Cernea expanded some of his oral responses, for historical accuracy or to add

  14. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group,

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of him taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows. Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human...

  15. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of his taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction1) (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows.Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human Re...

  16. Social anxiety and the ironic effects of positive interviewer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnick, Christopher J; Kowal, Marta; Santuzzi, Alecia M

    2015-01-01

    Positive interviewer feedback should encourage positive experiences and outcomes for interviewees. Yet, positive feedback is inconsistent with socially anxious interviewees' negative self-views. Socially anxious interviewees might experience increased self-focus while attempting to reconcile the inconsistency between their self-perceptions and that feedback. This could interfere with successful interview performance. This study used a 3 (feedback: positive, negative, no) × 2 (social anxiety: high, low) between-subjects design. Undergraduate students (N = 88) completed a measure of dispositional social anxiety. They then engaged in a simulated interview with a White confederate trained to adhere to a standardized script. Interviewees received positive, negative, or no interviewer feedback. Each interview was video recorded to code anxiety displays, impression management tactics, and interview success. Following positive feedback, socially anxious interviewees displayed more anxiety, less assertiveness, and received lower success ratings. Among anxious interviewees, increased self-focus provided an indirect path between positive feedback and lower success. Consistent with self-verification theory, anxious interviewees had poorer interview performance following positive feedback that contradicted their negative self-views. Thus, socially anxious interviewees might be at a disadvantage when interviewing, especially following positive feedback. Implications for interviewees and interviewers are discussed.

  17. Embedding objects during 3D printing to add new functionalities

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for integrating and embedding objects to add new functionalities during 3D printing based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) (also known as fused filament fabrication or molten polymer deposition) is presented. Unlike typical 3D printing, FDM-based 3D printing could allow objects to be integrated and embedded during 3D printing and the FDM-based 3D printed devices do not typically require any post-processing and finishing. Thus, various fluidic devices with integrated glass cov...

  18. Anorgasmia during pregabalin add-on therapy for partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; De Luca, Rosaria; Pollicino, Patrizia; Bramanti, Placido

    2013-09-01

    Anorgasmia is the inability to reach orgasm during sexual intercourse, and, although it is believed that around 90% of anorgasmia problems are related to psychological issues, the use of serotoninergic drugs, including antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics, is a common cause of situational anorgasmia. Pregabalin is a new antiepileptic drug, structurally related to gabapentin, and commonly used as adjunctive therapy for partial epilepsy and treatment of neuropathic pain in adults. Herein, we describe three men with epilepsy, who experienced severe anorgasmia after pregabalin add-on treatment.

  19. Profile Interview: Prof. Rob Moodie

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health leaders such as Jonathan Mann and Daniel Tarantola. We moved back ... We were starting to slow down our moves by then and we ... Profile Interview: Prof. Rob Moodie. “Get up. Do good. Be good. Be.” foundation to use a tax on tobacco to buy out and replace tobacco industry sponsorship in sports and the arts, and.

  20. Leaning in to "muddy" interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    subjectivities, situated identities, emotions, and conversational genres. Based on ethnographic fieldwork at a Danish Vocational Educational Training College, we introduce the concept of “leaning in” to provide an analytical grasp of the “muddy” interactional tension field in an interview situation, in which...

  1. Interview with Mike Parker Pearson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. T. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mike Parker Pearson is the Institute of Archaeology’s newly appointed Professor of British Later Prehistory. In this interview he reflects on his experience at the birth of post-processualism, current problems and opportunities in modern archaeology, and the subject for which he is best known: Stonehenge.

  2. Divergent Thinking and Interview Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batey, Mark; Rawles, Richard; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    This study examined divergent thinking (DT) test scores of applicants taking part in a selection procedure for an undergraduate psychology degree (N = 370). Interviewers made six specific (creative intelligence, motivation, work habits, emotional stability, sociability, and social responsibility) and one overall recommendation rating on each…

  3. TECHNOS Interview: Lewis J. Perelman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Mardell Jefferson

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Lewis Perelman, author of "Global Mind" and "School's Out: Hyperlearning, the New Technology, and the End of Education," explores the future of education in the U.S. Argues that the forces changing academia in the direction of obsolescence and ultimate extinction are unrelated to education policy or…

  4. Ralph Mero: An Omega Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Ralph Mero, Executive Director of Compassion in Dying, Seattle (Washington)-based organization that has brought new voice to controversial issue of physician-assisted rational suicide. Mero explains how his years as minister watching people suffer with cancer or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome led him to work for…

  5. An Interview with Khalil Mahshi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Educational Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In an interview, Khalil Mahshi, director-general of international and public relations for the Palestinian Ministry of Education and Higher Education, talks about the legacy of the first Palestinian intifadah and the current state of Palestinian education. He emphasizes the subjective nature of his observations and the complex role of commenting…

  6. Mathematical people profiles and interviews

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This unique collection contains extensive and in-depth interviews with mathematicians who have shaped the field of mathematics in the twentieth century. Collected by two mathematicians respected in the community for their skill in communicating mathematical topics to a broader audience, the book is also rich with photographs and includes an introduction by Philip J. Davis.

  7. An Interview with Lance Olsen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Segal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With over twenty books to his name, as editor or author, Lance Olsen is a cultural force unto himself. His latest book with Trevor Dodge, Architectures of Possibility (Raw Dog Screaming Press, is a writer's guide against transparent language, and predictable patterned literary convention. In this interview Olsen discusses radical pedagogy and experimental narrative theory and its practice.

  8. An Interview with Roddy Doyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Gülüm Tekin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, Roddy Doyle, one of the most popular contemporary writers in Ireland, provides insightful comments on crucial aspects of his writing career. Doyle speaks about the beginning of his literary adventure, the creative process of his work, and his artistic influences, as well as his feeling of pride in being a native Dubliner. Furthermore, he addresses his experience of the Celtic Tiger era in Ireland and the multicultural reality of the country in the late 1990s. Doyle’s detailed discussion of the female characters in his work is one of the most intriguing parts of the interview. He also gives hints about his latest novel The Guts (2013 and talks about the shift in theme, to the middle-age crisis in men, in his recent work: The Bullfighting (2011, Two Pints (2012, and The Guts (2013. His ideas about the filmic adaptations of his work, his favourite writers and his favourite fictional female characters are other inspiring points of the interview. The interview closes with Doyle’s characterization of the Post-Celtic Tiger period in Ireland and his views about the shifting portraits of Irish men and women.

  9. Primary Science Interview: Science Sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In this "Primary Science" interview, Lynne Bianchi talks with Emma Vanstone about "Science Sparks," which is a website full of creative, fun, and exciting science activity ideas for children of primary-school age. "Science Sparks" started with the aim of inspiring more parents to do science at home with their…

  10. news interview talk: Organisational properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practitioners in the domain of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) to generate communicative and meta-communicative .... Adopting a discourse-based approach places this research article in the realm of qualitative research (cf. ..... design language activities for South African business-news interviewer trainees. Adopting ...

  11. Levels Of Formality In Obama's Interview And Sby's Interview

    OpenAIRE

    Karo, Seftyani Fransiska; Tangkas, I Wayan Dirgayasa

    2013-01-01

    This study was intended to describe levels of formality used by Obama and SBY in their interviews. This study was carried out with descriptive research. The data were collected with documentary technique and the instrument used was documentary sheet. The data were analyzed by descriptive comparative. The result of the research show that Obama tends to use Casual level (44,78%), Formal (29,05%), Consultative (26%), and Intimate (0,17%) while SBY tends to use Formal level (49,20%), ...

  12. An interview with Angela Nieto. Interviewed by Eva Amsen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Angela Nieto is Full Professor at the Instituto de Neurociencias (CSIC-UMH) in Alicante, Spain, and Head of the institute's Developmental Neurobiology Unit. She is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (Sociedad Española de Biología del Desarollo, SEBD). We interviewed her to talk about the plans of the SEBD for the coming years.

  13. Lacosamide add-on therapy for partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer; Shukralla, Arif; McKay, Andrew J; Marson, Anthony G

    2015-06-16

    Around half of people with epilepsy will not achieve seizure freedom on their first antiepileptic drug; many will require add-on treatment with another drug. Sometimes multiple treatment combinations are tried to achieve maximum seizure control, although around a third of people do not achieve complete seizure control. Lacosamide is an antiepileptic drug that has been licensed as an add-on treatment for partial epilepsy. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of lacosamide when used as an add-on treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (21 May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL , The Cochrane Library Issue 4, April 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 21 May 2015), Scopus (1823 to 13 November 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (21 May 2015) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP, 21 May 2015). We imposed no language restrictions. We contacted UCB (sponsors of lacosamide) and experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials of add-on lacosamide in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted the relevant data. We assessed the following outcomes: (1) 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency; (2) seizure freedom; (3) treatment withdrawal for any reason; and (4) adverse events. Primary analyses were intention-to-treat. Summary risk ratios were estimated for each outcome. We included three trials in our review (1311 participants), which were classified as having low risk of bias. All trials were placebo-controlled and assessed doses ranging from 200 mg to 600 mg per day. Trial duration ranged from 24 to 26 weeks. All trials used adequate methods of randomisation and were double-blind. Overall the quality of the evidence was rated as moderate to high. The overall risk ratio for a 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency for all doses of lacosamide compared

  14. [Interviewing victims of sexual crimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Teresa; Ribeiro, Catarina

    2007-01-01

    The approach to victims of sexual crimes is of special complexity due to the nature of this kind of crime, the impact of victimization and the specificity of judicial investigation procedures. The absence of physical evidence and the secrecy that characterizes the majority of sexual victimization cases frequently lead the victim's story to be used as one of few proof elements. Given the importance of the information supplied by the victim in the criminal inquiry, it is essential to create strategies to optimise the interview process, not only to preserve evidence, but also to prevent a secondary victimization process. This review discusses in a brief manner the extent to which information given by victims can be considered relevant forensic evidence, and then presents the methodological guidelines for interview that should be used in this type of expertise.

  15. Stackwalker: Interviews: 2008-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newby, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Documentation from Simon Yuill's Stackwalker project, a parallel study made from audio interviews relating to crofting communities in the West of Scotland and migrant workers in fishing and food production in the North East of Scotland.The project reflects upon issues of spatial agency (land use,...... in context.This artist's book follows the exhibition, Fields, Factories and Workshops at the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, 7 August – 18 September 2010.English language text with Gaelic, Polish, Russian, Latvian and Lithuanian sections......., occupancy, and mobility) and forms of communal organisation that have developed within these communities. These are set against processes of archiving and documentation in terms of historical and legal practices. The book collates the transcribed interviews and provides an introductory essay setting them...

  16. Narrative Interviewing: Process and Benefits in Teaching about Aging and the Life Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellin, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Narrative interviewing (also termed qualitative interviewing) is a valid and vivid way to apply perspectives and concepts in gerontology to individual lives. As such it is widely used as a research method. However, teachers in many fields also assign interview projects for students, as supplemental assignments in aging-related courses. This…

  17. An Interview with Joseph Tabbi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Gonzalez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This interview between Jeff Gonzales and Joseph Tabbi discusses Tabbi’s new book of literary criticism Nobody Grew But the Business: On the Life and Work of William Gaddis (Northwestern UP, 2015. The book effectively and compellingly demonstrates that Gaddis was deeply engaged with the continuing corporate reengineering of postwar American experience not just in 1976’s J R, the Gaddis novel that deals most explicitly with corporations, but throughout his career.

  18. Guerin, Delbert oral history interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Interviewee: Guerin, Delbert; Interviewer: Hall, Peter V; Interviewer: Smith, Leigha; Principal Investigator: Hall, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    This interview is with Delbert Guerin, retired longshoreman (local 500), fisherman, and former chief of the Musqueam First Nation (1973-1982), He was also the lead plaintiff in Guerin v. The Queen, a land rights case decided in favour of the Musqueam in 1984. Topics discussed include: fishing industry; longshoring; job duties; equipment; technology; workplace safety; race; gender; rates of pay; alcohol use; and the evolution of work duties and culture.

  19. Brine, Terry oral history interview

    OpenAIRE

    Interviewee: Brine, Terry; Interviewer: La, Michelle; Interviewer: Garden, Bailey; Principal Investigator: Hall, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    Terry Brine was born in New Westminster and grew up in Burnaby. He studied education at the university and upon graduation joined the successful family business. He was the third manager of this family business after his father and grandfather. The store existed for more than 100 years at its origin location. Terry shares his experience about the success, decline and revitalization of Columbia Street from its heyday as the “Miracle Mile” of the region until today. The interview provides infor...

  20. An Interview with Roy Ellen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejm Benessaiah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I decided to undertake this interview with Professor Ellen, simply because I thought such a distinguished career deserved to be marked as he was retiring. Roy was happy to make time for our interviews, in the form of loosely structured conversation which, like the Arabian Nights, Roy pointed out, could have gone on forever, but I decided to draw the line at three sessions. Perhaps it could, and will go on to form part of a more in-depth biography, as I continued to discover other aspects and adventures of Roy’s interesting life in the course of other contexts, much as one does in the field. Much is known about what ethnobiologists and anthropologists say about another people’s lives; less is known about their own, apart from rare reflections, diaries and memoires. I found Roy’s reflections a source of comfort as I embarked on my own PhD fieldwork, reassuring me as I fumbled around, making my own unique but comparable mistakes among the insights I gleaned. The following is an edited version of the original interview. I hope it will be as enjoyable to the reader as it was to me working on it.

  1. IMPLEMENTASI PROGRAM ALOKASI DANA DESA (ADD DALAM PEMBERDAYAAN MASYARAKAT DI DESA PUNAGAYA KECAMATAN BANGKALA KABUPATEN JENEPONTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octrian TSL

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Punagaya village through the village fund allocation (ADD will allocate a budget for community development in the areas of sugar production business, the study aims to look at the implementation of the allocation of funds in the rural community empowerment programs and the factors that affect the implementation of the implementation of the allocation of funds within the village community empowerment program in the Village Punagaya sub Bangkala Jeneponto district. This research is descriptive qualitative research sampling technique used was purposive sampling. This study uses data analysis techniques interviews and observations, after which the data collected are then analyzed using frequency tables later be described qualitatively. Number of samples 33 people consisting of 1 person village head, village secretary 1 person, a member of the Committee seminar 5 people, local people 7 people, 4 people Ibu PKK, brown sugar 6 people Makers, Executive Team Live Help ADD 3orang, public figures 6 people. Penelitaian showed that 52% of people believe that the implementation of the Village punagaya village fund allocation in the village punagaya poorly this happens because people do not see the program conducted by the local government to improve the empowerment and increased repair services performed by local governments to use allocation of village funds. Based on the research I did it, it can be concluded that the public has not been empowered by optimal utilization of ADD in the Village District Punagaya Bangkala Jeneponto. It is caused due to problems such as the allocation of funds provided inadequate to meningatkan empowerment, besides the allocation of funds is often given too late and village officials rendahmya influence on the development and management of the allocation of funds is a factor inhibiting village program implementation in the village of village fund allocation Punagaya Sub Bangkala Jeneponto but from the village fund allocation is

  2. Repeated Self- and Peer-Review Leads to Continuous Improvement in Child Interviewing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Stacia N; Lyon, Thomas D

    The present study examined whether a training model that focuses on consistent exposure to protocol procedure, self-evaluation, and intensive peer-review sessions could improve interviewers' ability to adhere to best practices. Law students (N = 19) interviewed 5- to 10-year-old children on a weekly basis as part of a semester-long forensic child interviewing class. They transcribed their interviews, and participated in one-hour self and peer-reviews. The proportion of each question type was calculated (option-posing, Wh-, and open-invitations) within each interview for each interviewer. Across ten weeks of interviews, interviewers consistently improved their performance, decreasing the proportion of option-posing questions by 31% and increasing the proportion of open-invitations by 47%. All interviewers improved. The present study suggests that with consistent self-evaluation and peer-review, forensic interviewers can incrementally improve their performance.

  3. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Gender: Interviews from a Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow, Jeffry; Kastrup, Helge; Bryant, Fred B.; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Udo, Maria

    2010-01-01

    We conducted interviews with eleven groups of Danish and American students. The interview topics included gender and national components of science education, science anxiety, and attitudes toward science. The groups were science and nonscience students at the upper secondary and university levels, and one group of American science teachers who…

  4. A Teacher Takes on the Challenges of Deaf Literacy: An Interview with Jennifer Herbold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Jennifer Herbold, a deaf teacher of deaf students at the New Mexico School for the Deaf. Discusses important factors in determining Deaf students' success at learning to read. Notes that technology has enormous potential with deaf students because it provides increased exposure to English, it is often fun to use for deaf students, and…

  5. Non-invasive beamforming add-on module

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2017-02-23

    An embodiment of a non-invasive beamforming add-on apparatus couples to an existing antenna port and rectifies the beam azimuth in the upstream and downstream directions. The apparatus comprises input circuitry that is configured to receive one or more signals from a neighboring node of the linear wireless sensor network; first amplifier circuitry configured to adjust an amplitude of a respective received signal in accordance with a weighting coefficient and invoke a desired phase to a carrier frequency of the received signal thereby forming a first amplified signal; and second amplifier circuitry configured to adjust a gain of the first amplified signal towards upstream and downstream neighbors of the linear wireless sensor in the linear wireless sensor network.

  6. Symbolic BDD and ADD Algorithms for Energy Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Maoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy games, which model quantitative consumption of a limited resource, e.g., time or energy, play a central role in quantitative models for reactive systems. Reactive synthesis constructs a controller which satisfies a given specification, if one exists. For energy games a synthesized controller ensures to satisfy not only the safety constraints of the specification but also the quantitative constraints expressed in the energy game. A symbolic algorithm for energy games, recently presented by Chatterjee et al., is symbolic in its representation of quantitative values but concrete in the representation of game states and transitions. In this paper we present an algorithm that is symbolic both in the quantitative values and in the underlying game representation. We have implemented our algorithm using two different symbolic representations for reactive games, Binary Decision Diagrams (BDD and Algebraic Decision Diagrams (ADD. We investigate the commonalities and differences of the two implementations and compare their running times on specifications of energy games.

  7. Motivational interviewing for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindson-Hawley, Nicola; Thompson, Tom P; Begh, Rachna

    2015-03-02

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a directive patient-centred style of counselling, designed to help people to explore and resolve ambivalence about behaviour change. It was developed as a treatment for alcohol abuse, but may help people to a make a successful attempt to quit smoking. To determine whether or not motivational interviewing (MI) promotes smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register for studies using the term motivat* NEAR2 (interview* OR enhanc* OR session* OR counsel* OR practi* OR behav*) in the title or abstract, or motivation* as a keyword. Date of the most recent search: August 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which motivational interviewing or its variants were offered to tobacco users to assist cessation. We extracted data in duplicate. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically validated rates where available. We counted participants lost to follow-up as continuing smoking or relapsed. We performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel model. We identified 28 studies published between 1997 and 2014, involving over 16,000 participants. MI was conducted in one to six sessions, with the duration of each session ranging from 10 to 60 minutes. Interventions were delivered by primary care physicians, hospital clinicians, nurses or counsellors. Our meta-analysis of MI versus brief advice or usual care yielded a modest but significant increase in quitting (risk ratio (RR) 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16 to 1.36; 28 studies; N = 16,803). Subgroup analyses found that MI delivered by primary care physicians resulted in an RR of 3.49 (95% CI 1.53 to 7.94; 2 trials; N = 736). When delivered by counsellors the RR was smaller (1.25; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.63; 22 trials; N = 13,593) but MI still resulted in higher quit rates than brief advice or usual care. When we

  8. 5 CFR 591.227 - What adjustment factors does OPM add to the price indexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What adjustment factors does OPM add to...-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.227 What adjustment factors does OPM add to the price indexes? OPM adds to the price index an adjustment factor that reflects differences in need, access to and...

  9. 47 CFR 73.9006 - Add-in covered demodulator products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Add-in covered demodulator products. 73.9006... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control § 73.9006 Add-in covered... passed to an output (e.g., where a demodulator add-in card in a personal computer passes such content to...

  10. An add-on system including a micro-reactor for an atr-ir spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to an add-on system for an attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectrometer, the add-on system allowing for time-resolved in situ IR measurements of heterogeneous mixtures. The add-on device comprises a micro-reactor (300A) forming a sample cavity (305) when...

  11. An add-on system for photochemical ATR-IR spectroscopy studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to an add-on system for a unit mainly adapted for attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The add-on system enables time-resolved in-situ measurements of different sample types in an easy, simple and inexpensive way. The add-on system includes a cap (300G...

  12. Engaging families through motivational interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adrienne A; Wright, Katherine S

    2014-10-01

    Helping parents change key behaviors may reduce the risk of child maltreatment. However, traditional provider-centered approaches to working with the parents of pediatric patients may increase resistance to behavioral change. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centered communication technique that helps address problems of provider-centered approaches. In this article, evidence for use of MI to address several risk factors for child maltreatment is reviewed, including parental substance abuse, partner violence, depression treatment, harsh punishment, and parental management of children's health. Fundamental components of MI that may be incorporated into clinical practice are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Demonstrating Competence: The Portfolio Interview for Management Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Pamela

    1997-01-01

    Describes how one college helps students assemble a portfolio for the job search. Claims that presenting physical evidence of competencies is better than just talking about them. Outlines the characteristics of a portfolio and its use in an interview. Reports the results of an employer survey of desired job skills. (RJM)

  14. Using class interviews to evaluate teaching and courses in higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using class interviews to evaluate teaching and courses in higher education. ... South African Journal of Higher Education ... New approaches and teaching methods in Higher Education call for a variety of measures to evaluate their effectiveness, particularly where student demography is also changing and language ...

  15. Positive Health Psychology: An Interview with Shelley Taylor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Grant Jewell

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Shelley Taylor, a professor of Psychology at the University of California in Los Angles (California). Addresses topics such as how she became interested in psychology, the importance of health psychology in the curriculum, the ideal training for students in health psychology, and her work with "positive illusions." (CMK)

  16. Exploring the Career Construction Interview for Vocational Personality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Susan R.; Wolff, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the validity and usefulness of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) with college students (n = 83) from a midsize Southern university. Using Pearson's "r" correlations, comparisons were made between the three-letter RIASEC Strong Interest Inventory (SII) theme code and RIASEC theme codes derived from…

  17. Using Motivational Interviewing to Address College Client Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Mark B.; Schmitt, Dorothy M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI; W. R. Miller & S. Rollnick, 2002) is presented as a potentially effective counseling strategy for assisting traditionally aged college students in reducing their problematic, heavy alcohol use. MI's congruence with two developmental theories--Self-Determination Theory (R. M. Ryan & E. L. Deci, 2000) and…

  18. Student understanding of Symmetry and Gauss' law

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Helping students learn why Gauss' law can or cannot be easily applied to determine the strength of the electric field at various points for a particular charge distribution, and then helping them learn to determine the shape of the Gaussian surfaces if sufficient symmetry exists can develop their reasoning and problem solving skills. We investigate the difficulties that students in calculus-based introductory physics courses have with the concepts of symmetry, electric field and electric flux that are pivotal to Gauss' law of electricity. Determination of the electric field using Gauss' law requires discerning the symmetry of a particular charge distribution and being able to predict the direction of the electric field everywhere if a high symmetry exists. It requires a good grasp of how to add the electric field vectors using the principle of superposition, and the concepts of area vector and electric flux. We administered free response and multiple-choice questions and conducted interviews with individual s...

  19. Transactional sex and sexual harassment between professors and students at an urban university in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    This paper adds to discussion of transactional sex relationships in Africa by examining the distinction between transactional sex and sexual harassment in the context of professor-student relationships and their inherent power dynamics. By exploring the ways in which female university students in urban Benin toe the line between empowered agent and victim, I show how the power differential between professor and student obstructs the professor's ability to objectively determine consent, and examine why, in spite of this differential, male professors are frequently perceived as the victims of these relationships. Ethnographic data were gathered through participant observation on a public university campus in Benin and in-depth interviews and focus groups with 34 students and 5 professors from that university. Findings suggest that the problem of sexual harassment on campus will be difficult to address so long as transactional sex relationships between professors and students are permitted to continue.

  20. An Interview with Adolf Muschg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ricker-Abderhalden

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolf Muschg, a popular writer, teacher and aesthetician, is one of the comparatively few contemporary Swiss writers who has been able to establish himself firmly in Germany. In recent years, he has begun to attract the attention of American critics and Germanists as well. In the interview, Adolf Muschg deals with a wide spectrum of issues. He identifies the authors and works that mean most to him. He traces, for instance, his changing relationship to Goethe, whom he recently rediscovered. In Goethe's works, above all in his scientific studies, Muschg finds issues that are of central importance to the survival of our planet. He detects a kinship between Goethe and the "Greens" of the seventies and looks back critically on the turbulent sixties. He provides an analysis of the current tensions between the USA and Western Europe, while confirming his keen and very personal involvement with the USA. But at the core of the interview are his extensive comments on the creative processes and the perils inherent in writing fiction. There he deals with the complex relationship between literature and therapy, the therapeutic potential of literature for the writer and the reader. By describing the novelist's difficult journey on the narrow path between self-revelation and indiscretion, he also reflects upon the related issue of literary narcissism.

  1. Interviews and Dialogue Introduction Interview with Brenda Leibowitz

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    88 Journal of Student Affairs in Africa | Volume 4(1) 2016, 87–97 | 2307-6267 | DOI: 10.14426/jsaa.v4i1.147. Some people are excellent teachers in the traditional sense in that they teach well intuitively, and do not really spend much time in professional development or conducting research on their teaching. But it is ...

  2. Volume, rates, source and types of add-on pathology test requests across five hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew; Toouli, George; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2012-01-26

    Add-on test requests, where a clinician requests further test assays on an existing specimen, contribute disproportionately to pathology service workload. However, little research has quantified the volume, rates, source or types of add-on tests. This study provides a descriptive analysis of add-on testing within a pathology service serving five hospitals. We analyzed 6 months of test data extracted from a pathology service in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Add-on requests were analyzed in terms of total volume and as a proportion of all test requests and test assays; ten most frequently requested add-on test types for clinical chemistry and hematology; by patient registration category; and proportions of add-on requests received within 1-, 4-, 8-, and 24-h of specimen collection. Add-on test requests constituted 3.7% (n=19,541) of the total 529,361 test requests. Clinical chemistry and hematology add-on requests accounted for 76.9% of all add-on requests. The add-on request rate was higher in the clinical chemistry (5.4%) than in hematology (1.3%). Patients who entered hospital via the emergency department had the highest rates of add-on requests. A total of 79.5% of add-on requests across the pathology service were made within 24-h of specimen collection. The volume of add-on requests is substantial and varies considerably by test type and patient registration category thus impacting differentially upon pathology service departments. While some add-on requests are unavoidable in clinical practice, others are precipitated by inadequate information at the point of care. Improving appropriate utilization of add-on testing will reduce their burden on pathology services.

  3. The art of science: interview with Professor John Archibald Wheeler

    CERN Document Server

    Bičák, Jiři

    2011-01-01

    During the conference on the methods of differential geometry in physics in Warsaw in June 1976, Professor Wheeler gave an interview for the Czechoslovak Journal of Physics A. After Professor Wheeler authorized the English version in January 1977, the Czech translation was published in \\v{C}eskoslovensk\\'y \\v{c}asopis pro fyziku A (1978) and soon afterwards the Polish translation appeared in Postepy fizyky. After John Wheeler's recent death it occurred to me that it would now be appropriate to publish the original interview from 1976 so that it would not be lost to English readers; and so, despite being more than 30 years old, the interview appeared in the special issue on quantum gravity of "General Relativity and Gravitation" dedicated to the memory of J. A. Wheeler. John Wheeler would now surely add more about black holes in nuclei of galaxies, not mentioning just Cygnus X-1, when discussing cosmology he would undoubtedly address the problem of dark energy etc. However, in the conversation about Einstein a...

  4. The Dimensions of the Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1981-01-01

    Develops a conceptual base for analyzing the literature on interviewing for its usefulness to the reference interview. Four holistic dimensions of the reference interview are identified and discussed in relation to interviewer decisions and other factors not directly controlled by the librarian. There are 18 references. (Author/RAA)

  5. Turning the spotlight: Looking at the interviewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Randi Skovbjerg

    an explanation for variations in interviewer behaviour? The point of departure of the study is two interviewers - a female and a male - who have conducted a range of sociolinguistic interviews for the LANCHART Centre. The studies show clear differences in what the interviewers classify as their best and worst...

  6. Comparison of switch to the highest dose of rosuvastatin vs. add-on nicotinic acid vs. add-on fenofibrate for mixed dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kei, A; Liberopoulos, E N; Mikhailidis, D P; Elisaf, M

    2013-05-01

    Use of a statin at a standard dose may be insufficient for the treatment of mixed dyslipidaemia. Whether switch to the highest dose of rosuvastatin (40 mg) or add-on nicotinic acid (NA) or fenofibrate is more efficacious remains unknown. This was a prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end-point (PROBE) study. We recruited 100 patients with mixed dyslipidaemia who were treated with a statin at a standard dose but had not achieved lipid targets. Patients were randomised to switch to the highest approved dose of rosuvastatin (40 mg), add-on extended release nicotinic acid (ER-NA)/l-aropiprant (LRPT) or to add-on micronised fenofibrate for 3 months. The primary end-point was the change in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) levels. Ninety patients completed the study. Non-HDL-C decreased in all groups (by 23, 24 and 7% in the rosuvastatin, ER-NA/LRPT and fenofibrate group, respectively, p add-on fenofibrate group. Add-on ER-NA/LRPT was associated with the greatest HDL-C increase, while add-on ER-NA/LRPT and add-on fenofibrate were associated with the greatest triglyceride decrease. Twenty-four per cent of patients initially randomised to add-on ER-NA/LRPT dropped out because of side effects. In conclusion, switch to the highest dose of rosuvastatin and add-on ER-NA/LRPT may be better options compared with add-on fenofibrate for the management of patients with mixed dyslipidaemia not on treatment goals with a statin at a standard dose. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Repeated Self- and Peer-Review Leads to Continuous Improvement in Child Interviewing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Stacia N.; Lyon, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined whether a training model that focuses on consistent exposure to protocol procedure, self-evaluation, and intensive peer-review sessions could improve interviewers’ ability to adhere to best practices. Law students (N = 19) interviewed 5- to 10-year-old children on a weekly basis as part of a semester-long forensic child interviewing class. They transcribed their interviews, and participated in one-hour self and peer-reviews. The proportion of each question type was calculated (option-posing, Wh-, and open-invitations) within each interview for each interviewer. Across ten weeks of interviews, interviewers consistently improved their performance, decreasing the proportion of option-posing questions by 31% and increasing the proportion of open-invitations by 47%. All interviewers improved. The present study suggests that with consistent self-evaluation and peer-review, forensic interviewers can incrementally improve their performance. PMID:27239248

  8. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  9. An Interview with Ralph Clare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Gonzalez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fictions Inc., and this interview, offers detailed readings of a diverse body of texts that, in one way or another, push readers to think about the role of the corporation in 20th and 21st century America. Using a complex set of critical tools—historicizing the rise in the pharmaceutical industry in the 1980s to read White Noise; drawing on Slavoj Žižek and Louis Althusser to explain the model of resistance that appears in Crying of Lot 49; looking at 1980s gentrification policies and government outsourcing while discussing Ghostbusters—Clare generates a series of insights about the fears and the desires embodied in the corporation. What he finds is that older avenues of resistance to consumer capitalism have closed, but the desire to imagine new ones, and maybe create them, remains open.

  10. Interview with Theo van Leeuwen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Moschini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of LEA features an interview with Professor Theo van Leeuwen, where – starting from the fundamental role of the Hallidayan socio-semiotic approach to language in the development of Multimodality – he illustrates the background of his theoretical work as social semiotician and critical discourse analyst. Theo van Leeuwen broadly deals with issues such as the new emerging field of Critical Multimodal Studies, the importance of the socio-cultural perspective in Multimodality and the potential encounter between Multimodality and Cognitivism, with special reference to the concept of “social cognition” and to Metaphor Theory. He concludes his conversation with a reflection on the function of Studies in the Humanities in a specialized and digitally mediated world.

  11. An Interview with Hermann Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Holmes

    1979-08-01

    Full Text Available In an interview with Joan E. Holmes (University of Kansas, Hermann Kant, novelist and current president of the Writers Union of the German Democratic Republic (GDR or East Germany, discusses his own work, literary developments since 1949 in the GDR, and the changing concept of socialist realism. Central to all of these topics is the role of the writer and the function of literature in a socialist system, a question which resulted in a heated controversy during the summer and fall of 1979 in the GDR. The crux of the matter lies in the nature of Marxist theory and is at least as old as the Sickingen debate of 1859, when Marx, Engels and Lassalle discussed the kind of literature that the fledgling socialist movement should encourage in order to promote the building of a future communist society. The question of the role of the author and the function of literature has reappeared since that time in various forms—in the formulation of the concept of socialist realism in the 1930's by Gorki and Soviet Party Secretary Zhadanov, in the formalism debates of the 1950's, in the dictates of the Bitterfelder Way (1960's, and in the liberalizing influence of the proclamations of the Eighth Party Congress in 1971. Since the Ninth Party Congress (May 1976, the controversy has become a critical matter in the cultural policies of the GDR, a country where literature is considered an important political tool. Hermann Kant, in the tradition of the Eighth and Ninth Party Congresses, presents in this interview a broad interpretation of the concept of socialist realism, while at the same time strongly emphasizing the responsibility of the author vis à vis the socialist society. He questions whether too much rapid change can be beneficial for East Germany, and suggests that both tolerance and caution are required.

  12. Podcast - Interview with Anna Sfard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    During the 14th - 17th of November PhD Students and researchers from e-learning lab attended a PhD course called "Perspectives on Identity in Learning and Education Research". This course was co-organised by three local doctoral schools; The International Doctoral school of Technology and Science...... (an acquisition and a participation metaphor). Further, she describes how she in her research has adopted the notion of 'identification', rather than speaking about 'identity'....

  13. The Portrait of a Good Foreign Language Teacher: A Cross-Interview Analysis of Private Language Course Administrators’ Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şakire Erbay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The attempt to present the profile of a good language teacher is an early arrival, dating back to 1920s. The literature to date abounds with much scholarly attention to exploration of mainly students’ and teachers’ point of view regarding the issue. However, the paucity of research into other different perspectives in Turkey serves as the backcloth of the current study qualitative in nature, which employs in-depth interviews with the six administrators of six private courses in a province in the northeast part of Turkey with the aim of filling this hiatus. The data gathered via individual indepth interviews were analysed via content analysis, in which the researchers went through the transcribed texts to find the recurring themes, enumerate them, create broad categories out of them, and pick excerpts that could support their interpretations. Although it was not intended to provide definitive good language teacher profile, issues such as a finely-tuned classroom authority, energy, tolerance, creativity, a sound knowledge of language, an ongoing professional development, enhancement of student autonomy, good communication skills, and teaching experience were found as the distinguishing effective teacher characteristics, analogous to the previous studies. However, the findings contradict with the seemingly omnipresent tendency towards describing native speaker as good language teacher in the existing literature in that local Turkish teachers were described as effective teachers with their in-class teaching roles, second language learning experience, strong empathy with students while their native counterparts were valued solely for their communicative ability and potential role to add to institution prestige. The current study with a glimpse of Turkey is believed to help capture the essence of the issue by providing a close scrutiny of a different perspective, in turn yield insight for prospective English language teachers and teacher education

  14. Does waist circumference uncorrelated with BMI add valuable information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngueta, Gerard; Laouan-Sidi, Elhadji A; Lucas, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Estimation of relative contribution of Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) on health outcomes requires a regression model that includes both obesity metrics. But, multicollinearity could yield biased estimates. To address the multicollinearity issue between BMI and WC, we used the residual model approach. The standard WC (Y-axis) was regressed on the BMI (X-axis) to obtain residual WC. Data from two adult population surveys (Nunavik Inuit and James Bay Cree) were analysed to evaluate relative effect of BMI and WC on four cardiometabolic risk factors: insulin, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein levels. In multivariate models, standard WC and BMI were significantly associated with cardiometabolic outcomes. Residual WC was not linked with any outcomes. The BMI effect was weakened by including standard WC in the model, but its effect remained unchanged if residual WC was considered. The strong correlation between standard WC and BMI does not allow assessment of their relative contributions to health in the same model without a risk of making erroneous estimations. By contrast with BMI, fat distribution (residual WC) does not add valuable information to a model that already contains overall adiposity (BMI) in Inuit and Cree. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Does aquaculture add resilience to the global food system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troell, Max; Naylor, Rosamond L; Metian, Marc; Beveridge, Malcolm; Tyedmers, Peter H; Folke, Carl; Arrow, Kenneth J; Barrett, Scott; Crépin, Anne-Sophie; Ehrlich, Paul R; Gren, Asa; Kautsky, Nils; Levin, Simon A; Nyborg, Karine; Österblom, Henrik; Polasky, Stephen; Scheffer, Marten; Walker, Brian H; Xepapadeas, Tasos; de Zeeuw, Aart

    2014-09-16

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector and continues to expand alongside terrestrial crop and livestock production. Using portfolio theory as a conceptual framework, we explore how current interconnections between the aquaculture, crop, livestock, and fisheries sectors act as an impediment to, or an opportunity for, enhanced resilience in the global food system given increased resource scarcity and climate change. Aquaculture can potentially enhance resilience through improved resource use efficiencies and increased diversification of farmed species, locales of production, and feeding strategies. However, aquaculture's reliance on terrestrial crops and wild fish for feeds, its dependence on freshwater and land for culture sites, and its broad array of environmental impacts diminishes its ability to add resilience. Feeds for livestock and farmed fish that are fed rely largely on the same crops, although the fraction destined for aquaculture is presently small (∼4%). As demand for high-value fed aquaculture products grows, competition for these crops will also rise, as will the demand for wild fish as feed inputs. Many of these crops and forage fish are also consumed directly by humans and provide essential nutrition for low-income households. Their rising use in aquafeeds has the potential to increase price levels and volatility, worsening food insecurity among the most vulnerable populations. Although the diversification of global food production systems that includes aquaculture offers promise for enhanced resilience, such promise will not be realized if government policies fail to provide adequate incentives for resource efficiency, equity, and environmental protection.

  16. What a signature adds to the consent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neary, Peter

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: "Consent is a process by which a patient is informed and becomes a participant in decisions regarding their medical management." It is argued, however, that providing a signature to a form adds little to the quality of this process. METHODS: Views regarding the consent ritual of nonselected patients undergoing endoscopy (cystoscopy or sigmoidoscopy) were prospectively studied together with those of the attending staff. Patient volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups and given verbal explanation before the procedure, either alone (group A) or with a request to sign a form in addition (group B). A standardized questionnaire regarding preferences then was applied. RESULTS: A total of 37 patients (22 men) were studied along with seven staff members. Most surveyed felt that signing a consent form helped to empower the patient (group A, 84%; group B, 83%; staff, 100%). Although the patients mainly believed that it functioned primarily to protect the hospital and doctor (group A, 89%; group B, 67%), only one patient (3% of total) felt that such a formality undermined the patient-doctor relationship. Most staff members favored signing a form (86%). The majority of patients either favored it (group A, 47%; group B, 78%) or expressed no strong preference (group A, 32%; group B, 11%). Interestingly, more women than men preferred signing (73 vs. 55%; p = 0.25), perhaps because more women believed that it functioned to preserve autonomy (93 vs. 77% of men). Age was no particular determinant of perspective. CONCLUSION: Although it may be viewed as primarily serving to protect the doctor and hospital, the formal process of signing written consent forms appeals to patients and staff.

  17. Year-End Exams Add Urgency to Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Returning from spring vacation, Dowan McNair-Lee's students find their desks in neat rows, facing forward. For the previous seven months, the 8th graders had sat in clusters, facing one another, to facilitate discussion. But janitors used the break to ready the classroom for the year-end tests that are only two weeks away. The new arrangement is…

  18. Can Value Added Add Value to Teacher Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The five thoughtful papers included in this issue of "Educational Researcher" ("ER") raise new questions about the use of value-added methods (VAMs) to estimate teachers' contributions to students' learning as part of personnel evaluation. The papers address both technical and implementation concerns, considering potential…

  19. Experience Matters: Innovative Techniques Add up to Mathematical Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Ryan M.; Savitz, Fred R.

    2010-01-01

    The first-year college experience is anxiety-producing, and for college students, especially those representing traditionally underserved populations, the experience can be particularly daunting. To mitigate against potential failure a father/son team, the father a professor of education and the son a professor of mathematics, pooled their…

  20. The Transfer Credit Problem: Can Accountants Add 2 + 2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dennis

    Students in intensive two-year college accounting programs often encounter difficulties in trying to transfer to four-year college accounting programs. Courses such as auditing and taxation, which according to American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) standards, should be taken in the third or fourth year of a four-year…

  1. Video interview with Michael Dell

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Michael Dell, founder and presently Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Office of the DELL computer company visited CERN on Tuesday 26th January 2010. The Bulletin and the Video productions team had the opportunity to meet him. The video interview is transcribed for your convenience.   Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer. What motivated you to come and visit CERN? I obviously heard about the great science and research has going on here, and DELL is very pleased to be a partner and providing a lot of the computers to analyse the data and I really wanted to see for myself in person, some of the great science that is going on here. What is your view on fundamental research in IT, and in general? I think if you look at the field of science in the last hundred years, we have been able to solve a lot of problems, but there are still lots of unsolved problems and unsolved mysteries. And it is only through basic fundamental research that we will address these probl...

  2. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 3: strategies for increasing interview validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert E; van Walsum, Kimberly L; Spafford, Marlee M; Edwards, Janine C; Turnwald, Grant H

    2004-01-01

    The veterinary school admission interview is a widely used selection tool, yet concerns persist about its reliability, validity, and cost. Relative to medicine, optometry, and dentistry schools, veterinary schools have been more likely to conduct panel interviews and to fix the interview's weight in selection decisions, strategies that increase interview validity. This article provides strategies for further increasing the veterinary school interview's validity. Interview reliability and validity studies point to key strategies the veterinary school admissions committee can implement before the interview: (1) establishing the interview's purpose(s); (2) conducting a "job" analysis to identify desirable candidate skills, knowledge, and attributes; (3) developing a structured and panel interview where interviewers, if possible, are blind to other admission data; (4) training interviewers; (5) setting a reasonable interview schedule; and (6) determining methods for analyzing applicant data. During the interview, interviewers should proceed through a structured series of steps: (1) open the interview with a specified agenda; (2) probe for information using structured questions and anchored rating scales; (3) close the interview to allow for candidate questions; and (4) evaluate the interview data. After the interview, the admissions committee should (1) analyze the interview data within and across interviewers and (2) analyze the data across all selection tools in order to assign relative weights to the selection tools.

  3. Does a selection interview predict year 1 performance in dental school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, R; Ellis, J; Valentine, R A

    2017-05-01

    It is important for dental schools to select students who will complete their degree and progress on to become the dentists of the future. The process should be transparent, fair and ethical and utilise selection tools that select appropriate students. The interview is an integral part of UK dental schools student selection procedures. This study was undertaken in order to determine whether different interview methods (Cardiff with a multiple mini interview and Newcastle with a more traditional interview process) along with other components used in selection predicted academic performance in students. The admissions selection data for two dental schools (Cardiff and Newcastle) were collected and analysed alongside student performance in academic examinations in Year 1 of the respective schools. Correlation statistics were used to determine whether selection tools had any relevance to academic performance once students were admitted to their respective Universities. Data was available for a total of 177 students (77 Cardiff and 100 Newcastle). Examination performance did not correlate with admission interview scores at either school; however UKCAT score was linked to poor academic performance. Although interview methodology does not appear to correlate with academic performance it remains an integral and very necessary part of the admissions process. Ultimately schools need to be comfortable with their admissions procedures in attracting and selecting the calibre of students they desire. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The MLA Interview: The Department's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Dianne F.

    1999-01-01

    Offers advice about interviewing at the Modern Language Association (MLA) convention: practice or rehearse issues; allow enthusiasm about teaching to show; model good teaching practices in the interview; and listen thoughtfully and resist the temptation to talk too much. (RS)

  5. Are Employment Interview Skills "That" Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, Vickey

    1977-01-01

    Based on interviews with employers of alumni from a vocational-technical school, instructors discuss the importance of an employment interview, stressing composure, preparation, appropriate business-like attire, importance of a resume, and personality and attitude. (TA)

  6. Real Talk: Interviews, Radio Broadcasts and Videotaping as Context in Advanced Italian Conversation Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Clara

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problems faced by teachers of third-year (i.e. advanced) Italian language courses, particularly in developing students' speaking skills. Stresses the importance of "real talk" and discusses relevant student activities such as interviewing native speakers, preparing live radio broadcasts, and videotaping students speeches and…

  7. Dismantling Motivational Interviewing and Feedback for College Drinkers: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Scott T.; Vader, Amanda M.; Harris, T. Robert; Field, Craig A.; Jouriles, Ernest N.

    2009-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a counseling style that has been shown to reduce heavy drinking among college students. To date, all studies of MI among college students have used a format that includes a feedback profile delivered in an MI style. This study was a dismantling trial of MI and feedback among heavy-drinking college students. After…

  8. Project NANO: Will allowing high school students to use research grade scanning electron microscopes increase their interest in science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leslie TenEyck

    In this study, one AP Biology curriculum unit and one general Biology curriculum unit that included tabletop Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) technology provided by Project NANO, a grant-funded, collaborative initiative designed to integrate cutting-edge nanotechnology into high school classrooms were implemented at a public high school in rural Oregon. Nine students participated in the AP unit and 52 students participated in the general Biology unit. Each student completed an opinion-based pre and post survey to determine if using the SEM as a part of the curriculum unit had an impact on his or her interest in science or in nanoscience. Interviews were conducted to add to the data. The results indicate that using the SEM can increase a student's interest in science. Recommendations for improving student experience were identified.

  9. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  10. Macro Data with the FRED Excel Add-in

    OpenAIRE

    Humberto Barreto

    2013-01-01

    This working paper is intended to be a chapter in a forthcoming book, tentatively titled Macroeconomics with Excel. The printed book will be a manual for professors, while the Excel workbooks are freely available to students. See www.depauw.edu/learn/macroexcel for more information on this project. This version was presented at the 9th annual Economics Teaching Conference on October 25, 2013.

  11. Factor structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist with adults with intellectual disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Hatton, Chris; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The PAS-ADD Checklist is designed to screen for likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). The specificity of recommended subscales derived from diagnostic criteria is unclear. This paper therefore investigates the factor structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist to determine the adequacy of empirically derived subscales. \\ud METHOD: A total of 1,115 informants who had known service users for a median of 24 months completed the PAS-ADD Checklist on 1,155...

  12. Spectacle plane add power of multifocal intraocular lenses according to effective lens position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Youngsub; Song, Jong Suk; Kim, Hyo Myung

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of predicting the spectacle plane add power of multifocal intraocular lenses (MIOLs) based on the effective lens position (ELP) using the Haigis formula. Retrospective cross-sectional study. A total of 26 eyes from 18 consecutive patients who underwent phacoemulsification with Tecnis MIOL (Z*B00) implantation. The postoperative spectacle plane add power of MIOLs was determined from the monocular defocus curve. The predicted add power error was defined as the difference between the predicted and postoperatively measured spectacle plane add power. The median absolute predicted add power error determined by the preoperatively estimated ELP using the Haigis formula was compared with power error calculated using the value presented by the manufacturer. The correlations among predicted add power error, postoperative spectacle plane add power, and back-calculated ELP were analyzed. The median absolute predicted add power error calculated using the Haigis formula (0.13 D) was significantly smaller than that calculated using the value presented by the manufacturer (0.26 D). The predicted add power error determined by the value presented by the manufacturer was negatively correlated with back-calculated ELP. The postoperative spectacle plane add power was negatively correlated with back-calculated ELP in the ZKB00 IOL (n = 21). The predicted spectacle plane add power of MIOLs using the ELP of the Haigis formula was more accurate than that using the value presented by the manufacturer. The spectacle plane add power of MIOLs decreased as ELP increased. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Embedding objects during 3D printing to add new functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2016-07-01

    A novel method for integrating and embedding objects to add new functionalities during 3D printing based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) (also known as fused filament fabrication or molten polymer deposition) is presented. Unlike typical 3D printing, FDM-based 3D printing could allow objects to be integrated and embedded during 3D printing and the FDM-based 3D printed devices do not typically require any post-processing and finishing. Thus, various fluidic devices with integrated glass cover slips or polystyrene films with and without an embedded porous membrane, and optical devices with embedded Corning(®) Fibrance™ Light-Diffusing Fiber were 3D printed to demonstrate the versatility of the FDM-based 3D printing and embedding method. Fluid perfusion flow experiments with a blue colored food dye solution were used to visually confirm fluid flow and/or fluid perfusion through the embedded porous membrane in the 3D printed fluidic devices. Similar to typical 3D printed devices, FDM-based 3D printed devices are translucent at best unless post-polishing is performed and optical transparency is highly desirable in any fluidic devices; integrated glass cover slips or polystyrene films would provide a perfect optical transparent window for observation and visualization. In addition, they also provide a compatible flat smooth surface for biological or biomolecular applications. The 3D printed fluidic devices with an embedded porous membrane are applicable to biological or chemical applications such as continuous perfusion cell culture or biocatalytic synthesis but without the need for any post-device assembly and finishing. The 3D printed devices with embedded Corning(®) Fibrance™ Light-Diffusing Fiber would have applications in display, illumination, or optical applications. Furthermore, the FDM-based 3D printing and embedding method could also be utilized to print casting molds with an integrated glass bottom for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device replication

  14. Interpersonal Stance in Conflict Conversation: Police Interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnes, Merijn

    2013-01-01

    In this work we focus on the dynamics of the conflict that often arises in a police interview between suspects and police officers. Police interviews are a special type of social encounter, primarily because of the authority role of the police interviewer and the often uncooperative stance that the

  15. The E-Mail Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Eileen G.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses differences between e-mail reference interviews and those conducted using other media; presents a taxonomy of approaches to e-mail interviews; and introduces a model e-mail interview, based on a project at the University of Maryland's College of Library and Information Services. (Author/LRW)

  16. Different Approaches to the Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1989-01-01

    Develops two models of reference interview behavior: the Needs-Oriented Model and the Question-Oriented Model. The models are tested by reanalysis of data from a 1978 dissertation on interviews in the public library setting. Results show the appropriateness of the models and indicate that the question-oriented interview was more prevalent. (eight…

  17. An Interview with Jose Eustaquio Romao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordao, Clarissa Menezes

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of the European Union (EU) Year of Intercultural Dialogue, 2008, Clarissa Menezes Jordao interviewed Jose Eustaquio Romao, Director of the Paulo Freire Institute in Brazil. Her edited translation of that interview is presented here. In the interview Romao, guided by the legacy of Brazilian educator, Paulo Freire, discusses the…

  18. Error-free 320 Gb/s simultaneous add-drop multiplexing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Clausen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We report on the first demonstration of error-free time-division add-drop multiplexing at 320 Gb/s. The add- and drop-operations are performed simultaneously in a non-linear optical loop mirror with only 100 m of highly non-linear fibre.......We report on the first demonstration of error-free time-division add-drop multiplexing at 320 Gb/s. The add- and drop-operations are performed simultaneously in a non-linear optical loop mirror with only 100 m of highly non-linear fibre....

  19. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schober, Michael F; Conrad, Frederick G; Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    ..., administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews...

  20. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    ... affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types...

  1. The SAICA syllabus for Ethics: does it all add up?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deon Rossouw

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The South African Institute for Chartered Accountants (SAICA recently (2005 announced guidelines for a syllabus for Ethics that is to be included in the undergraduate studies of students studying towards the Chartered Accountant (CA qualification. The purpose of this paper is to make a critical comparison between the objectives and the outcomes of the SAICA Ethics syllabus to determine whether the proposed outcomes match the proposed objectives. A teaching-learning competency framework for applied ethics will be introduced first, to provide a theoretical framework within which the stated comparison between the proposed objectives and outcomes of the Ethics syllabus can be carried  out.

  2. Learning by Designing Interview Methods in Special Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Lise Høgh

    2017-01-01

    , and people with learning disabilities worked together to develop five new visual and digital methods for interviewing in special education. Thereby not only enhancing the students’ competences, knowledge and proficiency in innovation and research, but also proposing a new teaching paradigm for university......With the current emphasis on innovation and research in higher education, this paper proposes design-based research as base for a teaching approach to enhance the learning environment of university college students. The paper depicts how students, professors, professional educationalists...

  3. Transitioning from Clinical to Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper one aspect of the transition that must be made by experienced clinicians who become involved in conducting qualitative health research is examined, specifically, the differences between clinical and research interviewing. A clinician who is skillful and comfortable carrying out a clinical interview may not initially apprehend the important differences between these categories and contexts of interviewing. This situation can lead to difficulties and diminished quality of data collection because the purpose, techniques and orientation of a qualitative research interview are distinct from those of the clinical interview. Appreciation of these differences between interview contexts and genres, and strategies for addressing challenges associated with these differences, can help clinician researchers to become successful qualitative interviewers.

  4. COLOR AND ADVERTISING SPECIALTY COURSE: SPECIFIC FEATURES OF ETHNOCOLORISTIC INTERVIEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tofika-Gyzy Kerimova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author describes the importance of color in advertising. The primary objective of this article is to provide further information on this topic to the students of the International Center for Modular Training System Enhancement. Drawing on the results of various ethno-coloristic interviews, the author identifies new opportunities for further research in social sciences, philosophy and marketing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-20

  5. Strukturierte Interviews zur Studienplatzvergabe in der Medizin: Erste Erfahrungen [Structured interviews of applicants at a medical school: first experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waydhas, Christian

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: Interviews are one of the recently by the legislation accepted tools to select applicants for admission to a German medical school. In this manuscript the development of the interview procedure und first results will be presented. Methods: The list of interview items, the criteria for evaluating the candidates, the respective weighing of the interview results and the “Abitur” grades and the interview organisation have been developed by a nominal group process. The interviewers were questioned by means of an internet-based online tool. Results: A list of 7 items for interrogating the candidates was developed. With the interview, a maximum of 70 points could be achieved, while the “abitur” grade could contribute 80 points at most. Those 297 applicants with the best “Abitur” grades and the 1st to 3rd position of our medical school in their preference list for medical schools were invited. The relation of candidates to vacant positions was 3:1. We found no correlation of the achieved results in the interview with age, gender or „Abitur“ grades. The interviewers were satisfied or very satisfied with the efficiency and the concept of the interview process in 59% and with the compositon of the interview commissions in even 78%. There was less satisfaction with the list of interview items (43% satisfied. Conclusions: The recently introduced interview procedure for student applicants at our medical school was widely accepted by the medical teachers. The faculty has entered a constructive discussion to further develop the interview procedure based on this first experience. Particular focus will be put on the modification of the interview items. Reliability with respect to confounding variables such as age, gender, „Abitur“ grades was high. The validity of the interviews remains open, however. [german] Zielsetzung: Auswahlgespräche sind eines der zugelassenen Instrumente die am besten geeigneten Studierenden zu

  6. Self-assessment and goal-setting is associated with an improvement in interviewing skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hanley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Describe the relationship between medical students’ self-assessment and goal-setting (SAGS skills and development of interviewing skills during the first-year doctoring course. Method: 157 first-year medical students completed three two-case standardized patient (SP interviews. After each of the first two, students viewed videotapes of their interview, completed a SAGS worksheet, and reviewed a selected tape segment in a seminar. SAGS was categorized into good and poor quality and interviewing skills were rated by trained raters. Results: SAGS improved over time (37% good week 1 vs. 61% good week 10. Baseline SAGS and interviewing skills were not associated. Initial SAGS quality was associated with change in interviewing skills – those with poor-quality SAGS demonstrated a decrease and those with good-quality SAGS demonstrated an increase in scores by 17 weeks (ANOVA F=4.16, p=0.024. For students whose SAGS skills were good at both week 1 and 10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 1–10 and then increased significantly at week 17. For those whose SAGS remained ‘poor’ in weeks 1–10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 10–17. Conclusions: In general, the quality of students’ SAGS improved over time. Poor baseline SAGS skills and failure to improve were associated with a decrease in interviewing skills at 17 weeks. For students with better SAGS, interviewing skills increased at week 17. Improvement in SAGS skills was not associated with improved interviewing skills. Understanding structured self-assessment skills helps identify student characteristics that influence progressive mastery of communication skills and therefore may inform curriculum and remediation tailoring.

  7. Self-assessment and goal-setting is associated with an improvement in interviewing skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kathleen; Zabar, Sondra; Charap, Joseph; Nicholson, Joseph; Disney, Lindsey; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Describe the relationship between medical students’ self-assessment and goal-setting (SAGS) skills and development of interviewing skills during the first-year doctoring course. Method 157 first-year medical students completed three two-case standardized patient (SP) interviews. After each of the first two, students viewed videotapes of their interview, completed a SAGS worksheet, and reviewed a selected tape segment in a seminar. SAGS was categorized into good and poor quality and interviewing skills were rated by trained raters. Results SAGS improved over time (37% good week 1 vs. 61% good week 10). Baseline SAGS and interviewing skills were not associated. Initial SAGS quality was associated with change in interviewing skills – those with poor-quality SAGS demonstrated a decrease and those with good-quality SAGS demonstrated an increase in scores by 17 weeks (ANOVA F=4.16, p=0.024). For students whose SAGS skills were good at both week 1 and 10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 1–10 and then increased significantly at week 17. For those whose SAGS remained ‘poor’ in weeks 1–10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 10–17. Conclusions In general, the quality of students’ SAGS improved over time. Poor baseline SAGS skills and failure to improve were associated with a decrease in interviewing skills at 17 weeks. For students with better SAGS, interviewing skills increased at week 17. Improvement in SAGS skills was not associated with improved interviewing skills. Understanding structured self-assessment skills helps identify student characteristics that influence progressive mastery of communication skills and therefore may inform curriculum and remediation tailoring. PMID:25059835

  8. Calling all LEGO lovers! Add a mini control room to your collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The mini LHC Lego project launched in March (see here) now has almost 6,000 supporters - well on its way to the 10,000 votes needed for it to (hopefully!) hit store shelves. This week, the project added a new feature to its line: a mini control centre! The new LEGO Control centre, featuring operators "Kerstin" and "Marco".   The mini LHC project is the brainchild of ATLAS PhD student Nathan Readioff, who designed Lego replicas of the LHC and the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments on a micro scale. Each detector model is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand but crammed with detailed internal systems revealed by cutaway walls. Every major detector component is represented by a Lego piece. Now, Nathan has created a control centre to complement the mini LHC project. This would be an add-on feature for Lego’s consideration, should they decide to develop the accelerator into a box set. “The control centre is ...

  9. 40 CFR 63.3966 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3966 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction... add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency as part of the performance test...

  10. Repeated Self- and Peer-Review Leads to Continuous Improvement in Child Interviewing Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg, Stacia N.; Lyon, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined whether a training model that focuses on consistent exposure to protocol procedure, self-evaluation, and intensive peer-review sessions could improve interviewers’ ability to adhere to best practices. Law students (N = 19) interviewed 5- to 10-year-old children on a weekly basis as part of a semester-long forensic child interviewing class. They transcribed their interviews, and participated in one-hour self and peer-reviews. The proportion of each question type was ...

  11. Evaluation of an interviewer as a function of interviewer gaze, reinforcement of subject gaze, and interviewer attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinke, C L; Staneski, R A; Berger, D E

    1975-01-01

    Male subjects were interviewed by female interviewers who gazed constantly, intermittently, or not at all. Experimental subjects were reinforced with green light feedback whenever they gazed at the interviewers and were punished with red light feedback when they averted gaze for more than 6 seconds. Control subjects received noncontingent green and red light feedback. Although gaze of experimental subjects toward the interviewers was increased significantly, their attitudes toward the interviewers remained the same. This was probably because the subjects did not discriminate that their gazing behavior had changed. Subjects gave the most unfavorable reactions to the nongazing interviewers, rating them as least attractive, giving them the shortest answers, and sitting farthest from them during the debriefing session. Subjects did not discriminate between high and low attractive interviewers, except that the latter were rated disproportionately low on attentiveness if they did not gaze. Interviewers with high rates of talking were preferred over interviewers with low rates of talking. It was concluded that interpersonal attraction is related to gaze and physical attractiveness through a number of mediating variables which will have to be isolated more specifically in future research.

  12. 24 CFR 990.190 - Other formula expenses (add-ons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... costs in accordance with HUD's self-sufficiency program regulations and notices. (b) Energy loan amortization. A PHA may qualify for operating subsidy for payments of principal and interest cost for energy... eligible formula expenses shall be increased by add-ons. The allowed add-ons are: (a) Self-sufficiency. A...

  13. Sildenafil add-on therapy in paediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension, experiences of a national referral centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douwes, Johannes M.; Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Van Loon, Rosa L. E.; Ploegstra, Mark-Jan; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Hillege, Hans L.; Berger, Rudolphus

    2014-01-01

    Objective In paediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the effectiveness of add-on combination PAH-therapy has not yet been systematically studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sildenafil add-on therapy in paediatric PAH patients treated with bosentan. Methods In

  14. Factor Structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Chris; Taylor, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The PAS-ADD Checklist is designed to screen for likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). The specificity of recommended subscales derived from diagnostic criteria is unclear. This paper therefore investigates the factor structure of the PAS-ADD Checklist to determine the adequacy of empirically…

  15. Screening for Psychiatric Symptoms: PAS-ADD Checklist Norms for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Hatton, C.; Dixon, L.; Douglas, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities Checklist (PAS-ADD Checklist) is a screening instrument designed to help carers recognize likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). To date there are no published PAS-ADD Checklist data on a large nonpsychiatric population of adults…

  16. On frequency domain adaptive filters using the overlap-add method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommen, P.C.W.; Jayasinghe, J.A.K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors introduce a frequency-domain adaptive filter (FDAF) configuration using the overlap-add method which has the same complexity and convergence behavior as the overlap-save configuration. It is shown that an FDAF using the overlap-add method can be realized with the same number of DFTs

  17. Cognitive Control and Attentional Selection in Adolescents with ADHD versus ADD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Laurie; Henderson, John; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    An important research question is whether Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is related to early- or late-stage attentional control mechanisms and whether this differentiates a nonhyperactive subtype (ADD). This question was addressed in a sample of 145 ADD/ADHD and typically developing comparison adolescents (aged 13-17). Attentional…

  18. 75 FR 73075 - Notice of Motion To Add Exhibit to Petition for Declaratory Order and Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Motion To Add Exhibit to Petition for Declaratory Order and... of Pella, Iowa (Complainant) filed a motion to add a document as Exhibit P-28 to its July 2, 2010... document is added to a subscribed docket(s). For assistance with any FERC Online service, please e-mail...

  19. Measuring Narcissism within Add Health: The Development and Validation of a New Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark S.; Brunell, Amy B.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the development of a measure of narcissism within the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) data set. In Study 1, items were selected from Wave III to form the Add Health Narcissism Scale (AHNS). These were factor analyzed, yielding a single factor comprised of five subscales. We correlated the AHNS and…

  20. Novel optically transparant add/drop for use in high-speed packet-switched networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, J.M.; van Bochove, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    We present a novel optically transparent add/drop node, which is able to drop data and simultaneously uses this encoded data for its add function. Hence, it does not need a local transmitter, it can process most modulation formats and can insert data at an equal or higher bit rate than the data that

  1. Low-dose add-back therapy during postoperative GnRH agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wen Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Low dose add-back therapy could effectively ameliorate hypoestrogenic side effects and simultaneously maintain the therapeutic response of GnRH agonist treatment. The treatment dropout was lower compared with a regular dose. Therefore, low dose add-back therapy can be considered a treatment choice during postoperative GnRH agonist treatment.

  2. Social and Virtual Networks: Evaluating Synchronous Online Interviewing Using Instant Messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliffe, Vanessa; Gavin, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of the quality and utility of synchronous online interviewing for data collection in social network research. Synchronous online interviews facilitated by Instant Messenger as the communication medium, were undertaken with ten final year university students. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis of…

  3. Perceptions of Learning: Interviews with First and Second Graders in a Hungarian Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habók, Anita; Babarczy, Anna

    2018-01-01

    The paper discusses children' attitudes towards school and learning soon after entering primary school in Hungary. First and second grade primary school students (N = 33) were interviewed. The interviews explored the following questions: What are the teachers' and the children's roles in the classroom? What is learning? Where do children learn?…

  4. Teaching Qualitative Research: Experiential Learning in Group-Based Interviews and Coding Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLyser, Dydia; Potter, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes experiential-learning approaches to conveying the work and rewards involved in qualitative research. Seminar students interviewed one another, transcribed or took notes on those interviews, shared those materials to create a set of empirical materials for coding, developed coding schemes, and coded the materials using those…

  5. Exploratory Assessments of Child Abuse: Children's Responses to Interviewer's Questions across Multiple Interview Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tess; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study extends field research on interviews with young children suspected of having been abused by examining multiple assessment interviews designed to be inquisitory and exploratory, rather than formal evidential or forensic interviews. Methods: Sixty-six interviews with 24 children between the ages of 3 and 6 years who were…

  6. Artifact-based reflective interviews for identifying pragmatic epistemological resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Christopher Walden

    Physics Education Research studies the science of teaching and learning physics. The process of student learning is complex, and the factors that affect it are numerous. Describing students' understanding of physics knowledge and reasoning is the basis for much productive research; however, such research fails to account for certain types of student learning difficulties. In this dissertation, I explore one source of student difficulty: personal epistemology, students' ideas about knowledge and knowing. Epistemology traditionally answers three questions: What is knowledge? How is knowledge created? And, how do we know what we know? An individual's responses to these questions can affect learning in terms of how they approach tasks involving the construction and application of knowledge. The key issue addressed in this dissertation is the effect of methodological choices on the validity and reliability of claims concerning personal epistemology. My central concern is contextual validity, how what is said about one's epistemology is not identical to how one behaves epistemologically. In response to these issues, I present here a new methodology for research on student epistemology: video artifact-based reflective interview protocols. These protocols begin with video taping students in their natural classroom activities, and then asking the participants epistemological questions immediately after watching selected scenes from their activity, contextually anchoring them in their actual learning experience. The data from these interviews is viewed in the framework of Epistemological Resource Theory, a framework of small bits of knowledge whose coordination in a given context is used to describe personal epistemology. I claim that the privileged data from these interviews allows detailed epistemological resources to be identified, and that these resources can provide greater insight into how student epistemologies are applied in learning activities. This research

  7. Students

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Homework can sometimes be more of a hindrance than a help. While learning to play an instrument, students are given pieces of music by their teacher to practice at home. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/computer-help-me-play/

  8. (Congressional Add) Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    reactions. > Audio Engineering - Are you an aspiring musician ? Join us in this workshop to examine the physics of sound in musical instruments, and apply...LCD screen. 19 Chemistry’ of Smell - How do we smell things? What is happening in our brains when we smell something? Join this workshop to

  9. Criteria for Evaluating Oral History Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsino, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for establishing criteria for evaluating oral history interviews. Presents seven evaluation categories relating to oral history tapes and three categories relating to typescripts. (CK)

  10. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught geography…

  11. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    When the European Space Agency's Huygens spacecraft makes its plunge into the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan on January 14, radio telescopes of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will help international teams of scientists extract the maximum possible amount of irreplaceable information from an experiment unique in human history. Huygens is the 700-pound probe that has accompanied the larger Cassini spacecraft on a mission to thoroughly explore Saturn, its rings and its numerous moons. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten telescopes of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), located at Pie Town and Los Alamos, NM, Fort Davis, TX, North Liberty, IA, Kitt Peak, AZ, Brewster, WA, Owens Valley, CA, and Mauna Kea, HI, will directly receive the faint signal from Huygens during its descent. Along with other radio telescopes in Australia, Japan, and China, the NRAO facilities will add significantly to the information about Titan and its atmosphere that will be gained from the Huygens mission. A European-led team will use the radio telescopes to make extremely precise measurements of the probe's position during its descent, while a U.S.-led team will concentrate on gathering measurements of the probe's descent speed and the direction of its motion. The radio-telescope measurements will provide data vital to gaining a full understanding of the winds that Huygens encounters in Titan's atmosphere. Currently, scientists know little about Titan's winds. Data from the Voyager I spacecraft's 1980 flyby indicated that east-west winds may reach 225 mph or more. North-south winds and possible vertical winds, while probably much weaker, may still be significant. There are competing theoretical models of Titan's winds, and the overall picture is best summarized as

  12. The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Psychological Distress in Canadian Adults With ADD/ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Emily; Fowler, Ken; Hesson, Jacqueline

    2016-06-10

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and psychological distress in individuals self-reporting a diagnosis of attention deficit disorder (ADD)/ADHD. This correlational study encompasses cross-sectional data from 488 male and female adults (20-64 years) who reported that they have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. Psychological distress was measured with the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Adults with ADD/ADHD and high incomes have significantly lower K10 scores than Canadians with ADD/ADHD and low incomes. Income, but not education, was significant in predicting psychological distress among the sample. Canadian adults with ADD/ADHD have an increased risk for developing psychological distress and comorbid psychiatric disorders. The findings suggest that negative outcomes associated with ADD/ADHD are not necessarily pervasive. High income may serve as a protective factor for psychological distress among adults with ADD/ADHD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Add-on Antidepressants in the Naturalistic Treatment of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder - When, Who, and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schennach, Rebecca; Obermeier, Michael; Seemüller, Florian; Jäger, Markus; Schmauss, Max; Laux, Gerd; Pfeiffer, Herbert; Naber, Dieter; Schmidt, Lutz G; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Heuser, Isabella; Maier, Wolfgang; Lemke, Matthias R; Rüther, Eckart; Klingberg, Stefan; Gastpar, Markus; Spellmann, Ilja; Musil, Richard; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antidepressant add-on treatment within the acute treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients. Antidepressant add-on was evaluated in 365 patients within a naturalistic multicenter study. Patients with/without antidepressant add-on were compared regarding clinical and treatment-related variables, response and remission, and remission of depressive and negative symptoms. The efficacy of antidepressant add-on treatment was furthermore analyzed applying marginal structure models. Twenty-three percent of the patients received antidepressant add-on for a mean duration of 50.28 (33.42) days. Patients with the diagnosis of a schizoaffective disorder, multiple illness episodes, and a longer duration of their illness as well as those with significantly fewer baseline positive symptoms, more negative and depressive symptoms, more side effects, and less subjective well-being were augmented with antidepressants. At discharge no significant effect of antidepressant add-on treatment was observed in terms of a 25% improvement (p=0.2623), a 50% improvement (p=0.3946), remission (p=0.0552), or remission of depressive (p=0.6336) and negative symptoms (p=0.8756). Also, when analyzing marginal structure models considering the diagnostic subgroups, no significant effect was found. Add-on with antidepressants is common. A final recommendation in terms of this strategy's efficacy cannot be given. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Correlating family nurse practitioners' perspectives of adult ADD/ADHD with employed pharmacotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Jennifer; Tang, Hsin-Yi Jean

    2010-08-01

    This study explores how family nurse practitioners (FNPs) in the state of Washington view adulthood attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) and how these views affect the pharmacotherapy FNPs employ. A confidential survey containing 30 questions was mailed to self-selected FNPs who practice in the state of Washington (N= 126). Descriptive and Kendall's rank correlations coefficient statistical methods were used for data analysis. The majority of respondents do not hold negative views toward adults with ADD/ADHD and are aware that their personal views may affect how they treat the disorder. Most of the respondents agreed that given the likelihood of co-morbidity of adult ADD/ADHD, it can be a challenge to diagnose the disorder. The predominant prescribed medications for adult ADD/ADHD are consistent with current pediatric guidelines, with the exception of buproprion, which was identified by 40% of the respondents as either their primary or secondary drug of choice for treating adult ADD/ADHD. Research effort needs to focus on the efficacy of buproprion for treating ADD/ADHD in adults. Moreover, exploration of the effectiveness of current pediatric guidelines to treat ADD/ADHD in adults must be assessed.

  15. Makerere University Student Interview Transcript: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t teach to that people think that mangoes cause malaria. NI: They say, don’t eat ripe mangoes. ... but don’t eat ripe mangoes because they cause malaria. These mangoes, when they ripe up, they drop ( ...

  16. Needs Analysis for Nursing Students Utilizing Questionnaires and Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Misuzu; Tremarco, John

    2005-01-01

    ESP (English for Specific Purposes) is defined by Hutchinson and Waters (1987) as ""an approach to language teaching in which all decisions as to content and method are based on the learner's reason for learning."" Following on from this concept, it is essential to gain an understanding of the needs of our learners if we are to aid EFL (English as a Foreign Language) teachers in deciding what to teach and how best to go about implementing pedagogical-driven choices. The aims of this paper wer...

  17. Evaluating Medical Students' Patient Interviewing Skills: A Biopsychosocial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    An evaluation design project was undertaken to design a cost effective, standardized method for assessing the instructional effectiveness of the changes and outcomes associated with a pilot curriculum project focusing on the importance of the medical history in clinical problem solving. (LMO)

  18. Clinical efficacy of add-back therapy in treatment of endometriosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Debin; Hu, Min; Hong, Li; Hong, Shasha; Ding, Wenjuan; Min, Jie; Fang, Gui; Guo, Wenjun

    2014-09-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness of using gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRH-a), both with and without hormonal add-back therapy, for the management of endometriosis. Cochrane library, Ovid (Embase) and Pubmed databases were searched between the years 1998 and 2013 for published, prospective, randomised controlled trials (RCT) that assessed the effectiveness of "add-back" therapy for EMs treatment. The meta-analysis was performed using RevMan V5.0. The main outcome measures were as follows: lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) immediately after treatment and after 6 months of follow-up; femoral neck BMD; serum estradiol levels; changes in the Kupperman index score; the pelvic pain score, including dysmenorrhoea and dyspareunia; and pelvic tenderness. A total of 13 RCT, including 945 participants, were identified. The evidence suggested that "add-back" therapy was more effective for symptom relief than GnRH-a alone. BMD was significantly different when comparing "add-back" therapy to GnRH-a alone, both immediately after treatment and at 6 months. The "add-back" therapy increased serum oestrogen and did not reduce the efficacy of GnRH-a for treating dysmenorrhoea and dyspareunia. A variety of add-back regimens had a same effect for the treatment of endometriosis. "Add-back" therapy, based on the GnRH-a dose, does not reduce the efficacy of using GNRH-a for the management of endometriosis. "Add-back" therapy reduced the occurrence of side effects that can occur with GnRH-a therapy alone, such as osteoporosis and menopausal syndrome. There were no statistically significant differences when comparing the effectiveness of a variety of "add-back" regimens to each other.

  19. Interview at the level of the signifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2012-01-01

    The research strategy interview at the level of the signifier was developed in relation to a qualitative interview project into cross-cultural encounters temporarily and spatially framed by academic organizational settings. The research interest is gender and ethnicity. However, neither happens all...

  20. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  1. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  2. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  3. Interviewing Child Witnesses: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywitz, Karen; Camparo, Lorinda

    1998-01-01

    Reviews suggestions derived from the clinical and experimental literatures for interviewing child witnesses to abuse. Guidelines for questioning children are provided and phases of a forensic interview are outlined in a step-by-step fashion. The suggestions presented highlight a developmental perspective designed to facilitate children's memory…

  4. The Reference Interview: Impact of Environmental Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    This paper develops two models of the reference interview: (1) the Need-Oriented Model, which emphasizes identifying the client's information needs and allows for a broad-ranging diagnostic interview; and (2) the Question-Oriented Model, which is constrained by the client's initial question and focuses on refining that specific question,…

  5. Manual for the Employability Maturity Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Richard; Bolton, Brian

    The Employability Maturity Interview (EMI) is a 10-item structured interview developed to assess readiness for the vocational rehabilitation planning process and the need for additional vocational exploration and employability services. The items deal with occupational choice, self-appraisal of abilities, self-appraisal of personality…

  6. Structured Clinical Interviews and the Inferential Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigh, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews history of psychiatric nosology and the use of interview data as a vehicle for formulating clinical inferences. Focuses on qualities of structured interviews as well as procedures for constructing these indices and methods for establishing their psychometric properties. Reviews practical and theoretical limitations relating to formal…

  7. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  8. Training in motivational interviewing in obstetrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Christina L; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Mogensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a three day training course in motivational interviewing which is an approach to helping people to change could improve the communication skills of obstetric healthcare professionals in their interaction with obese pregnant women. DESIGN: Intervention study. SETTING......: The Region of Southern Denmark. METHODS: Eleven obstetric healthcare professionals working with obese pregnant women underwent a three day course in motivational interviewing techniques and were assessed before- and after training to measure the impact on their overall performance as well as the effect...... on specific behavioral techniques observed during interviews. FINDINGS: With a few exceptions, the participants changed their behavior appropriate to the motivational interviewing technique. The participants made more interventions towards the principles of motivational interviewing (adherent and non...

  9. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  10. Skype interviewing: The new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksana Janghorban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  11. Outcomes and lessons learned regarding the use of interviewing for baccalaureate nursing school admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce Splann

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the adoption, use, and outcomes of an admission interview process for selection into a large public baccalaureate nursing program between 2007 and 2011. This article reports the effects of implementation, including how interviews affected the grade point average of incoming students as well as student diversity, retention, and National Council Licensure Examination scores, over nine consecutive admission cycles. During the initial implementation cycles, reported satisfaction with the process was high; however, as implementation progressed, it became clear that the anticipated gains from the interview process related to ethnic and gender diversity were not being realized. Furthermore, implementation of the interview strategy created unforeseen difficulties. These two factors led to a decision to stop using this strategy for admission into the baccalaureate program. Lessons learned in the implementation of interviews as an admission criterion are included in the discussion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. COMMUNICATION SKILLS AT JOB INTERVIEW: PEDAGOGICAL INSIGHT INTO THE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ageeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to justify the need of teaching students how to use communicative skills in foreign language during the job interview; to demonstrate how to form the corresponding verbal competences based on the analysis of the certain communicative situation.Methods. The complex of complementary research methods are used in order to achieve the set goal: theoretical methods – analysis, synthesis, generalization of research papers; empirical methods – discourse-analysis of institutional communication; methods of data collection and storage; experimental methods – experimental learning, implementation.Results and scientific novelty. It is shown how to build up pupils’ competence of speech behavior during business dialogue, proceeding from a communicative situation. For the first time the job interview was described from the communicative point of view (strategic goals and verbal behavior of both communicators based on the recordings of real job interviews.Practical significance. The study results presented in the paper may be used in direct teaching communicative skills at the job interview, in theoretical courses (delivering lectures on cross-cultural education, teaching foreign languages, the language of the specialty, etc..

  13. Elements of programming interviews the insider's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz, Adnan; Prakash, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This is a larger-format version of Elements of Programming Interviews. The language is C++. Specifically, the font size is larger, and the page size is 7"x10" (the regular format uses 6"x9"). The content is identical. Have you ever... Wanted to work at an exciting futuristic company? Struggled with an interview problem that could have been solved in 15 minutes? Wished you could study real-world computing problems? If so, you need to read Elements of Programming Interviews (EPI). EPI is your comprehensive guide to interviewing for software development roles. The core of EPI is a collection of over 250 problems with detailed solutions. The problems are representative of interview questions asked at leading software companies. The problems are illustrated with 200 figures, 300 tested programs, and 150 additional variants. The book begins with a summary of the nontechnical aspects of interviewing, such as strategies for a great interview, common mistakes, perspectives from the other side of the table,...

  14. The "Veil of Ignorance": Exploring Ethical Issues in the Employment Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an exercise where students explore ethical implications of the employment interview by framing a set of ethical guidelines for a hypothetical hiring case in which they will play one of several roles. Finds that students become keenly aware of the influence of social and professional roles on how people view the ethical issues in the…

  15. Cinemeducation in Psychiatry: A Seminar in Undergraduate Medical Education Combining a Movie, Lecture, and Patient Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Schreiner, Julia; Reimer, Jens; Emami, Roya; Naber, Dieter; Harendza, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric educators are often faced with students' negative attitudes toward psychiatry. A new type of seminar has been established in order to enable students to gain a deeper understanding of psychiatric illness. Method: A "cinemeducation seminar," combining a movie, a lecture, and a patient interview, has been established as part…

  16. An Interview with Michael Horn: Blending Education for High-Octane Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Blended learning holds the potential of improving the way we educate students and of making them more motivated. Blended education--the melding of information technology based distance learning with school attendance--is perhaps the best way to educate students for 21st century skills, says Michael Horn in a "Kappan" interview. Horn points out…

  17. Medical School Factors That Prepare Students to Become Leaders in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Louise; Cuddy, Paul G; Hathaway, Susan B; Quaintance, Jennifer L; Kanter, Steven L

    2017-10-03

    To identify medical school factors graduates in major leadership positions perceive as contributing to their leadership development. Using a phenomenological, qualitative approach, in August-November 2015 the authors conducted semistructured interviews with 48 medical leaders who were 1976-1999 baccalaureate-MD graduates of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine (UMKC). At UMKC, they participated in longitudinal learning communities, the centerpiece for learning professional values and behaviors plus clinical skills, knowledge, and judgment, but received no formal leadership instruction. The authors subjected interview comments to directed, largely qualitative content analysis with iterative coding cycles. Most graduates said their experiences and the people at UMKC positively influenced their leadership growth. Medical school factors that emerged as contributing to that growth were the longitudinal learning communities including docents, junior-senior partners, and team experiences; expectations set for students to achieve; a clinically oriented but integrated curriculum; admission policies seeking students with academic and nonacademic qualifications; supportive student-student and student-faculty relationships; and a positive overall learning environment. Graduates viewed a combination of factors as best preparing them for leadership and excellence in clinical medicine; together these factors enabled them to assume leadership opportunities after graduation. This study adds medical leaders' perspective to the leadership development literature and offers guidance from theory and practice for medical schools to consider in shaping leadership education: Namely, informal leadership preparation coupled with extensive longitudinal clinical education in a nurturing, authentic environment can develop students effectively for leadership in medicine.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW CONCEPTS AND PURPOSES ADD VALUE TO THE CRM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaup Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    .... This research paper provides an impetus on developing the CRM strategies. The study focuses on evaluating various purposes of the CRM strategies that adds value in enhancing the customer data base, needs and market development...

  19. U.S. EPA Proposes to Add California Mine Site to Superfunds National Priorities List

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to add eight hazardous waste sites to the Superfund program's National Priorities List (NPL), including California's Argonaut Mine. Superfund is the federal program that investiga

  20. Strain-specific hyperkyphosis and megaesophagus in Add1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Raymond F; Seburn, Kevin L; Nicholson, Anthony; Peters, Luanne L

    2012-12-01

    The three adducin proteins (α, β, and γ) share extensive sequence, structural, and functional homology. Heterodimers of α- and β-adducin are vital components of the red cell membrane skeleton, which is required to maintain red cell elasticity and structural integrity. In addition to anemia, targeted deletion of the α-adducin gene (Add1) reveals unexpected, strain-dependent non-erythroid phenotypes. On an inbred 129 genetic background, Add1 null mice show abnormal inward curvature of the cervicothoracic spine with complete penetrance. More surprisingly, a subset of 129-Add1 null mice develop severe megaesophagus, while examination of peripheral nerves reveals a reduced number of axons in 129-Add1 null mice at four months of age. These unforeseen phenotypes, described here, reveal new functions for adducin and provide new models of mammalian disease. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Self-Reported Current Practices in Child Forensic Interviewing: Training, Tools, and Pre-Interview Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Jillian Rowback; Schreiber Compo, Nadja

    2017-05-01

    In child sexual abuse investigations, forensic interviewers within the Child Advocacy Center (CAC) model serve as neutral fact-finders for a team of professionals tasked with investigating and intervening in cases of alleged child sexual abuse. Although empirical evidence has led to the development of best-practice techniques and protocols, there is currently no universally adopted protocol in the field. The present research gathered detailed information from a national sample of real-world child forensic interviewers about their training and current practices, with a specific focus on assessing the information interviewers typically review prior to conducting child forensic interviews. Most notably, the survey revealed a lack of uniformity in interviewing protocols adopted and pre-interview preparation practices. Although rare, some interviewers reported using an allegation-blind interviewing approach, highlighting the need for future research on this and other under-studied techniques. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyereh Aminisani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Competency-based education has been recommended in training and education of public health to reduce the gap between traditional teaching and the competencies required in practice. Epidemiology as a fundamental of public health science has come to attention. The aim of this study was to introduce a complementary core competency program for Master of Science (MSc in epidemiology students in Iran. Methods: A workgroup in the department of statistics and epidemiology of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences including five epidemiologists and three biostatisticians prepared an outline of complementary core competencies for epidemiology MSc students. In the first step several discussion rounds were done to review the current curriculum, then the workgroup sought students’ opinions to find out about their needs. In addition, a review of the current literature around the topic was done. In the final step the program components were developed by the workgroup and initially implemented. Results: A complementary program consists of eight domains: general knowledge, problem finding, data analysis and interpretation, communications, management, consultation, leadership skills and professionalism. This program focused on basic competencies and those competencies outside the major field for a graduate of epidemiology to enhance their knowledge, attitude and skills. The program was scheduled to run in the third semester and approximate time for completion was three months. Conclusion: The development and initial implementation of the complementary core competency program was successful and the authors will attempt to extend the program and evaluate the implementation phase.

  3. Investigation of cascadability of add-drop multiplexers in OTDM systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kim Stokholm; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov; Clausen, Anders

    1998-01-01

    The influence of coherent cross-talk on the cascadability of add-drop multiplexers in optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) systems is analysed theoretically using moment generating functions. Calculations are validated by experiments......The influence of coherent cross-talk on the cascadability of add-drop multiplexers in optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) systems is analysed theoretically using moment generating functions. Calculations are validated by experiments...

  4. Sildenafil add-on therapy in paediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension, experiences of a national referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douwes, Johannes M; Roofthooft, Marcus T R; Van Loon, Rosa L E; Ploegstra, Mark-Jan; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Hillege, Hans L; Berger, Rolf M F

    2014-02-01

    In paediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the effectiveness of add-on combination PAH-therapy has not yet been systematically studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sildenafil add-on therapy in paediatric PAH patients treated with bosentan. In this observational study within a national paediatric patient cohort, follow-up data of 24 consecutive paediatric PAH patients initially treated with bosentan monotherapy and prospectively followed at the Dutch national referral centre for paediatric PAH in 2007-2013, were reviewed. Patients received add-on sildenafil therapy in case of clinical worsening. Fifteen children received add-on sildenafil therapy; nine remained on bosentan monotherapy. Patient characteristics, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), WHO functional class (WHO-FC), N-terminal pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP), and haemodynamic measurements at bosentan start were similar in both patient groups. In children with clinical worsening, sildenafil add-on therapy improved 6MWD at 5, 10, 15 and 21 months of follow-up, improved WHO-FC at 10, 15 and 21 months and stabilised NT-proBNP. Patients who received add-on sildenafil therapy had more advanced disease progression during bosentan monotherapy. Despite that, they had better or, at least, no worse survival compared to patients who remained on bosentan monotherapy. In children with PAH, sildenafil add-on therapy indicated by clinical deterioration on bosentan monotherapy, was associated with a significant improvement of WHO-functional class and 6MWD. Despite clinical deterioration on bosentan monotherapy, patients receiving sildenafil add-on therapy, had either better or, at least, no worse survival than patients remaining on bosentan monotherapy.

  5. Impact of add-on laboratory testing at an academic medical center: a five year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Louis S; Davis, Scott R; Humble, Robert M; Kulhavy, Jeff; Aman, Dean R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently receive orders to perform additional tests on existing specimens ('add-ons'). Previous studies have examined add-on ordering patterns over short periods of time. The objective of this study was to analyze add-on ordering patterns over an extended time period. We also analyzed the impact of a robotic specimen archival/retrieval system on add-on testing procedure and manual effort. In this retrospective study at an academic medical center, electronic health records from were searched to obtain all add-on orders that were placed in the time period of May 2, 2009 to December 31, 2014. During the time period of retrospective study, 880,359 add-on tests were ordered on 96,244 different patients. Add-on testing comprised 3.3 % of total test volumes. There were 443,411 unique ordering instances, leading to an average of 1.99 add-on tests per instance. Some patients had multiple episodes of add-on test orders at different points in time, leading to an average of 9.15 add-on tests per patient. The majority of add-on orders were for chemistry tests (78.8 % of total add-ons) with the next most frequent being hematology and coagulation tests (11.2 % of total add-ons). Inpatient orders accounted for 66.8 % of total add-on orders, while the emergency department and outpatient clinics had 14.8 % and 18.4 % of total add-on orders, respectively. The majority of add-ons were placed within 8 hours (87.3 %) and nearly all by 24 hours (96.8 %). Nearly 100 % of add-on orders within the emergency department were placed within 8 hours. The introduction of a robotic specimen archival/retrieval unit saved an average of 2.75 minutes of laboratory staff manual time per unique add-on order. This translates to 24.1 hours/day less manual effort in dealing with add-on orders. Our study reflects the previous literature in showing that add-on orders significantly impact the workload of the clinical laboratory. The majority of add-on orders are clinical chemistry

  6. A role for α-adducin (ADD-1) in nematode and human memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vanja; Gschwind, Leo; Vogler, Christian; Demougin, Philippe; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stetak, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Identifying molecular mechanisms that underlie learning and memory is one of the major challenges in neuroscience. Taken the advantages of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we investigated α-adducin (add-1) in aversive olfactory associative learning and memory. Loss of add-1 function selectively impaired short- and long-term memory without causing acquisition, sensory, or motor deficits. We showed that α-adducin is required for consolidation of synaptic plasticity, for sustained synaptic increase of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (GLR-1) content and altered GLR-1 turnover dynamics. ADD-1, in a splice-form- and tissue-specific manner, controlled the storage of memories presumably through actin-capping activity. In support of the C. elegans results, genetic variability of the human ADD1 gene was significantly associated with episodic memory performance in healthy young subjects. Finally, human ADD1 expression in nematodes restored loss of C. elegans add-1 gene function. Taken together, our findings support a role for α-adducin in memory from nematodes to humans. Studying the molecular and genetic underpinnings of memory across distinct species may be helpful in the development of novel strategies to treat memory-related diseases. PMID:22307086

  7. Probabilities of ADD/ADHD and Related Substance Use Among Canadian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Ross D; Speed, David; Hesson, Jacqueline

    2016-05-14

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and probabilities of comorbidities between self-reported ADD/ADHD and smoking, alcohol binge drinking, and substance use disorders (SUDs) from a national Canadian sample. Data were taken from the Public Use Microdata File of the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health (N = 17 311). The prevalence of (a) smoking, (b) alcohol binge drinking, and (c) SUDs was estimated among those with an ADD/ADHD diagnosis versus those without an ADD/ADHD diagnosis. After controlling for potential socioeconomic and mental health covariates, self-reported ADD/ADHD acted as a significant predictor for group membership in the heaviest smoking, heaviest drinking, and heaviest drug usage categories. Individuals self-reporting a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD were found to have a significantly higher likelihood of engaging in smoking and alcohol binge drinking, and were more likely to meet criteria for SUDs than individuals not reporting an ADD/ADHD diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. A role for α-adducin (ADD-1) in nematode and human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vanja; Gschwind, Leo; Vogler, Christian; Demougin, Philippe; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stetak, Attila

    2012-03-21

    Identifying molecular mechanisms that underlie learning and memory is one of the major challenges in neuroscience. Taken the advantages of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we investigated α-adducin (add-1) in aversive olfactory associative learning and memory. Loss of add-1 function selectively impaired short- and long-term memory without causing acquisition, sensory, or motor deficits. We showed that α-adducin is required for consolidation of synaptic plasticity, for sustained synaptic increase of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (GLR-1) content and altered GLR-1 turnover dynamics. ADD-1, in a splice-form- and tissue-specific manner, controlled the storage of memories presumably through actin-capping activity. In support of the C. elegans results, genetic variability of the human ADD1 gene was significantly associated with episodic memory performance in healthy young subjects. Finally, human ADD1 expression in nematodes restored loss of C. elegans add-1 gene function. Taken together, our findings support a role for α-adducin in memory from nematodes to humans. Studying the molecular and genetic underpinnings of memory across distinct species may be helpful in the development of novel strategies to treat memory-related diseases.

  9. ADD1/SREBP1c activates the PGC1-alpha promoter in brown adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Qin; Hansen, Jacob B; Petersen, Rasmus K

    2010-01-01

    regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC1alpha) in brown and inguinal white adipose tissues, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. Using in vitro models of white and brown adipocytes we demonstrate that beta......-adrenergic stimulation induced expression of LXRalpha, ADD1/SREBP1c and PGC1alpha in cells with a brown-like adipose phenotype. We demonstrate that ADD1/SREBP1c is a powerful inducer of PGC1alpha expression via a conserved E box in the proximal promoter and that beta-adrenergic stimulation led to recruitment of ADD1....../SREBP1c to this E box. The ability of ADD1/SREBP1c to activate the PGC1alpha promoter exhibited a striking cell type dependency, suggesting that additional cell type-restricted factors contribute to ADD1/SREBP1c-mediated activation. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a novel role of ADD1/SREBP1c...

  10. Comparing appropriateness and equivalence of email interviews to phone interviews in qualitative research on reproductive decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Despite an increasing use of qualitative email interviews by nurse researchers, there is little understanding about the appropriateness and equivalence of email interviews to other qualitative data collection methods, especially on sensitive topics research. The purpose is to describe our procedures for completing asynchronous, email interviews and to evaluate the appropriateness and equivalency of email interviews to phone interviews in two qualitative research studies that examined reproductive decisions. Content analysis guided the methodological appraisal of appropriateness and equivalency of in-depth, asynchronous email interviews to single phone interviews. Appropriateness was determined by: (a) participants' willingness to engage in email or phone interviews, (b) completing data collection in a timely period, and (c) participants' satisfaction with the interview. Equivalency was evaluated by: (a) completeness of the interview data, and (b) insight obtained from the data. Of the combined sample in the two studies (N=71), 31% of participants chose to participate via an email interview over a phone interview. The time needed to complete the email interviews averaged 27 to 28days and the number of investigator probe-participant response interchanges was 4 to 5cycles on average. In contrast, the phone interviews averaged 59 to 61min in duration. Most participants in both the email and phone interviews reported they were satisfied or very satisfied with their ability to express their true feelings throughout the interview. Regarding equivalence, 100% of the email and phone interviews provided insight into decision processes. Although insightful, two of the email and one phone interview had short answers or, at times, underdeveloped responses. Participants' quotes and behaviors cited within four published articles, a novel evaluation of equivalency, revealed that 20% to 37.5% of the citations about decision processes were from email participants, which is

  11. Good for them or good for us? The role of academic guidance interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, Alan R; Currie, Alison E; Laing, Malcolm R; Heys, Steven D

    2006-12-01

    Weak students may pass unnoticed through their undergraduate programme until they fail a summative assessment. Early recognition and support of struggling students is crucial if they are to avoid subsequent failure at high stakes assessments. We introduced a whole-class formative assessment 5 months before a summative assessment. Subsequently, we supported poorly performing students with academic guidance interviews and remedial support. The programme was evaluated by questionnaires issued to staff and students involved in the guidance interviews, and by recording the performance of students who had failed the formative assessment in the subsequent summative assessment. We conclude that the rescue of failing students requires early recognition and tailored intervention, with support for all participants.

  12. Interviews with candidates for president transmitted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Gomes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In election years, television interviews with presidential candidates, broadcast live, i.e. without the use of editing, have become an important genre of journalistic representation in Brazilian political campaigns. These interviews are conducted in network studios by well-known Brazilian news anchors. The fact that these interviews are transmitted directly to the electorate in an unedited form is generally offered as a guarantee of a genuine, authentic portrayal of the candidates themselves. The present work proposes that live network candidate interviews, rather than a means of political presentation on television, are actually an arena in which the institution of journalism attempts to use rhetorical and argumentative means to control the candidates’ discourse without relying on the traditional advantages conferred in daily news coverage.

  13. Willem Hendrik Gispen--an interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, P R

    2013-11-05

    This text is based on three long interviews in Utrecht University's Faculty Club, and on almost 40 years of working together in the same city, the same department, the same university. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  15. Interview with Science Education Pioneer Bob Yager

    OpenAIRE

    Stiles, John

    2016-01-01

    In a recent interview, Dr. Yager spoke about his participation in the changing field of science education, the challenges that still persist in implementing exemplary science teaching, STEM Education and his views on the current science education standards.

  16. An interview with Mark G. Hans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Mark G; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    It is a great honor to conduct an interview with Professor Mark G. Hans, after following his outstanding work ahead of the Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center and the Department of Orthodontics at the prestigious Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine (CWRU) in Cleveland, Ohio. Born in Berea, Ohio, Professor Mark Hans attended Yale University in New Haven, CT, and earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry. Upon graduation, Dr. Hans received his DDS and Masters Degree of Science in Dentistry with specialty certification in Orthodontics at Case Western Reserve University. During his education, Dr. Hans’ Master’s Thesis won the Harry Sicher Award for Best Research by an Orthodontic Student and being granted a Presidential Teaching Fellowship. As one of the youngest doctors ever certified by the American Board of Orthodontics, Dr. Hans continues to maintain his board certification. He has worked through academics on a variety of research interests, that includes the demographics of orthodontic practice, digital radiographic data, dental and craniofacial genetics, as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, with selected publications in these fields. One of his noteworthy contributions to the orthodontic literature came along with Dr. Donald Enlow on the pages of “Essentials of Facial Growth”, being reference on the study of craniofacial growth and development. Dr. Mark Hans’s academic career is linked to CWRU, recognized as the renowned birthplace of research on craniofacial growth and development, where the classic Bolton-Brush Growth Study was historically set. Today, Dr. Hans is the Director of The Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center, performing, with great skill and dedication, the handling of the larger longitudinal sample of bone growth study. He is Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthodontics, working in clinical and theoretical activities with students of the Undergraduate Course from the School of

  17. An equivalence study of interview platform: Does videoconference technology impact medical school acceptance rates of different groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballejos, Marlene P; Oglesbee, Scott; Hettema, Jennifer; Sapien, Robert

    2018-02-14

    Web-based interviewing may be an effective element of a medical school's larger approach to promotion of holistic review, as recommended by the Association of American Medical Colleges, by facilitating the feasibility of including rural and community physicians in the interview process. Only 10% of medical schools offer videoconference interviews to applicants and little is known about the impact of this interview modality on the admissions process. This study investigated the impact of overall acceptance rates using videoconference interviews and face-to-face interviews in the medical school selection process using an equivalence trial design. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine integrated a videoconferencing interview option for community and rural physician interviewers in a pseudo-random fashion during the 2014-2016 admissions cycles. Logistic regression was conducted to examine whether videoconference interviews impacted acceptance rates or the characteristics of accepted students. Demographic, admissions and diversity factors were analyzed that included applicant age, MCAT score, cumulative GPA, gender, underrepresented in medicine, socioeconomic status and geographic residency. Data from 752 interviews were analyzed. Adjusted rates of acceptance for face-to-face (37.0%; 95% CI 28.2, 46.7%) and videoconference (36.1%; 95% CI 17.8, 59.5%) interviews were within an a priori ± 5% margin of equivalence. Both interview conditions yielded highly diverse groups of admitted students. Having a higher medical college admission test score, grade point average, and self-identifying as disadvantaged increased odds of admission in both interview modalities. Integration of the videoconference interview did not impact the overall acceptance of a highly diverse and qualified group of applicants, and allowed rural and community physicians to participate in the medical school interview process as well as allowed campus faculty and medical student committee members

  18. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  19. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  20. Separating Interviewer and Sampling-Point Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Schnell; Frauke Kreuter

    2003-01-01

    "Data used in nationwide face-to-face surveys are almost always collected in multistage cluster samples. The relative homogeneity of the clusters selected in this way can lead to design effects at the sampling stage. Interviewers can further homogenize answers within the small geographic clusters that form the sampling points. The study presented here was designed to distinguish between interviewer effects and sampling-point effects using interpenetrated samples for conducting ...

  1. 77 FR 39760 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Credit LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To Add...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...-04] Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Credit LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To Add... will amend Chapter 26 of ICC's rules to add Section 26C to provide for the clearance of the CDX...

  2. How we capitalised on casual PBL facilitators' expertise and experience to add value to our medical programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; Arrigoni, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    While problem-based learning (PBL) has been widely implemented in medical education, it has been acknowledged to be resource-intensive, particularly in terms of academics' time. In some institutions, such as Bond University (Australia), casual facilitators have been employed (paid hourly) to oversee the PBL tutorials. Apart from considerable experience as PBL facilitators, they also have expertise as allied health professionals or biomedical scientists. Several facilitators have educational qualifications. Recognising that their roles have expanded beyond the PBL tutorial room, we canvassed PBL facilitators in terms of their contributions to Bond University's medical programme. We can report that our facilitators have contributed to the renewal of Bond's medical programme, from design (e.g. curriculum structure, case-writing) to PBL case reviews. They are also involved in formative and summative assessment. Facilitators identified that, because of their prolonged involvement with the students in small groups, they consider themselves more than facilitators of student learning. They are role models and personal guides. Recognising the value these casually employed facilitators have added to our medical programme, we will continue to develop their skills in, for example, reviewing cases and assessment. We recommend that if institutions do employ casual facilitators, their expertise and experience can add value to the curriculum and to students' experience.

  3. Interview in Sport Psychology: Method of Study and Preparing an Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bochaver K.A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Current article includes an analysis of interviewing in sport psychology, an observing of modern scientific interview protocols, a description of interview cases in private practice and research; also there is a discussion about efficiency and limitations of interview method in the article. Approaches to interviewing as the main and auxiliary method are discussed in details. The objective of the article is to show how an interview can reveal interesting biographical facts, personality traits, the installation of an athlete, to reflect his inner world, and to form working in the field of sport psychology professionals and students view on the advantages and opportunities an interview in the work of sports psychologist (research and practice. This method can be regarded as a tool of knowledge, but is also used as a preliminary interview before long-term or short-term therapeutic work. Clinical conversation as one of the options the interview are invited to the discussion; the article provides a common protocol for clinical interviews in the sport.

  4. Impact of add-on laboratory testing at an academic medical center: a five year retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Louis S.; Scott R Davis; Humble, Robert M.; Kulhavy, Jeff; Aman, Dean R.; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical laboratories frequently receive orders to perform additional tests on existing specimens (?add-ons?). Previous studies have examined add-on ordering patterns over short periods of time. The objective of this study was to analyze add-on ordering patterns over an extended time period. We also analyzed the impact of a robotic specimen archival/retrieval system on add-on testing procedure and manual effort. Methods In this retrospective study at an academic medical center, ele...

  5. 640 Gbit/s optical time-division add-drop multiplexing in a non-linear optical loop mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2009-01-01

    Error-free 640 Gbit/s all-optical time-division add-drop multiplexing is demonstrated using a non-linear optical loop mirror. Both the add- and drop operations are achieved simultaneously by switching.......Error-free 640 Gbit/s all-optical time-division add-drop multiplexing is demonstrated using a non-linear optical loop mirror. Both the add- and drop operations are achieved simultaneously by switching....

  6. 40 CFR 63.3166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Limitations § 63.3166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the procedures and test methods in this section to determine the add-on control device...

  7. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Metal Furniture Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must...

  8. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4566 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  9. 42 CFR 82.16 - How will NIOSH add to monitoring data to remedy limitations of individual monitoring and missed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIOSH add to monitoring data to remedy... PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Dose Reconstruction Process § 82.16 How will NIOSH add to monitoring data to remedy... to add this to the total dose estimate. For monitoring periods where external dosimetry data are...

  10. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I determine the add-on control... determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the procedures and test methods in this section to determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  11. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the procedures and test methods in this section to determine the add-on control device...

  12. 75 FR 73091 - Medicare Program; Town Hall Meeting on the Fiscal Year 2012 Applications for Add-on Payments for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Fiscal Year 2012 Applications for Add-on Payments for New Medical Services and Technologies Under the... Criteria for Add-on Payments for New Medical Services and Technologies Under the Inpatient and Outpatient...) of the Social Security Act (the Act) to discuss fiscal year (FY) 2012 applications for add-on...

  13. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Large Appliances Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? (a) For...

  14. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Metal Cans Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3545 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use...

  15. 40 CFR 63.4766 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Wood Building Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4766 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency...

  16. Nintedanib with Add-on Pirfenidone in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Results of the INJOURNEY Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancheri, Carlo; Kreuter, Michael; Richeldi, Luca; Ryerson, Christopher J; Valeyre, Dominique; Grutters, Jan C; Wiebe, Sabrina; Stansen, Wibke; Quaresma, Manuel; Stowasser, Susanne; Wuyts, Wim A

    2017-09-10

    Nintedanib and pirfenidone slow the progression of IPF, but the disease continues to progress. More data are needed on the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with nintedanib and add-on pirfenidone. To investigate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and exploratory efficacy endpoints in patients treated with nintedanib and add-on pirfenidone versus nintedanib alone. Patients with IPF and FVC ≥50% predicted at screening who completed a 4-5 week run-in with nintedanib 150 mg bid without dose reduction or treatment interruption were randomized to nintedanib 150 mg bid with add-on pirfenidone (titrated to 801 mg tid), or nintedanib 150 mg bid alone, open-label for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients with on-treatment gastrointestinal adverse events from baseline to week 12. Analyses were descriptive and exploratory. On-treatment gastrointestinal adverse events were reported in 37 of 53 patients (69.8%) treated with nintedanib with add-on pirfenidone and 27 of 51 patients (52.9%) treated with nintedanib alone. Pre-dose plasma trough concentrations of nintedanib were similar when it was administered alone or with add-on pirfenidone. Mean (SE) changes from baseline in FVC at week 12 were -13.3 (17.4) mL and -40.9 (31.4) mL in patients treated with nintedanib with add-on pirfenidone (n=48) and nintedanib alone (n=44), respectively. Nintedanib with add-on pirfenidone had a manageable safety and tolerability profile in patients with IPF, in line with the adverse event profiles of each drug. These data support further research into combination regimens in the treatment of IPF. Clinical trial registration is available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT02579603.

  17. Evolutionary diversification of protein-protein interactions by interface add-ons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plach, Maximilian G; Semmelmann, Florian; Busch, Florian; Busch, Markus; Heizinger, Leonhard; Wysocki, Vicki H; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2017-09-18

    Cells contain a multitude of protein complexes whose subunits interact with high specificity. However, the number of different protein folds and interface geometries found in nature is limited. This raises the question of how protein-protein interaction specificity is achieved on the structural level and how the formation of nonphysiological complexes is avoided. Here, we describe structural elements called interface add-ons that fulfill this function and elucidate their role for the diversification of protein-protein interactions during evolution. We identified interface add-ons in 10% of a representative set of bacterial, heteromeric protein complexes. The importance of interface add-ons for protein-protein interaction specificity is demonstrated by an exemplary experimental characterization of over 30 cognate and hybrid glutamine amidotransferase complexes in combination with comprehensive genetic profiling and protein design. Moreover, growth experiments showed that the lack of interface add-ons can lead to physiologically harmful cross-talk between essential biosynthetic pathways. In sum, our complementary in silico, in vitro, and in vivo analysis argues that interface add-ons are a practical and widespread evolutionary strategy to prevent the formation of nonphysiological complexes by specializing protein-protein interactions.

  18. New add-on intraocular lens for patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharioth, Gabor B

    2015-08-01

    We present a new option for visual rehabilitation of patients with advanced macular degeneration and evaluate the outcomes in the first 8 patients who had implantation of the ciliary sulcus-fixated macular add-on intraocular lens (IOL) (Scharioth Macula Lens) at our institute. The surgical technique for implantation of the add-on IOL is described. Near vision improved in 7 eyes and was stable in 1 eye. The corrected near visual acuity improved by 4.4 lines with the macular add-on IOL at 15 cm versus with glasses at 40 cm; it improved by 2.1 lines with the macular add-on IOL at 15 cm versus with glasses at 15 cm. Distance vision was stable in all eyes. No intraoperative or postoperative complication occurred. The macular add-on IOL has the potential of improving near vision and reading ability in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration. Dr. Scharioth is a consultant to Alcon Laboratories, Inc., and Medicontur Ltd. He is the inventor of the Scharioth Macula Lens and receives royalties. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effect of Childhood ADD/ADHD on Parental Workforce Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Emily J; Allele, Faith; Roberts, Hayley; Guinea, William; Lindsay, Daniel B

    2016-11-19

    This research aimed to examine the impact of attention deficit disorder (ADD)/ADHD in children on parental labor force participation across different child age groups. This study utilized a longitudinal, quantitative analyses approach. All data were collected from Wave 6 of the Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) survey. After adjusting for various confounders, mothers whose children were 10/11 years old and had been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD were significantly more likely to be out of the labor force compared with those mothers whose child had not been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. The impact was more pronounced for single mothers. No significant influence on paternal labor force participation was found. In assessing the cost-effectiveness of interventions for ADD/ADHD, policy makers and researchers must consider the long-term social and economic effects of ADD/ADHD on maternal workforce participation when considering costs and outcomes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Breaking bad news: an interview study of paediatric cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Anna-Lena; Dahlgren, Lars; Hägglöf, Bruno; Rydberg, Annika

    2011-06-01

    Technical developments in paediatric cardiology over the last few decades have increased expectations on professionals, demanding of them more emotional competence and communicative ability. The aim of this study was to examine the approach of paediatric cardiologists in informing and communicating with the family of the patient. A qualitative interview method was first tested in a pilot study with two paediatric cardiologists. There were nine subsequent semi-structured interviews that were carried out with paediatric cardiologists. A researcher performed all the interviews, which were taped, transcribed, decoded, and analysed. Among paediatric cardiologists, how to break bad news to the family is an important concern, evident in findings regarding the significance of trust and confidence, the use of different emotional positions, and a common ambition to achieve skills to handle the situation. There is a need for reflection, education, and sharing of experiences. The cardiologists desire further development of teamwork and of skills in medical students and residents for delivering bad news. Doctors are expected to cope with the complexities of diagnoses and decisions, while simultaneously being sensitive to the feelings of the parents, aware of their own emotions, and able to keep it all under control in the context of breaking the bad news to the parents and keeping them informed. These conflicting demands create a need to expand the professional role of the doctor by including more training in emotional competence and communicative ability, beginning in medical school and continuing through consultancy.

  1. What Should I Do with My Life? An Interview with Will Crouch on the Ethics of Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions college students face. However, little academic work exists to help students evaluate the ethical implications of different career paths. This interview with Will Crouch, an Oxford University student, explores his controversial work on the ethics of career choice. He argues that to pursue a…

  2. Avenues of access to future science teachers: An interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Richard

    2007-12-01

    This research study explored the experiences of individuals who chose careers in secondary science education by examining two cohorts of science education students in a teacher credential program and a group of current secondary science teachers in their first five years of teaching. Issues of how these individuals became interested in science education and the characteristics common among them were examined. This study explored the educational experiences that appeared to contribute to people becoming science teachers. This study also explored the participants' motivation and key turning point moments that appeared to contribute to their choice to pursue a career in science education. The research design used in this study was a two-year, semi-structured interview protocol. Research was conducted at one main university site and within one local unified school district. During the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 academic years, twenty-five secondary science pre-service teacher candidates at a University of California were interviewed, and during the 2005-2006 academic year, twenty-five current practicing science teachers within a Southern California unified school district were also interviewed. Data collection consisted of interviews with the fifty participants typically between 30-45 minutes in length. The EZ-Text software program was employed to aid in the analysis of the transcribed interview data. This study found that much of the previous research on the characteristics of entrants to teaching in general was supported, but that some specific differences exist among science teachers and the general population of teachers. The majority of the participants had exposure to internships or tutoring experiences and indicated that this made them more willing to pursue science teaching as a profession. This study found that high achieving female students constituted the entire female portion of the sample and cited teaching as a friendly avenue for females in science. Teacher

  3. Traces of Traumatizations in Narrative Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Loch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic childhood experiences often lead to the development of dissociation as a defense mechanism, and subsequently to fragmented memories. In narrative interviews this fragmentation is traced in the expressive field of language. In this article a range of case studies are used to illustrate how dissociations, resulting from traumatic experiences in the past as well as the present, may express themselves and how we, as interviewers, can give support to the client in interview situations. Only by understanding the inconsistencies caused by these traumatic experiences, interviewees are able to tell their life histories beyond the collectively effective taboos. By becoming aware of these mechanisms, the researcher can steer clear of reproducing the socially relevant silencing effects, i.e. denial processes, within the context of social scientific research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801544

  4. STS-93: Crew Interview - Cady Coleman

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Coleman wanted to be an astronaut, why she wanted to become a chemist, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) will influence little girls. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and her responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Coleman mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deploy Chandra, and the design configuration of Chandra that will allow for the transfer of information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) experiment, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  5. Student Microwave Experiments Involving the Doppler Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F. Neff; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of the Doppler Effect with microwaves in the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity of falling objects. The experiments described add to the repertoire of quantitative student microwave experiments. (Author/DS)

  6. So you Really Want to Interview Me?: Navigating “Sensitive” Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winsome Chunnu Brayda PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the qualitative interviewing techniques that the authors used to conduct their respective dissertation research in Jamaica and South Carolina. (The research in Jamaica examined the implementation of primary education policies. The research in South Carolina delved into the life history of Benner C. Turner, a controversial college president. Most of the literature about interviewing focuses on asking the right questions; in contrast, this article discusses the challenges of interviewing. In this article, selected interviews are used from both studies to examine the difficulties these researchers encountered when conducting “sensitive” interviews, the risks female researchers face in unfamiliar places, and the challenges of working in international settings (which requires interpersonal skills and cultural competency. While the task of research interviewing is complex, the authors provide ideas that can be used to navigate such moments.

  7. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  8. Interview med børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Interview med børn handler om børneinterview i forbindelse med forskning. Bogen er tænkt som inspiration til og afsæt for metodiske refleksioner i forbindelse med inddragelse af børn som informanter.......Interview med børn handler om børneinterview i forbindelse med forskning. Bogen er tænkt som inspiration til og afsæt for metodiske refleksioner i forbindelse med inddragelse af børn som informanter....

  9. Photo-Interviewing to Explore Everyday Occupation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukhave, Elise Bromann; Huniche, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article sheds light on the potential and the limitations of photo-interviewing for the study of human occupation and in so doing, reflects the rapid growth in the use of participatory visual methods in a number of other disciplines. Using a study that explored first person perspecti......Abstract This article sheds light on the potential and the limitations of photo-interviewing for the study of human occupation and in so doing, reflects the rapid growth in the use of participatory visual methods in a number of other disciplines. Using a study that explored first person...

  10. Children's developmental characteristics in the forensic interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Children can be credible witnesses in court procedures given an adequately conducted forensic interview with them. This paper presents the most important features of a child's development (the cognitive and socioemotional development and the development of language and communication and from these features derives the specific guidelines for forensic interviews of children. Due to the frequent belief that children can be led to false witnessing and that they do not differentiate between reality and fantasy the topics of lying and suggestibility are also discussed. At the end some practical suggestions are given with recommendations for trainings of all professionals working with children that are potential witnesses.

  11. Creativity and Marketing: Interview With Marie Taillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Taillard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this interview Dr. Taillard discusses her interest and ongoing research in the areas of marketing, consumer behaviour and creativity. She considers how academic training can be applied to a business context and describes the newly formed Creativity Marketing Centre at ESCP Europe. Exploring the multiple intersections between creativity and marketing represents not only a paradigmatic change for those interested in business and consumer behaviour but also for researchers of creativity who can start envisioning and studying consumption as a creative act. This interview will offer valuable points of reflection for all those interested to know more about this approach.

  12. Designing clinical interviewing training courses for psychiatric residents: a practical primer for interviewing mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Green, Ron; Barney, Christine; Cole, Stephen; Lapetina, Graciana; Baker, Bruce

    2007-06-01

    This article provides a no-nonsense primer for the design of effective clinical interviewing programs and the use of interviewing mentors. Principles for smoothly integrating educational tools such as direct observation, role-playing, the use of videotaping and facilic supervision are described. A sample core curriculum syllabus is provided including a comprehensive listing of core educational goals with regard to clinical interviewing skills.

  13. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 1: literature overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, G H; Spafford, M M; Edwards, J C

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the admission interview used by schools in four health professions (veterinary medicine, allopathic medicine, optometry, and dentistry) portrays a largely similar approach to selection interviews: INTERVIEW USE: At least 80% of schools interview applicants. For schools that offer interviews, at least 40% of candidates are interviewed (a strong academic profile is the number one determinant of receiving an interview offer). The interview is one of the three most important selection tools used by schools. Less than 26% of schools fix the interview's weight in the selection process (fixed weights range from 31% to 35%). INTERVIEW PURPOSE AND CONTENT: The most common purposes of the interview are to (1) gather information, (2) make decisions, (3) verify information provided in other parts of the application, (4) recruit candidates, and/or (5) promote public relations. The most common characteristics and skills interviewers are interested in assessing are motivation for the profession, interpersonal skills, and communication skills. The desire to assess cognitive ability with the interview (>25% of schools) is surprising in view of the use of other selection tools (e.g., GPA). INTERVIEW FORMAT: Medical schools are more likely to offer two interviews per candidate, while optometry schools are more likely to offer one interview per candidate. Individual interviews (one interviewer, one candidate) are the predominant format among medical schools, while panel interviews (more than one interviewer, one candidate) are the most common format among optometry schools. The duration of the interview is 30 to 45 minutes. Interview questions most often address facts and knowledge, hypothetical situations, and the ability to meet program requirements. Most interviews do not meet the criteria for a structured interview, which has demonstrated greater validity and reliability than semi-structured or unstructured interviews. INTERVIEWERS: Interviewers are most likely to

  14. Add-on effect of Brahmi in the management of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanto Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brahmi(Bacopa monnieri, an Ayurvedic herb has primarily been used to enhance cognitive ability, memory and learning skills. We present a case study of schizophrenia in which add-on Brahmi extracts 500 mg/day for a period of one month resulted in reduction in psychopathology without any treatment-emergent adverse effect. Although preliminary, our case study suggests therapeutic efficacy of add-on Brahmi in schizophrenia, thus opening up a new dimension of its role in alternative medicines.

  15. Add-drop filter based on dual photonic crystal nanobeam cavities in push-pull mode

    CERN Document Server

    Poulton, Christopher V; Wade, Mark T; Popovic, Milos A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an add-drop filter based on a dual photonic crystal nanobeam cavity system that emulates the operation of a traveling-wave resonator and drops light on resonance to a single output port. Realized on an advanced SOI CMOS (IBM 45nm SOI) chip without any foundry process modifications, the device shows 16dB extinction in through port and 1dB loss in drop port with a 3dB bandwidth of 64GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of a four-port add-drop filter based on photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

  16. An Interview with James T. Webb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    This interview with James T. Webb, clinical psychologist and coauthor of "Guiding the Gifted Child" (1982), focuses on ambivalent messages communicated to gifted/talented children, balancing parental attention among gifted and less gifted siblings, teaching social skills, underachievement, benefits of special programing for emotional development,…

  17. Interview of Jack Goody, 18 May 1991

    OpenAIRE

    Goody, Jack

    2004-01-01

    An interview of about 90 minutes, conducted by Eric Hobsbawm and filmed by Alan Macfarlane Jack Goody describes his education, his time as a prisoner of war in Italy, his later career as a distinguished anthropologist in Cambridge. He draws attention to the influence of thinkers such as Gordon Childe, and his interest in the wide contrasts between Africa and Eur-Asia

  18. Bertrand Russell Speaks: The BBC Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Woodrow

    1982-01-01

    Presents excerpts from 13 interviews with Bertrand Russell conducted for British television in 1959. The discussion covers the nature and purpose of philosophy, religion, war and pacifism, communism and capitalism, ethics and morality, personal and economic power, happiness, nationalism, individualism, fanaticism, and tolerance. (AM)

  19. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  20. Preventing mismatch answers in standardized survey interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, Yfke P.; Dijkstra, Wil

    Interaction analysis of question–answer sequences from a telephone survey shows that so-called mismatch answers, i.e. answers that do not correspond to the required answering format, are the most frequently occurring problematic verbal behavior. They also are likely to trigger suggestive interviewer